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Sample records for model membranes induced

  1. Resveratrol induces chain interdigitation in DPPC cell membrane model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Elena; Ciuchi, Federica; Guzzi, Rita; Rizzuti, Bruno; Bartucci, Rosa

    2016-12-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol found in various plants with potential therapeutic activity as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective and anti-tumoral. Lipid membranes are among cellular components that are targets of its action. In this work ESR of chain labeled lipids, calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and molecular docking are used to study the interaction of resveratrol with membrane model systems of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) as a function of resveratrol concentration (0-30 mol% of the lipid) and temperature (10-50°C). Resveratrol incorporated in DPPC bilayers induces considerable motional restriction at the lipid tail termini, removing the gradient of increasing mobility along the chain found in DPPC bilayers in the gel phase. In contrast, it leaves unperturbed the DPPC chain flexibility profile in the liquid-crystalline phase. At low concentration, resveratrol progressively reduces the pre-transition temperature and eliminates the pre-transition for content ≥5mol%. A reduced cooperativity and a downshift of the main transition temperature are observed, especially at high content. The typical diffraction pattern of DPPC multibilayers in the Lβ' phase is converted to a lamellar pattern with reduced d-spacing of untilted lipid chain in a hexagonal packing at 30 mol% of resveratrol. Molecular docking indicates that the energetically favoured anchoring site is the polar headgroup region, where resveratrol acts as a spacer. The overall results are consistent with the formation in DPPC of an interdigitated Lβi gel phase induced by 30 mol% resveratrol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Membrane-elasticity model of Coatless vesicle budding induced by ESCRT complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Różycki

    Full Text Available The formation of vesicles is essential for many biological processes, in particular for the trafficking of membrane proteins within cells. The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT directs membrane budding away from the cytosol. Unlike other vesicle formation pathways, the ESCRT-mediated budding occurs without a protein coat. Here, we propose a minimal model of ESCRT-induced vesicle budding. Our model is based on recent experimental observations from direct fluorescence microscopy imaging that show ESCRT proteins colocalized only in the neck region of membrane buds. The model, cast in the framework of membrane elasticity theory, reproduces the experimentally observed vesicle morphologies with physically meaningful parameters. In this parameter range, the minimum energy configurations of the membrane are coatless buds with ESCRTs localized in the bud neck, consistent with experiment. The minimum energy configurations agree with those seen in the fluorescence images, with respect to both bud shapes and ESCRT protein localization. On the basis of our model, we identify distinct mechanistic pathways for the ESCRT-mediated budding process. The bud size is determined by membrane material parameters, explaining the narrow yet different bud size distributions in vitro and in vivo. Our membrane elasticity model thus sheds light on the energetics and possible mechanisms of ESCRT-induced membrane budding.

  3. The Matrix protein M1 from influenza C virus induces tubular membrane invaginations in an in vitro cell membrane model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletti, David; Radzimanowski, Jens; Effantin, Gregory; Midtvedt, Daniel; Mangenot, Stéphanie; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Bassereau, Patricia; Bally, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Matrix proteins from enveloped viruses play an important role in budding and stabilizing virus particles. In order to assess the role of the matrix protein M1 from influenza C virus (M1-C) in plasma membrane deformation, we have combined structural and in vitro reconstitution experiments with model membranes. We present the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of M1-C and show by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering analysis that full-length M1-C folds into an elongated structure that associates laterally into ring-like or filamentous polymers. Using negatively charged giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), we demonstrate that M1-C full-length binds to and induces inward budding of membrane tubules with diameters that resemble the diameter of viruses. Membrane tubule formation requires the C-terminal domain of M1-C, corroborating its essential role for M1-C polymerization. Our results indicate that M1-C assembly on membranes constitutes the driving force for budding and suggest that M1-C plays a key role in facilitating viral egress. PMID:28120862

  4. From biological membranes to biomimetic model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes play an essential role in the cellular protection as well as in the control and the transport of nutrients. Many mechanisms such as molecular recognition, enzymatic catalysis, cellular adhesion and membrane fusion take place into the biological membranes. In 1972, Singer et al. provided a membrane model, called fluid mosaic model, in which each leaflet of the bilayer is formed by a homogeneous environment of lipids in a fluid state including globular assembling of proteins and glycoproteins. Since its conception in 1972, many developments were brought to this model in terms of composition and molecular organization. The main development of the fluid mosaic model was made by Simons et al. (1997 and Brown et al. (1997 who suggested that membrane lipids are organized into lateral microdomains (or lipid rafts with a specific composition and a molecular dynamic that are different to the composition and the dynamic of the surrounding liquid crystalline phase. The discovery of a phase separation in the plane of the membrane has induced an explosion in the research efforts related to the biology of cell membranes but also in the development of new technologies for the study of these biological systems. Due to the high complexity of biological membranes and in order to investigate the biological processes that occur on the membrane surface or within the membrane lipid bilayer, a large number of studies are performed using biomimicking model membranes. This paper aims at revisiting the fundamental properties of biological membranes in terms of membrane composition, membrane dynamic and molecular organization, as well as at describing the most common biomimicking models that are frequently used for investigating biological processes such as membrane fusion, membrane trafficking, pore formation as well as membrane interactions at a molecular level.

  5. Kinetic Defects Induced by Melittin in Model Lipid Membranes: A Solution Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Khadka, Nawal K

    2016-05-26

    Quantitative characterization of membrane defects (pores) is important for elucidating the molecular basis of many membrane-active peptides. We study kinetic defects induced by melittin in vesicular and planar lipid bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements indicate that melittin induces time-dependent calcein leakage. Solution atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to visualize melittin-induced membrane defects. After initial equilibration, the most probable defect radius is ∼3.8 nm in 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC) bilayers. Unexpectedly, defects become larger with longer incubation, accompanied by substantial shape transformation. The initial defect radius is ∼4.7 nm in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Addition of 30 mol % cholesterol to DOPC bilayers suppresses defect kinetics, although the inhibitory impact is negated by longer incubation. Overall, the kinetic rate of defect development follows DLPC > DOPC > DOPC/cholesterol. Kinetic defects are also observed when anionic lipids are present. Based on the observation that defects can occupy as large as 40% of the bilayer surface, we propose a kinetic defect growth model. We also study the effect of melittin on the phase behavior of DOPC/egg-sphingomyelin/cholesterol bilayers. We find that melittin initially suppresses or eliminates liquid-ordered (Lo) domains; Lo domains gradually emerge and become the dominant species with longer incubation; and defects in phase-coexisting bilayers have a most probable radius of ∼5 nm and are exclusively localized in the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase. Our experimental data highlight that melittin-induced membrane defects are not static; conversely, spontaneous defect growth is intrinsically associated with membrane permeabilization exerted by melittin.

  6. Correlating antimicrobial activity and model membrane leakage induced by nylon-3 polymers and detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovakeemian, Sara G; Liu, Runhui; Gellman, Samuel H; Heerklotz, Heiko

    2015-09-14

    Most antimicrobial peptides act upon target microorganisms by permeabilizing their membranes. The mode of action is often assessed by vesicle leakage experiments that use model membranes, with the assumption that biological activity correlates with the permeabilization of the lipid bilayer. The current work aims to extend the interpretation of vesicle leakage results and examine the correlation between vesicle leakage and antimicrobial activity. To this end, we used a lifetime-based leakage assay with calcein-loaded vesicles to study the membrane permeabilizing properties of a novel antifungal polymer poly-NM, two of its analogs, and a series of detergents. In conjunction, the biological activities of these compounds against Candida albicans were assessed and correlated with data from vesicle leakage. Poly-NM induces all-or-none leakage in polar yeast lipid vesicles at the polymer's MIC, 3 μg mL(-1). At this and higher concentrations, complete leakage after an initial lag time was observed. Concerted activity tests imply that this polymer acts independently of the detergent octyl glucoside (OG) for both vesicle leakage and activity against C. albicans spheroplasts. In addition, poly-NM was found to have negligible activity against zwitterionic vesicles and red blood cells. Our results provide a consistent, detailed picture of the mode of action of poly-NM: this polymer induces membrane leakage by electrostatic lipid clustering. In contrast, poly-MM:CO, a nylon-3 polymer comprised of both cationic and hydrophobic segments, seems to act by a different mechanism that involves membrane asymmetry stress. Vesicle leakage for this polymer is transient (limited to nylon-3 polymers we examined act via similar mechanisms; it is surprising that their mechanisms are so distinct. Some, but not all mechanisms of vesicle permeabilization allow for antimicrobial activity.

  7. Alveolocapillary membrane permeability in experimental model of ventilator induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталья Александровна Решетняк

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to assess alveocapillary membrane permeability for the whole protein, middle molecular peptides and some lipoperoxidation markers depending on respiratory volume using in reproduction of ventilator induced lung injury model.Material and methods: Experiments were carried out on 15 laboratory rats- males (body mass 180–240 gr. of “Vistar” line. The mechanical pulmonary ventilation in rats was carried out using tracheostomy cannula ALV Hamilton G 5 apparatus during 2 hours under the total anesthesia with sodium thiopental at a rate of 40 mg|kg of animal body mass. The initial parameters of ventilation were equal in all animals: Inspiratory time = 0,5 seconds; respiratory rate = 60 – 76/minute; pressure at the end of expiration (PEE = 0 - 2 sm. of water column; inspiration-expiration ratio (I:E = 1:1 or 1:2. Depending on the size of respiratory volume (RV animal were divided into 3 groups (n=5. Animals with RV=7 ml/kg of body mass formed the first group (the control one. The second group included animals with RV = 20 ml/kg of body mass (the moderate volutrauma and the third one included animals with RV = 40 ml/kg of body mass (the heavy volutrauma. The bronchoalveolar lavage was carried out on isolated lungs with the volume of filling at a rate 5 ml of 0,9 % sodium chloride solution for 1 g of pulmonary tissue and there was received nearly 2,5+0,5 ml of lavage liquid (sodium chloride solution + bronchoalveolar liquid. The alveolocapillary membrane permeability was assessed by detecting in the received liquid of bronchoalveolar lavage the concentration of whole protein on Lowry, the content of middle mass molecules on extinction at wave lengths 238, 254, 260, and 280 nm; the level of diene conjugates on V.B. Gavrilov and catalase activity on M.A. Koroliuk. The received data were processed using methods of nonparametric statistics. The revealed intergroup differences were assessed on Kruskall-Wallis «ANOVA» criterion. The differences at

  8. Syrinx fluid transport: modeling pressure-wave-induced flux across the spinal pial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, N S J

    2012-03-01

    Syrinxes are fluid-filled cavities of the spinal cord that characterize syringomyelia, a disease involving neurological damage. Their formation and expansion is poorly understood, which has hindered successful treatment. Syrinx cavities are hydraulically connected with the spinal subarachnoid space (SSS) enveloping the spinal cord via the cord interstitium and the network of perivascular spaces (PVSs), which surround blood vessels penetrating the pial membrane that is adherent to the cord surface. Since the spinal canal supports pressure wave propagation, it has been hypothesized that wave-induced fluid exchange across the pial membrane may play a role in syrinx filling. To investigate this conjecture a pair of one-dimensional (1-d) analytical models were developed from classical elastic tube theory coupled with Darcy's law for either perivascular or interstitial flow. The results show that transpial flux serves as a mechanism for damping pressure waves by alleviating hoop stress in the pial membrane. The timescale ratio over which viscous and inertial forces compete was explicitly determined, which predicts that dilated PVS, SSS flow obstructions, and a stiffer and thicker pial membrane-all associated with syringomyelia-will increase transpial flux and retard wave travel. It was also revealed that the propagation of a pressure wave is aided by a less-permeable pial membrane and, in contrast, by a more-permeable spinal cord. This is the first modeling of the spinal canal to include both pressure-wave propagation along the spinal axis and a pathway for fluid to enter and leave the cord, which provides an analytical foundation from which to approach the full poroelastic problem.

  9. Amniotic membrane extract ameliorates benzalkonium chloride-induced dry eye in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xinye; Luo, Pingping; Zhao, Hui; Chen, Jingyao; He, Hui; Xu, Yuxue; Lin, Zhirong; Zhou, Yueping; Xu, Jianjiang; Liu, Zuguo

    2013-10-01

    Human amniotic membrane (AM) is avascular but contains various beneficial bioactive factors, its extract (AE) is also effective in treating many ocular surface disorders. In this study, we for the first time evaluated the therapeutic effects of AE on dry eye induced by benzalkonium chloride in a BALB/c mouse model. Topical application of AE (1.5 and 3 μg/eye/day) resulted in significantly longer tear break-up time on Day 3 and 6, lower fluorescein staining scores on Day 3, and lower inflammatory index on Day 6. AE reduced corneal epithelial K10 expression, inflammatory infiltration, and levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in BAC treated mice than that in the control mice. Moreover, decreased TUNEL positive cells in cornea and increased goblet cells in conjunctiva were also observed in AE treated corneas. Finally, AE induced more Ki-67 positive cells in corneal epithelium of dry eye mouse. Taken together, our data provide further support for BAC induced dry eye model as a valuable for dry eye study and suggest a great potential for AE as a therapeutic agent in the clinical treatment of dry eye.

  10. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes...... controlled by membrane structure, permeability and curvature as well as membrane proteins by using a wide range of biochemical, biophysical and microscopic techniques. This review gives an overview of some currently used model biomembrane systems. We will also discuss some key membrane protein properties...... that are relevant for protein-membrane interactions in terms of protein structure and how it is affected by membrane composition, phase behavior and curvature....

  11. Current-induced membrane discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, M B; Mani, A; Bruus, H; Biesheuvel, P M; Bazant, M Z

    2012-01-01

    Possible mechanisms for over-limiting current (OLC) through aqueous ion-exchange membranes (exceeding diffusion limitation) have been debated for half a century. Flows consistent with electro-osmotic instability (EOI) have recently been observed in microfluidic experiments, but the existing theory neglects chemical effects and remains to be quantitatively tested. Here, we show that charge regulation and water self-ionization can lead to OLC by "current-induced membrane discharge" (CIMD), even in the absence of fluid flow. Salt depletion leads to a large electric field which expels water co-ions, causing the membrane to discharge and lose its selectivity. Since salt co-ions and water ions contribute to OLC, CIMD interferes with electrodialysis (salt counter-ion removal) but could be exploited for current-assisted ion exchange and pH control. CIMD also suppresses the extended space charge that leads to EOI, so it should be reconsidered in both models and experiments on OLC.

  12. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...... affected by the lipid environment. Theoretical predictions are pointed out, and compared to experimental findings, if available. Among others, the following phenomena are discussed: interactions of interfacially adsorbed peptides, pore-forming amphipathic peptides, adsorption of charged proteins onto...... oppositely charged lipid membranes, lipid-induced tilting of proteins embedded in lipid bilayers, protein-induced bilayer deformations, protein insertion and assembly, and lipid-controlled functioning of membrane proteins....

  13. Reversible and irreversible vascular bioeffects induced by ultrasound and microbubbles in chorioallantoic membrane model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarapacki, Christine; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Tabuchi, Arata; Karshafian, Raffi

    2017-03-01

    Background: The application of ultrasound and microbubbles at therapeutic conditions has been shown to improve delivery of molecules, cause vasoconstriction, modulate blood flow and induce a vascular shut down in in vivo cancerous tissues. The underlying mechanism has been associated with the interaction of ultrasonically-induced microbubble oscillation and cavitation with the blood vessel wall. In this study, the effect of ultrasound and microbubbles on blood flow and vascular architecture was studied using a fertilized chicken egg CAM (chorioallantoic membrane) model. Methods: CAM at day 12 of incubation (Hamburger-Hamilton stage 38-40) were exposed to ultrasound at varying acoustic pressures (160, 240 and 320 kPa peak negative pressure) in the presence of Definity microbubbles and 70 kDa FITC dextran fluorescent molecules. A volume of 50 µL Definity microbubbles were injected into a large anterior vein of the CAM prior to ultrasound exposure. The ultrasound treatment sequence consisted of 5 s exposure at 500 kHz frequency, 8 cycles and 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency with 5 s off for a total exposure of 2 minutes. Fluorescent videos and images of the CAM vasculature were acquired using intravital microscopy prior, during and following the ultrasound exposure. Perfusion was quantified by measuring the length of capillaries in a region of interest using Adobe Illustrator. Results and Discussion: The vascular bioeffects induced by USMB increased with acoustic peak negative pressure. At 160 kPa, no visible differences were observed compared to the control. At 240 kPa, a transient decrease in perfusion with subsequent recovery within 15 minutes was observed, whereas at 320 kPa, the fluorescent images showed an irreversible vascular damage. The study indicates that a potential mechanism for the transient decrease in perfusion may be related to blood coagulation. The results suggest that ultrasound and microbubbles can induce reversible and irreversible vascular

  14. Observing a model ion channel gating action in model cell membranes in real time in situ: membrane potential change induced alamethicin orientation change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuji; Li, Hongchun; Wei, Feng; Jasensky, Joshua; Boughton, Andrew P; Yang, Pei; Chen, Zhan

    2012-04-11

    Ion channels play crucial roles in transport and regulatory functions of living cells. Understanding the gating mechanisms of these channels is important to understanding and treating diseases that have been linked to ion channels. One potential model peptide for studying the mechanism of ion channel gating is alamethicin, which adopts a split α/3(10)-helix structure and responds to changes in electric potential. In this study, sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS), supplemented by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), has been applied to characterize interactions between alamethicin (a model for larger channel proteins) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid bilayers in the presence of an electric potential across the membrane. The membrane potential difference was controlled by changing the pH of the solution in contact with the bilayer and was measured using fluorescence spectroscopy. The orientation angle of alamethicin in POPC lipid bilayers was then determined at different pH values using polarized SFG amide I spectra. Assuming that all molecules adopt the same orientation (a δ distribution), at pH = 6.7 the α-helix at the N-terminus and the 3(10)-helix at the C-terminus tilt at about 72° (θ(1)) and 50° (θ(2)) versus the surface normal, respectively. When pH increases to 11.9, θ(1) and θ(2) decrease to 56.5° and 45°, respectively. The δ distribution assumption was verified using a combination of SFG and ATR-FTIR measurements, which showed a quite narrow distribution in the angle of θ(1) for both pH conditions. This indicates that all alamethicin molecules at the surface adopt a nearly identical orientation in POPC lipid bilayers. The localized pH change in proximity to the bilayer modulates the membrane potential and thus induces a decrease in both the tilt and the bend angles of the two helices in alamethicin. This is the first reported application of SFG

  15. Influence of bio-membrane on current characteristics induced by ambient ELF magnetic field for spherical tissue model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Noriyuki [Kyushu University, Kasuga (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering Sciences; Tarao, Hiroo; Isaka, Katsuo [University of Tokushima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-07-01

    Based on the experimental works using rats and chicken eggs, possible influences of the bio-membrane on the electric field and resultant current induced by the exposure to ambient ELF magnetic field, have been pointed out. Existence of the bio-membrane is, however, rarely implemented in conventional procedures of the induced current examination. The present contribution presents results of the analytical examination on how the thickness and electric conductivity of the bio-membrane affect the induced current profiles, indicating the significant role of the bio-membrane on the exact evaluation of the induced current characteristics. (author)

  16. Current-Induced Membrane Discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; van Soestbergen, M.; Mani, A.;

    2012-01-01

    Possible mechanisms for overlimiting current (OLC) through aqueous ion-exchange membranes (exceeding diffusion limitation) have been debated for half a century. Flows consistent with electro-osmotic instability have recently been observed in microfluidic experiments, but the existing theory...... neglects chemical effects and remains to be quantitatively tested. Here, we show that charge regulation and water self-ionization can lead to OLC by "current-induced membrane discharge'' (CIMD), even in the absence of fluid flow, in ion-exchange membranes much thicker than the local Debye screening length....... Salt depletion leads to a large electric field resulting in a local pH shift within the membrane with the effect that the membrane discharges and loses its ion selectivity. Since salt co-ions, H+ ions, and OH- ions contribute to OLC, CIMD interferes with electrodialysis (salt counterion removal...

  17. Membrane-Mediated Aggregation of Curvature-Inducing Nematogens and Membrane Tubulation

    OpenAIRE

    N Ramakrishnan; Sunil Kumar, P.B.; Ipsen, John H.

    2013-01-01

    The shapes of cell membranes are largely regulated by membrane-associated, curvature-active proteins. Herein, we use a numerical model of the membrane, recently developed by us, with elongated membrane inclusions possessing spontaneous directional curvatures that could be different along, and perpendicular to, the membrane’s long axis. We show that, due to membrane-mediated interactions, these curvature-inducing membrane-nematogens can aggregate spontaneously, even at low concentrations, and ...

  18. Current-Induced Membrane Discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, MB; Soestbergen, van, M Michiel; A Mani; Bruus, H.; Biesheuvel, PM; Bazant, MZ

    2012-01-01

    Possible mechanisms for overlimiting current (OLC) through aqueous ion-exchange membranes (exceeding diffusion limitation) have been debated for half a century. Flows consistent with electro-osmotic instability have recently been observed in microfluidic experiments, but the existing theory neglects chemical effects and remains to be quantitatively tested. Here, we show that charge regulation and water self-ionization can lead to OLC by “current-induced membrane discharge” (CIMD), even in the...

  19. Melatonin induces opposite effects on order and dynamics of anionic DPPG model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ipek; Severcan, Feride; Kazancı, Nadide

    2007-05-01

    The temperature and concentration induced effects of melatonin on anionic dipalmitoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) multilamellar liposomes (MLVs) were investigated by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results show that melatonin does not perturb the phase transition profile, while a decrease in the main transition temperature ( Tm) is noticed at high melatonin concentrations (15, 24 and 30 mol %). Low concentrations of melatonin (3, 6 and 9 mol %) decrease the frequency of the CH 2 stretching mode, implying an ordering effect, whilst high concentrations of melatonin disorders system both in the gel and liquid crystalline phases. Furthermore, at low and high concentrations, melatonin also causes opposite effect on membrane dynamics. The bandwidth of the CH 2 stretching modes decreases at low concentrations, implying a decrease in the dynamics, while increasing it at high concentrations. Furthermore, it causes significant decrease in the frequency of the C dbnd O stretching and PO2- antisymmetric double bond stretching bands of DPPG for all concentrations both in the gel and liquid crystalline phases, which indicates strong hydrogen bonding around these functional groups.

  20. Modeling of Membrane-Electrode-Assembly Degradation in Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cells - Local H2 Starvation and Start-Stop Induced Carbon-Support Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenbin; Yu, Paul T.; Carter, Robert N.; Makharia, Rohit; Gasteiger, Hubert A.

    Carbon-support corrosion causes electrode structure damage and thus electrode degradation. This chapter discusses fundamental models developed to predict cathode carbon-support corrosion induced by local H2 starvation and start-stop in a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Kinetic models based on the balance of current among the various electrode reactions are illustrative, yielding much insight on the origin of carbon corrosion and its implications for future materials developments. They are particularly useful in assessing carbon corrosion rates at a quasi-steady-state when an H2-rich region serves as a power source that drives an H2-free region as a load. Coupled kinetic and transport models are essential in predicting when local H2 starvation occurs and how it affects the carbon corrosion rate. They are specifically needed to estimate length scales at which H2 will be depleted and time scales that are valuable for developing mitigation strategies. To predict carbon-support loss distributions over an entire active area, incorporating the electrode pseudo-capacitance appears necessary for situations with shorter residence times such as start-stop events. As carbon-support corrosion is observed under normal transient operations, further model improvement shall be focused on finding the carbon corrosion kinetics associated with voltage cycling and incorporating mechanisms that can quantify voltage decay with carbon-support loss.

  1. Interaction of Defensins with Model Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lori K.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Yang, Lihua; Mishra, Abhijit; Gordon, Vernita D.; Selsted, Michael E.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2009-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) comprise a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. For many AMPs, activity comes from their ability to selectively disrupt and lyse bacterial cell membranes. There are a number of proposed models for this action, but the detailed molecular mechanism of selective membrane permeation remains unclear. Theta defensins are circularized peptides with a high degree of selectivity. We investigate the interaction of model bacterial and eukaryotic cell membranes with theta defensins RTD-1, BTD-7, and compare them to protegrin PG-1, a prototypical AMP, using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The relationship between membrane composition and peptide induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. By comparing the membrane phase behavior induced by these different peptides we will discuss the importance of amino acid composition and placement on membrane rearrangement.

  2. DMSO induces dehydration near lipid membrane surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Song, Jinsuk; Pas, Jolien; Meijer, Lenny H H; Han, Songi

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been broadly used in biology as a cosolvent, a cryoprotectant, and an enhancer of membrane permeability, leading to the general assumption that DMSO-induced structural changes in cell membranes...

  3. The dependence of induced polarization on fluid salinity and pH, studied with an extended model of membrane polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hördt, Andreas; Bairlein, Katharina; Bielefeld, Anja; Bücker, Matthias; Kuhn, Eva; Nordsiek, Sven; Stebner, Hermann

    2016-12-01

    The estimation of hydraulic parameters from spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements is difficult partly because the electrical impedance of sediments depends on several parameters that are not related to the texture. Important parameters that influence the spectral response are fluid salinity and pH. In order to understand the behaviour of SIP spectra from a mechanistic point of view, we carry out simulations with a membrane polarization model. The geometry consists of a sequence of wide and narrow pores with finite radii. The charge distribution at the mineral surface is described by a triple layer model, characterized by the zeta potential and the partition coefficient. We extended an existing model by incorporating known dependencies of the zeta potential and the partition coefficient on fluid salinity and pH. Our simulation results predict a decrease of the maximum phase shift of the complex electrical conductivity with increasing salinity, consistent with experimental observations. For very small pore radii, the phase shift may also show the opposite behaviour and increase with salinity. The imaginary conductivity at 1 Hz increases with increasing salinity, followed by a peak and a decrease at high salinities. The fact that our model predicts a decrease of the imaginary conductivity at high salinities is particularly important, because strong experimental evidence was recently found for such a decrease, which was theoretically unexplained so far. Both the maximum phase shift and the imaginary conductivity at 1 Hz decrease when pH decreases. The reason is that at low pH, the zeta potential and the partition coefficient both decrease, corresponding to a smaller charge density at the mineral surface, resulting in a weaker impact of the electrical double layer. The few existing experimental studies on pH dependence are qualitatively consistent with our simulation results.

  4. On "spinning" membrane models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Sezgin, E.; Townsend, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Several alternative actions for a bosonic membrane have recently been proposed. We show that a linearly realized locally world-volume-supersymmetric (spinning membrane) extension of any of these actions implies an analogous extension of the standard Dirac membrane action. We further show that a

  5. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly ...

  6. A model of photothermally induced damage to the retina during indocyanine-green-assisted peeling of the inner limiting membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Roberto; Toci, Guido; Rossi, Francesca; Giansanti, Fabrizio; Menchini, Ugo

    2004-07-01

    Intentional removal of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) in macular hole surgery is becoming a well-recognized procedure. It is usually performed with the assistance of Indocyanine Green (ICG), which selectively stains the membrane, in order to facilitate the visual control of surgery operations. In this theoretical study we investigate the possibility of heat damage to the retina being caused by the combination of ICG staining with the illumination provided by a standard light source for vitreo-retinal surgery, composed of a Xenon lamp and an optical fiber delivery system. For this purpose, we set up a bi-dimensional analytical model that describes light absorption and heat conduction in ICG-stained ILM and in retinal structures.

  7. Drug-induced erythrocyte membrane internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Bassat, I; Bensch, K G; Schrier, S L

    1972-07-01

    In vitro erythrocyte membrane internalization, resulting in the formation of membrane-lined vacuoles, can be quantified by a radioisotopic method. A complex of (37)Co-labeled vitamin B(12) and its plasma protein binders is first adsorbed to the cell surface, and after vacuoles are formed, the noninternalized label is removed by washing and trypsin treatment. The residual radioactivity represents trapped label and can be used to measure the extent of membrane internalization. Using this method, it was found that in addition to primaquine, a group of membrane-active drugs, specifically hydrocortisone, vinblastine, and chlorpromazine can induce membrane internalization in erythrocytes. This is a metabolic process dependent on drug concentration, temperature, and pH. Vacuole formation by all agents tested can be blocked by prior depletion of endogenous substrates or by poisoning the erythrocytes with sodium fluoride and sulfhydryl blocking agents. This phenomenon resembles in some respects the previously reported membrane internalization of energized erythrocyte ghosts. It is suggested that membrane internalization is dependent on an ATP-energized state and is influenced by the balance between the concentrations of magnesium and calcium in the membrane. This study provides a basis for proposing a unifying concept of the action of some membrane-active drugs, and for considering the role of erythrocyte membrane internalization in pathophysiologic events.

  8. Thermo-induced vesicular dynamics of membranes containing cholesterol derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Tsuyoshi; Vestergaard, Mun'delanji C; Hamada, Tsutomu; Le, Phuc Thi Minh; Takagi, Masahiro

    2012-08-01

    Membrane structural organization is an intrinsic property of a cell membrane. Any changes in lipid composition, and/or any stimuli that affect molecular packing induce structural re-organization. It membrane dynamics provide a means by which changes in structure organization can be determined, upon a change in the membrane internal or external environment. Here, we report on the effect of thermo-stress on membranes containing cholesterol liquid crystal (LC) compounds cholesterol benzoate (BENZO) and oxidized cholesterols. We have (1) revealed that lipid vesicles containing this artificial cholesterol derivative (BENZO) is thermo-responsive, and that this thermo-sensitivity is significantly similar to naturally oxy-cholesterols (2) elucidated the mechanism behind the membrane perturbation. Using Langmuir monolayer experiments, we have demonstrated that membrane perturbation was due to an increase in the molecular surface area, (3) discussed the similarities between cholesterol benzoate in the cholesterol LC state and in lipid bilayer membranes. Last, (4) drawing from previously reported findings, our new data on membrane dynamics, and the discussion above, we propose that artificial cholesterol derivatives such as BENZO, open new possibilities for controlled and tailored design using model membrane systems. Examples could include the development of membrane technology and provide a trigger for progress in thermo-tropical liquid crystal engineering.

  9. A multiphase model for chemically- and mechanically- induced cell differentiation in a hollow fibre membrane bioreactor: minimising growth factor consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Natalie C; Oliver, James M; Shipley, Rebecca J; Waters, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    We present a simplified two-dimensional model of fluid flow, solute transport, and cell distribution in a hollow fibre membrane bioreactor. We consider two cell populations, one undifferentiated and one differentiated, with differentiation stimulated either by growth factor alone, or by both growth factor and fluid shear stress. Two experimental configurations are considered, a 3-layer model in which the cells are seeded in a scaffold throughout the extracapillary space (ECS), and a 4-layer model in which the cell-scaffold construct occupies a layer surrounding the outside of the hollow fibre, only partially filling the ECS. Above this is a region of free-flowing fluid, referred to as the upper fluid layer. Following previous models by the authors (Pearson et al. in Math Med Biol, 2013, Biomech Model Mechanbiol 1-16, 2014a, we employ porous mixture theory to model the dynamics of, and interactions between, the cells, scaffold, and fluid in the cell-scaffold construct. We use this model to determine operating conditions (experiment end time, growth factor inlet concentration, and inlet fluid fluxes) which result in a required percentage of differentiated cells, as well as maximising the differentiated cell yield and minimising the consumption of expensive growth factor.

  10. Mathematical modelling of membrane separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank

    This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate mathemat......This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate....... It is found that the probability of entering the pore is highest when the largest of the radii in the ellipse is equal to half the radius of the pore, in case of molecules with circular radius less than the pore radius. The results are directly related to the macroscopic distribution coefficient...

  11. Liposome Model Systems to Study the Endosomal Escape of Cell-Penetrating Peptides: Transport across Phospholipid Membranes Induced by a Proton Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Madani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Detergent-mediated reconstitution of bacteriorhodopsin (BR into large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs was investigated, and the effects were carefully characterized for every step of the procedure. LUVs were prepared by the extrusion method, and their size and stability were examined by dynamic light scattering. BR was incorporated into the LUVs using the detergent-mediated reconstitution method and octyl glucoside (OG as detergent. The result of measuring pH outside the LUVs suggested that in the presence of light, BR pumps protons from the outside to the inside of the LUVs, creating acidic pH inside the vesicles. LUVs with 20% negatively charged headgroups were used to model endosomes with BR incorporated into the membrane. The fluorescein-labeled cell-penetrating peptide penetratin was entrapped inside these BR-containing LUVs. The light-induced proton pumping activity of BR has allowed us to observe the translocation of fluorescein-labeled penetratin across the vesicle membrane.

  12. Pentavalent outer membrane vesicles of Vibrio cholerae induce adaptive immune response and protective efficacy in both adult and passive suckling mice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Ritam; Koley, Hemanta; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Mitra, Soma; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Chattopadhyay, Brajadulal

    2015-03-01

    Recently, we demonstrated oral immunizations with single serotype outer membrane vesicles of Vibrio cholerae induced serogroup specific protective immunity in the RITARD model. In our present study, we advanced our research by formulating multi-serotype outer membrane vesicles, mixing the OMVs of five virulent V. cholerae strains. Four doses of oral immunization with cholera pentavalent outer membrane vesicles (CPMVs) induced V. cholerae specific B and T cell responses. CPMVs-immunized mice generated long lasting serum IgG, IgA, IgM as well as mucosal sIgA and also elicited a higher percentage of CD4+ T cell distribution in spleen. Our study revealed that in vitro CPMVs-activated dendritic cells were secreting T cell polarizing cytokines, IL-12p40, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-1β. Moreover, purified splenic CD4+ T cells of immunized mice also secreted IL-4, IL-13 and IL-17 cytokines, indicating the initiation of Th2 and Th17 cell mediated immune responses. CPMVs immunized adult female mice and their offspring were significantly protected from heterologous challenge with wild type V. cholerae. CPMVs could be exploited for the development of a novel non-living vaccine against circulating cholera in near future.

  13. Tracking membrane protein association in model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Reffay

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue.We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well.After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 A, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the

  14. Membrane-mediated aggregation of curvature-inducing nematogens and membrane tubulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, N; Sunil Kumar, P B; Ipsen, John H

    2013-03-05

    The shapes of cell membranes are largely regulated by membrane-associated, curvature-active proteins. Herein, we use a numerical model of the membrane, recently developed by us, with elongated membrane inclusions possessing spontaneous directional curvatures that could be different along, and perpendicular to, the membrane's long axis. We show that, due to membrane-mediated interactions, these curvature-inducing membrane-nematogens can aggregate spontaneously, even at low concentrations, and change the local shape of the membrane. We demonstrate that for a large group of such inclusions, where the two spontaneous curvatures have equal sign, the tubular conformation and sometimes the sheet conformation of the membrane are the common equilibrium shapes. We elucidate the factors necessary for the formation of these protein lattices. Furthermore, the elastic properties of the tubes, such as their compressional stiffness and persistence length, are calculated. Finally, we discuss the possible role of nematic disclination in capping and branching of the tubular membranes. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. DMSO Induces Dehydration near Lipid Membrane Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Song, Jinsuk; Pas, Jolien; Meijer, Lenny H.H.; Han, Songi

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been broadly used in biology as a cosolvent, a cryoprotectant, and an enhancer of membrane permeability, leading to the general assumption that DMSO-induced structural changes in cell membranes and their hydration water play important functional roles. Although the effects of DMSO on the membrane structure and the headgroup dehydration have been extensively studied, the mechanism by which DMSO invokes its effect on lipid membranes and the direct role of water in this process are unresolved. By directly probing the translational water diffusivity near unconfined lipid vesicle surfaces, the lipid headgroup mobility, and the repeat distances in multilamellar vesicles, we found that DMSO exclusively weakens the surface water network near the lipid membrane at a bulk DMSO mole fraction (XDMSO) of DMSO was found to effectively destabilize the hydration water structure at the lipid membrane surface at XDMSO 0.1, DMSO enters the lipid interface and restricts the lipid headgroup motion. We postulate that DMSO acts as an efficient cryoprotectant even at low concentrations by exclusively disrupting the water network near the lipid membrane surface, weakening the cohesion between water and adhesion of water to the lipid headgroups, and so mitigating the stress induced by the volume change of water during freeze-thaw. PMID:26200868

  16. Geometry of Membrane Sigma Models

    CERN Document Server

    Vysoky, Jan

    2015-01-01

    String theory still remains one of the promising candidates for a unification of the theory of gravity and quantum field theory. One of its essential parts is relativistic description of moving multi-dimensional objects called membranes (or p-branes) in a curved spacetime. On the classical field theory level, they are described by an action functional extremalising the volume of a manifold swept by a propagating membrane. This and related field theories are collectively called membrane sigma models. Differential geometry is an important mathematical tool in the study of string theory. It turns out that string and membrane backgrounds can be conveniently described using objects defined on a direct sum of tangent and cotangent bundles of the spacetime manifold. Mathematical field studying such object is called generalized geometry. Its integral part is the theory of Leibniz algebroids, vector bundles with a Leibniz algebra bracket on its module of smooth sections. Special cases of Leibniz algebroids are better ...

  17. Modeling electrically active viscoelastic membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitikantha Roy

    Full Text Available The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism.

  18. Membrane-Mediated Aggregation of Curvature-Inducing Nematogens and Membrane Tubulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Sunil Kumar, P.B.; Ipsen, John H.

    2013-01-01

    The shapes of cell membranes are largely regulated by membrane-associated, curvature-active proteins. Herein, we use a numerical model of the membrane, recently developed by us, with elongated membrane inclusions possessing spontaneous directional curvatures that could be different along, and perpendicular to, the membrane’s long axis. We show that, due to membrane-mediated interactions, these curvature-inducing membrane-nematogens can aggregate spontaneously, even at low concentrations, and change the local shape of the membrane. We demonstrate that for a large group of such inclusions, where the two spontaneous curvatures have equal sign, the tubular conformation and sometimes the sheet conformation of the membrane are the common equilibrium shapes. We elucidate the factors necessary for the formation of these protein lattices. Furthermore, the elastic properties of the tubes, such as their compressional stiffness and persistence length, are calculated. Finally, we discuss the possible role of nematic disclination in capping and branching of the tubular membranes. PMID:23473484

  19. Giant plasma membrane vesicles: models for understanding membrane organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic membranes into functional domains continues to fascinate and puzzle cell biologists and biophysicists. The lipid raft hypothesis proposes that collective lipid interactions compartmentalize the membrane into coexisting liquid domains that are central to membrane physiology. This hypothesis has proven controversial because such structures cannot be directly visualized in live cells by light microscopy. The recent observations of liquid-liquid phase separation in biological membranes are an important validation of the raft hypothesis and enable application of the experimental toolbox of membrane physics to a biologically complex phase-separated membrane. This review addresses the role of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) in refining the raft hypothesis and expands on the application of GPMVs as an experimental model to answer some of key outstanding problems in membrane biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Photo Induced Membrane Separation for Water Purification and Desalination Using Azobenzene Modified Anodized Alumina Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masahiro; Imura, Tatsuki

    2015-06-23

    Water purification and desalination to produce end-use water are important agendas in 21st century, because the global water shortage is becoming increasingly serious. Those processes using light energy, especially solar energy, without the consumption of fossil fuels are desired for creating sustainable society. For these earth-friendly water treatments, nanoporous materials and membranes are expected to provide new technologies. We have reported before that the repetitive photo isomerization of azobenzene groups between the trans and cis isomers induced by the simultaneous irradiation of UV and visible lights accelerates the molecular movement of nearby molecules in nanoporous materials. After further studies, we recently found that the permeation of water through azobenzene modified anodized alumina membranes as a photo responsive nanoporous membrane was achieved by the simultaneous irradiation of UV and visible lights, while no water penetration occurred under no light, only single UV or visible light. The photo induced permeation of water was promoted by the vaporization of water with the repetitive photo isomerization of azobenzene. This membrane permeation achieved the purification of water solutions, because dye molecules and a protein dissolved in aqueous solutions were not involved in the photo induced penetrated water. When 3.5% of sodium chloride solution as model seawater was employed for this membrane separation, the salt content of the permeated water was less than 0.01% to accomplish the complete desalination of seawater.

  1. Computational modeling of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler Leman, Julia; Ulmschneider, Martin B; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    The determination of membrane protein (MP) structures has always trailed that of soluble proteins due to difficulties in their overexpression, reconstitution into membrane mimetics, and subsequent structure determination. The percentage of MP structures in the protein databank (PDB) has been at a constant 1-2% for the last decade. In contrast, over half of all drugs target MPs, only highlighting how little we understand about drug-specific effects in the human body. To reduce this gap, researchers have attempted to predict structural features of MPs even before the first structure was experimentally elucidated. In this review, we present current computational methods to predict MP structure, starting with secondary structure prediction, prediction of trans-membrane spans, and topology. Even though these methods generate reliable predictions, challenges such as predicting kinks or precise beginnings and ends of secondary structure elements are still waiting to be addressed. We describe recent developments in the prediction of 3D structures of both α-helical MPs as well as β-barrels using comparative modeling techniques, de novo methods, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The increase of MP structures has (1) facilitated comparative modeling due to availability of more and better templates, and (2) improved the statistics for knowledge-based scoring functions. Moreover, de novo methods have benefited from the use of correlated mutations as restraints. Finally, we outline current advances that will likely shape the field in the forthcoming decade.

  2. Modeling transcranial magnetic stimulation from the induced electric fields to the membrane potentials along tractography-based white matter fiber tracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geeter, Nele; Dupré, Luc; Crevecoeur, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a promising non-invasive tool for modulating the brain activity. Despite the widespread therapeutic and diagnostic use of TMS in neurology and psychiatry, its observed response remains hard to predict, limiting its further development and applications. Although the stimulation intensity is always maximum at the cortical surface near the coil, experiments reveal that TMS can affect deeper brain regions as well. Approach. The explanation of this spread might be found in the white matter fiber tracts, connecting cortical and subcortical structures. When applying an electric field on neurons, their membrane potential is altered. If this change is significant, more likely near the TMS coil, action potentials might be initiated and propagated along the fiber tracts towards deeper regions. In order to understand and apply TMS more effectively, it is important to capture and account for this interaction as accurately as possible. Therefore, we compute, next to the induced electric fields in the brain, the spatial distribution of the membrane potentials along the fiber tracts and its temporal dynamics. Main results. This paper introduces a computational TMS model in which electromagnetism and neurophysiology are combined. Realistic geometry and tissue anisotropy are included using magnetic resonance imaging and targeted white matter fiber tracts are traced using tractography based on diffusion tensor imaging. The position and orientation of the coil can directly be retrieved from the neuronavigation system. Incorporating these features warrants both patient- and case-specific results. Significance. The presented model gives insight in the activity propagation through the brain and can therefore explain the observed clinical responses to TMS and their inter- and/or intra-subject variability. We aspire to advance towards an accurate, flexible and personalized TMS model that helps to understand stimulation in the connected

  3. Mesoscopic models of biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Kranenburg, M.;

    2006-01-01

    , as model systems to understand the fundamental properties of biomembranes. The properties of lipid bilayers can be studied at different time and length scales. For some properties it is sufficient to envision a membrane as an elastic sheet, while for others it is important to take into account the details...... of the individual atoms. In this review, we focus on an intermediate level, where groups of atoms are lumped into pseudo-particles to arrive at a coarse-grained, or mesoscopic, description of a bilayer, which is subsequently studied using molecular simulation. The aim of this review is to compare various strategies...

  4. Modeling and simulation of membrane process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Maciej

    2017-06-01

    The article presents the different approaches to polymer membrane mathematical modeling. Traditional models based on experimental physicochemical correlations and balance models are presented in the first part. Quantum and molecular mechanics models are presented as they are more popular for polymer membranes in fuel cells. The initial part is enclosed by neural network models which found their use for different types of processes in polymer membranes. The second part is devoted to models of fluid dynamics. The computational fluid dynamics technique can be divided into solving of Navier-Stokes equations and into Boltzmann lattice models. Both approaches are presented focusing on membrane processes.

  5. Fibrosis is not just fibrosis - basement membrane modelling and collagen metabolism differs between hepatitis B- and C-induced injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M J; Karsdal, Morten A; Kazankov, K

    2016-01-01

    . AIM: To investigate whether differences in extracellular matrix (ECM) composition of the liver during fibrogenesis in two seemingly similar types of viral hepatitis could be reflected by differences in ECM turnover. METHODS: Utilising a cross-sectional design, we measured specific ECM protein...... fragments in plasma from 197 chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients and 403 chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients matched for inflammation grade and fibrosis stage. Markers of matrix metalloprotease degraded type I, III, IV and VI collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M, C6M) and type III and IV collagen formation (Pro-C3, P4NP7S...... and fibrosis only in CHC. Basement membrane collagen fragments P4NP7S and C4M were significantly higher in matched activity and fibrosis cohorts within CHB vs CHC. CONCLUSION: The main parameters to determine extracellular matrix biomarker levels are inflammation, fibrosis, and type of viral insult. Compared...

  6. Rigid proteins and softening of biological membranes-with application to HIV-induced cell membrane softening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Himani; Zelisko, Matthew; Liu, Liping; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-05-06

    A key step in the HIV-infection process is the fusion of the virion membrane with the target cell membrane and the concomitant transfer of the viral RNA. Experimental evidence suggests that the fusion is preceded by considerable elastic softening of the cell membranes due to the insertion of fusion peptide in the membrane. What are the mechanisms underpinning the elastic softening of the membrane upon peptide insertion? A broader question may be posed: insertion of rigid proteins in soft membranes ought to stiffen the membranes not soften them. However, experimental observations perplexingly appear to show that rigid proteins may either soften or harden membranes even though conventional wisdom only suggests stiffening. In this work, we argue that regarding proteins as merely non-specific rigid inclusions is flawed, and each protein has a unique mechanical signature dictated by its specific interfacial coupling to the surrounding membrane. Predicated on this hypothesis, we have carried out atomistic simulations to investigate peptide-membrane interactions. Together with a continuum model, we reconcile contrasting experimental data in the literature including the case of HIV-fusion peptide induced softening. We conclude that the structural rearrangements of the lipids around the inclusions cause the softening or stiffening of the biological membranes.

  7. Modeling branching pore structures in membrane filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Cummings, Linda J.

    2016-11-01

    Membrane filters are in widespread industrial use, and mathematical models to predict their efficacy are potentially very useful, as such models can suggest design modifications to improve filter performance and lifetime. Many models have been proposed to describe particle capture by membrane filters and the associated fluid dynamics, but most such models are based on a very simple structure in which the pores of the membrane are assumed to be simple circularly-cylindrical tubes spanning the depth of the membrane. Real membranes used in applications usually have much more complex geometry, with interconnected pores which may branch and bifurcate. Pores are also typically larger on the upstream side of the membrane than on the downstream side. We present an idealized mathematical model, in which a membrane consists of a series of bifurcating pores, which decrease in size as the membrane is traversed. Feed solution is forced through the membrane by applied pressure, and particles are removed from the feed either by sieving, or by particle adsorption within pores (which shrinks them). Thus the membrane's permeability decreases as the filtration progresses, ultimately falling to zero. We discuss how filtration efficiency depends on the characteristics of the branching structure. Partial support from NSF DMS 1261596 is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Interactions between model bacterial membranes and synthetic antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Mishra, Abhijit; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2006-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides comprise a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. It has been shown that natural antimicrobial peptides and their analogs can permeate bacterial membranes selectively. There are a number of proposed models for this action, but the detailed molecular mechanism of the induced membrane permeation remains unclear. We investigate interactions between model bacterial membranes and a prototypical family of phenylene ethynylene-based antimicrobials with controllable hydrophilic and hydrophobic volume fractions, controllable charge placement. Preliminary results from synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) results will be presented.

  9. A Mathematical Model for Predicting the Life of PEM Fuel Cell Membranes Subjected to Hydration Cycling

    CERN Document Server

    Burlatsky, S F; O'Neill, J; Atrazhev, V V; Varyukhin, A N; Dmitriev, D V; Erikhman, N S

    2013-01-01

    Under typical PEM fuel cell operating conditions, part of membrane electrode assembly is subjected to humidity cycling due to variation of inlet gas RH and/or flow rate. Cyclic membrane hydration/dehydration would cause cyclic swelling/shrinking of the unconstrained membrane. In a constrained membrane, it causes cyclic stress resulting in mechanical failure in the area adjacent to the gas inlet. A mathematical modeling framework for prediction of the lifetime of a PEM FC membrane subjected to hydration cycling is developed in this paper. The model predicts membrane lifetime as a function of RH cycling amplitude and membrane mechanical properties. The modeling framework consists of three model components: a fuel cell RH distribution model, a hydration/dehydration induced stress model that predicts stress distribution in the membrane, and a damage accrual model that predicts membrane life-time. Short descriptions of the model components along with overall framework are presented in the paper. The model was used...

  10. Computer Simulation of Cytoskeleton-Induced Blebbing in Lipid Membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Spangler, Eric J; Revalee, Joel D; Kumar, P B Sunil; Laradji, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Blebs are balloon-shaped membrane protrusions that form during many physiological processes. Using computer simulation of a particle-based model for self-assembled lipid bilayers coupled to an elastic meshwork, we investigated the phase behavior and kinetics of blebbing. We found that blebs form for large values of the ratio between the areas of the bilayer and the cytoskeleton. We also found that blebbing can be induced when the cytoskeleton is subject to a localized ablation or a uniform compression. The results obtained are qualitatively in agreement with the experimental evidence and the model opens up the possibility to study the kinetics of bleb formation in detail.

  11. Macroscopic Modeling of Polymer-Electrolyte Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, A.Z.; Newman, J.

    2007-04-01

    In this chapter, the various approaches for the macroscopic modeling of transport phenomena in polymer-electrolyte membranes are discussed. This includes general background and modeling methodologies, as well as exploration of the governing equations and some membrane-related topic of interest.

  12. Purinergically induced membrane fluidization in ciliary cells: characterization and control by calcium and membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfahel, E; Korngreen, A; Parola, A H; Priel, Z

    1996-02-01

    To examine the role of membrane dynamics in transmembrane signal transduction, we studied changes in membrane fluidity in mucociliary tissues from frog palate and esophagus epithelia stimulated by extracellular ATP. Micromolar concentrations of ATP induced strong changes in fluorescence polarization, possibly indicating membrane fluidization. This effect was dosage dependent, reaching a maximum at 10-microM ATP. It was dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ (or Mg2+), though it was insensitive to inhibitors of voltage-gated calcium channels. It was inhibited by thapsigargin and by ionomycin (at low extracellular Ca2+ concentration), both of which deplete Ca2+ stores. It was inhibited by the calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitors quinidine, charybdotoxin, and apamine and was reduced considerably by replacement of extracellular Na+ with K+. Hyperpolarization, or depolarization, of the mucociliary membrane induced membrane fluidization. The degree of membrane fluidization depended on the degree of hyperpolarization or depolarization of the ciliary membrane potential and was considerably lower than the effect induced by extracellular ATP. These results indicate that appreciable membrane fluidization induced by extracellular ATP depends both on an increase in intracellular Ca2+, mainly from its internal stores, and on hyperpolarization of the membrane. Calcium-dependent potassium channels couple the two effects. In light of recent results on the enhancement of ciliary beat frequency, it would appear that extracellular ATP-induced changes both in ciliary beat frequency and in membrane fluidity are triggered by similar signal transduction pathways.

  13. Tethered bimolecular lipid membranes - A novel model membrane platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, Wolfgang; Koeper, Ingo; Naumann, Renate; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2008-10-01

    stabilization of lipid bilayers, i.e., the protein-tethered membrane. Our efforts in experimentally characterizing the resulting membrane functions and correlating the data with the structural details of the bilayer architectures are complemented by theoretical studies modeling the electrical and electrochemical response of functional tethered lipid bilayer membranes by extended SPICE simulations. (author)

  14. Modelling and simulation of affinity membrane adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Cristiana; Dimartino, Simone; Sarti, Giulio C

    2007-08-24

    A mathematical model for the adsorption of biomolecules on affinity membranes is presented. The model considers convection, diffusion and adsorption kinetics on the membrane module as well as the influence of dead end volumes and lag times; an analysis of flow distribution on the whole system is also included. The parameters used in the simulations were obtained from equilibrium and dynamic experimental data measured for the adsorption of human IgG on A2P-Sartoepoxy affinity membranes. The identification of a bi-Langmuir kinetic mechanisms for the experimental system investigated was paramount for a correct process description and the simulated breakthrough curves were in good agreement with the experimental data. The proposed model provides a new insight into the phenomena involved in the adsorption on affinity membranes and it is a valuable tool to assess the use of membrane adsorbers in large scale processes.

  15. Modeling anisotropic elasticity of fluid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishnan, N; Ipsen, John H; 10.1002/mats.201100002

    2011-01-01

    The biological membrane, which compartmentalizes the cell and its organelles, exhibit wide variety of macroscopic shapes of varying morphology and topology. A systematic understanding of the relation of membrane shapes to composition, external field, environmental conditions etc. have important biological relevance. Here we review the triangulated surface model, used in the macroscopic simulation of membranes and the associated Monte Carlo (DTMC) methods. New techniques to calculate surface quantifiers, that will facilitate the study of additional in-plane orientational degrees of freedom, has been introduced. The mere presence of a polar and nematic fields in the ordered phase drives the ground state conformations of the membrane to a cylinder and tetrahedron respectively.

  16. Diffusion through thin membranes: Modeling across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Vesa; Mattila, Keijo; Kühn, Thomas; Kekäläinen, Pekka; Pulkkinen, Otto; Minussi, Roberta Brondani; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Timonen, Jussi

    2016-04-01

    From macroscopic to microscopic scales it is demonstrated that diffusion through membranes can be modeled using specific boundary conditions across them. The membranes are here considered thin in comparison to the overall size of the system. In a macroscopic scale the membrane is introduced as a transmission boundary condition, which enables an effective modeling of systems that involve multiple scales. In a mesoscopic scale, a numerical lattice-Boltzmann scheme with a partial-bounceback condition at the membrane is proposed and analyzed. It is shown that this mesoscopic approach provides a consistent approximation of the transmission boundary condition. Furthermore, analysis of the mesoscopic scheme gives rise to an expression for the permeability of a thin membrane as a function of a mesoscopic transmission parameter. In a microscopic model, the mean waiting time for a passage of a particle through the membrane is in accordance with this permeability. Numerical results computed with the mesoscopic scheme are then compared successfully with analytical solutions derived in a macroscopic scale, and the membrane model introduced here is used to simulate diffusive transport between the cell nucleus and cytoplasm through the nuclear envelope in a realistic cell model based on fluorescence microscopy data. By comparing the simulated fluorophore transport to the experimental one, we determine the permeability of the nuclear envelope of HeLa cells to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein.

  17. A Model for Membrane Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngatchou, Annita

    2010-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor of the adrenal gland which originates from chromaffin cells and is characterized by the secretion of excessive amounts of neurotransmitter which lead to high blood pressure and palpitations. Pheochromocytoma contain membrane bound granules that store neurotransmitter. The release of these stored molecules into the extracellular space occurs by fusion of the granule membrane with the cell plasma membrane, a process called exocytosis. The molecular mechanism of this membrane fusion is not well understood. It is proposed that the so called SNARE proteins [1] are the pillar of vesicle fusion as their cleavage by clostridial toxin notably, Botulinum neurotoxin and Tetanus toxin abrogate the secretion of neurotransmitter [2]. Here, I describe how physical principles are applied to a biological cell to explore the role of the vesicle SNARE protein synaptobrevin-2 in easing granule fusion. The data presented here suggest a paradigm according to which the movement of the C-terminal of synaptobrevin-2 disrupts the lipid bilayer to form a fusion pore through which molecules can exit.

  18. Effects of icodextrin peritoneal dialysis solution on the peritoneal membrane in the STZ-induced diabetic rat model with partial nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Ai; Nakao, Kazushi; Takatori, Yuji; Kojo, Syoichirou; Inoue, Junko; Akagi, Shigeru; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Wada, Jun; Makino, Hirofumi

    2010-05-01

    Application of icodextrin-based peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF) provides a potential benefit in patients with diabetes and end-stage renal failure treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) because of better ultrafiltration capacity and avoidance of direct glucose exposure. We examined the effect of glucose and icodextrin-based PDF on histological alterations of peritoneal membranes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control Wistar rats with non-treated (n = 8), streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with 5/6 kidney ablation (n = 8), STZ-induced diabetic rats with 5/6 kidney ablation injected with a standard lactate-buffered 4.25% glucose-based PDF (Dianeal; n = 8) and STZ-induced diabetic rats with 5/6 kidney ablation injected with 7.5% icodextrin-based PDF (Extraneal; n = 8). Intraperitoneal injection was performed once daily with an instillation volume of 20 ml per injection during 8 weeks. Chronic high-glucose-based PDF exposure resulted in increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) expression, accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and up-regulation of the receptor for AGE (RAGE), which were ameliorated in the icodextrin-based PDF group. The peritoneal damages, such as neoangiogenesis and submesothelial fibrosis, were significantly reduced in icodextrin-based PDF compared to high-glucose-based PDF. Long-term in vivo exposure to high glucose-based PDF promotes the fibrosing process of peritoneal membranes. Icodextrin-based PDF may be helpful in slowing the PDF-induced deterioration of peritoneal function and prolonging the use of peritoneal dialysis in patients with diabetes.

  19. Time-dependent cell membrane damage under mechanical tension: Experiments and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Bo; Chang, Jay Han-Chieh; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cancer cell membrane damage during filtration caused by cell membrane tension. The membrane tension was induced when cells were captured on a microfabricated parylene-C filter during the constant-pressure-driven filtration. This work includes both experiments and modeling to explore the underlying biomechanics of the cell membrane damage. The developed model not only agrees with our time-dependent cell damage data, but also fits well with previous results on red ...

  20. Deciphering How Pore Formation Causes Strain-Induced Membrane Lysis of Lipid Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Joshua A; Goh, Haw Zan; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Knoll, Wolfgang; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-02-01

    Pore formation by membrane-active antimicrobial peptides is a classic strategy of pathogen inactivation through disruption of membrane biochemical gradients. It remains unknown why some membrane-active peptides also inhibit enveloped viruses, which do not depend on biochemical gradients. Here, we employ a label-free biosensing approach based on simultaneous quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation and ellipsometry measurements in order to investigate how a pore-forming, virucidal peptide destabilizes lipid vesicles in a surface-based experimental configuration. A key advantage of the approach is that it enables direct kinetic measurement of the surface-bound peptide-to-lipid (P:L) ratio. Comprehensive experiments involving different bulk peptide concentrations and biologically relevant membrane compositions support a unified model that membrane lysis occurs at or above a critical P:L ratio, which is at least several-fold greater than the value corresponding to the onset of pore formation. That is consistent with peptide-induced pores causing additional membrane strain that leads to lysis of highly curved membranes. Collectively, the work presents a new model that describes how peptide-induced pores may destabilize lipid membranes through a membrane strain-related lytic process, and this knowledge has important implications for the design and application of membrane-active peptides.

  1. Membrane shape instabilities induced by BAR domain proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    Membrane curvature has developed into a forefront of membrane biophysics. Numerous proteins involved in membrane curvature sensing and membrane curvature generation have recently been discovered, including proteins containing the crescent-shaped BAR domain as membrane binding and shaping module. Accordingly, the structure determination of these proteins and their multimeric complexes is increasingly well-understood. Substantially less understood, however, are thermodynamic and kinetic aspects and the detailed mechanisms of how these proteins interact with membranes in a curvature-dependent manner. New experimental approaches need to be combined with established techniques to be able to fill in these missing details. Here we use model membrane systems in combination with a variety of biophysical techniques to characterize mechanistic aspects of BAR domain protein function. This includes a characterization of membrane curvature sensing and membrane generation. We also establish kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of BAR protein dimerization in solution, and investigate kinetic aspects of membrane binding. We present two new approaches to investigate membrane shape instabilities and demonstrate that membrane shape instabilities can be controlled by protein binding and lateral membrane tension. This work is supported through NIH grant GM-097552 and NSF grant CBET-1053857.

  2. Understanding transport in model water desalination membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Edwin

    Polyamide based thin film composites represent the the state-of-the-art nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes used in water desalination. The performance of these membranes is enabled by the ultrathin (~100 nm) crosslinked polyamide film in facilitating the selective transport of water over salt ions. While these materials have been refined over the last several decades, understanding the relationships between polyamide structure and membrane performance remains a challenge because of the complex and heterogeneous nature of the polyamide film. In this contribution, we present our approach to addressing this challenge by studying the transport properties of model polyamide membranes synthesized via molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembly. First, we demonstrate that mLbL can successfully construct polyamide membranes with well-defined nanoscale thickness and roughness using a variety of monomer formulations. Next, we present measurement tools for characterizing the network structure and transport of these model polyamide membranes. Specifically, we used X-ray and neutron scattering techniques to characterize their structure as well as a recently-developed indentation based poromechanics approach to extrapolate their water diffusion coefficient. Finally, we illustrate how these measurements can provide insight into the original problem by linking the key polyamide network properties, i.e. water-polyamide interaction parameter and characteristic network mesh size, to the membrane performance.

  3. EDTA-induced membrane fluidization and destabilization: biophysical studies on artificial lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2007-11-01

    The molecular mechanism of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-induced membrane destabilization has been studied using a combination of four biophysical techniques on artificial lipid membranes. Data from Langmuir film balance and epifluorescence microscopy revealed the fluidization and expansion effect of EDTA on phase behavior of monolayers of either 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) or mixtures of DPPC and metal-chelating lipids, such as N(alpha),N(alpha)-Bis[carboxymethyl]-N(epsilon)-[(dioctadecylamino)succinyl]-L-lysine or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-[N-(5-amino-1-carboxypentyl iminodiacetic acid) succinyl]. A plausible explanation could be drawn from the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged groups of EDTA and the positively charged choline head group of DPPC. Intercalation of EDTA into the lipid membrane induced membrane curvature as elucidated by atomic force microscopy. Growth in size and shape of the membrane protrusion was found to be time-dependent upon exposure to EDTA. Further loss of material from the lipid membrane surface was monitored in real time using a quartz crystal microbalance. This indicates membrane restabilization by exclusion of the protrusions from the surface. Loss of lipid components facilitates membrane instability, leading to membrane permeabilization and lysis.

  4. EDTA-induced Membrane Fluidization and Destabilization: Biophysical Studies on Artificial Lipid Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Virapong PRACHAYASITTIKUL; Chartchalerm ISARANKURA-NA-AYUDHYA; Tanawut TANTIMONGCOLWAT; Chanin NANTASENAMAT; Hans-Joachim GALLA

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-induced membrane destabilization has been studied using a combination of four biophysical techniques on artificial lipid membranes.Data from Langmuir film balance and epifluorescence microscopy revealed the fluidization and expansion effect of EDTA on phase behavior of monolayers of either 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) or mixtures of DPPC and metal-chelating lipids, such as Nα,Nα-Bis[carboxymethyl]-Nε-[(dioctadecylamino)succinyl]-L-lysine or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-[N-(5-amino- 1-carboxypentyl iminodiacetic acid) succinyl]. A plausible explanation could be drawn from the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged groups of EDTA and the positively charged choline head group of DPPC.Intercalation of EDTA into the lipid membrane induced membrane curvature as elucidated by atomic force microscopy. Growth in size and shape of the membrane protrusion was found to be time-dependent upon exposure to EDTA. Further loss of material from the lipid membrane surface was monitored in real time using a quartz crystal microbalance. This indicates membrane restabilization by exclusion of the protrusions from the surface. Loss of lipid components facilitates membrane instability, leading to membrane permeabilization and lysis.

  5. Effect of Sodium Ferulate on Fluidity and Morphology of Cell Membrane in Ozone Induced Lung Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of sodium ferulate (SF), an active component of Radix Angelica, on lung damage induced by ozone (O3). Methods: Mice model of lung injury was induced by ozone inhalation and treated with SF. The level of lipid peroxide and microviscosity in alveolar epithelial cell membrane of the mice was determined, and the structural change of lung cells was observed by microscopy. Results: Ozone could increase the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the microviscosity in alveolar epithelial cell membrane, and induce inflammatory changes in morphologic structure. These abnormal changes were improved after SF administration, which was manifested as alleviation of heightened microviscosity, increase of membrane fluidity, as well as the basically normalized pulmonary cellular structure under microscope. Conclusion: SF has a preventive effect against oxidized pulmonary injury induced by ozone, the action of which could be through scavenging oxygen free radicals, reducing lipid peroxide production, increasing membranous fluidity and mitigating inflammatory changes in cell structure.

  6. Formation of polyhedral vesicles and polygonal membrane tubes induced by banana-shaped proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The shape transformations of fluid membranes induced by curved protein rods are studied using meshless membrane simulations. The rod assembly at low rod density induces a flat membrane tube and oblate vesicle. It is found that the polyhedral shapes are stabilized at high rod densities. The discrete shape transition between triangular and buckled discoidal tubes is obtained and their curvature energies are analyzed by a simple geometric model. For vesicles, triangular hosohedron and elliptic-disk shapes are formed in equilibrium, whereas tetrahedral and triangular prism shapes are obtained as metastable states.

  7. Modeling of ion conductivity in Nafion membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhen; PENG Xiaofeng; WANG Buxuan; LEE Duujong; DUAN Yuanyuan

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to describe the ion transport behavior in a Nafion Membrane of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC).By analyzing the surface energy configuration of the ionic clusters in a Nafion membrane,an equivalent field intensity,Ee,was introduced to facilitate the analysis of surface resistance against ion conduction in the central region of clusters.An expression was derived for ionic conductivity incorporating the influence of surface resistance.A face-centered cubic (FCC)lattice model for a spatial cluster distribution was used to modify the effect of water content on ionic conductivity in the polymeric matrix,i.e.,the regions between clusters.Compared with the available empirical correlations,the new expression showed much better agreement with the available experimental results,which indicates the rationality to consider the structural influence on ion conduction in water-swollen Nation membranes.

  8. Simulation Model of Membrane Gas Separator Using Aspen Custom Modeler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dong-keun [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Gahui; Yun, Jinwon; Yu, Sangseok [Chungnam Nat’l Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Membranes are used to separate pure gas from gas mixtures. In this study, three different types of mass transport through a membrane were developed in order to investigate the gas separation capabilities of a membrane. The three different models typically used are a lumped model, a multi-cell model, and a discretization model. Despite the multi-cell model producing similar results to a discretization model, the discretization model was selected for this investigation, due to the cell number dependence of a multi-cell model. The mass transport model was then used to investigate the effects of pressure difference, flow rate, total exposed area, and permeability. The results showed that the pressure difference increased with the stage cut, but the selectivity was a trade-off for the increasing pressure difference. Additionally, even though permeability is an important parameter, the selectivity and stage cut of the membrane converged as permeability increased.

  9. Triangle-hinge models for unoriented membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sugishita, Sotaro; Umeda, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    Triangle-hinge models [M. Fukuma, S. Sugishita, and N. Umeda, J. High Energy Phys. 1507, 088 (2015)] are introduced to describe worldvolume dynamics of membranes. The Feynman diagrams consist of triangles glued together along hinges and can be restricted to tetrahedral decompositions in a large-N limit. In this paper, after clarifying that all the tetrahedra resulting in the original models are orientable, we define a version of triangle-hinge models that can describe the dynamics of unoriented membranes. By regarding each triangle as representing a propagation of an open membrane of disk topology, we introduce a local worldvolume parity transformation which inverts the orientation of a triangle, and define unoriented triangle-hinge models by gauging the transformation. Unlike two-dimensional cases, this local transformation generally relates a manifold to a nonmanifold, but still is a well-defined manipulation among tetrahedral decompositions. We further show that matter fields can be introduced in the same way as in the original oriented models. In particular, the models will describe unoriented membranes in a target spacetime by taking matter fields to be the target space coordinates.

  10. Structure and mechanism of peptide-induced membrane pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shuo

    This thesis reports the studies of the structure and mechanism of peptide-induced membrane pores by antimicrobial peptide alamethicin and by a peptide named Baxalpha5, which is derived from Bax protein. Alamethicin is one of best known antimicrobial peptides, which are ubiquitous throughout the biological world. Bax-alpha5 peptide is the pore-forming domain of apoptosis regulator protein Bax, which activates pore formation on outer mitochondrial membrane to release cytochrome c to initiate programmed cell death. Both peptides as well as many other pore-forming peptides, induce pores in membrane, however the structure and mechanism of the pore formation were unknown. By utilizing grazing angle x-ray diffraction, I was able to reconstruct the electron density profile of the membrane pores induced by both peptides. The fully hydrated multiple bilayers of peptide-lipid mixture on solid substrate were prepared in the condition that pores were present, as established previously by neutron in-plane scattering and oriented circular dichroism. At dehydrated conditions, the inter bilayer distance of the sample shortened and the interactions between bilayers caused the membrane pores to become long-ranged correlated and formed a periodically ordered lattice of rhombohedral symmetry, so that x-ray diffraction can be applied. To help solving the phase problem of diffraction, a brominated lipid was used and multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction was performed below the bromine K-edge. The reconstructed electron density profiles unambiguously revealed that the alamethicin-induced membrane pore is of barrel-stave type, while the Bax-alpha5 induced pore is of lipidic toroidal (wormhole) type. The underlying mechanism of pore formation was resolved by observing the time-dependent process of pore formation in vesicles exposed to Bax-alpha5 solutions, as well as the membrane thinning experiment. This demonstrated that Bax-alpha5 exhibited the same sigmoidal concentration dependence as

  11. A Membrane Model from Implicit Elasticity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, A. D.; Liao, J.; Einstein, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    A Fungean solid is derived for membranous materials as a body defined by isotropic response functions whose mathematical structure is that of a Hookean solid where the elastic constants are replaced by functions of state derived from an implicit, thermodynamic, internal-energy function. The theory utilizes Biot’s (1939) definitions for stress and strain that, in 1-dimension, are the stress/strain measures adopted by Fung (1967) when he postulated what is now known as Fung’s law. Our Fungean membrane model is parameterized against a biaxial data set acquired from a porcine pleural membrane subjected to three, sequential, proportional, planar extensions. These data support an isotropic/deviatoric split in the stress and strain-rate hypothesized by our theory. These data also demonstrate that the material response is highly non-linear but, otherwise, mechanically isotropic. These data are described reasonably well by our otherwise simple, four-parameter, material model. PMID:24282079

  12. Interaction of Mastoparan with Model Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloot, Justin

    2010-10-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents began during the 20th century to reduce the effects of infectious diseases. Since the 1990s, antimicrobial resistance has become an ever-increasing global problem. Our laboratory recently found that small antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have potent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms including antibiotic resistant organisms. These AMPs are potential therapeutic agents against the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance. AMPs are small peptides produced by plants, insects and animals. Several hypotheses concede that these peptides cause some type of structural perturbations and increased membrane permeability in bacteria however, how AMPs kill bacteria remains unclear. The goal of this study was to design an assay that would allow us to evaluate and monitor the pore forming ability of an AMP, Mastoparan, on model membrane structures called liposomes. Development of this model will facilitate the study of how mastoparan and related AMPs interact with the bacterial membrane.

  13. Interaction of Artepillin C with model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazin, Wallance Moreira; Olivier, Danilo da Silva; Vilanova, Neus; Ramos, Ana Paula; Voets, Ilja Karina; Soares, Ademilson Espencer Egea; Ito, Amando Siuiti

    2017-05-01

    Green propolis, a mixture of beeswax and resinous compounds processed by Apis mellifera, displays several pharmacological properties. Artepillin C, the major compound in green propolis, consists of two prenylated groups bound to a phenyl group. Several studies have focused on the therapeutic effects of Artepillin C, but there is no evidence that it interacts with amphiphilic aggregates to mimic cell membranes. We have experimentally and computationally examined the interaction between Artepillin C and model membranes composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) because phosphatidylcholine (PC) is one of the most abundant phospholipids in eukaryotic cell membranes. PC is located in both outer and inner leaflets and has been used as a simplified membrane model and a non-specific target to study the action of amphiphilic molecules with therapeutic effects. Experimental results indicated that Artepillin C adsorbed onto the DMPC monolayers. Its presence in the lipid suspension pointed to an increased tendency toward unilamellar vesicles and to decreased bilayer thickness. Artepillin C caused point defects in the lipid structure, which eliminated the ripple phase and the pre-transition in thermotropic chain melting. According to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, (1) Artepillin C aggregated in the aqueous phase before it entered the bilayer; (2) Artepillin C was oriented along the direction normal to the surface; (3) the negatively charged group on Artepillin C was accommodated in the polar region of the membrane; and (4) thinner regions emerged around the Artepillin C molecules. These results help an understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological action of propolis.

  14. Separation of components in lipid membranes induced by shape transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góźdź, W. T.; Bobrovska, N.; Ciach, A.

    2012-07-01

    Vesicles composed of a two component membrane with each component characterized by different spontaneous curvature are investigated by minimization of the free energy consisting of Helfrich elastic energy and entropy of mixing. The results show that mixing and demixing of membrane components can be induced by elongating a vesicle or changing its volume, if one of the components forms a complex with macromolecules on the outer monolayer. The influence of elastic coefficients on the separation of components is also examined.

  15. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) attenuates myocardial inflammation and mitochondrial injury induced by venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) in a healthy piglet model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Juanhong; Yu, Wenkui; Chen, Qiyi; Shi, Jialiang; Hu, Yimin; Zhang, Juanjuan; Gao, Tao; Xi, Fengchan; He, Changsheng; Gong, Jianfeng; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the myocardial inflammation and mitochondrial function during venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) and further evaluated the effects of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on them. Eighteen piglets were assigned to the control group, ECMO group, and ECMO+CRRT group. Myocardial inflammation was assessed by the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), myocardial concentrations, and mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6; mitochondrial function was assessed by activities of mitochondrial complexes I-V. VV ECMO elicited a general activation of serum and myocardial inflammation and significantly decreased the activities of mitochondrial complexes I and IV. After being combined with CRRT, serum and myocardial concentrations of IL-1β and IL-6, myocardial mRNA expression of IL-6, and the activity of MPO were decreased significantly; the activities of mitochondrial complexes were increased. We conclude that myocardial inflammation was activated during ECMO therapy, inducing mitochondrial injury; moreover, CRRT reduced myocardial inflammation and partially ameliorated mitochondrial function.

  16. Model-building codes for membrane proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley, David Noyes; Hunt, Thomas W.; Brown, W. Michael; Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Slepoy, Alexander; Sale, Kenneth L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Young, Malin M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Gray, Genetha Anne (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach to modeling the transmembrane spanning helical bundles of integral membrane proteins using only a sparse set of distance constraints, such as those derived from MS3-D, dipolar-EPR and FRET experiments. Algorithms have been written for searching the conformational space of membrane protein folds matching the set of distance constraints, which provides initial structures for local conformational searches. Local conformation search is achieved by optimizing these candidates against a custom penalty function that incorporates both measures derived from statistical analysis of solved membrane protein structures and distance constraints obtained from experiments. This results in refined helical bundles to which the interhelical loops and amino acid side-chains are added. Using a set of only 27 distance constraints extracted from the literature, our methods successfully recover the structure of dark-adapted rhodopsin to within 3.2 {angstrom} of the crystal structure.

  17. Modelling Of Manufacturing Processes With Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciunean, Daniel Cristian; Crăciunean, Vasile

    2015-07-01

    The current objectives to increase the standards of quality and efficiency in manufacturing processes can be achieved only through the best combination of inputs, independent of spatial distance between them. This paper proposes modelling production processes based on membrane structures introduced in [4]. Inspired from biochemistry, membrane computation [4] is based on the concept of membrane represented in its formalism by the mathematical concept of multiset. The manufacturing process is the evolution of a super cell system from its initial state according to the given actions of aggregation. In this paper we consider that the atomic production unit of the process is the action. The actions and the resources on which the actions are produced, are distributed in a virtual network of companies working together. The destination of the output resources is specified by corresponding output events.

  18. Cholesterol transport in model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sumit; Porcar, Lionel; Butler, Paul; Perez-Salas, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    Physiological processes distribute cholesterol unevenly within the cell. The levels of cholesterol are maintained by intracellular transport and a disruption in the cell's ability to keep these normal levels will lead to disease. Exchange rates of cholesterol are generally studied in model systems using labeled lipid vesicles. Initially donor vesicles have all the cholesterol and acceptor vesicles are devoid of it. They are mixed and after some time the vesicles are separated and cholesterol is traced in each vesicle. The studies performed up to date have significant scatter indicating that the methodologies are not consistent. The present work shows in-situ Time-Resolved SANS studies of cholesterol exchange rates in unsaturated PC lipid vesicles. Molecular dynamics simulations were done to investigate the energetic and kinetic behavior of cholesterol in this system. This synergistic approach will provide insight into our efforts to understand cholesterol traffic.

  19. Self-Segregation of Myelin Membrane Lipids in Model Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yurlova, Larisa; Kahya, Nicoletta; Aggarwal, Shweta; Kaiser, Hermann-Josef; Chiantia, Salvatore; Bakhti, Mostafa; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Ben-David, Oshrit; Futerman, Anthony H.; Bruegger, Britta; Simons, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin sheaths, which are multilamellar, lipid-rich membranes produced by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. To act as an insulator, myelin has to form a stable and firm membrane structure. In this study, we have analyzed t

  20. Membrane invagination induced by Shiga toxin B-subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezeshkian, W.; Hansen, Allan Grønhøj; Johannes, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial Shiga toxin is composed of an enzymatically active A-subunit, and a receptor-binding homopentameric B-subunit (STxB) that mediates intracellular toxin trafficking. Upon STxB-mediated binding to the glycolipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) at the plasma membrane of target cells, Shiga...... toxin is internalized by clathrin-dependent and independent endocytosis. The formation of tubular membrane invaginations is an essential step in the clathrin-independent STxB uptake process. However, the mechanism by which STxB induces these invaginations has remained unclear. Using a combination of all...... toxin molecules then creates a tubular membrane invagination that drives toxin entry into the cell. This mechanism requires: (1) a precise molecular architecture of the STxB binding sites; (2) a fluid bilayer in order for the tubular invagination to form. Although, STxB binding to the membrane requires...

  1. The model of stress distribution in polymer electrolyte membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Atrazhev, Vadim V; Dmitriev, Dmitry V; Erikhman, Nikolay S; Sultanov, Vadim I; Patterson, Timothy; Burlatsky, Sergei F

    2014-01-01

    An analytical model of mechanical stress in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of a hydrogen/air fuel cell with porous Water Transfer Plates (WTP) is developed in this work. The model considers a mechanical stress in the membrane is a result of the cell load cycling under constant oxygen utilization. The load cycling causes the cycling of the inlet gas flow rate, which results in the membrane hydration/dehydration close to the gas inlet. Hydration/dehydration of the membrane leads to membrane swelling/shrinking, which causes mechanical stress in the constrained membrane. Mechanical stress results in through-plane crack formation. Thereby, the mechanical stress in the membrane causes mechanical failure of the membrane, limiting fuel cell lifetime. The model predicts the stress in the membrane as a function of the cell geometry, membrane material properties and operation conditions. The model was applied for stress calculation in GORE-SELECT.

  2. Adhesion-induced phase behavior of two-component membranes and vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhiparkouhi, Tahereh; Weikl, Thomas R; Discher, Dennis E; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2013-01-22

    The interplay of adhesion and phase separation is studied theoretically for two-component membranes that can phase separate into two fluid phases such as liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. Many adhesion geometries provide two different environments for these membranes and then partition the membranes into two segments that differ in their composition. Examples are provided by adhering vesicles, by hole- or pore-spanning membranes, and by membranes supported by chemically patterned surfaces. Generalizing a lattice model for binary mixtures to these adhesion geometries, we show that the phase behavior of the adhering membranes depends, apart from composition and temperature, on two additional parameters, the area fraction of one membrane segment and the affinity contrast between the two segments. For the generic case of non-vanishing affinity contrast, the adhering membranes undergo two distinct phase transitions and the phase diagrams in the composition/temperature plane have a generic topology that consists of two two-phase coexistence regions separated by an intermediate one-phase region. As a consequence, phase separation and domain formation is predicted to occur separately in each of the two membrane segments but not in both segments simultaneously. Furthermore, adhesion is also predicted to suppress the phase separation process for certain regions of the phase diagrams. These generic features of the adhesion-induced phase behavior are accessible to experiment.

  3. Decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyama, Hiroyuki; Kono, Nozomu; Matsuda, Shinji; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-16

    Various kinds of fatty acids are distributed in membrane phospholipids in mammalian cells and tissues. The degree of fatty acid unsaturation in membrane phospholipids affects many membrane-associated functions and can be influenced by diet and by altered activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes such as fatty acid desaturases. However, little is known about how mammalian cells respond to changes in phospholipid fatty acid composition. In this study we showed that stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) knockdown increased the amount of saturated fatty acids and decreased that of monounsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids without affecting the amount or the composition of free fatty acid and induced unfolded protein response (UPR), evidenced by increased expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) mRNAs and splicing of Xbox-binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA. SCD1 knockdown-induced UPR was rescued by various unsaturated fatty acids and was enhanced by saturated fatty acid. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3), which incorporates preferentially polyunsaturated fatty acids into phosphatidylcholine, was up-regulated in SCD1 knockdown cells. Knockdown of LPCAT3 synergistically enhanced UPR with SCD1 knockdown. Finally we showed that palmitic acid-induced UPR was significantly enhanced by LPCAT3 knockdown as well as SCD1 knockdown. These results suggest that a decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces UPR.

  4. Dissipative Particle Dynamics of tension-induced membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies of tension-induced membrane fusion using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations are briefly reviewed. The stochastic nature of the fusion process makes it necessary to simulate a large number of fusion attempts in order to obtain reliable fusion statistics and to extract...

  5. Membrane Compartmentalization Reducing the Mobility of Lipids and Proteins within a Model Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Reddy, Tyler; Fowler, Philip W; Duncan, Anna L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-01

    The cytoskeleton underlying cell membranes may influence the dynamic organization of proteins and lipids within the bilayer by immobilizing certain transmembrane (TM) proteins and forming corrals within the membrane. Here, we present coarse-grained resolution simulations of a biologically realistic membrane model of asymmetrically organized lipids and TM proteins. We determine the effects of a model of cytoskeletal immobilization of selected membrane proteins using long time scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing compartments with varying degrees of restraints within the membrane models, we are able to reveal how compartmentalization caused by cytoskeletal immobilization leads to reduced and anomalous diffusional mobility of both proteins and lipids. This in turn results in a reduced rate of protein dimerization within the membrane and of hopping of membrane proteins between compartments. These simulations provide a molecular realization of hierarchical models often invoked to explain single-molecule imaging studies of membrane proteins.

  6. Stability of Model Membranes in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namani, Trishool; Deamer, David W.

    2008-08-01

    The first forms of cellular life required a source of amphiphilic compounds capable of assembling into stable boundary structures. Membranes composed of fatty acids have been proposed as model systems of primitive membranes, but their bilayer structure is stable only within a narrow pH range and low ionic strength. They are particularly sensitive to aggregating effects of divalent cations (Mg+2, Ca+2, Fe+2) that would be present in Archaean sea water. Here we report that mixtures of alkyl amines and fatty acids form vesicles at strongly basic and acidic pH ranges which are resistant to the effects of divalent cations up to 0.1 M. Vesicles formed by mixtures of decylamine and decanoic acid (1:1 mole ratio) are relatively permeable to pyranine, a fluorescent anionic dye, but permeability could be reduced by adding 2 mol% of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon such as pyrene. Permeability to the dye was also reduced by increasing the chain length of the amphiphiles. For instance, 1:1 mole ratio mixtures of dodecylamine and dodecanoic acid were able to retain pyranine dye during and following gel filtration. We conclude that primitive cell membranes were likely to be composed of mixtures of amphiphilic and hydrophobic molecules that manifested increased stability over pure fatty acid membranes.

  7. Numerical simulation of bubble induced shear in membrane bioreactors: effects of mixed liquor rheology and membrane configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuefei; Wang, Yuan; Waite, T David; Leslie, Greg

    2015-05-15

    A CFD model, incorporating an empirically determined rheology model and a porous media model, was developed to simulate bubble induced surface shear in membrane bioreactors configured with hollow fibre membranes with outer diameters ranging from 1.3 to 2.4 mm, arranged in vertically orientated modules with packing density from 200 to 560 m(2)/m(3). The rheology model was developed for mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentrations of 3 to 16 gL(-1) in the presence and absence of coagulant (generated by addition of a ferrous salt) for shear rates ranging from 0 to 500 s(-1). Experimentally determined particle relaxation times for the biological flocs in the mixed liquor, both in the absence and presence of iron, were negligible, consistent with an environment where positive buoyancy forces were greater than negative settling forces thereby allowing the sludge mixture to be modelled as a single continuous phase. The non-Newtonian behaviour of the mixed liquor was incorporated into the CFD simulations using an Ostwald-de Waele rheology model. Interactions between mixed liquor and hollow fibre membranes of different fibre size and packing density were described using a porous media model that was calibrated by empirical measurement of inertial loss coefficients over a range of viscosities (0.8 × 10(-3) to 2.1 × 10(-3) Pa.s) and velocities (0 to 0.35 m/s) typically encountered in full scale MBRs. Experimental results indicated that addition of iron salts resulted in an increase in MLSS and sludge viscosity. Shear stress is affected by both velocity and viscosity. The increase in sludge viscosity resulted in an increase in resistance to flow through the hollow fibre membrane bundles and, as a result, decreased the liquid flow velocities. CFD simulations provided insight on the effects of point of coagulant addition and MLSS concentration on bubble-induced shear over a range of industrially relevant conditions. A 12% increase in shear stress was observed when

  8. Single particle fluorescence burst analysis of epsin induced membrane fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Arielle; Shoup, Daniel; Kustigian, Lauren; Puchalla, Jason; Carr, Chavela M; Rye, Hays S

    2015-01-01

    Vital cellular processes, from cell growth to synaptic transmission, rely on membrane-bounded carriers and vesicles to transport molecular cargo to and from specific intracellular compartments throughout the cell. Compartment-specific proteins are required for the final step, membrane fission, which releases the transport carrier from the intracellular compartment. The role of fission proteins, especially at intracellular locations and in non-neuronal cells, while informed by the dynamin-1 paradigm, remains to be resolved. In this study, we introduce a highly sensitive approach for the identification and analysis of membrane fission machinery, called burst analysis spectroscopy (BAS). BAS is a single particle, free-solution approach, well suited for quantitative measurements of membrane dynamics. Here, we use BAS to analyze membrane fission induced by the potent, fission-active ENTH domain of epsin. Using this method, we obtained temperature-dependent, time-resolved measurements of liposome size and concentration changes, even at sub-micromolar concentration of the epsin ENTH domain. We also uncovered, at 37°C, fission activity for the full-length epsin protein, supporting the argument that the membrane-fission activity observed with the ENTH domain represents a native function of the full-length epsin protein.

  9. Lipid membrane-mediated attraction between curvature inducing objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wel, Casper; Vahid, Afshin; Šarić, Anđela; Idema, Timon; Heinrich, Doris; Kraft, Daniela J.

    2016-09-01

    The interplay of membrane proteins is vital for many biological processes, such as cellular transport, cell division, and signal transduction between nerve cells. Theoretical considerations have led to the idea that the membrane itself mediates protein self-organization in these processes through minimization of membrane curvature energy. Here, we present a combined experimental and numerical study in which we quantify these interactions directly for the first time. In our experimental model system we control the deformation of a lipid membrane by adhering colloidal particles. Using confocal microscopy, we establish that these membrane deformations cause an attractive interaction force leading to reversible binding. The attraction extends over 2.5 times the particle diameter and has a strength of three times the thermal energy (‑3.3 kBT). Coarse-grained Monte-Carlo simulations of the system are in excellent agreement with the experimental results and prove that the measured interaction is independent of length scale. Our combined experimental and numerical results reveal membrane curvature as a common physical origin for interactions between any membrane-deforming objects, from nanometre-sized proteins to micrometre-sized particles.

  10. Detection of electroporation-induced membrane permeabilization states in the brain using diffusion-weighted MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Hansen, Rasmus H; Agerholm-Larsen, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue permeabilization by electroporation (EP) is a promising technique to treat certain cancers. Non-invasive methods for verification of induced permeabilization are important, especially in deep-seated cancers. In this study we evaluated diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging...... (DW-MRI) as a quantitative method for detecting EP-induced membrane permeabilization of brain tissue using a rat brain model. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty-four anesthetized Sprague-Dawley male rats were electroporated in the right hemisphere, using different voltage levels to induce no permeabilization......-induced permeabilization of brain tissue and to some extent of differentiating NP, TMP and PMP using appropriate scan timing....

  11. Comparison of the oxime-induced reactivation of rhesus monkey, swine and guinea pig erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase following inhibition by sarin or paraoxon, using a perfusion model for the real-time determination of membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkert, Nadja M; Lallement, Guy; Clarençon, Didier; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz

    2009-04-28

    Recently, a dynamically working in vitro model with real-time determination of membrane-bound human acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was shown to be a versatile model to investigate oxime-induced reactivation kinetics of organophosphate- (OP) inhibited enzyme. In this assay, AChE was immobilized on particle filters which were perfused with acetylthiocholine, Ellman's reagent and phosphate buffer. Subsequently, AChE activity was continuously analyzed in a flow-through detector. Now, it was an intriguing question whether this model could be used with erythrocyte AChE from other species in order to investigate kinetic interactions in the absence of annoying side reactions. Rhesus monkey, swine and guinea pig erythrocytes were a stable and highly reproducible enzyme source. Then, the model was applied to the reactivation of sarin- and paraoxon-inhibited AChE by obidoxime or HI 6 and it could be shown that the derived reactivation rate constants were in good agreement to previous results obtained from experiments with a static model. Hence, this dynamic model offers the possibility to investigate highly reproducible interactions between AChE, OP and oximes with human and animal AChE.

  12. Analysis on nonlinear wind-induced dynamic response of membrane roofs with aerodynamic effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qing-xiang; SUN Bing-nan

    2008-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of membrane structures and the air influence factors, this paper presen-ted a method to simulate the air aerodynamic force effects including the added air mass, the acoustic radiation damping and the pneumatic stiffness. The infinite air was modeled using the acoustic fluid element of commer-cial FE software and the finite element membrane roof models were coupled with fluid models. A comparison be-tween the results obtained by IrE computation and those obtained by the vibration experiment for a cable-mem-brane verified the validity of the method. Furthermore, applying the method to a flat membrane roof structure and using its wind tunnel test results, the analysis of nonlinear wind-induced dynamic responses for such geo-metrically nonlinear roofs, including the roof-air coupled model was performed. The result shows that the air has large influence on vibrating membrane roofs according to results of comparing the nodal time-history displace-ments, accelerations and stress of the two different cases. Meantime, numerical studies show that the method developed can successfully solve the nonlinear wind-induced dynamic response of the membrane roof with aero-dynamic effects.

  13. [Properties of the chorioamnios zone inducing premature membranes rupture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraz Cruz, M C Noemí; Beltrán Montoya, Jorge; Bustos López, Hugo; Flores Pliego, Arturo; Espejel, Aurora; Buendía Díaz, Gerardo; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2003-11-01

    Premature membrane rupture (PMR) is one of the most serious public health problems in the world, ocurring in 10% of all pregnancies. PMR has important adverse effects on maternofetal morbidity-mortality, as it has been estimated that it accounts on the whole for 70% and 40% of neonatal morbidity and mortality, respectively. PMR treatment is empirical, as its aetiology is unknown and its physiopathogenic description has just been initiated. This work analyzes the possibility of documenting functional differences in human chorio-amnios, comparing the zone where rupture most frequently occurs in PMR with some other distant chorio-amnionic zones and with equivalent zones of fetal membranes obtained from nine month pregnancies which have not undergone labor. The membrane zone which was nearest to the cervical os was identified and marked to be analyzed later for extracellular matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity, histology and topographical MMP distribution. The MMP expression was quantitatively determined in explant culture media from membrane fragments using specific immuno-enzymatic essays (ELISA) and zymography. In addition, immuno-histochemistry methods were used to reveal MMP expression in the different tissues. This methods allowed us to show the existence of a decreasing MMP activity gradient, with the greatest value corresponding to the zone nearest to the cervical os in the membranes obtained from PMR cases. In membranes obtained from cesarean operations no characteristic pattern was documented and values were always lower than those obtained for PMR tissues. We conclude that there is a chorio-amnionic zone in which connective tissue degradation is specifically induced and which coincides with the membrane zone in contact with the cervical os.

  14. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  15. A general model for membrane-based separation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soni, Vipasha; Abildskov, Jens; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil;

    2009-01-01

    behaviour will play an important role. In this paper, modelling of membrane-based processes for separation of gas and liquid mixtures are considered. Two general models, one for membrane-based liquid separation processes (with phase change) and another for membrane-based gas separation are presented...

  16. Interaction of tea tree oil with model and cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Cristiano; Molinari, Agnese; Toccacieli, Laura; Calcabrini, Annarica; Stringaro, Annarita; Chistolini, Pietro; Arancia, Giuseppe; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2006-07-27

    Tea tree oil (TTO) is the essential oil steam-distilled from Melaleuca alternifolia, a species of northern New South Wales, Australia. It exhibits a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and an antifungal activity. Only recently has TTO been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of multidrug resistant (MDR) human melanoma cells. It has been suggested that the effect of TTO on tumor cells could be mediated by its interaction with the plasma membrane, most likely by inducing a reorganization of lipid architecture. In this paper we report biophysical and structural results obtained using simplified planar model membranes (Langmuir films) mimicking lipid "rafts". We also used flow cytometry analysis (FCA) and freeze-fracturing transmission electron microscopy to investigate the effects of TTO on actual MDR melanoma cell membranes. Thermodynamic (compression isotherms and adsorption kinetics) and structural (Brewster angle microscopy) investigation of the lipid monolayers clearly indicates that TTO interacts preferentially with the less ordered DPPC "sea" and that it does not alter the more ordered lipid "rafts". Structural observations, performed by freeze fracturing, confirm that TTO interacts with the MDR melanoma cell plasma membrane. Moreover, experiments performed by FCA demonstrate that TTO does not interfere with the function of the MDR drug transporter P-gp. We therefore propose that the effect exerted on MDR melanoma cells is mediated by the interaction with the fluid DPPC phase, rather than with the more organized "rafts" and that this interaction preferentially influences the ATP-independent antiapoptotic activity of P-gp likely localized outside "rafts".

  17. Correlation-induced DNA adsorption on like-charged membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Blossey, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    The adsorption of DNA or other polyelectrolyte molecules on charged membranes is a recurrent motif in soft matter and bionanotechnological systems. Two typical situations encountered are the deposition of single DNA chains onto substrates for further analysis, e.g., by force microscopy, or the pulling of polyelectrolytes into membrane nanopores, as in sequencing applications. In this paper, we present a theoretical analysis of such scenarios based on the self-consistent field theory approach, which allows us to address the important effect of charge correlations. We calculate the grand potential of a stiff polyelectrolyte immersed in an electrolyte in contact with a negatively charged dielectric membrane. For the sake of conciseness, we neglect conformational polymer fluctuations and model the molecule as a rigid charged line. At strongly charged membranes, the adsorbed counterions enhance the screening ability of the interfacial region. In the presence of highly charged polymers such as double-stranded DNA molecules close to the membrane, this enhanced interfacial screening dominates the mean-field level DNA-membrane repulsion and results in the adsorption of the DNA molecule to the surface. This picture provides a simple explanation for the recently observed DNA binding onto similarly charged substrates [G. L.-Caballero et al., Soft Matter 10, 2805 (2014), 10.1039/c3sm52428k] and points out charge correlations as a non-negligible ingredient of polymer-surface interactions.

  18. Modeling of membrane processes for air revitalization and water recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Foerg, Sandra L.; Dall-Bauman, Liese A.

    1992-01-01

    Gas-separation and reverse-osmosis membrane models are being developed in conjunction with membrane testing at NASA JSC. The completed gas-separation membrane model extracts effective component permeabilities from multicomponent test data, and predicts the effects of flow configuration, operating conditions, and membrane dimensions on module performance. Variable feed- and permeate-side pressures are considered. The model has been applied to test data for hollow-fiber membrane modules with simulated cabin-air feeds. Results are presented for a membrane designed for air drying applications. Extracted permeabilities are used to predict the effect of operating conditions on water enrichment in the permeate. A first-order reverse-osmosis model has been applied to test data for spiral wound membrane modules with a simulated hygiene water feed. The model estimates an effective local component rejection coefficient under pseudosteady-state conditions. Results are used to define requirements for a detailed reverse-osmosis model.

  19. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces membrane fluidity, inhibits cholesterol domain formation, and normalizes bilayer width in atherosclerotic-like model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol crystalline domains characterize atherosclerotic membranes, altering vascular signaling and function. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce membrane lipid peroxidation and subsequent cholesterol domain formation. We evaluated non-peroxidation-mediated effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), other TG-lowering agents, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and other long-chain fatty acids on membrane fluidity, bilayer width, and cholesterol domain formation in model membranes. In membranes prepared at 1.5:1 cholesterol-to-phospholipid (C/P) mole ratio (creating pre-existing domains), EPA, glycyrrhizin, arachidonic acid, and alpha linolenic acid promoted the greatest reductions in cholesterol domains (by 65.5%, 54.9%, 46.8%, and 45.2%, respectively) compared to controls; other treatments had modest effects. EPA effects on cholesterol domain formation were dose-dependent. In membranes with 1:1 C/P (predisposing domain formation), DHA, but not EPA, dose-dependently increased membrane fluidity. DHA also induced cholesterol domain formation without affecting temperature-induced changes in-bilayer unit cell periodicity relative to controls (d-space; 57Å-55Å over 15-30°C). Together, these data suggest simultaneous formation of distinct cholesterol-rich ordered domains and cholesterol-poor disordered domains in the presence of DHA. By contrast, EPA had no effect on cholesterol domain formation and produced larger d-space values relative to controls (60Å-57Å; pmembrane bilayer width, membrane fluidity, and cholesterol crystalline domain formation; suggesting omega-3 fatty acids with differing chain length or unsaturation may differentially influence membrane lipid dynamics and structural organization as a result of distinct phospholipid/sterol interactions.

  20. Hyposmotic membrane stretch potentiated muscarinic receptor agonist-induced depolarization of membrane potential in guinea-pig gastric myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Li; Nan-Ge Jin; Lin Piao; Ming-Yu Hong; Zheng-Yuan Jin; Ying Li; Wen-Xie Xu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship betweenhyposmotic membrane stretch and muscarinic receptoragonist-induced depolarization of membrane potentialin antral gastric circular myocytes of guinea-pig.METHODS: Using whole cell patch-clamp techniquerecorded membrane potential and current in singlegastric myocytes isolated by collagena se.RESULTS: Hyposmotic membrane stretch hyperpolarizedmembrane potential from -60.0mV±1.0mV to -67.9mV±1.0mV. TEA (10mmol/L), a nonselective potassiumchannel blocker significantly inhibited hyposmoticmembrane stretch-induced hyperpolarization. After KCIin the pipette and NaCI in the external solution werereplaced by CsCI to block the potassium current,hyposmotic membrane stretch depolarized the membranepotential from -60.0 mV±-1.0mV to -44.8 mV±2.3mV(P<0.05), and atropine (1 pmol/L) inhibited thedepolarization of the membrane potential. Muscarinicreceptor agonist Carbachol depolarized membranepotential from -60.0mV±1.0mV to -50.3 mV±0.3mV(P<0.05) and hyposmotic membrane stretchpotentiated the depolarization. Carbachol inducedmuscarinic current (Icch) was greatly increased byhyposmotic membrane stretch.CONCLUSION: Hyposmotic membrane stretchpotentiated muscarinic receptor agonist-induceddepolarization of membrane potential, which is relatedto hyposmotic membrane stretch-induced increase ofmuscarinic current.

  1. Coarctation induces alterations in basement membranes in the cardiovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipke, D W; McCarthy, K J; Elton, T S

    1993-01-01

    A coarctation hypertensive rat model was used to examine the effects of elevated blood pressure on basement membrane component synthesis by cardiac myocytes and aorta using immunohistochemistry and Northern blot analysis. Carotid arterial pressure increased immediately on coarctation, and left ve...

  2. Computer simulation of cytoskeleton-induced blebbing in lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangler, E. J.; Harvey, C. W.; Revalee, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Blebs are balloon-shaped membrane protrusions that form during many physiological processes. Using computer simulation of a particle-based model for self-assembled lipid bilayers coupled to an elastic meshwork, we investigated the phase behavior and kinetics of blebbing. We found that blebs form...

  3. Structural Basis for Host Membrane Remodeling Induced by Protein 2B of Hepatitis A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives-Adrián, Laia; Garriga, Damià; Buxaderas, Mònica; Fraga, Joana; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The complexity of viral RNA synthesis and the numerous participating factors require a mechanism to topologically coordinate and concentrate these multiple viral and cellular components, ensuring a concerted function. Similarly to all other positive-strand RNA viruses, picornaviruses induce rearrangements of host intracellular membranes to create structures that act as functional scaffolds for genome replication. The membrane-targeting proteins 2B and 2C, their precursor 2BC, and protein 3A appear to be primarily involved in membrane remodeling. Little is known about the structure of these proteins and the mechanisms by which they induce massive membrane remodeling. Here we report the crystal structure of the soluble region of hepatitis A virus (HAV) protein 2B, consisting of two domains: a C-terminal helical bundle preceded by an N-terminally curved five-stranded antiparallel β-sheet that displays striking structural similarity to the β-barrel domain of enteroviral 2A proteins. Moreover, the helicoidal arrangement of the protein molecules in the crystal provides a model for 2B-induced host membrane remodeling during HAV infection. IMPORTANCE No structural information is currently available for the 2B protein of any picornavirus despite it being involved in a critical process in viral factory formation: the rearrangement of host intracellular membranes. Here we present the structure of the soluble domain of the 2B protein of hepatitis A virus (HAV). Its arrangement, both in crystals and in solution under physiological conditions, can help to understand its function and sheds some light on the membrane rearrangement process, a putative target of future antiviral drugs. Moreover, this first structure of a picornaviral 2B protein also unveils a closer evolutionary relationship between the hepatovirus and enterovirus genera within the Picornaviridae family. PMID:25589659

  4. Structural elucidation of the interaction between neurodegenerative disease-related tau protein with model lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emmalee M.

    A protein's sequence of amino acids determines how it folds. That folded structure is linked to protein function, and misfolding to dysfunction. Protein misfolding and aggregation into beta-sheet rich fibrillar aggregates is connected with over 20 neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized in part by misfolding, aggregation and deposition of the microtubule associated tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). However, two questions remain: What is tau's fibrillization mechanism, and what is tau's cytotoxicity mechanism? Tau is prone to heterogeneous interactions, including with lipid membranes. Lipids have been found in NFTs, anionic lipid vesicles induced aggregation of the microtubule binding domain of tau, and other protein aggregates induced ion permeability in cells. This evidence prompted our investigation of tau's interaction with model lipid membranes to elucidate the structural perturbations those interactions induced in tau protein and in the membrane. We show that although tau is highly charged and soluble, it is highly surface active and preferentially interacts with anionic membranes. To resolve molecular-scale structural details of tau and model membranes, we utilized X-ray and neutron scattering techniques. X-ray reflectivity indicated tau aggregated at air/water and anionic lipid membrane interfaces and penetrated into membranes. More significantly, membrane interfaces induced tau protein to partially adopt a more compact conformation with density similar to folded protein and ordered structure characteristic of beta-sheet formation. This suggests possible membrane-based mechanisms of tau aggregation. Membrane morphological changes were seen using fluorescence microscopy, and X-ray scattering techniques showed tau completely disrupts anionic membranes, suggesting an aggregate-based cytotoxicity mechanism. Further investigation of protein constructs and a "hyperphosphorylation" disease mimic helped

  5. Atomic force microscopy of model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandat, Sandrine; Azouzi, Slim; Beauvais, Estelle; Mastouri, Amira; El Kirat, Karim

    2013-02-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are biomimetic model systems that are now widely used to address the biophysical and biochemical properties of biological membranes. Two main methods are usually employed to form SLBs: the transfer of two successive monolayers by Langmuir-Blodgett or Langmuir-Schaefer techniques, and the fusion of preformed lipid vesicles. The transfer of lipid films on flat solid substrates offers the possibility to apply a wide range of surface analytical techniques that are very sensitive. Among them, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened new opportunities for determining the nanoscale organization of SLBs under physiological conditions. In this review, we first focus on the different protocols generally employed to prepare SLBs. Then, we describe AFM studies on the nanoscale lateral organization and mechanical properties of SLBs. Lastly, we survey recent developments in the AFM monitoring of bilayer alteration, remodeling, or digestion, by incubation with exogenous agents such as drugs, proteins, peptides, and nanoparticles.

  6. Numerical simulation of endocytosis: Viscous flow driven by membranes with non-uniformly distributed curvature-inducing molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowengrub, John; Allard, Jun; Aland, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    The formation of membrane vesicles from a larger membrane that occurs during endocytosis and other cell processes is typically orchestrated by curvature-inducing molecules attached to the membrane. Recent reports demonstrate that vesicles can form de novo in a few milliseconds. Membrane dynamics at these scales are strongly influenced by hydrodynamic interactions. To study this problem, we develop new diffuse interface models for the dynamics of inextensible vesicles in a viscous fluid with stiff, curvature-inducing molecules. The model couples the Navier-Stokes equations with membrane-induced bending forces that incorporate concentration-dependent bending stiffness coefficients and spontaneous curvatures, with equations for molecule transport and for a Lagrange multiplier to enforce local inextensibility. Two forms of surface transport equations are considered: Fickian surface diffusion and Cahn-Hilliard surface dynamics, with the former being more appropriate for small molecules and the latter being better for large molecules. The system is solved using adaptive finite element methods in 3D axisymmetric geometries. The results demonstrate that hydrodynamics can indeed enable the rapid formation of a small vesicle attached to the membrane by a narrow neck. When the Fickian model is used, this is a transient state with the steady state being a flat membrane with a uniformly distributed molecule concentration due to diffusion. When the Cahn-Hilliard model is used, molecule concentration gradients are sustained, the neck stabilizes and the system evolves to a steady-state with a small, compact vesicle attached to the membrane. By varying the membrane coverage of molecules in the Cahn-Hilliard model, we find that there is a critical (smallest) neck radius and a critical (fastest) budding time. These critical points are associated with changes in the vesicle morphology from spherical to mushroom-like as the molecule coverage on the membrane is increased.

  7. Relating rejection of trace organic contaminants to membrane properties in forward osmosis: measurements, modelling and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming; Nghiem, Long D; Price, William E; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-02-01

    This study elucidates the relationship between membrane properties and the rejection of trace organic contaminants (TrOCs) in forward osmosis (FO). An asymmetric cellulose triacetate (CTA) and a thin-film composite (TFC) polyamide FO membrane were used for this investigation. The effective average pore radius (rp), selective barrier thickness over porosity parameter (l/ε), surface charge, support layer structural parameter (S), pure water permeability coefficient (A) and salt (NaCl) permeability coefficient (B) of the two membranes were systematically characterised. Results show that measured rejection of TrOCs as a function of permeate water flux can be well described by the pore hindrance transport model. This observation represents the first successful application of this model, which was developed for pressure-driven nanofiltration, to an osmotically-driven membrane process. The rejection of charged TrOCs by the CTA and TFC membranes was high and was governed by both electrostatic repulsion and steric hindrance. The TFC membrane exhibited higher rejection of neutral TrOCs with low molecular weight than the CTA membrane, although the estimated pore size of the TFC membrane (0.42 nm) was slightly larger than that of the CTA membrane (0.37 nm). This higher rejection of neutral TrOCs by the TFC membrane is likely attributed to its active layer properties, namely a more effective active layer structure, as indicated by a larger l/ε parameter, and pore hydration induced by the negative surface charge.

  8. Modelling Meso-Scale Diffusion Processes in Stochastic Fluid Bio-Membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Rafii-Tabar, H

    1999-01-01

    The space-time dynamics of rigid inhomogeneities (inclusions) free to move in a randomly fluctuating fluid bio-membrane is derived and numerically simulated as a function of the membrane shape changes. Both vertically placed (embedded) inclusions and horizontally placed (surface) inclusions are considered. The energetics of the membrane, as a two-dimensional (2D) meso-scale continuum sheet, is described by the Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian, with the membrane height function treated as a stochastic process. The diffusion parameter of this process acts as the link coupling the membrane shape fluctuations to the kinematics of the inclusions. The latter is described via Ito stochastic differential equation. In addition to stochastic forces, the inclusions also experience membrane-induced deterministic forces. Our aim is to simulate the diffusion-driven aggregation of inclusions and show how the external inclusions arrive at the sites of the embedded inclusions. The model has potential use in such emerging fields as...

  9. Non-metabolic membrane tubulation and permeability induced by bioactive peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonin Lamazière

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Basic cell-penetrating peptides are potential vectors for therapeutic molecules and display antimicrobial activity. The peptide-membrane contact is the first step of the sequential processes leading to peptide internalization and cell activity. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in peptide-membrane interaction are not well understood and are frequently controversial. Herein, we compared the membrane activities of six basic peptides with different size, charge density and amphipaticity: Two cell-penetrating peptides (penetratin and R9, three amphipathic peptides and the neuromodulator substance P. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Experiments of X ray diffraction, video-microscopy of giant vesicles, fluorescence spectroscopy, turbidimetry and calcein leakage from large vesicles are reported. Permeability and toxicity experiments were performed on cultured cells. The peptides showed differences in bilayer thickness perturbations, vesicles aggregation and local bending properties which form lipidic tubular structures. These structures invade the vesicle lumen in the absence of exogenous energy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that the degree of membrane permeabilization with amphipathic peptides is dependent on both peptide size and hydrophobic nature of the residues. We propose a model for peptide-induced membrane perturbations that explains the differences in peptide membrane activities and suggests the existence of a facilitated "physical endocytosis," which represents a new pathway for peptide cellular internalization.

  10. Advanced Wastewater Treatment Engineering—Investigating Membrane Fouling in both Rotational and Static Membrane Bioreactor Systems Using Empirical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced wastewater treatment using membranes are popular environmental system processes since they allow reuse and recycling. However, fouling is a key limiting factor and so proprietary systems such as Avanti’s RPU-185 Flexidisks membrane bioreactor (MBR use novel rotating membranes to assist in ameliorating it. In earlier research, this rotating process was studied by creating a simulation model based on first principles and traditional fouling mechanisms. In order to directly compare the potential benefits of this rotational system, this follow-up study was carried out using Avanti’s newly developed static (non-rotating Flexidisks MBR system. The results from operating the static pilot unit were simulated and modelled using the rotational fouling model developed earlier however with rotational switching functions turned off and rotational parameters set to a static mode. The study concluded that a rotating MBR system could increase flux throughput when compared against a similar static system. It is thought that although the slowly rotating spindle induces a weak crossflow shear, it is still able to even out cake build up across the membrane surface, thus reducing the likelihood of localised critical flux being exceeded at the micro level and lessening the potential of rapid trans-membrane pressure increases at the macro level.

  11. Advanced Wastewater Treatment Engineering-Investigating Membrane Fouling in both Rotational and Static Membrane Bioreactor Systems Using Empirical Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Parneet; Jones, Franck Anderson

    2016-01-05

    Advanced wastewater treatment using membranes are popular environmental system processes since they allow reuse and recycling. However, fouling is a key limiting factor and so proprietary systems such as Avanti's RPU-185 Flexidisks membrane bioreactor (MBR) use novel rotating membranes to assist in ameliorating it. In earlier research, this rotating process was studied by creating a simulation model based on first principles and traditional fouling mechanisms. In order to directly compare the potential benefits of this rotational system, this follow-up study was carried out using Avanti's newly developed static (non-rotating) Flexidisks MBR system. The results from operating the static pilot unit were simulated and modelled using the rotational fouling model developed earlier however with rotational switching functions turned off and rotational parameters set to a static mode. The study concluded that a rotating MBR system could increase flux throughput when compared against a similar static system. It is thought that although the slowly rotating spindle induces a weak crossflow shear, it is still able to even out cake build up across the membrane surface, thus reducing the likelihood of localised critical flux being exceeded at the micro level and lessening the potential of rapid trans-membrane pressure increases at the macro level.

  12. Rigid proteins and softening of biological membranes—with application to HIV-induced cell membrane softening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Himani; Zelisko, Matthew; Liu, Liping; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-05-01

    A key step in the HIV-infection process is the fusion of the virion membrane with the target cell membrane and the concomitant transfer of the viral RNA. Experimental evidence suggests that the fusion is preceded by considerable elastic softening of the cell membranes due to the insertion of fusion peptide in the membrane. What are the mechanisms underpinning the elastic softening of the membrane upon peptide insertion? A broader question may be posed: insertion of rigid proteins in soft membranes ought to stiffen the membranes not soften them. However, experimental observations perplexingly appear to show that rigid proteins may either soften or harden membranes even though conventional wisdom only suggests stiffening. In this work, we argue that regarding proteins as merely non-specific rigid inclusions is flawed, and each protein has a unique mechanical signature dictated by its specific interfacial coupling to the surrounding membrane. Predicated on this hypothesis, we have carried out atomistic simulations to investigate peptide-membrane interactions. Together with a continuum model, we reconcile contrasting experimental data in the literature including the case of HIV-fusion peptide induced softening. We conclude that the structural rearrangements of the lipids around the inclusions cause the softening or stiffening of the biological membranes.

  13. Modeling of interactions between nanoparticles and cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Young-Min

    Rapid development of nanotechnology and ability to manufacture materials and devices with nanometer feature size leads to exciting innovations in many areas including the medical and electronic fields. However, the possible health and environmental impacts of manufactured nanomaterials are not fully known. Recent experimental reports suggest that some of the manufactured nanomaterials, such as fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, are highly toxic even in small concentrations. The goal of the current work is to understand the mechanisms responsible for the toxicity of nanomaterials. In the current study coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the interactions between NPs and cellular membranes at a molecular level. One of the possible toxicity mechanisms of the nanomaterials is membrane disruption. Possibility of membrane disruption exposed to the manufactured nanomaterials are examined by considering chemical reactions and non-reactive physical interactions as chemical as well as physical mechanisms. Mechanisms of transport of carbon-based nanoparticles (fullerene and its derivative) across a phospholipid bilayer are investigated. The free energy profile is obtained using constrained simulations. It is shown that the considered nanoparticles are hydrophobic and therefore they tend to reside in the interior of the lipid bilayer. In addition, the dynamics of the membrane fluctuations is significantly affected by the nanoparticles at the bilayer-water interface. The hydrophobic interaction between the particles and membrane core induces the strong coupling between the nanoparticle motion and membrane deformation. It is observed that the considered nanoparticles affect several physical properties of the membrane. The nanoparticles embedded into the membrane interior lead to the membrane softening, which becomes more significant with increase in CNT length and concentration. The lateral pressure profile and membrane energy in the membrane

  14. Early stages of salmon calcitonin aggregation: effect induced by ageing and oxidation processes in water and in the presence of model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiano, Maria Cristina; Colone, Marisa; Bombelli, Cecilia; Chistolini, Pietro; Valvo, Luisa; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2005-06-30

    The natural ageing- and hydrogen peroxide-induced aggregation of salmon calcitonin were studied in water and in the presence of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes. The early stages of the aggregation process at low protein concentration were investigated by means of Circular Dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and conventional and immunogold labelling Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). In buffered water solution, salmon calcitonin showed a two-stage conformational variation related to fibril formation and phase-separation of larger aggregates. A first stage, characterised by small conformational changes but a decrease in dichroic band intensity, was followed by a second stage, 6 days after, leading to higher conformational variations and aggregations. Salmon calcitonin showed a distinct modification in the secondary structure and aggregate morphology in the presence of hydrogen peroxide with respect to natural ageing, indicating that the two aggregation processes (natural and chemical-induced) followed a distinct mechanism. The oxidised forms of the peptide were separated by liquid chromatography. The same study was performed in the presence of DPPC liposomes. The results obtained by conventional and immunogold labelling TEM evidenced that salmon calcitonin in buffered water solution essentially does not enter the liposomes but forms around them a fibril network characterised by the same conformational changes after 6 days. The oxidised sample in the presence of liposomes showed a "fibrils hank", separated from liposomes. The presence of liposomes did not affect either the aggregation or the conformational modifications yet observed by TEM and CD in water solution.

  15. Modeling the pharmacodynamics of passive membrane permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Robert V.; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2011-11-01

    Small molecule permeability through cellular membranes is critical to a better understanding of pharmacodynamics and the drug discovery endeavor. Such permeability may be estimated as a function of the free energy change of barrier crossing by invoking the barrier domain model, which posits that permeation is limited by passage through a single "barrier domain" and assumes diffusivity differences among compounds of similar structure are negligible. Inspired by the work of Rezai and co-workers (JACS 128:14073-14080, 2006), we estimate this free energy change as the difference in implicit solvation free energies in chloroform and water, but extend their model to include solute conformational affects. Using a set of eleven structurally diverse FDA approved compounds and a set of thirteen congeneric molecules, we show that the solvation free energies are dominated by the global minima, which allows solute conformational distributions to be effectively neglected. For the set of tested compounds, the best correlation with experiment is obtained when the implicit chloroform global minimum is used to evaluate the solvation free energy difference.

  16. A bilayer-couple model of bacterial outer membrane vesicle biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, Jeffrey W; Whiteley, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria naturally produce outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that arise through bulging and pinching off of the outer membrane. OMVs have several biological functions for bacteria, most notably as trafficking vehicles for toxins, antimicrobials, and signaling molecules. While their biological roles are now appreciated, the mechanism of OMV formation has not been fully elucidated. We recently demonstrated that the signaling molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS) is required for OMV biogenesis in P. aeruginosa. We hypothesized that PQS stimulates OMV formation through direct interaction with the outer leaflet of the outer membrane. To test this hypothesis, we employed a red blood cell (RBC) model that has been used extensively to study small-molecule-membrane interactions. Our results revealed that addition of PQS to RBCs induced membrane curvature, resulting in the formation of membrane spicules (spikes), consistent with small molecules that are inserted stably into the outer leaflet of the membrane. Radiotracer experiments demonstrated that sufficient PQS was inserted into the membrane to account for this curvature and that curvature induction was specific to PQS structure. These data suggest that a low rate of interleaflet flip-flop forces PQS to accumulate in and expand the outer leaflet relative to the inner leaflet, thus inducing membrane curvature. In support of PQS-mediated outer leaflet expansion, the PQS effect was antagonized by chlorpromazine, a molecule known to be preferentially inserted into the inner leaflet. Based on these data, we propose a bilayer-couple model to describe P. aeruginosa OMV biogenesis and suggest that this is a general mechanism for bacterial OMV formation. Despite the ubiquity and importance of outer membrane vesicle (OMV) production in Gram-negative bacteria, the molecular details of OMV biogenesis are not fully understood. Early experiments showed that 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS) induces OMV formation

  17. Lipid-packing perturbation of model membranes by pH-responsive antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvares, Dayane S; Viegas, Taisa Giordano; Ruggiero Neto, João

    2017-08-29

    The indiscriminate use of conventional antibiotics is leading to an increase in the number of resistant bacterial strains, motivating the search for new compounds to overcome this challenging problem. Antimicrobial peptides, acting only in the lipid phase of membranes without requiring specific membrane receptors as do conventional antibiotics, have shown great potential as possible substituents of these drugs. These peptides are in general rich in basic and hydrophobic residues forming an amphipathic structure when in contact with membranes. The outer leaflet of the prokaryotic cell membrane is rich in anionic lipids, while the surface of the eukaryotic cell is zwitterionic. Due to their positive net charge, many of these peptides are selective to the prokaryotic membrane. Notwithstanding this preference for anionic membranes, some of them can also act on neutral ones, hampering their therapeutic use. In addition to the electrostatic interaction driving peptide adsorption by the membrane, the ability of the peptide to perturb lipid packing is of paramount importance in their capacity to induce cell lysis, which is strongly dependent on electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. In the present research, we revised the adsorption of antimicrobial peptides by model membranes as well as the perturbation that they induce in lipid packing. In particular, we focused on some peptides that have simultaneously acidic and basic residues. The net charges of these peptides are modulated by pH changes and the lipid composition of model membranes. We discuss the experimental approaches used to explore these aspects of lipid membranes using lipid vesicles and lipid monolayer as model membranes.

  18. 3D wind-induced response analysis of a cable-membrane structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-jie LUO; Da-jian HAN

    2009-01-01

    Wind loading is a dominant factor for design of a cable-membrane structure. Three orthogonal turbulent components, including the longitudinal, lateral and vertical wind velocities, should be taken into account for the wind loads. In this study, a stochastic 3D coupling wind field model is derived by the spectral representation theory, The coherence functions of the three orthognnal turbulent components are considered in this model. Then the model is applied to generate the three correlated wind turbulent components. After that, formulae are proposed to transform the velocities into wind loads, and to introduce the modified wind pressure force. Finally, a wind-induced time-history response analysis is conducted for a 3D cable-membrane structure. Analytical results indicate that responses induced by the proposed wind load model are 10%--25% larger than those by the con-ventionai uncorrelated model, and that the responses are not quite influenced by the modified wind pressure force. Therefore, we concluded that, in the time-history response analysis, the coherences of the three orthogonal turbulent components are necessary for a 3D cable-membrane structure, but the modified wind pressure force can be ignored.

  19. Characterization of an estrogen-induced oviduct membrane glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poola, I.; Lucas, J.J.

    1986-05-01

    During estrogen-induced chick oviduct differentiation a number of N-linked membrane glycoproteins are induced as judged by GDP-(/sup 14/C)Man labeling of endogenous acceptors, /sup 125/I-con A labeling as well as coomassie blue and PAS staining of SDS polyacrylamide gels. The authors have begun to characterize one of these glycoproteins having an M/sub r/ of 91 KDa. The protein has been purified via preparative SDS-PAGE and electroelution. The purified protein migrates as a single band on analytical SDS-PAGE and comigrates with an endogenous membrane glycoprotein labeled with GDP-(/sup 14/C)Man. Amino acid analysis indicates a high proportion of GLU and ASP residues (110 and 66 moles respectively). N-terminal sequence analysis by gas phase instrumentation yielded the following: X-X-VAL-ASP-VAL-ASP-ALA-THR-VAL-GLU-GLU-ASP-GLU. The protein contains about 2% neutral sugar including 6 mol Man, 2 mol Gal, 1 mol Fuc, 4 mol GlcNAc, 1 mol GalNAc and 1 mol sialic acid per mole of protein. The presence of the GalNAc residue suggests the protein contains an O-linked oligosaccharide moiety in addition to the N-linked chain(s). The detailed structure of the carbohydrate moieties is currently under investigation.

  20. Shear-Induced Membrane Fusion in Viscous Solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Kogan, Maxim

    2014-05-06

    Large unilamellar lipid vesicles do not normally fuse under fluid shear stress. They might deform and open pores to relax the tension to which they are exposed, but membrane fusion occurring solely due to shear stress has not yet been reported. We present evidence that shear forces in a viscous solution can induce lipid bilayer fusion. The fusion of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine (DOPC) liposomes is observed in Couette flow with shear rates above 3000 s-1 provided that the medium is viscous enough. Liposome samples, prepared at different viscosities using a 0-50 wt % range of sucrose concentration, were studied by dynamic light scattering, lipid fusion assays using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and linear dichroism (LD) spectroscopy. Liposomes in solutions with 40 wt % (or more) sucrose showed lipid fusion under shear forces. These results support the hypothesis that under suitable conditions lipid membranes may fuse in response to mechanical-force- induced stress. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  1. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  2. Ice Formation in Model Biological Membranes in the Presence of Cryoprotectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, M A; Kisselev, A M; Ollivon, M

    2000-01-01

    Ice formation in model biological membranes is studied by SAXS and WAXS in the presence of cryoprotectors: dimethyl sulfoxide and glycerol. Three types of phospholipid membranes: DPPC, DMPC, DSPC are chosen for the investigation as well-studied model biological membranes. A special cryostat is used for sample cooling from 14.1C to -55.4C. The ice formation is only detected by WAXS in binary phospholipid/water and ternary phospholipid/cryoprotector/water systems in the condition of excess solvent. Ice formation in a binary phospholipid/water system creates an abrupt decrease of the membrane repeat distance by delta-d, so-called ice-induced dehydration of intermembrane space. The value of delta-d decreases as the cryoprotector concentration increases. The formation of ice does not influence the membrane structure (delta-d = 0) for cryoprotector mole fractions higher than 0.05.

  3. Outer membrane VDAC1 controls permeability transition of the inner mitochondrial membrane in cellulo during stress-induced apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flora Tomasello; Angela Messina; Lydia Lartigue; Laura Schembri; Chantal Medina; Simona Reina; Didier Thorava; Marc Crouzet; Francois Ichas; Vito De Pinto; Francesca De Giorgi

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC)l is the main channel of the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) and it has been proposed to be part of the permeability transition pore (PTP), a putative multiprotein complex candidate agent of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Working at the single live cell level, we found that over-expression of VDAC1 triggers MPT at the mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM). Conversely, silencing VDAC1 ex-pression results in the inhibition of MPT caused by selenite-induced oxidative stress. This MOM-M1M crosstalk was modulated by Cyclosporin A and mitochondrial Cyclophilin D, but not by Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, indicative of PTP opera-tion. VDAC1-dependent MPT engages a positive feedback loop involving reactive oxygen species and p38-MAPK, and secondarily triggers a canonical apoptotic response including Bax activation, cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation. Our data thus support a model of the PTP complex involving VDAC1 at the MOM, and indicate that VDAC1-dependent MPT is an upstream mechanism playing a causal role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis.

  4. Inducing morphological changes in lipid bilayer membranes with microfabricated substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangjie; Collins, Liam F.; Ashkar, Rana; Heberle, Frederick A.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Collier, C. Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Lateral organization of lipids and proteins into distinct domains and anchoring to a cytoskeleton are two important strategies employed by biological membranes to carry out many cellular functions. However, these interactions are difficult to emulate with model systems. Here we use the physical architecture of substrates consisting of arrays of micropillars to systematically control the behavior of supported lipid bilayers - an important step in engineering model lipid membrane systems with well-defined functionalities. Competition between attractive interactions of supported lipid bilayers with the underlying substrate versus the energy cost associated with membrane bending at pillar edges can be systematically investigated as functions of pillar height and pitch, chemical functionalization of the microstructured substrate, and the type of unilamellar vesicles used for assembling the supported bilayer. Confocal fluorescent imaging and AFM measurements highlight correlations that exist between topological and mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and lateral lipid mobility in these confined environments. This study provides a baseline for future investigations into lipid domain reorganization on structured solid surfaces and scaffolds for cell growth.

  5. Ca2+-induced phase separation in the membrane of palmitate-containing liposomes and its possible relation to membrane permeabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonov, Alexey V; Gritsenko, Elena N; Shlyapnikova, Elena A; Kharakoz, Dmitry P; Belosludtseva, Natalia V; Lezhnev, Enrik I; Saris, Nils-Erik L; Mironova, Galina D

    2007-01-01

    A Ca(2+)-induced phase separation of palmitic acid (PA) in the membrane of azolectin unilamellar liposomes has been demonstrated with the fluorescent membrane probe nonyl acridine orange (NAO). It has been shown that NAO, whose fluorescence in liposomal membranes is quenched in a concentration-dependent way, can be used to monitor changes in the volume of lipid phase. The incorporation of PA into NAO-labeled liposomes increased fluorescence corresponding to the expansion of membrane. After subsequent addition of Ca(2+), fluorescence decreased, which indicated separation of PA/Ca(2+) complexes into distinct membrane domains. The Ca(2+)-induced phase separation of PA was further studied in relation to membrane permeabilization caused by Ca(2+) in the PA-containing liposomes. A supposition was made that the mechanism of PA/Ca(2+)-induced membrane permeabilization relates to the initial stage of Ca(2+)-induced phase separation of PA and can be considered as formation of fast-tightening lipid pores due to chemotropic phase transition in the lipid bilayer.

  6. Capsid protein VP4 of human rhinovirus induces membrane permeability by the formation of a size-selective multimeric pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Panjwani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-enveloped viruses must deliver their viral genome across a cell membrane without the advantage of membrane fusion. The mechanisms used to achieve this remain poorly understood. Human rhinovirus, a frequent cause of the common cold, is a non-enveloped virus of the picornavirus family, which includes other significant pathogens such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus. During picornavirus cell entry, the small myristoylated capsid protein VP4 is released from the virus, interacts with the cell membrane and is implicated in the delivery of the viral RNA genome into the cytoplasm to initiate replication. In this study, we have produced recombinant C-terminal histidine-tagged human rhinovirus VP4 and shown it can induce membrane permeability in liposome model membranes. Dextran size-exclusion studies, chemical crosslinking and electron microscopy demonstrated that VP4 forms a multimeric membrane pore, with a channel size consistent with transfer of the single-stranded RNA genome. The membrane permeability induced by recombinant VP4 was influenced by pH and was comparable to permeability induced by infectious virions. These findings present a molecular mechanism for the involvement of VP4 in cell entry and provide a model system which will facilitate exploration of VP4 as a novel antiviral target for the picornavirus family.

  7. The efficacy of trivalent cyclic hexapeptides to induce lipid clustering in PG/PE membranes correlates with their antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Sebastian; Kerth, Andreas; Dathe, Margitta; Blume, Alfred

    2015-11-01

    Various models have been proposed for the sequence of events occurring after binding of specific antimicrobial peptides to lipid membranes. The lipid clustering model arose by the finding that antimicrobial peptides can induce a segregation of certain negatively charged lipids in lipid model membranes. Anionic lipid segregation by cationic peptides is initially an effect of charge interaction where the ratio of peptide and lipid charges is thought to be the decisive parameter in the peptide induced lipid demixing. However, the sequence of events following this initial lipid clustering is more complex and can lead to deactivation of membrane proteins involved in cell division or perturbation of lipid reorganization essential for cell division. In this study we used DSC and ITC techniques to investigate the effect of binding different cyclic hexapeptides with varying antimicrobial efficacy, to phosphatidylglycerol (PG)/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipid membranes and their ability to induce lipid segregation in these mixtures. We found that these cyclic hexapeptides consisting of three charged and three aromatic amino acids showed indeed different abilities to induce lipid demixing depending on their amino acid composition and their sequence. The results clearly showed that the cationic amino acids are essential for electrostatic binding but that the three hydrophobic amino acids in the peptides and their position in the sequence also contribute to binding affinity and to the extent of induction of lipid clustering. The efficacy of these different hexapeptides to induce PG clusters in PG/PE membranes was found to be correlated with their antimicrobial activity.

  8. Membranous nephropathy: from models to man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Laurence H.; Salant, David J.

    2014-01-01

    As recently as 2002, most cases of primary membranous nephropathy (MN), a relatively common cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults, were considered idiopathic. We now recognize that MN is an organ-specific autoimmune disease in which circulating autoantibodies bind to an intrinsic antigen on glomerular podocytes and form deposits of immune complexes in situ in the glomerular capillary walls. Here we define the clinical and pathological features of MN and describe the experimental models that enabled the discovery of the major target antigen, the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R). We review the pathophysiology of experimental MN and compare and contrast it with the human disease. We discuss the diagnostic value of serological testing for anti-PLA2R and tissue staining for the redistributed antigen, and their utility for differentiating between primary and secondary MN, and between recurrent MN after kidney transplant and de novo MN. We end with consideration of how knowledge of the antigen might direct future therapeutic strategies. PMID:24892704

  9. Modelling Ser129 phosphorylation inhibits membrane binding of pore-forming alpha-synuclein oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Sebastian Nübling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In several neurodegenerative diseases, hyperphosphorylation at position Ser129 is found in fibrillar deposits of alpha-synuclein (asyn, implying a pathophysiological role of asyn phosphorylation in neurodegeneration. However, recent animal models applying asyn phosphorylation mimics demonstrated a protective effect of phosphorylation. Since metal-ion induced asyn oligomers were identified as a potential neurotoxic aggregate species with membrane pore-forming abilities, the current study was undertaken to determine effects of asyn phosphorylation on oligomer membrane binding. METHODS: We investigated the influence of S129 phosphorylation on interactions of metal-ion induced asyn oligomers with small unilamellar lipid vesicles (SUV composed of POPC and DPPC applying the phosphorylation mimic asyn129E. Confocal single-particle fluorescence techniques were used to monitor membrane binding at the single-particle level. RESULTS: Binding of asyn129E monomers to gel-state membranes (DPPC-SUV is slightly reduced compared to wild-type asyn, while no interactions with membranes in the liquid-crystalline state (POPC-SUV are seen for both asyn and asyn129E. Conversely, metal-ion induced oligomer formation is markedly increased in asyn129E. Surprisingly, membrane binding to POPC-SUV is nearly absent in Fe(3+ induced asyn129E oligomers and markedly reduced in Al(3+ induced oligomers. CONCLUSION: The protective effect of pseudophosphorylation seen in animal models may be due to impeded oligomer membrane binding. Phosphorylation at Ser129 may thus have a protective effect against neurotoxic asyn oligomers by preventing oligomer membrane binding and disruption of the cellular electrophysiological equilibrium. Importantly, these findings put a new complexion on experimental pharmaceutical interventions against POLO-2 kinase.

  10. Evaluation of membrane models and their composition for islet amyloid polypeptide-membrane aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillon, Lucie; Lequin, Olivier; Khemtémourian, Lucie

    2013-09-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) forms amyloid fibrils in the pancreatic islets of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The formation of IAPP fibrils has been shown to cause membrane damage which most likely is responsible for the death of pancreatic islet β-cells during the pathogenesis of T2DM. Several studies have demonstrated a clear interaction between IAPP and lipid membranes. However the effect of different lipid compositions and of various membrane mimetics (including micelles, bicelles, SUV and LUV) on fibril formation kinetics and fibril morphology has not yet systematically been analysed. Here we report that the interaction of IAPP with various membrane models promoted different processes of fibril formation. Our data reveal that in SDS and DPC micelles, IAPP adopts a stable α-helical structure for several days, suggesting that the micelle models may stabilize monomeric or small oligomeric species of IAPP. In contrast, zwitterionic DMPC/DHPC bicelles and DOPC SUV accelerate the fibril formation compared to zwitterionic DOPC LUV, indicating that the size of the membrane model and its curvature influence the fibrillation process. Negatively charged membranes decrease the lag-time of the fibril formation kinetics while phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol have an opposite effect, probably due to the modulation of the physical properties of the membrane and/or due to direct interactions with IAPP within the membrane core. Finally, our results show that the modulation of lipid composition influences not only the growth of fibrils at the membrane surface but also the interactions of β-sheet oligomers with membranes.

  11. Spatiotemporal Organization of Spin-Coated Supported Model Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    All cells of living organisms are separated from their surroundings and organized internally by means of flexible lipid membranes. In fact, there is consensus that the minimal requirements for self-replicating life processes include the following three features: (1) information carriers (DNA, RNA), (2) a metabolic system, and (3) encapsulation in a container structure [1]. Therefore, encapsulation can be regarded as an essential part of life itself. In nature, membranes are highly diverse interfacial structures that compartmentalize cells [2]. While prokaryotic cells only have an outer plasma membrane and a less-well-developed internal membrane structure, eukaryotic cells have a number of internal membranes associated with the organelles and the nucleus. Many of these membrane structures, including the plasma membrane, are complex layered systems, but with the basic structure of a lipid bilayer. Biomembranes contain hundreds of different lipid species in addition to embedded or peripherally associated membrane proteins and connections to scaffolds such as the cytoskeleton. In vitro, lipid bilayers are spontaneously self-organized structures formed by a large group of amphiphilic lipid molecules in aqueous suspensions. Bilayer formation is driven by the entropic properties of the hydrogen bond network in water in combination with the amphiphilic nature of the lipids. The molecular shapes of the lipid constituents play a crucial role in bilayer formation, and only lipids with approximately cylindrical shapes are able to form extended bilayers. The bilayer structure of biomembranes was discovered by Gorter and Grendel in 1925 [3] using monolayer studies of lipid extracts from red blood cells. Later, a number of conceptual models were developed to rationalize the organization of lipids and proteins in biological membranes. One of the most celebrated is the fluid-mosaic model by Singer and Nicolson (1972) [4]. According to this model, the lipid bilayer component of

  12. Mechanism of membrane fusion induced by vesicular stomatitis virus G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Irene S; Jenni, Simon; Stanifer, Megan L; Roth, Eatai; Whelan, Sean P J; van Oijen, Antoine M; Harrison, Stephen C

    2017-01-03

    The glycoproteins (G proteins) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and related rhabdoviruses (e.g., rabies virus) mediate both cell attachment and membrane fusion. The reversibility of their fusogenic conformational transitions differentiates them from many other low-pH-induced viral fusion proteins. We report single-virion fusion experiments, using methods developed in previous publications to probe fusion of influenza and West Nile viruses. We show that a three-stage model fits VSV single-particle fusion kinetics: (i) reversible, pH-dependent, G-protein conformational change from the known prefusion conformation to an extended, monomeric intermediate; (ii) reversible trimerization and clustering of the G-protein fusion loops, leading to an extended intermediate that inserts the fusion loops into the target-cell membrane; and (iii) folding back of a cluster of extended trimers into their postfusion conformations, bringing together the viral and cellular membranes. From simulations of the kinetic data, we conclude that the critical number of G-protein trimers required to overcome membrane resistance is 3 to 5, within a contact zone between the virus and the target membrane of 30 to 50 trimers. This sequence of conformational events is similar to those shown to describe fusion by influenza virus hemagglutinin (a "class I" fusogen) and West Nile virus envelope protein ("class II"). Our study of VSV now extends this description to "class III" viral fusion proteins, showing that reversibility of the low-pH-induced transition and architectural differences in the fusion proteins themselves do not change the basic mechanism by which they catalyze membrane fusion.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus produces membrane-derived vesicles that induce host cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamata Gurung

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacteria produce outer membrane vesicles that play a role in the delivery of virulence factors to host cells. However, little is known about the membrane-derived vesicles (MVs produced by gram-positive bacteria. The present study examined the production of MVs from Staphylococcus aureus and investigated the delivery of MVs to host cells and subsequent cytotoxicity. Four S. aureus strains tested, two type strains and two clinical isolates, produced spherical nanovesicles during in vitro culture. MVs were also produced during in vivo infection of a clinical S. aureus isolate in a mouse pneumonia model. Proteomic analysis showed that 143 different proteins were identified in the S. aureus-derived MVs. S. aureus MVs were interacted with the plasma membrane of host cells via a cholesterol-rich membrane microdomain and then delivered their component protein A to host cells within 30 min. Intact S. aureus MVs induced apoptosis of HEp-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas lysed MVs neither delivered their component into the cytosol of host cells nor induced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, this study is the first report that S. aureus MVs are an important vehicle for delivery of bacterial effector molecules to host cells.

  14. Morphology transition of raft-model membrane induced by osmotic pressure: Formation of double-layered vesicle similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onai, Teruaki; Hirai, Mitsuhiro

    2010-10-01

    The effect of osmotic pressure on the structure of large uni-lamellar vesicle (LUV) of the lipid mixtures of monosialoganglioside (GM1)-cholesterol-dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) was studies by using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) method. The molar ratios of the mixtures were 0.1/0.1/1, 0/0.1/1, and 0/0/1. The ternary lipid mixture is a model of lipid rafts. The value of osmotic pressure was varied from 0 to 4.16×105 N/m2 by adding the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in the range from 0 to 25 % w/v. In the case of the mixtures without GM1, the rise of the osmotic pressure just enhances the multi-lamellar stacking with deceasing the inter-lamellar spacing. On the other hand, the mixture containing GM1 shows the structural transition from a uni-lamellar vesicle to a double-layered vesicle (a liposome including a smaller one inside) by the rise of osmotic pressure. In this morphology transition the total surface area of the double-layered vesicle is mostly as same as that of the LUV at the initial state. The polar head region of GM1 is bulky and highly hydrophilic due to the oligosaccharide chain containing a sialic acid residue. Then, the present results suggest that the existence of GM1 in the outer-leaflet of the LUV is essentially important for such a double-layered vesicle formation. Alternatively, a phenomenon similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis in cells can be caused simply by a variation of osmotic pressure.

  15. Morphology transition of raft-model membrane induced by osmotic pressure: Formation of double-layered vesicle similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onai, Teruaki; Hirai, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: mhirai@fs.aramaki.gunma-u.ac.j [Department of Physics, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8510 (Japan)

    2010-10-01

    The effect of osmotic pressure on the structure of large uni-lamellar vesicle (LUV) of the lipid mixtures of monosialoganglioside (G{sub M1})-cholesterol-dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) was studies by using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) method. The molar ratios of the mixtures were 0.1/0.1/1, 0/0.1/1, and 0/0/1. The ternary lipid mixture is a model of lipid rafts. The value of osmotic pressure was varied from 0 to 4.16x10{sup 5} N/m{sup 2} by adding the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in the range from 0 to 25 % w/v. In the case of the mixtures without G{sub M1}, the rise of the osmotic pressure just enhances the multi-lamellar stacking with deceasing the inter-lamellar spacing. On the other hand, the mixture containing G{sub M1} shows the structural transition from a uni-lamellar vesicle to a double-layered vesicle (a liposome including a smaller one inside) by the rise of osmotic pressure. In this morphology transition the total surface area of the double-layered vesicle is mostly as same as that of the LUV at the initial state. The polar head region of G{sub M1} is bulky and highly hydrophilic due to the oligosaccharide chain containing a sialic acid residue. Then, the present results suggest that the existence of G{sub M1} in the outer-leaflet of the LUV is essentially important for such a double-layered vesicle formation. Alternatively, a phenomenon similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis in cells can be caused simply by a variation of osmotic pressure.

  16. Performance modeling of direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) seawater desalination process using a commercial composite membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Junggil

    2015-01-10

    This paper presents the development of a rigorous theoretical model to predict the transmembrane flux of a flat sheet hydrophobic composite membrane, comprising both an active layer of polytetrafluoroethylene and a scrim-backing support layer of polypropylene, in the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process. An integrated model includes the mass, momentum, species and energy balances for both retentate and permeate flows, coupled with the mass transfer of water vapor through the composite membrane and the heat transfer across the membrane and through the boundary layers adjacent to the membrane surfaces. Experimental results and model predictions for permeate flux and performance ratio are compared and shown to be in good agreement. The permeate flux through the composite layer can be ignored in the consideration of mass transfer pathways at the composite membrane. The effect of the surface porosity and the thickness of active and support layers on the process performance of composite membrane has also been studied. Among these parameters, surface porosity is identified to be the main factor significantly influencing the permeate flux and performance ratio, while the relative influence of the surface porosity on the performance ratio is less than that on flux.

  17. CHARMM-GUI HMMM Builder for Membrane Simulations with the Highly Mobile Membrane-Mimetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yifei; Cheng, Xi; Lee, Jumin; Vermaas, Josh V; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Park, Soohyung; Klauda, Jeffery B; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-17

    Slow diffusion of the lipids in conventional all-atom simulations of membrane systems makes it difficult to sample large rearrangements of lipids and protein-lipid interactions. Recently, Tajkhorshid and co-workers developed the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model with accelerated lipid motion by replacing the lipid tails with small organic molecules. The HMMM model provides accelerated lipid diffusion by one to two orders of magnitude, and is particularly useful in studying membrane-protein associations. However, building an HMMM simulation system is not easy, as it requires sophisticated treatment of the lipid tails. In this study, we have developed CHARMM-GUI HMMM Builder (http://www.charmm-gui.org/input/hmmm) to provide users with ready-to-go input files for simulating HMMM membrane systems with/without proteins. Various lipid-only and protein-lipid systems are simulated to validate the qualities of the systems generated by HMMM Builder with focus on the basic properties and advantages of the HMMM model. HMMM Builder supports all lipid types available in CHARMM-GUI and also provides a module to convert back and forth between an HMMM membrane and a full-length membrane. We expect HMMM Builder to be a useful tool in studying membrane systems with enhanced lipid diffusion.

  18. Mathematical modelling of dextran filtration through hollow fibre membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank; Pinelo, Manuel; Brøns, Morten

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a mathematical model of an ultrafiltration process. The results of the model are produced using standard numerical techniques with Comsol Multiphysics. The model describes the fluid flow and separation in hollow fibre membranes. The flow of solute and solvent within...... of the solute permeability the concentration dependent viscosity decreases the volumetric flux through the membrane at high pressures. This effect is due to a very high concentration at the membrane surface. The model is related to experimental data. There is a good qualitative and a reasonable quantitative...

  19. An Integrated Framework Advancing Membrane Protein Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca F Alford

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are critical functional molecules in the human body, constituting more than 30% of open reading frames in the human genome. Unfortunately, a myriad of difficulties in overexpression and reconstitution into membrane mimetics severely limit our ability to determine their structures. Computational tools are therefore instrumental to membrane protein structure prediction, consequently increasing our understanding of membrane protein function and their role in disease. Here, we describe a general framework facilitating membrane protein modeling and design that combines the scientific principles for membrane protein modeling with the flexible software architecture of Rosetta3. This new framework, called RosettaMP, provides a general membrane representation that interfaces with scoring, conformational sampling, and mutation routines that can be easily combined to create new protocols. To demonstrate the capabilities of this implementation, we developed four proof-of-concept applications for (1 prediction of free energy changes upon mutation; (2 high-resolution structural refinement; (3 protein-protein docking; and (4 assembly of symmetric protein complexes, all in the membrane environment. Preliminary data show that these algorithms can produce meaningful scores and structures. The data also suggest needed improvements to both sampling routines and score functions. Importantly, the applications collectively demonstrate the potential of combining the flexible nature of RosettaMP with the power of Rosetta algorithms to facilitate membrane protein modeling and design.

  20. Retinal Damage Induced by Internal Limiting Membrane Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Gelman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The internal limiting membrane (ILM, the basement membrane of the Müller cells, serves as the interface between the vitreous body and the retinal nerve fiber layer. It has a fundamental role in the development, structure, and function of the retina, although it also is a pathologic component in the various vitreoretinal disorders, most notably in macular holes. It was not until understanding of the evolution of idiopathic macular holes and the advent of idiopathic macular hole surgery that the idea of adjuvant ILM peeling in the treatment of tractional maculopathies was explored. Today intentional ILM peeling is a commonly applied surgical technique among vitreoretinal surgeons as it has been found to increase the rate of successful macular hole closure and improve surgical outcomes in other vitreoretinal diseases. Though ILM peeling has refined surgery for tractional maculopathies, like all surgical procedures it is not immune to perioperative risk. The essential role of the ILM to the integrity of the retina and risk of trauma to retinal tissue spurs suspicion with regard to its routine removal. Several authors have investigated the retinal damage induced by ILM peeling and these complications have been manifested across many different diagnostic studies.

  1. Membrane Tolerance to Ethanol is Rapidly Lost after Withdrawal: A Model for Studies of Membrane Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraschi, Theodore F.; Ellingson, John S.; Wu, Alice; Zimmerman, Robert; Rubin, Emanuel

    1986-06-01

    The structural properties of liver microsomes and erythrocytes obtained from rats that had been chronically administered ethanol were examined by electron spin resonance (ESR) following ethanol withdrawal for 1-10 days. Membranes obtained from control animals exhibited considerable molecular disordering upon the addition of ethanol in vitro (50-100 mM). Conversely, microsomal and erythrocyte membranes from alcoholic animals were resistant to this disordering by ethanol (membrane tolerance). These membrane properties were also apparent in lipid bilayers comprised of either total lipids or phospholipids isolated from the control and alcoholic animals. While several weeks of ethanol administration were required for both erythrocytes and microsomes to develop membrane tolerance, erythrocytes from alcoholic animals were disordered by ethanol in vitro after the animals had been withdrawn from ethanol for only 1 day. The same rapid loss of tolerance was observed in microsomes after 2 days of withdrawal. The same time course for the loss of tolerance was observed in lipid bilayers prepared from the total lipid and phospholipid extracts. No significant differences in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio were observed between the microsomal or erythrocyte membranes isolated before and after withdrawal. Thus, alterations in the microsomal and erythrocyte phospholipids, and not cholesterol content, were responsible for conveying membrane tolerance. Membrane structural properties can be rapidly adjusted in a mammalian system in response to the withdrawal of the external membrane perturbant ethanol. The withdrawal model, which begins with established membrane tolerance and leads to rapid and complete loss of tolerance, provides a model to analyze the compositional changes responsible for this tolerance to disordering by ethanol.

  2. Establishment of the model of vascular endothelial cell membrane chromatography and its preliminary application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YiPing; HE LangChong

    2007-01-01

    A model of vascular endothelial cell membrane chromatography was established by using an ECV304 cell membrane stationary phase (ECV304 CMSP) prepared by immobilizing the ECV304 cell membrane onto the surface of silica carrier. The surface and chromatographic characteristics of ECV304 CMSP were studied. The active component from Caulophyllum robustum was screened by using the model of vascular endothelial cell membrane chromatography. The interaction between the active component and membrane receptor was determined by using a replace experiments. The effect of the active component was tested by using tube formation of ECV304 cell. The results indicated that the model of ECV304 cell membrane chromatograph (ECV304 CMC) can stimulate the interaction between drug and receptor in vitro and the retention characteristics of taspine as active component was similar to that of model molecule in the model of ECV304 CMC. And therefore, taspine acted on VEGFR2 and inhibited the tube formation of ECV304 cell induced by VEGF. This model can be used to screen definite active component as a screening model.

  3. Exploring large-scale phenomena in composite membranes through an efficient implicit-solvent model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laradji, Mohamed; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Spangler, Eric J.

    2016-07-01

    Several microscopic and mesoscale models have been introduced in the past to investigate various phenomena in lipid membranes. Most of these models account for the solvent explicitly. Since in a typical molecular dynamics simulation, the majority of particles belong to the solvent, much of the computational effort in these simulations is devoted for calculating forces between solvent particles. To overcome this problem, several implicit-solvent mesoscale models for lipid membranes have been proposed during the last few years. In the present article, we review an efficient coarse-grained implicit-solvent model we introduced earlier for studies of lipid membranes. In this model, lipid molecules are coarse-grained into short semi-flexible chains of beads with soft interactions. Through molecular dynamics simulations, the model is used to investigate the thermal, structural and elastic properties of lipid membranes. We will also review here few studies, based on this model, of the phase behavior of nanoscale liposomes, cytoskeleton-induced blebbing in lipid membranes, as well as nanoparticles wrapping and endocytosis by tensionless lipid membranes. Topical Review article submitted to the Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, May 9, 2016

  4. Stress-induced outer membrane vesicle production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Ian A; Kuehn, Meta J

    2013-07-01

    As an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa must be able to adapt and survive changes and stressors in its environment during the course of infection. To aid survival in the hostile host environment, P. aeruginosa has evolved defense mechanisms, including the production of an exopolysaccharide capsule and the secretion of a myriad of degradative proteases and lipases. The production of outer membrane-derived vesicles (OMVs) serves as a secretion mechanism for virulence factors as well as a general bacterial response to envelope-acting stressors. This study investigated the effect of sublethal physiological stressors on OMV production by P. aeruginosa and whether the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) and the MucD periplasmic protease are critical mechanistic factors in this response. Exposure to some environmental stressors was determined to increase the level of OMV production as well as the activity of AlgU, the sigma factor that controls MucD expression. Overexpression of AlgU was shown to be sufficient to induce OMV production; however, stress-induced OMV production was not dependent on activation of AlgU, since stress caused increased vesiculation in strains lacking algU. We further determined that MucD levels were not an indicator of OMV production under acute stress, and PQS was not required for OMV production under stress or unstressed conditions. Finally, an investigation of the response of P. aeruginosa to oxidative stress revealed that peroxide-induced OMV production requires the presence of B-band but not A-band lipopolysaccharide. Together, these results demonstrate that distinct mechanisms exist for stress-induced OMV production in P. aeruginosa.

  5. [Structural modifications of the surface of Escherichia coli bacteria and copper-induced permeability of plasma membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, V S; Volodina, L A; Deĭnega, E Iu; Fedorov, Iu I

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Cu2+ on the structural organization of the cell surface of Escherichia coli bacteria during the induction of conductivity of a plasma membrane was studied. A fluorescent study did not reveal any substantial changes in the microviscosity of lipids by the action of copper ions. At the same time, a substantial reorganization of membrane proteins during plasmolysis was observed. A model of the copper-induced structural reorganization of membrane lipids was constructed, according to which the reorganization leads to the opening in the membrane of channels of nonspecific conductivity for cations. The opening of conductivity channels results from the break of disulfide bonds in critical membrane proteins during the interaction with Cu+, which form either due to the reduction of Cu2+ on specific sites of cell surface or by means of external reducing agents.

  6. Numerical Poisson-Boltzmann Model for Continuum Membrane Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botello-Smith, Wesley M; Liu, Xingping; Cai, Qin; Li, Zhilin; Zhao, Hongkai; Luo, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Membrane protein systems are important computational research topics due to their roles in rational drug design. In this study, we developed a continuum membrane model utilizing a level set formulation under the numerical Poisson-Boltzmann framework within the AMBER molecular mechanics suite for applications such as protein-ligand binding affinity and docking pose predictions. Two numerical solvers were adapted for periodic systems to alleviate possible edge effects. Validation on systems ranging from organic molecules to membrane proteins up to 200 residues, demonstrated good numerical properties. This lays foundations for sophisticated models with variable dielectric treatments and second-order accurate modeling of solvation interactions.

  7. α-Synuclein senses lipid packing defects and induces lateral expansion of lipids leading to membrane remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouberai, Myriam M; Wang, Juan; Swann, Marcus J; Galvagnion, Celine; Guilliams, Tim; Dobson, Christopher M; Welland, Mark E

    2013-07-19

    There is increasing evidence for the involvement of lipid membranes in both the functional and pathological properties of α-synuclein (α-Syn). Despite many investigations to characterize the binding of α-Syn to membranes, there is still a lack of understanding of the binding mode linking the properties of lipid membranes to α-Syn insertion into these dynamic structures. Using a combination of an optical biosensing technique and in situ atomic force microscopy, we show that the binding strength of α-Syn is related to the specificity of the lipid environment (the lipid chemistry and steric properties within a bilayer structure) and to the ability of the membranes to accommodate and remodel upon the interaction of α-Syn with lipid membranes. We show that this interaction results in the insertion of α-Syn into the region of the headgroups, inducing a lateral expansion of lipid molecules that can progress to further bilayer remodeling, such as membrane thinning and expansion of lipids out of the membrane plane. We provide new insights into the affinity of α-Syn for lipid packing defects found in vesicles of high curvature and in planar membranes with cone-shaped lipids and suggest a comprehensive model of the interaction between α-Syn and lipid bilayers. The ability of α-Syn to sense lipid packing defects and to remodel membrane structure supports its proposed role in vesicle trafficking.

  8. Simplified model for fouling of a pleated membrane filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Cummings, Linda

    2014-11-01

    Pleated filter cartridge are widely used to remove undesired impurities from a fluid. A filter membrane is sandwiched between porous support layers, then pleated and packed in to an annular cylindrical cartridge. Although this arrangement offers a high ratio of surface filtration area to volume, the filter performance (measured, e.g., by graph of total flux versus throughput for a given pressure drop), is not as good as a flat filter membrane. The reasons for this difference in performance are currently unclear, but likely factors include the additional resistance of the porous support layers upstream and downstream of the membrane, the pleat packing density (PPD) and possible damage to the membrane during the pleating process. To investigate this, we propose a simplified mathematical model of the filtration within a single pleat. We consider the fluid dynamics through the membrane and support layers, and propose a model by which the pores of the membrane become fouled (i) by particles smaller than the membrane pore size; and (ii) by particles larger than the pores.We present some simulations of our model, investigating how flow and fouling differ between not only flat and pleated membranes, but also for support layers of different permeability profiles. NSF DMS-1261596.

  9. Cooperative Effects of Noise and Coupling on Stochastic Dynamics of a Membrane-Bulk Coupling Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun; JIA Ya; YI Ming

    2009-01-01

    Based on a membrane-bulk coupling cell model proposed by Gomez-Marin et al. [ Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 (2007) 168303], the cooperative effects of noise and coupling on the stochastic dynamical behavior are investigated, For parameters in a certain region, the oscillation can be induced by the cooperative effect of noise and coupling. Whether considering the coupling or not, corresponding coherence resonance phenomena are observed. Furthermore, the effects of two coupling parameters, cell size L and coupling intensity k, on the noise-induced oscillation of membranes are studied. Contrary effects of noise are found in and out of the deterministic oscillatory regions.

  10. Transferable coarse-grained model for perfluorosulfonic acid polymer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, An-Tsung; Okazaki, Susumu; Shinoda, Wataru

    2017-09-01

    Perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer membranes are widely used as proton exchange membranes. Because the structure of the aqueous domain within the PFSA membrane is expected to directly influence proton conductance, many coarse-grained (CG) simulation studies have been performed to investigate the membrane morphology; these studies mostly used phenomenological models, such as dissipative particle dynamics. However, a chemically accurate CG model is required to investigate the morphology in realistic membranes and to provide a concrete molecular design. Here, we attempt to construct a predictive CG model for the structure and morphology of PFSA membranes that is compatible with the Sinoda-DeVane-Klein (SDK) CG water model [Shinoda et al., Mol. Simul. 33, 27 (2007)]. First, we extended the parameter set for the SDK CG force field to examine a hydrated PFSA membrane based on thermodynamic and structural data from experiments and all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. However, a noticeable degradation of the morphology motivated us to improve the structural properties by using the iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) approach. Thus, we explored a possible combination of the SDK and IBI approaches to describe the nonbonded interaction. The hybrid SDK/IBI model improved the structural issues of SDK, showing a better agreement with AA-MD in the radial distribution functions. The hybrid SDK/IBI model was determined to reasonably reproduce both the thermodynamic and structural properties of the PFSA membrane for all examined water contents. In addition, the model demonstrated good transferability and has considerable potential for application to realistic long-chained PFSA membranes.

  11. N-3 fatty acids and membrane microdomains: from model membranes to lymphocyte function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Teague, Heather

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes the author's research on fish oil derived n-3 fatty acids, plasma membrane organization and B cell function. We first cover basic model membrane studies that investigated how docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) targeted the organization of sphingolipid-cholesterol enriched lipid microdomains. A key finding here was that DHA had a relatively poor affinity for cholesterol. This work led to a model that predicted DHA acyl chains in cells would manipulate lipid-protein microdomain organization and thereby function. We then review how the predictions of the model were tested with B cells in vitro followed by experiments using mice fed fish oil. These studies reveal a highly complex picture on how n-3 fatty acids target lipid-protein organization and B cell function. Key findings are as follows: (1) n-3 fatty acids target not just the plasma membrane but also endomembrane organization; (2) DHA, but not eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), disrupts microdomain spatial distribution (i.e. clustering), (3) DHA alters protein lateral organization and (4) changes in membrane organization are accompanied by functional effects on both innate and adaptive B cell function. Altogether, the research over the past 10 years has led to an evolution of the original model on how DHA reorganizes membrane microdomains. The work raises the intriguing possibility of testing the model at the human level to target health and disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanoengineered field induced charge separation membranes manufacture thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kevin C.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Bourcier, William L.; Floyd, III, William Clary

    2016-08-02

    A device according to one embodiment includes a porous membrane having a surface charge and pore configuration characterized by a double layer overlap effect being present in pores of the membrane, where the porous membrane includes functional groups that preferentially interact with either cations or anions. A device according to another embodiment includes a porous membrane having a surface charge in pores thereof sufficient to impart anion or cation selectivity in the pores. Additional devices, systems and methods are also presented.

  13. There Is No Simple Model of the Plasma Membrane Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Schütz, Gerhard J.; Eggeling, Christian; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Ever since technologies enabled the characterization of eukaryotic plasma membranes, heterogeneities in the distributions of its constituents were observed. Over the years this led to the proposal of various models describing the plasma membrane organization such as lipid shells, picket-and-fences, lipid rafts, or protein islands, as addressed in numerous publications and reviews. Instead of emphasizing on one model we in this review give a brief overview over current models and highlight how current experimental work in one or the other way do not support the existence of a single overarching model. Instead, we highlight the vast variety of membrane properties and components, their influences and impacts. We believe that highlighting such controversial discoveries will stimulate unbiased research on plasma membrane organization and functionality, leading to a better understanding of this essential cellular structure. PMID:27747212

  14. There is no simple model of the plasma membrane organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Bernardino De La Serna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ever since technologies enabled the characterisation of eukaryotic plasma membranes, heterogeneities in the distributions of its constituents were observed. Over the years this led to the proposal of various models describing the plasma membrane organisation such as lipid shells, picket-and-fences, lipid rafts, or protein islands, as addressed in numerous publications and reviews. Instead of emphasising on one model we in this review give a brief overview over current models and highlight how current experimental work in one or the other way do not support the existence of a single overarching model. Instead, we highlight the vast variety of membrane properties and components, their influences and impacts. We believe that highlighting such controversial discoveries will stimulate unbiased research on plasma membrane organisation and functionality, leading to a better understanding of this essential cellular structure.

  15. Dynamic modeling of ultrafiltration membranes for whey separation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saltık, M.B.; Özkan, Leyla; Jacobs, Marc; Padt, van der Albert

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a control relevant rigorous dynamic model for an ultrafiltration membrane unit in a whey separation process. The model consists of a set of differential algebraic equations and is developed for online model based applications such as model based control and process monitori

  16. Effects of phenylpropanolamine (PPA) on in vitro human erythrocyte membranes and molecular models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwalsky, Mario, E-mail: msuwalsk@udec.cl [Faculty of Chemical Sciences, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Zambrano, Pablo; Mennickent, Sigrid [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Villena, Fernando [Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Sotomayor, Carlos P.; Aguilar, Luis F. [Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Bolognin, Silvia [CNR-Institute for Biomedical Technologies, University of Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} PPA is a common ingredient in cough-cold medication and appetite suppressants. {yields} Reports on its effects on human erythrocytes are very scarce. {yields} We found that PPA induced in vitro morphological changes to human erythrocytes. {yields} PPA interacted with isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes. {yields} PPA interacted with class of lipid present in the erythrocyte membrane outer monolayer. -- Abstract: Norephedrine, also called phenylpropanolamine (PPA), is a synthetic form of the ephedrine alkaloid. After reports of the occurrence of intracranial hemorrhage and other adverse effects, including several deaths, PPA is no longer sold in USA and Canada. Despite the extensive information about PPA toxicity, reports on its effects on cell membranes are scarce. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of PPA with cell membranes, ranges of concentrations were incubated with intact human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), and molecular models of cell membranes. The latter consisted in bilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), phospholipid classes present in the outer and inner monolayers of most plasmatic cell membranes, respectively. The capacity of PPA to perturb the bilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was assessed by X-ray diffraction, DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) and IUM were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, and intact human erythrocytes were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study presents evidence that PPA affects human red cell membranes as follows: (a) in SEM studies on human erythrocytes it was observed that 0.5 mM PPA induced shape changes; (b) in IUM PPA induced a sharp decrease in the fluorescence anisotropy in the lipid bilayer acyl chains in a concentration range lower than 100 {mu}M; (c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that PPA in the 0.1-0.5 m

  17. Fouling-induced enzyme immobilization for membrane reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jianquan; Meyer, Anne S.; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2013-01-01

    A simple enzyme immobilization method accomplished by promoting membrane fouling formation is proposed. The immobilization method is based on adsorption and entrapment of the enzymes in/on the membrane. To evaluate the concept, two membrane orientations, skin layer facing feed (normal mode......, but the reverse mode allowed for higher enzyme loading and stability, and irreversible fouling (i.e. pore blocking) developed more readily in the support structure than in the skin layer. Compared with an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR) with free enzymes, the novel EMR with enzymes immobilized in membrane...... support improved the enzyme reusability (especially for ADH), and reduced the product inhibition (especially for GDH). © 2013 Elsevier Ltd....

  18. Possible mechanism of structural transformations induced by StAsp-PSI in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Fernando; Palomares-Jerez, M Francisca; Daleo, Gustavo; Villalaín, José; Guevara, M Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we have analyzed the effect of StAsp-PSI (plant-specific insert of potato aspartic protease) on the structural and thermotropic properties of the major phospholipid types of bacterial and animal cells. Results obtained suggest that StAsp-PSI induces a destabilization of the membrane bilayers, depending on the time of interaction between the protein and the bilayers, rather than on its concentration. This temporal delay would be consistent with a lateral diffusion of StAsp-PSI monomers to assemble into aggregates to form pores. Like with the results previously reported for the StAsp-PSI circular dichroism, data obtained here from IR spectroscopy show that there are slight changes in the StAsp-PSI secondary structure in the presence of lipid membranes; suggesting that these changes could be related with the StAsp-PSI self-association. Results obtained from steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and differential scanning calorimetry assays suggest that StAsp-PSI interacts with both uncharged and negatively charged phospholipids, modulates the phase polymorphic behavior of model membranes and partitions and buries differentially in the membrane depending on the presence of negatively charged phospholipids. © 2013.

  19. Synthetic antimicrobial oligomers induce composition-dependent topological transition in membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Gordon, Vernita; Mishra, Abhijit; Purdy, Kirstin; Cronan, John; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2007-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides comprise a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. Recently, their synthetic analogs have demonstrated broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity via permeating bacterial membranes selectively, although the precise molecular mechanism underlying the activity is still unknown. We systematically investigate interactions and self-assembled structures formed by model bacterial membranes and a prototypical family of phenylene ethynylene-based small molecule antimicrobials with controllable activity and selectivity. Synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) results correlate antibacterial activity and the induced formation of an inverted hexagonal phase, and indicate that the organization of negative curvature lipids such as DOPE are crucially important. Preliminary killing assays of DOPE-deficient mutant bacteria agree with the x-ray results.

  20. Mesoscale computational studies of membrane bilayer remodeling by curvature-inducing proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Sunil Kumar, P. B.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2014-10-01

    Biological membranes constitute boundaries of cells and cell organelles. These membranes are soft fluid interfaces whose thermodynamic states are dictated by bending moduli, induced curvature fields, and thermal fluctuations. Recently, there has been a flood of experimental evidence highlighting active roles for these structures in many cellular processes ranging from trafficking of cargo to cell motility. It is believed that the local membrane curvature, which is continuously altered due to its interactions with myriad proteins and other macromolecules attached to its surface, holds the key to the emergent functionality in these cellular processes. Mechanisms at the atomic scale are dictated by protein-lipid interaction strength, lipid composition, lipid distribution in the vicinity of the protein, shape and amino acid composition of the protein, and its amino acid contents. The specificity of molecular interactions together with the cooperativity of multiple proteins induce and stabilize complex membrane shapes at the mesoscale. These shapes span a wide spectrum ranging from the spherical plasma membrane to the complex cisternae of the Golgi apparatus. Mapping the relation between the protein-induced deformations at the molecular scale and the resulting mesoscale morphologies is key to bridging cellular experiments across various length scales. In this review, we focus on the theoretical and computational methods used to understand the phenomenology underlying protein-driven membrane remodeling. Interactions at the molecular scale can be computationally probed by all atom and coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD, CGMD), as well as dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, which we only describe in passing. We choose to focus on several continuum approaches extending the Canham-Helfrich elastic energy model for membranes to include the effect of curvature-inducing proteins and explore the conformational phase space of such systems. In this description, the

  1. Mesoscale computational studies of membrane bilayer remodeling by curvature-inducing proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, N., E-mail: ramn@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-19104 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-19104 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-19104 (United States); Sunil Kumar, P.B., E-mail: sunil@physics.iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, 600036 (India); Radhakrishnan, Ravi, E-mail: rradhak@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-19104 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-19104 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-19104 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Biological membranes constitute boundaries of cells and cell organelles. These membranes are soft fluid interfaces whose thermodynamic states are dictated by bending moduli, induced curvature fields, and thermal fluctuations. Recently, there has been a flood of experimental evidence highlighting active roles for these structures in many cellular processes ranging from trafficking of cargo to cell motility. It is believed that the local membrane curvature, which is continuously altered due to its interactions with myriad proteins and other macromolecules attached to its surface, holds the key to the emergent functionality in these cellular processes. Mechanisms at the atomic scale are dictated by protein–lipid interaction strength, lipid composition, lipid distribution in the vicinity of the protein, shape and amino acid composition of the protein, and its amino acid contents. The specificity of molecular interactions together with the cooperativity of multiple proteins induce and stabilize complex membrane shapes at the mesoscale. These shapes span a wide spectrum ranging from the spherical plasma membrane to the complex cisternae of the Golgi apparatus. Mapping the relation between the protein-induced deformations at the molecular scale and the resulting mesoscale morphologies is key to bridging cellular experiments across various length scales. In this review, we focus on the theoretical and computational methods used to understand the phenomenology underlying protein-driven membrane remodeling. Interactions at the molecular scale can be computationally probed by all atom and coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD, CGMD), as well as dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, which we only describe in passing. We choose to focus on several continuum approaches extending the Canham–Helfrich elastic energy model for membranes to include the effect of curvature-inducing proteins and explore the conformational phase space of such systems. In this description

  2. Development of a Comprehensive Fouling Model for a Rotating Membrane Bioreactor System Treating Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane bioreactors (MBRs are now main stream wastewater treatment technologies. In recent times, novel pressure driven rotating membrane disc modules have been specially developed that induce high shear on the membrane surface, thereby reducing fouling. Previous research has produced dead-end filtration fouling model which combines all three classical mechanisms that was later used by another researcher as a starting point for a greatly refined model of a cross flow side-stream MBR that incorporated both hydrodynamics and soluble microbial products’ (SMP effects. In this study, a comprehensive fouling model was created based on this earlier work that incorporated all three classical fouling mechanisms for a rotating MBR system. It was tested and validated for best fit using appropriate data sets. The initial model fit appeared good for all simulations, although it still needs to be calibrated using further appropriate data sets.

  3. The LEA-like protein HSP 12 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a plasma membrane location and protects membranes against desiccation and ethanol-induced stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, K; Brandt, W; Rumbak, E; Lindsey, G

    2000-02-15

    The LEA-like protein HSP 12 was identified as having a plasma membrane location in yeast. Gold particles, indicative of the presence of HSP 12, were observed on the external side of the plasma membrane when yeast grown to stationary phase were subjected to immunocytochemical analysis. Growth of yeast in the osmolyte mannitol resulted in an increased number of gold particles that were now observed to be present on both sides of the plasma membrane. No gold particles were observed using a mutant strain of the same yeast that did not express HSP 12. A model liposome system encapsulating the fluorescent dye calcein was used to investigate the protection by HSP 12 of membranes during desiccation. HSP 12 was found to act in an analogous manner to trehalose and protect liposomal membrane integrity against desiccation. The interaction between HSP 12 and the liposomal membrane was judged to be electrostatic as membrane protection was only observed with positively charged liposomes and not with either neutral or negatively charged liposomes. The ability of the wild-type and mutant yeast to grow in media containing ethanol was compared. It was found that yeast not expressing the HSP 12 protein were less able to grow in media containing ethanol. HSP 12 was shown to confer increased integrity on the liposomal membrane in the presence of ethanol. Ethanol, like mannitol, was found to induce HSP 12 protein synthesis. However, yeast grown in both ethanol and mannitol showed a decreased HSP 12 response compared with yeast grown in the presence of either osmolyte alone.

  4. Round window membrane intracochlear drug delivery enhanced by induced advection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkholder, David A; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D

    2014-01-28

    Delivery of therapeutic compounds to the inner ear via absorption through the round window membrane (RWM) has advantages over direct intracochlear infusions; specifically, minimizing impact upon functional hearing measures. However, previous reports show that significant basal-to-apical concentration gradients occur, with the potential to impact treatment efficacy. Here we present a new approach to inner ear drug delivery with induced advection aiding distribution of compounds throughout the inner ear in the murine cochlea. Polyimide microtubing was placed near the RWM niche through a bullaostomy into the middle ear cavity allowing directed delivery of compounds to the RWM. We hypothesized that a posterior semicircular canalostomy would induce apical flow from the patent cochlear aqueduct to the canalostomy due to influx of cerebral spinal fluid. To test this hypothesis, young adult CBA/CaJ mice were divided into two groups: bullaostomy approach only (BA) and bullaostomy+canalostomy (B+C). Cochlear function was evaluated by distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds during and after middle ear infusion of salicylate in artificial perilymph (AP), applied near the RWM. The mice recovered for 1week, and were re-tested. The results demonstrate there was no significant impact on auditory function utilizing the RWM surgical procedure with or without the canalostomy, and DPOAE thresholds were elevated reversibly during the salicylate infusion. Comparing the threshold shifts for both methods, the B+C approach had more of a physiological effect than the BA approach, including at lower frequencies representing more apical cochlear locations. Unlike mouse cochleostomies, there was no deleterious auditory functional impact after 1week recovery from surgery. The B+C approach had more drug efficacy at lower frequencies, underscoring potential benefits for more precise control of delivery of inner ear therapeutic compounds.

  5. Fatty acid membrane assembly on coacervate microdroplets as a step towards a hybrid protocell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dora Tang, T.-Y.; Rohaida Che Hak, C.; Thompson, Alexander J.; Kuimova, Marina K.; Williams, D. S.; Perriman, Adam W.; Mann, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    Mechanisms of prebiotic compartmentalization are central to providing insights into how protocellular systems emerged on the early Earth. Protocell models are based predominantly on the membrane self-assembly of fatty-acid vesicles, although membrane-free scenarios that involve liquid-liquid microphase separation (coacervation) have also been considered. Here we integrate these alternative models of prebiotic compartmentalization and develop a hybrid protocell model based on the spontaneous self-assembly of a continuous fatty-acid membrane at the surface of preformed coacervate microdroplets prepared from cationic peptides/polyelectrolytes and adenosine triphosphate or oligo/polyribonucleotides. We show that the coacervate-supported membrane is multilamellar, and mediates the selective uptake or exclusion of small and large molecules. The coacervate interior can be disassembled without loss of membrane integrity, and fusion and growth of the hybrid protocells can be induced under conditions of high ionic strength. Our results highlight how notions of membrane-mediated compartmentalization, chemical enrichment and internalized structuration can be integrated in protocell models via simple chemical and physical processes.

  6. Membrane Permeabilization Induced by Sphingosine: Effect of Negatively Charged Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rojo, Noemi; Sot, Jesús; Viguera, Ana R.; Collado, M. Isabel; Torrecillas, Alejandro; Gómez-Fernández, J.C.; Goñi, Félix M.; Alonso, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine [(2S, 3R, 4E)-2-amino-4-octadecen-1, 3-diol] is the most common sphingoid long chain base in sphingolipids. It is the precursor of important cell signaling molecules, such as ceramides. In the last decade it has been shown to act itself as a potent metabolic signaling molecule, by activating a number of protein kinases. Moreover, sphingosine has been found to permeabilize phospholipid bilayers, giving rise to vesicle leakage. The present contribution intends to analyze the mechanism by which this bioactive lipid induces vesicle contents release, and the effect of negatively charged bilayers in the release process. Fluorescence lifetime measurements and confocal fluorescence microscopy have been applied to observe the mechanism of sphingosine efflux from large and giant unilamellar vesicles; a graded-release efflux has been detected. Additionally, stopped-flow measurements have shown that the rate of vesicle permeabilization increases with sphingosine concentration. Because at the physiological pH sphingosine has a net positive charge, its interaction with negatively charged phospholipids (e.g., bilayers containing phosphatidic acid together with sphingomyelins, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cholesterol) gives rise to a release of vesicular contents, faster than with electrically neutral bilayers. Furthermore, phosphorous 31-NMR and x-ray data show the capacity of sphingosine to facilitate the formation of nonbilayer (cubic phase) intermediates in negatively charged membranes. The data might explain the pathogenesis of Niemann-Pick type C1 disease. PMID:24940775

  7. Protein-induced surface structuring in myelin membrane monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosetti, Carla M; Maggio, Bruno

    2007-12-15

    Monolayers prepared from myelin conserve all the compositional complexity of the natural membrane when spread at the air-water interface. They show a complex pressure-dependent surface pattern that, on compression, changes from the coexistence of two liquid phases to a viscous fractal phase embedded in a liquid phase. We dissected the role of major myelin protein components, myelin basic protein (MBP), and Folch-Lees proteolipid protein (PLP) as crucial factors determining the structural dynamics of the interface. By analyzing mixtures of a single protein with the myelin lipids we found that MBP and PLP have different surface pressure-dependent behaviors. MBP stabilizes the segregation of two liquid phases at low pressures and becomes excluded from the film under compression, remaining adjacent to the interface. PLP, on the contrary, organizes a fractal-like pattern at all surface pressures when included in a monolayer of the protein-free myelin lipids but it remains mixed in the MBP-induced liquid phase. The resultant surface topography and dynamics is regulated by combined near to equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium effects. PLP appears to act as a surface skeleton for the whole components whereas MBP couples the structuring to surface pressure-dependent extrusion and adsorption processes.

  8. Membraner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner......Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner...

  9. Defining the Free-Energy Landscape of Curvature-Inducing Proteins on Membrane Bilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Tourdot, Richard W; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Curvature-sensing and curvature-remodeling proteins are known to reshape cell membranes, and this remodeling event is essential for key biophysical processes such as tubulation, exocytosis, and endocytosis. Curvature-inducing proteins can act as curvature sensors as well as induce curvature in cell membranes to stabilize emergent high curvature, non-spherical, structures such as tubules, discs, and caveolae. A definitive understanding of the interplay between protein recruitment and migration, the evolution of membrane curvature, and membrane morphological transitions is emerging but remains incomplete. Here, within a continuum framework and using the machinery of Monte Carlo simulations, we introduce and compare three free-energy methods to delineate the free-energy landscape of curvature-inducing proteins on bilayer membranes. We demonstrate the utility of the Widom test-particle/field insertion methodology in computing the excess chemical potentials associated with curvature-inducing proteins on the membra...

  10. [Radiation-induced changes in structural state of membranes of human blood cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlakova, E B; Atkarskaia, M V; Fatkullina, L D; Andreev, S G

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate radiation-induced changes in the structural state of the membranes, blood samples of healthy donors were subjected to gamma radiation in the range of small (1-10 cGy) and medium doses (50 cGy-2 Gy). After irradiation, the microviscosity of lipid membranes of red and white blood cells was measured by ESR spin probe method. At doses exceeding 1 cGy, statistically significant changes of the degree of spontaneous erythrocyte hemolysis and of the lymphocyte plasma membrane microviscosity were observed. Under identical irradiation conditions, the stability of lymphocyte membranes was less as compared to erythrocyte membranes.

  11. Modeling and vibration control of an active membrane mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Eric J.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-09-01

    The future of space satellite technology lies in ultra-large mirrors and radar apertures for significant improvements in imaging and communication bandwidths. The availability of optical-quality membranes drives a parallel effort for structural models that can capture the dominant dynamics of large, ultra-flexible satellite payloads. Unfortunately, the inherent flexibility of membrane mirrors wreaks havoc with the payload's on-orbit stability and maneuverability. One possible means of controlling these undesirable dynamics is by embedding active piezoelectric ceramics near the boundary of the membrane mirror. In doing so, active feedback control can be used to eliminate detrimental vibration, perform static shape control, and evaluate the health of the structure. The overall motivation of the present work is to design a control system using distributed bimorph actuators to eliminate any detrimental vibration of the membrane mirror. As a basis for this study, a piezoceramic wafer was attached in a bimorph configuration near the boundary of a tensioned rectangular membrane sample. A finite element model of the system was developed to capture the relevant system dynamics from 0 to 300 Hz. The finite element model was compared against experimental results, and fair agreement found. Using the validated finite element models, structural control using linear quadratic regulator control techniques was then used to numerically demonstrate effective vibration control. Typical results show that less than 12 V of actuation voltage is required to eliminate detrimental vibration of the membrane samples in less than 15 ms. The functional gains of the active system are also derived and presented. These spatially descriptive control terms dictate favorable regions within the membrane domain for placing sensors and can be used as a design guideline for structural control applications. The results of the present work demonstrate that thin plate theory is an appropriate modeling

  12. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fengge; Miraoui, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    The fuel cell is a potential candidate for energy storage and conversion in our future energy mix. It is able to directly convert the chemical energy stored in fuel (e.g. hydrogen) into electricity, without undergoing different intermediary conversion steps. In the field of mobile and stationary applications, it is considered to be one of the future energy solutions.Among the different fuel cell types, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has shown great potential in mobile applications, due to its low operating temperature, solid-state electrolyte and compactness.This book pre

  13. Flowfield-induced oscillations of a flexible membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael; Smits, Alexander

    1998-11-01

    Preliminary experiments are reported on the interaction between a flexible membrane and the wake flow generated by a bluff body. The bluff body generates a strong vortex sheet, and as the vortices pass over the membrane a traveling flexural wave develops in the membrane, causing it to flap. The amplitude and frequeny of the flapping is a function of the size, shape and position of the bluff body, the velocity of the flow, the size, shape, and material properties of the membrane. Experiments designed to maximize the frequency and amplitude of the flapping are reported for a variety of membrane constructions, with an eye to optimizing power generation by the flexing of the piezo-electric materials used in the construction of the membrane.

  14. Membranous Replication Factories Induced by Plus-Strand RNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Romero-Brey

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the membranous replication factories of members of plus-strand (+ RNA viruses. We discuss primarily the architecture of these complex membrane rearrangements, because this topic emerged in the last few years as electron tomography has become more widely available. A general denominator is that two “morphotypes” of membrane alterations can be found that are exemplified by flaviviruses and hepaciviruses: membrane invaginations towards the lumen of the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER and double membrane vesicles, representing extrusions also originating from the ER, respectively. We hypothesize that either morphotype might reflect common pathways and principles that are used by these viruses to form their membranous replication compartments.

  15. Modeling the Elastic Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Edward; Gibaud, Thomas; Zakhary, Mark; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2011-03-01

    Model membranes such as lipid bilayers have been indispensable tools for our understanding of the elastic properties of biological membranes. In this talk, I will introduce a colloidal model for membranes and demonstrate that the physical properties of these colloidal membranes are identical to lipid bilayers. The model system is unique in that the constituent molecules are homogenous and non-amphiphilic, yet their self-assembly into membranes and other hierarchical assemblages, such as a lamellar type phases and chiral ribbons, proceeds spontaneously in solution. Owing to the large size of the constituent molecules, individual molecules can be directly visualized and simultaneous observations at the continuum and molecular lengthscales are used to characterize the behavior of model membranes with unprecedented detail. Moreover, once assembled in solution, molecular interactions can be controlled in situ. In particular, the strength of chiral interactions can be varied, leading to fascinating transitions in behavior that resembles the formation of starfish vesicles. These observations point towards the important role of line tension, and have potential implications for phase separated lipid mixtures or lipid rafts.

  16. Stability and rupture of archaebacterial cell membrane: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangyang; Zheng, Fengxian; Zhang, Xianren; Wang, Wenchuan

    2009-01-29

    It is known that the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius can grow in hot springs at 65-80 degrees C and live in acidic environments (pH 2-3); however, the origin of its unusual thermal stability remains unclear. In this work, using a vesicle as a model, we study the thermal stability and rupture of archaebacterial cell membrane. We perform a simulation investigation of the structure-property relationship of monolayer membrane formed by bolaform lipids and compare it with that of bilayer membrane formed by monopolar lipids. The origin of the unusually thermal stability of archaebacterial cell and the mechanism for its rupture are presented in molecular details.

  17. 3D-Membrane Stacks on Supported Membranes Composed of Diatom Lipids Induced by Long-Chain Polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräb, Oliver; Abacilar, Maryna; Daus, Fabian; Geyer, Armin; Steinem, Claudia

    2016-10-04

    Long-chain polyamines (LCPAs) are intimately involved in the biomineralization process of diatoms taking place in silica deposition vesicles being acidic compartments surrounded by a lipid bilayer. Here, we addressed the question whether and how LCPAs interact with lipid membranes composed of glycerophospholipids and glyceroglycolipids mimicking the membranes of diatoms and higher plants. Solid supported lipid bilayers and monolayers containing the three major components that are unique in diatoms and higher plants, i.e., monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), were prepared by spreading small unilamellar vesicles. The integrity of the membranes was investigated by fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy showing continuous flat bilayers and monolayers with small protrusions on top of the membrane. The addition of a synthetic polyamine composed of 13 amine groups separated by a propyl spacer (C3N13) results in flat but three-dimensional membrane stacks within minutes. The membrane stacks are connected with the underlying membrane as verified by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. Membrane stack formation was found to be independent of the lipid composition; i.e., neither glyceroglycolipids nor negatively charged lipids were required. However, the formation process was strongly dependent on the chain length of the polyamine. Whereas short polyamines such as the naturally occurring spermidine, spermine, and the synthetic polyamines C3N4 and C3N5 do not induce stack formation, those containing seven and more amine groups (C3N7, C3N13, and C3N18) do form membrane stacks. The observed stack formation might have implications for the stability and expansion of the silica deposition vesicle during valve and girdle band formation in diatoms.

  18. Analysis of light-induced transmembrane ion gradients and membrane potential in Photosystem I proteoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  19. Analysis of Light-Induced Transmembrane Ion Gradients and Membrane Potential in Photosystem I Proteoliposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennisi, Cristian P. [Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Yoshida, Ken [Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  20. Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase in Maize Roots Induced for NO3- Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, S.; Locci, G.; Pinton, R.; Cesco, S.; Varanini, Z.

    1995-12-01

    Plasma membrane H+-ATPase was studied in maize (Zea mays L.) roots induced for NO3- uptake. Membrane vesicles were isolated by means of Suc density gradient from roots exposed for 24 h either to 1.5 mM NO3- or 1.5 mM SO4-. The two populations of vesicles had similar composition as shown by diagnostic inhibitors of membrane-associated ATPases. However, both ATP-dependent intravesicular H+ accumulation and ATP hydrolysis were considerably enhanced (60-100%) in vesicles isolated from NO3--induced roots. Km for Mg:ATP and pH dependency were not influenced by NO3- treatment of the roots. ATP hydrolysis in plasma membrane vesicles for both control and NO3--induced roots was not affected by 10 to 150 mM NO3- or Cl-. On the other hand, kinetics of NO3-- or Cl--stimulated ATP-dependent intravesicular H+ accumulation were modified in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from NO3-- induced roots. Immunoassays carried out with polyclonal antibodies against plasma membrane H+-ATPase revealed an increased steady-state level of the enzyme in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from NO3--induced roots. Results are consistent with the idea of an involvement of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in the overall response of roots to NO3-.

  1. Membrane-Bound Alpha Synuclein Clusters Induce Impaired Lipid Diffusion and Increased Lipid Packing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iyer, Aditya; Schilderink, Nathalie; Claessens, Mireille M A E; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    The aggregation of membrane-bound α-synuclein (αS) into oligomers and/or amyloid fibrils has been suggested to cause membrane damage in in vitro model phospholipid membrane systems and in vivo. In this study, we investigate how αS interactions that precede the formation of well-defined aggregates in

  2. Changes in lipid membrane mechanics induced by di- and tri-phenyltins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Przybyło, Magda; Drabik, Dominik; Szostak, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    properties of biological membranes. It was found that the membrane/water partition coefficient equals 4, a value significantly higher than octanol/water partition coefficient. In addition, the effect of di- and tri-phenyltin chlorides on the mechanics of model lipid membranes was measured for the first time...

  3. Critical Review of Membrane Bioreactor Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naessens, W.; Maere, T.; Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios;

    2012-01-01

    modelling. In this paper, the vast literature on hydrodynamic and integrated modelling in MBR is critically reviewed. Hydrodynamic models are used at different scales and focus mainly on fouling and only little on system design/optimisation. Integrated models also focus on fouling although the ones...

  4. An induced rebinding model of antigen discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dushek, Omer; van der Merwe, P Anton

    2014-04-01

    T cells have to detect rare high-affinity 'foreign' peptide MHC (pMHC) ligands among abundant low-affinity 'self'-peptide MHC ligands. It remains unclear how this remarkable discrimination is achieved. Kinetic proofreading mechanisms can provide the required specificity but only at the expense of much reduced sensitivity. A number of recent observations suggest that pMHC engagement of T cell receptors (TCRs) induces changes such as clustering and/or conformational alterations that enhance subsequent rebinding. We show that inclusion of induced rebinding to the same pMHC in kinetic proofreading models enhances the sensitivity of TCR recognition while retaining specificity. Moreover, induced rebinding is able to reproduce the striking, and hitherto unexplained, 2D membrane-binding properties recently reported for the TCR.

  5. Ion induced changes in the structure of bordered pit membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinkee; Holbrook, N Michele; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2012-01-01

    Ion-mediated changes in xylem hydraulic resistance are hypothesized to result from hydrogel like properties of pectins located in the bordered pit membranes separating adjacent xylem vessels. Although the kinetics of the ion-mediated changes in hydraulic resistance are consistent with the swelling/deswelling behavior of pectins, there is no direct evidence of this activity. In this report we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate structural changes in bordered pit membranes associated with changes in the ionic concentration of the surrounding solution. When submerged in de-ionized water, AFM revealed bordered pit membranes as relatively smooth, soft, and lacking any sharp edges surface, in contrast to pictures from scanning electron microscope (SEM) or AFM performed on air-dry material. Exposure of the bordered pit membranes to 50 mM KCl solution resulted in significant changes in both surface physical properties and elevation features. Specifically, bordered pit membranes became harder and the fiber edges were clearly visible. In addition, the membrane contracted and appeared much rougher due to exposed microfibers. In neither solution was there any evidence of discrete pores through the membrane whose dimensions were altered in response to the ionic composition of the surrounding solution. Instead the variable hydraulic resistance appears to involve changes in the both the permeability and the thickness of the pit membrane.

  6. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm.

  7. Staphylococcal phenotypes induced by naturally occurring and synthetic membrane-interactive polyphenolic β-lactam resistance modifiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Palacios

    Full Text Available Galloyl catechins, in particular (--epicatechin gallate (ECg, have the capacity to abrogate β-lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; they also prevent biofilm formation, reduce the secretion of a large proportion of the exoproteome and induce profound changes to cell morphology. Current evidence suggests that these reversible phenotypic traits result from their intercalation into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. We have endeavoured to potentiate the capacity of ECg to modify the MRSA phenotype by stepwise removal of hydroxyl groups from the B-ring pharmacophore and the A:C fused ring system of the naturally occurring molecule. ECg binds rapidly to the membrane, inducing up-regulation of genes responsible for protection against cell wall stress and maintenance of membrane integrity and function. Studies with artificial membranes modelled on the lipid composition of the staphylococcal bilayer indicated that ECg adopts a position deep within the lipid palisade, eliciting major alterations in the thermotropic behaviour of the bilayer. The non-galloylated homolog (--epicatechin enhanced ECg-mediated effects by facilitating entry of ECg molecules into the membrane. ECg analogs with unnatural B-ring hydroxylation patterns induced higher levels of gene expression and more profound changes to MRSA membrane fluidity than ECg but adopted a more superficial location within the bilayer. ECg possessed a high affinity for the positively charged staphylococcal membrane and induced changes to the biophysical properties of the bilayer that are likely to account for its capacity to disperse the cell wall biosynthetic machinery responsible for β-lactam resistance. The ability to enhance these properties by chemical modification of ECg raises the possibility that more potent analogs could be developed for clinical evaluation.

  8. Sulfonated polystyrene fiber network-induced hybrid proton exchange membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yingfang; Ji, Liwen; Lin, Zhan; Li, Ying; Alcoutlabi, Mataz; Hamouda, Hechmi; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2011-09-01

    A novel type of hybrid membrane was fabricated by incorporating sulfonated polystyrene (S-PS) electrospun fibers into Nafion for the application in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. With the introduction of S-PS fiber mats, a large amount of sulfonic acid groups in Nafion aggregated onto the interfaces between S-PS fibers and the ionomer matrix, forming continuous pathways for facile proton transport. The resultant hybrid membranes had higher proton conductivities than that of recast Nafion, and the conductivities were controlled by selectively adjusting the fiber diameters. Consequently, hybrid membranes fabricated by ionomers, such as Nafion, incorporated with ionic-conducting nanofibers established a promising strategy for the rational design of high-performance proton exchange membranes.

  9. Droplet Manipulation Using Acoustic Streaming Induced by a Vibrating Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Hoang Van; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    We present a simple method for on-demand manipulation of aqueous droplets in oil. With numerical simulations and experiments, we show that a vibrating membrane can produce acoustic streaming. By making use of this vortical flow, we manage to repulse the droplets away from the membrane edges. Then, by simply aligning the membrane at 45° to the flow, the droplets can be forced to follow the membrane's boundaries, thus steering them across streamlines and even between different oil types. We also characterize the repulsion and steering effect with various excitation voltages at different water and oil flow rates. The maximum steering frequency we have achieved is 165 Hz. The system is extremely robust and reliable: the same membrane can be reused after many days and with different oils and/or surfactants at the same operating frequency.

  10. Modeling Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    The objective of this doctoral thesis was to develop reliable steady-state and transient component models suitable to asses-, develop- and optimize proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Several components in PEM fuel cell systems were characterized and modeled. The developed component...

  11. Carbon dioxide (hydrogen sulfide) membrane separations and WGS membrane reactor modeling for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin

    Acid-gas removal is of great importance in many environmental or energy-related processes. Compared to current commercial technologies, membrane-based CO2 and H2S capture has the advantages of low energy consumption, low weight and space requirement, simplicity of installation/operation, and high process flexibility. However, the large-scale application of the membrane separation technology is limited by the relatively low transport properties. In this study, CO2 (H2S)-selective polymeric membranes with high permeability and high selectivity have been studied based on the facilitated transport mechanism. The membrane showed facilitated effect for both CO2 and H2S. A CO2 permeability of above 2000 Barrers, a CO2/H2 selectivity of greater than 40, and a CO2/N2 selectivity of greater than 200 at 100--150°C were observed. As a result of higher reaction rate and smaller diffusing compound, the H2S permeability and H2S/H2 selectivity were about three times higher than those properties for CO2. The novel CO2-selective membrane has been applied to capture CO 2 from flue gas and natural gas. In the CO2 capture experiments from a gas mixture with N2 and H2, a permeate CO 2 dry concentration of greater than 98% was obtained by using steam as the sweep gas. In CO2/CH4 separation, decent CO 2 transport properties were obtained with a feed pressure up to 500 psia. With the thin-film composite membrane structure, significant increase on the CO2 flux was achieved with the decrease of the selective layer thickness. With the continuous removal of CO2, CO2-selective water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor is a promising approach to enhance CO conversion and increase the purity of H2 at process pressure under relatively low temperature. The simultaneous reaction and transport process in the countercurrent WGS membrane reactor was simulated by using a one-dimensional non-isothermal model. The modeling results show that a CO concentration of less than 10 ppm and a H2 recovery of greater

  12. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements of FCCP-induced change in membrane permeability of MDCK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingzhi; Li, Xianchan; Lin, Yuqing; Yang, Lifen; Yu, Ping; Mao, Lanqun

    2012-05-07

    This study demonstrates a new electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) method for measurements of the changes in membrane permeability during the process of cell anoxia. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were employed as the model cells and were cultured onto gelatin-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. EIS measurements were conducted at the MDCK/gelatin-modified GC electrodes with Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-) as the redox probe. The anoxia of the cells grown onto electrode surface was induced by the addition of carbonycyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP) into the cell culture, in which the MDCK/gelatin-modified GC electrodes were immersed for different times. The EIS results show that the presence of FCCP in the cell culture clearly decreases the charge-transfer resistance of the Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-) redox probe at the MDCK/gelatin-modified GC electrodes, and the charge-transfer resistance decreases with increasing time employed for immersing the MDCK/gelatin-modified GC electrodes into the cell culture containing FCCP. These results demonstrate that the EIS method could be used to monitor the changes in the cell membrane permeability during the FCCP-induced cell anoxia. To simulate the EIS system, a rational equivalent circuit was proposed and the values of ohmic resistance of the electrolyte, charge-transfer resistance and constant phase elements for both the gelatin and the cell layers are given with the fitting error in an acceptable value. This study actually offers a new and simple approach to measuring the dynamic process of cell death induced by anoxia through monitoring the changes in the cell membrane permeability.

  13. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes.

  14. Preparation and Characterization of Membranes Formed by Nonsolvent Induced Phase Separation: A Review

    KAUST Repository

    Guillen, Gregory R.

    2011-04-06

    The methods and mechanisms of nonsolvent induced phase separation have been studied for more than fifty years. Today, phase inversion membranes are widely used in numerous chemical industries, biotechnology, and environmental separation processes. The body of knowledge has grown exponentially in the past fifty years, which suggests the need for a critical review of the literature. Here we present a review of nonsolvent induced phase separation membrane preparation and characterization for many commonly used membrane polymers. The key factors in membrane preparation discussed include the solvent type, polymer type and concentration, nonsolvent system type and composition, additives to the polymer solution, and film casting conditions. A brief introduction to membrane characterization is also given, which includes membrane porosity and pore size distribution characterization, membrane physical and chemical properties characterization, and thermodynamic and kinetic evaluation of the phase inversion process. One aim of this review is to lay out the basics for selecting polymer solvent nonsolvent systems with appropriate film casting conditions to produce membranes with the desired performance, morphology, and stability, and to choose the proper way to characterize these properties of nonsolvent induced phase inversion membranes. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Membrane Modeling, Simulation and Optimization for Propylene/Propane Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Alshehri, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Energy efficiency is critical for sustainable industrial growth and the reduction of environmental impacts. Energy consumption by the industrial sector accounts for more than half of the total global energy usage and, therefore, greater attention is focused on enhancing this sector’s energy efficiency. It is predicted that by 2020, more than 20% of today’s energy consumption can be avoided in countries that have effectively implemented an action plan towards efficient energy utilization. Breakthroughs in material synthesis of high selective membranes have enabled the technology to be more energy efficient. Hence, high selective membranes are increasingly replacing conventional energy intensive separation processes, such as distillation and adsorption units. Moreover, the technology offers more special features (which are essential for special applications) and its small footprint makes membrane technology suitable for platform operations (e.g., nitrogen enrichment for oil and gas offshore sites). In addition, its low maintenance characteristics allow the technology to be applied to remote operations. For these reasons, amongst other, the membrane technology market is forecast to reach $16 billion by 2017. This thesis is concerned with the engineering aspects of membrane technology and covers modeling, simulation and optimization of membranes as a stand-alone process or as a unit operation within a hybrid system. Incorporating the membrane model into a process modeling software simplifies the simulation and optimization of the different membrane processes and hybrid configurations, since all other unit operations are pre-configured. Various parametric analyses demonstrated that only the membrane selectivity and transmembrane pressure ratio parameters define a membrane’s ability to accomplish a certain separation task. Moreover, it was found that both membrane selectivity and pressure ratio exhibit a minimum value that is only defined by the feed composition

  16. Applying fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate peptide-induced membrane disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2017-01-01

    to quantify leakage of fluorescent molecules of different sizes from large unilamellar lipid vesicles, thereby providing a tool for estimating the size of peptide-induced membrane disruptions. If fluorescently labeled lipids are incorporated into the membranes of the vesicles, FCS can also be used to obtain...

  17. Changes in the anisotropy of oriented membrane dynamics induced by myelin basic protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, F.; Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Relini, A.; Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A.; Fasano, A.; Riccio, P.

    We report recent results showing the evidence of the effect induced by physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the dynamics of dimyristoyl L-a-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) membranes. Incoherent elastic neutron scattering scans, performed over a wide temperature range, have shown that the anisotropy of motions in oriented membranes is significantly enhanced by the presence of MBP.

  18. Changes in the anisotropy of oriented membrane dynamics induced by myelin basic protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natali, F. [OGG-INFM, Grenoble (France); Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Relini, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Genova (Italy); Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Parma (Italy); Fasano, A. [Dipartimento di Biochimica e Biologia Molecolare, Universita di Bari (Italy); Riccio, P. [Dipartimento di Biologia D.B.A.F., Universita della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    We report recent results showing the evidence of the effect induced by physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the dynamics of dimyristoyl L-a-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) membranes. Incoherent elastic neutron scattering scans, performed over a wide temperature range, have shown that the anisotropy of motions in oriented membranes is significantly enhanced by the presence of MBP. (orig.)

  19. Anomalous diffusion induced by cristae geometry in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerii M Sukhorukov

    Full Text Available Diffusion of inner membrane proteins is a prerequisite for correct functionality of mitochondria. The complicated structure of tubular, vesicular or flat cristae and their small connections to the inner boundary membrane impose constraints on the mobility of proteins making their diffusion a very complicated process. Therefore we investigate the molecular transport along the main mitochondrial axis using highly accurate computational methods. Diffusion is modeled on a curvilinear surface reproducing the shape of mitochondrial inner membrane (IM. Monte Carlo simulations are carried out for topologies resembling both tubular and lamellar cristae, for a range of physiologically viable crista sizes and densities. Geometrical confinement induces up to several-fold reduction in apparent mobility. IM surface curvature per se generates transient anomalous diffusion (TAD, while finite and stable values of projected diffusion coefficients are recovered in a quasi-normal regime for short- and long-time limits. In both these cases, a simple area-scaling law is found sufficient to explain limiting diffusion coefficients for permeable cristae junctions, while asymmetric reduction of the junction permeability leads to strong but predictable variations in molecular motion rate. A geometry-based model is given as an illustration for the time-dependence of diffusivity when IM has tubular topology. Implications for experimental observations of diffusion along mitochondria using methods of optical microscopy are drawn out: a non-homogenous power law is proposed as a suitable approach to TAD. The data demonstrate that if not taken into account appropriately, geometrical effects lead to significant misinterpretation of molecular mobility measurements in cellular curvilinear membranes.

  20. Alteration of polyethersulphone membranes through UV-induced modification using various materials: A brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law Yong Ng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Polyethersulphone (PES membranes have been widely applied in various separation applications such as microfiltration, ultrafiltration and nanofiltration. This has occurred as these membranes are easy to form, have good mechanical strength and good chemical stability (resistant to acidic or alkaline conditions due to the presence of aromatic hydrocarbon groups in the structure. PES membranes are commonly fabricated through the phase inversion method due to the simplicity of the process. However, PES membranes are generally hydrophobic, which usually requires them to be modified before application. In most cases, these methods can reduce the hydrophobicity of the membrane surface and thus reduce membrane fouling during application. This review will further discuss the recently developed UV-induced modifications of PES membranes. The UV-induced grafting method is easy to apply to existing PES membranes, with or without the need for a photo-initiator. Additionally, nanoparticles entrapped in PES membranes subsequently exposed to UV-irradiation have been reported to possess photo-catalytic activity. However, UV-irradiation methods still require special care in order to produce membranes with the best performance.

  1. A Dry Membrane Protection Technique to Allow Surface Acoustic Wave Biosensor Measurements of Biological Model Membrane Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Enachescu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Model membrane approaches have attracted much attention in biomedical sciences to investigate and simulate biological processes. The application of model membrane systems for biosensor measurements is partly restricted by the fact that the integrity of membranes critically depends on the maintenance of an aqueous surrounding, while various biosensors require a preconditioning of dry sensors. This is for example true for the well-established surface acoustic wave (SAW biosensor SAM®5 blue. Here, a simple drying procedure of sensor-supported model membranes is introduced using the protective disaccharide trehalose. Highly reproducible model membranes were prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, transferred to SAW sensors and supplemented with a trehalose solution. Membrane rehydration after dry incorporation into the SAW device becomes immediately evident by phase changes. Reconstituted model membranes maintain their full functionality, as indicated by biotin/avidin binding experiments. Atomic force microscopy confirmed the morphological invariability of dried and rehydrated membranes. Approximating to more physiological recognition phenomena, the site-directed immobilization of the integrin VLA-4 into the reconstituted model membrane and subsequent VCAM-1 ligand binding with nanomolar affinity were illustrated. This simple drying procedure is a novel way to combine the model membrane generation by Langmuir-Blodgett technique with SAW biosensor measurements, which extends the applicability of SAM®5 blue in biomedical sciences.

  2. Cellular membrane accommodation of copper-induced oxidative conditions in the coral Seriatopora caliendrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chuan-Ho, E-mail: chtang@nmmba.gov.tw [Institute of Marine Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, National Dong Hwa University, Pingtung, Taiwan, ROC (China); National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Pingtung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Ching-Yu [Institute of Environmental Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Shu-Hui [Center of General Education, National Kaohsiung Marine University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Wei-Hsien [National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Pingtung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Marine Biotechnology and Resources and Asia-Pacific Ocean Research Center, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Coral cells alter membrane lipid to accommodate copper-induce oxidative conditions • Coral membrane repair occur due to lipid alterations • Zooxanthellae release results from membrane repair by symbiosome fusion • Copper-induced lipid alterations perturb membrane-related functions in coral cells • Copper chronic effect on coral fitness are related to long-term membrane perturbation - Abstract: Oxidative stress has been associated with copper-induced toxicity in scleractinian corals. To gain insight into the accommodation of the cellular membrane to oxidative conditions, a pocilloporid coral, Seriatopora caliendrum, was exposed to copper at distinct, environmentally relevant dose for various lengths of time. Glycerophosphocholine profiling of the response of the coral to copper exposure was characterized using a validated method. The results indicate that coral lipid metabolism is programmed to induce membrane alterations in response to the cellular deterioration that occurs during the copper exposure period. Decreasing lyso-phosphatidylcholines and exchanging polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines for polyunsaturated plasmanylcholines were the initial actions taken to prevent membrane permeabilization. To relax/resist the resulting membrane strain caused by cell/organelle swelling, the coral cells inversely exchanged polyunsaturated plasmanylcholines for polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines and further increased the levels of monounsaturated glycerophosphocholines. At the same time, the levels of saturated phosphatidylcholines were also increased to increase membrane rigidity and protect against oxidative attack. Interestingly, such alterations in lipid metabolism were also required for membrane fusion to repair the deteriorated membranes by repopulating them with proximal lipid reservoirs, similar to symbiosome membranes. Additionally, increasing saturated and monounsaturated plasmanylcholines and inhibiting the suppression of saturated lyso

  3. Zebrafish larva as a reliable model for in vivo assessment of membrane remodeling involvement in the hepatotoxicity of chemical agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podechard, Normand; Chevanne, Martine; Fernier, Morgane; Tête, Arnaud; Collin, Aurore; Cassio, Doris; Kah, Olivier; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Sergent, Odile

    2016-11-28

    The easy-to-use in vivo model, zebrafish larva, is being increasingly used to screen chemical-induced hepatotoxicity, with a good predictivity for various mechanisms of liver injury. However, nothing is known about its applicability in exploring the mechanism called membrane remodeling, depicted as changes in membrane fluidity or lipid raft properties. The aim of this study was, therefore, to substantiate the zebrafish larva as a suitable in vivo model in this context. Ethanol was chosen as a prototype toxicant because it is largely described, both in hepatocyte cultures and in rodents, as capable of inducing a membrane remodeling leading to hepatocyte death and liver injury. The zebrafish larva model was demonstrated to be fully relevant as membrane remodeling was maintained even after a 1-week exposure without any adaptation as usually reported in rodents and hepatocyte cultures. It was also proven to exhibit a high sensitivity as it discriminated various levels of cytotoxicity depending on the extent of changes in membrane remodeling. In this context, its sensitivity appeared higher than that of WIF-B9 hepatic cells, which is suited for analyzing this kind of hepatotoxicity. Finally, the protection afforded by a membrane stabilizer, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), or by a lipid raft disrupter, pravastatin, definitely validated zebrafish larva as a reliable model to quickly assess membrane remodeling involvement in chemical-induced hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, this model, compatible with a high throughput screening, might be adapted to seek hepatotoxicants via membrane remodeling, and also drugs targeting membrane features to propose new preventive or therapeutic strategies in chemical-induced liver diseases. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Understanding Detergent Effects on Lipid Membranes: A Model Study of Lysolipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Feldborg, Lise Nørkjær

    2010-01-01

    -phosphatidylcholine lipids (LPCs) on 1-palmitoy1-2-oleyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) lipid membranes by use of isothermal titration calorimetry and vesicle fluctuation analysis. The membrane partition coefficient (K) and critical micelle concentration (cmc) are determined by isothermal titration calorimetry...... in terms of a phenomenological model based on continuum elastic theory, which yields information about the curvature-inducing properties of the LPC molecule. The results reveal: 1), an increase in the partition coefficient with increasing LPC acyl-chain length; and 2), that the degree of acyl...

  5. Ion transport through dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) induced transient water pores in cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Liu, Weirong; Zheng, Shengchao; Zhou, Li; Ye, Benlan; Qi, Zhi

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) increases membrane permeability, which makes it widely used as a vehicle to facilitate drug delivery across biological membranes. However, the mechanism of how DMSO increases membrane permeability has not been well understood. Recently, molecular dynamics simulations have demonstrated that DMSO can induce water pores in biological membranes, but no direct experimental evidence is so far available to prove the simulation result. Using FluxOR Tl⁺ influx assay and intracellular Ca²⁺ imaging technique, we studied the effect of DMSO on Tl⁺ and Ca²⁺ permeation across cell membranes. Upon application of DMSO on CHO-K1 cell line, Tl⁺ influx was transiently increased in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in Tl⁺ permeability induced by DMSO was not changed in the presence of blockers for K⁺ channel and Na⁺-K⁺ ATPase, suggesting that Tl⁺ permeates through transient water pores induced by DMSO to enter into the cell. In addition, Ca²⁺ permeability was significantly increased upon application of DMSO, indicating that the transient water pores induced by DMSO were non-selective pores. Furthermore, similar results could be obtained from RAW264.7 macrophage cell line. Therefore, this study provided experimental evidence to support the prediction that DMSO can induce transient water pores in cell membranes, which in turn facilitates the transport of active substances across membranes.

  6. Experimental investigation and modeling of industrial oily wastewater treatment using modified polyethersulfone ultrafiltration hollow fiber membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salahi, Abdolhamid; Mohammadi, Toraj [Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behbahani, Reza Mosayebi [Petroleum University of Technology (PUT), Ahwaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hemmati, Mahmood [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Hollow fiber membranes were prepared from polyethersulfone/additives/NMP and DMSO system via phase inversion induced by precipitation in non-solvent coagulation bath. The interaction effects of polyethylene-glycol (PEG), propionic-acid (PA), Tween-20, PEG molecular weight and polyvinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP) on morphology and performance of synthesized membranes were investigated. Taguchi method (L{sub 16} orthogonal array) was used initially to plan a minimum number of experiments. 32 membranes were synthesized (with two replications) and their permeation flux and TOC rejection properties to oily wastewater treatment were studied. The obtained results indicated that addition of PA to spinning dope decreases flux while it increases TOC rejection of prepared membranes. Also, the result shows that addition of PVP, Tween-20 and PEG content in spinning dope enhances permeation flux while reducing TOC rejection. The obtained results indicated that the synthesized membranes was effective and suitable for treatment of the oily wastewater to achieve up to 92.6, 98.2, and 98.5% removal of TOC, TSS, and OGC, respectively with a flux of 247.19 L/(m{sup 2}h). Moreover, Hermia's models were used for permeation flux decline prediction. Experimental data and models predictions were compared. The results showed that there is reasonable agreement between experimental data and the cake layer model followed by the intermediate blocking model.

  7. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  8. Insights into thermophilic archaebacterial membrane stability from simplified models of lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Charles H.; Nie, Huifen; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2007-05-01

    Lipid aggregation into fluid bilayers is an essential process for sustaining life. Simplified models of lipid structure, which allow for long time scales or large length scales not obtainable with all-atom simulations, have recently been developed and show promise for describing lipid dynamics in biological systems. Here, we describe two simplified models, a reduced-lipid model and a bola-lipid model for thermophilic bacterial membranes, developed for use with the rapid discrete molecular dynamics simulation method. In the reduced-lipid model, we represent the lipid chain by a series of three beads interacting through pairwise discrete potentials that model hydrophobic attractions between hydrocarbon tails in implicit solvent. Our phase diagram recapitulates those produced by continuous potential models with similar coarse-grained lipid representations. We also find that phase transition temperatures for our reduced-lipid model are dependent upon the flexibility of the lipid chain, giving an insight into archaebacterial membrane stability and prompting development of a bola-lipid model specific for archaebacteria lipids. With both the reduced-lipid and bola-lipid model, we find that the reduced flexibility inherent in archaebacteria lipids yields more stable bilayers as manifested by increased phase transition temperatures. The results of these studies provide a simulation methodology for lipid molecules in biological systems and show that discrete molecular dynamics is applicable to lipid aggregation and dynamics.

  9. Stability properties of elementary dynamic models of membrane transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Julio A

    2003-01-01

    Living cells are characterized by their capacity to maintain a stable steady state. For instance, cells are able to conserve their volume, internal ionic composition and electrical potential difference across the plasma membrane within values compatible with the overall cell functions. The dynamics of these cellular variables is described by complex integrated models of membrane transport. Some clues for the understanding of the processes involved in global cellular homeostasis may be obtained by the study of the local stability properties of some partial cellular processes. As an example of this approach, I perform, in this study, the neighborhood stability analysis of some elementary integrated models of membrane transport. In essence, the models describe the rate of change of the intracellular concentration of a ligand subject to active and passive transport across the plasma membrane of an ideal cell. The ligand can be ionic or nonionic, and it can affect the cell volume or the plasma membrane potential. The fundamental finding of this study is that, within the physiological range, the steady states are asymptotically stable. This basic property is a necessary consequence of the general forms of the expressions employed to describe the active and passive fluxes of the transported ligand.

  10. A streptococcal lipid toxin induces membrane permeabilization and pyroptosis leading to fetal injury

    OpenAIRE

    Whidbey, Christopher; Vornhagen, Jay; Gendrin, Claire; Boldenow, Erica; Samson, Jenny Mae; Doering, Kenji; Ngo, Lisa; Ezekwe, Ejiofor A D; Gundlach, Jens H; Elovitz, Michal A.; Liggitt, Denny; Duncan, Joseph A; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Group B streptococci (GBS) are Gram-positive bacteria that cause infections in utero and in newborns. We recently showed that the GBS pigment is hemolytic and increased pigment production promotes bacterial penetration of human placenta. However, mechanisms utilized by the hemolytic pigment to induce host cell lysis and the consequence on fetal injury are not known. Here, we show that the GBS pigment induces membrane permeability in artificial lipid bilayers and host cells. Membrane defects i...

  11. Graphene-Induced Pore Formation on Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Guangxin; Zhang, Yuanzhao; Luan, Binquan; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Zhou, Royce W.; Yang, Zaixing; Zhao, Lin; Xu, Jiaying; Luo, Judong; Zhou, Ruhong

    2017-01-01

    Examining interactions between nanomaterials and cell membranes can expose underlying mechanisms of nanomaterial cytotoxicity and guide the design of safer nanomedical technologies. Recently, graphene has been shown to exhibit potential toxicity to cells; however, the molecular processes driving its lethal properties have yet to be fully characterized. We here demonstrate that graphene nanosheets (both pristine and oxidized) can produce holes (pores) in the membranes of A549 and Raw264.7 cells, substantially reducing cell viability. Electron micrographs offer clear evidence of pores created on cell membranes. Our molecular dynamics simulations reveal that multiple graphene nanosheets can cooperate to extract large numbers of phospholipids from the membrane bilayer. Strong dispersion interactions between graphene and lipid-tail carbons result in greatly depleted lipid density within confined regions of the membrane, ultimately leading to the formation of water-permeable pores. This cooperative lipid extraction mechanism for membrane perforation represents another distinct process that contributes to the molecular basis of graphene cytotoxicity. PMID:28218295

  12. Membrane Phospholipid Redistribution in Cytokinesis: A Theoretical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-Wen AN; Wen-Zhou WU; Wei-Yi CHEN

    2005-01-01

    In cell mitosis, cytokinesis is a major deformation process, during which the site of the contractile ring is determined by the biochemical stimulus from asters of the mitotic apparatus, actin and myosin assembly is related to the motion of membrane phospholipids, and local distribution and arrangement of the microfilament cytoskeleton are different at different cytokinesis stages. Based on the Zinemanas-Nir model, a new model is proposed in this study to simulate the entire process by coupling the biochemical stimulus with the mechanical actions. There were three assumptions in this model: the movements of phospholipid proteins are driven by gradients of biochemical stimulus on the membrane surface; the local assembly of actin and myosin filament depends on the amount of phospholipid proteins at the same location;and the surface tension includes membrane tensions due to both the passive deformation of the membrane and the active contraction of actin filament, which is determined by microfilament redistribution and rearrangement. This model could explain the dynamic movement of microfilaments during cytokinesis and predict cell deformation. The calculated results from this model demonstrated that the reorientation of phospholipid proteins and the redistribution and reorientation of microfilaments may play a crucial role in cell division. This model may better represent the cytokinesis process by the introduction of biochemical stimulus.

  13. [Membrane model of the cupula of the vestibular semicircular canals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrachuk, A V; Shipov, A A; Sirenko, S P

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model of the time-course variations of the cupula of the semicircular canals of the vestibular apparatus is presented. The model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data which suggests that the cupular matter has viscosity-elasticity properties. Their role in the functioning of the vestibular apparatus is discussed in qualitative terms. The applicability of the membrane model to the description of the time-course variations of the cupula is considered.

  14. Investigating membrane nanoporation induced by bipolar pulsed electric fields via second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, E. K.; Ibey, B. L.; Beier, H. T.; Armani, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Electric pulses have become an effective tool for transporting cargo (DNA, drugs, etc.) across cell membranes. This enhanced transport is believed to occur through temporary pores formed in the plasma membrane. Traditionally, millisecond duration, monopolar (MP) pulses are used for electroporation, but bipolar (BP) pulses have proven equally effective as MP pulses with the added advantage of less cytotoxicity. With the goal of further reducing cytotoxic effects and inducing non-thermal, intra-cellular effects, researchers began investigating reduced pulse durations, pushing into the nanosecond regime. Cells exposed to these MP, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have shown increased repairable membrane permeability and selective channel activation. However, attempts to improve this further by moving to the BP pulse regime has proven unsuccessful. In the present work, we use second harmonic generation imaging to explore the structural effects of bipolar nsPEFs on the plasma membrane. By varying the temporal spacing between the pulse phases over several orders of magnitude and comparing the response to a single MP case, we systematically examine the disparity in cellular response. Our circuit-based model predicts that, as the temporal spacing increases several orders of magnitude, nanoporation increases and eventually exceeds the MP case. On the whole, our experimental data agree with this assertion; however, a detailed analysis of the data sets demonstrates that biological processes may play a larger role in the observed response than previously thought, dominating the effect for temporal spacing up to 5 μs. These findings could ultimately lead to understanding the biophysical mechanism underlying all electroporation.

  15. Modeling the Influence of Transport on Chemical Reactivity in Microbial Membranes: Mineral Precipitation/Dissolution Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmy, A. R.; Liu, C.; Clark, S.; Straatsma, T.; Rustad, J.

    2003-12-01

    It has long been known that microorganisms can alter the chemical composition of their immediate surroundings and influence such processes as ion uptake or adsorption and mineral precipitation dissolution. However, only recently have molecular imaging and molecular modeling capabilities been developed that begin to shed light on the nature of these processes at the nm to um scale at the surface of bacterial membranes. In this presentation we will show the results of recent molecular simulations of microbial surface reactions and describe our efforts to develop accurate non-equilibrium thermodynamic models for the microbial surface that can describe ion uptake and surface induced mineral precipitation. The thermodynamic models include the influence of the bacterial electrical double layer on the uptake of ions from solution and the removal, or exclusion, of ions from the surface of the cell, non-equilibrium diffusion and chemical reaction within the membrane, as well as a new thermodynamic approach to representing ion activities within the microbial membrane. In the latter case, the variability in the water content within the microbial membrane has a significant influence on the calculated mineral saturation indices. In such cases, we will propose the use of recently developed mixed solvent-electrolyte formalisms. Recent experimental data for mixed-solvent electrolyte systems will also be presented to demonstrate the potential impact of the variable water content on calculated ion activities within the membrane.

  16. Modeling and Simulation for Fuel Cell Polymer Electrolyte Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Hayashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have established methods to evaluate key properties that are needed to commercialize polyelectrolyte membranes for fuel cell electric vehicles such as water diffusion, gas permeability, and mechanical strength. These methods are based on coarse-graining models. For calculating water diffusion and gas permeability through the membranes, the dissipative particle dynamics–Monte Carlo approach was applied, while mechanical strength of the hydrated membrane was simulated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics. As a result of our systematic search and analysis, we can now grasp the direction necessary to improve water diffusion, gas permeability, and mechanical strength. For water diffusion, a map that reveals the relationship between many kinds of molecular structures and diffusion constants was obtained, in which the direction to enhance the diffusivity by improving membrane structure can be clearly seen. In order to achieve high mechanical strength, the molecular structure should be such that the hydrated membrane contains narrow water channels, but these might decrease the proton conductivity. Therefore, an optimal design of the polymer structure is needed, and the developed models reviewed here make it possible to optimize these molecular structures.

  17. Tension induced phase transitions in biomimetic fluid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Marc; Vlahovska, Petia

    2012-11-01

    Membranes in eukaryotic cells are mixtures of hundreds of lipid species. The lipid diversity enables membranes to phase separate and form domains, called rafts, which play a critical role in cell functions such as signaling and trafficking. The phase transitions underlying raft formation have been extensively studied as a function of temperature and composition. However, the third dimension of the phase diagram, i.e., the tension (2D pressure), is still unexplored because membrane tension is difficult to control and quantify. To overcome this challenge, we develop two approaches, capillary micromechanics and electrodeformation, in which the tension is regulated by the area dilation accompanying deformation of a vesicle (a closed membrane). The first technique consists of forcing an initially quasi-spherical vesicle through a tapered glass microcapillary, while the second method utilizes uniform electric fields to deform the vesicle into an ellipsoid. Domains are visualized using a fluorescent dye, which preferentially partitions in one of the phases. The experimental results suggest that the miscibility temperature (at which domains form in an initially homogeneous membrane) increases with applied tension. Domain motions and coarsening are also investigated.

  18. Perforin rapidly induces plasma membrane phospholipid flip-flop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil S Metkar

    Full Text Available The cytotoxic cell granule secretory pathway is essential for host defense. This pathway is fundamentally a form of intracellular protein delivery where granule proteases (granzymes from cytotoxic lymphocytes are thought to diffuse through barrel stave pores generated in the plasma membrane of the target cell by the pore forming protein perforin (PFN and mediate apoptotic as well as additional biological effects. While recent electron microscopy and structural analyses indicate that recombinant PFN oligomerizes to form pores containing 20 monomers (20 nm when applied to liposomal membranes, these pores are not observed by propidium iodide uptake in target cells. Instead, concentrations of human PFN that encourage granzyme-mediated apoptosis are associated with pore structures that unexpectedly favor phosphatidylserine flip-flop measured by Annexin-V and Lactadherin. Efforts that reduce PFN mediated Ca influx in targets did not reduce Annexin-V reactivity. Antigen specific mouse CD8 cells initiate a similar rapid flip-flop in target cells. A lipid that augments plasma membrane curvature as well as cholesterol depletion in target cells enhance flip-flop. Annexin-V staining highly correlated with apoptosis after Granzyme B (GzmB treatment. We propose the structures that PFN oligomers form in the membrane bilayer may include arcs previously observed by electron microscopy and that these unusual structures represent an incomplete mixture of plasma membrane lipid and PFN oligomers that may act as a flexible gateway for GzmB to translocate across the bilayer to the cytosolic leaflet of target cells.

  19. Ion induced changes in the structure of bordered pit membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkee eLee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Xylem hydraulic resistance varies with ion concentration in sap solution. It is assumed that this variation in resistance results from hydrogel like properties of pectins located in bordered pit membranes separating adjacent vessels. Although kinetics of the resistance change suggests swelling/deswelling behavior of the pectins, there is no direct evidence of this activity. In this report we provide evidence of structural changes in bordered pit membranes responding to variation in ionic concentration of solute around it using atomic force microscopy (AFM. AFM revealed bordered pit membranes as relatively smooth, soft and lacking any sharp edges surface when submerged in de-ionized water, in contrast to pictures from scanning electron microscope (SEM or AFM performed on air dry material. Exposure of the bordered pit membranes to 50 mM KCl solution resulted in significant changes in both surface physical properties with and elevation features as bordered pit membrane became harder, with visible edges of fibers and collapsed, while no change in porosity was observed. Analysis suggests a need for a major shift in our understanding to the physical bases of variable xylem resistance from change in porosity to change in pathway length. Findings support the role of actuating properties of hybrid hydrogel-cellulose materials in water redistribution and embolism resistance.

  20. Facilitated Anion Transport Induces Hyperpolarization of the Cell Membrane That Triggers Differentiation and Cell Death in Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Hernando, Elsa; Calabuig-Fariñas, Silvia; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Sahlholm, Kristoffer; Knöpfel, Thomas; García-Valverde, María; Rodilla, Ananda M; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Farràs, Rosa; Ciruela, Francisco; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2015-12-23

    Facilitated anion transport potentially represents a powerful tool to modulate various cellular functions. However, research into the biological effects of small molecule anionophores is still at an early stage. Here we have used two potent anionophore molecules inspired in the structure of marine metabolites tambjamines to gain insight into the effect induced by these compounds at the cellular level. We show how active anionophores, capable of facilitating the transmembrane transport of chloride and bicarbonate in model phospholipid liposomes, induce acidification of the cytosol and hyperpolarization of plasma cell membranes. We demonstrate how this combined effect can be used against cancer stem cells (CSCs). Hyperpolarization of cell membrane induces cell differentiation and loss of stemness of CSCs leading to effective elimination of this cancer cell subpopulation.

  1. Desalination membranes from functional block copolymer via non-solvent induced phase inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hyemin; Poelma, Justin; Leibfarth, Frank; Hawker, Craig; Bang, Joona

    2012-02-01

    Commercially available reverse osmosis (RO) and forward osmosis (FO) membranes are most commonly derived from materials such as polysulfone, polyimide, and cellulose acetate. While these membranes have improved the efficiency of the desalination process, they suffer from mechanical and chemical stability, fouling issues, and low fluxes. In this study, we combine a well-established membrane formation method, non-solvent-induced phase separation, with the self-assembly of a functional amphiphilic block copolymersAn amine and acid functional polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide-co-allyl glycidyl ether) were chosen for the membranes. Membranes were formed by casting a concentrated polymer solution (12 to 25 wt% polymer) on PET fabric followed by immersion in a non-solvent bath. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an asymmetric porous structure consisting of a dense skin layer on top of a highly porous layer. Membrane performance was investigating using an FO test cell under the seawater condition.

  2. Ultrafast spectroscopy of model biological membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Avishek

    2009-01-01

    In this PhD thesis, I have described the novel time-resolved sum-frequency generation (TR-SFG) spectroscopic technique that I developed during the course of my PhD research and used it study the ultrafast vibrational, structural and orientational dynamics of water molecules at model biological membr

  3. A kinetic model for the effects of vanadate on human erythrocyte membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张天蓝; 王夔

    1999-01-01

    The effects of vanadate on human erythrocyte membrane have been investigated with stopped-flow and equilibrium fluorescence quenching techniques. The equilibrium study showed a half-quenching concentration (K1/2) of 0.27 mmol·L-1. The stopped-flow experiment exhibited a fast rise (t1、2f~1s) and a slow drop (t1/2s 1~2 min) in fluorescence. Based on the results and that from the across membrane transport of vanadate, a kinetic model is proposed which suggests that the membrane proteins experience a series of conformational changes before and during the quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence. These changes are induced mainly by three kinds of interactions: (i) the long-distance, non-specific interaction between the vanadate and the erythrocyte membrane surface, (ⅱ) the charge interaction between the vanadate and parts of the membrane proteins, and(ⅲ) the binding of the vanadate to some membrane proteins.

  4. Interaction of Cytotoxic and Cytoprotective Bile Acids with Model Membranes: Influence of the Membrane Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, M; Ferreira, M J; Kozica, A; Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves da Silva, A; Saramago, B

    2015-08-18

    To understand the role of bile acids (BAs) in cell function, many authors have investigated their effect on biomembrane models which are less complex systems, but there are still many open questions. The present study aims to contribute for the deepening of the knowledge of the interaction between BAs and model membranes, in particular, focusing on the effect of BA mixtures. The cytotoxic deoxycholic acid (DCA), the cytoprotective ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and the equimolar mixture (DCA + UDCA) were investigated. Monolayers and liposomes were taken as model membranes with two lipid compositions: an equimolar mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (Chol)) traditionally associated with the formation of lipid rafts and an equimolar POPC/SM binary mixture. The obtained results showed that DCA causes the fluidization of monolayers and bilayers, leading to the eventual rupture of POPC/SM liposomes at high concentration. UDCA may provide a stabilization of POPC/SM membranes but has a negligible effect on the Chol-containing liposomes. In the case of equimolar mixture DCA/UDCA, the interactions depend not only on the lipid composition but also on the design of the experiment. The BA mixture has a greater impact on the monolayers than do pure BAs, suggesting a cooperative DCA-UDCA interaction that enhances the penetration of UDCA in both POPC/SM and POPC/SM/Chol monolayers. For the bilayers, the presence of UDCA in the mixture decreases the disturbing effect of DCA.

  5. Membrane invagination induced by Shiga toxin B-subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezeshkian, W.; Hansen, Allan Grønhøj; Johannes, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    -atom molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations we show that the molecular architecture of STxB enables the following sequence of events: the Gb3 binding sites on STxB are arranged such that tight avidity-based binding results in a small increment of local curvature. Membrane-mediated clustering of several...... specific interactions with Gb3 lipids, our study points to a generic molecular design principle for clathrin-independent endocytosis of nanoparticles....... toxin molecules then creates a tubular membrane invagination that drives toxin entry into the cell. This mechanism requires: (1) a precise molecular architecture of the STxB binding sites; (2) a fluid bilayer in order for the tubular invagination to form. Although, STxB binding to the membrane requires...

  6. DNA-Tile Structures Induce Ionic Currents through Lipid Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpfrich, Kerstin; Zettl, Thomas; Meijering, Anna E C; Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Kocabey, Samet; Liedl, Tim; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2015-05-13

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures have been used to create man-made transmembrane channels in lipid bilayers. Here, we present a DNA-tile structure with a nominal subnanometer channel and cholesterol-tags for membrane anchoring. With an outer diameter of 5 nm and a molecular weight of 45 kDa, the dimensions of our synthetic nanostructure are comparable to biological ion channels. Because of its simple design, the structure self-assembles within a minute, making its creation scalable for applications in biology. Ionic current recordings demonstrate that the tile structures enable ion conduction through lipid bilayers and show gating and voltage-switching behavior. By demonstrating the design of DNA-based membrane channels with openings much smaller than that of the archetypical six-helix bundle, our work showcases their versatility inspired by the rich diversity of natural membrane components.

  7. Shiga toxin induces membrane reorganization and formation of long range lipid order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovyeva, Vita; Johannes, Ludger; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2015-01-01

    microscopy. A content of 1% of glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) receptor lipids in a bilayer was used to bind the Shiga toxin B-subunit to the surface of gel domains. Binding of the Shiga toxin B-subunit to lipids led to the modulation of orientational membrane texture in gel domains and induced...... membrane reordering. When Shiga toxin was added above the lipid chain melting temperature, the toxin interaction with the membrane induced rearrangement and clustering of Gb3 lipids that resulted in the long range order and alignment of lipids in gel domains. The toxin induced redistribution of Gb3 lipids...... inside gel domains is governed by the temperature at which Shiga toxin was added to the membrane: above or below the phase transition. The temperature is thus one of the critical factors controlling lipid organization and texture in the presence of Shiga toxin. Lipid chain ordering imposed by Shiga toxin...

  8. Training-induced changes in membrane transport proteins of human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, C.

    2006-01-01

    for 6-8 weeks substantially increases the density of membrane proteins, whereas years of training (as performed by athletes) have no further effect. Studies suggest that training-induced changes at the protein level are important functionally. The underlying factors responsible for these changes......Training improves human physical performance by inducing structural and cardiovascular changes, metabolic changes, and changes in the density of membrane transport proteins. This review focuses on the training-induced changes in proteins involved in sarcolemmal membrane transport. It is concluded...... that the same type of training affects many transport proteins, suggesting that all transport proteins increase with training, and that both sprint and endurance training in humans increase the density of most membrane transport proteins. There seems to be an upper limit for these changes: intense training...

  9. Liposome clusters with shear stress-induced membrane permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Tamura, Ryota; Natsume, Tomotaka

    2013-09-01

    Clusters of negatively charged liposomes were prepared by the addition of Ca(2+) and characterized in their structure and membrane permeability under shear stress. The liposomes mainly used were composed of zwitterionic 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), 20 mol% negatively charged 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) and 30 mol% cholesterol. The liposomes with mean diameter of 193 nm were aggregated into the clusters with a distribution peak at about 1.5 μm in the 50mM Tris buffer solution of pH 8.5 at the lipid and Ca(2+) concentrations of 1.0mM and 40 mM, respectively. More than 90% of liposomes were redispersed at the Ca(2+) concentration of 80 mM. POPG-rich liposomes (POPC/POPG/cholesterol=5:65:30 [lipid]=1.0mM) were irreversibly aggregated at [Ca(2+)]≥ 10 mM, indicating the significant contribution of POPC to the reversible clustering of liposomes. The membranes of liposome clusters were impermeable to 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF) in the static liquid system at 25°C due to the decrease in specific surface area of the liposomal system. In the shear flow, in clear contrast, continuous membrane permeation of CF was observed at the shear rate of 1.5 × 10(3)s(-1), exhibiting comparable membrane permeability to the non-clustered liposomes. The theoretical analysis of modified DLVO potential indicated that liposome membranes were not in contact with each other within the clusters. Therefore, the liposome clusters are structurally flexible under the applied shear stress, providing sufficient lipid membrane-water interfacial area for the permeation of CF. The results obtained would be important to control the formation of liposome clusters and their permeabilization for biochemical and biomedical applications.

  10. Fabrication of ordered lamellar polyacrylamide/P123 composite membranes via solvent-evaporation-induced self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Fan, Yubing; Hu, Jun; Liu, Honglai

    2009-03-01

    A series of composite membranes of poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (P123) and polyacrylamide (PAM) have been successfully prepared by solvent-evaporation-induced self-assembly. Micellar self-assembly of P123 in aqueous solution plays an important role as a model for the formation of composite membranes. XRD patterns show that the synthesized compositions are in a lamellar mesostructure. The lattice spacing changes with P123 concentration: the higher the concentration of P123, the smaller the lattice spacing of the composite membranes. The data on sizes and zeta potentials of pure p-PAM aggregates, P123 micelles, p-PAM/P123 mixtures, and c-PAM/P123 composite aggregates suggest that interactions take place between PAM and P123 aggregations. The fabrication of the lamellar membranes via water-evaporation-induced self-assembly is recorded by fluorescent emission spectroscopy and dynamic light-scattering methods. Based on analysis of the results, a tentative mechanism for the formation of the lamellar membranes has been proposed.

  11. Phenylarsine Oxide Inhibits the Fusicoccin-Induced Activation of Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivari, Claudio; Albumi, Cristina; Pugliarello, Maria Chiara; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism by which fusicoccin (FC) induces the activation of the plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase, we used phenylarsine oxide (PAO), a known inhibitor of protein tyrosine-phosphatases. PAO was supplied in vivo in the absence or presence of FC to radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings and cultured Arabidopsis cells prior to PM extraction. Treatment with PAO alone caused a slight decrease of PM H+-ATPase activity and, in radish, a decrease of PM-associated 14-3-3 proteins. When supplied prior to FC, PAO drastically inhibited FC-induced activation of PM H+-ATPase, FC binding to the PM, and the FC-induced increase of the amount of 14-3-3 associated with the PM. On the contrary, PAO was completely ineffective on all of the above-mentioned parameters when supplied after FC. The H+-ATPase isolated from PAO-treated Arabidopsis cells maintained the ability to respond to FC if supplied with exogenous, nonphosphorylated 14-3-3 proteins. Altogether, these results are consistent with a model in which the dephosphorylated state of tyrosine residues of a protein(s), such as 14-3-3 protein, is required to permit FC-induced association between the 14-3-3 protein and the PM H+-ATPase. PMID:10677439

  12. Tuning of Block Copolymer Membrane Morphology through Water Induced Phase Inversion Technique

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2016-06-01

    Isoporous membranes are attractive for the regulation and detection of transport at the molecular level. A well-defined asymmetric membranes from diblock copolymers with an ordered nanoporous membrane morphologies were fabricated by the combination of block copolymer self-assembly and non-solvent-induced phase separation (NIPS) technique. This is a straightforward and fast one step procedure to develop integrally anisotropic (“asymmetric”) membranes having isoporous top selective layer. Membranes prepared via this method exhibit an anisotropic cross section with a thin separation layer supported from underneath a macroporous support. These membrane poses cylindrical pore structure with ordered nanopores across the entire membrane surfaces with pore size in the range from 20 to 40 nm. Tuning the pore morphology of the block copolymer membranes before and after fabrication are of great interest. In this thesis, we first investigated the pore morphology tuning of asymmetric block copolymer membrane by complexing with small organic molecules. We found that the occurrence of hydrogen-bond formation between PS-b-P4VP block copolymer and –OH/ –COOH functionalized organic molecules significantly tunes the pore morphology of asymmetric nanoporous membranes. In addition, we studied the complexation behavior of ionic liquids with PS-b-P4VP block copolymer in solutions and investigated their effect on final membrane morphology during the non-solvent induced phase separation process. We found that non-protic ionic liquids facilitate the formation of hexagonal nanoporous block copolymer structure, while protic ionic liquids led to a lamella-structured membrane. Secondly, we demonstrated the catalytic activity of the gold nanoparticle-enhanced hollow fiber membranes by the reduction of nitrophenol. Also, we systematically investigated the pore morphology of isoporous PS-b-P4VP using 3D imaging technique. Thirdly, we developed well-distributed silver nanoparticles on the

  13. Inefficacy of osmotic backwash induced by sodium chloride salt solution in controlling SWRO membrane fouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, A. Mohammed; Al-Jeshi, Subhi; Saeed, Mohamed O.; Alreweli, Ali

    2014-12-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of osmotic backwash induced by high salt (NaCl) concentration solution on feed side of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, online and offline, in controlling membrane fouling and therefore minimizing/eliminating the need for chemical cleaning. SWRO membranes were deliberately fouled by feeding seawater from an open intake located on the Arabian Gulf Coast without dosing chemicals. The fouled membranes were subjected to offline cleaning with the salt solution of up to 25 % concentration. Despite the partial removal of foulants from the membrane surface, SWRO membrane performance could not be restored, indicating the ineffectiveness of osmotic backwash in aiding offline salt cleaning. Similarly, online osmotic backwash was found to be not only ineffective in removing foulants from membrane surfaces but actually increased the fouling rate, as indicated by faster fouling rates compared to other cases. Although the driving force required for the osmotic backwash existed, the generated back flow proved to be insufficient to detach foulants from membrane surfaces. During the study period, the average SWRO membrane flux was maintained between 19 and 23 LMH, whereas the average generated back flow flux by high salt concentration solution was only 11 LMH, which was not adequate to remove foulants from membrane surfaces. Moreover, it seems that the membrane configuration as well as inherent microstructure of SWRO membrane places certain constraints on the osmotic backwash process and renders osmotic backwash ineffective in tackling SWRO membrane fouling. Hence, chemical cleaning is essential to restore SWRO membrane performance whenever fouling occurs, and the use of highly concentrated salt solution does not have any significant benefit. Membrane autopsy revealed only an insignificant accumulation of biofouling layer despite the absence of disinfection. However, it was shown that culturable biofilm bacteria species

  14. New hybrid model of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui-min; CAO Guang-yi; ZHU Xin-jian

    2007-01-01

    Model and simulation are good tools for design optimization of fuel cell systems. This paper proposes a new hybrid model of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The hybrid model includes physical component and black-box component. The physical component represents the well-known part of PEMFC, while artificial neural network (ANN) component estimates the poorly known part of PEMFC. The ANN model can compensate the performance of the physical model. This hybrid model is implemented on Matlab/Simulink software. The hybrid model shows better accuracy than that of the physical model and ANN model. Simulation results suggest that the hybrid model can be used as a suitable and accurate model for PEMFC.

  15. An Inducible Reconstitution System for the Real-Time Kinetic Analysis of Protease Activity and Inhibition Inside the Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R P; Urban, S

    2017-01-01

    Intramembrane proteases are an ancient and diverse group of multispanning membrane proteins that cleave transmembrane substrates inside the membrane to effect a wide range of biological processes. As proteases, a clear understanding of their function requires kinetic dissection of their catalytic mechanism, but this is difficult to achieve for membrane proteins. Kinetic measurements in detergent systems are complicated by micelle fusion/exchange, which introduces an additional kinetic step and imposes system-specific behaviors (e.g., cooperativity). Conversely, kinetic analysis in proteoliposomes is hindered by premature substrate cleavage during coreconstitution, and lack of methods to quantify proteolysis in membranes in real time. In this chapter, we describe a method for the real-time kinetic analysis of intramembrane proteolysis in model liposomes. Our assay is inducible, because the enzyme is held inactive by low pH during reconstitution, and fluorogenic, since fluorescence emission from the substrate is quenched near lipids but restored upon proteolytic release from the membrane. The precise measurement of initial reaction velocities continuously in real time facilitates accurate steady-state kinetic analysis of intramembrane proteolysis and its inhibition inside the membrane environment. Using real data we describe a step-by-step strategy to implement this assay for essentially any intramembrane protease.

  16. Kinetic modelling of coupled transport across biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korla, Kalyani; Mitra, Chanchal K

    2014-04-01

    In this report, we have modelled a secondary active co-transporter (symport and antiport), based on the classical kinetics model. Michaelis-Menten model of enzyme kinetics for a single substrate, single intermediate enzyme catalyzed reaction was proposed more than a hundred years ago. However, no single model for the kinetics of co-transport of molecules across a membrane is available in the literature We have made several simplifying assumptions and have followed the basic Michaelis-Menten approach. The results have been simulated using GNU Octave. The results will be useful in general kinetic simulations and modelling.

  17. Effects of the local anesthetic benzocaine on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Villena, Fernando; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2004-04-01

    The interaction of the local anesthetic benzocaine with the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models is described. The latter consisted of isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphospatidylcholine (DMPC), and phospholipid multilayers of DMPC and dimyristoylphospatidyletanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Optical and scanning electron microscopy of human erythrocytes revealed that benzocaine induced the formation of echinocytes. Experiments performed on IUM and DMPC LUV by fluorescence spectroscopy showed that benzocaine interacted with the phospholipid bilayer polar groups and hydrophobic acyl chains. X-ray diffraction analysis of DMPC confirmed these results and showed that benzocaine had no effects on DMPE. The effect on sodium transport was also studied using the isolated toad skin. Electrophysiological measurements indicated a significant decrease in the potential difference (PD) and in the short-circuit current (Isc) after the application of benzocaine, reflecting inhibition of active ion transport.

  18. A Simple Experimental Model to Investigate Force Range for Membrane Nanotube Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lor, Chai; Mattson-Hoss, Michelle K; Xu, Jing; Hirst, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    The presence of membrane tubules in living cells is essential to many biological processes. In cells, one mechanism to form nanosized lipid tubules is via molecular motor induced bilayer extraction. In this paper, we describe a simple experimental model to investigate the forces required for lipid tube formation using kinesin motors anchored to DOPC vesicles. Previous related studies have used molecular motors actively pulling on the membrane to extract a nanotube. Here, we invert the system geometry; molecular motors are used as static anchors linking DOPC vesicles to a two-dimensional microtubule network and an external flow is introduced to generate nanotubes facilitated by the drag force. We found that a drag force of ~7 pN was sufficient for tubule extraction for vesicles ranging from 1 to 2 um in radius. By our method, we found that the force generated by a single molecular motor was sufficient for membrane tubule extraction from a spherical lipid vesicle.

  19. Understanding Peptide Dendrimer Interactions with Model Cell Membrane Mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup

    membranes or highly conserved motifs, effectively making resistance due to mutations less likely to develop and spread. For this we studied the conditions to form supported lipid bilayers with basic systems and further established a protocol for producing biomimetic bacterial model membranes via the vesicle...... fusion method, which presents improved means for studying drug-membrane interactions in the future. The interaction mechanism of a family of dendrimers was examined and in particular one dendrimer (BALY) was extensively studied by the combined use of quartz crystal microbalance, atomic force microscopy...... and neutron reection. The application of several complementary surface-sensitive techniques allowed for systematically addressing the interface-related processes and gain insights into different aspects of the interaction. BALY was found to interact via a uidity-dependent mechanism. It inserted into the outer...

  20. Desipramine induces disorder in cholesterol-rich membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Salonen, Emppu; Mäkelä, Anna R

    2009-01-01

    canine parvovirus (CPV), a virus known to interact with endosomal membranes and sphingomyelin, as an intracellular probe. DMI was found to cause retention of the virus in intracellular vesicular structures leading to the inhibition of viral proliferation. This implies that DMI has a deleterious effect...

  1. Phase behaviors and membrane properties of model liposomes: Temperature effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsing-Lun; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2014-09-01

    The phase behaviors and membrane properties of small unilamellar vesicles have been explored at different temperatures by dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The vesicles spontaneously formed by model lipids exhibit pre-transition from gel to ripple phase and main transition from ripple to liquid phase. The vesicle shape exhibits the faceted feature at low temperature, becomes more sphere-like with increasing temperature, but loses its sphericity at high temperature. As the temperature rises, the vesicle size grows but the membrane thickness declines. The main transition (Tm) can be identified by the inflection point. The membrane structural characteristics are analyzed. The inner and outer leaflets are asymmetric. The length of the lipid tail and area density of the lipid head in both leaflets decrease with increasing temperature. However, the mean lipid volume grows at low temperature but declines at high temperature. The membrane mechanical properties are also investigated. The water permeability grows exponentially with increasing T but the membrane tension peaks at Tm. Both the bending and stretching moduli have their minima near Tm. Those results are consistent with the experimental observations, indicating that the main signatures associated with phase transition are clearly observed in small unilamellar vesicles.

  2. Phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine ceramides in model skin lipid membranes: permeability and biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Školová, Barbora; Kováčik, Andrej; Tesař, Ondřej; Opálka, Lukáš; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2017-05-01

    Ceramides based on phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine are essential constituents of the skin lipid barrier that protects the body from excessive water loss. The roles of the individual ceramide subclasses in regulating skin permeability and the reasons for C4-hydroxylation of these sphingolipids are not completely understood. We investigated the chain length-dependent effects of dihydroceramides, sphingosine ceramides (with C4-unsaturation) and phytoceramides (with C4-hydroxyl) on the permeability, lipid organization and thermotropic behavior of model stratum corneum lipid membranes composed of ceramide/lignoceric acid/cholesterol/cholesteryl sulfate. Phytoceramides with very long C24 acyl chains increased the permeability of the model lipid membranes compared to dihydroceramides or sphingosine ceramides with the same chain lengths. Either unsaturation or C4-hydroxylation of dihydroceramides induced chain length-dependent increases in membrane permeability. Infrared spectroscopy showed that C4-hydroxylation of the sphingoid base decreased the relative ratio of orthorhombic chain packing in the membrane and lowered the miscibility of C24 phytoceramide with lignoceric acid. The phase separation in phytoceramide membranes was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. In contrast, phytoceramides formed strong hydrogen bonds and highly thermostable domains. Thus, the large heterogeneity in ceramide structures and in their aggregation mechanisms may confer resistance towards the heterogeneous external stressors that are constantly faced by the skin barrier. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) induced intermolecular cross-linking of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Wang, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Xian-Qing; Ren, Jing; Zeng, Cheng-Ming

    2011-03-15

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that EGCG possesses prooxidant potential in biological systems, including modifying proteins, breaking DNA strands and inducing the generation of reactive oxygen species. In the present study, the prooxidant effect of EGCG on erythrocyte membranes was investigated. SDS-PAGE and NBT-staining assay were utilized to detect the catechol-protein adducts that generated upon treating the membranes with EGCG. The results indicated that EGCG was able to bind covalently to sulfhydryl groups of membrane proteins, leading to the formation of protein aggregates with intermolecular cross-linking. We suggested that the catechol-quinone originated from the oxidation of EGCG acted as a cross-linker on which peptide chains were combined through thiol-S-alkylation at the C2- and C6-sites of the gallyl ring. EGC showed similar effects as EGCG on the ghost membranes, whereas ECG and EC did not, suggesting that a structure with a gallyl moiety is a prerequisite for a catechin to induce the aggregation of membrane proteins and to deplete membrane sulfhydryls. EDTA and ascorbic acid inhibited the EGCG-induced aggregation of membrane proteins by blocking the formation of catechol-quinone. The information of the present study may provide a fresh insight into the prooxidant effect and cytotoxicity of tea catechins.

  4. Mathematical and Computational Modeling of Polymer Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Sehribani

    In this thesis a comprehensive review of fuel cell modeling has been given and based on the review, a general mathematical fuel cell model has been developed in order to understand the physical phenomena governing the fuel cell behavior and in order to contribute to the efforts investigating the optimum performance at different operating conditions as well as with different physical parameters. The steady state, isothermal model presented here accounts for the combined effects of mass and species transfer, momentum conservation, electrical current distribution through the gas channels, the electrodes and the membrane, and the electrochemical kinetics of the reactions in the anode and cathode catalyst layers. One of the important features of the model is that it proposes a simpler modified pseudo-homogeneous/agglomerate catalyst layer model which takes the advantage of the simplicity of pseudo-homogenous modeling while taking into account the effects of the agglomerates in the catalyst layer by using experimental geometric parameters published. The computation of the general mathematical model can be accomplished in 3D, 2D and 1D with the proper assumptions. Mainly, there are two computational domains considered in this thesis. The first modeling domain is a 2D Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) model including the modified agglomerate/pseudo-homogeneous catalyst layer modeling with consistent treatment of water transport in the MEA while the second domain presents a 3D model with different flow filed designs: straight, stepped and tapered. COMSOL Multiphysics along with Batteries and Fuel Cell Module have been used for 2D & 3D model computations while ANSYS FLUENT PEMFC Module has been used for only 3D two-phase computation. Both models have been validated with experimental data. With 2D MEA model, the effects of temperature and water content of the membrane as well as the equivalent weight of the membrane on the performance have been addressed. 3D COMSOL simulation

  5. Percolative model of proton conductivity of Nafion {sup registered} membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costamagna, Paola; Grosso, Simone; Di Felice, Renzo [DICheP, Department of Chemical and Process Engineering ' G.B. Bonino' , University of Genoa, Via Opera Pia 15, 16145 Genoa (Italy)

    2008-04-01

    A model is proposed for the simulation of Nafion {sup registered} proton conductivity, where it is assumed that proton conduction occurs only in the water present in the membrane pores. Water is considered to be present in the pores due to two different phenomena: adsorption and capillary condensation. In the latter case, the pore is flooded and proton conduction occurs throughout the whole pore section. The conditions under which capillary condensation occurs are simulated in the model through the Kelvin-Cohan equation for condensation. The Kelvin-Cohan equation is a function of RH, temperature and the pore radius; the larger the pore, the higher the RH for which capillary condensation takes place. If the conditions for capillary condensation are not satisfied, then water is present in the pore due to adsorption under the form of a water layer which covers the pore walls and provides a path for proton conduction. In this case, the modified Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) equation has been used in the model to simulate the thickness of the water layer. In both cases of capillary condensation and adsorption, the conductance g of a pore has then been calculated through the formula g = {kappa}S/l, where {kappa} is the proton conductivity of water, S the cross-section of the pore volume which is occupied by water, and l is the pore length. Pores of different size are present in the membrane (data of pore size distribution have been extracted from the literature); connectivity of the water layers present in the different pores is necessary in order to achieve a continuous path of proton conduction through the membrane, which is a percolation problem. To this end, the structure of the membrane pores has been simulated in the model through the effective medium approximation (EMA). The simulation results of proton conductivity of the membrane show good agreement with literature experimental data, even when varying the RH operating conditions. (author)

  6. Myelin basic protein induces neuron-specific toxicity by directly damaging the neuronal plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS insults may cause massive demyelination and lead to the release of myelin-associated proteins including its major component myelin basic protein (MBP. MBP is reported to induce glial activation but its effect on neurons is still little known. Here we found that MBP specifically bound to the extracellular surface of the neuronal plasma membrane and induced neurotoxicity in vitro. This effect of MBP on neurons was basicity-dependent because the binding was blocked by acidic lipids and competed by other basic proteins. Further studies revealed that MBP induced damage to neuronal membrane integrity and function by depolarizing the resting membrane potential, increasing the permeability to cations and other molecules, and decreasing the membrane fluidity. At last, artificial liposome vesicle assay showed that MBP directly disturbed acidic lipid bilayer and resulted in increased membrane permeability. These results revealed that MBP induces neurotoxicity through its direct interaction with acidic components on the extracellular surface of neuronal membrane, which may suggest a possible contribution of MBP to the pathogenesis in the CNS disorders with myelin damage.

  7. Anisotropic viscoelastic models in large deformation for architectured membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebouah, Marie; Chagnon, Gregory; Heuillet, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Due to the industrial elaboration process, membranes can have an in-plane anisotropic mechanical behaviour. In this paper, anisotropic membranes elaborated with two different materials were developed either by calendering or by inducing a force in one direction during the process. Experimental tests are developed to measure the differences of mechanical behaviour for both materials in different in-plane properties: stiffness, viscoelasticity and stress-softening. A uniaxial formulation is developed, and a homogenisation by means of a sphere unit approach is used to propose a three-dimensional formulation to represent the materials behaviour. An evolution of the mechanical parameters, depending on the direction, is imposed to reproduce the anisotropic behaviour of the materials. Comparison with experimental data highlights very promising results.

  8. Modeling Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    The objective of this doctoral thesis was to develop reliable steady-state and transient component models suitable to asses-, develop- and optimize proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Several components in PEM fuel cell systems were characterized and modeled. The developed component...... cell systems. Consequences of indirectly fueling PEM stacks with hydrocarbons using reforming technology were investigated using a PEM stack model including CO poisoning kinetics and a transient Simulink steam reforming system model. Aspects regarding the optimization of PEM fuel cell systems...

  9. Computational model for amoeboid motion: Coupling membrane and cytosol dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moure, Adrian; Gomez, Hector

    2016-10-01

    A distinguishing feature of amoeboid motion is that the migrating cell undergoes large deformations, caused by the emergence and retraction of actin-rich protrusions, called pseudopods. Here, we propose a cell motility model that represents pseudopod dynamics, as well as its interaction with membrane signaling molecules. The model accounts for internal and external forces, such as protrusion, contraction, adhesion, surface tension, or those arising from cell-obstacle contacts. By coupling the membrane and cytosol interactions we are able to reproduce a realistic picture of amoeboid motion. The model results are in quantitative agreement with experiments and show how cells may take advantage of the geometry of their microenvironment to migrate more efficiently.

  10. Mesoscale computational studies of membrane bilayer remodeling by curvature-inducing proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishnan, N; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes constitute boundaries of cells and cell organelles. Physico-chemical mechanisms at the atomic scale are dictated by protein-lipid interaction strength, lipid composition, lipid distribution in the vicinity of the protein, shape and amino acid composition of the protein, and its amino acid contents. The specificity of molecular interactions together with the cooperativity of multiple proteins induce and stabilize complex membrane shapes at the mesoscale. These shapes span a wide spectrum ranging from the spherical plasma membrane to the complex cisternae of the Golgi apparatus. Mapping the relation between the protein-induced deformations at the molecular scale and the resulting mesoscale morphologies is key to bridging cellular experiments across the various length scales. In this review, we focus on the theoretical and computational methods used to understand the phenomenology underlying protein-driven membrane remodeling. The suite of methods discussed here can be tailored to applicatio...

  11. Outer membrane proteins induced by iron deficiency in Anabaena sp.PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanling Dong; Xudong Xu

    2009-01-01

    Iron deficiency can induce cyanobacteria to synthesize siderophore receptor proteins on the outer membrane to enhance the uptake of iron. In this study, an outer membrane of high purity was prepared from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 based on aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning and discontinuous sucrose density ultra-centrifugation, and the induction of outer membrane proteins by iron deficiency was investigated using 2-D gel electrophoresis. At least five outer membrane proteins were newly synthesized or significantly up-regulated in cells transferred to iron-deficient conditions, which were all identified to be siderophore receptor proteins according to MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. Bacterial luciferase reporter genes luxAB were employed to monitor the transcription of the encoding genes. The genes were induced by iron deficiency at the transcriptional level in different responsive modes. Luciferase activity expressed from an iron-regulated promoter may be used as a bioreporter for utilizable iron in natural water samples.

  12. Membrane lipid profiles of coral responded to zinc oxide nanoparticle-induced perturbations on the cellular membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuan-Ho; Lin, Ching-Yu; Lee, Shu-Hui; Wang, Wei-Hsien

    2017-06-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnOs) released from popular sunscreens used during marine recreation apparently endanger corals; however, the known biological effects are very limited. Membrane lipids constitute the basic structural element to create cell a dynamic structure according to the circumstance. Nano-specific effects have been shown to mechanically perturb the physical state of the lipid membrane, and the cells accommodating the actions of nZnOs can be involved in the alteration of the membrane lipid composition. To gain insight into the effects of nanoparticles on coral, glycerophosphocholine (GPC) profiling of the coral Seriatopora caliendrum exposed to nZnOs was performed in this study. Increasing lyso-GPCs, docosapentaenoic acid-possessing GPCs and docosahexaenoic acid-possessing GPCs and decreasing arachidonic acid-possessing GPCs were the predominant changes responded to nZnO exposure in the coral. A backfilling of polyunsaturated plasmanylcholines was observed in the coral exposed to nZnO levels over a threshold. These changes can be logically interpreted as an accommodation to nZnOs-induced mechanical disturbances in the cellular membrane based on the biophysical properties of the lipids. Moreover, the coral demonstrated a difference in the changes in lipid profiles between intra-colonial functionally differentiated polyps, indicating an initial membrane composition-dependent response. Based on the physicochemical properties and physiological functions of these changed lipids, some chronic biological effects can be incubated once the coral receives long-term exposure to nZnOs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Membrane Sealant Poloxamer P188 Protects Against Isoproterenol Induced Cardiomyopathy in Dystrophin Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sali Arpana

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an increasing cause of death in patients. The absence of dystrophin leads to loss of membrane integrity, cell death and fibrosis in cardiac muscle. Treatment of cardiomyocyte membrane instability could help prevent cardiomyopathy. Methods Three month old female mdx mice were exposed to the β1 receptor agonist isoproterenol subcutaneously and treated with the non-ionic tri-block copolymer Poloxamer P188 (P188 (460 mg/kg/dose i.p. daily. Cardiac function was assessed using high frequency echocardiography. Tissue was evaluated with Evans Blue Dye (EBD and picrosirius red staining. Results BL10 control mice tolerated 30 mg/kg/day of isoproterenol for 4 weeks while death occurred in mdx mice at 30, 15, 10, 5 and 1 mg/kg/day within 24 hours. Mdx mice tolerated a low dose of 0.5 mg/kg/day. Isoproterenol exposed mdx mice showed significantly increased heart rates (p Conclusions This model suggests that chronic intermittent intraperitoneal P188 treatment can prevent isoproterenol induced cardiomyopathy in dystrophin deficient mdx mice.

  14. Pseudomonas putida response in membrane bioreactors under salicylic acid-induced stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Rosas, Irene; González, Elena; Gutierrez-Lavin, Antonio; Diaz, Mario

    2014-02-28

    Starvation and changing feeding conditions are frequently characteristics of wastewater treatment plants. They are typical causes of unsteady-state operation of biological systems and provoke cellular stress. The response of a membrane bioreactor functioning under feed-induced stress conditions is studied here. In order to simplify and considerably amplify the response to stress and to obtain a reference model, a pure culture of Pseudomonas putida was selected instead of an activated sludge and a sole substrate (salicylic acid) was employed. The system degraded salicylic acid at 100-1100mg/L with a high level of efficiency, showed rapid acclimation without substrate or product inhibition phenomena and good stability in response to unsteady states caused by feed variations. Under starvation conditions, specific degradation rates of around 15mg/gh were achieved during the adaptation of the biomass to the new conditions and no biofilm formation was observed during the first days of experimentation using an initial substrate to microorganisms ratio lower than 0.1. When substrate was added to the reactor as pulses resulting in rapidly changing concentrations, P. putida growth was observed only for substrate to microorganism ratios higher than 0.6, with a maximum YX/S of 0.5g/g. Biofilm development under changing feeding conditions was fast, biomass detachment only being significant for biomass concentrations on the membrane surface that were higher than 16g/m(2).

  15. Elastic cell membranes induce long-lived anomalous thermal diffusion on nearby particles

    CERN Document Server

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The physical approach of a small particle (virus, medical drug) to the cell membrane represents the crucial first step before active internalization and is governed by thermal diffusion. Using a fully analytical theory we show that the stretching and bending of the elastic membrane by the approaching particle induces a memory in the system which leads to anomalous diffusion, even though the particle is immersed in a purely Newtonian liquid. For typical cell membranes the transient subdiffusive regime extends beyond 10ms and can enhance residence times and binding rates up to 50\\%. Our analytical predictions are validated by numerical simulations.

  16. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B.N. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Lathika, K.M. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mishra, K.P. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)]. E-mail: kpm@magnum.barc.ernet.in

    2006-03-15

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after {gamma}-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  17. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, B. N.; Lathika, K. M.; Mishra, K. P.

    2006-03-01

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after γ-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  18. Helfrich model of membrane bending: from Gibbs theory of liquid interfaces to membranes as thick anisotropic elastic layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campelo, Felix; Arnarez, Clement; Marrink, Siewert J; Kozlov, Michael M

    2014-06-01

    Helfrich model of membrane bending elasticity has been most influential in establishment and development of Soft-Matter Physics of lipid bilayers and biological membranes. Recently, Helfrich theory has been extensively used in Cell Biology to understand the phenomena of shaping, fusion and fission of cellular membranes. The general background of Helfrich theory on the one hand, and the ways of specifying the model parameters on the other, are important for quantitative treatment of particular biologically relevant membrane phenomena. Here we present the origin of Helfrich model within the context of the general Gibbs theory of capillary interfaces, and review the strategies of computing the membrane elastic moduli based on considering a lipid monolayer as a three-dimensional thick layer characterized by trans-monolayer profiles of elastic parameters. We present the results of original computations of these profiles by a state-of-the-art numerical approach.

  19. A model for a liquid membrane separation stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The coupled mixer-settlers having a common settling zone suggested for use to extract fission products from a conversion reactor blanket are analogues of membrane apparatuses and at a first glance in terms of hydrodynamics do not differ from conventional mixer-settlers. However, the common settling zone complicates both the design solutions and their modelling. For example, different emulsion types can result in mixers and it is not known how this fact will affect phenomena such as separation rates, disperse phase entrainment under conditions close to flooding. For initial studies of the feasibility of the process in principle and the primary optimization of the structure of the transfer scheme one needs to have a model and a program to calculate the statics of a multistage membrane facility of this type.

  20. Simulation modeling of supported lipid membranes - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirtz, Michael; Kumar, Naresh; Chi, Lifeng

    2014-03-01

    Lipid membranes are of great importance for many biological systems and biotechnological applications. One method to gain a profound understanding of the dynamics in lipid membranes and their interaction with other system components is by modeling these systems by computer simulations. Many different approaches have been undertaken in this endeavor that have led to molecular level insights into the underlying mechanisms of several experimental observations and biological processes with an extremely high temporal resolution. As compared to the free-standing lipid bilayers, there are fewer simulation studies addressing the systems of supported lipid membranes. Nevertheless, these have significantly enhanced our understanding of the behavior of lipid layers employed in applications spanning from biosensors to drug delivery and for biological processes such as the breathing cycle of lung surfactants. In this review, we give an account of the state of the art of methods and applications of the simulations of supported lipid bilayers, interfacial membranes at the air/water interface and on solid surfaces.

  1. Time resolved multiphoton excited fluorescence probes in model membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, this thesis reports on a time-resolved fluorescence study of several fluorescent probes successfully employed in membrane research. Concentration and temperature effects on fluorescence anisotropy parameters are demonstrated by DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and PPO in DPPC lipid bilayers. Fluorescence anisotropy has shown that trans-stilbene and Rhd 800 have a two-site location in membranes. Multiphoton induced fluorescence of DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl in liposomes was measured using 800nm excitation with a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. P-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl are new probes for membranes. Comparison of one and multiphoton excitation results has demonstrated higher initial anisotropy with multiphoton excitation than with one-photon excitation. The rotational times were identical for one and multiphoton excitation, indicating the absence of significant local heating or sample perturbation. Excimer formation of alpha-NPO w...

  2. Aluminum Trichloride Induces Hypertension and Disturbs the Function of Erythrocyte Membrane in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuyue; Cao, Zheng; Sun, Xudong; Zuang, Cuicui; Huang, Wanyue; Li, Yanfei

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum (Al) is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. Al accumulates in erythrocyte and causes toxicity on erythrocyte membrane. The dysfunction of erythrocyte membrane is a potential risk to hypertension. The high Al content in plasma was associated with hypertension. To investigate the effect of AlCl3 on blood pressure and the function of erythrocyte membrane, the rats were intragastrically exposed to 0, 64(1/20 LD50), 128(1/10 LD50), and 256(1/5 LD50) mg/kg body weight AlCl3 in double distilled water for 120 days, respectively. Then, we determined the systolic and mean arterial blood pressures of rats, the osmotic fragility, the percentage of membrane proteins, the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Mg(2+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase, catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-pX), and malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the erythrocyte membrane in this experiment. The results showed that AlCl3 elevated the systolic and mean arterial blood pressure of rats, increased the osmotic fragility, decreased the percentage of membrane protein, inhibited the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Mg(2+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase, CAT, SOD and GSH-pX, and increased the MDA content of erythrocyte membrane. These results indicate that AlCl3 may induce hypertension by disturbing the function of erythrocyte membrane.

  3. Cold induces micro- and nano-scale reorganization of lipid raft markers at mounds of T-cell membrane fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    Full Text Available Whether and how cold causes changes in cell-membrane or lipid rafts remain poorly characterized. Using the NSOM/QD and confocal imaging systems, we found that cold caused microscale redistribution of lipid raft markers, GM1 for lipid and CD59 for protein, from the peripheral part of microdomains to the central part on Jurkat T cells, and that cold also induced the nanoscale size-enlargement (1/3- to 2/3-fold of the nanoclusters of lipid raft markers and even the colocalization of GM1 and CD59 nanoclusters. These findings indicate cold-induced lateral rearrangement/coalescence of raft-related membrane heterogeneity. The cold-induced re-distribution of lipid raft markers under a nearly-natural condition provide clues for their alternations, and help to propose a model in which raft lipids associate themselves or interact with protein components to generate functional membrane heterogeneity in response to stimulus. The data also underscore the possible cold-induced artifacts in early-described cold-related experiments and the detergent-resistance-based analyses of lipid rafts at 4 degrees C, and provide a biophysical explanation for recently-reported cold-induced activation of signaling pathways in T cells. Importantly, our fluorescence-topographic NSOM imaging demonstrated that GM1/CD59 raft markers distributed and re-distributed at mounds but not depressions of T-cell membrane fluctuations. Such mound-top distribution of lipid raft markers or lipid rafts provides spatial advantage for lipid rafts or contact molecules interacting readily with neighboring cells or free molecules.

  4. The Effect of Lidocaine · HCl on the Fluidity of Native and Model Membrane Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Seop; Jung, Tae-Sang; Noh, Yang-Ho; Kim, Woo-Sung; Park, Won-Ick; Kim, Young-Soo; Chung, In-Kyo; Sohn, Uy Dong; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Bae, Moon-Kyoung; Jang, Hye-Ock; Yun, Il

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigated the mechanism of pharmacological action of local anesthetic and provide the basic information about the development of new effective local anesthetics. Fluorescent probe techniques were used to evaluate the effect of lidocaine·HCl on the physical properties (transbilayer asymmetric lateral and rotational mobility, annular lipid fluidity and protein distribution) of synaptosomal plasma membrane vesicles (SPMV) isolated from bovine cerebral cortex, and liposomes of total lipids (SPMVTL) and phospholipids (SPMVPL) extracted from the SPMV. An experimental procedure was used based on selective quenching of 1,3-di(1-pyrenyl)propane (Py-3-Py) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) by trinitrophenyl groups, and radiationless energy transfer from the tryptophans of membrane proteins to Py-3-Py. Lidocaine·HCl increased the bulk lateral and rotational mobility of neuronal and model membrane lipid bilayes, and had a greater fluidizing effect on the inner monolayer than the outer monolayer. Lidocaine·HCl increased annular lipid fluidity in SPMV lipid bilayers. It also caused membrane proteins to cluster. The most important finding of this study is that there is far greater increase in annular lipid fluidity than that in lateral and rotational mobilities by lidocaine·HCl. Lidocaine·HCl alters the stereo or dynamics of the proteins in the lipid bilayers by combining with lipids, especially with the annular lipids. In conclusion, the present data suggest that lidocaine, in addition to its direct interaction with proteins, concurrently interacts with membrane lipids, fluidizing the membrane, and thus inducing conformational changes of proteins known to be intimately associated with membrane lipid.

  5. Ex vivo model for pre-clinical evaluation of dialyzers containing new membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiout, A; Meinhold, H; Jörres, A; Krieg, R; Kessel, M; Tretzel, J; Baurmeister, U

    1985-01-01

    The ex vivo model which reflects hemodialysis modulating factors during the first twenty minutes of blood membrane interaction, is applicable as a pre-clinical test for new membranes. The biocompatibility of a new cellulosic membrane (MC) proved to be superior to regenerated cellulose and comparable to synthetic membranes such as PAN regarding complement activation.

  6. Perforate on CHO cell membranes induced by electromagnetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... 2Anatomy Department and K. K. Leung Brain Research Center, Fourth Military Medical University, Changle ... now, most research on EMP-induced effects was focused .... EMP is a form of high energy non-ionizing radiation. It.

  7. Nanosecond pulsed electric field induced cytoskeleton, nuclear membrane and telomere damage adversely impact cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, M; Fox, P; Buescher, S; Kolb, J

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the effects of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) on three human cell lines and demonstrated cell shrinkage, breakdown of the cytoskeleton, nuclear membrane and chromosomal telomere damage. There was a differential response between cell types coinciding with cell survival. Jurkat cells showed cytoskeleton, nuclear membrane and telomere damage that severely impacted cell survival compared to two adherent cell lines. Interestingly, disruption of the actin cytoskeleton in adherent cells prior to nsPEF exposure significantly reduced cell survival. We conclude that nsPEF applications are able to induce damage to the cytoskeleton and nuclear membrane. Telomere sequences, regions that tether and stabilize DNA to the nuclear membrane, are severely compromised as measured by a pan-telomere probe. Internal pore formation following nsPEF applications has been described as a factor in induced cell death. Here we suggest that nsPEF induced physical changes to the cell in addition to pore formation need to be considered as an alternative method of cell death. We suggest nsPEF electrochemical induced depolymerization of actin filaments may account for cytoskeleton and nuclear membrane anomalies leading to sensitization.

  8. Human T Cell Crosstalk Is Induced by Tumor Membrane Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzana, Ronny; Eisenberg, Galit; Merims, Sharon; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Pato, Aviad; Yefenof, Eitan; Engelstein, Roni; Peretz, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC). Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+T-APCs). We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1) Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2) Fratricide (killing) of CD8+T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response. PMID:25671577

  9. Human T cell crosstalk is induced by tumor membrane transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Uzana

    Full Text Available Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC. Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+ T-APCs. We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+ T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1 Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2 Fratricide (killing of CD8+ T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response.

  10. MIM-Induced Membrane Bending Promotes Dendritic Spine Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarikangas, Juha; Kourdougli, Nazim; Senju, Yosuke; Chazal, Genevieve; Segerstråle, Mikael; Minkeviciene, Rimante; Kuurne, Jaakko; Mattila, Pieta K; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M; Becker, Lore; Racz, Ildikó; Hans, Wolfgang; Klopstock, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; von Ossowski, Lotta; Taira, Tomi; Lappalainen, Pekka; Rivera, Claudio; Hotulainen, Pirta

    2015-06-22

    Proper morphogenesis of neuronal dendritic spines is essential for the formation of functional synaptic networks. However, it is not known how spines are initiated. Here, we identify the inverse-BAR (I-BAR) protein MIM/MTSS1 as a nucleator of dendritic spines. MIM accumulated to future spine initiation sites in a PIP2-dependent manner and deformed the plasma membrane outward into a proto-protrusion via its I-BAR domain. Unexpectedly, the initial protrusion formation did not involve actin polymerization. However, PIP2-dependent activation of Arp2/3-mediated actin assembly was required for protrusion elongation. Overexpression of MIM increased the density of dendritic protrusions and suppressed spine maturation. In contrast, MIM deficiency led to decreased density of dendritic protrusions and larger spine heads. Moreover, MIM-deficient mice displayed altered glutamatergic synaptic transmission and compatible behavioral defects. Collectively, our data identify an important morphogenetic pathway, which initiates spine protrusions by coupling phosphoinositide signaling, direct membrane bending, and actin assembly to ensure proper synaptogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mapping Cd²⁺-induced membrane permeability changes of single live cells by means of scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filice, Fraser P; Li, Michelle S M; Henderson, Jeffrey D; Ding, Zhifeng

    2016-02-18

    Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) is a powerful, non-invasive, analytical methodology that can be used to investigate live cell membrane permeability. Depth scan SECM imaging allowed for the generation of 2D current maps of live cells relative to electrode position in the x-z or y-z plane. Depending on resolution, one depth scan image can contain hundreds of probe approach curves (PACs). Individual PACs were obtained by simply extracting vertical cross-sections from the 2D image. These experimental PACs were overlaid onto theoretically generated PACs simulated at specific geometry conditions. Simulations were carried out using 3D models in COMSOL Multiphysics to determine the cell membrane permeability coefficients at different locations on the surface of the cells. Common in literature, theoretical PACs are generated using a 2D axially symmetric geometry. This saves on both compute time and memory utilization. However, due to symmetry limitations of the model, only one experimental PAC right above the cell can be matched with simulated PAC data. Full 3D models in this article were developed for the SECM system of live cells, allowing all experimental PACs over the entire cell to become usable. Cd(2+)-induced membrane permeability changes of single human bladder (T24) cells were investigated at several positions above the cell, displaced from the central axis. The experimental T24 cells under study were incubated with Cd(2+) in varying concentrations. It is experimentally observed that 50 and 100 μM Cd(2+) caused a decrease in membrane permeability, which was uniform across all locations over the cell regardless of Cd(2+) concentration. The Cd(2+) was found to have detrimental effects on the cell, with cells shrinking in size and volume, and the membrane permeability decreasing. A mapping technique for the analysis of the cell membrane permeability under the Cd(2+) stress is realized by the methodology presented.

  12. Pseudomonas putida response in membrane bioreactors under salicylic acid-induced stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, Sergio; Rosas, Irene; González, Elena; Gutierrez-Lavin, Antonio; Diaz, Mario, E-mail: mariodiaz@uniovi.es

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • MBR under feed-induced stress conditions: starvation and changing feeding conditions. • High capacity of MBR to withstand high variations in feed loads. • Slow biofilm formation under starvation conditions during the first days. • Observed growth of P. putida for substrate to microorganism ratio higher than 0.6 g/g. • Maximum specific growth rate and growth yield values of around 37.5 h{sup −1} and 0.5 g/g. - Abstract: Starvation and changing feeding conditions are frequently characteristics of wastewater treatment plants. They are typical causes of unsteady-state operation of biological systems and provoke cellular stress. The response of a membrane bioreactor functioning under feed-induced stress conditions is studied here. In order to simplify and considerably amplify the response to stress and to obtain a reference model, a pure culture of Pseudomonas putida was selected instead of an activated sludge and a sole substrate (salicylic acid) was employed. The system degraded salicylic acid at 100–1100 mg/L with a high level of efficiency, showed rapid acclimation without substrate or product inhibition phenomena and good stability in response to unsteady states caused by feed variations. Under starvation conditions, specific degradation rates of around 15 mg/g h were achieved during the adaptation of the biomass to the new conditions and no biofilm formation was observed during the first days of experimentation using an initial substrate to microorganisms ratio lower than 0.1. When substrate was added to the reactor as pulses resulting in rapidly changing concentrations, P. putida growth was observed only for substrate to microorganism ratios higher than 0.6, with a maximum Y{sub X/S} of 0.5 g/g. Biofilm development under changing feeding conditions was fast, biomass detachment only being significant for biomass concentrations on the membrane surface that were higher than 16 g/m{sup 2}.

  13. Mutant Brucella abortus membrane fusogenic protein induces protection against challenge infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Filho, Job Alves; de Paulo Martins, Vicente; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Santos, Nathalia V; de Oliveira, Fernanda Souza; Menezes, Gustavo B; Azevedo, Vasco; Cravero, Silvio Lorenzo; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2015-04-01

    Brucella species can cause brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes serious livestock economic losses and represents a public health threat. The mechanism of virulence of Brucella spp. is not yet fully understood. Therefore, it is crucial to identify new molecules that serve as virulence factors to better understand this host-pathogen interplay. Here, we evaluated the role of the Brucella membrane fusogenic protein (Mfp) and outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19) in bacterial pathogenesis. In this study, we showed that B. abortus Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan deletion mutant strains have reduced persistence in vivo in C57BL/6 and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) knockout (KO) mice. Additionally, 24 h after macrophage infection with a Δmfp::kan or Δomp19::kan strain expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) approximately 80% or 65% of Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs) retained the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP-1, respectively, whereas around 60% of BCVs containing wild-type S2308 were found in LAMP-1-negative compartments. B. abortus Δomp19::kan was attenuated in vivo but had a residual virulence in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, whereas the Δmfp::kan strain had a lower virulence in these same mouse models. Furthermore, Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan strains were used as live vaccines. Challenge experiments revealed that in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, the Δmfp::kan strain induced greater protection than the vaccine RB51 and protection similar that of vaccine S19. However, a Δomp19::kan strain induced protection similar to that of RB51. Thus, these results demonstrate that Brucella Mfp and Omp19 are critical for full bacterial virulence and that the Δmfp::kan mutant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate in future studies.

  14. Optomechanically induced transparency in a membrane-in-the-middle setup at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuza, M.; Biancofiore, C.; Bawaj, M.; Molinelli, C.; Galassi, M.; Natali, R.; Tombesi, P.; Di Giuseppe, G.; Vitali, D.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the analog of electromagnetically induced transparency in a room temperature cavity optomechanics setup formed by a thin semitransparent membrane within a Fabry-Pérot cavity. Due to destructive interference, a weak probe field is completely reflected by the cavity when the pump beam is resonant with the motional red sideband of the cavity. Under this condition we infer a significant slowing down of light of hundreds of microseconds, which is easily tuned by shifting the membrane along the cavity axis. We also observe the associated phenomenon of electromagnetically induced amplification which occurs due to constructive interference when the pump is resonant with the blue sideband.

  15. Modeling and optimization of membrane lifetime in dead-end ultra filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zondervan, Edwin; Roffel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a membrane lifetime model is developed and experimentally validated. The lifetime model is based on the Weibull probability density function. The lifetime model can be used to determine an unambiguous characteristic membrane lifetime. Experimental results showed that membrane lifetime

  16. The Critical Role of Membrane Cholesterol in Salmonella-Induced Autophagy in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chen Huang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It was previously observed that plasma membrane cholesterol plays a critical role in the Salmonella-induced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent (PI3K-dependent anti-inflammatory response in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs. The PI3K/Akt pathway is associated with autophagy which has emerged as a critical mechanism of host defense against several intracellular bacterial pathogens. Plasma membrane contributes directly to the formation of early Atg16L1-positive autophagosome precursors. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the role of plasma membrane cholesterol on the Salmonella-induced autophagy in IECs. By using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD, it was demonstrated that disruption of membrane cholesterol by MBCD enhanced NOD2 and Atg16L1 proteins expression in membrane, and autophagic LC3II proteins expression and LC3 punctae in Salmonella-infected Caco-2 cells, which was counteracted by Atg16L1 siRNA. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2 siRNA enhanced the Salmonella-induced activation of Akt in Caco-2 cells. However, inhibitors of Akt or extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK had no significant effect on Salmonella-induced autophagy Beclin 1 or LC3 proteins expression. In conclusion, our study suggests that cholesterol accumulation in the plasma membrane at the entry site of Salmonella results in the formation of Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV and decreased autophagy. Our results offer mechanistic insights on the critical role of membrane cholesterol in the pathogenesis of Salmonella infection in intestinal epithelial cells and the therapeutic potential of its antagonists.

  17. Membrane regulation of the stress response from prokaryotic models to mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigh, Laszlo; Nakamoto, Hitoshi; Landry, Jacques; Gomez-Munoz, Antonio; Harwood, John L; Horvath, Ibolya

    2007-10-01

    "Membrane regulation" of stress responses in various systems is widely studied. In poikilotherms, membrane rigidification could be the first reaction to cold perception: reducing membrane fluidity of membranes at physiological temperatures is coupled with enhanced cold inducibility of a number of genes, including desaturases (see J.L. Harwood's article in this Proceedings volume). A similar role of changes in membrane physical state in heat (oxidative stress, etc.) sensing- and signaling gained support recently from prokaryotes to mammalian cells. Stress-induced remodeling of membrane lipids could influence generation, transduction, and deactivation of stress signals, either through global effects on the fluidity of the membrane matrix, or by specific interactions of boundary (or raft) lipids with receptor proteins, lipases, ion channels, etc. Our data point to membranes not only as targets of stress, but also as sensors in activating a stress response.

  18. Crystalline polymorphism induced by charge regulation in ionic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cheuk-Yui; Palmer, Liam C; Kewalramani, Sumit; Qiao, Baofu; Stupp, Samuel I; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2013-10-08

    The crystallization of molecules with polar and hydrophobic groups, such as ionic amphiphiles and proteins, is of paramount importance in biology and biotechnology. By coassembling dilysine (+2) and carboxylate (-1) amphiphiles of various tail lengths into bilayer membranes at different pH values, we show that the 2D crystallization process in amphiphile membranes can be controlled by modifying the competition of long-range and short-range interactions among the polar and the hydrophobic groups. The pH and the hydrophobic tail length modify the intermolecular packing and the symmetry of their crystalline phase. For hydrophobic tail lengths of 14 carbons (C14), we observe the coassembly into crystalline bilayers with hexagonal molecular ordering via in situ small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. As the tail length increases, the hexagonal lattice spacing decreases due to an increase in van der Waals interactions, as demonstrated by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. For C16 and C18 we observe a reentrant crystalline phase transition sequence, hexagonal-rectangular-C-rectangular-P-rectangular-C-hexagonal, as the solution pH is increased from 3 to 10.5. The stability of the rectangular phases, which maximize tail packing, increases with increasing tail length. As a result, for very long tails (C22), the possibility of observing packing symmetries other than rectangular-C phases diminishes. Our work demonstrates that it is possible to systematically exchange chemical and mechanical energy by changing the solution pH value within a range of physiological conditions at room temperature in bilayers of molecules with ionizable groups.

  19. On ripples and rafts: Curvature induced nanoscale structures in lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Friederike; Dolezel, Stefan; Lenz, Olaf; Meinhardt, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    We develop an elastic theory that predicts the spontaneous formation of nanoscale structures in lipid bilayers which locally phase separate between two phases with different spontaneous monolayer curvature. The theory rationalizes in a unified manner the observation of a variety of nanoscale structures in lipid membranes: Rippled states in one-component membranes, lipid rafts in multicomponent membranes. Furthermore, we report on recent observations of rippled states and rafts in simulations of a simple coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers, which are compatible with experimental observations and with our elastic model.

  20. Penetration of alkali atoms throughout a graphene membrane: theoretical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalov, D W; Virojanadara, C

    2012-03-07

    Theoretical studies of penetration of various alkali atoms (Li, Na, Rb, Cs) throughout a graphene membrane grown on a silicon carbide substrate are reported and compared with recent experimental results. Results of first principles modeling demonstrate a rather low (about 0.8 eV) energy barrier for the formation of temporary defects in the carbon layer required for the penetration of Li at a high concentration of adatoms, a higher (about 2 eV) barrier for Na, and barriers above 4 eV for Rb and Cs. Experiments prove migration of lithium adatoms from the graphene surface to the buffer layer and SiC substrate at room temperature, sodium at 100 °C and impenetrability of the graphene membrane for Rb and Cs. Differences between epitaxial and free-standing graphene for the penetration of alkali ions are also discussed.

  1. Preparation and Characterization of Hydrophilically Modified PVDF Membranes by a Novel Nonsolvent Thermally Induced Phase Separation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningen Hu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a nonsolvent thermally-induced phase separation (NTIPS method was first proposed to fabricate hydrophilically-modified poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF membranes to overcome the drawbacks of conventional thermally-induced phase separation (TIPS and nonsolvent-induced phase separation (NIPS methods. Hydrophilically-modified PVDF membranes were successfully prepared by blending in hydrophilic polymer polyvinyl alcohol (PVA at 140 °C. A series of PVDF/PVA blend membranes was prepared at different total polymer concentrations and blend ratios. The morphological analysis via SEM indicated that the formation mechanism of these hydrophilically-modified membranes was a combined NIPS and TIPS process. As the total polymer concentration increased, the tensile strength of the membranes increased; meanwhile, the membrane pore size, porosity and water flux decreased. With the PVDF/PVA blend ratio increased from 10:0 to 8:2, the membrane pore size and water flux increased. The dynamic water contact angle of these membranes showed that the hydrophilic properties of PVDF/PVA blend membranes were prominently improved. The higher hydrophilicity of the membranes resulted in reduced membrane resistance and, hence, higher permeability. The total resistance Rt of the modified PVDF membranes decreased significantly as the hydrophilicity increased. The irreversible fouling related to pore blocking and adsorption fouling onto the membrane surface was minimal, indicating good antifouling properties.

  2. Analysis of the galanin-induced decrease in membrane excitability in mudpuppy parasympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, R L; Konopka, L M

    1991-01-01

    Previously, we showed that the neuropeptide galanin hyperpolarizes and decreases membrane excitability of mudpuppy parasympathetic neurons [Konopka L. M., McKeon T. W. and Parsons R. L. (1989) J. Physiol. 410, 107-122]. We also demonstrated that membrane excitability remains depressed when the agonist-induced potential change is negated electrotonically. We hypothesized that galanin inhibits the membrane conductances associated with spike generation. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that the decreased excitability is due to a galanin-induced increase in membrane potassium conductance which reduces the effectiveness of subsequent depolarizing stimuli. Therefore, in the present study we tested, with the galanin-induced hyperpolarization negated, whether the galanin-induced increased membrane potassium conductance was responsible for the decreased excitability. The results showed that the galanin-induced decreased excitability was not dependent on the peak amplitude of the galanin-induced hyperpolarization. Furthermore, the decreased excitability occurred in cells in which there was no measurable galanin-induced hyperpolarization. Moreover, in most cells the galanin-induced decrease in input resistance, measured at the peak of the hyperpolarization (3-25 mV), was less than 15% and when the hyperpolarization was negated electronically, the decrease was even less (approximately 2%). These results indicated that when the hyperpolarization was negated, the galanin-induced increase in potassium conductance was not responsible for the decreased excitability. In preparations pretreated with 5 mM tetraethylammonium, galanin decreased excitability which indicated that a galanin-induced decrease in the calcium-dependent potassium current was not necessary for the decreased excitability. Galanin also decreased excitability in preparations exposed to either 1-3 microM tetrodotoxin or 100-200 microM cadmium. Following galanin application, the threshold for initiation of

  3. Biophysical studies of cholesterol in unsaturated phospholipid model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Justin Adam

    Cellular membranes contain a staggering diversity of lipids. The lipids are heterogeneously distributed to create regions, or domains, whose physical properties differ from the bulk membrane and play an essential role in modulating the function of resident proteins. Many basic questions pertaining to the formation of these lateral assemblies remain. This research employs model membranes of well-defined composition to focus on the potential role of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their interaction with cholesterol (chol) in restructuring the membrane environment. Omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs are the main bioactive components of fish oil, whose consumption alleviates a variety of health problems by a molecular mechanism that is unclear. We hypothesize that the incorporation of PUFAs into membrane lipids and the effect they have on molecular organization may be, in part, responsible. Chol is a major constituent in the plasma membrane of mammals. It determines the arrangement and collective properties of neighboring lipids, driving the formation of domains via differential affinity for different lipids. The molecular organization of 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-eicosapentaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PEPC-d31) and 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PDPC-d31) in membranes with sphingomyelin (SM) and chol (1:1:1 mol) was compared by solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy. Eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are the two major n-3 PUFAs found in fish oil, while PEPC-d31 and PDPC-d31 are phospholipids containing the respective PUFAs at the sn-2 position and a perdeuterated palmitic acid at the sn-1 position. Analysis of spectra recorded as a function of temperature indicates that in both cases, formation of PUFA-rich (less ordered) and SM-rich (more ordered) domains occurred. A surprisingly substantial proportion of PUFA was found to infiltrate the more ordered domain. There was almost twice as much DHA (65%) as EPA (30%). The implication is that n-3

  4. Drought-induced xylem pit membrane damage in aspen and balsam poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillabrand, Rachel M; Hacke, Uwe G; Lieffers, Victor J

    2016-10-01

    Drought induces an increase in a tree's vulnerability to a loss of its hydraulic conductivity in many tree species, including two common in western Canada, trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) and balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera). Termed 'cavitation fatigue' or 'air-seeding fatigue', the mechanism of this phenomenon is not well understood, but hypothesized to be a result of damage to xylem pit membranes. To examine the validity of this hypothesis, the effect of drought on the porosity of pit membranes in aspen and balsam poplar was investigated. Controlled drought and bench dehydration treatments were used to induce fatigue and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to image pit membranes for relative porosity evaluations from air-dried samples after ethanol dehydration. A significant increase in the diameter of the largest pore was found in the drought and dehydration treatments of aspen, while an increase in the percentage of porous pit membranes was found in the dehydration treatments of both species. Additionally, the location of the largest pore per pit membrane was observed to tend toward the periphery of the membrane.

  5. Decavanadate induces mitochondrial membrane depolarization and inhibits oxygen consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, S S; Gutiérrez-Merino, C; Aureliano, M

    2007-05-01

    Decavanadate induced rat liver mitochondrial depolarization at very low concentrations, half-depolarization with 39 nM decavanadate, while it was needed a 130-fold higher concentration of monomeric vanadate (5 microM) to induce the same effect. Decavanadate also inhibits mitochondrial repolarization induced by reduced glutathione in vitro, with an inhibition constant of 1 microM, whereas no effect was observed up to 100 microM of monomeric vanadate. The oxygen consumption by mitochondria is also inhibited by lower decavanadate than monomeric vanadate concentrations, i.e. 50% inhibition is attained with 99 M decavanadate and 10 microM monomeric vanadate. Thus, decavanadate is stronger as mitochondrial depolarization agent than as inhibitor of mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Up to 5 microM, decavanadate does not alter mitochondrial NADH levels nor inhibit neither F(O)F(1)-ATPase nor cytochrome c oxidase activity, but it induces changes in the redox steady-state of mitochondrial b-type cytochromes (complex III). NMR spectra showed that decameric vanadate is the predominant vanadate species in decavanadate solutions. It is concluded that decavanadate is much more potent mitochondrial depolarization agent and a more potent inhibitor of mitochondrial oxygen consumption than monomeric vanadate, pointing out the importance to take into account the contribution of higher oligomeric species of vanadium for the biological effects of vanadate solutions.

  6. MICROPOROUS PVDF-HFP-BASED POLYMER MEMBRANES FORMED FROM SUPERCRITICAL CO2 INDUCED PHASE SEPARATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Microporous poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene)(PVDF-HFP)membranes following supercritical CO2 induced phase separation process were prepared using four solvents.The solid electrolytes of PVDF-HFP were formed by microporous PVDF-HFP membranes filled and swollen by a liquid electrolyte.The effect of the solvents on the morphology and structure,electrolyte absorptions and lithium ionic conductivity of the activated membranes were investigated.It was approved that all the membrane had the similar"sponge-like"and asymmetric structure when different solvent was used.As the mutual affinity between solvent and supercritical CO2 decreased,the membrane porosity and the average pore diameter increased.The PVDF-HFP membrane with porosity at 88% and pore size at 10 μm were successfully prepared.The uptake of electrolyte solution and lithium ionic conductivity could reach 487 wt% and 3.09×10-3 S/cm respectively for obtained membrane.

  7. Hydrophilic modification of polyethersulfone porous membranes via a thermal-induced surface crosslinking approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Li-Jun; Zhao, Wen-Zhen

    2009-05-01

    A thermal-induced surface crosslinking process was employed to perform a hydrophilic surface modification of PES porous membranes. Difunctional poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) was used as the main crosslinking modifier. The addition of trifunctional trimethylolpropane trimethylacrylate (TMPTMA) into the reaction solutions accelerated the crosslinking progress of PEGDA on PES membranes. The membrane surface morphology and chemical composition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. The mass gains (MG) of the modified membranes could be conveniently modulated by varying the PEGDA concentration and crosslinking time. The measurements of water contact angle showed that the hydrophilicity of PES membranes was remarkably enhanced by the coating of crosslinked PEGDA layer. When a moderate mass gain of about 150 μg/cm 2 was reached, both the permeability and anti-fouling ability of PES membranes could be significantly improved. Excessive mass gain not only contributed little to the anti-fouling ability, but also brought a deteriorated permeability to PES membranes.

  8. Composite Membrane Formation by Combination of Reaction-Induced and Nonsolvent-Induced Phase Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Aburabie, Jamaliah

    2017-05-25

    A novel method of preparing skinned asymmetric membranes with two distinctive layers is described: a top layer composed of chemically cross-linked polymer chains (dense layer) and a bottom layer of non-cross-linked polymer chains (porous substructure). The method consists of two simple steps that are compatible with industrial membrane fabrication facilities. Unlike conventional processes to prepare asymmetric membranes, with this approach it is possible to finely control the structure and functionalities of the final membrane. The thickness of the dense layer can be easily controlled over several orders of magnitude and targeted functional groups can be readily incorporated in it.

  9. Lateralized differences in tympanic membrane temperature, but not induced mood, are related to episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propper, Ruth E; Barr, Taylor D; Brunyé, Tad T

    2015-03-01

    The present research examined the effects of pre-encoding and pre-recall induced mood on episodic memory. It was hypothesized that happy and/or angry mood prior to encoding (increasing left hemisphere activity), in tandem with fearful mood prior to recall (increasing right hemisphere activity) would be associated with superior episodic memory. It was also hypothesized that tympanic membrane measures (TMT), indicative of hemispheric activity, would change as a function of induced mood. Although subjectively-experienced mood induction was successful, pre-encoding and pre-recall mood did not alter memory, and only altered TMT in the pre-encoding fear and pre-recall angry mood induction conditions. Interestingly, baseline absolute difference between left and right TMT, a measure of differential hemispheric activity, regardless of the direction of that activity, was significantly positively related to number of total words written, number of correctly recalled words, and corrected recall score. This same TMT measure pre-encoding, regardless of specific mood, was significantly negatively related to false recall. Results are discussed in terms the HERA model of episodic memory, and in the nature of interhemispheric interaction involved in episodic recall.

  10. Outer membrane vesicles derived from Escherichia coli induce systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyong-Su Park

    Full Text Available Sepsis, characterized by a systemic inflammatory state that is usually related to Gram-negative bacterial infection, is a leading cause of death worldwide. Although the annual incidence of sepsis is still rising, the exact cause of Gram-negative bacteria-associated sepsis is not clear. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs, constitutively secreted from Gram-negative bacteria, are nano-sized spherical bilayered proteolipids. Using a mouse model, we showed that intraperitoneal injection of OMVs derived from intestinal Escherichia coli induced lethality. Furthermore, OMVs induced host responses which resemble a clinically relevant condition like sepsis that was characterized by piloerection, eye exudates, hypothermia, tachypnea, leukopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, dysfunction of the lungs, hypotension, and systemic induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6. Our study revealed a previously unidentified causative microbial signal in the pathogenesis of sepsis, suggesting OMVs as a new therapeutic target to prevent and/or treat severe sepsis caused by Gram-negative bacterial infection.

  11. Reconstitution studies on the involvement of radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in damage to membrane enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, O; Nagatsuka, S; Nakazawa, T

    1983-04-01

    The effect of radiation on the drug-metabolizing enzyme system of microsomes, reconstituted with liposomes of microsomal phospholipids, NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase and cytochrome P-450, was examined to elucidate the role of lipid peroxidation of membranes in radiation-induced damage to membrane-bound enzymes. The reconstituted system of non-irradiated enzymes with irradiated liposomes showed a low activity of hexobarbital hydroxylation, whereas irradiated enzymes combined with non-irradiated liposomes exhibited an activity equal to that of unirradiated controls. Irradiation of liposomes caused a decrease in cytochrome P-450 content by destruction of the haem of cytochrome P-450 and also inhibited the binding capacity of cytochrome P-450 for hexobarbital. The relationship between radiation-induced lipid peroxidation and membrane-bound enzymes is discussed.

  12. Reconstitution studies on the involvement of radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in damage to membrane enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, O.; Nagatsuka, S.; Nakazawa, T. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1983-04-01

    The effect of ..gamma..-radiation on the drug-metabolizing enzyme system of microsomes, reconstituted with liposomes of microsomal phospholipids, NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase and cytochrome P-450, was examined to elucidate the role of lipid peroxidation of membranes in radiation-induced damage to membrane-bound enzymes. The reconstituted system of non-irradiated enzymes with irradiated liposomes showed a low activity of hexobarbital hydroxylation, whereas irradiated enzymes combined with non-irradiated liposomes exhibited an activity equal to that of unirradiated controls. Irradiation of liposomes caused a decrease in cytochrome P-450 content by destruction of the haem of cytochrome P-450 and also inhibited the binding capacity of cytochrome P-450 for hexobarbital. The relationship between radiation-induced lipid peroxidation and membrane-bound enzymes is discussed.

  13. Cell-free synthesis of membrane proteins: tailored cell models out of microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenz, Susanne F; Sachse, Rita; Schmidt, Thomas; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Incorporation of proteins in biomimetic giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) is one of the hallmarks towards cell models in which we strive to obtain a better mechanistic understanding of the manifold cellular processes. The reconstruction of transmembrane proteins, like receptors or channels, into GUVs is a special challenge. This procedure is essential to make these proteins accessible to further functional investigation. Here we describe a strategy combining two approaches: cell-free eukaryotic protein expression for protein integration and GUV formation to prepare biomimetic cell models. The cell-free protein expression system in this study is based on insect lysates, which provide endoplasmic reticulum derived vesicles named microsomes. It enables signal-induced translocation and posttranslational modification of de novo synthesized membrane proteins. Combining these microsomes with synthetic lipids within the electroswelling process allowed for the rapid generation of giant proteo-liposomes of up to 50 μm in diameter. We incorporated various fluorescent protein-labeled membrane proteins into GUVs (the prenylated membrane anchor CAAX, the heparin-binding epithelial growth factor like factor Hb-EGF, the endothelin receptor ETB, the chemokine receptor CXCR4) and thus presented insect microsomes as functional modules for proteo-GUV formation. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy was applied to detect and further characterize the proteins in the GUV membrane. To extend the options in the tailoring cell models toolbox, we synthesized two different membrane proteins sequentially in the same microsome. Additionally, we introduced biotinylated lipids to specifically immobilize proteo-GUVs on streptavidin-coated surfaces. We envision this achievement as an important first step toward systematic protein studies on technical surfaces.

  14. Atom-membrane cooling and entanglement using cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genes, Claudiu; Ritsch, Helmut; Drewsen, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a hybrid optomechanical system composed of a micromechanical oscillator as a movable membrane and an atomic three-level ensemble within an optical cavity. We show that a suitably tailored cavity field response via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the atomic medium...

  15. Macrophage Chemotaxis in Anti-tubular Basement Membrane-Induced Interstitial Nephritis in Guinea Pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kennedy, Thomas L.; Merrow, Martha; Phillips, S. Michael; Norman, Michael; Neilson, Eric G.

    1985-01-01

    Interstitial renal lesions containing T cells and macrophages develop after 14 days in guinea pigs immunized to produce anti-tubular basement membrane-induced interstitial nephritis. We serially examined the renal venous and systemic arterial sera from such animals to determine if chemotactic factor

  16. Oscillations and multiple steady states in active membrane transport models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, F M; Bisch, P M

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of some non-linear extensions of the six-state alternating access model for active membrane transport is investigated. We use stoichio-metric network analysis to study the stability of steady states. The bifurcation analysis has been done through standard numerical methods. For the usual six-state model we have proved that there is only one steady state, which is globally asymptotically stable. When we added an autocatalytic step we found self-oscillations. For the competition between a monomer cycle and a dimer cycle, with steps of dimer formation, we have also found self-oscillations. We have also studied models involving the formation of a complex with other molecules. The addition of two steps for formation of a complex of the monomer with another molecule does not alter either the number or the stability of steady states of the basic six-state model. The model which combines the formation of a complex with an autocatalytic step shows both self-oscillations and multiple steady states. The results lead us to conclude that oscillations could be produced by active membrane transport systems if the transport cycle contains a sufficiently large number of steps (six in the present case) and is coupled to at least one autocatalytic reaction,. Oscillations are also predicted when the monomer cycle is coupled to a dimer cycle. In fact, the autocatalytic reaction can be seen as a simplification of the model involving competition between monomer and dimer cycles, which seems to be a more realistic description of biological systems. A self-regulation mechanism of the pumps, related to the multiple stationary states, is expected only for a combined effect of autocatalysis and formation of complexes with other molecules. Within the six-state model this model also leads to oscillation.

  17. Metaxin deficiency alters mitochondrial membrane permeability and leads to resistance to TNF-induced cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Koh; Wang, Xiaofei; Kim, Sung Ouk; Armstrong, Lucas C; Bornstein, Paul; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-02-01

    Metaxin, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, is critical for TNF-induced cell death in L929 cells. Its deficiency, caused by retroviral insertion-mediated mutagenesis, renders L929 cells resistance to TNF killing. In this study, we further characterized metaxin deficiency-caused TNF resistance in parallel with Bcl-X(L) overexpression-mediated death resistance. We did not find obvious change in mitochondria membrane potential in metaxin-deficient (Met(mut)) and Bcl-X(L)-overexpressing cells, but we did find an increase in the release rate of the mitochondrial membrane potential probe rhodamine 123 (Rh123) that was preloaded into mitochondria. In addition, overexpression of a function-interfering mutant of metaxin (MetaΔTM/C) or Bcl-X(L) in MCF-7.3.28 cells also resulted in an acquired resistance to TNF killing and a faster rate of Rh123 release, indicating a close correlation between TNF resistance and higher rates of the dye release from the mitochondria. The release of Rh123 can be controlled by the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (PT) pore, as targeting an inner membrane component of the PT pore by cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibited Rh123 release. However, metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression apparently affect Rh123 release from a site(s) different from that of CsA, as CsA can overcome their effect. Though both metaxin and Bcl-X(L) appear to function on the outer mitochondrial membrane, they do not interact with each other. They may use different mechanisms to increase the permeability of Rh123, since previous studies have suggested that metaxin may influence certain outer membrane porins while Bcl-X(L) may form pores on the outer membrane. The alteration of the mitochondrial outer membrane properties by metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression, as indicated by a quicker Rh123 release, may be helpful in maintaining mitochondrial integrity.

  18. Structure and properties of PVDF membrane with PES-C addition via thermally induced phase separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lishun; Sun, Junfen

    2014-12-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and PVDF membrane with phenolphthalein polyethersulfone (PES-C) addition were prepared via thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) method by using diphenyl carbonate (DPC) and dimethyl acetamide (DMAc) as mixed diluents. The effects of coagulation temperature and pre-evaporation time on structure and properties of membranes were studied. The changes of sewage flux in MBR and the attenuation coefficient of sewage flux were investigated. The resistance distributions of PVDF and PVDF/PES-C membranes were compared by resistance analysis. Membrane composition and structure were characterized by ATR-FTIR, TGA, SEM and AFM. The foulant on membranes was analyzed by FTIR. The contact angle of PVDF/PES-C membrane was lower than that of PVDF membrane. A thinner skin layer and a porous cellular support layer formed in PVDF/PES-C membrane and resulted in a higher porosity and pure water flux. The pure water flux and porosity of PVDF/PES-C membrane increased with rising coagulation temperature and decreased with extending pre-evaporation time. The flux attenuation coefficient, the cake layer resistance and internal fouling resistance of PVDF/PES-C membrane in MBR were smaller than those of PVDF membrane in MBR. The FTIR spectrum of foulant on membrane indicated that the foulant on PVDF/PES-C membrane was mostly composed of protein and polysaccharide, while the foulant on pure PVDF membrane included biopolymer clusters besides protein and polysaccharide.

  19. Chromium(VI)—induces Production of Reactive Oxygen Species,Change of Plasma Membrane Potential and Dissipation of Mitochondria Membrane otential in Chinese Hamster Lung Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIEYI; ZHUANGZHI-XIONG

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To examine whether Reactive Oxygen Species(ROS) is generated,and whether plasma membrane potential and mitochnodrial membrane potential are depolarized in Chinese Hamster Lung(CHL)cell lines exposed to Cr(VI),Methods:CHL Cells were incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 umol/L,2.5umol/L,0.65umol/L for 3 and 6 hours,respectively.The rpoduction of ROS was performed by using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin discetate;The changes in plasma membrane potential were performed by using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin discetate;The changes in plasma membrane potential were performed by using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate;The changes in plasma membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent cationic dye DiBAC4;And the changes in mitochondria membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123,Results:The ROS levels in CHL cells increased in all treated groups compared with the control group(P<0.01);The plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cells dissipated after incubated with Cr(VI) at 10umol/L for 3 hours and 6 hours(P<0.01),at 2.5umol/L for 6 hours(P<0.01 or 0.05),Conclusion:Cr(VI) causes the dissipation of plasma membrane potential and mitochnodrial membrane otential in CHL cell cultrues,and Cr(VI)-induced ROS may play a role in the injuries.

  20. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  1. Flash-induced structural dynamics in photosystem II membrane fragments of green plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Jörg; Renger, Gernot

    2009-07-07

    Time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering with laser excitation is a promising novel pump-probe approach, which opens up new perspectives for the study of protein-membrane dynamics in specific functional states of even complex systems. This is demonstrated here for the case of photosystem II membrane fragments with inhibited electron transfer. In contrast to the case of the model system bacteriorhodopsin, a transient reduction of the dynamics is observed approximately 160 micros after the actinic laser flash. This effect is the first observation of a modulated structural dynamics in photosystem II membrane fragments.

  2. Modelling wastewater treatment in a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagni, Alessandro; Ferraris, Marco; Casu, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling has been widely applied to membrane bioreactor (MBRs) processes. However, to date, very few studies have reported on the application of the anaerobic digestion model N.1 (ADM1) to anaerobic membrane processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of the ADM1 to a submerged anaerobic MBR (SAMBR) treating simulated industrial wastewater composed of cheese whey and sucrose. This study demonstrated that the biological processes involved in SAMBRs can be modelled by using the ADM1. Moreover, the results showed that very few modifications of the parameters describing the ADM1 were required to reasonably fit the experimental data. In particular, adaptation to the specific conditions of the coefficients describing the wastewater characterisation and the reduction of the hydrolysis rate of particulate carbohydrate (khyd,ch) from 0.25 d(-1) (as suggested by the ADM1 for high-rate mesophilic reactors) to 0.13 d(-1) were required to fit the experimental data.

  3. Model for probing membrane-cortex adhesion by micropipette aspiration and fluctuation spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Alert, Ricard; Brugués, Jan; Sens, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model for membrane-cortex adhesion which couples membrane deformations, hydrodynamics and kinetics of membrane-cortex ligands. In its simplest form, the model gives explicit predictions for the critical pressure for membrane detachment and for the value of adhesion energy. We show that these quantities exhibit a significant dependence on the active acto-myosin stresses. The model provides a simple framework to access quantitative information on cortical activity by means of micropipette experiments. We also extend the model to incorporate fluctuations and show that detailed information on the stability of membrane-cortex coupling can be obtained by a combination of micropipette aspiration and fluctuation spectroscopy measurements.

  4. Intestinal D-glucose transport and membrane fluidity along crypt-villus axis of streptozocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudeja, P K; Wali, R K; Klitzke, A; Brasitus, T A

    1990-10-01

    Diabetes was induced in male Lewis rats by a single injection of streptozocin (50 mg/kg body wt ip). After 10-14 days, diabetic and age- and sex-matched control animals were killed, and their proximal small intestines were removed. Villus-tip, mid-villus, and lower-villus enterocytes were harvested from each group with a method that combined divalent cation chelation with mild mechanical dissociation. These fractions were used as starting material to prepare brush-border membrane vesicles. Preparations from each of these fractions were then analyzed and compared with respect to their Na(+)-gradient-dependent and Na(+)-independent D-glucose transport, lipid fluidity, and lipid composition. The results of these experiments demonstrated that 1) maximum rates of Na(+)-gradient-dependent D-glucose transport (Vmax) were greatest in membrane vesicles prepared from mature cells (villus tip and mid villus) of control rats; 2) the glucose concentration producing half-maximal rates of transport (Km), however, was significantly lower in lower-villus membrane vesicles of control rats, suggesting that a distinct glucose transporter existed in the membranes of these relatively immature enterocytes; 3) Na(+)-gradient-dependent, but not Na(+)-independent, D-glucose uptake was greater in diabetic membrane vesicles prepared from mid-villus and lower-villus fractions but not in vesicles prepared from villus-tip cells; and 4) no obvious relationship between alterations in membrane lipid fluidity and enhanced uptake of Na(+)-gradient-dependent D-glucose by these transporter(s) could be established in this experimental model of acute diabetes mellitus.

  5. Temperature-Induced Protein Conformational Changes in Barley Root Plasma Membrane-Enriched Microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Charles R.

    1987-01-01

    The membrane-bound proteins of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Conquest) root plasma membrane-enriched microsomes displayed fluorescence typical of protein-associated trytophan residues. The protein fluorescence intensity was sensitive to variations in sample temperature. The temperature-induced decline in protein fluorescence intensity was nonlinear with slope discontinuities at about 12 and 32°C. Detergents at levels above their critical micelle concentration enhanced protein fluorescence. Glutaraldehyde reduced protein fluorescence. Protein fluorescence polarization increased at temperatures above 30°C. Both the rate of tryptophan photoionization and the fluorescence intensity of the photoionization products suggested alterations in membrane protein conformation between 12 and 32°C. The quenching of the intrinsic protein fluorescence by acrylamide and potassium iodide indicated changes in accessibility of the extrinsic agents to the protein tryptophan residues beginning at about 14°C. The results indicate thermally induced changes in the dynamics of the membrane proteins over the temperature range of 12 to 32°C which could account for the complex temperature dependence of the barley root plasma membrane ATPase. PMID:16665545

  6. Early membrane events induced by salicylic acid in motor cells of the Mimosa pudica pulvinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, Saed; Rocher, Françoise; Bonmort, Janine; Fleurat-Lessard, Pierrette; Roblin, Gabriel

    2013-04-01

    Salicylic acid (o-hydroxy benzoic acid) (SA) induced a rapid dose-dependent membrane hyperpolarization (within seconds) and a modification of the proton secretion (within minutes) of Mimosa pudica pulvinar cells at concentrations higher than 0.1mM. Observations on plasma membrane vesicles isolated from pulvinar tissues showed that SA acted directly at the membrane level through a protonophore action as suggested by the inhibition of the proton gradient and the lack of effect on H(+)-ATPase catalytic activity. Comparative data obtained with protonophores (carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone and 2,4-dinitrophenol) and inhibitors of ATPases (vanadate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, and diethylstilbestrol) corroborated this conclusion. Consequently, the collapse of the proton motive force led to an impairment in membrane functioning. This impairment is illustrated by the inhibition of the ion-driven turgor-mediated seismonastic reaction of the pulvinus following SA treatment. SA acted in a specific manner as its biosynthetic precursor benzoic acid induced much milder effects and the m- and p-OH benzoic acid derivatives did not trigger similar characteristic effects. Therefore, SA may be considered both a membrane signal molecule and a metabolic effector following its uptake in the cells.

  7. Sequential biogenesis of host cell membrane rearrangements induced by hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Pauline; Beaumont, Elodie; Uzbekov, Rustem; Brand, Denys; Gaillard, Julien; Blanchard, Emmanuelle; Roingeard, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Like most positive-strand RNA viruses, hepatitis C virus (HCV) forms a membrane-associated replication complex consisting of replicating RNA, viral and host proteins anchored to altered cell membranes. We used a combination of qualitative and quantitative electron microscopy (EM), immuno-EM, and the 3D reconstruction of serial EM sections to analyze the host cell membrane alterations induced by HCV. Three different types of membrane alteration were observed: vesicles in clusters (ViCs), contiguous vesicles (CVs), and double-membrane vesicles (DMVs). The main ultrastructural change observed early in infection was the formation of a network of CVs surrounding the lipid droplets. Later stages in the infectious cycle were characterized by a large increase in the number of DMVs, which may be derived from the CVs. These DMVs are thought to constitute the membranous structures harboring the viral replication complexes in which viral replication is firmly and permanently established and to protect the virus against double-stranded RNA-triggered host antiviral responses.

  8. PREPARATION OF EVOH MICROPOROUS MEMBRANES via THERMALLY INDUCED PHASE SEPARATION USING BINARY SOLVENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Microporous ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH) flat membranes and hollow-fiber membranes with 38 mol% ethylene content were prepared via thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) using the mixture of 1,4-butanediol and poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG400) as diluents. Effects of the ratio of 1,4-butanediol to PEG400 on the phase diagrams, phase separation mechanism and membrane morphology were studied by small angle light scattering (SALS) measurements, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that by varying the composition of the binary solvent, the phase diagrams and membrane morphology can be controlled successfully. Moreover, the phase diagrams showed that broader regions of Liquid-Liquid (L-L) phase separation were obtained, as well as closer distances between L-L phase separation lines and Solid-Liquid (S-L) phase separation lines. Interconnected structures observed both in the flat membrane and hollow fiber membrane consist with the above results.

  9. Membrane aggregation and perturbation induced by antimicrobial peptide of S-thanatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guoqiu, E-mail: guoqiuwu@163.com [Center of Clinical Laboratory Medicine of Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Wu, Hongbin; Li, Linxian; Fan, Xiaobo; Ding, Jiaxuan; Li, Xiaofang; Xi, Tao [Biotechnology Center, Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Shen, Zilong, E-mail: Zilongshen@sina.com [Biotechnology Center, Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2010-04-23

    Thanatin, a 21-residue peptide, is an inducible insect peptide. In our previous study, we have identified a novel thanatin analog of S-thanatin, which exhibited a broad antimicrobial activity against bacteria and fungi with low hemolytic activity. This study was aimed to delineate the antimicrobial mechanism of S-thanatin and identify its interaction with bacterial membranes. In this study, membrane phospholipid was found to be the target for S-thanatin. In the presence of vesicles, S-thanatin interestingly led to the aggregation of anionic vesicles and sonicated bacteria. Adding S-thanatin to Escherichia coli suspension would result in the collapse of membrane and kill bacteria. The sensitivity assay of protoplast elucidated the importance of outer membrane (OM) for S-thanatin's antimicrobial activity. Compared with other antimicrobial peptide, S-thanatin produced chaotic membrane morphology and cell debris in electron microscopic appearance. These results supported our hypothesis that S-thanatin bound to negatively charged LPS and anionic lipid, impeded membrane respiration, exhausted the intracellular potential, and released periplasmic material, which led to cell death.

  10. Fouling of a microfiltration membrane by humic-like substances: a mathematical approach to modelling permeate flux and membrane retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; Farsi, Ali; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2016-01-01

    Membrane retention of the humic-like substances present in a soluble microbial products (SMP) suspension was studied by using a dead-end filtration system. The SMP suspension was extracted from the sludge of an enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor. Our results showed that both adsorption and steric retention of the humic-like substances governed their transport through the membrane during the filtration. The adsorption, which followed pseudo-first order kinetics, did not cause substantial decline of permeate flux. The steric retention, on the other hand, formed a gel layer, which in turn led to a major decrease in the flux. The reduction of permeate flux was well predicted by cake filtration theory. Based on the adsorption and the steric retention, a new model was developed for predicting the overall membrane retention of the humic-like substances. The general trend of the modelled overall retention was in partial agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Mathematical modelling of methane steam reforming in a membrane reactor: an isothermal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assaf, E.M. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisico-Quimica; Jesus, C.D.F.; Assaf, J.M. [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    1998-06-01

    A mathematical modelling of one-dimensional, stationary and isothermic membrane reactor for methane steam reforming was developed to compare the maximum yield for methane conversion in this reactor with that in a conventional fixed-bed reactor. Fick`s first law was used to describe the mechanism of hydrogen permeation. The variables studied include: reaction temperature, hydrogen feed flow rate and membrane thickness. The results show that the membrane reactor presents a higher methane conversion yield than the conventional fixed-bed reactor. (author) 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.; e-mail: eassaf at iqsc.sc.usp.br; mansur at power.ufscar.br

  12. MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF METHANE STEAM REFORMING IN A MEMBRANE REACTOR: AN ISOTHERMIC MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. ASSAF

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical modelling of one-dimensional, stationary and isothermic membrane reactor for methane steam reforming was developed to compare the maximum yield for methane conversion in this reactor with that in a conventional fixed-bed reactor. Fick's first law was used to describe the mechanism of hydrogen permeation. The variables studied include: reaction temperature, hydrogen feed flow rate and membrane thickness. The results show that the membrane reactor presents a higher methane conversion yield than the conventional fixed-bed reactor.

  13. Meso-scale Modeling of Block Copolymers Self-Assembly in Casting Solutions for Membrane Manufacture

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Isoporous membranes manufactured from diblock copolymer are successfully produced at laboratory scale under controlled conditions. Because of the complex phenomena involved, membrane preparation requires trial and error methodologies to find the optimal conditions, leading to a considerable demand of resources. Experimental insights demonstrate that the self-assembly of the block copolymers in solution has an effect on the final membrane structure. Nevertheless, the complete understanding of these multi-scale phenomena is elusive. Herein we use the coarse-grained method Dissipative Particle Dynamics to study the self-assembly of block copolymers that are used for the preparation of the membranes. To simulate representative time and length scales, we introduce a framework for model reduction of polymer chain representations for dissipative particle dynamics, which preserves the properties governing the phase equilibria. We reduce the number of degrees of freedom by accounting for the correlation between beads in fine-grained models via power laws and the consistent scaling of the simulation parameters. The coarse-graining models are consistent with the experimental evidence, showing a morphological transition of the aggregates as the polymer concentration and solvent affinity change. We show that hexagonal packing of the micelles can occur in solution within different windows of polymer concentration depending on the solvent affinity. However, the shape and size dispersion of the micelles determine the characteristic arrangement. We describe the order of crew-cut micelles using a rigid-sphere approximation and propose different phase parameters that characterize the emergence of monodisperse-spherical micelles in solution. Additionally, we investigate the effect of blending asymmetric diblock copolymers (AB/AC) over the properties of the membranes. We observe that the co-assembly mechanism localizes the AC molecules at the interface of A and B domains, and induces

  14. Ouabain Modulates the Lipid Composition of Hippocampal Plasma Membranes from Rats with LPS-induced Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Israel José Pereira; Kinoshita, Paula Fernanda; Scavone, Cristoforo; Mignaco, Julio Alberto; Barbosa, Leandro Augusto de Oliveira; Santos, Hérica de Lima

    2015-12-01

    The effects of ouabain (OUA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vivo on hippocampal membranes (RHM) of Wistar male rats aged 3 months were analyzed. After intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of OUA only, LPS only, OUA plus LPS, or saline, the content of proteins, phospholipids, cholesterol and gangliosides from RHM was analyzed. The total protein and cholesterol contents of RHM were not significantly affected by OUA or LPS for the experimentally paired groups. In contrast, total phospholipids and gangliosides were strongly modulated by either OUA or LPS treatments. LPS reduced the total phospholipids (roughly 23 %) and increased the total gangliosides (approximately 40 %). OUA alone increased the total phospholipids (around 23 %) and also the total gangliosides (nearly 34 %). OUA pretreatment compensated the LPS-induced changes, preserving the total phospholipids and gangliosides around the same levels of the control. Thus, an acute treatment with OUA not only modulated the composition of hippocampal membranes from 3-month-old rats, but also was apparently able to counteract membrane alterations resulting from LPS-induced neuroinflammation. This study demonstrates for the first time that the OUA capacity modulates the lipid composition of hippocampal plasma membranes from rats with LPS-induced neuroinflammation.

  15. Plasma membrane ubiquinone controls ceramide production and prevents cell death induced by serum withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, M P; Gómez-Díaz, C; Villalba, J M; Burón, M I; López-Lluch, G; Navas, P

    1997-06-01

    Serum provides cultured cells with survival factors required to maintain growth. Its withdrawal induces the development of programmed cell death. HL-60 cells were sensitive to serum removal, and an increase of lipid peroxidation and apoptosis was observed. Long-term treatment with ethidium bromide induced the mitochondria-deficient rho(o)HL-60 cell line. These cells were surprisingly more resistant to serum removal, displaying fewer apoptotic cells and lower lipid peroxidation. HL-60 cells contained less ubiquinone at the plasma membrane than rho(o)HL-60 cells. Both cell types increased plasma membrane ubiquinone in response to serum removal, although this increase was much higher in rho(o) cells. Addition of ubiquinone to both cell cultures in the absence of serum improved cell survival with decreasing lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. Ceramide was accumulated after serum removal in HL-60 but not in rho(o)HL-60 cells, and exogenous ubiquinone reduced this accumulation. These results demonstrate a relationship between ubiquinone levels in the plasma membrane and the induction of serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis, and ceramide accumulation. Thus, ubiquinone, which is a central component of the plasma membrane electron transport system, can represent a first level of protection against oxidative damage caused by serum withdrawal.

  16. Recombinant Dengue virus protein NS2B alters membrane permeability in different membrane models

    OpenAIRE

    León-Juárez, Moisés; Martínez-Castillo, Macario; Shrivastava, Gaurav; García-Cordero, Julio; Villegas-Sepulveda, Nicolás; Mondragón-Castelán, Mónica; Mondragón-Flores, Ricardo; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the main phenomena occurring in cellular membranes during virus infection is a change in membrane permeability. It has been observed that numerous viral proteins can oligomerize and form structures known as viroporins that alter the permeability of membranes. Previous findings have identified such proteins in cells infected with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a member of the same family that Dengue virus (DENV) belongs to (Flaviviridae). In the present work, we investiga...

  17. FORMATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF POLYETHYLENE MICROPOROUS MEMBRANES THROUGH THERMALLY INDUCED PHASE SEPARATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wenjun; YUAN Youxin; CABASSO,Israel

    1995-01-01

    Microporous membranes of low-high density polyethylene and their blends were prepared by thermally-induced phase separation of polymer/long-aliphatic chain alcohol (diluent)mixtures.The microstructures of this particular membrane, which depends on the diluent properties,polymer concentration and cooling rate, were observed by scanning electron microscopy."Beehive-type,"leafy-like, and lacy porous structure morphologies can be formed,depending on the blend composition and phase separation conditions, which were discussed by the polymer and diluent crystallization processes.

  18. Change in membrane permeability induced by protegrin 1: implication of disulphide bridges for pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangoni, M E; Aumelas, A; Charnet, P; Roumestand, C; Chiche, L; Despaux, E; Grassy, G; Calas, B; Chavanieu, A

    1996-03-25

    Protegrin 1 (PG-1) is a naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial peptide that is 18 residues long, has an aminated carboxy terminus and contains two disulphide bridges. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of PG-1 and three linear analogues. Then, the membrane permeabilisation induced by these peptides was studied upon Xenopus laevis oocytes by electrophysiological methods. From the results obtained, we concluded that protegrin is able to form anion channels. Moreover, it seems clear that the presence of disulphide bridges is a prerequisite for the pore formation at the membrane level and not for the antimicrobial activity.

  19. Complexation-Induced Phase Separation: Preparation of Metal-Rich Polymeric Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Villalobos Vazquez de la Parra, Luis Francisco

    2017-08-01

    The majority of state-of-the-art polymeric membranes for industrial or medical applications are fabricated by phase inversion. Complexation induced phase separation (CIPS)—a surprising variation of this well-known process—allows direct fabrication of hybrid membranes in existing facilities. In the CIPS process, a first step forms the thin metal-rich selective layer of the membrane, and a succeeding step the porous support. Precipitation of the selective layer takes place in the same solvent used to dissolve the polymer and is induced by a small concentration of metal ions. These ions form metal-coordination-based crosslinks leading to the formation of a solid skin floating on top of the liquid polymer film. A subsequent precipitation in a nonsolvent bath leads to the formation of the porous support structure. Forming the dense layer and porous support by different mechanisms while maintaining the simplicity of a phase inversion process, results in unprecedented control over the final structure of the membrane. The thickness and morphology of the dense layer as well as the porosity of the support can be controlled over a wide range by manipulating simple process parameters. CIPS facilitates control over (i) the thickness of the dense layer throughout several orders of magnitude—from less than 15 nm to more than 6 μm, (ii) the type and amount of metal ions loaded in the dense layer, (iii) the morphology of the membrane surface, and (iv) the porosity and structure of the support. The nature of the CIPS process facilitates a precise loading of a high concentration of metal ions that are located in only the top layer of the membrane. Moreover, these metal ions can be converted—during the membrane fabrication process—to nanoparticles or crystals. This simple method opens up fascinating possibilities for the fabrication of metal-rich polymeric membranes with a new set of properties. This dissertation describes the process in depth and explores promising

  20. Analysis of constant tension-induced rupture of lipid membranes using activation energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal, Mohammad Abu Sayem; Levadnyy, Victor; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-05-11

    The stretching of biomembranes and lipid membranes plays important roles in various physiological and physicochemical phenomena. Here we analyzed the rate constant kp of constant tension-induced rupture of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) as a function of tension σ using their activation energy Ua. To determine the values of kp, we applied constant tension to a GUV membrane using the micropipette aspiration method and observed the rupture of GUVs, and then analyzed these data statistically. First, we investigated the temperature dependence of kp for GUVs of charged lipid membranes composed of negatively charged dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) and electrically neutral dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC). By analyzing this result, the values of Ua of tension-induced rupture of DOPG/DOPC-GUVs were obtained. Ua decreased with an increase in σ, supporting the classical theory of tension-induced pore formation. The analysis of the relationship between Ua and σ using the theory on the electrostatic interaction effects on the tension-induced rupture of GUVs provided the equation of Ua including electrostatic interaction effects, which well fits the experimental data of the tension dependence of Ua. A constant which does not depend on tension, U0, was also found to contribute significantly to Ua. The Arrhenius equations for kp using the equation of Ua and the parameters determined by the above analysis fit well to the experimental data of the tension dependence of kp for DOPG/DOPC-GUVs as well as for DOPC-GUVs. On the basis of these results, we discussed the possible elementary processes underlying the tension-induced rupture of GUVs of lipid membranes. These results indicate that the Arrhenius equation using the experimentally determined Ua is useful in the analysis of tension-induced rupture of GUVs.

  1. Mathematical Model of Natural Gas Desulfurization Based on Membrane Absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shuli; Ma Jun; Wang Ganyu; Zhou Heng

    2014-01-01

    Models of mass transfer kinetics combined with mass transfer differential equation and mass transfer resistance equation were established on the basis of double-iflm theory. Mass transfer process of H2S absorption by means of polypro-pylene hydrophobic microporous hollow ifber membrane contactor was simulated using MDEA (N-methyldiethanolamine) as the absorption liquid and corresponding experiments of natural gas desulfurization were performed. The simulation re-sults indicated that the removal rate of hydrogen sulifde showed positive dependence on the absorption liquid concentration and gas pressure. However, the desulfurization rate showed negative dependence on gas lfow. The simulated values were in good agreement with the experimental results. The in-tube concentration of hydrogen sulifde at the same point increased with increase in the gas velocity. Axial concentration of hydrogen sulifde decreased rapidly at the beginning, and the de-crease saw a slowdown during the latter half period. Hydrogen sulifde concentration dropped quickly in the radial direction, and the reduction in the radial direction was weakened with the increase of axial length due to the gradual reduction of hy-drogen sulifde concentration along the tube. The desulfurization rate under given operating conditions can be predicted by this model, and the theoretical basis for membrane module design can also be provided.

  2. Structural effects of the Solanum steroids solasodine, diosgenin and solanine on human erythrocytes and molecular models of eukaryotic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Londoño-Londoño, Julián; Jemioła-Rzemińska, Małgorzata; Strzałka, Kazimierz; Villena, Fernando; Avello, Marcia; Suwalsky, Mario

    2014-01-01

    This report presents evidence that the following Solanum steroids: solasodine, diosgenin and solanine interact with human erythrocytes and molecular models of their membranes as follows: a) X-ray diffraction studies showed that the compounds at low molar ratios (0.1-10.0mol%) induced increasing structural perturbation to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers and to a considerable lower extent to those of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine; b) differential scanning calorimetry data showed that the compounds were able to alter the cooperativity of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine phase transitions in a concentration-dependent manner; c) in the presence of steroids, the fluorescence of Merocyanine 540 incorporated to the membranes decreased suggesting a fluidization of the lipid system; d) scanning electron microscopy observations showed that all steroids altered the normal shape of human erythrocytes inducing mainly echinocytosis, characterized by the formation of blebs in their surfaces, an indication that their molecules are located into the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane.

  3. Modeling impermeable membranes as acoustic filters for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenaga, Miguel A; Juan, Eduardo J

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of this research project was to explore a mathematical expression that could be used by medical device designers to appropriately select impermeable membranes to isolate acoustic transducers from water, dust, earwax or other foreign material. The sound transmission properties of various types of impermeable membranes were analytically evaluated and compared to experimental measurements. Computer simulations were also performed to estimate the effects of three key membrane parameters: thickness (h), density (p) and sound speed (c), on the membrane's overall acoustic response. Results indicated that membrane thickness and density affect sound transmission the most. Membrane sound speed had minimal effect on sound transmission.

  4. Salt-induced redox-independent phosphorylation of light harvesting chlorophyll a/b proteins in Dunaliella salina thylakoid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian-De; Shen, Yun-Gang

    2005-02-17

    This study investigated the regulation of the major light harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein (LHCII) phosphorylation in Dunaliella salina thylakoid membranes. We found that both light and NaCl could induce LHCII phosphorylation in D. salina thylakoid membranes. Treatments with oxidants (ferredoxin and NADP) or photosynthetic electron flow inhibitors (DCMU, DBMIB, and stigmatellin) inhibited LHCII phosphorylation induced by light but not that induced by NaCl. Furthermore, neither addition of CuCl(2), an inhibitor of cytochrome b(6)f complex reduction, nor oxidizing treatment with ferricyanide inhibited light- or NaCl-induced LHCII phosphorylation, and both salts even induced LHCII phosphorylation in dark-adapted D. salina thylakoid membranes as other salts did. Together, these results indicate that the redox state of the cytochrome b(6)f complex is likely involved in light- but not salt-induced LHCII phosphorylation in D. salina thylakoid membranes.

  5. Computer-aided modeling framework – a generic modeling template for catalytic membrane fixed bed reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorova, Marina; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on development of computer-aided modeling framework. The framework is a knowledge-based system that is built on a generic modeling language and structured based on workflows for different general modeling tasks. The overall objective of this work is to support the model developers...... and users to generate and test models systematically, efficiently and reliably. In this way, development of products and processes can be faster, cheaper and very efficient. In this contribution, as part of the framework a generic modeling template for the systematic derivation of problem specific catalytic...... membrane fixed bed models is developed. The application of the modeling template is highlighted with a case study related to the modeling of a catalytic membrane reactor coupling dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with hydrogenation of nitrobenzene....

  6. The membrane-induced structure of melittin is correlated with the fluidity of the lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, August; Biverståhl, Henrik; Nordin, Jon; Danielsson, Jens; Lindahl, Emma; Mäler, Lena

    2007-01-01

    The effect of the bee toxin melittin on DMPC dynamics in fast-tumbling bicelles has been investigated. The (13)C R(1) and (13)C-(1)H NOE relaxation parameters for DMPC were used to monitor the effect of melittin and cholesterol on lipid dynamics. It was found that melittin has the largest effect on the DMPC mobility in DMPC/DHPC bicelles, while less effect was observed in cholesterol-doped bicelles, or in bicelles made with CHAPS, indicating that the rigidity of the membrane affects the melittin-membrane interaction. CD spectra were analysed in terms of cooperativity of the alpha-helix to random coil transition in melittin, and these results also indicated similar differences between the bicelles. The study shows that bicelles can be used to investigate lipid dynamics by spin relaxation, and in particular of peptide-induced changes in membrane fluidity.

  7. Geometry effect on the strain-induced self-rolling of semiconductor membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Ik Su; Challa, Archana; Derickson, Brad; Hsia, K Jimmy; Li, Xiuling

    2010-10-13

    Semiconductor micro- and nanotubes can be formed by strain-induced self-rolling of membranes. The effect of geometrical dimensions on the self-rolling behavior of epitaxial mismatch-strained In(x)Ga(1-x)As-GaAs membranes are systematically studied both experimentally and theoretically using the finite element method. The final rolling direction depends on the length and width of the membrane as well as the diameter of the rolled-up tube. The energetics of the final states, the history of rolling process, and the kinetic control of the etching anisotropy ultimately determine the rolling behavior. Results reported here provide critical information for precise positioning and uniform large area assembly of semiconducting micro- and nanotubes for applications in photonics, microelectromechanical systems, etc.

  8. Pervaporation : membranes and models for the dehydration of ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitzen, Johannes Wilhelmus Franciscus

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis the dehydration of ethanol/water mixtures by pervaporation using homogeneous membranes is studied. Both the general transport mechanism as well as the development of highly selective membranes for ethanol/water separation are investigated.

  9. Importance of interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins and retinoic acid inducible gene I for influenza virus replication: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Siqingaowa; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between Influenza viruses and host cells is key to elucidating the pathogenesis of these viruses. Several host factors have been identified that exert antiviral functions; however, influenza viruses continue to replicate utilizing host cell machinery. Herein, we review the mechanisms of action of two host-derived proteins on conferring cellular resistance to the influenza virus; (1) the interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins, 1, 2 and 3, a recently identified family of early restriction factors; and (2) retinoic acid inducible gene I, a key mediator of antiviral immunity. These data may contribute to the design of novel and efficient anti-influenza treatments.

  10. Model Checking the Biological Model of Membrane Computing with Probabilistic Symbolic Model Checker by Using Two Biological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravie c. Muniyandi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Membrane computing formalism has provided better modeling capabilities for biological systems in comparison to conventional mathematical models. Model checking could be used to reason about the biological system in detail and with precision by verifying formally whether membrane computing model meets the properties of the system. Approach: This study was carried to investigate the preservation of properties of two biological systems that had been modeled and simulated in membrane computing by a method of model checking using PRISM. The two biological systems were prey-predator population and signal processing in the legend-receptor networks of protein TGF-ß. Results: The model checking of membrane computing model of the biological systems with five different properties showed that the properties of the biological systems could be preserved in the membrane computing model. Conclusion: Membrane computing model not only provides a better approach in representing and simulating a biological system but also able to sustain the basic properties of the system.

  11. Derivation of adsorption parameters for nanofiltration membranes using a 1-pK Basic Stern model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lint, W.B.S.; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Higler, A.P.; Verweij, H.

    2002-01-01

    The ion retention and flux of nanofiltration (NF) membranes are to a large extent determined by the membrane surface charge. This surface charge is in turn strongly influenced by adsorption of ions from the solution onto the membrane material. A 1-pK adsorption model with a Basic Stern electrostatic

  12. Dynamic monitoring of membrane nanotubes formation induced by vaccinia virus on a high throughput microfluidic chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Min; Xu, Na; Wang, Cheng; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ling

    2017-03-01

    Membrane nanotubes (MNTs) are physical connections for intercellular communication and induced by various viruses. However, the formation of vaccinia virus (VACV)-induced MNTs has never been studied. In this report, VACV-induced MNTs formation process was monitored on a microfluidic chip equipped with a series of side chambers, which protected MNTs from fluidic shear stress. MNTs were formed between susceptible cells and be facilitated by VACV infection through three patterns. The formed MNTs varied with cell migration and virus concentration. The length of MNTs was positively correlated with the distance of cell migration. With increasing virus titer, the peak value of the ratio of MNT-carried cell appeared earlier. The immunofluorescence assay indicated that the rearrangement of actin fibers induced by VACV infection may lead to the formation of MNTs. This study presents evidence for the formation of MNTs induced by virus and helps us to understand the relationship between pathogens and MNTs.

  13. The antimicrobial peptide aurein 1.2 disrupts model membranes via the carpet mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, David I; Le Brun, Anton P; Whitwell, Thomas C; Sani, Marc-Antoine; James, Michael; Separovic, Frances

    2012-12-05

    The membrane interactions of the antimicrobial peptide aurein 1.2 were studied using a range of biophysical techniques to determine the location and the mechanism of action in DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) and DMPC/DMPG (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) model membranes that mimic characteristics of eukaryotic and prokaryotic membranes, respectively. Neutron reflectometry and solid-state NMR revealed subtle changes in membrane structure caused by the peptide. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, vesicle dye leakage and atomic force microscopy measurements were used to investigate the global mode of peptide interaction. Aurein 1.2 displayed an enhanced interaction with the anionic DMPC/DMPG membrane while exhibiting primarily a surface interaction with both types of model membranes, which led to bilayer disruption and membrane lysis. The antimicrobial peptide interaction is consistent with the carpet mechanism for aurein 1.2 with discrete structural changes depending on the type of phospholipid membrane.

  14. Chitosan nanoparticle-based neuronal membrane sealing and neuroprotection following acrolein-induced cell injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Riyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly reactive aldehyde acrolein is a very potent endogenous toxin with a long half-life. Acrolein is produced within cells after insult, and is a central player in slow and progressive "secondary injury" cascades. Indeed, acrolein-biomolecule complexes formed by cross-linking with proteins and DNA are associated with a number of pathologies, especially central nervous system (CNS trauma and neurodegenerative diseases. Hydralazine is capable of inhibiting or reducing acrolein-induced damage. However, since hydralazine's principle activity is to reduce blood pressure as a common anti-hypertension drug, the possible problems encountered when applied to hypotensive trauma victims have led us to explore alternative approaches. This study aims to evaluate such an alternative - a chitosan nanoparticle-based therapeutic system. Results Hydralazine-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were prepared using different types of polyanions and characterized for particle size, morphology, zeta potential value, and the efficiency of hydralazine entrapment and release. Hydralazine-loaded chitosan nanoparticles ranged in size from 300 nm to 350 nm in diameter, and with a tunable, or adjustable, surface charge. Conclusions We evaluated the utility of chitosan nanoparticles with an in-vitro model of acrolein-mediated cell injury using PC -12 cells. The particles effectively, and statistically, reduced damage to membrane integrity, secondary oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation. This study suggests that a chitosan nanoparticle-based therapy to interfere with "secondary" injury may be possible.

  15. Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells Modeling and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuqian; Wang, Xia; Shi, Zhongying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yu, Fan

    2006-11-01

    Performance of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is dependent on operating parameters and designing parameters. Operating parameters mainly include temperature, pressure, humidity and the flow rate of the inlet reactants. Designing parameters include reactants distributor patterns and dimensions, electrodes dimensions, and electrodes properties such as porosity, permeability and so on. This work aims to investigate the effects of various designing parameters on the performance of PEM fuel cells, and the optimum values will be determined under a given operating condition.A three-dimensional steady-state electrochemical mathematical model was established where the mass, fluid and thermal transport processes are considered as well as the electrochemical reaction. A Powell multivariable optimization algorithm will be applied to investigate the optimum values of designing parameters. The objective function is defined as the maximum potential of the electrolyte fluid phase at the membrane/cathode interface at a typical value of the cell voltage. The robustness of the optimum design of the fuel cell under different cell potentials will be investigated using a statistical sensitivity analysis. By comparing with the reference case, the results obtained here provide useful tools for a better design of fuel cells.

  16. Modelling and Fabrication of Micro-SOFC Membrane Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigita ABAKEVIČIENĖ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication process of micro-SOFC membrane structure using the bulk micromachining of silicon technique with SiO2 and Si3N4 sacrificial layers is presented in this study. The process involves back side photolithography, magnetron sputtering of platinum thin films, thermal evaporation of YSZ electrolyte, deep reactive ion etching of silicon, and, finally, release of free-standing membrane using CF4/O2 plasma etching.X-ray analysis shows the cubic phase of YSZ electrolyte and platinum electrodes. Modelling of normal stress distribution in the micro-SOFC structure with the Si3N4 sacrificial layer shows that at high temperatures the substrate expands less than the coating, causing tensile stresses in the substrate area next to the coating and compressive stresses in the coating, as the substrate material has a lower coefficient of thermal expansion than the layered Pt/YSZ/Pt coating. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.2.5585

  17. Modelling and Fabrication of Micro-SOFC Membrane Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigita ABAKEVIČIENĖ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication process of micro-SOFC membrane structure using the bulk micromachining of silicon technique with SiO2 and Si3N4 sacrificial layers is presented in this study. The process involves back side photolithography, magnetron sputtering of platinum thin films, thermal evaporation of YSZ electrolyte, deep reactive ion etching of silicon, and, finally, release of free-standing membrane using CF4/O2 plasma etching.X-ray analysis shows the cubic phase of YSZ electrolyte and platinum electrodes. Modelling of normal stress distribution in the micro-SOFC structure with the Si3N4 sacrificial layer shows that at high temperatures the substrate expands less than the coating, causing tensile stresses in the substrate area next to the coating and compressive stresses in the coating, as the substrate material has a lower coefficient of thermal expansion than the layered Pt/YSZ/Pt coating. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.2.5585

  18. Membrane trafficking in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyder, Serge; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Bertazzi, Dimitri L; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-09

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM), or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC), and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway) or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway). Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END) and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway). Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes.

  19. Membrane Trafficking in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Feyder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM, or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC, and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway. Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway. Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes.

  20. Acidic phospholipid bicelles: a versatile model membrane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struppe, J; Whiles, J A; Vold, R R

    2000-01-01

    With the aim of establishing acidic bicellar solutions as a useful membrane model system, we have used deuterium NMR spectroscopy to investigate the properties of dimyristoyl/dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC/DHPC) bicelles containing 25% (w/w in H(2)O) of either dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS) or dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG). The addition of the acidic lipid component to this lyotropic liquid crystalline system reduces its range of stability because of poor miscibility of the two dimyristoylated phospholipids. Compared to the neutral bicelles, which are stable at pH 4 to pH 7, acidic bicelles are stable only from pH 5.5 to pH 7. Solid-state deuterium NMR analysis of d(54)-DMPC showed similar ordering in neutral and acidic bicelles. Fully deuterated DMPS or DMPG is ordered in a way similar to that of DMPC. Study of the binding of the myristoylated N-terminal 14-residue peptide mu-GSSKSKPKDPSQRR from pp60(nu-src) to both neutral and acidic bicelles shows the utility of these novel membrane mimetics. PMID:10620292

  1. Defective membrane remodeling in neuromuscular diseases: insights from animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda S Cowling

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in membrane remodeling play an essential role in a plethora of cell functions including endocytosis and intracellular transport. Defects in several of them lead to human diseases. Myotubularins, amphiphysins, and dynamins are all proteins implicated in membrane trafficking and/or remodeling. Mutations in myotubularin, amphiphysin 2 (BIN1, and dynamin 2 lead to different forms of centronuclear myopathy, while mutations in myotubularin-related proteins cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. In addition to centronuclear myopathy, dynamin 2 is also mutated in a dominant form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. While several proteins from these different families are implicated in similar diseases, mutations in close homologues or in the same protein in the case of dynamin 2 lead to diseases affecting different tissues. This suggests (1 a common molecular pathway underlying these different neuromuscular diseases, and (2 tissue-specific regulation of these proteins. This review discusses the pathophysiology of the related neuromuscular diseases on the basis of animal models developed for proteins of the myotubularin, amphiphysin, and dynamin families. A better understanding of the common mechanisms between these neuromuscular disorders will lead to more specific health care and therapeutic approaches.

  2. Temperature Driven Annealing of Perforations in Bicellar Model Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieh, Mu-Ping [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Raghunathan, V.A. [Raman Research Institute, India; Pabst, Georg [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria; Harroun, Thad [Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada; Nagashima, K [University of Toronto, Mississauga, ON, Canada; Morales, H [University of Toronto, Mississauga, ON, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Macdonald, P [University of Toronto, Mississauga, ON, Canada

    2011-01-01

    Bicellar model membranes composed of 1,2-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC), with a DMPC/DHPC molar ratio of 5, and doped with the negatively charged lipid 1,2-dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG), at DMPG/DMPC molar ratios of 0.02 or 0.1, were examined using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), {sup 31}P NMR, and {sup 1}H pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion NMR with the goal of understanding temperature effects on the DHPC-dependent perforations in these self-assembled membrane mimetics. Over the temperature range studied via SANS (300-330 K), these bicellar lipid mixtures exhibited a well-ordered lamellar phase. The interlamellar spacing d increased with increasing temperature, in direct contrast to the decrease in d observed upon increasing temperature with otherwise identical lipid mixtures lacking DHPC. {sup 31}P NMR measurements on magnetically aligned bicellar mixtures of identical composition indicated a progressive migration of DHPC from regions of high curvature into planar regions with increasing temperature, and in accord with the 'mixed bicelle model' (Triba, M. N.; Warschawski, D. E.; Devaux, P. E. Biophys. J.2005, 88, 1887-1901). Parallel PFG diffusion NMR measurements of transbilayer water diffusion, where the observed diffusion is dependent on the fractional surface area of lamellar perforations, showed that transbilayer water diffusion decreased with increasing temperature. A model is proposed consistent with the SANS, {sup 31}P NMR, and PFG diffusion NMR data, wherein increasing temperature drives the progressive migration of DHPC out of high-curvature regions, consequently decreasing the fractional volume of lamellar perforations, so that water occupying these perforations redistributes into the interlamellar volume, thereby increasing the interlamellar spacing.

  3. Temperature driven annealing of perforations in bicellar model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieh, Mu-Ping; Raghunathan, V A; Pabst, Georg; Harroun, Thad; Nagashima, Kazuomi; Morales, Hannah; Katsaras, John; Macdonald, Peter

    2011-04-19

    Bicellar model membranes composed of 1,2-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC), with a DMPC/DHPC molar ratio of 5, and doped with the negatively charged lipid 1,2-dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG), at DMPG/DMPC molar ratios of 0.02 or 0.1, were examined using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), (31)P NMR, and (1)H pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion NMR with the goal of understanding temperature effects on the DHPC-dependent perforations in these self-assembled membrane mimetics. Over the temperature range studied via SANS (300-330 K), these bicellar lipid mixtures exhibited a well-ordered lamellar phase. The interlamellar spacing d increased with increasing temperature, in direct contrast to the decrease in d observed upon increasing temperature with otherwise identical lipid mixtures lacking DHPC. (31)P NMR measurements on magnetically aligned bicellar mixtures of identical composition indicated a progressive migration of DHPC from regions of high curvature into planar regions with increasing temperature, and in accord with the "mixed bicelle model" (Triba, M. N.; Warschawski, D. E.; Devaux, P. E. Biophys. J.2005, 88, 1887-1901). Parallel PFG diffusion NMR measurements of transbilayer water diffusion, where the observed diffusion is dependent on the fractional surface area of lamellar perforations, showed that transbilayer water diffusion decreased with increasing temperature. A model is proposed consistent with the SANS, (31)P NMR, and PFG diffusion NMR data, wherein increasing temperature drives the progressive migration of DHPC out of high-curvature regions, consequently decreasing the fractional volume of lamellar perforations, so that water occupying these perforations redistributes into the interlamellar volume, thereby increasing the interlamellar spacing.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of partially fluorinated poly(acryl) ionomers for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells and ESR-spectroscopic investigation of the radically induced degradation of model compounds; Synthese und Charakterisierung teilfluorierter Poly(acryl)-Ionomere als Polymerelektrolytmembranen fuer Brennstoffzellen und ESR-spektroskopische Untersuchung der radikalinduzierten Degradation von Modellverbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberger, Frank

    2008-07-09

    this work deals with the EPR-spectroscopic investigation of radically induced degradation reactions of model compounds which represent structural units of poly(aryl) ionomers prepared in the first part of this work. These model compounds are exposed to hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals in a flow cell, which are generated directly by photolysis of hydrogen peroxide in the cavity of an ESR spectrometer. By using this experimental setup different parameters (such as concentration of hydroxyl radicals, monomer concentration, flow rate, and pH value) are varied systematically and their influences in terms of the observed product formation of the aromatic model compounds with the hydroxyl radicals are estimated. Conclusions in terms of possible radical reactions of the poly(aryl) ionomer can be drawn from these investigations and information of avoidable structural features (e.g. type of the end groups of the ionomers) and avoidable conditions (e.g. inhomogeneities of pH values in the membrane) are obtained. (orig.)

  5. Multiscale modeling of droplet interface bilayer membrane networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Eric C; Farimani, Amir B; Aluru, Narayana R; Philen, Michael K

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayer (DIB) networks are considered for the development of stimuli-responsive membrane-based materials inspired by cellular mechanics. These DIB networks are often modeled as combinations of electrical circuit analogues, creating complex networks of capacitors and resistors that mimic the biomolecular structures. These empirical models are capable of replicating data from electrophysiology experiments, but these models do not accurately capture the underlying physical phenomena and consequently do not allow for simulations of material functionalities beyond the voltage-clamp or current-clamp conditions. The work presented here provides a more robust description of DIB network behavior through the development of a hierarchical multiscale model, recognizing that the macroscopic network properties are functions of their underlying molecular structure. The result of this research is a modeling methodology based on controlled exchanges across the interfaces of neighboring droplets. This methodology is validated against experimental data, and an extension case is provided to demonstrate possible future applications of droplet interface bilayer networks.

  6. Endophilin A1 induces different membrane shapes using a conformational switch that is regulated by phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambroso, Mark R; Hegde, Balachandra G; Langen, Ralf

    2014-05-13

    Membrane remodeling is controlled by proteins that can promote the formation of highly curved spherical or cylindrical membranes. How a protein induces these different types of membrane curvature and how cells regulate this process is still unclear. Endophilin A1 is a protein involved in generating endocytotic necks and vesicles during synaptic endocytosis and can transform large vesicles into lipid tubes or small and highly curved vesicles in vitro. By using EM and electron paramagnetic resonance of endophilin A1, we find that tubes are formed by a close interaction with endophilin A1's BIN/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain and deep insertion of its amphipathic helices. In contrast, vesicles are predominantly stabilized by the shallow insertion of the amphipathic helical wedges with the BAR domain removed from the membrane. By showing that the mechanism of membrane curvature induction is different for vesiculation and tubulation, these data also explain why previous studies arrived at different conclusions with respect to the importance of scaffolding and wedging in the membrane curvature generation of BAR proteins. The Parkinson disease-associated kinase LRRK2 phosphorylates S75 of endophilin A1, a position located in the acyl chain region on tubes and the aqueous environment on vesicles. We find that the phosphomimetic mutation S75D favors vesicle formation by inhibiting this conformational switch, acting to regulate endophilin A1-mediated curvature. As endophilin A1 is part of a protein superfamily, we expect these mechanisms and their regulation by posttranslational modifications to be a general means for controlling different types of membrane curvature in a wide range of processes in vivo.

  7. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Guijarro, José Manuel; García, Carolina; Macías, Álvaro; García-Fernández, Luis Francisco; Moreno, Cristina; Reyes, Fernando; Martínez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Fernández, Rogelio; Martínez, Valentín; Valenzuela, Carmen; Lillo, M. Pilar; Galmarini, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734) inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv) presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:26474061

  8. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Molina-Guijarro

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734 inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy.

  9. Effects of vitamin E supplementation on plasma membrane permeabilization and fluidization induced by chlorpromazine in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruoka, Nobuyuki; Murata, Tetsuhito; Omata, Naoto; Takashima, Yasuhiro; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Wada, Yuji

    2008-03-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors play a key role in most research on antipsychotic drugs, but little is known about the effects of these drugs on the plasma membrane in the central nervous system. Therefore, we investigated whether chlorpromazine (CPZ), a typical phenothiazine antipsychotic drug, affects the plasma membrane integrity in the rat brain, and if so, whether these membrane alterations can be prevented by dietary supplementation with vitamin E, which has been shown to be an antioxidant and also a membrane-stabilizer. Leakage of [(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([(18)F]FDG)-6-phosphate from rat striatal slices and decrease in 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene fluorescence anisotropy were used as indexes for plasma membrane permeabilization and fluidization, respectively. CPZ induced leakage of [(18)F]FDG-6-phosphate from striatal slices, and the leakage was delayed in the vitamin E-supplemented group compared to that in the normal diet group. The decrease in plasma membrane anisotropy induced by CPZ was significantly attenuated by vitamin E supplementation. Chronic treatment with alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, a free radical scavenger, had no effect on CPZ-induced plasma membrane permeabilization, and the treatment with CPZ did not induce lipid peroxidation. CPZ can reduce plasma membrane integrity in the brain, and this reduction can be prevented by vitamin E via its membrane-stabilizing properties, not via its antioxidant activity.

  10. Surface modification of silicone rubber membrane by plasma induced graft copolymerization as artificial cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiue, G H; Lee, S D; Chang, P C

    1996-11-01

    In this study a highly biocompatible polymer membrane was prepared by surface modification. An artificial cornea was also developed for clinical applications. Silicone rubber (SR) membrane was grafted with hydrophilic monomers such as 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and acrylic acid by plasma induced grafted polymerization. Surface properties of the SR were characterized using secondary ions mass spectra, Fourier transform infrared/attenuated total reflection, and element spectra for chemical analysis. The corneal epithelial (CE) cell was cultured in vitro, and penetrating keratoplasty of albino rabbit cornea (in vivo) was performed to evaluate biological properties of modified SR membranes. The ability of the CE cell to attach onto various SR membranes was observed by inverted microscopy. The proliferation of CE cell was conducted in approximately 96 h. Experimental results indicated that the attachment and growth of CE onto SR-g-pHEMA (75 micrograms/ cm2) is enhanced. The morphologies of an attached CE cell are similar to those of a primary CE cell. In the in vivo study, the depth of anterior chamber was maintained 2 weeks after penetrating keratoplasty was performed with a SR grafted with pHEMA (210 micrograms/cm2). This phenomenon displayed a high biocompatibility of modified SR membrane with the CE cell. Furthermore, results in this study provide a valuable reference for application of the modified SR for an artificial cornea.

  11. Thermal transport in suspended silicon membranes measured by laser-induced transient gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vega-Flick

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying thermal transport at the nanoscale poses formidable experimental challenges due both to the physics of the measurement process and to the issues of accuracy and reproducibility. The laser-induced transient thermal grating (TTG technique permits non-contact measurements on nanostructured samples without a need for metal heaters or any other extraneous structures, offering the advantage of inherently high absolute accuracy. We present a review of recent studies of thermal transport in nanoscale silicon membranes using the TTG technique. An overview of the methodology, including an analysis of measurements errors, is followed by a discussion of new findings obtained from measurements on both “solid” and nanopatterned membranes. The most important results have been a direct observation of non-diffusive phonon-mediated transport at room temperature and measurements of thickness-dependent thermal conductivity of suspended membranes across a wide thickness range, showing good agreement with first-principles-based theory assuming diffuse scattering at the boundaries. Measurements on a membrane with a periodic pattern of nanosized holes (135nm indicated fully diffusive transport and yielded thermal diffusivity values in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the results obtained to-date, we conclude that room-temperature thermal transport in membrane-based silicon nanostructures is now reasonably well understood.

  12. Confined diffusion of transmembrane proteins and lipids induced by the same actin meshwork lining the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Iwasawa, Kokoro; Kalay, Ziya; Tsunoyama, Taka A; Watanabe, Yusuke; Umemura, Yasuhiro M; Murakoshi, Hideji; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Nemoto, Yuri L; Morone, Nobuhiro; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms by which the diffusion rate in the plasma membrane (PM) is regulated remain unresolved, despite their importance in spatially regulating the reaction rates in the PM. Proposed models include entrapment in nanoscale noncontiguous domains found in PtK2 cells, slow diffusion due to crowding, and actin-induced compartmentalization. Here, by applying single-particle tracking at high time resolutions, mainly to the PtK2-cell PM, we found confined diffusion plus hop movements (termed "hop diffusion") for both a nonraft phospholipid and a transmembrane protein, transferrin receptor, and equal compartment sizes for these two molecules in all five of the cell lines used here (actual sizes were cell dependent), even after treatment with actin-modulating drugs. The cross-section size and the cytoplasmic domain size both affected the hop frequency. Electron tomography identified the actin-based membrane skeleton (MSK) located within 8.8 nm from the PM cytoplasmic surface of PtK2 cells and demonstrated that the MSK mesh size was the same as the compartment size for PM molecular diffusion. The extracellular matrix and extracellular domains of membrane proteins were not involved in hop diffusion. These results support a model of anchored TM-protein pickets lining actin-based MSK as a major mechanism for regulating diffusion.

  13. Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane Assay: A 3D Animal Model for Study of Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xue; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ming, Huixin; Zhang, Jinyan; Huang, Guangwu; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a highly invasive and metastatic head and neck cancer. However, mechanistic study of the invasion and metastasis of NPC has been hampered by the lack of proper in vivo models. We established an in vivo chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model to study NPC tumor biology. We found 100% micro-tumor formation 3 days after inoculation with NPC cell lines (4/4) or primary tumor biopsy tissue (35/35). The transplanted NPC micro-tumors grew on CAMs with extracellular matrix interaction and induced angiogenesis. In addition, the CAM model could be used to study the growth of transplanted NPC tumors and also several important steps of metastasis, including tumor invasion by detecting the extent of basement membrane penetration, tumor angiogenesis by analyzing the area of neo-vessels, and tumor metastasis by quantifying tumor cells in distant organs. We established and described a feasible, easy-to-manipulate and reliable CAM model for in vivo study of NPC tumor biology. This model closely simulates the clinical features of NPC growth, progression and metastasis and could help elucidate the biological mechanisms of the growth pattern and invasion of NPC cells and in quantitative assessment of angiogenesis and cell intravasation.

  14. Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane Assay: A 3D Animal Model for Study of Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Xiao

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a highly invasive and metastatic head and neck cancer. However, mechanistic study of the invasion and metastasis of NPC has been hampered by the lack of proper in vivo models. We established an in vivo chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM model to study NPC tumor biology. We found 100% micro-tumor formation 3 days after inoculation with NPC cell lines (4/4 or primary tumor biopsy tissue (35/35. The transplanted NPC micro-tumors grew on CAMs with extracellular matrix interaction and induced angiogenesis. In addition, the CAM model could be used to study the growth of transplanted NPC tumors and also several important steps of metastasis, including tumor invasion by detecting the extent of basement membrane penetration, tumor angiogenesis by analyzing the area of neo-vessels, and tumor metastasis by quantifying tumor cells in distant organs. We established and described a feasible, easy-to-manipulate and reliable CAM model for in vivo study of NPC tumor biology. This model closely simulates the clinical features of NPC growth, progression and metastasis and could help elucidate the biological mechanisms of the growth pattern and invasion of NPC cells and in quantitative assessment of angiogenesis and cell intravasation.

  15. UCH-L1 induces podocyte hypertrophy in membranous nephropathy by protein accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Frithjof; Sachs, Marlies; Meyer, Tobias N; Sievert, Henning; Lindenmeyer, Maja T; Wiech, Thorsten; Cohen, Clemens D; Balabanov, Stefan; Stahl, R A K; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine

    2014-07-01

    Podocytes are terminally differentiated cells of the glomerular filtration barrier that react with hypertrophy in the course of injury such as in membranous nephropathy (MGN). The neuronal deubiquitinase ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is expressed and activated in podocytes of human and rodent MGN. UCH-L1 regulates the mono-ubiquitin pool and induces accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins in affected podocytes. Here, we investigated the role of UCH-L1 in podocyte hypertrophy and in the homeostasis of the hypertrophy associated "model protein" p27(Kip1). A better understanding of the basic mechanisms leading to podocyte hypertrophy is crucial for the development of specific therapies in MGN. In human and rat MGN, hypertrophic podocytes exhibited a simultaneous up-regulation of UCH-L1 and of cytoplasmic p27(Kip1) content. Functionally, inhibition of UCH-L1 activity and knockdown or inhibition of UCH-L1 attenuated podocyte hypertrophy by decreasing the total protein content in isolated glomeruli and in cultured podocytes. In contrast, UCH-L1 levels and activity increased podocyte hypertrophy and total protein content in culture, specifically of cytoplasmic p27(Kip1). UCH-L1 enhanced cytoplasmic p27(Kip1) levels by nuclear export and decreased poly-ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of p27(Kip1). In parallel, UCH-L1 increased podocyte turnover, migration and cytoskeletal rearrangement, which are associated with known oncogenic functions of cytoplasmic p27(Kip1) in cancer. We propose that UCH-L1 induces podocyte hypertrophy in MGN by increasing the total protein content through altered degradation and accumulation of proteins such as p27(Kip1) in the cytoplasm of podocytes. Modification of both UCH-L1 activity and levels could be a new therapeutic avenue to podocyte hypertrophy in MGN. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mucosal immunization with Shigella flexneri outer membrane vesicles induced protection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, A I; de Souza, J; Sánchez-Gómez, S; Pardo-Ros, M; Irache, J M; Gamazo, C

    2011-10-26

    Vaccination appears to be the only rational prophylactic approach to control shigellosis. Unfortunately, there is still no safe and efficacious vaccine available. We investigated the protection conferred by a new vaccine containing outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Shigella flexneri with an adjuvant based on nanoparticles in an experimental model of shigellosis in mice. OMVs were encapsulated in poly(anhydride) nanoparticles prepared by a solvent displacement method with the copolymer PMV/MA. OMVs loaded into NPs (NP-OMVs) were homogeneous and spherical in shape, with a size of 197nm (PdI=0.06). BALB/c mice (females, 9-week-old, 20±1g) were immunized by intradermal, nasal, ocular (20μg) or oral route (100μg) with free or encapsulated OMV. Thirty-five days after administration, mice were infected intranasally with a lethal dose of S. flexneri (1×10(7)CFU). The new vaccine was able to protect fully against infection when it was administered via mucosa. By intradermal route the NP-OMVs formulation increased the protection from 20%, obtained with free extract, to 100%. Interestingly, both OMVs and OMV-NP induced full protection when administered by the nasal and conjuntival route. A strong association between the ratio of IL-12p40/IL-10 and protection was found. Moreover, low levels of IFN-γ correlate with protection. Under the experimental conditions used, the adjuvant did not induce any adverse effects. These results place OMVs among promising candidates to be used for vaccination against Shigellosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Membranous nephropathy with crescents associated with levamisole-induced MPO-ANCA vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinuddin, Irfan; Madhrira, Machaiah; Bracamonte, Erika; Thajudeen, Bijin; Sussman, Amy

    2016-07-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) is the most common cause of crescentic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (GN). Levamisole used as an adulterant in cocaine is increasingly recognized as a cause of AAV. We report the case of a 50 year old woman with atypical anti-MPO AAV associated with cocaine use and exposure to levamisole. In addition to the clinical and pathologic findings of crescentic GN, the patient also had biopsy evidence of secondary membranous nephropathy (MN). Although AAV and MN have been reported previously in the same patient and both have been induced by drug exposures, this is the first report of MN in a patient with AAV likely induced by levamisole. We suggest that MPO can cause both pauci-immune vasculitis and secondary membranous nephropathy in some cases, as in cases of levamisole-adulterated cocaine use.

  18. Single-vesicle detection and analysis of peptide-induced membrane permeabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Ehrlich, Nicky; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2015-01-01

    methods as alternatives to the quenching-based assays for studying peptide-induced leakage from large unilamellar lipid vesicles. Specifically, we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the leakage of fluorescent molecules of different sizes from large unilamellar lipid vesicles......The capability of membrane-active peptides to disrupt phospholipid membranes is often studied by investigating peptide-induced leakage of quenched fluorescent molecules from large unilamellar lipid vesicles. In this article, we explore two fluorescence microscopy-based single-vesicle detection...... dispersed in aqueous solution, and we use confocal imaging of surface-immobilized large unilamellar lipid vesicles to investigate whether there are heterogeneities in leakage between individual vesicles. Of importance, we design an experimental protocol that allows us to quantitatively correlate the results...

  19. Inducible models of bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Casey R; Rosen, Clifford J

    2014-12-11

    Bone is an essential organ that not only confers structural stability to the organism, but also serves as a reservoir for hematopoietic elements and is thought to affect systemic homeostasis through the release of endocrine factors as well as calcium. The loss of bone mass due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption leads to increased fragility that can result in devastating fractures. Further understanding of the effects of environmental stimuli on the development of bone disease in humans is needed, and they can be studied using animal models. Here, we present established and novel methods for the induction of bone loss in mice, including manipulation of diet and environment, administration of drugs, irradiation, and surgically induced hormone deficiency. All of these models are directly related to human cases, and thus, can be used to investigate the causes of bone loss resulting from these interventions. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Chromium(VI)-induced Production of Reactive Oxygen Species, Change of Plasma Membrane Potential and Dissipation of Mitochondria Membrane Potential in Chinese Hamster Lung Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To examine whether Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) is generated, and whether plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential are depolarized in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cell lines exposed to Cr (VI). Methods CHL cells were incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 μmol/L, 2.5 μmol/L, 0.65 μmol/L for 3 and 6 hours, respectively. The production of ROS was performed by using 2,7_dichlorofluorescin diacetate; The changes in plasma membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent cationic dye DiBAC4; And the changes in mitochondria membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123. Results The ROS levels in CHL cells increased in all treated groups compared with the control group (P<0.01); The plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cells dissipated after incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 μmol/L for 3 hours and 6 hours (P<0.01), at 2.5 μmol/L for 6 hours (P<0.01 or 0.05). Conclusion Cr(VI) causes the dissipation of plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cell cultures, and Cr(VI)_induced ROS may play a role in the injuries.

  1. Mechanics and dynamics of triglyceride-phospholipid model membranes: Implications for cellular properties and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi I; Duelund, Lars; Qvortrup, Klaus; Pedersen, Jan S; Ipsen, John H

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate here that triolein alters the mechanical properties of phospholipid membranes and induces extraordinary conformational dynamics. Triolein containing membranes exhibit fluctuations up to size range of 100μm and with the help of these are e.g. able to squeeze through narrow passages between neighbouring structures. Triolein-phosphatidylcholine membranes were found to have bending rigidity significantly lower than that of corresponding pure phosphatidylcholine membrane. Moreover, the triolein containing membranes were found to be reluctant to fuse, which is in good accordance with larger lamellar distances observed in the TOPOPC membranes. These findings suggest repulsion between adjacent membranes. We provide a comprehensive discussion on the possible explanations for the observed mechanics and dynamics in the TOPOPC system and on their potential cellular implications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. N-acylated peptides derived from human lactoferricin perturb organization of cardiolipin and phosphatidylethanolamine in cell membranes and induce defects in Escherichia coli cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Zweytick

    Full Text Available Two types of recently described antibacterial peptides derived from human lactoferricin, either nonacylated or N-acylated, were studied for their different interaction with membranes of Escherichia coli in vivo and in model systems. Electron microscopy revealed striking effects on the bacterial membrane as both peptide types induced formation of large membrane blebs. Electron and fluorescence microscopy, however demonstrated that only the N-acylated peptides partially induced the generation of oversized cells, which might reflect defects in cell-division. Further a different distribution of cardiolipin domains on the E. coli membrane was shown only in the presence of the N-acylated peptides. The lipid was distributed over the whole bacterial cell surface, whereas cardiolipin in untreated and nonacylated peptide-treated cells was mainly located at the septum and poles. Studies with bacterial membrane mimics, such as cardiolipin or phosphatidylethanolamine revealed that both types of peptides interacted with the negatively charged lipid cardiolipin. The nonacylated peptides however induced segregation of cardiolipin into peptide-enriched and peptide-poor lipid domains, while the N-acylated peptides promoted formation of many small heterogeneous domains. Only N-acylated peptides caused additional severe effects on the main phase transition of liposomes composed of pure phosphatidylethanolamine, while both peptide types inhibited the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition. Lipid mixtures of phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin revealed anionic clustering by all peptide types. However additional strong perturbation of the neutral lipids was only seen with the N-acylated peptides. Nuclear magnetic resonance demonstrated different conformational arrangement of the N-acylated peptide in anionic and zwitterionic micelles revealing possible mechanistic differences in their action on different membrane lipids. We hypothesized that both peptides kill

  3. N-acylated peptides derived from human lactoferricin perturb organization of cardiolipin and phosphatidylethanolamine in cell membranes and induce defects in Escherichia coli cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweytick, Dagmar; Japelj, Bostjan; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Zorko, Mateja; Dowhan, William; Blondelle, Sylvie E; Riedl, Sabrina; Jerala, Roman; Lohner, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Two types of recently described antibacterial peptides derived from human lactoferricin, either nonacylated or N-acylated, were studied for their different interaction with membranes of Escherichia coli in vivo and in model systems. Electron microscopy revealed striking effects on the bacterial membrane as both peptide types induced formation of large membrane blebs. Electron and fluorescence microscopy, however demonstrated that only the N-acylated peptides partially induced the generation of oversized cells, which might reflect defects in cell-division. Further a different distribution of cardiolipin domains on the E. coli membrane was shown only in the presence of the N-acylated peptides. The lipid was distributed over the whole bacterial cell surface, whereas cardiolipin in untreated and nonacylated peptide-treated cells was mainly located at the septum and poles. Studies with bacterial membrane mimics, such as cardiolipin or phosphatidylethanolamine revealed that both types of peptides interacted with the negatively charged lipid cardiolipin. The nonacylated peptides however induced segregation of cardiolipin into peptide-enriched and peptide-poor lipid domains, while the N-acylated peptides promoted formation of many small heterogeneous domains. Only N-acylated peptides caused additional severe effects on the main phase transition of liposomes composed of pure phosphatidylethanolamine, while both peptide types inhibited the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition. Lipid mixtures of phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin revealed anionic clustering by all peptide types. However additional strong perturbation of the neutral lipids was only seen with the N-acylated peptides. Nuclear magnetic resonance demonstrated different conformational arrangement of the N-acylated peptide in anionic and zwitterionic micelles revealing possible mechanistic differences in their action on different membrane lipids. We hypothesized that both peptides kill bacteria by

  4. Mitochondrial DNA damage associated with lipid peroxidation of the mitochondrial membrane induced by Fe2+-citrate

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Iron imbalance/accumulation has been implicated in oxidative injury associated with many degenerative diseases such as hereditary hemochromatosis, beta-thalassemia, and Friedreich's ataxia. Mitochondria are particularly sensitive to iron-induced oxidative stress - high loads of iron cause extensive lipid peroxidation and membrane permeabilization in isolated mitochondria. Here we detected and characterized mitochondrial DNA damage in isolated rat liver mitochondria exposed to a Fe2+-citrate c...

  5. Heme protein-induced tubular cytoresistance: expression at the plasma membrane level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zager, R A

    1995-05-01

    Following experimental rhabdomyolysis, animals become resistant to heme protein-induced acute renal failure (ARF). The goals of this study were to: (a) ascertain whether this resistance, previously documented only in vivo, is expressed directly at the proximal tubular cell level; (b) determine whether heme proteinuria (vs. other consequences of rhabdomyolysis) is its trigger; and (c) ascertain some of its subcellular determinants. Rats were injected with a borderline toxic dose of glycerol and 24 hours later proximal tubular segments (PTS) were isolated for study. Their vulnerability to diverse forms of injury (FeSO4-induced oxidant stress, hypoxia, Ca2+ ionophore, cytochalasin D, PLA2) was compared to that found in normal PTS. Post-glycerol PTS manifested significant resistance to each insult (decreased lactate dehydrogenase +/- N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase release). Protection against FeSO4 was virtually complete and it was associated with a 50% decrease in membrane lipid peroxidation. No decrease in hydroxyl radical generation was noted during the FeSO4 challenge (salicylate trap assessment), suggesting a primary increase in membrane resistance to attack. That PLA2 addition caused less deacylation, plasma membrane enzyme (alanine aminopeptidase) release, and LDH leakage from post-glycerol versus normal tubules supported this hypothesis. To test whether cytoresistance was specifically triggered by heme proteins (vs. being a non-specific filtered protein effect, or a result of endotoxin cascade activation), rats were injected with purified myoglobin, non-heme containing filterable proteins, or endotoxin. Only myoglobin induced cytoresistance. In vivo heme oxygenase inhibition (tin-protoporphyrin) did not block the emergence of cytoresistance and it was expressed despite Na,K-ATPase inhibition (ouabain) or cytoskeletal disruption (cytochalasin D). In vivo heat shock failed to protect. In conclusion, (1) rhabdomyolysis induces broad based proximal tubular

  6. Nanovid microscopy for assessing sperm membrane changes induced by in vitro capacitating and acrosomal reacting procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degelos, S D; Wilson, M P; Chandler, J E

    1994-01-01

    This study was to verify the usefulness of Nanovid microscopy techniques for evaluating induced modifications in bovine spermatozoal membranes. Frozen thawed bovine sperm were labeled with 20-nm colloidal gold particles bound to concanavalin A (ConA) or heparin ligands. Sperm membrane changes were induced in vitro by capacitating and acrosome-reacting procedures. Capacitation was induced by incubation with 10 micrograms/ml of heparin for 4 hours at 37 degrees C, 5% CO2, and high humidity. Membrane changes associated with the acrosome reaction were induced by addition of lysophosphatidylcholine (100 micrograms/ml) and incubation for 15 minutes at 37 degrees C, 5% CO2, and high humidity. Gray intensity (black = 0; white = 255) of sperm (ONCELL) and background (OFFCELL) were evaluated with computer-enhanced videomicroscopy with either differential interference contrast (DIC) or Nanovid optics. A high gold concentration on a membrane region produced blacker video pictures with Nanovid microscopy. Gray intensity of video pictures of a region with little or no gold would have a gray intensity equal to or greater than that of the background, that is, toward white. Weighted least squares methods were used to analyze ONCELL data using OFFCELL as a covariate. In experiment 1, ONCELL intensities of cells labeled with ConA-gold complex were lower than those labeled with heparin-gold at the same treatment level. In experiment 2, ONCELL intensity decreased as the concentration of heparin-gold increased from 0 to 0.041 microgram/microliter heparin. ONCELL intensity significantly decreased after sperm were treated with the highest heparin-gold level and acrosome reacted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Interaction of local and general anaesthetics with liposomal membrane models: a QCM-D and DSC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, José Gabriel; Paradiso, Patrizia; Serro, Ana Paula; Fernandes, Anabela; Saramago, Benilde

    2012-06-15

    The behaviour of four local anaesthetics (lidocaine, levobupivacaine, ropivacaine and tetracaine) and one general anaesthetic (propofol) is compared when interacting with two types of model membranes: supported layers of liposomes and liposomes in solution. Several liposomal compositions were tested: dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), binary mixtures of DMPC with cholesterol (CHOL), and ternary mixtures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), DMPC, and CHOL. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, QCM-D, was used to assess changes in the properties of supported layers of liposomes. The effect of the anaesthetics on the phase behaviour of the liposomes in suspension was determined by differential scanning calorimetry. Both techniques show that all anaesthetics have a fluidizing effect on the model membranes but, apparently, the solid supported liposomes are less affected by the anaesthetics than the liposomes in solution. Although the different anaesthetics were compared at different concentrations, tetracaine and propofol seem to induce the strongest perturbation on the liposome membrane. The resistance of the liposomes to the anaesthetic action was found to increase with the presence of cholesterol, while adding DPPC to the binary mixture DMPC+CHOL does not change its behaviour. The novelty of the present work resides upon three points: (1) the use of supported layers of liposomes as model membranes to study interactions with anaesthetics; (2) application of QCM-D to assess changes of the adsorbed liposomes; (3) a comparison of the effect of local and general anaesthetics interacting with various model membranes in similar experimental conditions.

  8. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of shear-induced instabilities of lipid bilayer membranes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Walther, Jens H.; Kawano, Satoyuki; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    We study shear-induced instabilities of lipid bilayers immersed in water using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. The shear imposed by the flow of the water induces initially microscopic structural changes of the membrane, starting with tilting of the molecules in the direction of the shear. The tilting propagates in the spanwise direction when the shear rate exceeds a critical value and the membrane undergoes a bucklinglike deformation in the direction perpendicular to the shear. The bucklinglike undulation continues until a localized Kelvin-Helmholtz-like instability leads to membrane rupture. We study the different modes of membrane undulation using membranes of different geometries and quantify the relative importance of the bucklinglike bending and the Kelvin-Helmholtz-like instability of the membrane.

  9. Correlation between the n-alkanols-induced sensitization of erythrocytes to hyperthermia and the fluidization of their membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, I T; Zlatanov, I

    1995-01-01

    It was reported recently that the thermohaemolysis of mammalian erythrocytes is related to a thermo-induced membrane event of permeability barrier impairment in which the inactivation of membrane proteins is implicated. Here, the influence of different n-alkanols, methanol to octanol, on the onset temperature Tm of this barrier impairment event was compared with the changes in the dynamic properties of the membrane lipid region for human erythrocytes. The potencies of these n-alkanols to decrease Tm, to fluidize and disorder the lipid region were strongly related to their lipid solubilities. With respect to their membrane concentration, all the applied n-alkanols were roughly equipotent in decreasing Tm and in fluidizing and disordering the membrane lipids. Since Tm corresponds to the stability of erythrocytes against hyperthermia, this result indicates that the heat sensitization of these cells, induced by the n-alkanols employed, strongly correlated the fluidization (disordering) of the lipid region of their membranes.

  10. Bilayer Thickness Mismatch Controls Domain Size in Model Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Petruzielo, Robin S [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Drazba, Paul [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Feigenson, Gerald [Cornell University; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm beyond the reach of optical microscopy are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

  11. Mechanics and dynamics of triglyceride-phospholipid model membranes: Implications for cellular properties and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi I.; Duelund, Lars; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate here that triolein alters the mechanical properties of phospholipid membranes and induces extraordinary conformational dynamics. Triolein containing membranes exhibit fluctuations up to size range of 100µm and with the help of these are e.g. able to squeeze through narrow passages ...

  12. Mechanics and dynamics of triglyceride-phospholipid model membranes: Implications for cellular properties and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi I.; Duelund, Lars; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate here that triolein alters the mechanical properties of phospholipid membranes and induces extraordinary conformational dynamics. Triolein containing membranes exhibit fluctuations up to size range of 100µm and with the help of these are e.g. able to squeeze through narrow passages ...

  13. Small unilamellar liposomes as a membrane model for cell inactivation by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, S.; Frache, G.; Thomann, J. S.; Clément, F.; Penny, C.; Belmonte, T.; Duday, D.

    2016-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is thought to be a promising tool for numerous biomedical applications due to its ability to generate a large diversity of reactive species in a controlled way. In some cases, it can also generate pulsed electric fields at the zone of treatment, which can induce processes such as electroporation in cell membranes. However, the interaction of these reactive species and the pulse electric field with cells in a physiological medium is very complex, and we still need a better understanding in order to be useful for future applications. A way to reach this goal is to work with model cell membranes such as liposomes, with the simplest physiological liquid and in a controlled atmosphere in order to limit the number of parallel reactions and processes. In this paper, where this approach has been chosen, 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) have been synthesized in a phosphate buffered aqueous solution, and this solution has been treated by a nanosecond pulsed plasma jet under a pure nitrogen atmosphere. It is only the composition of the plasma gas that has been changed in order to generate different cocktails of reactive species. After the quantification of the main plasma reactive species in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, structural, surface charge state, and chemical modifications generated on the plasma treated liposomes, due to the interaction with the plasma reactive species, have been carefully characterized. These results allow us to further understand the effect of plasma reactive species on model cell membranes in physiological liquids. The permeation through the liposomal membrane and the reaction of plasma reactive species with molecules encapsulated inside the liposomes have also been evaluated. New processes of degradation are finally presented and discussed, which come from the specific conditions of plasma treatment under the pure nitrogen atmosphere.

  14. Network modeling of membrane-based artificial cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Eric C.; Philen, Michael K.; Leo, Donald J.

    2013-04-01

    Computational models are derived for predicting the behavior of artificial cellular networks for engineering applications. The systems simulated involve the use of a biomolecular unit cell, a multiphase material that incorporates a lipid bilayer between two hydrophilic compartments. These unit cells may be considered building blocks that enable the fabrication of complex electrochemical networks. These networks can incorporate a variety of stimuli-responsive biomolecules to enable a diverse range of multifunctional behavior. Through the collective properties of these biomolecules, the system demonstrates abilities that recreate natural cellular phenomena such as mechanotransduction, optoelectronic response, and response to chemical gradients. A crucial step to increase the utility of these biomolecular networks is to develop mathematical models of their stimuli-responsive behavior. While models have been constructed deriving from the classical Hodgkin-Huxley model focusing on describing the system as a combination of traditional electrical components (capacitors and resistors), these electrical elements do not sufficiently describe the phenomena seen in experiment as they are not linked to the molecular scale processes. From this realization an advanced model is proposed that links the traditional unit cell parameters such as conductance and capacitance to the molecular structure of the system. Rather than approaching the membrane as an isolated parallel plate capacitor, the model seeks to link the electrical properties to the underlying chemical characteristics. This model is then applied towards experimental cases in order that a more complete picture of the underlying phenomena responsible for the desired sensing mechanisms may be constructed. In this way the stimuli-responsive characteristics may be understood and optimized.

  15. Rat mammary carcinogenesis induced by in situ expression of constitutive Raf kinase activity is prevented by tethering Raf to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlin, Daniel R; Gould, Michael N

    2003-06-01

    Mammary carcinogenesis induced through expression of activated Raf was investigated using a model in which retroviral vectors were infused into the central ducts of rat mammary glands. This model allows efficient expression of experimental proteins in a small fraction of endogenous mammary epithelial cells in situ. We previously reported that Raf is the dominant oncogenic signaling pathway from activated Ras in rat mammary glands. We show here that mammary gland carcinogenesis is rapidly induced by the expression of c-Raf-1 kinase that is activated by N-terminal truncation (Delta-Raf). Interestingly, targeting Raf to the plasma membrane via C-terminal fusion with Ras membrane localization signals (Raf-Caax) induces Raf kinase activity that transforms 3T3 cells more frequently than Delta-Raf, yet in situ expression of Raf-Caax does not induce mammary carcinomas. To investigate these contrasting results and begin elucidating the mechanisms of Raf-induced mammary carcinogenesis, we combined both activating mutations (N-terminal truncation and C-terminal membrane localization motifs) in one Raf construct (Delta-Raf-Caax). While Delta-Raf-Caax transforms 3T3 cells more efficiently than Delta-Raf or Raf-Caax, in situ expression of Delta-Raf-Caax does not induce carcinomas in vivo, demonstrating that lipid modification on the C-terminus of Delta-Raf negates its oncogenic potential in rat mammary gland.

  16. Gramicidin channel-induced lipid membrane deformation energy: influence of chain length and boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, A

    1996-01-31

    The influence of boundary conditions on the deformation energy of a lipid membrane containing a gramicidin A channel was evaluated numerically. A liquid crystal model was used to calculate the relative contributions of compression, splay and surface tension. It is proposed that the nearest neighbor lipid molecules are displaced from the channel end in a direction perpendicular to the bilayer and it is concluded that surface tension is the major component of the deformation free energy for monoolein (gmo)/n-alkane membranes. This unexpected result supports the validity of the liquid crystal models of membrane deformation since gramicidin lifetime has been shown to correlate with surface tension for gmo membranes. The theory accurately predicts the experimentally measured relative lifetimes without the use of adjustable parameters. For conditions where splay may be neglected surface tension is always the major component of the deformation energy, irrespective of the magnitude of the compression coefficient. The deformation may extend for hundreds of angstroms from the peptide. The results obtained here are expected to be important for the characterization of protein-membrane interactions in general.

  17. Isoporous PS-b-PEO ultrafiltration membranes via self-assembly and water-induced phase separation

    KAUST Repository

    Karunakaran, Madhavan

    2014-03-01

    A simple and efficient approach towards the fabrication of a skinned membrane with highly ordered pores in the nanometer range is presented here. We successfully combined the self-assembly of PS-b-PEO block copolymer and water induced phase separation for the preparation of isoporous PS-b-PEO block copolymer membranes. We produced for the first time asymmetric isoporous PS-b-PEO membranes with a 100nm thin isoporous separating layer using water at room temperature as coagulant. This was possible by careful selection of the block lengths and the solvent system. FESEM, AFM and TEM measurements were employed to characterize the nanopores of membranes. The pure water fluxes were measured and the flux of membrane was exceptionally high (around 800Lm-2h-1bar-1). Protein rejection measurements were carried out for this membrane and the membrane had a retention of about 67% of BSA and 99% of γ-globulin. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  18. A Simple Experimental Model to Investigate Force Range for Membrane Nanotube Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai eLor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of membrane tubules in living cells is essential to many biological processes. In cells, one mechanism to form nano-sized lipid tubules is via molecular motor induced bilayer extraction. In this paper, we describe a simple experimental model to investigate the forces required for lipid tube formation using kinesin motors anchored to 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC vesicles. Previous related studies have used molecular motors actively pulling on the membrane to extract a nanotube. Here we invert the system geometry; molecular motors are used as static anchors linking DOPC vesicles to a two-dimensional microtubule network, and an external flow is introduced to generate nanotubes facilitated by the drag force. We find that a drag force of approximately ≈7 pN is sufficient for tubule extraction for vesicles ranging from 1-2 um in radius. By our method, we find that the force generated by a single molecular motor is sufficient for membrane tubule extraction from a spherical lipid vesicle.

  19. A new method for modeling rough membrane surface and calculation of interfacial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leihong; Zhang, Meijia; He, Yiming; Chen, Jianrong; Hong, Huachang; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fouling control necessitates the establishment of an effective method to assess interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. This study proposed a new method which includes a rigorous mathematical equation for modeling membrane surface morphology, and combination of surface element integration (SEI) method and the composite Simpson's approach for assessment of interfacial interactions. The new method provides a complete solution to quantitatively calculate interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. Application of this method in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) showed that, high calculation accuracy could be achieved by setting high segment number, and moreover, the strength of three energy components and energy barrier was remarkably impaired by the existence of roughness on the membrane surface, indicating that membrane surface morphology exerted profound effects on membrane fouling in the MBR. Good agreement between calculation prediction and fouling phenomena was found, suggesting the feasibility of this method.

  20. Random walk model of subdiffusion in a system with a thin membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz

    2015-02-01

    We consider in this paper subdiffusion in a system with a thin membrane. The subdiffusion parameters are the same in both parts of the system separated by the membrane. Using the random walk model with discrete time and space variables the probabilities (Green's functions) P(x,t) describing a particle's random walk are found. The membrane, which can be asymmetrical, is characterized by the two probabilities of stopping a random walker by the membrane when it tries to pass through the membrane in both opposite directions. Green's functions are transformed to the system in which the variables are continuous, and then the membrane permeability coefficients are given by special formulas which involve the probabilities mentioned above. From the obtained Green's functions, we derive boundary conditions at the membrane. One of the conditions demands the continuity of a flux at the membrane, but the other one is rather unexpected and contains the Riemann-Liouville fractional time derivative P(x(N)(-),t)=λ(1)P(x(N)(+),t)+λ(2)∂(α/2)P(x(N)(+),t)/∂t(α/2), where λ(1),λ(2) depending on membrane permeability coefficients (λ(1)=1 for a symmetrical membrane), α is a subdiffusion parameter, and x(N) is the position of the membrane. This boundary condition shows that the additional "memory effect," represented by the fractional derivative, is created by the membrane. This effect is also created by the membrane for a normal diffusion case in which α=1.

  1. Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Methane Steam Reforming Reaction at High Pressure in a Ceramic Membrane Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Hacarlioglu, Pelin

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation describes the preparation of a novel inorganic membrane for hydrogen permeation and its application in a membrane reactor for the study of the methane steam reforming reaction. The investigations include both experimental studies of the membrane permeation mechanism and theoretical modeling of mass transfer through the membrane and simulation of the membrane reactor with 1-D and 2-D models. A hydrothermally stable and hydrogen selective membrane composed of silica and a...

  2. The Fluid-Mosaic Model of Membrane Structure: still relevant to understanding the structure, function and dynamics of biological membranes after more than 40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolson, Garth L

    2014-06-01

    In 1972 the Fluid-Mosaic Membrane Model of membrane structure was proposed based on thermodynamic principals of organization of membrane lipids and proteins and available evidence of asymmetry and lateral mobility within the membrane matrix [S. J. Singer and G. L. Nicolson, Science 175 (1972) 720-731]. After over 40years, this basic model of the cell membrane remains relevant for describing the basic nano-structures of a variety of intracellular and cellular membranes of plant and animal cells and lower forms of life. In the intervening years, however, new information has documented the importance and roles of specialized membrane domains, such as lipid rafts and protein/glycoprotein complexes, in describing the macrostructure, dynamics and functions of cellular membranes as well as the roles of membrane-associated cytoskeletal fences and extracellular matrix structures in limiting the lateral diffusion and range of motion of membrane components. These newer data build on the foundation of the original model and add new layers of complexity and hierarchy, but the concepts described in the original model are still applicable today. In updated versions of the model more emphasis has been placed on the mosaic nature of the macrostructure of cellular membranes where many protein and lipid components are limited in their rotational and lateral motilities in the membrane plane, especially in their natural states where lipid-lipid, protein-protein and lipid-protein interactions as well as cell-matrix, cell-cell and intracellular membrane-associated protein and cytoskeletal interactions are important in restraining the lateral motility and range of motion of particular membrane components. The formation of specialized membrane domains and the presence of tightly packed integral membrane protein complexes due to membrane-associated fences, fenceposts and other structures are considered very important in describing membrane dynamics and architecture. These structures along

  3. Role of arachidonic acid in hyposmotic membrane stretch-induced increase in calcium-activated potassium currents in gastric myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng YANG; Wen-xie XU; Xing-lan LI; Hui-ying XU; Jia-bin SUN; Bin MEI; Hai-feng ZHENG; Lian-hua PIAO; De-gang XING; Zhai-liu LI

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To study effects of arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolites on the hyposmotic membrane stretch-induced increase in calcium-activated potassium currents (IKCa) in gastric myocytes. Methods: Membrane currents were recorded by using a conventional whole cell patch-clamp technique in gastric myocytes isolated with collagenase. Results: Hyposmotic membrane stretch and AA increased both IK(Ca) and spontaneous transient outward currents significantly.Exogenous AA could potentiate the hyposmotic membrane stretch-induced increase in IK(Ca). The hyposmotic membrane stretch-induced increase in IK(Ca) was significantly suppressed by dimethyleicosadienoic acid (100 μmol/L in pipette solution), an inhibitor of phospholipase A2. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid, a lipoxygenase inhibitor, significantly suppressed AA and hyposmotic membrane stretch-induced increases in IK(Ca). External calcium-free or gadolinium chloride, a blocker of stretch-activated channels, blocked the AA-induced increase in IK(Ca) significantly, but it was not blocked by nicardipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker. Ryanodine, a calcium-induced calcium release agonist, completely blocked the AA-induced increase in IK(Ca); however, heparin, a potent inhibitor of inositol triphosphate receptor, did not block the AA-induced increase in IK(Ca). Conclusion:Hyposmotic membrane stretch may activate phospholipase A2, which hydrolyzes membrane phospholipids to ultimately produce AA; AA as a second messenger mediates Ca2+ influx, which triggers Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release and elicits activation of IK(Ca) in gastric antral circular myocytes of the guinea pig.

  4. SIMULATION OF THE LIGHT-INDUCED OSCILLATIONS OF THE MEMBRANE-POTENTIAL IN POTAMOGETON LEAF-CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MIEDEMA, H; PRINS, HBA

    1993-01-01

    An attempt has been made to simulate the light-induced oscillations of the membrane potential of Potamogeton lucens leaf cells in relation to the apoplastic pH changes. Previously it was demonstrated that the membrane potential of these cells can be described in terms of proton movements only. It is

  5. Comparative studies on performance of radiation-induced and thermal cross-linked ion-exchange membrane for water electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, Tina; Jasti, Amaranadh [Electro-Membrane Processes Division, Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), G. B. Marg, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India); Goel, N.K. [Radiation Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Shahi, Vinod K., E-mail: vkshahi@csmcri.or [Electro-Membrane Processes Division, Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), G. B. Marg, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India); Sabharwal, Sunil [Radiation Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2011-07-15

    Radiation-induced and thermal cross-linked sulfonated poly(ether sulfone) (SPS)-sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPK) composite ion-exchange membranes (SPS/SPK({gamma}) and SPS/SPK(T), respectively) were prepared. Their performances for water electrolysis were comparatively assessed. Thermal cross-linked membrane (SPS/SPK(T)) showed cross-linking of part functional groups (-SO{sub 3}H) and thus deterioration in membrane conductivity. While, radiation-induced cross-linked membrane (SPS/SPK({gamma})) avoided any cross-linking between functional groups and thus conductivity. Electrolysis performances of these membranes were evaluated in comparison with Nafion117 membrane. Relatively low current efficiency (CE) for SPS/SPK and SPS/SPK(T) membranes was due to their high mass transfer (water) via electro-osmotic drag, which was negligible for SPS/SPK({gamma}) membrane. SPS/SPK({gamma}) membrane exhibited comparable stabilities and water splitting performance with Nafion117 membrane, which revealed its suitability as substitute for electrochemical applications.

  6. Comparative studies on performance of radiation-induced and thermal cross-linked ion-exchange membrane for water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Tina; Jasti, Amaranadh; Goel, N. K.; Shahi, Vinod K.; Sabharwal, Sunil

    2011-07-01

    Radiation-induced and thermal cross-linked sulfonated poly(ether sulfone) (SPS)-sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPK) composite ion-exchange membranes (SPS/SPK(γ) and SPS/SPK(T), respectively) were prepared. Their performances for water electrolysis were comparatively assessed. Thermal cross-linked membrane (SPS/SPK(T)) showed cross-linking of part functional groups (-SO 3H) and thus deterioration in membrane conductivity. While, radiation-induced cross-linked membrane (SPS/SPK(γ)) avoided any cross-linking between functional groups and thus conductivity. Electrolysis performances of these membranes were evaluated in comparison with Nafion117 membrane. Relatively low current efficiency (CE) for SPS/SPK and SPS/SPK(T) membranes was due to their high mass transfer (water) via electro-osmotic drag, which was negligible for SPS/SPK(γ) membrane. SPS/SPK(γ) membrane exhibited comparable stabilities and water splitting performance with Nafion117 membrane, which revealed its suitability as substitute for electrochemical applications.

  7. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: a lattice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, D A; Chapman, D

    1979-04-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure-area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T(0), which locates the gel-fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a "smooth" homogeneous surface ("cholesterol-like") and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T(0) can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken "annulus" of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T(0) does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10(-7) sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed.

  8. Opioids Inhibit Angiogenesis in a Chorioallantoic Membrane Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Haktan; Tufek, Adnan; Karaman, Evren; Tokgoz, Orhan

    2017-02-01

    Angiogenesis is an important characteristic of cancer. Switching from the avascular phase to the vascular phase is a necessary process for tumor growth. Therefore, research in cancer treatment has focused on angiogenesis as a drug target. Despite the widespread use of opioids to treat pain in patients with cancer, little is known about the effect of these drugs on vascular endothelium and angiogenesis. We aimed to investigate the efficacies of morphine, codeine, and tramadol in 3 different concentrations on angiogenesis in hens' eggs. This is a prospective, observational, controlled, in-vivo animal study. Single academic medical center. This study was conducted on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of fertilized hens' eggs. The efficacies of morphine, codeine, and tramadol in 3 different concentrations were evaluated on angiogenesis in a total of 165 hens' eggs. Statistically significant differences were found between drug-free agarose used as a negative control and concentrations of morphine of 10 µM and 1 µM, a concentration of tramadol of 10 µM, and concentrations of codeine of 10 µM and 1 µM. Concentrations of morphine of 10 µM and 1 µM showed strong antiangiogenic effects. While codeine had strong antiangiogenic effects at high concentrations, at 0.1 µM it was shown to have weak antiangiogenic effects. However, tramadol at a concentration of 10 µM had only weak antiangiogenic effects. This is just a CAM model study. In this study, we tested the effects of 3 different opioid drugs on angiogenesis in 3 different concentrations, and we observed that morphine was a good anti-angiogenic agent, but tramadol and codeine only had anti-angiogenic effects at high doses.Key Words: Morphine, codeine, tramadol, opioid, bevacizumab, chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), angiogenesis.

  9. Molecular Modeling of Interfacial Proton Transport in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The proton conductivity of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) plays a crucial role for the performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). High hydration of Nafion-like membranes is crucial to high proton conduction across the PEM, which limits the operation temperature of PEFCs to <100o C. At elevated temperatures (>100o C) and minimal hydration, interfacial proton transport becomes vital for membrane operation. Along with fuel cell systems, interfacial proton conduction is of...

  10. Sphingomyelin-induced inhibition of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase causes neurodegeneration in type A Niemann-Pick disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cañamás, A; Benvegnù, S; Rueda, C B; Rábano, A; Satrústegui, J; Ledesma, M D

    2017-05-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type A (NPA) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neurological alterations that leads to death in childhood. Loss-of-function mutations in the acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) gene cause NPA, and result in the accumulation of sphingomyelin (SM) in lysosomes and plasma membrane of neurons. Using ASM knockout (ASMko) mice as a NPA disease model, we investigated how high SM levels contribute to neural pathology in NPA. We found high levels of oxidative stress both in neurons from these mice and a NPA patient. Impaired activity of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) increases intracellular calcium. SM induces PMCA decreased activity, which causes oxidative stress. Incubating ASMko-cultured neurons in the histone deacetylase inhibitor, SAHA, restores PMCA activity and calcium homeostasis and, consequently, reduces the increased levels of oxidative stress. No recovery occurs when PMCA activity is pharmacologically impaired or genetically inhibited in vitro. Oral administration of SAHA prevents oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, and improves behavioral performance in ASMko mice. These results demonstrate a critical role for plasma membrane SM in neuronal calcium regulation. Thus, we identify changes in PMCA-triggered calcium homeostasis as an upstream mediator for NPA pathology. These findings can stimulate new approaches for pharmacological remediation in a disease with no current clinical treatments.

  11. Complex reconstruction of the dorsal hand using the induced membrane technique associated with bone substitute: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Moris

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The induced membrane technique allowed the reconstruction of small bone deficits in the long bones of the hand in a two-step procedure, the first step taking place in an emergency context of composite tissue trauma.

  12. Aroma Stripping under various Forms of Membrane Distillation Processes: Experiments and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    of MD configurations: Vacuum Membrane Distillation , Sweeping Gas Membrane Distillation , Direct Contact Membrane Distillation and Osmotic Membrane Distillation. The influence of feed temperature and feed flow rate on the permeate flux and concentration factor for different types of aroma compounds have...... been measured for these MD configurations. A general transport model for the flux of water and aroma compounds have been derived and compared with the experimental data. A reasonable agreement between the modelling and the experiments could be obtained. From the modelling it was possible to explain...

  13. Citrinin-induced fluidization of the plasma membrane of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaskó, Ágnes; Mike, Nóra; Gróf, Pál; Gazdag, Zoltán; Czibulya, Zsuzsanna; Nagy, Lívia; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor; Pesti, Miklós

    2013-09-01

    Citrinin (CTN) is a toxic fungal metabolite that is a hazardous contaminant of foods and feeds. In the present study, its acute toxicity and effects on the plasma membrane of Schizosaccharomyces pombe were investigated. The minimum inhibitory concentration of CTN against the yeast cells proved to be 500 μM. Treatment with 0, 250, 500 or 1000 μM CTN for 60 min resulted in a 0%, 2%, 21% or 100% decrease, respectively, in the survival rate of the cell population. Treatment of cells with 0, 100, 500 or 1000 μM CTN for 20 min induced decrease in the phase-transition temperature of the 5-doxylstearic acid-labeled plasma membrane to 16.51, 16.04, 14.18 or 13.98°C, respectively as measured by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. This perturbation was accompanied by the efflux of essential K⁺ from the cells. The existence of an interaction between CTN and glutathione was detected for the first time by spectrofluorometry. Our observations may suggest a direct interaction of CTN with the free sulfhydryl groups of the integral proteins of the plasma membrane, leading to dose-dependent membrane fluidization. The change in fluidity disturbed the ionic homeostasis, contributing to the death of the cells, which is a novel aspect of CTN cytotoxicity.

  14. Harvesting microalgal biomass using a magnetically induced membrane vibration (MMV) system: filtration performance and energy consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilad, M R; Discart, V; Vandamme, D; Foubert, I; Muylaert, K; Vankelecom, Ivo F J

    2013-06-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effectiveness of submerged microfiltration to harvest both a marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and a Chlorella vulgaris in a recently developed magnetically induced membrane vibrating (MMV) system. We assess the filtration performance by conducting the improved flux step method (IFM), fed-batch concentration filtrations and membrane fouling autopsy using two lab-made membranes with different porosity. The full-scale energy consumption was also estimated. Overall results suggest that the MMV offers a good fouling control and the process was proven to be economically attractive. By combining the membrane filtration (15× concentration) with centrifugation to reach a final concentration of 25% w/v, the energy consumption to harvest P. tricornutum and C. vulgaris was, respectively, as low as 0.84 and 0.77kWh/m(3), corresponding to 1.46 and 1.39 kWh/kg of the harvested biomass. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Edwardsiella tarda Outer Membrane Protein C: An Immunogenic Protein Induces Highly Protective Effects in Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus against Edwardsiellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuguo Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Outer membrane protein C of Edwardsiella tarda is a major cell surface antigen and it was identified to be an immunogenic protein by Western blot using flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus anti-recombinant OmpC (rOmpC, and anti-E. tarda antibodies. rOmpC tested the immune protective effect against E. tarda challenge in a flounder model and produced a relative percentage of survival rate of 85%. The immune response of flounder induced by rOmpC was investigated, and the results showed that: (1 the levels of specific serum antibodies induced by rOmpC were significantly higher than the control group after the second week after immunization, and the peak level occurred at week five after immunization; (2 rOmpC could induce the proliferation of sIg+ lymphocytes, and the peak levels of sIg+ lymphocytes in blood, spleen, and pronephros occurred at 4–5 weeks after immunization; and (3 the MHCIIα, CD4-1, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α genes were significantly induced after being injected with rOmpC. Taken together, these results demonstrated that rOmpC could evoke highly protective effects against E. tarda challenge and induce strong innate immune response and humoral immune response of flounder, which indicated that OmpC was a promising vaccine candidate against E. tarda infection.

  16. Modeling of annexin A2-Membrane interactions by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, Davit; Gerke, Volker; Heuer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The annexins are a family of Ca2+-regulated phospholipid binding proteins that are involved in membrane domain organization and membrane trafficking. Although they are widely studied and crystal structures are available for several soluble annexins their mode of membrane association has never been studied at the molecular level. Here we obtained molecular information on the annexin-membrane interaction that could serve as paradigm for the peripheral membrane association of cytosolic proteins by Molecular Dynamics simulations. We analyzed systems containing the monomeric annexin A2 (AnxA2), a membrane with negatively charged phosphatidylserine (POPS) lipids as well as Ca2+ ions. On the atomic level we identify the AnxA2 orientations and the respective residues which display the strongest interaction with Ca2+ ions and the membrane. The simulation results fully agree with earlier experimental findings concerning the positioning of bound Ca2+ ions. Furthermore, we identify for the first time a significant interaction between lysine residues of the protein and POPS lipids that occurs independently of Ca2+ suggesting that AnxA2-membrane interactions can also occur in a low Ca2+ environment. Finally, by varying Ca2+ concentrations and lipid composition in our simulations we observe a calcium-induced negative curvature of the membrane as well as an AnxA2-induced lipid ordering.

  17. Sonication-induced Ostwald ripening of ZIF-8 nanoparticles and formation of ZIF-8/polymer composite membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Thompson, Joshua A.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of typical membrane processing conditions on the structure, interfacial morphology, and gas separation performance of MOF/polymer nanocomposite membranes is investigated. In particular, the ZIF-8/Matrimid® nanocomposite membrane system is examined, and it is shown that ultrasonication - a commonly employed particle dispersion method - induces significant changes in the shape, size distribution, and structure of ZIF-8 particles suspended in an organic solvent during membrane processing. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy reveal that ZIF-8 nanoparticles undergo substantial Ostwald ripening when subjected to high intensity ultrasonication as often required in the formation of MOF/polymer nanocomposite membranes. Other characterization techniques reveal that the ripened particles exhibit lower pore volumes and lower surface areas compared to the as-made material. ZIF-8/Matrimid® composite membranes fabricated using two sonication methods show significant differences in microstructure. Permeation measurements show significant enhancement in permeability of CO 2 and increased CO 2/CH 4 selectivity in membranes fabricated with high-intensity sonication. In contrast, composite membranes prepared with low-intensity sonication are found to be defective. A careful evaluation of MOF membrane processing conditions, as well as knowledge of the properties of the MOF material after these membrane processing steps, are necessary to develop reliable processing-structure-property relations for MOF-containing membranes. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanism of blue-light-induced plasma-membrane depolarization in etiolated cucumber hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A large, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane precedes the rapid blue-light (BL)-induced growth suppression in etiolated seedlings of Cucumis sativus L. The mechanism of this voltage transient was investigated by applying inhibitors of ion channels and the plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase, by manipulating extracellular ion concentrations, and by measuring cell input resistance and ATP levels. The depolarizing phase was not affected by Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil, La3+) or by reducing extracellular free Ca2+ by treatment with ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). However, these treatments did reduce the rate of repolarization, indicating an inward movement of Ca2+ is involved. No effects of the K(+)-channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA+) were detected. Vanadate and KCN, used to inhibit the H(+)-ATPase, reduced or completely inhibited the BL-induced depolarization. Levels of ATP increased by 11-26% after 1-2 min of BL. Input resistance of trichrome cells, measured with double-barreled microelectrodes, remained constant during the onset of the depolarization but decreased as the membrane voltage became more positive than -90 mV. The results indicate that the depolarization mechanism initially involves inactivation of the H(+)-ATPase with subsequent transient activation of one or more types of ion channels.

  19. Estradiol pretreatment attenuated nicotine-induced endothelial cell apoptosis via estradiol functional membrane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-li; Zhao, Jian-li; Lau, Wayne-Bond; Zhang, Yan-qing; Qiao, Zhong-dong; Wang, Ya-jing

    2011-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is highly associated with increased cardiovascular disease complications. The female population, however, manifests reduced cardiovascular morbidity. We define nicotine's effect upon human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), determine whether estradiol might ameliorate endothelial dysfunction via its membrane estrogen receptor (mER), and attempt to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Endothelial cells were pretreated with estradiol-BSA and measured resultant ion flux across the cells via the patch clamp technique to assess mER is functionality. Estradiol-BSA administration was associated with 30% decreased nicotine-induced apoptosis and also attenuated nicotine-activated phosphorylation of p38 and ERK. Pretreatment of estradiol-BSA triggered a low calcium influx, suggesting ahead low influx calcium played a critical role in the underlying protective mechanisms of estradiol. Furthermore, this estradiol-BSA protection against apoptosis remained effective in the presence of tamoxifen, an intracellular estrogen receptor (iER) inhibitor. Additionally, tamoxifen did not abolish estradiol-BSA's inhibitory effect upon p38 and ERK's activation, giving evidence to the obligatory role of p38 and ERK signaling in the estradiol-BSA's anti-apoptotic action via mER. Our study provides evidence that nicotine enhances endothelial cell apoptosis, but estrogen exerts anti-apoptotic effect through its functional membrane estrogen receptor. Clinically, the nicotine in cigarettes might contribute to endothelial dysfunction, whereas ambient estradiol may provide cellular protection against nicotine-induced injury through its functional membrane receptor via MAPK pathway downregulation.

  20. In vivo direct patulin-induced fluidization of the plasma membrane of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Eszter; Papp, Gábor; Belágyi, József; Gazdag, Zoltán; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Pesti, Miklós

    2010-07-01

    Patulin is a toxic metabolite produced by various species of Penicillium, Aspergillus and Byssochlamys. In the present study, its effects on the plasma membrane of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe were investigated. The phase-transition temperature (G) of untreated cells, measured by electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry proved to be 14.1 degrees C. Treatment of cells for 20 min with 50, 500, or 1000 microM patulin resulted in a decrease of the G value of the plasma membrane to 13.9, 10.1 or 8.7 degrees C, respectively. This change in the transition temperature was accompanied by the loss of compounds absorbing light at 260 nm. Treatment of cells with 50, 500 or 1000 microM patulin for 20 min induced the efflux of 25%, 30.5% or 34%, respectively, of these compounds. Besides its cytotoxic effects an adaptation process was observed. This is the first study to describe the direct interaction of patulin with the plasma membrane, a process which could definitely contribute to the adverse toxic effects induced by patulin.

  1. Measurement of interfacial toughness of metal film wire and polymer membrane through electricity induced buckling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghua; Xie, Huimin; Lu, Jian; Chen, Pengwan; Zhang, Qingming

    2011-06-15

    Measurement of interfacial toughness of a metal film wire and a flexible substrate is a challenging issue for evaluating the interfacial bonding capacity of the film-wire/substrate systems. In this paper, an electricity induced buckling method is proposed to measure the interfacial toughness between a metal film wire and a polymer membrane, which does not use a pre-existing weak interface. This method relies on causing a buckling driven delamination of the metal film wire from the polymer membrane, by inducing a compressive stress due to electrification of the film wire. For a sort of structure formed by a constantan film wire and a polymer membrane, the current density range under which the buckling of the film wire will emerge is obtained from experiments. The average interfacial toughness of one typical sample is measured to be 31.6 J/m(2). According to the buckling topographies under different current densities, the interfacial toughness of the constantan film wire and the polymer substrate is found to vary from 10 J/m(2) to 60 J/m(2).

  2. Lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and subsequent cell death in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Tsutomu; Toyoda, Futoshi; Imai, Shinji; Tanigawa, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Kousuke; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2016-05-01

    Local anesthetics are administered intraarticularly for pain control in orthopedic clinics and surgeries. Although previous studies have shown that local anesthetics can be toxic to chondrocytes, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study investigates acute cellular responses associated with lidocaine-induced toxicity to articular chondrocytes. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were exposed to lidocaine and their morphological changes were monitored with live cell microscopy. The viability of chondrocytes was evaluated using a fluorescence based LIVE/DEAD assay. Acute treatment of chondrocytes with lidocaine (3-30 mM) induced spherical protrusions on the cell surface (so called "membrane blebbing") in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The concentration-response relationship for the lidocaine effect was shifted leftward by elevating extracellular pH, as expected for the non-ionized lidocaine being involved in the bleb formation. ROCK (Rho-kinase) inhibitors Y-27632 and fasudil completely prevented the lidocaine-induced membrane blebbing, suggesting that ROCK activation is required for bleb formation. Caspase-3 levels were unchanged by 10 mM lidocaine (p = 0.325) and a caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not affect the lidocaine-induced blebbing (p = 0.964). GTP-RhoA levels were significantly increased (p ROCK inhibitors or a myosin-II inhibitor blebbistatin (p ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and thereby produces a cytotoxic effect on chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:754-762, 2016.

  3. Investigating cellular electroporation using planar membrane models and miniaturized devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitert, van Iris

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on increasing our understanding of the electroporation process. Electroporation is a technique employed to introduce foreign molecules into cells that can normally not pass the cell membrane. By applying a short but high electric field, pores appear in the membrane through which

  4. Ligand-induced type II interleukin-4 receptor dimers are sustained by rapid re-association within plasma membrane microcompartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, David; Moraga, Ignacio; Winkelmann, Hauke; Birkholz, Oliver; Wilmes, Stephan; Schulte, Markos; Kraich, Michael; Kenneweg, Hella; Beutel, Oliver; Selenschik, Philipp; Paterok, Dirk; Gavutis, Martynas; Schmidt, Thomas; Garcia, K. Christopher; Müller, Thomas D.; Piehler, Jacob

    2017-07-01

    The spatiotemporal organization of cytokine receptors in the plasma membrane is still debated with models ranging from ligand-independent receptor pre-dimerization to ligand-induced receptor dimerization occurring only after receptor uptake into endosomes. Here, we explore the molecular and cellular determinants governing the assembly of the type II interleukin-4 receptor, taking advantage of various agonists binding the receptor subunits with different affinities and rate constants. Quantitative kinetic studies using artificial membranes confirm that receptor dimerization is governed by the two-dimensional ligand-receptor interactions and identify a critical role of the transmembrane domain in receptor dimerization. Single molecule localization microscopy at physiological cell surface expression levels, however, reveals efficient ligand-induced receptor dimerization by all ligands, largely independent of receptor binding affinities, in line with the similar STAT6 activation potencies observed for all IL-4 variants. Detailed spatiotemporal analyses suggest that kinetic trapping of receptor dimers in actin-dependent microcompartments sustains robust receptor dimerization and signalling.

  5. Interactions of biocidal guanidine hydrochloride polymer analogs with model membranes: a comparative biophysical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongxin Zhou; Anna Zheng; Jianjiang Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Four synthesized biocidal guanidine hydrochloride polymers with different alkyl chain length,including polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride and its three new analogs,were used to investigate their interactions with phospholipids vesicles mimicking bacterial membrane.Characterization was conducted by using fluorescence dye leakage,isothermal titration calorimetry,and differential scanning calorimetry.The results showed that the gradually lengthened alkyl chain of the polymer increased the biocidal activity,accompanied with the increased dye leakage rate and the increased binding constant and energy change value of polymer-membrane interaction.The polymer-membrane interaction induced the change of pretransition and main phase transition (decreased temperature and increased width) of phospholipids vesicles,suggesting the conformational change in the phospholipids headgroups and disordering in the hydrophobic regions of lipid membranes.The above information revealed that the membrane disruption actions of guanidine hydrochloride polymers are the results of the polymer's strong binding to the phospholipids membrane and the subsequent perturbations of the polar headgroups and hydrophobic core region of the phospholipids membrane.The alkyl chain structure significantly affects the binding constant and energy change value of the polymer-membrane interactions and the perturbation extent of the phospholipids membrane,which lead to the different biocidal activity of the polymer analogs.This work provides important information about the membrane disruption action mechanism of biocidal guanidine hydrochloride polymers.

  6. Modeling and simulations of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells with poroelastic approach for coupled liquid water transport and deformation in the membrane

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Performance degradation and durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells depend strongly on transport and deformation characteristics of their components especially the polymer membrane. Physical properties of membranes, such as ionic conductivity and Young's modulus, depend on the water content that varies significantly with operating conditions and during transients. Recent studies indicate that cyclic transients may induce hygrothermal fatigue that leads to the ultimate fail...

  7. Erythrocytes Membrane Alterations Reflecting Liver Damage in CCl₄-Induced Cirrhotic Rats: The Ameliorative Effect of Naltrexone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Sarhadi Kholari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cirrhosis is the consequence of chronic liver disease. Deleterious effects of oxidative stress on hepatocytes may be reflected in the erythrocyte membrane. Naltrexone (NTX has been shown to attenuate hepatocellular injury in fibrotic animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the progressive effect of CCl4 on the liver and whether the improvement of liver cirrhosis can be monitored through alterations in the erythrocyte membrane. In this study, 84 male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups and received reagents (i.p. as follows: 1- CCl₄, 2- NTX + CCl₄, 3- Mineral Oil (M, and 4- NTX + M. After 2, 6 and 8 weeks, the blood and liver tissue samples were collected. Plasma enzyme activities, the content of erythrocyte GSH and some membrane compositions, including protein carbonyl, protein sulfhydryl, and malondialdehyde were assessed. After 6 and 8 weeks, plasma enzyme activities and the content of protein carbonyl were higher in CCl4 group significantly, as compared to other groups (P<0.001. NTX significantly diminished protein carbonyl and plasma enzyme activities (P<0.001. GSH did not change until the 6th week. However, CCl4+NTX increased it significantly as compared to CCl₄ group (P<0.05. Protein sulfhydryl showed changes in NTX+CCl₄ group which indicated a significant increase in protein sulfhydryl content in a 6th week compared to CCl4 group (P<0.05. MDA did not show any significant alteration. CCl₄-induced cirrhosis is accompanied by increased content of oxidative stress markers, especially protein carbonyl of RBC membrane and plasma enzyme activities. This study shows that the progression of liver cirrhosis and the ameliorative effect of NTX can be followed through alterations of these markers.

  8. Management of traumatic tibial diaphyseal bone defect by “induced-membrane technique”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gap nonunion of long bones is a challenging problem, due to the limitation of conventional reconstructive techniques more so if associated with infection and soft tissue defect. Treatment options such as autograft with non-vascularized fibula and cancellous bone graft, vascularized bone graft, and bone transportation are highly demanding on the part of surgeons and hospital setups and have many drawbacks. This study aims to analyze the outcome of patients with wide diaphyseal bone gap treated with induced-membrane technique (Masquelet technique.Materials and Methods: This study included 9 patients (7 males and 2 females, all with tibial bone-gap. Eight of the 9 patients were infected and in 3 patients there was associated large soft tissue defect requiring flap cover. This technique is two-stage procedure. Stage I surgery included debridement, fracture stabilization, application of spacer between bone ends, and soft tissue reconstruction. Stage II surgery included removal of spacer with preservation of induced membrane formed at spacer surface and filling the bone-gap with morselized iliac crest bone-graft within the membrane sleeve. Average bone-gap of 5.2 cm was treated. The spacer was always found to be encapsulated by a thick glistening membrane which did not collapse after its removal. All patients were followed up for an average period of 21.5 months. Results: Serial Radiographs showed regular uptake of autograft and thus consolidation within themselves in the region of bone gap and also with host bone. Bone-union was documented in all patients and all patients are walking full weight-bearing without support. Conclusions: The study highlights that the technique provide effective and practical management for difficult gap nonunion. It does not require specialized equipment, investigations, and surgery. Thus, it provides a reasonable alternative to the developing infrastructures and is a reliable and reproducible technique.

  9. Lipid asymmetry in plant plasma membranes: phosphate deficiency-induced phospholipid replacement is restricted to the cytosolic leaflet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjällström, H; Hellgren, Lars; Wieslander, Å;

    2010-01-01

    barrier) and rafts both contain only trace amounts of DGDG, we conclude that this lipid class is not compatible with membrane functions requiring a high degree of lipid order. By not replacing phospholipids site specifically with DGDG, negative functional effects of this lipid in the plasma membrane...... are avoided.-Tjellström, H., Hellgren, L. I., Wieslander, A., Sandelius, A. S. Lipid asymmetry in plant plasma membranes: phosphate deficiency-induced phospholipid replacement is restricted to the cytosolic leaflet.......As in other eukaryotes, plant plasma membranes contain sphingolipids, phospholipids, and free sterols. In addition, plant plasma membranes also contain sterol derivatives and usually 5 mol% DGDG was included. As both the apoplastic plasma membrane leaflet (probably the major water permeability...

  10. A Mouse Model for Laser-induced Choroidal Neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ronil S; Soetikno, Brian T; Lajko, Michelle; Fawzi, Amani A

    2015-12-27

    The mouse laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) model has been a crucial mainstay model for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) research. By administering targeted laser injury to the RPE and Bruch's membrane, the procedure induces angiogenesis, modeling the hallmark pathology observed in neovascular AMD. First developed in non-human primates, the laser-induced CNV model has come to be implemented into many other species, the most recent of which being the mouse. Mouse experiments are advantageously more cost-effective, experiments can be executed on a much faster timeline, and they allow the use of various transgenic models. The miniature size of the mouse eye, however, poses a particular challenge when performing the procedure. Manipulation of the eye to visualize the retina requires practice of fine dexterity skills as well as simultaneous hand-eye-foot coordination to operate the laser. However, once mastered, the model can be applied to study many aspects of neovascular AMD such as molecular mechanisms, the effect of genetic manipulations, and drug treatment effects. The laser-induced CNV model, though useful, is not a perfect model of the disease. The wild-type mouse eye is otherwise healthy, and the chorio-retinal environment does not mimic the pathologic changes in human AMD. Furthermore, injury-induced angiogenesis does not reflect the same pathways as angiogenesis occurring in an age-related and chronic disease state as in AMD. Despite its shortcomings, the laser-induced CNV model is one of the best methods currently available to study the debilitating pathology of neovascular AMD. Its implementation has led to a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AMD, as well as contributing to the development of many of the AMD therapies currently available.

  11. Rotation of Vibrio fischeri Flagella Produces Outer Membrane Vesicles That Induce Host Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschtgen, Marie-Stephanie; Lynch, Jonathan B; Koch, Eric; Schwartzman, Julia; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Ruby, Edward

    2016-08-15

    Using the squid-vibrio association, we aimed to characterize the mechanism through which Vibrio fischeri cells signal morphogenesis of the symbiotic light-emitting organ. The symbiont releases two cell envelope molecules, peptidoglycan (PG) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that, within 12 h of light organ colonization, act in synergy to trigger normal tissue development. Recent work has shown that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by V. fischeri are sufficient to induce PG-dependent morphogenesis; however, the mechanism(s) of OMV release by these bacteria has not been described. Like several genera of both beneficial and pathogenic bacteria, V. fischeri cells elaborate polar flagella that are enclosed by an extension of the outer membrane, whose function remains unclear. Here, we present evidence that along with the well-recognized phenomenon of blebbing from the cell's surface, rotation of this sheathed flagellum also results in the release of OMVs. In addition, we demonstrate that most of the development-inducing LPS is associated with these OMVs and that the presence of the outer membrane protein OmpU but not the LPS O antigen on these OMVs is important in triggering normal host development. These results also present insights into a possible new mechanism of LPS release by pathogens with sheathed flagella. Determining the function(s) of sheathed flagella in bacteria has been challenging, because no known mutation results only in the loss of this outer membrane-derived casing. Nevertheless, the presence of a sheathed flagellum in such host-associated genera as Vibrio, Helicobacter, and Brucella has led to several proposed functions, including physical protection of the flagella and masking of their immunogenic flagellins. Using the squid-vibrio light organ symbiosis, we demonstrate another role, that of V. fischeri cells require rotating flagella to induce apoptotic cell death within surface epithelium, which is a normal step in the organ's development

  12. Atomic model for the membrane-embedded VO motor of a eukaryotic V-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhab-Jafari, Mohammad T; Rohou, Alexis; Schmidt, Carla; Bueler, Stephanie A; Benlekbir, Samir; Robinson, Carol V; Rubinstein, John L

    2016-11-03

    Vacuolar-type ATPases (V-ATPases) are ATP-powered proton pumps involved in processes such as endocytosis, lysosomal degradation, secondary transport, TOR signalling, and osteoclast and kidney function. ATP hydrolysis in the soluble catalytic V1 region drives proton translocation through the membrane-embedded VO region via rotation of a rotor subcomplex. Variability in the structure of the intact enzyme has prevented construction of an atomic model for the membrane-embedded motor of any rotary ATPase. We induced dissociation and auto-inhibition of the V1 and VO regions of the V-ATPase by starving the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, allowing us to obtain a ~3.9-Å resolution electron cryomicroscopy map of the VO complex and build atomic models for the majority of its subunits. The analysis reveals the structures of subunits ac8c'c″de and a protein that we identify and propose to be a new subunit (subunit f). A large cavity between subunit a and the c-ring creates a cytoplasmic half-channel for protons. The c-ring has an asymmetric distribution of proton-carrying Glu residues, with the Glu residue of subunit c″ interacting with Arg735 of subunit a. The structure suggests sequential protonation and deprotonation of the c-ring, with ATP-hydrolysis-driven rotation causing protonation of a Glu residue at the cytoplasmic half-channel and subsequent deprotonation of a Glu residue at a luminal half-channel.

  13. Combined biofouling and scaling in membrane feed channels: a new modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, A I; Bergwerff, L; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Picioreanu, C

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for combined fouling due to biofilms and mineral precipitates in membrane feed channels with spacers. Finite element simulation of flow and solute transport in two-dimensional geometries was coupled with a particle-based approach for the development of a composite (cells and crystals) foulant layer. Three fouling scenarios were compared: biofouling only, scaling only and combined fouling. Combined fouling causes a quicker flux decline than the summed flux deterioration when scaling and biofouling act independently. The model results indicate that the presence of biofilms leads to more mineral formation due to: (1) an enhanced degree of saturation for salts next to the membrane and within the biofilm; and (2) more available surface for nucleation to occur. The impact of biofilm in accelerating gypsum precipitation depends on the composition of the feed water (eg the presence of NaCl) and the kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth. Interactions between flow, solute transport and biofilm-induced mineralization are discussed.

  14. Characterization of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization: focus on OH radical distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shota; Honda, Ryosuke; Hokari, Yutaro; Takashima, Keisuke; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-08-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) is used medically for plasma-induced cell permeabilization. However, how plasma irradiation specifically triggers permeabilization remains unclear. In an attempt to identify the dominant factor(s), the distribution of plasma-produced reactive species was investigated, primarily focusing on OH radicals. A stronger plasma discharge, which produced more OH radicals in the gas phase, also produced more OH radicals in the liquid phase (OHaq), enhancing the cell membrane permeability. In addition, plasma irradiation-induced enhancement of cell membrane permeability decreased markedly with increased solution thickness (<1 mm), and the plasma-produced OHaq decayed in solution (diffusion length on the order of several hundred micrometers). Furthermore, the horizontally center-localized distribution of OHaq corresponded with the distribution of the permeabilized cells by plasma irradiation, while the overall plasma-produced oxidizing species in solution (detected by iodine-starch reaction) exhibited a doughnut-shaped horizontal distribution. These results suggest that OHaq, among the plasma-produced oxidizing species, represents the dominant factor in plasma-induced cell permeabilization. These results enhance the current understanding of the mechanism of APP as a cell-permeabilization tool.

  15. Cortisol Induces Reactive Oxygen Species Through a Membrane Glucocorticoid Receptor in Rainbow Trout Myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Marlen B; Aedo, Jorge E; Zuloaga, Rodrigo; Valenzuela, Cristian; Molina, Alfredo; Valdés, Juan A

    2017-04-01

    Cortisol is an essential regulator of neuroendocrine stress responses in teleosts. Cortisol predominantly affects target tissues through the genomic pathway, which involves interacting with cytoplasmic glucocorticoid receptors, and thereby, modulating stress-response gene expressions. Cortisol also produces rapid effects via non-genomic pathways, which do not involve gene transcription. Although cortisol-mediated genomic pathways are well documented in teleosts, non-genomic pathways are not fully understood. Moreover, no studies have focused on the contribution of non-genomic cortisol pathways in compensatory stress responses in fish. In this study, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skeletal myotubes were stimulated with physiological concentrations of cortisol and cortisol-BSA, a membrane-impermeable agent, resulting in an early induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This production was not suppressed by transcription or translation inhibitors, suggesting non-genomic pathway involvement. Moreover, myotube preincubation with RU486 and NAC completely suppressed cortisol- and cortisol-BSA-induced ROS production. Subcellular fractionation analysis revealed the presence of cell membrane glucocorticoid receptors. Finally, cortisol-BSA induced a significant increase in ERK1/2 and CREB phosphorylation, as well as in CREB-dependent transcriptional activation of the pgc1a gene expression. The obtained results strongly suggest that cortisol acts through a non-genomic glucocorticoid receptor-mediated pathway to induce ROS production and contribute to ERK/CREB/PGC1-α signaling pathway activation as stress compensation mechanisms. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 718-725, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Static Magnetic Field Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Pulp Cells by Affecting Cell Membrane Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Chih Hsieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the causes of dental pulpitis is lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced inflammatory response. Following pulp tissue inflammation, odontoblasts, dental pulp cells (DPCs, and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs will activate and repair damaged tissue to maintain homeostasis. However, when LPS infection is too serious, dental repair is impossible and disease may progress to irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether static magnetic field (SMF can attenuate inflammatory response of dental pulp cells challenged with LPS. In methodology, dental pulp cells were isolated from extracted teeth. The population of DPSCs in the cultured DPCs was identified by phenotypes and multilineage differentiation. The effects of 0.4 T SMF on DPCs were observed through MTT assay and fluorescent anisotropy assay. Our results showed that the SMF exposure had no effect on surface markers or multilineage differentiation capability. However, SMF exposure increases cell viability by 15%. In addition, SMF increased cell membrane rigidity which is directly related to higher fluorescent anisotropy. In the LPS-challenged condition, DPCs treated with SMF demonstrated a higher tolerance to LPS-induced inflammatory response when compared to untreated controls. According to these results, we suggest that 0.4 T SMF attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response to DPCs by changing cell membrane stability.

  17. The Octyl Ester of Ginsenoside Rh2 Induces Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization via Bax Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Zhang, Bing; Sun, Yong; Xiong, Zeng-Xing; Peng, Han; Deng, Ze-Yuan; Hu, Jiang-Ning

    2016-04-25

    Ginsenoside Rh2 is a potential pharmacologically active metabolite of ginseng. Previously, we have reported that an octyl ester derivative of ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2-O), has been confirmed to possess higher bioavailability and anticancer effect than Rh2 in vitro. In order to better assess the possibility that Rh2-O could be used as an anticancer compound, the underlying mechanism was investigated in this study. The present results revealed that lysosomal destabilization was involved in the early stage of cell apoptosis in HepG2 cells induced by Rh2-O. Rh2-O could induce an early lysosomal membrane permeabilization with the release of lysosomal protease cathepsins to the cytosol in HepG2 cells. The Cat B inhibitor (leu) and Cat D inhibitor (pepA) inhibited Rh2-O-induced HepG2 apoptosis as well as tBid production and Δφm depolarization, indicating that lysosomal permeabilization occurred upstream of mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, Rh2-O induced a significant increase in the protein levels of DRAM1 and Bax (p lysosomes of HepG2 cells. Knockdown of Bax partially inhibited Rh2-O-induced Cat D release from lysosomes. Thus it was concluded that Rh2-O induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells through activation of the lysosomal-mitochondrial apoptotic pathway involving the translocation of Bax to the lysosome.

  18. Membrane-lipid therapy in operation: the HSP co-inducer BGP-15 activates stress signal transduction pathways by remodeling plasma membrane rafts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Gombos

    Full Text Available Aging and pathophysiological conditions are linked to membrane changes which modulate membrane-controlled molecular switches, causing dysregulated heat shock protein (HSP expression. HSP co-inducer hydroxylamines such as BGP-15 provide advanced therapeutic candidates for many diseases since they preferentially affect stressed cells and are unlikely have major side effects. In the present study in vitro molecular dynamic simulation, experiments with lipid monolayers and in vivo ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy showed that BGP-15 alters the organization of cholesterol-rich membrane domains. Imaging of nanoscopic long-lived platforms using the raft marker glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric green fluorescent protein diffusing in the live Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell plasma membrane demonstrated that BGP-15 prevents the transient structural disintegration of rafts induced by fever-type heat stress. Moreover, BGP-15 was able to remodel cholesterol-enriched lipid platforms reminiscent of those observed earlier following non-lethal heat priming or membrane stress, and were shown to be obligate for the generation and transmission of stress signals. BGP-15 activation of HSP expression in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells involves the Rac1 signaling cascade in accordance with the previous observation that cholesterol affects the targeting of Rac1 to membranes. Finally, in a human embryonic kidney cell line we demonstrate that BGP-15 is able to inhibit the rapid heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 acetylation monitored during the early phase of heat stress, thereby promoting a prolonged duration of HSF1 binding to heat shock elements. Taken together, our results indicate that BGP-15 has the potential to become a new class of pharmaceuticals for use in 'membrane-lipid therapy' to combat many various protein-misfolding diseases associated with aging.

  19. A Coarse Grained Model for a Lipid Membrane with Physiological Composition and Leaflet Asymmetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyan Sharma

    Full Text Available The resemblance of lipid membrane models to physiological membranes determines how well molecular dynamics (MD simulations imitate the dynamic behavior of cell membranes and membrane proteins. Physiological lipid membranes are composed of multiple types of phospholipids, and the leaflet compositions are generally asymmetric. Here we describe an approach for self-assembly of a Coarse-Grained (CG membrane model with physiological composition and leaflet asymmetry using the MARTINI force field. An initial set-up of two boxes with different types of lipids according to the leaflet asymmetry of mammalian cell membranes stacked with 0.5 nm overlap, reliably resulted in the self-assembly of bilayer membranes with leaflet asymmetry resembling that of physiological mammalian cell membranes. Self-assembly in the presence of a fragment of the plasma membrane protein syntaxin 1A led to spontaneous specific positioning of phosphatidylionositol(4,5bisphosphate at a positively charged stretch of syntaxin consistent with experimental data. An analogous approach choosing an initial set-up with two concentric shells filled with different lipid types results in successful assembly of a spherical vesicle with asymmetric leaflet composition. Self-assembly of the vesicle in the presence of the synaptic vesicle protein synaptobrevin 2 revealed the correct position of the synaptobrevin transmembrane domain. This is the first CG MD method to form a membrane with physiological lipid composition as well as leaflet asymmetry by self-assembly and will enable unbiased studies of the incorporation and dynamics of membrane proteins in more realistic CG membrane models.

  20. Atomic-level description of protein-lipid interactions using an accelerated membrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Muller, Melanie P; Arcario, Mark J; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins are structurally diverse proteins that are involved in fundamental cellular processes. Their activity of these proteins is frequently modulated through their interaction with cellular membranes, and as a result techniques to study the interfacial interaction between peripheral proteins and the membrane are in high demand. Due to the fluid nature of the membrane and the reversibility of protein-membrane interactions, the experimental study of these systems remains a challenging task. Molecular dynamics simulations offer a suitable approach to study protein-lipid interactions; however, the slow dynamics of the lipids often prevents sufficient sampling of specific membrane-protein interactions in atomistic simulations. To increase lipid dynamics while preserving the atomistic detail of protein-lipid interactions, in the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model the membrane core is replaced by an organic solvent, while short-tailed lipids provide a nearly complete representation of natural lipids at the organic solvent/water interface. Here, we present a brief introduction and a summary of recent applications of the HMMM to study different membrane proteins, complementing the experimental characterization of the presented systems, and we offer a perspective of future applications of the HMMM to study other classes of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  1. Study of Raft Domains in Model Membrane of DPPC/PE/Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda

    2010-10-01

    Raft domains in bilayer membrane are thought to play an important role in many cell functions such as cell signaling or trans-membrane protein activation. Here we use a model membrane consisting of DPPC/PE/cholesterol to examine the structure of membrane rafts and phase interactions. In particular we are interested in lipids containing the highly polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA. We use both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy to obtain information on the structural properties of raft regions and track cholesterol. As expected, we find phase separation of raft regions between saturated and unsaturated lipids. Moreover, we find that the roughness of the domains change with varying cholesterol concentration possibly due to overpacking. This model study provides further understanding of the role of cholesterol in bilayer membrane leading towards a better knowledge of cell membranes.

  2. Immunology of membranous nephropathy: from animal models to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinico, R A; Mezzina, N; Trezzi, B; Ghiggeri, G M; Radice, A

    2016-02-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN), the leading cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults, is characterized by the deposition of subepithelial immune deposits that consist mainly of immunoglobulin (Ig)G and complement. Most of the cases are primary or idiopathic (iMN), while only approximately 25% of the cases are secondary to some known disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus, hepatitis B, drugs and malignancies. Most of our knowledge on the pathogenesis of iMN has relied upon old experimental models (i.e. Heymann nephritis) that have shown that immune deposits are formed in situ by the reaction of autoantibodies against the respective podocyte antigen. Recent findings indicate that podocyte proteins also act as an autoantigen in human iMN. The M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) has been identified as the main target antigen, as it can be found in approximately 70% of iMN patients but only rarely in other glomerulonephritides. Podocytes damage in the experimental model of Heymann nephritis is complement-mediated. In humans, the presence of complement within the subepithelial deposits is well established, but IgG4, which does not activate complement by classical or alternative pathways, represents the predominant subclass of IgG anti-PLA2R. Some evidence suggests that IgG4 anti-PLA2R autoantibodies can bind mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and activate the lectin complement pathway. A genetic background for iMN has been demonstrated by genome-wide association studies that have shown highly significant associations of the PLA2R1 and the human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DQA1 loci with iMN. In addition to their diagnostic value, anti-PLA2R antibodies may be useful to monitor disease activity and predict response to treatment.

  3. Theoretical modeling and experimental validation of transport and separation properties of carbon nanotube electrospun membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jung-Gil

    2016-12-27

    Developing a high flux and selective membrane is required to make membrane distillation (MD) a more attractive desalination process. Amongst other characteristics membrane hydrophobicity is significantly important to get high vapor transport and low wettability. In this study, a laboratory fabricated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite electrospun (E-CNT) membrane was tested and has showed a higher permeate flux compared to poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PH) electrospun membrane (E-PH membrane) in a direct contact MD (DCMD) configuration. Only 1% and 2% of CNTs incorporation resulted in an enhanced permeate flux with lower sensitivity to feed salinity while treating a 35 and 70 g/L NaCl solutions. Experimental results and the mechanisms of E-CNT membrane were validated by a proposed new step-modeling approach. The increased vapor transport in E-CNT membranes could not be elucidated by an enhancement of mass transfer only at a given physico-chemical properties. However, the theoretical modeling approach considering the heat and mass transfers simultaneously enabled to explain successfully the enhanced flux in the DCMD process using E-CNT membranes. This indicates that both mass and heat transfers improved by CNTs are attributed to the enhanced vapor transport in the E-CNT membrane.

  4. Membrane translocation of IL-33 receptor in ventilator induced lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hsing Yang

    Full Text Available Ventilator-induced lung injury is associated with inflammatory mechanism and causes high mortality. The objective of this study was to discover the role of IL-33 and its ST2 receptor in acute lung injury induced by mechanical ventilator (ventilator-induced lung injury; VILI. Male Wistar rats were intubated after tracheostomy and received ventilation at 10 cm H2O of inspiratory pressure (PC10 by a G5 ventilator for 4 hours. The hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were collected and analyzed. The morphological changes of lung injury were also assessed by histological H&E stain. The dynamic changes of lung injury markers such as TNF-α and IL-1β were measured in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, and lung tissue homogenization by ELISA assay. During VILI, the IL-33 profile change was detected in BALF, peripheral serum, and lung tissue by ELISA analysis. The Il-33 and ST2 expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry staining and western blot analysis. The consequence of VILI by H&E stain showed inducing lung congestion and increasing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β in the lung tissue homogenization, serum, and BALF, respectively. In addition, rats with VILI also exhibited high expression of IL-33 in lung tissues. Interestingly, the data showed that ST2L (membrane form was highly accumulated in the membrane fraction of lung tissue in the PC10 group, but the ST2L in cytosol was dramatically decreased in the PC10 group. Conversely, the sST2 (soluble form was slightly decreased both in the membrane and cytosol fractions in the PC10 group compared to the control group. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that ST2L translocation from the cytosol to the cell membranes of lung tissue and the down-expression of sST2 in both fractions can function as new biomarkers of VILI. Moreover, IL-33/ST2 signaling activated by mechanically responsive lung injury may potentially serve as a new therapy target.

  5. C. elegans as a model for membrane traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ken; Norris, Anne; Sato, Miyuki; Grant, Barth D

    2014-01-01

    The counterbalancing action of the endocytosis and secretory pathways maintains a dynamic equilibrium that regulates the composition of the plasma membrane, allowing it to maintain homeostasis and to change rapidly in response to alterations in the extracellular environment and/or intracellular metabolism. These pathways are intimately integrated with intercellular signaling systems and play critical roles in all cells. Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed diverse roles of membrane trafficking in physiology and development and have also provided molecular insight into the fundamental mechanisms that direct cargo sorting, vesicle budding, and membrane fisson and fusion. In this review, we summarize progress in understanding membrane trafficking mechanisms derived from work in C. elegans, focusing mainly on work done in non-neuronal cell-types, especially the germline, early embryo, coelomocytes, and intestine.

  6. The molecular face of lipid rafts in model membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risselada, H. Jelger; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2008-01-01

    Cell membranes contain a large number of different lipid species. Such a multicomponent mixture exhibits a complex phase behavior with regions of structural and compositional heterogeneity. Especially domains formed in ternary mixtures, composed of saturated and unsaturated lipids together with

  7. A novel transferrin receptor-targeted hybrid peptide disintegrates cancer cell membrane to induce rapid killing of cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamoto Megumi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transferrin receptor (TfR is a cell membrane-associated glycoprotein involved in the cellular uptake of iron and the regulation of cell growth. Recent studies have shown the elevated expression levels of TfR on cancer cells compared with normal cells. The elevated expression levels of this receptor in malignancies, which is the accessible extracellular protein, can be a fascinating target for the treatment of cancer. We have recently designed novel type of immunotoxin, termed "hybrid peptide", which is chemically synthesized and is composed of target-binding peptide and lytic peptide containing cationic-rich amino acids components that disintegrates the cell membrane for the cancer cell killing. The lytic peptide is newly designed to induce rapid killing of cancer cells due to conformational change. In this study, we designed TfR binding peptide connected with this novel lytic peptide and assessed the cytotoxic activity in vitro and in vivo. Methods In vitro: We assessed the cytotoxicity of TfR-lytic hybrid peptide for 12 cancer and 2 normal cell lines. The specificity for TfR is demonstrated by competitive assay using TfR antibody and siRNA. In addition, we performed analysis of confocal fluorescence microscopy and apoptosis assay by Annexin-V binding, caspase activity, and JC-1 staining to assess the change in mitochondria membrane potential. In vivo: TfR-lytic was administered intravenously in an athymic mice model with MDA-MB-231 cells. After three weeks tumor sections were histologically analyzed. Results The TfR-lytic hybrid peptide showed cytotoxic activity in 12 cancer cell lines, with IC50 values as low as 4.0-9.3 μM. Normal cells were less sensitive to this molecule, with IC50 values > 50 μM. Competition assay using TfR antibody and knockdown of this receptor by siRNA confirmed the specificity of the TfR-lytic hybrid peptide. In addition, it was revealed that this molecule can disintegrate the cell membrane of T47

  8. Defective Membrane Remodeling in Neuromuscular Diseases: Insights from Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Cowling, Belinda S; Anne Toussaint; Jean Muller; Jocelyn Laporte

    2012-01-01

    Proteins involved in membrane remodeling play an essential role in a plethora of cell functions including endocytosis and intracellular transport. Defects in several of them lead to human diseases. Myotubularins, amphiphysins, and dynamins are all proteins implicated in membrane trafficking and/or remodeling. Mutations in myotubularin, amphiphysin 2 (BIN1), and dynamin 2 lead to different forms of centronuclear myopathy, while mutations in myotubularin-related proteins cause Charcot-Marie-Too...

  9. Interactions between HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies and Model Lipid Membranes imaged with AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauscher, Stefan; Hardy, Gregory; Alam, Munir; Shapter, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    Lipid membrane interactions with rare, broadly neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), 2F5 and 4E10, play a critical role in HIV-1 neutralization. Our research is motivated by recent immunization studies that have shown that induction of antibodies that avidly bind the gp41-MPER antigen is not sufficient for neutralization. Rather, it is required that antigen designs induce polyreactive antibodies that recognize MPER antigens as well as the viral lipid membrane. However, the mechanistic details of how membrane properties influence NAb-lipid and NAb-antigen interactions remain unknown. Furthermore, it is well established that the native viral membrane is heterogeneous, representing a mosaic of lipid rafts and protein clustering. However, the size, physical properties, and dynamics of these regions are poorly characterized and their potential roles in HIV-1 neutralization are also unknown. To understand how membrane properties contribute to 2F5/4E10 membrane interactions, we have engineered biomimetic supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and use atomic force microscopy to visualize membrane domains, antigen clustering, and antibody-membrane interactions at sub-nanometer z-resolution. Our results show that localized binding of HIV-1 antigens and NAbs occur preferentially with the most fluid membrane domain. This supports the theory that NAbs may interact with regions of low lateral lipid forces that allow antibody insertion into the bilayer.

  10. Comparison of the Modeling Approach between Membrane Bioreactor and Conventional Activated Sludge Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Tao; Sin, Gürkan; Spanjers, Henri

    2009-01-01

    Activated sludge models (ASM) have been developed and largely applied in conventional activated sludge (CAS) systems. The applicability of ASM to model membrane bioreactors (MBR) and the differences in modeling approaches have not been studied in detail. A laboratory-scale MBR was modeled using ASM...... to the inhibition effect of soluble microbial products (SMP) at elevated concentration. Second, a greater biomass affinity to oxygen and ammonium was found, which was probably related to smaller MBR sludge flocs. Finally, the membrane throughput during membrane backwashing/relaxation can be normalized...

  11. Zonal rate model for stacked membrane chromatography part II: characterizing ion-exchange membrane chromatography under protein retention conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Patrick; von Lieres, Eric; Haynes, Charles

    2012-03-01

    The Zonal Rate Model (ZRM) has previously been shown to accurately account for contributions to elution band broadening, including external flow nonidealities and radial concentration gradients, in ion-exchange membrane (IEXM) chromatography systems operated under nonbinding conditions. Here, we extend the ZRM to analyze and model the behavior of retained proteins by introducing terms for intra-column mass transfer resistances and intrinsic binding kinetics. Breakthrough curve (BTC) data from a scaled-down anion-exchange membrane chromatography module using ovalbumin as a model protein were collected at flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 20 mL min(-1). Through its careful accounting of transport nonidealities within and external to the membrane stack, the ZRM is shown to provide a useful framework for characterizing putative protein binding mechanisms and models, for predicting BTCs and complex elution behavior, including the common observation that the dynamic binding capacity can increase with linear velocity in IEXM systems, and for simulating and scaling separations using IEXM chromatography. Global fitting of model parameters is used to evaluate the performance of the Langmuir, bi-Langmuir, steric mass action (SMA), and spreading-type protein binding models in either correlating or fundamentally describing BTC data. When combined with the ZRM, the bi-Langmuir, and SMA models match the chromatography data, but require physically unrealistic regressed model parameters to do so. In contrast, for this system a spreading-type model is shown to accurately predict column performance while also providing a realistic fundamental explanation for observed trends, including an observed increase in dynamic binding capacity with flow rate.

  12. Pore-scale modeling and simulation of flow, transport, and adsorptive or osmotic effects in membranes: the influence of membrane microstructure

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.

    2015-07-17

    The selection of an appropriate membrane for a particular application is a complex and expensive process. Computational modeling can significantly aid membrane researchers and manufacturers in this process. The membrane morphology is highly influential on its efficiency within several applications, but is often overlooked in simulation. Two such applications which are very important in the provision of clean water are forward osmosis and filtration using functionalized micro/ultra/nano-filtration membranes. Herein, we investigate the effect of the membrane morphology in these two applications. First we present results of the separation process using resolved finger- and sponge-like support layers. Second, we represent the functionalization of a typical microfiltration membrane using absorptive pore walls, and illustrate the effect of different microstructures on the reactive process. Such numerical modeling will aid manufacturers in optimizing operating conditions and designing efficient membranes.

  13. The Effect of Simvastatin on Infection-Induced Inflammatory Response of Human Fetal Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basraon, Sanmaan K; Costantine, Maged M; Saade, George; Menon, Ramkumar

    2015-07-01

    Inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to preterm labor pathophysiology. The objective of this study was to test anti-inflammatory properties of simvastatin in human fetal membranes exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Normal term human fetal membrane explants (n = 11) were allocated to one of the six study groups: control, LPS only (100 ng/mL), simvastatin only (125 ng/mL), simvastatin given 6 hrs prior to LPS (S-L), simvastatin given 6 hrs post-LPS (L-S), and simvastatin and LPS given simultaneously (L+S). Explants were incubated for 24 hrs. Multiplex ELISA for cytokines: IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α; soluble cytokine receptors: sIL-1R2, sIL-6R, sTNFR1, and R2; MMPs (1, 2, 7, 9, and 10); and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) was performed on tissue culture supernatants. Pairwise comparison between different groups was conducted by least square mean estimates. Compared with controls, LPS stimulation increased cytokine production and their tissue bioavailability (measured as the molar ratio of cytokine to its soluble receptor), thus confirming membrane immune reactivity (P fetal inflammatory response associated with infection-induced preterm birth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Boric acid permeation in forward osmosis membrane processes: modeling, experiments, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xue; Tang, Chuyang Y; Gu, Yangshuo; She, Qianhong; Qi, Saren

    2011-03-15

    Forward osmosis (FO) is attracting increasing interest for its potential applications in desalination. In FO, permeation of contaminants from feed solution into draw solution through the semipermeable membrane can take place simultaneously with water diffusion. Understanding the contaminants transport through and rejection by FO membrane has significant technical implications in the way to separate clean water from the diluted draw solution. In this study, a model was developed to predict boron flux in FO operation. A strong agreement between modeling results and experimental data indicates that the model developed in this study can accurately predict the boron transport through FO membranes. Furthermore, the model can guide the fabrication of improved FO membranes with decreased boron permeability and structural parameter to minimize boron flux. Both theoretical model and experimental results demonstrated that when membrane active layer was facing draw solution, boron flux was substantially greater compared to the other membrane orientation due to more severe internal concentration polarization. In this investigation, for the first time, rejection of contaminants was defined in FO processes. This is critical to compare the membrane performance between different membranes and experimental conditions.

  15. Studies on the interactions of bisphenols with anionic phospholipids of decomposer membranes in model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniatowski, Marcin; Sobolewska, Katarzyna; Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and other bisphenols constitute a class of organic pollutants, which because of their estrogenic properties, low dose activity and bioaccumulation pose considerable risk for public health as well as for the environment. Accumulated in the sediment bisphenols can endanger the decomposers' populations being incorporated into their cellular membranes; however, the mechanism of their membrane activity is unknown. Therefore, to study these phenomena we applied anionic phospholipid Langmuir monolayers as simple but versatile models of decomposers biomembranes. Phosphatidylglycerols and cardiolipins are not only the main components of bacterial membranes but also of crucial importance in mitochondrial and thylakoid membranes in eukaryotic cells. In our investigations we applied five compounds of the bisphenol class most commonly detected in the environment. To characterize the bisphenols-model membrane interactions we applied multiple mutually independent methods of physical chemistry; namely: the Langmuir monolayer technique, surface potential measurements, Brewster angle microscopy for the visualization of the monolayers' texture and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction for the discussion of the phospholipids packing within the monolayers. Our studies indicated that all the investigated bisphenols interact with the model membrane, but the strength of the interactions is dependent on the bisphenol structure and hydrophobicity and the fluidity of the model membranes. We proved that bisphenol S often treated as the least toxic BPA analog can also be incorporated to the model membranes changing their structure and fluidity.

  16. Activation of muscarinic receptors in rat parotid acinar cells induces AQP5 trafficking to nuclei and apical plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Gota; Bragiel, Aneta M; Wang, Di; Pieczonka, Tomasz D; Skowronski, Mariusz T; Shono, Masayuki; Nielsen, Søren; Ishikawa, Yasuko

    2015-04-01

    The subcellular distribution of aquaporin-5 (AQP5) in rat parotid acinar cells in response to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activation remains unclear. Immunoconfocal and immunoelectron microscopy were used to visualize the distribution of AQP5 in parotid acinar cells. Western blotting was used to analyze AQP5 levels in membranes. To clarify the characteristics of membrane domains associated with AQP5, detergent solubility and sucrose-density flotation experiments were performed. Under control conditions, AQP5 was diffusely distributed on the apical plasma membrane (APM) and apical plasmalemmal region and throughout the cytoplasm. Upon mAChR activation, AQP5 was predominantly located in the nucleus, APM and lateral plasma membrane (LPM). Subsequently, localization of AQP5 in the nucleus, APM and LPM was decreased. Prolonged atropine treatment inhibited mAChR agonist-induced translocation of AQP5 to the nucleus, APM and LPM. AQP5 levels were enhanced in isolated nuclei and nuclear membranes prepared from parotid tissues incubated with mAChR agonist. mAChR agonist induced AQP5 levels in both soluble and insoluble nuclear fractions solubilized with Triton X-100 or Lubrol WX. Small amounts of AQP5 in nuclei were detected using low-density sucrose gradient. When AQP5 was present in the nuclear membrane, nuclear size decreased. The activation of mAChR induced AQP5 translocation to the nucleus, APM and LPM, and AQP5 may trigger water transport across the nuclear membrane and plasma membrane in rat parotid acinar cells. AQP5 translocates to the nuclear membrane and may trigger the movement of water, inducing shrinkage of the nucleus and the start of nuclear functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An in vitro study on the antioxidant capacity of usnic acid on human erythrocytes and molecular models of its membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwalsky, M; Jemiola-Rzeminska, M; Astudillo, C; Gallardo, M J; Staforelli, J P; Villena, F; Strzalka, K

    2015-11-01

    Usnic acid (UA) has been associated with chronic diseases through its antioxidant action. Its main target is the cell membrane; however, its effect on that of human erythrocytes has been scarcely investigated. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of the interaction between UA and cell membranes human erythrocytes and molecular models of its membrane have been utilized. Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) were chosen as representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Results by X-ray diffraction showed that UA produced structural perturbations on DMPC and DMPE bilayers. DSC studies have indicated that thermotropic behavior of DMPE was most strongly distorted by UA than DMPC, whereas the latter is mainly affected on the pretransition. Scanning electron (SEM) and defocusing microscopy (DM) showed that UA induced alterations to erythrocytes from the normal discoid shape to echinocytes. These results imply that UA molecules were located in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. Results of its antioxidant properties showed that UA neutralized the oxidative capacity of HClO on DMPC and DMPE bilayers; SEM, DM and hemolysis assays demonstrated the protective effect of UA against the deleterious oxidant effects of HClO upon human erythrocytes.

  18. Induced-charge electrokinetics, bipolar current, and concentration polarization in a microchannel-Nafion-membrane system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2016-06-01

    The presence of a floating electrode array located within the depletion layer formed due to concentration polarization across a microchannel-membrane interface device may produce not only induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) but also bipolar current resulting from the induced Faradaic reaction. It has been shown that there exists an optimal thickness of a thin dielectric coating that is sufficient to suppress bipolar currents but still enables ICEO vortices that stir the depletion layer, thereby affecting the system's current-voltage response. In addition, the use of alternating-current electro-osmosis by activating electrodes results in further enhancement of the fluid stirring and opens new routes for on-demand spatiotemporal control of the depletion layer length.

  19. Synthetic antimicrobial oligomers induce a composition-dependent topological transition in membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Gordon, Vernita D; Mishra, Abhijit; Som, Abhigyan; Purdy, Kirstin R; Davis, Matthew A; Tew, Gregory N; Wong, Gerard C L

    2007-10-10

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are cationic amphiphiles that comprise a key component of innate immunity. Synthetic analogues of AMPs, such as the family of phenylene ethynylene antimicrobial oligomers (AMOs), recently demonstrated broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unknown. Homologues in this family can be inactive, specifically active against bacteria, or nonspecifically active against bacteria and eukaryotic cells. Using synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we show that observed antibacterial activity correlates with an AMO-induced topological transition of small unilamellar vesicles into an inverted hexagonal phase, in which hexagonal arrays of 3.4-nm water channels defined by lipid tubes are formed. Polarized and fluorescence microscopy show that AMO-treated giant unilamellar vesicles remain intact, instead of reconstructing into a bulk 3D phase, but are selectively permeable to encapsulated macromolecules that are smaller than 3.4 nm. Moreover, AMOs with different activity profiles require different minimum threshold concentrations of phosphoethanolamine (PE) lipids to reconstruct the membrane. Using ternary membrane vesicles composed of DOPG:DOPE:DOPC with a charge density fixed at typical bacterial values, we find that the inactive AMO cannot generate the inverted hexagonal phase even when DOPE completely replaces DOPC. The specifically active AMO requires a threshold ratio of DOPE:DOPC = 4:1, and the nonspecifically active AMO requires a drastically lower threshold ratio of DOPE:DOPC = 1.5:1. Since most gram-negative bacterial membranes have more PE lipids than do eukaryotic membranes, our results imply that there is a relationship between negative-curvature lipids such as PE and antimicrobial hydrophobicity that contributes to selective antimicrobial activity.

  20. Synthetic Antimicrobial Oligomers Induce a Composition-Dependent Topological Transition in Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L.; Gordon, V.D.; Mishra, A.; Som, A.; Purdy, K.R.; Davis, M.A.; Tew, G.N.; Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are cationic amphiphiles that comprise a key component of innate immunity. Synthetic analogues of AMPs, such as the family of phenylene ethynylene antimicrobial oligomers (AMOs), recently demonstrated broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unknown. Homologues in this family can be inactive, specifically active against bacteria, or nonspecifically active against bacteria and eukaryotic cells. Using synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we show that observed antibacterial activity correlates with an AMO-induced topological transition of small unilamellar vesicles into an inverted hexagonal phase, in which hexagonal arrays of 3.4-nm water channels defined by lipid tubes are formed. Polarized and fluorescence microscopy show that AMO-treated giant unilamellar vesicles remain intact, instead of reconstructing into a bulk 3D phase, but are selectively permeable to encapsulated macromolecules that are smaller than 3.4 nm. Moreover, AMOs with different activity profiles require different minimum threshold concentrations of phosphoethanolamine (PE) lipids to reconstruct the membrane. Using ternary membrane vesicles composed of DOPG:DOPE:DOPC with a charge density fixed at typical bacterial values, we find that the inactive AMO cannot generate the inverted hexagonal phase even when DOPE completely replaces DOPC. The specifically active AMO requires a threshold ratio of DOPE:DOPC = 4:1, and the nonspecifically active AMO requires a drastically lower threshold ratio of DOPE:DOPC = 1.5:1. Since most gram-negative bacterial membranes have more PE lipids than do eukaryotic membranes, our results imply that there is a relationship between negative-curvature lipids such as PE and antimicrobial hydrophobicity that contributes to selective antimicrobial activity.

  1. cPKCγ membrane translocation is involved in herkinorin‑induced neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Xiaochen; Cui, Xu; Wei, Haiping; Feng, Guang; Zhang, Xuezheng; He, Yongjin; Li, Junfa; Li, Tianzuo

    2017-01-01

    Herkinorin is an opiate analgesic with limited adverse effects, functioning as a primary selective atypical opioid µ agonist. The present study aimed to identify whether herkinorin has a positive effect on ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into five groups: i) Naïve, ii) sham, iii) I/R, iv) I/R with dimethyl sulfoxide (I/R+D) and v) I/R with herkinorin (I/R+H). The I/R injury model was induced by occluding the middle cerebral artery for 1 h followed by 24 h or 7 days of reperfusion. Neurobehavioral scores and sensorimotor functions were examined 24 h and 7 days following reperfusion. In addition, infarct volumes were examined at these time points using a 2,3,5‑triphenyltetrazolium chloride assay. Herkinorin treatment improved neurobehavioral and sensorimotor functional recovery from I/R‑induced brain injury. There was a significant decrease in infarct volume in the I/R+H group at 24 h or 7 days following reperfusion compared with the I/R and I/R+D groups. Western blotting suggested that the decrease in conventional protein kinase C γ (cPKCγ) membrane translocation in the peri‑infarct region may be attenuated by herkinorin pretreatment. These results indicated that herkinorin may be beneficial in I/R‑induced mouse brain injury, and this may be attributed to the membrane translocation of cPKCγ following activation.

  2. Modeling of hydrodynamics in hollow fiber membrane bioreactor for mammalian cells cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Menshutina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical modelling in CFD-packages are powerfull instrument for design and calculation of any engineering tasks. CFD-package contains the set of programs that allow to model the different objects behavior based on the mathematical lows. ANSYS Fluent are widely used for modelling of biotechnological and chemical-technological processes. This package is convenient to describe their hydrodynamics. As cell cultivation is one of the actual scientific direction in modern biotechnology ANSYS Fluent was used to create the model of hollow fiber membrane bioreactor. The fibers are hollow cylindrical membrane to be used for cell cultivation. The criterion of process effectiveness for cell growth is full filling of the membrane surface by cells in the bioreactor. While the cell growth the fiber permeability is decreased which effects to feed flow through membrane pores. The specific feature of this process is to ensure such feed flow to deliver the optimal nutrition for the cells on the external membrane surface. The velocity distribution inside the fiber and in all bioreactor as a whole has been calculated based on mass an impulse conservation equations taking into account the mathematical model assumptions. The hydrodynamics analysis in hollow fiber membrane bioreactor is described by the three-dimensional model created in ANSYS Fluent. The specific features of one membrane model are considered and for whole bioreactor too.

  3. An Equivalent Electrical Circuit Model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Mathematical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh An Nguyen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC models proposed in the literature consist of mathematical equations. However, they are not adequately practical for simulating power systems. The proposed model takes into account phenomena such as activation polarization, ohmic polarization, double layer capacitance and mass transport effects present in a PEM fuel cell. Using electrical analogies and a mathematical modeling of PEMFC, the circuit model is established. To evaluate the effectiveness of the circuit model, its static and dynamic performances under load step changes are simulated and compared to the numerical results obtained by solving the mathematical model. Finally, the applicability of our model is demonstrated by simulating a practical system.

  4. Vanadate induces necrotic death in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes through mitochondrial membrane depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Sandra Sofia; Henao, Fernando; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2008-03-01

    Besides the well-known inotropic effects of vanadium in cardiac muscle, previous studies have shown that vanadate can stimulate cell growth or induce cell death. In this work, we studied the toxicity to neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (cardiomyocytes) of two vanadate solutions containing different oligovanadates distribution, decavanadate (containing decameric vanadate, V 10) and metavanadate (containing monomeric vanadate and also di-, tetra-, and pentavanadate). Incubation for 24 h with decavanadate or metavanadate induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes, without significant caspase-3 activation. Only 10 microM total vanadium of either decavanadate (1 microM V 10) or metavanadate (10 microM total vanadium) was needed to produce 50% loss of cell viability after 24 h (assessed with MTT and propidium iodide assays). Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that vanadium accumulation in cardiomyocytes after 24 h was the same when incubation was done with decavanadate or metavanadate. A decrease of 75% of the rate of mitochondrial superoxide anion generation, monitored with dihydroethidium, and a sustained rise of cytosolic calcium (monitored with Fura-2-loaded cardiomyocytes) was observed after 24 h of incubation of cardiomyocytes with decavanadate or metavanadate concentrations close to those inducing 50% loss of cell viability produced. In addition, mitochondrial membrane depolarization within cardiomyocytes, monitored with tetramethylrhodamine ethyl esther or with 3,3',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide, were observed after only 6 h of incubation with decavanadate or metavanadate. The concentration needed for 50% mitochondrial depolarization was 6.5 +/- 1 microM total vanadium for both decavanadate (0.65 microM V 10) and metavanadate. In conclusion, mitochondrial membrane depolarization was an early event in decavanadate- and monovanadate-induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes.

  5. Key factors regulating the mass delivery of macromolecules to model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Richard A.; Watkins, Erik B.; Jagalski, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    We show that both gravity and electrostatics are key factors regulating interactions between model cell membranes and self-assembled liquid crystalline aggregates of dendrimers and phospholipids. The system is a proxy for the trafficking of reservoirs of therapeutic drugs to cell membranes for slow...... diffusion and continuous delivery. Neutron reflectometry measurements were carried out on supported lipid bilayers of varying charge and on hydrophilic silica surfaces. Translocation of the macromolecule across the membrane and adsorption of the lamellar aggregates occur only when the membrane (1...... of the aggregates to activate endocytosis pathways on specific cell types is discussed in the context of targeted drug delivery applications....

  6. Ultrastructural analysis of miltefosine-induced surface membrane damage in adult Schistosoma mansoni BH strain worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertão, Humberto Gonçalves; da Silva, Renata Alexandre Ramos; Padilha, Rafael José R; de Azevedo Albuquerque, Mônica Camelo Pessôa; Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi

    2012-06-01

    Schistosomiasis is an infectious parasitic disease caused by helminths from the genus Schistosoma; it affects over 200 million people globally and is endemic in 70 countries. In Brazil, 6 million individuals are infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Furthermore, as the prevalence of S. mansoni infections is increasing, approximately 26 million citizens in 19 Brazilian states are at risk for infection. Schistosomiasis disease control involves predominately the administration of a single drug, praziquantel. Although praziquantel exhibits chemotherapeutic efficacy and safety, its massive use in endemic zones, the possibility of the emergence of drug-resistant Schistosoma parasites, and the lack of another efficacious antischistosomal drug demand the discovery of new schistosomicidal compounds. First developed as anti-tumor drug, miltefosine is an alkylphospholipid derivative that exhibits bioactivity against Leishmania and Trypanosoma parasites, free-living protozoa, bacteria, and fungi. With its anti-parasite activity, miltefosine was the first orally administered drug against visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis approved. Previously, by means of the MTT cytotoxic assay and a DNA fragmentation test, we verified that, at doses of 100 and 200 μM (40 and 80 μg/mL), miltefosine exhibited in vitro schistosomicidal activity against adult S. mansoni worms. Here, we present ultrastructural evidence of rapid, severe miltefosine-induced surface membrane damage in S. mansoni following drug treatment. The number of dead parasites was concentration- and time-dependent following miltefosine treatment. At a miltefosine concentration of 200 μM (∼80 μg/mL), in vitro parasite killing was initiated as early as 3 h post-incubation, and it was maximal after 24 h of treatment. The parasite death was preceded by progressive surface membrane damage, characterized by tegument peeling, spine reduction and erosion, blister formation and rupture, and the emergence of holes. According to our

  7. Needle-shaped polymeric particles induce transient disruption of cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Nishit; Mitragotri, Samir

    2010-08-06

    Nano- and microparticles of various shapes have recently been introduced for various drug-delivery applications. Shape of particles has been shown to have an impact on various processes including circulation, vascular adhesion and phagocytosis. Here, we assess the role of particle geometry and surface chemistry in their interactions with cell membranes. Using representative particles of different shape (spheres, elongated and flat particles), size (500 nm-1 microm) and surface chemistry (positively and negatively charged), we evaluated the response of endothelial cells to particles. While spherical and elliptical disc-shaped particles did not have an impact on cell spreading and motility, needle-shaped particles induced significant changes in the same. Further studies revealed that needle-shaped particles induced disruption of cell membranes as indicated by the release of lactate dehydrogenase and uptake of extracellular calcein. The effect of needle-shaped particles on cells was transient and was reversed over a time period of 1-48 h depending on particle parameters.

  8. Tl(+) induces both cationic and transition pore permeability in the inner membrane of rat heart mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Nesterov, Vladimir P; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Furaev, Viktor V; Novozhilov, Artemy V

    2013-12-01

    Effects of Tl(+) were studied in experiments with isolated rat heart mitochondria (RHM) injected into 400 mOsm medium containing TlNO3 and a nitrate salt (KNO3 or NH4NO3) or TlNO3 and sucrose. Tl(+) increased permeability of the inner membrane of the RHM to K(+) and H(+). This manifested as an increase of the non-energized RHM swelling, in the order of sucrose Tl(+)-induced opening of the mitochondrial permeability pore (MPTP) in Ca(2+)-loaded rat heart mitochondria increased both the swelling and the inner membrane potential dissipation, as well as decreased basal state and 2,4-dinitrophenol-stimulated respiration. These effects of Tl(+) were suppressed by the MPTP inhibitors (cyclosporine A, ADP, bongkrekic acid, and n-ethylmaleimide), activated in the presence of the MPTP inducer (carboxyatractyloside) or mitoKATP inhibitor (5-hydroxydecanoate), but were not altered in the presence of mitoKATP agonists (diazoxide or pinacidil). We suggest that the greater sensitivity of heart and striated muscles, versus liver, to thallium salts in vivo can result in more vigorous Tl(+) effects on muscle cell mitochondria.

  9. MRP transporters as membrane machinery in the bradykinin-inducible export of ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yumei; Migita, Keisuke; Sun, Jing; Katsuragi, Takeshi

    2010-04-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plays the role of an autocrine/paracrine signal molecule in a variety of cells. So far, however, the membrane machinery in the export of intracellular ATP remains poorly understood. Activation of B2-receptor with bradykinin-induced massive release of ATP from cultured taenia coli smooth muscle cells. The evoked release of ATP was unaffected by gap junction hemichannel blockers, such as 18alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid and Gap 26. Furthermore, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) coupled Cl(-) channel blockers, CFTR(inh)172, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, Gd3(+) and glibenclamide, failed to suppress the export of ATP by bradykinin. On the other, the evoked release of ATP was greatly reduced by multidrug resistance protein (MRP) transporter inhibitors, MK-571, indomethacin, and benzbromarone. From western blotting analysis, blots of MRP 1 protein only, but not MRP 2 and MRP 3 protein, appeared at 190 kD. However, the MRP 1 protein expression was not enhanced after loading with 1 muM bradykinin for 5 min. Likewise, niflumic acid and fulfenamic acid, Ca2(+)-activated Cl(-) channel blockers, largely abated the evoked release of ATP. The possibility that the MRP transporter system couples with Ca2(+)-activated Cl(-) channel activities is discussed here. These findings suggest that MRP transporters, probably MRP 1, unlike CFTR-Cl(-) channels and gap junction hemichannels, may contribute as membrane machinery to the export of ATP induced by G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation.

  10. Air gap membrane distillation. 2. Model validation and hollow fibre module performance analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, C.M.; Meindersma, G.W.; Reith, T.; de Haan, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the experimental results of counter current flow air gap membrane distillation experiments are presented and compared with predictive model calculations. Measurements were carried out with a cylindrical test module containing a single hollow fibre membrane in the centre and a

  11. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jimin, E-mail: jimin.wang@yale.edu; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo, E-mail: yorgo.modis@yale.edu

    2014-04-15

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed.

  12. Statistical modelling of the interplay between solute shape and rejection in porous membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank; Pinelo, Manuel; Brøns, Morten

    2012-01-01

    membrane, it can be expected that the possibility for a solute particle to enter the membrane pore will only depend upon the relation between such molecular conformation and pore size. The objective of the present study is to use geometric and statistical modelling to determine the effect of particle elongation...

  13. Reconstituting ring-rafts in bud-mimicking topography of model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Lee, In-Ho; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Park, Seung Chul; Oh, Soojung; Jordan, Luke R.; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Jeon, Noo Li; Lee, Byoungho; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2014-07-01

    During vesicular trafficking and release of enveloped viruses, the budding and fission processes dynamically remodel the donor cell membrane in a protein- or a lipid-mediated manner. In all cases, in addition to the generation or relief of the curvature stress, the buds recruit specific lipids and proteins from the donor membrane through restricted diffusion for the development of a ring-type raft domain of closed topology. Here, by reconstituting the bud topography in a model membrane, we demonstrate the preferential localization of cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains in the collar band of the bud-neck interfaced with the donor membrane. The geometrical approach to the recapitulation of the dynamic membrane reorganization, resulting from the local radii of curvatures from nanometre-to-micrometre scales, offers important clues for understanding the active roles of the bud topography in the sorting and migration machinery of key signalling proteins involved in membrane budding.

  14. Approaching Biomarkers of Membranous Nephropathy from a Murine Model to Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chao Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Membranous glomerulonephropathy (MN is the most prevalent cause of nephrotic syndrome in adult humans. However, the specific biomarkers of MN have not been fully elucidated. We examined the alterations in gene expression associated with the development of MN. Methods. Murine MN was induced by cationic bovine serum albumin (cBSA. After full-blown MN, cDNA microarray analysis was performed to identify gene expression changes, and highly expressed genes were evaluated as markers both in mice and human kidney samples. Results. MN mice revealed clinical proteinuria and the characteristic diffuse thickening of the glomerular basement membrane. There were 175 genes with significantly different expressions in the MN kidneys compared with the normal kidneys. Four genes, metallothionein-1 (Mt1, cathepsin D (CtsD, lymphocyte 6 antigen complex (Ly6, and laminin receptor-1 (Lamr1, were chosen and quantified. Mt1 was detected mainly in tubules, Lamr1 was highly expressed in glomeruli, and CtsD was detected both in tubules and glomeruli. The high expressions of Lamr1 and CtsD were also confirmed in human kidney biopsies. Conclusion. The murine MN model resembled the clinical and pathological features of human MN and may provide a tool for investigating MN. Applying cDNA microarray analysis may help to identify biomarkers for human MN.

  15. Validating induced seismicity forecast models - Induced Seismicity Test Bench

    CERN Document Server

    Kiraly-Proag, Eszter; Gischig, Valentin; Wiemer, Stefan; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Doetsch, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Induced earthquakes often accompany fluid injection, and the seismic hazard they pose threatens various underground engineering projects. Models to monitor and control induced seismic hazard with traffic light systems should be probabilistic, forward-looking, and updated as new data arrive. In this study, we propose an Induced Seismicity Test Bench to test and rank such models; this test bench can be used for model development, model selection, and ensemble model building. We apply the test bench to data from the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-For\\^ets 2004 geothermal stimulation projects, and we assess forecasts from two models: Shapiro and Smoothed Seismicity (SaSS) and Hydraulics and Seismics (HySei). These models incorporate a different mix of physics-based elements and stochastic representation of the induced sequences. Our results show that neither model is fully superior to the other. Generally, HySei forecasts the seismicity rate better after shut-in, but is only mediocre at forecasting the spatial distri...

  16. Interactions of a Photochromic Spiropyran with Liposome Model Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Jonsson, Fabian

    2013-02-19

    The interactions between anionic or zwitterionic liposomes and a water-soluble, DNA-binding photochromic spiropyran are studied using UV/vis absorption and linear dichroism (LD) spectroscopy. The spectral characteristics as well as the kinetics of the thermal isomerization process in the absence and presence of the two different liposome types provide information about the environment and whether or not the spiropyran resides in the liposome membrane. By measuring LD on liposomes deformed and aligned by shear flow, further insight is obtained about interaction and binding geometry of the spiropyran at the lipid membranes. We show that the membrane interactions differ between the two types of liposomes used as well as the isomeric forms of the spiropyran photoswitch. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. [Membrane-based photochemical systems as models for photosynthetic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to improve our conceptual view of the ways in which membranes and interfaces can be used to control chemical reactivity. We have focused on understanding three elementary processes that are central to developing membrane-based integrated chemical systems for water photolysis or related photoconversion/photostorage processes. Specifically, we have sought to identify: the influence of interfaces upon charge separation/recombination reactions, pathways for transmembrane charge separation across hydrocarbon bilayer membranes, and mechanisms of water oxidation catalyzed by transition metal coordination complexes. Historically, the chemical dynamics of each of these processes has been poorly understood, with numerous unresolved issues and conflicting viewpoints appearing in the literature. As described in this report our recent research has led to considerable clarification of the underlying reaction mechanisms.

  18. Roles of charged particles and reactive species on cell membrane permeabilization induced by atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shota; Kanzaki, Makoto; Hokari, Yutaro; Tominami, Kanako; Mokudai, Takayuki; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-07-01

    As factors that influence cell membrane permeabilization during direct and indirect atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation, charged particle influx, superoxide anion radicals (O2 -•), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in plasma-irradiated solution were evaluated. These are the three strong candidate factors and might multiply contribute to cell membrane permeabilization. In particular, a shorter plasma diffusion distance leads to the enhancement of the direct effects such as charged particle influx and further increase cell membrane permeability. In addition, O2 -• dissipates over time (a life span of the order of minutes) in plasma-irradiated water, and the deactivation of a plasma-irradiated solution in term of cell membrane permeabilization occurs in a life span of the same order. These results could promote the understanding of the mechanism of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization.

  19. Interdigitation of long-chain sphingomyelin induces coupling of membrane leaflets in a cholesterol dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Róg, Tomasz; Orłowski, Adam; Llorente, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    It has been a long-standing question how the two leaflets in a lipid bilayer modulate each others' physical properties. In this paper, we discuss how this interaction may take place through interdigitation. We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to consider asymmetric lipid membrane models...... whose compositions are based on the lipidomics data determined for exosomes released by PC-3 prostate cancer cells. The simulations show interdigitation to be exceptionally strong for long-chain sphingomyelin (SM) molecules. In asymmetric membranes the amide-linked chain of SM is observed to extend deep......, and that cholesterol modulates the effect of SM interdigitation by influencing the conformational order of lipid hydrocarbon chains in the opposing (cytosolic) leaflet....

  20. Inhibition of PIM1 kinase attenuates inflammation-induced pro-labour mediators in human foetal membranes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ratana; Barker, Gillian; Lappas, Martha

    2017-06-01

    Does proviral integration site for Moloney murine leukaemic virus (PIM)1 kinase play a role in regulating the inflammatory processes of human labour and delivery? PIM1 kinase plays a critical role in foetal membranes in regulating pro-inflammatory and pro-labour mediators. Infection and inflammation have strong causal links to preterm delivery by stimulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and collagen degrading enzymes, which can lead to rupture of membranes. PIM1 has been shown to have a role in immune regulation and inflammation in non-gestational tissues; however, its role has not been explored in the field of human labour. PIM1 expression was analysed in myometrium and/or foetal membranes obtained at term and preterm (n = 8-9 patients per group). Foetal membranes, freshly isolated amnion cells and primary myometrial cells were used to investigate the effect of PIM1 inhibition on pro-labour mediators (n = 5 patients per treatment group). Foetal membranes, from term and preterm, were obtained from non-labouring and labouring women, and from preterm pre-labour rupture of membranes (PPROM) (n = 9 per group). Amnion was collected from women with and without preterm chorioamnionitis (n = 8 per group). Expression of PIM1 kinase was determined by qRT-PCR and western blotting. To determine the effect of PIM1 kinase inhibition on the expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-labour mediators induced by bacterial products lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 μg/ml) and flagellin (1 μg/ml) and pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) (10 ng/ml), chemical inhibitors SMI-4a (20 μM) and AZD1208 (50 μM) were used in foetal membrane explants and siRNA against PIM1 was used in primary amnion cells. Statistical significance was set at P pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL6) and chemokines CXCL8 and CCL2 mRNA and release, prostaglandin prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) release, adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule 1 mRNA expression and release, and

  1. Protein kinase A regulates 3-phosphatidylinositide dynamics during platelet-derived growth factor-induced membrane ruffling and chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Paula B; Campbell, Shirley L; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K

    2008-12-12

    Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is required for chemotaxis in fibroblasts; however, the mechanism(s) by which PKA regulates the cell migration machinery remain largely unknown. Here we report that one function of PKA during platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced chemotaxis was to promote membrane ruffling by regulating phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP(3)) dynamics. Inhibition of PKA activity dramatically altered membrane dynamics and attenuated formation of peripheral membrane ruffles in response to PDGF. PKA inhibition also significantly decreased the number and size of PIP(3)-rich membrane ruffles in response to uniform stimulation and to gradients of PDGF. This ruffling defect was quantified using a newly developed method, based on computer vision edge-detection algorithms. PKA inhibition caused a marked attenuation in the bulk accumulation of PIP(3) following PDGF stimulation, without effects on PI3-kinase (PI3K) activity. The deficits in PIP(3) dynamics correlated with a significant inhibition of growth factor-induced membrane recruitment of endogenous Akt and Rac activation in PKA-inhibited cells. Simultaneous inhibition of PKA and Rac had an additive inhibitory effect on growth factor-induced ruffling dynamics. Conversely, the expression of a constitutively active Rac allele was able to rescue the defect in membrane ruffling and restore the localization of a fluorescent PIP(3) marker to membrane ruffles in PKA-inhibited cells, even in the absence of PI3K activity. These data demonstrate that, like Rac, PKA contributes to PIP(3) and membrane dynamics independently of direct regulation of PI3K activity and suggest that modulation of PIP(3)/3-phosphatidylinositol (3-PI) lipids represents a major target for PKA in the regulation of PDGF-induced chemotactic events.

  2. The single-giant unilamellar vesicle method reveals lysenin-induced pore formation in lipid membranes containing sphingomyelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Jahangir Md; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2012-06-26

    Lysenin is a sphingomyelin (SM)-binding pore-forming toxin. To reveal the interaction of lysenin with lipid membranes, we investigated lysenin-induced membrane permeation of a fluorescent probe, calcein, through dioleoylphosphatidylcholine(DOPC)/SM, DOPC/SM/cholesterol(chol), and SM/chol membranes, using the single-giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) method. The results clearly show that lysenin formed pores in all the membranes, through which membrane permeation of calcein occurred without disruption of GUVs. The membrane permeation began stochastically, and the membrane permeability coefficient increased over time to reach a maximum, steady value, Ps, which persisted for a long time(100--500 s), indicating that the pore concentration increases over time and finally reaches its steady value, NP s . The Ps values increased as the SM/lysenin ratio decreased, and at low concentrations of lysenin, the Ps values of SM/DOPC/chol (42/30/28)GUVs were much larger than those of SM/DOPC (58/42) GUVs. The dependence of Ps on the SM/lysenin ratio for these membranes was almost the same as that of the fraction of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-resistant lysenin oligomers, indicating that NP s increases as the SDS-resistant oligomer fraction increases. On the other hand, lysenin formed pores in GUVs of SM/chol(60/40) membrane, which is in a homogeneous liquid-ordered phase, indicating that the phase boundary is not necessary for pore formation. The Ps values of SM/chol (60/40) GUVs were smaller than those of SM/DOPC/chol (42/30/28) GUVs even though the SDS-resistant oligomer fractions were similar for both membranes, suggesting that not all of the oligomers can convert into a pore. On the basis of these results, we discuss the elementary processes of lysenin-induced pore formation.

  3. Analysis of mass transfer characteristics in a tubular membrane using CFD modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jixiang; Vedantam, Sreepriya; Spanjers, Henri; Nopens, Ingmar; van Lier, Jules B

    2012-10-01

    In contrast to the large amount of research into aerobic membrane bioreactors, little work has been reported on anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AMBRs). As to the application of membrane bioreactors, membrane fouling is a key issue. Membrane fouling generally occurs more seriously in AMBRs than in aerobic membrane bioreactors. However, membrane fouling could be managed through the application of suitable shear stress that can be introduced by the application of a two-phase flow. When the two-phase flow is applied in AMBRs, little is known about the mass transfer characteristics, which is of particular importance, in tubular membranes of AMBRs. In our present work, we have employed fluid dynamic modeling to analyze the mass transfer characteristics in the tubular membrane of a side stream AMBR in which, gas-lift two-phase flow was applied. The modeling indicated that the mass transfer capacity at the membrane surface at the noses of gas bubbles was higher than the mass transfer capacity at the tails of the bubbles, which is in contrast to the results when water instead of sludge is applied. At the given mass transfer rate, the filterability of the sludge was found to have a strong influence on the transmembrane pressure at a steady flux. In addition, the model also showed that the shear stress in the internal space of the tubular membrane was mainly around 20 Pa but could be as high as about 40 Pa due to gas bubble movements. Nonetheless, at these shear stresses a stable particle size distribution was found for sludge particles.

  4. Inefficacy of osmotic backwash induced by sodium chloride salt solution in controlling SWRO membrane fouling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farooque, A Mohammed; Al-Jeshi, Subhi; Saeed, Mohamed O; Alreweli, Ali

    2014-01-01

    ...) concentration solution on feed side of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, online and offline, in controlling membrane fouling and therefore minimizing/eliminating the need for chemical cleaning...

  5. Modeling the improvement of ultrafiltration membrane mass transfer when using biofiltration pretreatment in surface water applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netcher, Andrea C; Duranceau, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    In surface water treatment, ultrafiltration (UF) membranes are widely used because of their ability to supply safe drinking water. Although UF membranes produce high-quality water, their efficiency is limited by fouling. Improving UF filtrate productivity is economically desirable and has been attempted by incorporating sustainable biofiltration processes as pretreatment to UF with varying success. The availability of models that can be applied to describe the effectiveness of biofiltration on membrane mass transfer are lacking. In this work, UF water productivity was empirically modeled as a function of biofilter feed water quality using either a quadratic or Gaussian relationship. UF membrane mass transfer variability was found to be governed by the dimensionless mass ratio between the alkalinity (ALK) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). UF membrane productivity was optimized when the biofilter feed water ALK to DOC ratio fell between 10 and 14. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Free energy difference in indolicidin attraction to eukaryotic and prokaryotic model cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, In-Chul; Ripoll, Daniel R; Wallqvist, Anders

    2012-03-15

    We analyzed the thermodynamic and structural determinants of indolicidin interactions with eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes using a series of atomistically detailed molecular dynamics simulations. We used quartz-supported bilayers with two different compositions of zwitterionic and anionic phospholipids as model eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes. Indolicidin was preferentially attracted to the model prokaryotic cell membrane in contrast to the weak adsorption on the eukaryotic membrane. The nature of the indolicidin surface adsorption depended on an electrostatic guiding component, an attractive enthalpic component derived from van der Waals interactions, and a balance between entropic factors related to peptide confinement at the interface and counterion release from the bilayer surface. Thus, whereas we attributed the specificity of the indolicidin/membrane interaction to electrostatics, these interactions were not the sole contributors to the free energy of adsorption. Instead, a balance between an attractive van der Waals enthalpic component and a repulsive entropic component determined the overall strength of indolicidin adsorption.

  7. Mechanism of Inhibition of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide-Induced Membrane Damage by a Small Organic Fluorogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxu; Wan, Mingwei; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai

    2016-02-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is believed to be responsible for the death of insulin-producing β-cells. However, the mechanism of membrane damage at the molecular level has not been fully elucidated. In this article, we employ coarse- grained dissipative particle dynamics simulations to study the interactions between a lipid bilayer membrane composed of 70% zwitterionic lipids and 30% anionic lipids and hIAPPs with α-helical structures. We demonstrated that the key factor controlling pore formation is the combination of peptide charge-induced electroporation and peptide hydrophobicity-induced lipid disordering and membrane thinning. According to these mechanisms, we suggest that a water-miscible tetraphenylethene BSPOTPE is a potent inhibitor to rescue hIAPP-induced cytotoxicity. Our simulations predict that BSPOTPE molecules can bind directly to the helical regions of hIAPP and form oligomers with separated hydrophobic cores and hydrophilic shells. The micelle-like hIAPP-BSPOTPE clusters tend to be retained in the water/membrane interface and aggregate therein rather than penetrate into the membrane. Electrostatic attraction between BSPOTPE and hIAPP also reduces the extent of hIAPP binding to the anionic lipid bilayer. These two modes work together and efficiently prevent membrane poration.

  8. Models of natural computation : gene assembly and membrane systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brijder, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with two research areas in natural computing: the computational nature of gene assembly and membrane computing. Gene assembly is a process occurring in unicellular organisms called ciliates. During this process genes are transformed through cut-and-paste operations. We

  9. Trafficking of Intracellular Membranes: Mass action model of virus fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nir, Shlomo; Duzgunes, Nejat; Hoekstra, Dick; Ramalho-Santos, Joao; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C

    1995-01-01

    :Shlomo Nir, Nejat Düzgüneş, Dick Hoekstra, João Ramalho-Santos, Maria C. Pedroso de Lima The purpose of this presentation is to describe procedures of analysis of final extents and kinetics of virus fusion with target membranes. The presentation of results will focus on deductions from studies of f

  10. Partitioning of Lipids at Domain Boundaries in Model Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, Lars V.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2010-01-01

    Line-active molecules ("linactants") that bind to the boundary interface between different fluid lipid domains in membranes have a strong potential as regulators of the lateral heterogeneity that is important for many biological processes. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations in combination w

  11. Models of natural computation : gene assembly and membrane systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brijder, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with two research areas in natural computing: the computational nature of gene assembly and membrane computing. Gene assembly is a process occurring in unicellular organisms called ciliates. During this process genes are transformed through cut-and-paste operations. We stud

  12. Mathematical model analysis on the enhancement of aeration efficiency using ladder-type flat membrane module forms in the Submerged Membrane Bio-reactor(SMBR)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The cross-flow shearing action produced from the inferior aeration in the Submerged Membrane Bio-reactor(SMBR) is an effective way to further improve anti-fouling effects of membrane modules.Based on the widely-applied vertical structure of flat membrane modules,improvements are made that ladder-type flat membrane structure is designed with a certain inclined angle θ so that the cross-flow velocity of bubble near the membrane surface can be held,and the intensity and times of elastic colli-sion between bubbles and membrane surface can be increased.This can improve scouring action of membrane surface on aeration and reduce energy consumption of strong aeration in SMBR.By de-ducing and improving the mathematics model of collision between bubble and vertical flat put forward by Vries,the relatively suitable incline angle θ under certain aeration place and in certain size rang of bubble can be obtained with the computer iterative calculation technology.Finally,for many groups of ladder-type flat membrane in parallel placement in the practical application of SMBR,some sugges-tions are offered:the interval distance of membrane modules is 8―15 mm,and aeration should be op-erated at 5―7 mm among membrane modules,and the optimal design angle of trapeziform membrane is 1.7°―2.5°.

  13. Bcl-2 protects against FCCP-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispersyn, G; Nuydens, R; Connors, R; Borgers, M; Geerts, H

    1999-08-05

    This report addresses the relation between Bcl-2 and mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) in apoptotic cell death. Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells are differentiated into neuron-like cells with nerve growth factor (NGF). It is known that Bcl-2 can attenuate apoptosis induced by deprivation of neurotrophic factor. The protective effect of Bcl-2 has been correlated with preservation of DeltaPsi(m). Protonophores, such as carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), collapse the proton gradient across the mitochondrial inner membrane, resulting in a complete abolition of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Based on the analysis of morphology, of phosphatidylserine exposure and of nuclear fragmentation we conclude that FCCP induces apoptosis in PC12 cells, which can be prevented by overexpression of Bcl-2. To determine whether the cytoprotective effect of Bcl-2 is due to stabilization of DeltaPsi(m), we investigated the effect of Bcl-2 on changes in DeltaPsi(m), induced by FCCP in PC12 cells. We showed that treatment with FCCP induced a reduction in DeltaPsi(m), as assessed with the lipophilic cationic membrane potential-sensitive dye JC-1, and that Bcl-2 protects against FCCP-induced changes in NGF differentiated PC12 cells. Our data indicate that Bcl-2 protects against FCCP-induced cell death by stabilizing DeltaPsi(m).

  14. Steroid hormones partition to distinct sites in a model membrane bilayer: direct demonstration by small-angle X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, G A; Rubin, R T; Mason, R P

    1998-01-19

    The classical, genomic mechanisms of steroid hormone action cannot account for their rapid cellular effects. Membrane-bound steroid receptors have been partially characterized, but many rapid steroid effects occur in the absence of steroid-protein binding. Although it has been proposed that