WorldWideScience

Sample records for model membrane disruption

  1. Disruption model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Bronner, G.

    1982-07-01

    Calculations of disruption time and energy dissipation have been obtained by simulating the plasma as an electrical conducting loop that varies in resistivity, current density, major radius. The calculations provide results which are in good agreement with experimental observations. It is believed that this approach allows engineering designs for disruptions to be completed in large tokamaks such as INTOR or FED

  2. Plasma membrane disruption: repair, prevention, adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Steinhardt, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    Many metazoan cells inhabit mechanically stressful environments and, consequently, their plasma membranes are frequently disrupted. Survival requires that the cell rapidly repair or reseal the disruption. Rapid resealing is an active and complex structural modification that employs endomembrane as its primary building block, and cytoskeletal and membrane fusion proteins as its catalysts. Endomembrane is delivered to the damaged plasma membrane through exocytosis, a ubiquitous Ca2+-triggered response to disruption. Tissue and cell level architecture prevent disruptions from occurring, either by shielding cells from damaging levels of force, or, when this is not possible, by promoting safe force transmission through the plasma membrane via protein-based cables and linkages. Prevention of disruption also can be a dynamic cell or tissue level adaptation triggered when a damaging level of mechanical stress is imposed. Disease results from failure of either the preventive or resealing mechanisms.

  3. Contribution of the Tyr-1 in Plantaricin149a to Disrupt Phospholipid Model Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Tonarelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plantaricin149a (Pln149a is a cationic antimicrobial peptide, which was suggested to cause membrane destabilization via the carpet mechanism. The mode of action proposed to this antimicrobial peptide describes the induction of an amphipathic α-helix from Ala7 to Lys20, while the N-terminus residues remain in a coil conformation after binding. To better investigate this assumption, the purpose of this study was to determine the contributions of the Tyr1 in Pln149a in the binding to model membranes to promote its destabilization. The Tyr to Ser substitution increased the dissociation constant (KD of the antimicrobial peptide from the liposomes (approximately three-fold higher, and decreased the enthalpy of binding to anionic vesicles from −17.2 kcal/mol to −10.2 kcal/mol. The peptide adsorption/incorporation into the negatively charged lipid vesicles was less effective with the Tyr1 substitution and peptide Pln149a perturbed the liposome integrity more than the analog, Pln149S. Taken together, the peptide-lipid interactions that govern the Pln149a antimicrobial activity are found not only in the amphipathic helix, but also in the N-terminus residues, which take part in enthalpic contributions due to the allocation at a lipid-aqueous interface.

  4. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svarnas, P.; Aleiferis, Sp. [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Matrali, S. H. [Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Gazeli, K. [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); IPREM-LCABIE, Plasmas et Applications, UPPA, 64000 Pau (France); Clement, F. [IPREM-LCABIE, Plasmas et Applications, UPPA, 64000 Pau (France); Antimisiaris, S. G. [Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (ICES)-FORTH, Rion 26504 (Greece)

    2012-12-24

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  5. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svarnas, P.; Aleiferis, Sp.; Matrali, S. H.; Gazeli, K.; Clément, F.; Antimisiaris, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  6. SV40 late protein VP4 forms toroidal pores to disrupt membranes for viral release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghava, Smita; Giorda, Kristina M; Romano, Fabian B; Heuck, Alejandro P; Hebert, Daniel N

    2013-06-04

    Nonenveloped viruses are generally released from the cell by the timely lysis of host cell membranes. SV40 has been used as a model virus for the study of the lytic nonenveloped virus life cycle. The expression of SV40 VP4 at later times during infection is concomitant with cell lysis. To investigate the role of VP4 in viral release and its mechanism of action, VP4 was expressed and purified from bacteria as a fusion protein for use in membrane disruption assays. Purified VP4 perforated membranes as demonstrated by the release of fluorescent markers encapsulated within large unilamellar vesicles or liposomes. Dynamic light scattering results revealed that VP4 treatment did not cause membrane lysis or change the size of the liposomes. Liposomes encapsulated with 4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-3-indacene-labeled streptavidin were used to show that VP4 formed stable pores in membranes. These VP4 pores had an inner diameter of 1-5 nm. Asymmetrical liposomes containing pyrene-labeled lipids in the outer monolayer were employed to monitor transbilayer lipid diffusion. Consistent with VP4 forming toroidal pore structures in membranes, VP4 induced transbilayer lipid diffusion or lipid flip-flop. Altogether, these studies support a central role for VP4 acting as a viroporin in the disruption of cellular membranes to trigger SV40 viral release by forming toroidal pores that unite the outer and inner leaflets of membrane bilayers.

  7. Amphipathic beta-strand mimics as potential membrane disruptive antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jessica L; Gillies, Elizabeth R

    2009-08-21

    In recent years, there have been increasing numbers of bacterial strains emerging that are resistant to the currently available antibiotics. In the search for new antibiotics, attention has been focused on natural antimicrobial peptides that act by selectively disrupting the membranes of bacterial cells, a mechanism that is thought to be nonconducive to the development of resistance. It is desirable to mimic the structures and activities of these peptides while introducing properties such as resistance to proteolytic degradation, which make molecules more ideal for development as drugs. Described here is the design and synthesis of beta-strand mimetic oligomers based on alternating alpha-amino acids and azacyclohexenone units that segregate cationic lysine and hydrophobic valine side chains on opposite faces of the beta-strand. (1)H NMR dilution studies demonstrated that despite the incorporation of alternating d- and l-amino acids in order to obtain facial amphiphilicity, these oligomers are capable of dimerizing to beta-sheet mimics in a manner similar to the oligomers containing all l-amino acids. The ability of the molecules to disrupt phospholipid vesicles mimicking the membranes of both bacterial and mammalian cells was investigated using a fluorescent dye leakage assay. Several of the oligomers were found to exhibit activity and selectivity for the bacterial over mammalian membranes. Overall, these studies demonstrate the promise of this class of molecules for the development of new potential antibiotics and provide information on the structural features that are important for activity.

  8. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes control...

  9. The Mechanism by Which Luteolin Disrupts the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Qiu, Yunguang; Luo, Qichao; Zhao, Lifen; Yan, Xin; Ding, Qiaoce; Jiang, Hualiang; Yang, Huaiyu

    2018-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most versatile human pathogens. Luteolin (LUT) has anti-MRSA activity by disrupting the MRSA cytoplasmic membrane. However, the mechanism by which luteolin disrupts the membrane remains unclear. Here, we performed differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and all-atomic molecular dynamics (AA-MD) simulations to investigate the interactions and effects of LUT on model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). We detected the transition thermodynamic parameters of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes, dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) liposomes, and liposomes composed of both DPPC and DPPG at different LUT concentrations and showed that LUT molecules were located between polar heads and the hydrophobic region of DPPC/DPPG. In the MD trajectories, LUT molecules ranging from 5 to 50 had different effects on the membranes thickness, fluidity and ordered property of lipids, and lateral pressure of lipid bilayers composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG). Also, most LUT molecules were distributed in the region between the phosphorus atoms and C9 atoms of DOPC and DOPG. On the basis of the combination of these results, we conclude that the distinct effects of LUT on lipid bilayers composed of PCs and PGs may elucidate the mechanism by which LUT disrupts the cytoplasmic membrane of MRSA.

  10. Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa2 toxin disrupts cell membranes by forming large protein aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharad, Sudarat; Toca-Herrera, José L; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Krittanai, Chartchai

    2016-10-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cyt2Aa2 showed toxicity against Dipteran insect larvae and in vitro lysis activity on several cells. It has potential applications in the biological control of insect larvae. Although pore-forming and/or detergent-like mechanisms were proposed, the mechanism underlying cytolytic activity remains unclear. Analysis of the haemolytic activity of Cyt2Aa2 with osmotic stabilizers revealed partial toxin inhibition, suggesting a distinctive mechanism from the putative pore formation model. Membrane permeability was studied using fluorescent dye entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) at various protein/lipid molar ratios. Binding of Cyt2Aa2 monomer to the lipid membrane did not disturb membrane integrity until the critical protein/lipid molar ratio was reached, when Cyt2Aa2 complexes and cytolytic activity were detected. The complexes are large aggregates that appeared as a ladder when separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. Interaction of Cyt2Aa2 with Aedes albopictus cells was investigated by confocal microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRF). The results showed that Cyt2Aa2 binds on the cell membrane at an early stage without cell membrane disruption. Protein aggregation on the cell membrane was detected later which coincided with cell swelling. Cyt2Aa2 aggregations on supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) were visualized by AFM. The AFM topographic images revealed Cyt2Aa2 aggregates on the lipid bilayer at low protein concentration and subsequently disrupts the lipid bilayer by forming a lesion as the protein concentration increased. These results supported the mechanism whereby Cyt2Aa2 binds and aggregates on the lipid membrane leading to the formation of non-specific hole and disruption of the cell membrane. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. From biological membranes to biomimetic model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes play an essential role in the cellular protection as well as in the control and the transport of nutrients. Many mechanisms such as molecular recognition, enzymatic catalysis, cellular adhesion and membrane fusion take place into the biological membranes. In 1972, Singer et al. provided a membrane model, called fluid mosaic model, in which each leaflet of the bilayer is formed by a homogeneous environment of lipids in a fluid state including globular assembling of proteins and glycoproteins. Since its conception in 1972, many developments were brought to this model in terms of composition and molecular organization. The main development of the fluid mosaic model was made by Simons et al. (1997 and Brown et al. (1997 who suggested that membrane lipids are organized into lateral microdomains (or lipid rafts with a specific composition and a molecular dynamic that are different to the composition and the dynamic of the surrounding liquid crystalline phase. The discovery of a phase separation in the plane of the membrane has induced an explosion in the research efforts related to the biology of cell membranes but also in the development of new technologies for the study of these biological systems. Due to the high complexity of biological membranes and in order to investigate the biological processes that occur on the membrane surface or within the membrane lipid bilayer, a large number of studies are performed using biomimicking model membranes. This paper aims at revisiting the fundamental properties of biological membranes in terms of membrane composition, membrane dynamic and molecular organization, as well as at describing the most common biomimicking models that are frequently used for investigating biological processes such as membrane fusion, membrane trafficking, pore formation as well as membrane interactions at a molecular level.

  12. A Network Disruption Modeling Tool

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leinart, James

    1998-01-01

    Given that network disruption has been identified as a military objective and C2-attack has been identified as the mechanism to accomplish this objective, a target set must be acquired and priorities...

  13. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Cationic peptide exposure enhances pulsed-electric-field-mediated membrane disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Stephen M; Aiken, Erik J; Beres, Kaytlyn A; Hahn, Adam R; Kamin, Samantha J; Hagness, Susan C; Booske, John H; Murphy, William L

    2014-01-01

    The use of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to irreversibly electroporate cells is a promising approach for destroying undesirable cells. This approach may gain enhanced applicability if the intensity of the PEF required to electrically disrupt cell membranes can be reduced via exposure to a molecular deliverable. This will be particularly impactful if that reduced PEF minimally influences cells that are not exposed to the deliverable. We hypothesized that the introduction of charged molecules to the cell surfaces would create regions of enhanced transmembrane electric potential in the vicinity of each charged molecule, thereby lowering the PEF intensity required to disrupt the plasma membranes. This study will therefore examine if exposure to cationic peptides can enhance a PEF's ability to disrupt plasma membranes. We exposed leukemia cells to 40 μs PEFs in media containing varying concentrations of a cationic peptide, polyarginine. We observed the internalization of a membrane integrity indicator, propidium iodide (PI), in real time. Based on an individual cell's PI fluorescence versus time signature, we were able to determine the relative degree of membrane disruption. When using 1-2 kV/cm, exposure to >50 μg/ml of polyarginine resulted in immediate and high levels of PI uptake, indicating severe membrane disruption, whereas in the absence of peptide, cells predominantly exhibited signatures indicative of no membrane disruption. Additionally, PI entered cells through the anode-facing membrane when exposed to cationic peptide, which was theoretically expected. Exposure to cationic peptides reduced the PEF intensity required to induce rapid and irreversible membrane disruption. Critically, peptide exposure reduced the PEF intensities required to elicit irreversible membrane disruption at normally sub-electroporation intensities. We believe that these cationic peptides, when coupled with current advancements in cell targeting techniques will be useful tools in

  15. Disrupted yeast mitochondria can import precursor proteins directly through their inner membrane

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Import of precursor proteins into the yeast mitochondrial matrix can occur directly across the inner membrane. First, disruption of the outer membrane restores protein import to mitochondria whose normal import sites have been blocked by an antibody against the outer membrane or by a chimeric, incompletely translocated precursor protein. Second, a potential- and ATP-dependent import of authentic or artificial precursor proteins is observed with purified inner membrane vesicles virtually free ...

  16. From Digital Disruption to Business Model Scalability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Lund, Morten; Thomsen, Peter Poulsen

    2017-01-01

    as a response to digital disruption. A series of case studies illustrate that besides frequent existing messages in the business literature relating to the importance of creating agile businesses, both in growing and declining economies, as well as hard to copy value propositions or value propositions that take...... a long time to replicate, business model scalability can be cornered into four dimensions. In many corporate restructuring exercises and Mergers and Acquisitions there is a tendency to look for synergies in the form of cost reductions, lean workflows and market segments. However, this state of mind......This article discusses the terms disruption, digital disruption, business models and business model scalability. It illustrates how managers should be using these terms for the benefit of their business by developing business models capable of achieving exponentially increasing returns to scale...

  17. Analytic modeling of axisymmetric disruption halo currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, D.A.; Kellman, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    Currents which can flow in plasma facing components during disruptions pose a challenge to the design of next generation tokamaks. Induced toroidal eddy currents and both induced and conducted poloidal ''halo'' currents can produce design-limiting electromagnetic loads. While induction of toroidal and poloidal currents in passive structures is a well-understood phenomenon, the driving terms and scalings for poloidal currents flowing on open field lines during disruptions are less well established. A model of halo current evolution is presented in which the current is induced in the halo by decay of the plasma current and change in enclosed toroidal flux while being convected into the halo from the core by plasma motion. Fundamental physical processes and scalings are described in a simplified analytic version of the model. The peak axisymmetric halo current is found to depend on halo and core plasma characteristics during the current quench, including machine and plasma dimensions, resistivities, safety factor, and vertical stability growth rate. Two extreme regimes in poloidal halo current amplitude are identified depending on the minimum halo safety factor reached during the disruption. A 'type I' disruption is characterized by a minimum safety factor that remains relatively high (typically 2 - 3, comparable to the predisruption safety factor), and a relatively low poloidal halo current. A 'type II' disruption is characterized by a minimum safety factor comparable to unity and a relatively high poloidal halo current. Model predictions for these two regimes are found to agree well with halo current measurements from vertical displacement event disruptions in DIII-D [T. S. Taylor, K. H. Burrell, D. R. Baker, G. L. Jackson, R. J. La Haye, M. A. Mahdavi, R. Prater, T. C. Simonen, and A. D. Turnbull, open-quotes Results from the DIII-D Scientific Research Program,close quotes in Proceedings of the 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, Yokohama, 1998, to be published in

  18. Mechanics of membrane bulging during cell-wall disruption in Gram-negative bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Kristopher E.; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2011-04-01

    The bacterial cell wall is a network of sugar strands crosslinked by peptides that serve as the primary structure for bearing osmotic stress. Despite its importance in cellular survival, the robustness of the cell wall to network defects has been relatively unexplored. Treatment of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli with the antibiotic vancomycin, which disrupts the crosslinking of new material during growth, leads to the development of pronounced bulges and eventually of cell lysis. Here, we model the mechanics of the bulging of the cytoplasmic membrane through pores in the cell wall. We find that the membrane undergoes a transition between a nearly flat state and a spherical bulge at a critical pore radius of ~20 nm. This critical pore size is large compared to the typical distance between neighboring peptides and glycan strands, and hence pore size acts as a constraint on network integrity. We also discuss the general implications of our model to membrane deformations in eukaryotic blebbing and vesiculation in red blood cells.

  19. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...... oppositely charged lipid membranes, lipid-induced tilting of proteins embedded in lipid bilayers, protein-induced bilayer deformations, protein insertion and assembly, and lipid-controlled functioning of membrane proteins....

  20. On "spinning" membrane models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Sezgin, E.; Townsend, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Several alternative actions for a bosonic membrane have recently been proposed. We show that a linearly realized locally world-volume-supersymmetric (spinning membrane) extension of any of these actions implies an analogous extension of the standard Dirac membrane action. We further show that a

  1. Detergent disruption of bacterial inner membranes and recovery of protein translocation activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, K.; Wickner, W.T.

    1989-01-01

    Isolation of the integral membrane components of protein translocation requires methods for fractionation and functional reconstitution. The authors treated inner-membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli with mixtures of octyl β-D-glucoside, phospholipids, and an integral membrane carrier protein under conditions that extract most of the membrane proteins into micellar solution. Upon dialysis, proteoliposomes were reconstituted that supported translocation of radiochemically pure [ 35 S]pro-OmpA (the precursor of outer membrane protein A). Translocation into these proteoliposomes required ATP hydrolysis and membrane proteins, indicating that the reaction is that of the inner membrane. The suspension of membranes in detergent was separated into supernatant and pellet fractions by ultracentrifugation. After reconstitution, translocation activity was observed in both fractions, but processing by leader peptidase of translocated pro-OmpA to OmpA was not detectable in the reconstituted pellet fraction. Processing activity was restored by addition of pure leader peptidase as long as this enzyme was added before detergent removal, indicating that the translocation activity is not associated with detergent-resistant membrane vesicles. These results show that protein translocation activity can be recovered from detergent-disrupted membrane vesicles, providing a first step towards the goal of isolating the solubilized components

  2. Mathematical modelling of membrane separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank

    This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate mathemat......This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate...... mathematical models, each with a different approach to membrane separation. The first model is a statistical model investigating the interplay between solute shape and the probability of entering the membrane. More specific the transition of solute particles from being spherical to becoming more elongated...... and the rejection coefficient. The second model is a stationary model for the flux of solvent and solute in a hollow fibre membrane. In the model we solve the time independent equations for transport of solvent and solute within the hollow fibre. Furthermore, the flux of solute and solvent through the membrane...

  3. Disruption?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray......This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray...

  4. Pulse radiolysis studies of model membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijman, M.G.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis the influence of the structure of membranes on the processes in cell membranes were examined. Different models of the membranes were evaluated. Pulse radiolysis was used as the technique to examine the membranes. (R.B.)

  5. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...

  6. Modeling Steroidogenesis Disruption Using High-Throughput ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental chemicals can elicit endocrine disruption by altering steroid hormone biosynthesis and metabolism (steroidogenesis) causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. Historically, a lack of assays resulted in few chemicals having been evaluated for effects on steroidogenesis. The steroidogenic pathway is a series of hydroxylation and dehydrogenation steps carried out by CYP450 and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, yet the only enzyme in the pathway for which a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay has been developed is aromatase (CYP19A1), responsible for the aromatization of androgens to estrogens. Recently, the ToxCast HTS program adapted the OECD validated H295R steroidogenesis assay using human adrenocortical carcinoma cells into a high-throughput model to quantitatively assess the concentration-dependent (0.003-100 µM) effects of chemicals on 10 steroid hormones including progestagens, androgens, estrogens and glucocorticoids. These results, in combination with two CYP19A1 inhibition assays, comprise a large dataset amenable to clustering approaches supporting the identification and characterization of putative mechanisms of action (pMOA) for steroidogenesis disruption. In total, 514 chemicals were tested in all CYP19A1 and steroidogenesis assays. 216 chemicals were identified as CYP19A1 inhibitors in at least one CYP19A1 assay. 208 of these chemicals also altered hormone levels in the H295R assay, suggesting 96% sensitivity in the

  7. Applying fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate peptide-induced membrane disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding the interactions of antimicrobial peptides with phospholipid membranes. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful experimental technique that can be used to gain insight into these interactions. Specifically, FCS can be used to quant......There is considerable interest in understanding the interactions of antimicrobial peptides with phospholipid membranes. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful experimental technique that can be used to gain insight into these interactions. Specifically, FCS can be used...... to quantify leakage of fluorescent molecules of different sizes from large unilamellar lipid vesicles, thereby providing a tool for estimating the size of peptide-induced membrane disruptions. If fluorescently labeled lipids are incorporated into the membranes of the vesicles, FCS can also be used to obtain...

  8. Membrane Incorporation, Channel Formation, and Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis by Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oligomerization, conformational changes, and the consequent neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's β-amyloid protein (AβP play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Mounting evidence suggests that oligomeric AβPs cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis, eventually leading to neuronal death. We have demonstrated that oligomeric AβPs directly incorporate into neuronal membranes, form cation-sensitive ion channels (“amyloid channels”, and cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis via the amyloid channels. Other disease-related amyloidogenic proteins, such as prion protein in prion diseases or α-synuclein in dementia with Lewy bodies, exhibit similarities in the incorporation into membranes and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. Here, based on our experimental results and those of numerous other studies, we review the current understanding of the direct binding of AβP into membrane surfaces and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. The implication of composition of membrane lipids and the possible development of new drugs by influencing membrane properties and attenuating amyloid channels for the treatment and prevention of AD is also discussed.

  9. A Model for Membrane Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngatchou, Annita

    2010-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor of the adrenal gland which originates from chromaffin cells and is characterized by the secretion of excessive amounts of neurotransmitter which lead to high blood pressure and palpitations. Pheochromocytoma contain membrane bound granules that store neurotransmitter. The release of these stored molecules into the extracellular space occurs by fusion of the granule membrane with the cell plasma membrane, a process called exocytosis. The molecular mechanism of this membrane fusion is not well understood. It is proposed that the so called SNARE proteins [1] are the pillar of vesicle fusion as their cleavage by clostridial toxin notably, Botulinum neurotoxin and Tetanus toxin abrogate the secretion of neurotransmitter [2]. Here, I describe how physical principles are applied to a biological cell to explore the role of the vesicle SNARE protein synaptobrevin-2 in easing granule fusion. The data presented here suggest a paradigm according to which the movement of the C-terminal of synaptobrevin-2 disrupts the lipid bilayer to form a fusion pore through which molecules can exit.

  10. Drug-model membrane interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniz, Usha K.

    1994-01-01

    In the present day world, drugs play a very important role in medicine and it is necessary to understand their mode of action at the molecular level, in order to optimise their use. Studies of drug-biomembrane interactions are essential for gaining such as understanding. However, it would be prohibitively difficult to carry out such studies, since biomembranes are highly complex systems. Hence, model membranes (made up of these lipids which are important components of biomembranes) of varying degrees of complexity are used to investigate drug-membrane interactions. Bio- as well as model-membranes undergo a chain melting transition when heated, the chains being in a disordered state above the transition point, T CM . This transition is of physiological importance since biomembranes select their components such that T CM is less than the ambient temperature but not very much so, so that membrane flexibility is ensured and porosity, avoided. The influence of drugs on the transition gives valuable clues about various parameters such as the location of the drug in the membrane. Deep insights into drug-membrane interactions are obtained by observing the effect of drugs on membrane structure and the mobilities of the various groups in lipids, near T CM . Investigation of such changes have been carried out with several drugs, using techniques such as DSC, XRD and NMR. The results indicate that the drug-membrane interaction not only depends on the nature of drug and lipids but also on the form of the model membrane - stacked bilayer or vesicles. The light that these results shed on the nature of drug-membrane interactions is discussed. (author). 13 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  11. Neutrons and model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragneto, G.

    2012-11-01

    Current research in membrane protein biophysics highlights the emerging role of lipids in shaping membrane protein function. Cells and organisms have developed sophisticated mechanisms for controlling the lipid composition and many diseases are related to the failure of these mechanisms. One of the recent advances in the field is the discovery of the existence of coexisting micro-domains within a single membrane, important for regulating some signaling pathways. Many important properties of these domains remain poorly characterized. The characterization and analysis of bio-interfaces represent a challenge. Performing measurements on these few nanometer thick, soft, visco-elastic and dynamic systems is close to the limits of the available tools and methods. Neutron scattering techniques including small angle scattering, diffraction, reflectometry as well as inelastic methods are rapidly developing for these studies and are attracting an increasing number of biologists and biophysicists at large facilities. This manuscript will review some recent progress in the field and provide perspectives for future developments. It aims at highlighting neutron reflectometry as a versatile method to tackle questions dealing with the understanding and function of biomembranes and their components. The other important scattering methods are only briefly introduced.

  12. A pyrazole curcumin derivative restores membrane homeostasis disrupted after brain trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Ying, Zhe; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    We have assessed potential mechanisms associated with the deleterious effects of TBI on the integrity of plasma membranes in the hippocampus, together with consequences for behavioral function. In addition, we have investigated the efficacy of a dietary intervention based on a pyrazole curcumin derivative with demonstrated bioactivity and brain absorption, to re-establish membrane integrity. We report that moderate fluid percussion injury (FPI) increases levels of 4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE), an intermediary for the harmful effects of lipid peroxidation on neurons. A more direct action of FPI on membrane homeostasis was evidenced by a reduction in calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) important for metabolism of membrane phospholipids such as DHA, and an increase in the fatty acid transport protein (FATP) involved in translocation of long-chain fatty acids across the membrane. A potential association between membrane disruption and neuronal function was suggested by reduced levels of the NR2B subunit of the transmembrane NMDA receptor, in association with changes in iPLA2 and syntaxin-3 (STX-3, involved in the action of membrane DHA on synaptic membrane expansion). In addition, changes in iPLA2, 4-HNE, and STX-3 were proportional to reduced performance in a spatial learning task. In turn, the dietary supplementation with the curcumin derivative counteracted all the effects of FPI, effectively restoring parameters of membrane homeostasis. Results show the potential of the curcumin derivative to promote membrane homeostasis following TBI, which may foster a new line of non-invasive therapeutic treatments for TBI patients by endogenous up-regulation of molecules important for neural repair and plasticity. PMID:20816821

  13. Increasing Extracellular Free Fatty Acid Production in Escherichia coli by Disrupting Membrane Transport Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kwang Soo; Lee, Sung Kuk

    2017-12-27

    Transposon mutagenesis was used to identify three mutants of E. coli that exhibited increased free fatty acid (FFA) production, which resulted from the disruption of genes related to membrane transport. Deletion of envR, gusC, and mdlA individually in a recombinant E. coli strain resulted in 1.4-, 1.8-, and 1.2-fold increases in total FFA production, respectively. In particular, deletion of envR increased the percentage of extracellular FFA to 46%, compared with 29% for the control strain. Multiple deletion of envR, gusC, mdlA, ompF, and fadL had a synergistic effect on FFA production, resulting in high extracellular FFA production, comprising up to 50% of total FFA production. This study has identified new membrane proteins involved in FFA production and showed that genetic engineering targeting these membrane transporters is important to increase both total FFA and extracellular FFA production.

  14. Mesoscopic models of biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Kranenburg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Phospholipids are the main components of biological membranes and dissolved in water these molecules self-assemble into closed structures, of which bilayers are the most relevant from a biological point of view. Lipid bilayers are often used, both in experimental and by theoretical investigations......, as model systems to understand the fundamental properties of biomembranes. The properties of lipid bilayers can be studied at different time and length scales. For some properties it is sufficient to envision a membrane as an elastic sheet, while for others it is important to take into account the details...... to coarse grain a biological membrane. The conclusion of this comparison is that there can be many valid different strategies, but that the results obtained by the various mesoscopic models are surprisingly consistent. A second objective of this review is to illustrate how mesoscopic models can be used...

  15. Modeling electrically active viscoelastic membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitikantha Roy

    Full Text Available The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism.

  16. Mesoscopic models of biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Kranenburg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Phospholipids are the main components of biological membranes and dissolved in water these molecules self-assemble into closed structures, of which bilayers are the most relevant from a biological point of view. Lipid bilayers are often used, both in experimental and by theoretical investigations...... to coarse grain a biological membrane. The conclusion of this comparison is that there can be many valid different strategies, but that the results obtained by the various mesoscopic models are surprisingly consistent. A second objective of this review is to illustrate how mesoscopic models can be used...

  17. Giant plasma membrane vesicles: models for understanding membrane organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic membranes into functional domains continues to fascinate and puzzle cell biologists and biophysicists. The lipid raft hypothesis proposes that collective lipid interactions compartmentalize the membrane into coexisting liquid domains that are central to membrane physiology. This hypothesis has proven controversial because such structures cannot be directly visualized in live cells by light microscopy. The recent observations of liquid-liquid phase separation in biological membranes are an important validation of the raft hypothesis and enable application of the experimental toolbox of membrane physics to a biologically complex phase-separated membrane. This review addresses the role of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) in refining the raft hypothesis and expands on the application of GPMVs as an experimental model to answer some of key outstanding problems in membrane biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) enhance cytotoxicity of cisplatin to hepatocellular cells by microdomain disruption on plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shengyong; Chen, Xinhua; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Guo, Danjing; Xu, Yuning; Wu, Liming; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-08-15

    Previous studies showed nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) can ablate solid tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but its effect on cell membrane is not fully understood. We hypothesized nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on outer-cellular membrane with direct mechanical force and as a result the plasma membrane permeability increases to facilitate the small molecule intake. Three HCC cells were pulsed one pulse per minute, an interval longer than nanopore resealing time. The cationized ferritin was used to mark up the electronegative microdomains, propidium iodide (PI) for membrane permeabilization, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for the negative cell surface charge and cisplatin for inner-cellular cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that the ferritin marked-microdomain and negative cell surface charge were disrupted by nsPEF caused-mechanical force. The cell uptake of propidium and cytotoxicity of DNA-targeted cisplatin increased with a dose effect. Cisplatin gains its maximum inner-cellular cytotoxicity when combining with nsPEF stimulation. We conclude that nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on the outer cellular membrane directly and increase the membrane permeabilization for PI and cisplatin. The microdomain disruption and membrane infiltration changes are caused by the mechanical force from the changes of negative cell surface charge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) enhance cytotoxicity of cisplatin to hepatocellular cells by microdomain disruption on plasma membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Shengyong; Chen, Xinhua; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin [Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Zhejiang University, 310003 Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health and Key Laboratory of Organ Transplantation of Zhejiang Province, The Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Guo, Danjing; Xu, Yuning [Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health and Key Laboratory of Organ Transplantation of Zhejiang Province, The Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Wu, Liming, E-mail: wlm@zju.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Zhejiang University, 310003 Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health and Key Laboratory of Organ Transplantation of Zhejiang Province, The Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Zheng, Shusen, E-mail: shusenzheng@zju.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Zhejiang University, 310003 Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health and Key Laboratory of Organ Transplantation of Zhejiang Province, The Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Previous studies showed nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) can ablate solid tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but its effect on cell membrane is not fully understood. We hypothesized nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on outer-cellular membrane with direct mechanical force and as a result the plasma membrane permeability increases to facilitate the small molecule intake. Three HCC cells were pulsed one pulse per minute, an interval longer than nanopore resealing time. The cationized ferritin was used to mark up the electronegative microdomains, propidium iodide (PI) for membrane permeabilization, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for the negative cell surface charge and cisplatin for inner-cellular cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that the ferritin marked-microdomain and negative cell surface charge were disrupted by nsPEF caused-mechanical force. The cell uptake of propidium and cytotoxicity of DNA-targeted cisplatin increased with a dose effect. Cisplatin gains its maximum inner-cellular cytotoxicity when combining with nsPEF stimulation. We conclude that nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on the outer cellular membrane directly and increase the membrane permeabilization for PI and cisplatin. The microdomain disruption and membrane infiltration changes are caused by the mechanical force from the changes of negative cell surface charge.

  20. Spermicidal efficacy of VRP, a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide, inducing apoptosis and membrane disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Prasanta; Bhoumik, Arpita; Saha, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sandipan; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Ghosh, Jimut K; Dungdung, Sandhya R

    2018-02-01

    Presently available contraceptives are mostly hormonal or detergent in nature with numerous side effects like irritation, lesion, inflammation in vagina, alteration of body homeostasis, etc. Antimicrobial peptides with spermicidal activity but without adverse effects may be suitable alternatives. In the present study, spermicidal activity of a cationic antimicrobial peptide VRP on human spermatozoa has been elucidated. Progressive forward motility of human spermatozoa was instantly stopped after 100 μM VRP treatment and at 350 μM, all kinds of sperm motility ceased within 20 s as assessed by the Sander-Cramer assay. The spermicidal effect was confirmed by eosin-nigrosin assay and HOS test. VRP treatment (100 μM) in human spermatozoa induced both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis. TUNEL assay showed VRP treatment significantly disrupted the DNA integrity and changed the mitochondrial membrane permeability as evident from MPTP assay. AFM and SEM results depicted ultra structural changes including disruption of the acrosomal cap and plasma membrane of the head and midpiece region after treatment with 350 μM VRP. MTT assay showed after treatments with 100 and 350 μM of VRP for 24 hr, a substantial amount of Lactobacillus acidophilus (about 90% and 75%, respectively) remained viable. Hence, VRP being a small synthetic peptide with antimicrobial and spermicidal activity but tolerable to normal vaginal microflora, may be a suitable target for elucidating its contraceptive potentiality. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Toxins in botanical dietary supplements: blue cohosh components disrupt cellular respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B; Khan, Ikhlas A; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-24

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA "black box" warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3), exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage.

  2. The SV40 late protein VP4 is a viroporin that forms pores to disrupt membranes for viral release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Raghava

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonenveloped viruses are generally released by the timely lysis of the host cell by a poorly understood process. For the nonenveloped virus SV40, virions assemble in the nucleus and then must be released from the host cell without being encapsulated by cellular membranes. This process appears to involve the well-controlled insertion of viral proteins into host cellular membranes rendering them permeable to large molecules. VP4 is a newly identified SV40 gene product that is expressed at late times during the viral life cycle that corresponds to the time of cell lysis. To investigate the role of this late expressed protein in viral release, water-soluble VP4 was expressed and purified as a GST fusion protein from bacteria. Purified VP4 was found to efficiently bind biological membranes and support their disruption. VP4 perforated membranes by directly interacting with the membrane bilayer as demonstrated by flotation assays and the release of fluorescent markers encapsulated into large unilamellar vesicles or liposomes. The central hydrophobic domain of VP4 was essential for membrane binding and disruption. VP4 displayed a preference for membranes comprised of lipids that replicated the composition of the plasma membranes over that of nuclear membranes. Phosphatidylethanolamine, a lipid found at high levels in bacterial membranes, was inhibitory against the membrane perforation activity of VP4. The disruption of membranes by VP4 involved the formation of pores of ∼3 nm inner diameter in mammalian cells including permissive SV40 host cells. Altogether, these results support a central role of VP4 acting as a viroporin in the perforation of cellular membranes to trigger SV40 viral release.

  3. A System Shock Approach to Modelling Clandestine Network Disruption

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dipper, Tamlan

    2004-01-01

    .... This model took as its focus the disruption of successful terrorist operations. In doing so it drew upon operational art, group behavioural studies, and psychological research into problem solving...

  4. Helicobacter pylori Disrupts Host Cell Membranes, Initiating a Repair Response and Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Fen Juan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, the human stomach pathogen, lives on the inner surface of the stomach and causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Plasma membrane repair response is a matter of life and death for human cells against physical and biological damage. We here test the hypothesis that H. pylori also causes plasma membrane disruption injury, and that not only a membrane repair response but also a cell proliferation response are thereby activated. Vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA have been considered to be major H. pylori virulence factors. Gastric cancer cells were infected with H. pylori wild type (vacA+/cagA+, single mutant (ΔvacA or ΔcagA or double mutant (ΔvacA/ΔcagA strains and plasma membrane disruption events and consequent activation of membrane repair components monitored. H. pylori disrupts the host cell plasma membrane, allowing localized dye and extracellular Ca2+ influx. Ca2+-triggered members of the annexin family, A1 and A4, translocate, in response to injury, to the plasma membrane, and cell surface expression of an exocytotic maker of repair, LAMP-2, increases. Additional forms of plasma membrane disruption, unrelated to H. pylori exposure, also promote host cell proliferation. We propose that H. pylori activation of a plasma membrane repair is pro-proliferative. This study might therefore provide new insight into potential mechanisms of H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

  5. Time-dependent effect of rutin on skin fibroblasts membrane disruption following UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gęgotek, Agnieszka; Bielawska, Katarzyna; Biernacki, Michał; Dobrzyńska, Izabela; Skrzydlewska, Elżbieta

    2017-08-01

    Chronic exposure of the skin to solar UV radiation induces a number of biological alterations, including a redox imbalance; therefore, there is an urgent need for skin cells protective compounds. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of natural, previously extensively examined, polyphenol with antioxidant properties - rutin, on UV-induced skin fibroblasts membrane disruption. Accordingly, fibroblasts exposed to UVA and UVB irradiation were incubated with rutin (12h before and/or up to 24h after irradiation), and the structural and metabolic changes were examined. Rutin penetration through the fibroblast phospholipid bilayer was aided by UVA-induced bilitranslocase activity 2-4h after irradiation, while UVB irradiation led to enhanced phospholipid peroxidation and higher membrane permeability to facilitate the interaction of rutin with phospholipids. Lipidomic analysis revealed that 4h of rutin treatment also partially prevented UVA/B-induced increase in phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine level, as well as their membrane localization, which resulted in an enhanced zeta potential in the cells and liposomes. Moreover, rutin 2h following irradiation, in a various degree, prevented the increased in phospholipase A2 activity and ROS generation, and partially protected against the reduction of arachidonic and linoleic acids level and the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal level increase. Rutin effectively prevented against decrease in glutathione peroxidase, glutathione and vitamins E and C activities/levels, particularly 2h following UVA irradiation. In conclusion, highest skin fibroblasts membrane level of rutin occurred in 2-4h following UVA/B-radiation results in its strongest effect on biomembrane structure and functions and cellular antioxidant system irrespective of the radiation type. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanical loading disrupts osteocyte plasma membranes which initiates mechanosensation events in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kanglun; Sellman, David P; Bahraini, Anoosh; Hagan, Mackenzie L; Elsherbini, Ahmed; Vanpelt, Kayce T; Marshall, Peyton L; Hamrick, Mark W; McNeil, Anna; McNeil, Paul L; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E

    2018-02-01

    Osteocytes sense loading in bone, but their mechanosensation mechanisms remain poorly understood. Plasma membrane disruptions (PMD) develop with loading under physiological conditions in many cell types (e.g., myocytes, endothelial cells). These PMD foster molecular flux across cell membranes that promotes tissue adaptation, but this mechanosensation mechanism had not been explored in osteocytes. Our goal was to investigate whether PMD occur and initiate consequent mechanotransduction in osteocytes during physiological loading. We found that osteocytes experience PMD during in vitro (fluid flow) and in vivo (treadmill exercise) mechanical loading, in proportion to the level of stress experienced. In fluid flow studies, osteocyte PMD preferentially formed with rapid as compared to gradual application of loading. In treadmill studies, osteocyte PMD increased with loading in weight bearing locations (tibia), but this trend was not seen in non-weight bearing locations (skull). PMD initiated osteocyte mechanotransduction including calcium signaling and expression of c-fos, and repair rates of these PMD could be enhanced or inhibited pharmacologically to alter downstream mechanotransduction and osteocyte survival. PMD may represent a novel mechanosensation pathway in bone and a target for modifying skeletal adaptation signaling in osteocytes. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:653-662, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Disruption of Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane (MAM) Integrity Contributes to Muscle Insulin Resistance in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Emily; Chanon, Stéphanie; Robert, Maud; Bendridi, Nadia; Bidaux, Gabriel; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Ji-Cao, Jingwei; Durand, Christine; Gauvrit-Ramette, Daphné; Vidal, Hubert; Lefai, Etienne; Rieusset, Jennifer

    2018-04-01

    Modifications of the interactions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, defined as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), were recently shown to be involved in the control of hepatic insulin action and glucose homeostasis, but with conflicting results. Whereas skeletal muscle is the primary site of insulin-mediated glucose uptake and the main target for alterations in insulin-resistant states, the relevance of MAM integrity in muscle insulin resistance is unknown. Deciphering the importance of MAMs on muscle insulin signaling could help to clarify this controversy. Here, we show in skeletal muscle of different mice models of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) a marked disruption of ER-mitochondria interactions as an early event preceding mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Furthermore, in human myotubes, palmitate-induced insulin resistance is associated with a reduction of structural and functional ER-mitochondria interactions. Importantly, experimental increase of ER-mitochondria contacts in human myotubes prevents palmitate-induced alterations of insulin signaling and action, whereas disruption of MAM integrity alters the action of the hormone. Lastly, we found an association between altered insulin signaling and ER-mitochondria interactions in human myotubes from obese subjects with or without T2D compared with healthy lean subjects. Collectively, our data reveal a new role of MAM integrity in insulin action of skeletal muscle and highlight MAM disruption as an essential subcellular alteration associated with muscle insulin resistance in mice and humans. Therefore, reduced ER-mitochondria coupling could be a common alteration of several insulin-sensitive tissues playing a key role in altered glucose homeostasis in the context of obesity and T2D. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  8. Focal junctions retard lateral movement and disrupt fluid phase connectivity in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, D.; Wojewodzka, U.; Gniadecki, R.

    2008-01-01

    -p-cyclodextrin further decreased the recovery of DiI-C-18:0. We propose a model in which focal junctions impose lateral heterogeneity in the plasma membrane by entrapment of lipid microdomains between dense arrays of immobilized transmembrane molecules which can enmesh otherwise freely percolating L-d phase lipids. (c...... containing liquid-ordered (L-o) lipids. Indeed, values of maximal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that the long-range mobility of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, marker of L-o) was similar to 1.5-fold retarded within the focal junctions compared to the surrounding membrane. However, 1...

  9. Membranes and theoretical modeling of membrane distillation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayet, Mohamed

    2011-05-11

    Membrane distillation (MD) is one of the non-isothermal membrane separation processes used in various applications such desalination, environmental/waste cleanup, food, etc. It is known since 1963 and is still being developed at laboratory stage for different purposes and not fully implemented in industry. An abrupt increase in the number of papers on MD membrane engineering (i.e. design, fabrication and testing in MD) is seen since only 6 years ago. The present paper offers a comprehensive MD state-of-the-art review covering a wide range of commercial membranes, MD membrane engineering, their MD performance, transport mechanisms, experimental and theoretical modeling of different MD configurations as well as recent developments in MD. Improved MD membranes with specific morphology, micro- and nano-structures are highly demanded. Membranes with different pore sizes, porosities, thicknesses and materials as well as novel structures are required in order to carry out systematic MD studies for better understanding mass transport in different MD configurations, thereby improving the MD performance and looking for MD industrialization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. `Financial Tech` Will Disrupt Business Models Globally.

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Financial services is about to experience the redefinition of its traditional business models as the proliferation of Internet-enabled smartphones and four technology platforms in online payments, money transfer, asset management and crowdfunding emerge in global markets. A seismic decline is occurring in the use of high street outlets in developed countries as consumers demand more convenient and easier ways to manage their financial service requirements. In emerging nations, where banking n...

  11. Molecular Modeling of Nafion Permselective Membranes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vishnyakov, Aleksey M; Neimark, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    .... We developed molecular models for Nafion and nerve agent simulant DMMP and explored microphase segregation and mechanisms of DMMP sorption and transport in hydrated membranes with K+ counterion...

  12. Heat transfer modelling of first walls subject to plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Makowitz, H.

    1981-01-01

    A brief description of the plasma disruption problem and potential thermal consequences to the first wall is given. Thermal models reviewed include: a) melting of a solid with melt layer in place; b) melting of a solid with complete removal of melt (ablation); c) melting/vaporization of a solid; and d) vaporization of a solid but no phase change affecting the temperature profile

  13. Modeling branching pore structures in membrane filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Cummings, Linda J.

    2016-11-01

    Membrane filters are in widespread industrial use, and mathematical models to predict their efficacy are potentially very useful, as such models can suggest design modifications to improve filter performance and lifetime. Many models have been proposed to describe particle capture by membrane filters and the associated fluid dynamics, but most such models are based on a very simple structure in which the pores of the membrane are assumed to be simple circularly-cylindrical tubes spanning the depth of the membrane. Real membranes used in applications usually have much more complex geometry, with interconnected pores which may branch and bifurcate. Pores are also typically larger on the upstream side of the membrane than on the downstream side. We present an idealized mathematical model, in which a membrane consists of a series of bifurcating pores, which decrease in size as the membrane is traversed. Feed solution is forced through the membrane by applied pressure, and particles are removed from the feed either by sieving, or by particle adsorption within pores (which shrinks them). Thus the membrane's permeability decreases as the filtration progresses, ultimately falling to zero. We discuss how filtration efficiency depends on the characteristics of the branching structure. Partial support from NSF DMS 1261596 is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Antifungal Activity of (+-2,2’-Epicytoskyrin A and Its Membrane-Disruptive Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Wulansari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available (+-2,2’-Epicytoskyrin A, a bis-anthraquinone isolated from fungal endophyte Diaporthe sp. GNBP-10 associated with Uncaria gambir Roxb., was investigated for its antifungal activity. The broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC against 22 yeast strains and three filamentous fungi. The MICs of (+-2,2’-epicytoskyrin A ranged from 16 to 128 µg/mL, which exhibited lower activity than the antifungal nystatin. A study of the mechanism of action revealed similar effects of (+-2,2’-epicytoskyrin A and nystatin on Candida tropicalis at their MICs (16 and 8 µg/mL, respectively and 2 times of the MIC. Both compounds caused cytoplasmic material and ion leakages on fungal cell, which were characterized by an increase in absorbance at 260 nm and 280 nm as well as Ca2+ and K+ ion concentrations. The morphology of the fungal cells after (+-2,2’-epicytoskyrin A treatment was observed under a scanning electron microscope. The control cells, which were not treated with either (+-2,2’-epicytoskyrin A or nystatin, showed a smooth surface, while the cells treated with either (+-2,2’-epicytoskyrin A or nystatin shrank and displayed a donut-like shape. More shrinkage was observed in the 2 times MIC concentration and even more in the cells exposed to nystatin. The action of (+-2,2’-epicytoskyrin A was proposed through membrane disruption.

  15. Liquid crystal model of membrane flexoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Alejandro D

    2006-07-01

    An interfacial liquid crystal model is formulated and used to derive a membrane shape equation that takes into account pressure, tension, bending, torsion, and flexoelectric forces. Flexoelectricity introduces electric field-induced curvature and is of relevance to the study and characterization of biological membranes. It is shown that flexoelectricity renormalizes the membrane mechanical tension, shear, and bending effects, and hence it offers diverse pathways to manipulate the membrane's shape. The derived electroelastic shape equation provides systematic guidance on how to use electric fields in membrane studies.

  16. Delay and Disruption Tolerant Networking MACHETE Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segui, John S.; Jennings, Esther H.; Gao, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    To verify satisfaction of communication requirements imposed by unique missions, as early as 2000, the Communications Networking Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) saw the need for an environment to support interplanetary communication protocol design, validation, and characterization. JPL's Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE), described in Simulator of Space Communication Networks (NPO-41373) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 8 (August 2005), p. 44, combines various commercial, non-commercial, and in-house custom tools for simulation and performance analysis of space networks. The MACHETE environment supports orbital analysis, link budget analysis, communications network simulations, and hardware-in-the-loop testing. As NASA is expanding its Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) capabilities to support planned and future missions, building infrastructure to maintain services and developing enabling technologies, an important and broader role is seen for MACHETE in design-phase evaluation of future SCaN architectures. To support evaluation of the developing Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) field and its applicability for space networks, JPL developed MACHETE models for DTN Bundle Protocol (BP) and Licklider/Long-haul Transmission Protocol (LTP). DTN is an Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) architecture providing communication in and/or through highly stressed networking environments such as space exploration and battlefield networks. Stressed networking environments include those with intermittent (predictable and unknown) connectivity, large and/or variable delays, and high bit error rates. To provide its services over existing domain specific protocols, the DTN protocols reside at the application layer of the TCP/IP stack, forming a store-and-forward overlay network. The key capabilities of the Bundle Protocol include custody-based reliability, the ability to cope with intermittent connectivity

  17. Model Answers to Lipid Membrane Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, O. G.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since it was discovered that biological membranes have a core of a bimolecular sheet of lipid molecules, lipid bilayers have been a model laboratory for investigating physicochemical and functional properties of biological membranes. Experimental and theoretical models help the experimental ...... to pursue. Here we review some membrane models for lipid self-assembly, monolayers, bilayers, liposomes, and lipid-protein interactions and illustrate how such models can help answering questions in modern lipid cell biology....... scientist to plan experiments and interpret data. Theoretical models are the theoretical scientist's preferred toys to make contact between membrane theory and experiments. Most importantly, models serve to shape our intuition about which membrane questions are the more fundamental and relevant ones...

  18. Macroscopic Modeling of Polymer-Electrolyte Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, A.Z.; Newman, J.

    2007-04-01

    In this chapter, the various approaches for the macroscopic modeling of transport phenomena in polymer-electrolyte membranes are discussed. This includes general background and modeling methodologies, as well as exploration of the governing equations and some membrane-related topic of interest.

  19. Computational model of surface ablation from tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.; Hassanein, A.

    1993-10-01

    Energy transfer to material surfaces is dominated by photon radiation through low temperature plasma vapors if tokamak disruptions are due to low kinetic energy particles ( < 100 eV). Simple models of radiation transport are derived and incorporated into a fast-running computer routine to model this process. The results of simulations are in fair agreement with plasma gun erosion tests on several metal targets

  20. Evaluating Alzheimer's Disease Progression by Modeling Crosstalk Network Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haochen; Wei, Chunxiang; He, Hua; Liu, Xiaoquan

    2016-01-01

    Aβ, tau, and P-tau have been widely accepted as reliable markers for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The crosstalk between these markers forms a complex network. AD may induce the integral variation and disruption of the network. The aim of this study was to develop a novel mathematic model based on a simplified crosstalk network to evaluate the disease progression of AD. The integral variation of the network is measured by three integral disruption parameters. The robustness of network is evaluated by network disruption probability. Presented results show that network disruption probability has a good linear relationship with Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). The proposed model combined with Support vector machine (SVM) achieves a relative high 10-fold cross-validated performance in classification of AD vs. normal and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) vs. normal (95% accuracy, 95% sensitivity, 95% specificity for AD vs. normal; 90% accuracy, 94% sensitivity, 83% specificity for MCI vs. normal). This research evaluates the progression of AD and facilitates AD early diagnosis. PMID:26834548

  1. Focal junctions retard lateral movement and disrupt fluid phase connectivity in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, D.; Wojewodzka, U.; Gniadecki, R.

    2008-01-01

    ,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI-C-18:0), which specifically partitions to the liquid-disordered (L-d), non-raft phase, was also enriched in focal junctions and its mobility was slightly retarded. Cross-linking of GM(1) by CTB or raft aggregation by methyl......-p-cyclodextrin further decreased the recovery of DiI-C-18:0. We propose a model in which focal junctions impose lateral heterogeneity in the plasma membrane by entrapment of lipid microdomains between dense arrays of immobilized transmembrane molecules which can enmesh otherwise freely percolating L-d phase lipids. (c...

  2. Modeling methodology for supply chain synthesis and disruption analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Teresa; Blackhurst, Jennifer

    2004-11-01

    The concept of an integrated or synthesized supply chain is a strategy for managing today's globalized and customer driven supply chains in order to better meet customer demands. Synthesizing individual entities into an integrated supply chain can be a challenging task due to a variety of factors including conflicting objectives, mismatched incentives and constraints of the individual entities. Furthermore, understanding the effects of disruptions occurring at any point in the system is difficult when working toward synthesizing supply chain operations. Therefore, the goal of this research is to present a modeling methodology to manage the synthesis of a supply chain by linking hierarchical levels of the system and to model and analyze disruptions in the integrated supply chain. The contribution of this research is threefold: (1) supply chain systems can be modeled hierarchically (2) the performance of synthesized supply chain system can be evaluated quantitatively (3) reachability analysis is used to evaluate the system performance and verify whether a specific state is reachable, allowing the user to understand the extent of effects of a disruption.

  3. Artificial membranes as models in penetration investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krulikowska, M; Arct, J; Lucova, M; Cetner, B; Majewski, S

    2013-02-01

    In vitro methods used in the research of transepidermal transport of active substances generally rely on the penetration rate of test compounds through standard membranes. Models typically used in penetration experiments are specially prepared human or animal skin samples or synthetic membranes. The objective of this study was to establish if the test results for an artificial liposome membrane can be extrapolated to determine the actual bioavailability of active substances. Tests were conducted in a side-by-side diffusion cell. As model membranes, a liquid-crystal lipid membrane (LM), phospholipid membrane (PM) and pig skin sample were used. The test compounds were eight synthetic dyes used in hair colouring products. Research findings reveal that membranes composed of lipids, identical to those present in the epidermis and forming analogical liquid-crystal structures provide a close approximation of the actual bioavailability of active substances (correlation between the results obtained for pig skin and LM was significant: R = 0.95 and R = 0.93 in the presence of a 1% Sodium dodecyl sulphate in donor system). Unlike biological membranes, intercellular cement does not contain phospholipids. The observed correlation between penetration coefficients through the PM and pig skin was not significant (R = 0.82). The experiments confirm that the PM constitutes a less credible model for the studies of transepidermal transport in real life conditions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Disruption of Membrane by Colistin Kills Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Persisters and Enhances Killing of Other Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Peng; Niu, Hongxia; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Hao; Margolick, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Persisters are small populations of quiescent bacterial cells that survive exposure to bactericidal antibiotics and are responsible for many persistent infections and posttreatment relapses. However, little is known about how to effectively kill persister bacteria. In the work presented here, we found that colistin, a membrane-active antibiotic, was highly active against Escherichia coli persisters at high concentrations (25 or 50 μg/ml). At a clinically relevant lower concentration (10 μg/ml), colistin alone had no apparent effect on E. coli persisters. In combination with other drugs, this concentration of colistin enhanced the antipersister activity of gentamicin and ofloxacin but not that of ampicillin, nitrofurans, and sulfa drugs in vitro. The colistin enhancement effect was most likely due to increased uptake of the other antibiotics, as demonstrated by increased accumulation of fluorescence-labeled gentamicin. Interestingly, colistin significantly enhanced the activity of ofloxacin and nitrofurantoin but not that of gentamicin or sulfa drugs in the murine model of urinary tract infection. Our findings suggest that targeting bacterial membranes is a valuable approach to eradicating persisters and should have implications for more effective treatment of persistent bacterial infections. PMID:27600051

  5. Interaction of elaiophylin with model bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, J.; Dencheva-Zarkova, M.

    2017-01-01

    Elaiophylin is a new macrodiolide antibiotic, which is produced by the Streptomyces strains [1]. It displays biological activities against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. The mode of action of this antibiotic has been attributed to an alteration of the membrane permeability. When this antibiotic is inserted into the bilayer membranes destabilization of the membrane and formation of ion-penetrable channels is observed. The macrodiolide antibiotic forms stable cation selective ion channels in synthetic lipid bilayer membranes. The aim of this work was to study the interactions of Elaiophylin with model bilayer membranes and to get information on the mechanical properties of lipid bilayers in presence of this antibiotic. Patch-clamp technique [2] were used in the study

  6. QSAR Models for Reproductive Toxicity and Endocrine Disruption Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Vračko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive toxicity is an important regulatory endpoint, which is required in registration procedures of chemicals used for different purposes (for example pesticides. The in vivo tests are expensive, time consuming and require large numbers of animals, which must be sacrificed. Therefore an effort is ongoing to develop alternative In vitro and in silico methods to evaluate reproductive toxicity. In this review we describe some modeling approaches. In the first example we describe the CAESAR model for prediction of reproductive toxicity; the second example shows a classification model for endocrine disruption potential based on counter propagation artificial neural networks; the third example shows a modeling of relative binding affinity to rat estrogen receptor, and the fourth one shows a receptor dependent modeling experiment.

  7. Steam Explosion and Vibrating Membrane Filtration to Improve the Processing Cost of Microalgae Cell Disruption and Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Lorente

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore an innovative downstream route for microalgae processing to reduce cost production. Experiments have been carried out on cell disruption and fractionation stages to recover lipids, sugars, and proteins. Steam explosion and dynamic membrane filtration were used as unit operations. The species tested were Nannochloropsis gaditana, Chlorella sorokiniana, and Dunaliella tertiolecta with different cell wall characteristics. Acid-catalysed steam explosion permitted cell disruption, as well as the hydrolysis of carbohydrates and partial hydrolysis of proteins. This permitted a better access to non-polar solvents for lipid extraction. Dynamic filtration was used to moderate the impact of fouling. Filtration enabled two streams: A permeate containing water and monosaccharides and a low-volume retentate containing the lipids and proteins. The necessary volume of solvent to extract the lipids is thus much lower. An estimation of operational costs of both steam explosion and membrane filtration was performed. The results show that the steam explosion operation cost varies between 0.005 $/kg and 0.014 $/kg of microalgae dry sample, depending on the cost of fuel. Membrane filtration cost in fractionation was estimated at 0.12 $/kg of microalgae dry sample.

  8. The polyene antimycotics nystatin and filipin disrupt the plasma membrane, whereas natamycin inhibits endocytosis in germinating conidia of Penicillium discolor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van M.R.; Golovina, E.A.; Dijksterhuis, J.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the differences in membrane permeability and the effect on endocytosis of the polyene antimycotics nystatin, filipin and natamycin on germinating fungal conidia. Methods and Results: The model system was Penicillium discolor, a food spoilage fungus. Filipin resulted in

  9. Basolateral cholesterol depletion alters Aquaporin-2 post-translational modifications and disrupts apical plasma membrane targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Hanne B; Fuglsang, Cecilia Hvitfeldt; Pedersen, Cecilie Nøhr; Fenton, Robert A

    2018-01-01

    Apical plasma membrane accumulation of the water channel Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) in kidney collecting duct principal cells is critical for body water homeostasis. Posttranslational modification (PTM) of AQP2 is important for regulating AQP2 trafficking. The aim of this study was to determine the role of cholesterol in regulation of AQP2 PTM and in apical plasma membrane targeting of AQP2. Cholesterol depletion from the basolateral plasma membrane of a collecting duct cell line (mpkCCD14) using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD) increased AQP2 ubiquitylation. Forskolin, cAMP or dDAVP-mediated AQP2 phosphorylation at Ser269 (pS269-AQP2) was prevented by cholesterol depletion from the basolateral membrane. None of these effects on pS269-AQP2 were observed when cholesterol was depleted from the apical side of cells, or when MBCD was applied subsequent to dDAVP stimulation. Basolateral, but not apical, MBCD application prevented cAMP-induced apical plasma membrane accumulation of AQP2. These studies indicate that manipulation of the cholesterol content of the basolateral plasma membrane interferes with AQP2 PTM and subsequently regulated apical plasma membrane targeting of AQP2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction of antimicrobial biomimetics with bacterial and cytoplasmic membrane models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidalevitz, David

    2010-03-01

    Non-natural mimics of antimicrobial peptides are excellent candidates for anti-infectious agents due to their stability towards enzymatic degradation and broad adjustability of physicochemical properties. This study examines how structural rigidity affects interactions of the AMP analogs with model Langmuir monolayers of phospholipids at the air-liquid interface mimicking bacterial and mammalian lipid membrane surfaces. Flexible acyl-lysine olygomer was more efficient in disrupting Gram-negative rather than Gram-positive bacterial model membrane. Electron density profiles across the film, derived from XR data, demonstrate that following OAK and arylamide insertion into bacterial membrane mimics their hydrophobic cores were located within the lipid acyl chains, inducing opposite local curvatures. Moreover, flexible OAK molecules were found to penetrate the six acyl chains lipid A better than two chain DPPG, while conformationally restrained arylamide molecules, as well as previously characterized natural antimicrobial peptides LL-37, protegrin-1 and SMAP-29, insert into DPPG monolayer with almost identical or better efficiency.

  11. Consensus models to predict endocrine disruption for all ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humans are potentially exposed to tens of thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment. It is well known that some environmental chemicals mimic natural hormones and thus have the potential to be endocrine disruptors. Most of these environmental chemicals have never been tested for their ability to disrupt the endocrine system, in particular, their ability to interact with the estrogen receptor. EPA needs tools to prioritize thousands of chemicals, for instance in the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP). Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project (CERAPP) was intended to be a demonstration of the use of predictive computational models on HTS data including ToxCast and Tox21 assays to prioritize a large chemical universe of 32464 unique structures for one specific molecular target – the estrogen receptor. CERAPP combined multiple computational models for prediction of estrogen receptor activity, and used the predicted results to build a unique consensus model. Models were developed in collaboration between 17 groups in the U.S. and Europe and applied to predict the common set of chemicals. Structure-based techniques such as docking and several QSAR modeling approaches were employed, mostly using a common training set of 1677 compounds provided by U.S. EPA, to build a total of 42 classification models and 8 regression models for binding, agonist and antagonist activity. All predictions were evaluated on ToxCast data and on an exte

  12. Simulation Model of Membrane Gas Separator Using Aspen Custom Modeler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dong-keun [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Gahui; Yun, Jinwon; Yu, Sangseok [Chungnam Nat’l Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Membranes are used to separate pure gas from gas mixtures. In this study, three different types of mass transport through a membrane were developed in order to investigate the gas separation capabilities of a membrane. The three different models typically used are a lumped model, a multi-cell model, and a discretization model. Despite the multi-cell model producing similar results to a discretization model, the discretization model was selected for this investigation, due to the cell number dependence of a multi-cell model. The mass transport model was then used to investigate the effects of pressure difference, flow rate, total exposed area, and permeability. The results showed that the pressure difference increased with the stage cut, but the selectivity was a trade-off for the increasing pressure difference. Additionally, even though permeability is an important parameter, the selectivity and stage cut of the membrane converged as permeability increased.

  13. Interaction of Mastoparan with Model Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloot, Justin

    2010-10-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents began during the 20th century to reduce the effects of infectious diseases. Since the 1990s, antimicrobial resistance has become an ever-increasing global problem. Our laboratory recently found that small antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have potent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms including antibiotic resistant organisms. These AMPs are potential therapeutic agents against the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance. AMPs are small peptides produced by plants, insects and animals. Several hypotheses concede that these peptides cause some type of structural perturbations and increased membrane permeability in bacteria however, how AMPs kill bacteria remains unclear. The goal of this study was to design an assay that would allow us to evaluate and monitor the pore forming ability of an AMP, Mastoparan, on model membrane structures called liposomes. Development of this model will facilitate the study of how mastoparan and related AMPs interact with the bacterial membrane.

  14. Disruption of SPT23 results in increased heat sensitivity due to plasma membrane damage in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Yu, Qilin; Xiao, Chenpeng; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Biao; Li, Mingchun

    2018-02-13

    The ability to adapt to environmental changes is the necessary strategy of cell survival. Spt23 is responsible for regulation of Δ-9 desaturase expression in Pichia pastoris. Disruption of SPT23 leads to a remarkable decrease in cellular unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, we found that deletion of SPT23 resulted in growth defect under high temperature culture conditions and heat treatment induced the expression of SPT23. By measuring expression changes of heat shock proteins, protein levels and cellular localization of Hsf1, it revealed that the sensitivity of spt23Δ to high temperature was independent of heat shock response. Addition of the osmotic stabilizer sorbitol can restore the growth defects of spt23Δ under heat condition. In addition, loss of SPT23 led to increased plasma membrane permeability, decreased plasma membrane integrity, depolarization, ergosterol synthesis defect and cell wall component disorder, which suggested that the sensitivity to heat treatment in spt23Δ was due to plasma membrane damage. Taken together, our results give new insights into the relationship between Spt23 and high temperature environmental stress. © FEMS 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Time-dependent effect of rutin on skin fibroblasts membrane disruption following UV radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Gęgotek

    2017-08-01

    In conclusion, highest skin fibroblasts membrane level of rutin occurred in 2–4 h following UVA/B-radiation results in its strongest effect on biomembrane structure and functions and cellular antioxidant system irrespective of the radiation type.

  16. Membrane Vesicles of Group B Streptococcus Disrupt Feto-Maternal Barrier Leading to Preterm Birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manalee Vishnu Surve

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the genitourinary tract with Group B Streptococcus (GBS, an opportunistic gram positive pathogen, is associated with premature rupture of amniotic membrane and preterm birth. In this work, we demonstrate that GBS produces membrane vesicles (MVs in a serotype independent manner. These MVs are loaded with virulence factors including extracellular matrix degrading proteases and pore forming toxins. Mice chorio-decidual membranes challenged with MVs ex vivo resulted in extensive collagen degradation leading to loss of stiffness and mechanical weakening. MVs when instilled vaginally are capable of anterograde transport in mouse reproductive tract. Intra-amniotic injections of GBS MVs in mice led to upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammation mimicking features of chorio-amnionitis; it also led to apoptosis in the chorio-decidual tissue. Instillation of MVs in the amniotic sac also resulted in intrauterine fetal death and preterm delivery. Our findings suggest that GBS MVs can independently orchestrate events at the feto-maternal interface causing chorio-amnionitis and membrane damage leading to preterm birth or fetal death.

  17. Membrane Vesicles of Group B Streptococcus Disrupt Feto-Maternal Barrier Leading to Preterm Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sthanam, Lakshmi Kavitha; Srivastava, Rohit; Basu, Bhakti; Dutta, Suryendu; Sen, Shamik; Modi, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Infection of the genitourinary tract with Group B Streptococcus (GBS), an opportunistic gram positive pathogen, is associated with premature rupture of amniotic membrane and preterm birth. In this work, we demonstrate that GBS produces membrane vesicles (MVs) in a serotype independent manner. These MVs are loaded with virulence factors including extracellular matrix degrading proteases and pore forming toxins. Mice chorio-decidual membranes challenged with MVs ex vivo resulted in extensive collagen degradation leading to loss of stiffness and mechanical weakening. MVs when instilled vaginally are capable of anterograde transport in mouse reproductive tract. Intra-amniotic injections of GBS MVs in mice led to upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammation mimicking features of chorio-amnionitis; it also led to apoptosis in the chorio-decidual tissue. Instillation of MVs in the amniotic sac also resulted in intrauterine fetal death and preterm delivery. Our findings suggest that GBS MVs can independently orchestrate events at the feto-maternal interface causing chorio-amnionitis and membrane damage leading to preterm birth or fetal death. PMID:27583406

  18. Modelling Of Manufacturing Processes With Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciunean, Daniel Cristian; Crăciunean, Vasile

    2015-07-01

    The current objectives to increase the standards of quality and efficiency in manufacturing processes can be achieved only through the best combination of inputs, independent of spatial distance between them. This paper proposes modelling production processes based on membrane structures introduced in [4]. Inspired from biochemistry, membrane computation [4] is based on the concept of membrane represented in its formalism by the mathematical concept of multiset. The manufacturing process is the evolution of a super cell system from its initial state according to the given actions of aggregation. In this paper we consider that the atomic production unit of the process is the action. The actions and the resources on which the actions are produced, are distributed in a virtual network of companies working together. The destination of the output resources is specified by corresponding output events.

  19. Liquid immiscibility in model bilayer lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Sarah L.

    There is growing evidence that cell plasma membranes are laterally organized into "raft" regions in which particular lipids and proteins are concentrated. These domains have sub-micron dimensions and have been implicated in vital cell functions. Similar liquid domains are observed in model bilayer membrane mixtures that mimick cellular lipid compositions. In model membranes, domains can be large (microns) and can readily form in the absence of proteins. This thesis presents studies of liquid immiscibility in model membrane systems using two experimental methods. By fluorescence microscopy, this thesis documents that miscibility transitions occur in a wide variety of ternary lipid mixtures containing high melting temperature (saturated) lipids, low melting temperature (usually unsaturated) lipids, and cholesterol. I have constructed detailed miscibility phase diagrams for three separate ternary lipid mixtures (DOPC/DPPC/Chol, DOPC/PSM/Chol, and POPC/PSM/Chol). Phase separation is also observed in membranes of lipids extracted from human erythrocytes. NMR experiments probe lipid order and verify the coexistence of a saturated lipid and cholesterol rich liquid ordered (Lo) phase with a more disordered, unsaturated lipid rich liquid crystalline (Lalpha) phase at low temperatures. These experiments also find multiple thermodynamic transitions and lipid organization on different length-scales. This complexity is revealed because fluorescence microscopy and NMR probe lipid order at different length-scales (>1mum vs. ˜100nm). NMR detects small domains (˜80nm) at temperatures just below the miscibility transition, even though micron-scale domains are observed by fluorescent microscopy. NMR does detect large-scale ("100nm) demixing, but at a lower temperature. In addition, it has long been known that >10nm length-scale structure is present in many lipid mixtures containing cholesterol and at least one additional lipid species, though it is shown here that only a subset of

  20. Critical Review of Membrane Bioreactor Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naessens, W.; Maere, T.; Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios

    2012-01-01

    modelling. In this paper, the vast literature on hydrodynamic and integrated modelling in MBR is critically reviewed. Hydrodynamic models are used at different scales and focus mainly on fouling and only little on system design/optimisation. Integrated models also focus on fouling although the ones......Membrane bioreactor technology exists for a couple of decades, but has not yet overwhelmed the market due to some serious drawbacks of which operational cost due to fouling is the major contributor. Knowledge buildup and optimisation for such complex systems can heavily benefit from mathematical...

  1. Membrane fouling mechanism of biofilm-membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR): Pore blocking model and membrane cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Wenxiang; Tang, Bing; Ding, Jie; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Zhien

    2018-02-01

    Biofilm membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR) is considered as an important wastewater treatment technology that incorporates advantages of both biofilm and MBR process, as well as can alleviate membrane fouling, with respect to the conventional activated sludge MBR. But, to be efficient, it necessitates the establishment of proper methods for the assessment of membrane fouling. Four Hermia membrane blocking models were adopted to quantify and evaluate the membrane fouling of BF-MBR. The experiments were conducted with various operational conditions, including membrane types, agitation speeds and transmembrane pressure (TMP). Good agreement between cake formation model and experimental data was found, confirming the validity of the Hermia models for assessing the membrane fouling of BF-MBR and that cake layer deposits on membrane. Moreover, the influences of membrane types, agitation speeds and transmembrane pressure on the Hermia pore blocking coefficient of cake layer were investigated. In addition, the permeability recovery after membrane cleaning at various operational conditions was studied. This work confirms that, unlike conventional activated sludge MBR, BF-MBR possesses a low degree of membrane fouling and a higher membrane permeability recovery after cleaning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Disruptive innovation in health care delivery: a framework for business-model innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jason; Christensen, Clayton M

    2008-01-01

    Disruptive innovation has brought affordability and convenience to customers in a variety of industries. However, health care remains expensive and inaccessible to many because of the lack of business-model innovation. This paper explains the theory of disruptive innovation and describes how disruptive technologies must be matched with innovative business models. The authors present a framework for categorizing and developing business models in health care, followed by a discussion of some of the reasons why disruptive innovation in health care delivery has been slow.

  3. Interactions of Model Cell Membranes with Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, S. M.; Camesano, T. A.; Nagarajan, R.

    2011-12-01

    The same properties that give nanoparticles their enhanced function, such as high surface area, small size, and better conductivity, can also alter the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials. Ultimately, many of these nanomaterials will be released into the environment, and can cause cytotoxic effects to environmental bacteria, aquatic organisms, and humans. Previous results from our laboratory suggest that nanoparticles can have a detrimental effect on cells, depending on nanoparticle size. It is our goal to characterize the properties of nanomaterials that can result in membrane destabilization. We tested the effects of nanoparticle size and chemical functionalization on nanoparticle-membrane interactions. Gold nanoparticles at 2, 5,10, and 80 nm were investigated, with a concentration of 1.1x1010 particles/mL. Model cell membranes were constructed of of L-α-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), which has negatively charged lipid headgroups. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to measure frequency changes at different overtones, which were related to mass changes corresponding to nanoparticle interaction with the model membrane. In QCM-D, a lipid bilayer is constructed on a silicon dioxide crystal. The crystals, oscillate at different harmonic frequencies depending upon changes in mass or energy dissipation. When mass is added to the crystal surface, such as through addition of a lipid vesicle solution, the frequency change decreases. By monitoring the frequency and dissipation, we could verify that a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) formed on the silica surface. After formation of the SLB, the nanoparticles can be added to the system, and the changes in frequency and dissipation are monitored in order to build a mechanistic understanding of nanoparticle-cell membrane interactions. For all of the smaller nanoparticles (2, 5, and 10 nm), nanoparticle addition caused a loss of mass from the lipid bilayer, which appears to be due to the formation of holes

  4. Metabolic effects of bariatric surgery in mouse models of circadian disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arble, D M; Sandoval, D A; Turek, F W; Woods, S C; Seeley, R J

    2015-08-01

    Mounting evidence supports a link between circadian disruption and metabolic disease. Humans with circadian disruption (for example, night-shift workers) have an increased risk of obesity and cardiometabolic diseases compared with the non-disrupted population. However, it is unclear whether the obesity and obesity-related disorders associated with circadian disruption respond to therapeutic treatments as well as individuals with other types of obesity. Here, we test the effectiveness of the commonly used bariatric surgical procedure, Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy (VSG), in mouse models of genetic and environmental circadian disruption. VSG led to a reduction in body weight and fat mass in both Clock(Δ19) mutant and constant-light mouse models (Pdisruption. Interestingly, the decrease in body weight occurred without altering diurnal feeding or activity patterns (P>0.05). Within circadian-disrupted models, VSG also led to improved glucose tolerance and lipid handling (Pdisruption, and that the potent effects of bariatric surgery are orthogonal to circadian biology. However, as the effects of bariatric surgery are independent of circadian disruption, VSG cannot be considered a cure for circadian disruption. These data have important implications for circadian-disrupted obese patients. Moreover, these results reveal new information about the metabolic pathways governing the effects of bariatric surgery as well as of circadian disruption.

  5. Mouse models for preeclampsia: disruption of redox-regulated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chambers Anne E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The concept that oxidative stress contributes to the development of human preeclampsia has never been tested in genetically-defined animal models. Homozygous deletion of catechol-O-methyl transferase (Comt-/- in pregnant mice leads to human preeclampsia-like symptoms (high blood pressure, albuminurea and preterm birth resulting from extensive vasculo-endothelial pathology, primarily at the utero-fetal interface where maternal cardiac output is dramatically increased during pregnancy. Comt converts estradiol to 2-methoxyestradiol 2 (2ME2 which counters angiogenesis by depleting hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha at late pregnancy. We propose that in wild type (Comt++ pregnant mice, 2ME2 destabilizes HIF-1 alpha by inhibiting mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD. Thus, 2ME2 acts as a pro-oxidant, disrupting redox-regulated signaling which blocks angiogenesis in wild type (WT animals in physiological pregnancy. Further, we suggest that a lack of this inhibition under normoxic conditions in mutant animals (Comt-/- stabilises HIF-1 alpha by inactivating prolyl hydroxlases (PHD. We predict that a lack of inhibition of MnSOD, leading to persistent accumulation of HIF-1 alpha, would trigger inflammatory infiltration and endothelial damage in mutant animals. Critical tests of this hypothesis would be to recreate preeclampsia symptoms by inducing oxidative stress in WT animals or to ameliorate by treating mutant mice with Mn-SOD-catalase mimetics or activators of PHD.

  6. Disruption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Plantaricin 149 and investigation of its mechanism of action with biomembrane model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, José Luiz S; Nobre, Thatyane M; Siano, Alvaro; Humpola, Verónica; Bossolan, Nelma R S; Zaniquelli, Maria E D; Tonarelli, Georgina; Beltramini, Leila M

    2009-10-01

    The action of a synthetic antimicrobial peptide analog of Plantaricin 149 (Pln149a) against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its interaction with biomembrane model systems were investigated. Pln149a was shown to inhibit S. cerevisiae growth by more than 80% in YPD medium, causing morphological changes in the yeast wall and remaining active and resistant to the yeast proteases even after 24 h of incubation. Different membrane model systems and carbohydrates were employed to better describe the Pln149a interaction with cellular components using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopies, adsorption kinetics and surface elasticity in Langmuir monolayers. These assays showed that Pln149a does not interact with either mono/polysaccharides or zwitterionic LUVs, but is strongly adsorbed to and incorporated into negatively charged surfaces, causing a conformational change in its secondary structure from random-coil to helix upon adsorption. From the concurrent analysis of Pln149a adsorption kinetics and dilatational surface elasticity data, we determined that 2.5 muM is the critical concentration at which Pln149a will disrupt a negative DPPG monolayer. Furthermore, Pln149a exhibited a carpet-like mechanism of action, in which the peptide initially binds to the membrane, covering its surface and acquiring a helical structure that remains associated to the negatively charged phospholipids. After this electrostatic interaction, another peptide region causes a strain in the membrane, promoting its disruption.

  7. INCREASED SERUM LEVELS OF UREA AND CREATININE ARE SURROGATE MARKERS FOR DISRUPTION OF RETINAL PHOTORECEPTOR EXTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE AND INNER SEGMENT ELLIPSOID ZONE IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Sandeep; Ruia, Surabhi; Prasad, Senthamizh; Jain, Astha; Mishra, Nibha; Natu, Shankar M; Meyer, Carsten H; Gilhotra, Jagjit S; Kruzliak, Peter; Akduman, Levent

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the role of serum urea and creatinine as surrogate markers for disruption of retinal photoreceptor external limiting membrane (ELM) and inner segment ellipsoid zone (EZ) in Type 2 diabetic retinopathy (DR) using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, for the first time. One hundred and seventeen consecutive cases of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (diabetes without retinopathy [No DR; n = 39], nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy [NPDR; n = 39], proliferative diabetic retinopathy [PDR; n = 39]) and 40 healthy control subjects were included. Serum levels of urea and creatinine were assessed using standard protocol. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography was used to grade the disruption of ELM and EZ as follows: Grade 0, no disruption of ELM and EZ; Grade 1, ELM disrupted, EZ intact; Grade 2, ELM and EZ disrupted. Data were analyzed statistically. Increase in serum levels of urea (F = 22.93) and creatinine (F = 15.82) and increased grades of disruption of ELM and EZ (γ = 116.3) were observed with increased severity of DR (P serum levels of urea (F = 10.45) and creatinine (F = 6.89) was observed with increased grades of disruption of ELM and EZ (P = 0.001). Serum levels of urea and creatinine are surrogate markers for disruption of retinal photoreceptor ELM and EZ on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in DR.

  8. Inhibition of Kv channel expression by NSAIDs depolarizes membrane potential and inhibits cell migration by disrupting calpain signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Kristopher; Littlejohn, Alaina; Thomas, Laurel; Marsh, Elizabeth; Lillich, James D

    2015-12-15

    Clinical use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is well known to cause gastrointestinal ulcer formation via several mechanisms that include inhibiting epithelial cell migration and mucosal restitution. The drug-affected signaling pathways that contribute to inhibition of migration by NSAIDs are poorly understood, though previous studies have shown that NSAIDs depolarize membrane potential and suppress expression of calpain proteases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel subunits. Kv channels play significant roles in cell migration and are targets of NSAID activity in white blood cells, but the specific functional effects of NSAID-induced changes in Kv channel expression, particularly on cell migration, are unknown in intestinal epithelial cells. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of NSAIDs on expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, and 1.6 in vitro and/or in vivo and evaluated the functional significance of loss of Kv subunit expression. Indomethacin or NS-398 reduced total and plasma membrane protein expression of Kv1.3 in cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Additionally, depolarization of membrane potential with margatoxin (MgTx), 40mM K(+), or silencing of Kv channel expression with siRNA significantly reduced IEC-6 cell migration and disrupted calpain activity. Furthermore, in rat small intestinal epithelia, indomethacin and NS-398 had significant, yet distinct, effects on gene and protein expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, or 1.6, suggesting that these may be clinically relevant targets. Our results show that inhibition of epithelial cell migration by NSAIDs is associated with decreased expression of Kv channel subunits, and provide a mechanism through which NSAIDs inhibit cell migration and may contribute to NSAID-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Physical model for membrane protrusions during spreading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamaraux, F; Ali, O; Fourcade, B; Keller, S; Bruckert, F

    2008-01-01

    During cell spreading onto a substrate, the kinetics of the contact area is an observable quantity. This paper is concerned with a physical approach to modeling this process in the case of ameboid motility where the membrane detaches itself from the underlying cytoskeleton at the leading edge. The physical model we propose is based on previous reports which highlight that membrane tension regulates cell spreading. Using a phenomenological feedback loop to mimic stress-dependent biochemistry, we show that the actin polymerization rate can be coupled to the stress which builds up at the margin of the contact area between the cell and the substrate. In the limit of small variation of membrane tension, we show that the actin polymerization rate can be written in a closed form. Our analysis defines characteristic lengths which depend on elastic properties of the membrane–cytoskeleton complex, such as the membrane–cytoskeleton interaction, and on molecular parameters, the rate of actin polymerization. We discuss our model in the case of axi-symmetric and non-axi-symmetric spreading and we compute the characteristic time scales as a function of fundamental elastic constants such as the strength of membrane–cytoskeleton adherence

  10. Mixed Discrete-Continuous Railway Disruption-Length Models with Copulas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zilko, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    The uncertainty of railway disruption length hinders the performance of the Operational Control Centre Rail (OCCR) in Utrecht. One way to model this uncertainty is by representing the disruption length as a probabilistic distribution. A dependence model, taking the form of a joint distribution,

  11. Biodegradable nanoparticles loaded with tetrameric melittin: preparation and membrane disruption evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Horta, Azucena; Matamoros-Acosta, Arely; Chavez-Montes, Abelardo; Castro-Rios, Rocio; Lara-Arias, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    Melittin is the main component of bee venom consisting of 26 amino acids that has multiple effects, including antibacterial, antiviral and anti-inflammatory in various cell types. This peptide forms pores in biological membranes and triggers cell death. Therefore it has potential as an anti-cancer therapy. However, the therapeutic application of melittin is limited due to its main side effect, hemolysis, which is especially pronounced following intravenous administration. In the present study, we formulated tetrameric melittin-carrying poly-D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles (PLGA-NPs) and analyzed the lytic activity of this system on liposomes that resembles breast cancer cells. Tetrameric melittin binds avidly to PLGA-NPs with an encapsulation efficiency of 97% and retains its lytic activity demonstrating the effectiveness of PLGA-NPs as nanocarriers for this cytolytic peptide.

  12. Mathematical model of a PEMFC using a PBI membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheddie, Denver; Munroe, Norman

    2006-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) operating with Nafion[reg] membranes have encountered numerous problems associated with water management and CO poisoning because of their low temperature of operation. Alternative high temperature membranes have been investigated, one such membrane being polybenzimidazole (PBI). This paper presents a one dimensional mathematical model, which predicts the polarization performance of a PEMFC using a PBI membrane. Peak power densities in the same order as Nafion[reg] are predicted. Results indicate that the greatest scope for improving PBI PEMFC performance is increasing the membrane conductivity and improving the catalyst performance as it interfaces with the PBI membrane

  13. A statistical model describing combined irreversible electroporation and electroporation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Shirley; Kos, Bor; Last, David; Guez, David; Daniels, Dianne; Harnof, Sagi; Mardor, Yael; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2016-03-01

    Electroporation-based therapies such as electrochemotherapy (ECT) and irreversible electroporation (IRE) are emerging as promising tools for treatment of tumors. When applied to the brain, electroporation can also induce transient blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption in volumes extending beyond IRE, thus enabling efficient drug penetration. The main objective of this study was to develop a statistical model predicting cell death and BBB disruption induced by electroporation. This model can be used for individual treatment planning. Cell death and BBB disruption models were developed based on the Peleg-Fermi model in combination with numerical models of the electric field. The model calculates the electric field thresholds for cell kill and BBB disruption and describes the dependence on the number of treatment pulses. The model was validated using in vivo experimental data consisting of rats brains MRIs post electroporation treatments. Linear regression analysis confirmed that the model described the IRE and BBB disruption volumes as a function of treatment pulses number (r(2) = 0.79; p disruption, the ratio increased with the number of pulses. BBB disruption radii were on average 67% ± 11% larger than IRE volumes. The statistical model can be used to describe the dependence of treatment-effects on the number of pulses independent of the experimental setup.

  14. Modelling multi-ion plasma gun simulations of Tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    The effect of impurity ions in plasma gun ablation tests of various targets is considered. Inclusion of reasonable amounts of impurity (∼10%) is adequate to explain observed energy transmission and erosion measurements. The gun tests and the computer code calculations are relevant to the parameter range expected for major disruptions on large tokamaks

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of large integral membrane proteins with an implicit membrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Seiichiro; Feig, Michael

    2006-01-12

    The heterogeneous dielectric generalized Born (HDGB) methodology is an the extension of the GBMV model for the simulation of integral membrane proteins with an implicit membrane environment. Three large integral membrane proteins, the bacteriorhodopsin monomer and trimer and the BtuCD protein, were simulated with the HDGB model in order to evaluate how well thermodynamic and dynamic properties are reproduced. Effects of the truncation of electrostatic interactions were examined. For all proteins, the HDGB model was able to generate stable trajectories that remained close to the starting experimental structures, in excellent agreement with explicit membrane simulations. Dynamic properties evaluated through a comparison of B-factors are also in good agreement with experiment and explicit membrane simulations. However, overall flexibility was slightly underestimated with the HDGB model unless a very large electrostatic cutoff is employed. Results with the HDGB model are further compared with equivalent simulations in implicit aqueous solvent, demonstrating that the membrane environment leads to more realistic simulations.

  16. Skin barrier disruption by acetone: observations in a hairless mouse skin model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rissmann, R.; Oudshoorn, M.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834939; Hennink, W.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070880409; Ponec, M.; Bouwstra, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    To disrupt the barrier function of the skin, different in vivo methods have been established, e.g., by acetone wiping or tape-stripping. In this study, the acetone-induced barrier disruption of hairless mice was investigated in order to establish a reliable model to study beneficial, long-term

  17. Determination of membrane disruption and genomic DNA binding of cinnamaldehyde to Escherichia coli by use of microbiological and spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tian-Fu; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Zeng, Xin-An; Wang, Lang-Hong; Brennan, Charles S

    2018-01-01

    This work was aimed to investigate the antibacterial action of cinnamaldehyde (CIN) against Escherichia coli ATCC 8735 (E. coli) based on membrane fatty acid composition analysis, alterations of permeability and cell morphology as well as interaction with genomic DNA. Analysis of membrane fatty acids using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) and saturated fatty acids (SFA) were the major fatty acids in plasmic membrane, and their levels were significantly changed after exposure of E. coli to CIN at low concentrations. For example, the proportion of UFA decreased from 39.97% to 20.98%, while the relative content of SFA increased from 50.14% to 67.80% as E. coli was grown in increasing concentrations of CIN (from 0 to 0.88mM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the morphology of E. coli cells to be wrinkled, distorted and even lysed after exposure to CIN, which therefore decreased the cell viability. The binding of CIN to genomic DNA was probed using fluorescence, UV-Visible absorption spectra, circular dichroism, molecular modeling and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results indicated that CIN likely bound to the minor groove of genomic DNA, and changed the secondary structure and morphology of this biomacromolecule. Therefore, CIN can be deem as a kind of natural antimicrobial agents, which influence both cell membrane and genomic DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. MFI-molecular sieve membranes:synthesis, characterization and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Jareman, Fredrik

    2002-01-01

    This work concerns evaluation by permeation measurements and modeling of thin (<2µm) MFI molecular sieve membranes and, to a smaller extent, synthesis of such materials. The membranes have been synthesized on graded a-alumina microfiltration filters using The seed film method. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used for characterization in addition to permeation measurements. Mathematical models describing membrane flux for real membranes and defect distributions were ...

  19. Finite element modeling of lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng; Klug, William S.

    2006-12-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented for the study of biological membranes composed of lipid bilayers based on the finite element method. The classic model for these membranes employs a two-dimensional-fluid-like elastic constitutive law which is sensitive to curvature, and subjects vesicles to physically imposed constraints on surface area and volume. This model is implemented numerically via the use of C1-conforming triangular Loop subdivision finite elements. The validity of the framework is tested by computing equilibrium shapes from previously-determined axisymmetric shape-phase diagram of lipid bilayer vesicles with homogeneous material properties. Some of the benefits and challenges of finite element modeling of lipid bilayer systems are discussed, and it is indicated how this framework is natural for future investigation of biologically realistic bilayer structures involving nonaxisymmetric geometries, binding and adhesive interactions, heterogeneous mechanical properties, cytoskeletal interactions, and complex loading arrangements. These biologically relevant features have important consequences for the shape mechanics of nonidealized vesicles and cells, and their study requires not simply advances in theory, but also advances in numerical simulation techniques, such as those presented here.

  20. Studies on the biocidal and cell membrane disruption potentials of stem bark extracts of Afzelia africana (Smith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAVID A AKINPELU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We had recently reported antibacterial activity in the crude extract of the stem bark of Afzelia africana (Akinpelu et al., 2008. In this study, we assessed the biocidal and cell membrane disruption potentials of fractions obtained from the crude extract of the plant. The aqueous (AQ and butanol (BL fractions exhibited appreciable antibacterial activities against the test bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of the AQ and BL fractions ranged between 0.313 and 2.5 mg/ml, while their minimum bactericidal concentrations varied between 0.625 and 5.0 mg/ml. Also, the AQ fraction killed about 95.8% of E. coli cells within 105 min at a concentration of 5 mg/ml, while about 99.1% of Bacillus pumilus cells were killed by this fraction at the same concentration and exposure time. A similar trend was observed for the BL fraction. At a concentration of 5 mg/ml, the butanol fraction leaked 9.8 μg/ml of proteins from E. coli cells within 3 h, while the aqueous fraction leaked 6.5 μg/ml of proteins from the same organisms at the same concentration and exposure time. We propose that the stem bark of Afzelia africana is a potential source of bioactive compounds of importance to the pharmaceutical industry.

  1. Mitochondrial uncouplers act synergistically with the fumigant phosphine to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential and cause cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmas, Nicholas; Zuryn, Steven; Ebert, Paul R

    2008-10-30

    Phosphine is the most widely used fumigant for the protection of stored commodities against insect pests, especially food products such as grain. However, pest insects are developing resistance to phosphine and thereby threatening its future use. As phosphine inhibits cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and reduces the strength of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)), we reasoned that mitochondrial uncouplers should act synergistically with phosphine. The mitochondrial uncouplers FCCP and PCP caused complete mortality in populations of both wild-type and phosphine-resistant lines of Caenorhabditis elegans simultaneously exposed to uncoupler and phosphine at concentrations that were individually nonlethal. Strong synergism was also observed with a third uncoupler DNP. We have also tested an alternative complex IV inhibitor, azide, with FCCP and found that this also caused a synergistic enhancement of toxicity in C. elegans. To investigate potential causes of the synergism, we measured DeltaPsi(m), ATP content, and oxidative damage (lipid hydroperoxides) in nematodes subjected to phosphine-FCCP treatment and found that neither an observed 50% depletion in ATP nor oxidative stress accounted for the synergistic effect. Instead, a synergistic reduction in DeltaPsi(m) was observed upon phosphine-FCCP co-treatment suggesting that this is directly responsible for the subsequent mortality. These results support the hypothesis that phosphine-induced mortality results from the in vivo disruption of normal mitochondrial activity. Furthermore, we have identified a novel pathway that can be targeted to overcome genetic resistance to phosphine.

  2. Disruption of the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) plays a central role in palmitic acid-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjo, Satoko; Jiang, Shuying; Nameta, Masaaki; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kanai, Mai; Nomura, Yuta; Goda, Nobuhito

    2017-10-01

    The mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) is a specialized subdomain of ER that physically connects with mitochondria. Although disruption of inter-organellar crosstalk via the MAM impairs cellular homeostasis, its pathological significance in insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus remains unclear. Here, we reveal the importance of reduced MAM formation in the induction of fatty acid-evoked insulin resistance in hepatocytes. Palmitic acid (PA) repressed insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in HepG2 cells within 12h. Treatment with an inhibitor of the ER stress response failed to restore PA-mediated suppression of Akt activation. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production did not increase in PA-treated cells. Even short-term exposure (3h) to PA reduced the calcium flux from ER to mitochondria, followed by a significant decrease in MAM contact area, suggesting that PA suppressed the functional interaction between ER and mitochondria. Forced expression of mitofusin-2, a critical component of the MAM, partially restored MAM contact area and ameliorated the PA-elicited suppression of insulin sensitivity with Ser473 phosphorylation of Akt selectively improved. These results suggest that loss of proximity between ER and mitochondria, but not perturbation of homeostasis in the two organelles individually, plays crucial roles in PA-evoked Akt inactivation in hepatic insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling of the axon membrane skeleton structure and implications for its mechanical properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihao Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution microscopy recently revealed that, unlike the soma and dendrites, the axon membrane skeleton is structured as a series of actin rings connected by spectrin filaments that are held under tension. Currently, the structure-function relationship of the axonal structure is unclear. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM to show that the stiffness of the axon plasma membrane is significantly higher than the stiffnesses of dendrites and somata. To examine whether the structure of the axon plasma membrane determines its overall stiffness, we introduced a coarse-grain molecular dynamics model of the axon membrane skeleton that reproduces the structure identified by super-resolution microscopy. Our proposed computational model accurately simulates the median value of the Young's modulus of the axon plasma membrane determined by atomic force microscopy. It also predicts that because the spectrin filaments are under entropic tension, the thermal random motion of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav, which are bound to ankyrin particles, a critical axonal protein, is reduced compared to the thermal motion when spectrin filaments are held at equilibrium. Lastly, our model predicts that because spectrin filaments are under tension, any axonal injuries that lacerate spectrin filaments will likely lead to a permanent disruption of the membrane skeleton due to the inability of spectrin filaments to spontaneously form their initial under-tension configuration.

  4. Zeolite Membranes: Ozone Detemplation, Modeling, and Performance Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, J.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane technology plays an increasingly important role in developing a more sustainable process industry. Zeolites are a novel class of membrane materials with unique properties enabling molecular sieving and affinity based separations. This thesis proposes some new concepts in zeolite membrane synthesis, application, and modeling. The influence of zeolite polarity is assessed and the use of a hydrophobic zeolite membrane for water separation is explored. Ozonication, a novel method for zeo...

  5. A general model for membrane-based separation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soni, Vipasha; Abildskov, Jens; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2009-01-01

    behaviour will play an important role. In this paper, modelling of membrane-based processes for separation of gas and liquid mixtures are considered. Two general models, one for membrane-based liquid separation processes (with phase change) and another for membrane-based gas separation are presented....... The separation processes covered are: membrane-based gas separation processes, pervaporation and various types of membrane distillation processes. The specific model for each type of membrane-based process is generated from the two general models by applying the specific system descriptions and the corresponding......A separation process could be defined as a process that transforms a given mixture of chemicals into two or more compositionally distinct end-use products. One way to design these separation processes is to employ a model-based approach, where mathematical models that reliably predict the process...

  6. Detailed modelling and optimal design of membrane separation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Marriott, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    The search for alternatives to traditional energy intensive separation methods such as distillation has led to the introduction of processes based on membranes. In this research, the use of detailed mathematical models for the optimal design of membrane systems is investigated. Mathematical models of hollow-fibre and spiral-wound membrane modules are presented in this thesis. The models are developed from rigorous mass, momentum and energy balances and can be used to describ...

  7. Atomic force microscopy of model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandat, Sandrine; Azouzi, Slim; Beauvais, Estelle; Mastouri, Amira; El Kirat, Karim

    2013-02-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are biomimetic model systems that are now widely used to address the biophysical and biochemical properties of biological membranes. Two main methods are usually employed to form SLBs: the transfer of two successive monolayers by Langmuir-Blodgett or Langmuir-Schaefer techniques, and the fusion of preformed lipid vesicles. The transfer of lipid films on flat solid substrates offers the possibility to apply a wide range of surface analytical techniques that are very sensitive. Among them, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened new opportunities for determining the nanoscale organization of SLBs under physiological conditions. In this review, we first focus on the different protocols generally employed to prepare SLBs. Then, we describe AFM studies on the nanoscale lateral organization and mechanical properties of SLBs. Lastly, we survey recent developments in the AFM monitoring of bilayer alteration, remodeling, or digestion, by incubation with exogenous agents such as drugs, proteins, peptides, and nanoparticles.

  8. Membrane disrupting lytic peptide conjugates destroy hormone dependent and independent breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuschner, Carola; Enright, Frederick M; Gawronska, Barbara; Hansel, William

    2003-03-01

    We have prepared conjugates of a membrane disrupting lytic peptide (hecate) and a 15-amino acid segment of the beta-chain of CG and hecate and the decapeptide, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH). We have tested the concept that these conjugates will target breast cancer cells expressing LH/CG or LHRH receptors. In previous studies, we were able to destroy prostate cancers in vitro and in vivo with lytic peptide conjugates. Hecate, hecate-betaCG and LHRH-hecate were added to cultures of the human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-435S. Hecate and its conjugates showed concentration dependent toxicity to both cell lines. The lytic peptide alone showed similar EC50 values for both cell lines; however, there was a significant difference between the EC50 values when the conjugates were tested. The hormone dependent MCF-7 cell line was less sensitive to the betaCG conjugate than to the LHRH conjugate; the reverse was found for the hormone independent MDA-MB-435S cells. Removal of steroids decreased the sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to both lytic peptide conjugates and this sensitivity could be restored by adding estradiol. Activation of protein kinase C further increased the sensitivity to the drug. MDA-MB-435S xenografts were established in intact female athymic nude mice, which were treated once a week for 3 weeks with hecate-betaCG via the lateral tail vein. The ability of hecate-betaCG to destroy xenografts of human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-435S) in nude mice was demonstrated for the first time. We conclude that hecate-betaCG and LHRH-hecate conjugates could serve as useful drugs for the treatment of breast cancer.

  9. Disruption management in the airline industry-Concepts, models and methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jens; Larsen, Allan; Larsen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a thorough review of the current state-of-the-art within airline disruption management of resources, including aircraft, crew, passenger and integrated recovery. An overview of model formulations of the aircraft and crew scheduling problems is presented in order to emphasize...... similarities between solution approaches applied to the planning and recovery problems. A brief overview of research within schedule robustness in airline scheduling is included in the review, since this proactive measure is a natural complement to disruption management....

  10. Simulations of simple linoleic acid-containing lipid membranes and models for the soybean plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaohong; Ou, Anna; Klauda, Jeffery B.

    2017-06-01

    The all-atom CHARMM36 lipid force field (C36FF) has been tested with saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated lipids; however, it has not been validated against the 18:2 linoleoyl lipids with an unsaturated sn-1 chain. The linoleoyl lipids are common in plants and the main component of the soybean membrane. The lipid composition of soybean plasma membranes has been thoroughly characterized with experimental studies. However, there is comparatively less work done with computational modeling. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results show that the pure linoleoyl lipids, 1-stearoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0/18:2) and 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (di-18:2), agree very well with the experiments, which demonstrates the accuracy of the C36FF for the computational study of soybean membranes. Based on the experimental composition, the soybean hypocotyl and root plasma membrane models are developed with each containing seven or eight types of linoleoyl phospholipids and two types of sterols (sitosterol and stigmasterol). MD simulations are performed to characterize soybean membranes, and the hydrogen bonds and clustering results demonstrate that the lipids prefer to interact with the lipids of the same/similar tail unsaturation. All the results suggest that these two soybean membrane models can be used as a basis for further research in soybean and higher plant membranes involving membrane-associated proteins.

  11. Business Model as an Inducer of Disruptive Innovations: The Case of Gol Airlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirlei de Almeida Pereira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to investigate the premises that the success of disruptive innovation is related to the business model adopted by organizations. An analysis of five business models from the literature review - Bovet and Martha (2000, Applegate (2001, Chesbrough and Rosenbloom (2002, Osterwalder and Pigneur (2010, and Rodrigues, Maccari and Lenzi (2012 – was conducted based on the case of the Brazilian Gol Airlines who is recognized as a success business that promoted a disruptive innovation. The results suggest that the assertive choice of the business model can leverage innovation processes, and two of the models listed are adherence to the case studied. Keywords: Disruptive Innovation; Business Model; Innovation Elements; Strategy; Gol Airlines.

  12. Polyether sulfone membrane modeling and construction for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polyether sulfone membrane modeling and construction for the removal of nitrate from water using ion interference sulfate and iron nano-particle. ... The aim of this study was constructed the polyether sulfone membrane and modelling it, and for checking impact pressure, the amount of iron nanoparticles and sulfate iron ...

  13. Models of dynamic extraction of lipid tethers from cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Sarah A; Chou, Tom

    2010-01-01

    When a ligand that is bound to an integral membrane receptor is pulled, the membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton can deform before either the membrane delaminates from the cytoskeleton or the ligand detaches from the receptor. If the membrane delaminates from the cytoskeleton, it may be further extruded and form a membrane tether. We develop a phenomenological model for this process by assuming that deformations obey Hooke's law up to a critical force at which the cell membrane locally detaches from the cytoskeleton and a membrane tether forms. We compute the probability of tether formation and show that tethers can be extruded only within an intermediate range of force loading rates and pulling velocities. The mean tether length that arises at the moment of ligand detachment is computed as are the force loading rates and pulling velocities that yield the longest tethers

  14. Modelling Ser129 phosphorylation inhibits membrane binding of pore-forming alpha-synuclein oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Sebastian Nübling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In several neurodegenerative diseases, hyperphosphorylation at position Ser129 is found in fibrillar deposits of alpha-synuclein (asyn, implying a pathophysiological role of asyn phosphorylation in neurodegeneration. However, recent animal models applying asyn phosphorylation mimics demonstrated a protective effect of phosphorylation. Since metal-ion induced asyn oligomers were identified as a potential neurotoxic aggregate species with membrane pore-forming abilities, the current study was undertaken to determine effects of asyn phosphorylation on oligomer membrane binding. METHODS: We investigated the influence of S129 phosphorylation on interactions of metal-ion induced asyn oligomers with small unilamellar lipid vesicles (SUV composed of POPC and DPPC applying the phosphorylation mimic asyn129E. Confocal single-particle fluorescence techniques were used to monitor membrane binding at the single-particle level. RESULTS: Binding of asyn129E monomers to gel-state membranes (DPPC-SUV is slightly reduced compared to wild-type asyn, while no interactions with membranes in the liquid-crystalline state (POPC-SUV are seen for both asyn and asyn129E. Conversely, metal-ion induced oligomer formation is markedly increased in asyn129E. Surprisingly, membrane binding to POPC-SUV is nearly absent in Fe(3+ induced asyn129E oligomers and markedly reduced in Al(3+ induced oligomers. CONCLUSION: The protective effect of pseudophosphorylation seen in animal models may be due to impeded oligomer membrane binding. Phosphorylation at Ser129 may thus have a protective effect against neurotoxic asyn oligomers by preventing oligomer membrane binding and disruption of the cellular electrophysiological equilibrium. Importantly, these findings put a new complexion on experimental pharmaceutical interventions against POLO-2 kinase.

  15. Flexoelectric effects in model and native membranes containing ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A G; Miller, B A; Hristova, K; Usherwood, P N

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study of flexoelectricity in model membranes containing ion pores and native membranes containing ion channels has been undertaken with the objective of determining the relationship, if any, between flexoelectricity and ion transport. Model membrane patches containing ion pores induced by a blue-green algal toxin, microcystin-LR, and locust muscle membrane patches containing potassium channels were studied using patch-clamp techniques. A correspondence was established between the presence of open channels and pores and the amplitude of the 1st harmonic of the total membrane current when the membranes or patches were subjected to pressure oscillations. The 2nd harmonic of the membrane current provided a measure of the amplitude of a membrane curvature induced by pressure, thus making it possible to determine the membrane flexoelectric coefficient. This study shows that flexoelectricity could be an effective driving force for ion transport through membrane pores and channels, thus further highlighting the possible biological significance of this mechano-electric phenomenon.

  16. Spatiotemporal Organization of Spin-Coated Supported Model Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    All cells of living organisms are separated from their surroundings and organized internally by means of flexible lipid membranes. In fact, there is consensus that the minimal requirements for self-replicating life processes include the following three features: (1) information carriers (DNA, RNA), (2) a metabolic system, and (3) encapsulation in a container structure [1]. Therefore, encapsulation can be regarded as an essential part of life itself. In nature, membranes are highly diverse interfacial structures that compartmentalize cells [2]. While prokaryotic cells only have an outer plasma membrane and a less-well-developed internal membrane structure, eukaryotic cells have a number of internal membranes associated with the organelles and the nucleus. Many of these membrane structures, including the plasma membrane, are complex layered systems, but with the basic structure of a lipid bilayer. Biomembranes contain hundreds of different lipid species in addition to embedded or peripherally associated membrane proteins and connections to scaffolds such as the cytoskeleton. In vitro, lipid bilayers are spontaneously self-organized structures formed by a large group of amphiphilic lipid molecules in aqueous suspensions. Bilayer formation is driven by the entropic properties of the hydrogen bond network in water in combination with the amphiphilic nature of the lipids. The molecular shapes of the lipid constituents play a crucial role in bilayer formation, and only lipids with approximately cylindrical shapes are able to form extended bilayers. The bilayer structure of biomembranes was discovered by Gorter and Grendel in 1925 [3] using monolayer studies of lipid extracts from red blood cells. Later, a number of conceptual models were developed to rationalize the organization of lipids and proteins in biological membranes. One of the most celebrated is the fluid-mosaic model by Singer and Nicolson (1972) [4]. According to this model, the lipid bilayer component of

  17. Novel thermal efficiency-based model for determination of thermal conductivity of membrane distillation membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanneste, Johan; Bush, John A.; Hickenbottom, Kerri L.; Marks, Christopher A.; Jassby, David

    2017-01-01

    Development and selection of membranes for membrane distillation (MD) could be accelerated if all performance-determining characteristics of the membrane could be obtained during MD operation without the need to recur to specialized or cumbersome porosity or thermal conductivity measurement techniques. By redefining the thermal efficiency, the Schofield method could be adapted to describe the flux without prior knowledge of membrane porosity, thickness, or thermal conductivity. A total of 17 commercially available membranes were analyzed in terms of flux and thermal efficiency to assess their suitability for application in MD. The thermal-efficiency based model described the flux with an average %RMSE of 4.5%, which was in the same range as the standard deviation on the measured flux. The redefinition of the thermal efficiency also enabled MD to be used as a novel thermal conductivity measurement device for thin porous hydrophobic films that cannot be measured with the conventional laser flash diffusivity technique.

  18. Performance modeling of direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) seawater desalination process using a commercial composite membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Junggil

    2015-01-10

    This paper presents the development of a rigorous theoretical model to predict the transmembrane flux of a flat sheet hydrophobic composite membrane, comprising both an active layer of polytetrafluoroethylene and a scrim-backing support layer of polypropylene, in the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process. An integrated model includes the mass, momentum, species and energy balances for both retentate and permeate flows, coupled with the mass transfer of water vapor through the composite membrane and the heat transfer across the membrane and through the boundary layers adjacent to the membrane surfaces. Experimental results and model predictions for permeate flux and performance ratio are compared and shown to be in good agreement. The permeate flux through the composite layer can be ignored in the consideration of mass transfer pathways at the composite membrane. The effect of the surface porosity and the thickness of active and support layers on the process performance of composite membrane has also been studied. Among these parameters, surface porosity is identified to be the main factor significantly influencing the permeate flux and performance ratio, while the relative influence of the surface porosity on the performance ratio is less than that on flux.

  19. An Integrated Framework Advancing Membrane Protein Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca F Alford

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are critical functional molecules in the human body, constituting more than 30% of open reading frames in the human genome. Unfortunately, a myriad of difficulties in overexpression and reconstitution into membrane mimetics severely limit our ability to determine their structures. Computational tools are therefore instrumental to membrane protein structure prediction, consequently increasing our understanding of membrane protein function and their role in disease. Here, we describe a general framework facilitating membrane protein modeling and design that combines the scientific principles for membrane protein modeling with the flexible software architecture of Rosetta3. This new framework, called RosettaMP, provides a general membrane representation that interfaces with scoring, conformational sampling, and mutation routines that can be easily combined to create new protocols. To demonstrate the capabilities of this implementation, we developed four proof-of-concept applications for (1 prediction of free energy changes upon mutation; (2 high-resolution structural refinement; (3 protein-protein docking; and (4 assembly of symmetric protein complexes, all in the membrane environment. Preliminary data show that these algorithms can produce meaningful scores and structures. The data also suggest needed improvements to both sampling routines and score functions. Importantly, the applications collectively demonstrate the potential of combining the flexible nature of RosettaMP with the power of Rosetta algorithms to facilitate membrane protein modeling and design.

  20. Endocytosed 2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibrils Induce Necrosis and Apoptosis of Rabbit Synovial Fibroblasts by Disrupting Endosomal/Lysosomal Membranes: A Novel Mechanism on the Cytotoxicity of Amyloid Fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadakazu Okoshi

    Full Text Available Dialysis-related amyloidosis is a major complication in long-term hemodialysis patients. In dialysis-related amyloidosis, β2-microglobulin (β2-m amyloid fibrils deposit in the osteoarticular tissue, leading to carpal tunnel syndrome and destructive arthropathy with cystic bone lesions, but the mechanism by which these amyloid fibrils destruct bone and joint tissue is not fully understood. In this study, we assessed the cytotoxic effect of β2-m amyloid fibrils on the cultured rabbit synovial fibroblasts. Under light microscopy, the cells treated with amyloid fibrils exhibited both necrotic and apoptotic changes, while the cells treated with β2-m monomers and vehicle buffer exhibited no morphological changes. As compared to β2-m monomers and vehicle buffer, β2-m amyloid fibrils significantly reduced cellular viability as measured by the lactate dehydrogenase release assay and the 3-(4,5-di-methylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction assay and significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells as measured by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method. β2-m amyloid fibrils added to the medium adhered to cell surfaces, but did not disrupt artificial plasma membranes as measured by the liposome dye release assay. Interestingly, when the cells were incubated with amyloid fibrils for several hours, many endosomes/lysosomes filled with amyloid fibrils were observed under confocal laser microscopy and electron microscopy, Moreover, some endosomal/lysosomal membranes were disrupted by intravesicular fibrils, leading to the leakage of the fibrils into the cytosol and adjacent to mitochondria. Inhibition of actin-dependent endocytosis by cytochalasin D attenuated the toxicity of amyloid fibrils. These results suggest that endocytosed β2-m amyloid fibrils induce necrosis and apoptosis by disrupting endosomal/lysosomal membranes, and this novel mechanism on the cytotoxicity of amyloid

  1. There Is No Simple Model of the Plasma Membrane Organization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de la serna, J. B.; Schütz, G.; Eggeling, Ch.; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, SEP 2016 (2016), 106 ISSN 2296-634X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-06989S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : plasma membrane * membrane organization models * heterogeneous distribution Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  2. COMPUTATION MODELING OF TCDD DISRUPTION OF B CELL TERMINAL DIFFERENTIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we established a computational model describing the molecular circuit underlying B cell terminal differentiation and how TCDD may affect this process by impinging upon various molecular targets.

  3. How Can Blockchain Technology Disrupt the Existing Business Models?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Nowiński

    2017-09-01

    Contribution & Value Added: This study provides an analysis of the possible impact of blockchain technology on business model innovation. Blockchain technology is gaining momentum with more and more diverse applications, as well as increasing numbers of actors involved in its applications. This paper contributes to our understanding of the possible applications of blockchain technology to businesses, and in particular to its impact on business models.

  4. A stochastic inventory management model for a dual sourcing supply chain with disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovou, Eleftherios; Vlachos, Dimitrios; Xanthopoulos, Anastasios

    2010-03-01

    As companies continue to globalise their operations and outsource significant portion of their value chain activities, they often end up relying heavily on order replenishments from distant suppliers. The explosion in long-distance sourcing is exposing supply chains and shareholder value at ever increasing operational and disruption risks. It is well established, both in academia and in real-world business environments, that resource flexibility is an effective method for hedging against supply chain disruption risks. In this contextual framework, we propose a single period stochastic inventory decision-making model that could be employed for capturing the trade-off between inventory policies and disruption risks for an unreliable dual sourcing supply network for both the capacitated and uncapacitated cases. Through the developed model, we obtain some important managerial insights and evaluate the merit of contingency strategies in managing uncertain supply chains.

  5. Mutations in BIN1 associated with centronuclear myopathy disrupt membrane remodeling by affecting protein density and oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Wu

    Full Text Available The regulation of membrane shapes is central to many cellular phenomena. Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR domain-containing proteins are key players for membrane remodeling during endocytosis, cell migration, and endosomal sorting. BIN1, which contains an N-BAR domain, is assumed to be essential for biogenesis of plasma membrane invaginations (T-tubules in muscle tissues. Three mutations, K35N, D151N and R154Q, have been discovered so far in the BAR domain of BIN1 in patients with centronuclear myopathy (CNM, where impaired organization of T-tubules has been reported. However, molecular mechanisms behind this malfunction have remained elusive. None of the BIN1 disease mutants displayed a significantly compromised curvature sensing ability. However, two mutants showed impaired membrane tubulation both in vivo and in vitro, and displayed characteristically different behaviors. R154Q generated smaller membrane curvature compared to WT N-BAR. Quantification of protein density on membranes revealed a lower membrane-bound density for R154Q compared to WT and the other mutants, which appeared to be the primary reason for the observation of impaired deformation capacity. The D151N mutant was unable to tubulate liposomes under certain experimental conditions. At medium protein concentrations we found 'budding' structures on liposomes that we hypothesized to be intermediates during the tubulation process except for the D151N mutant. Chemical crosslinking assays suggested that the D151N mutation impaired protein oligomerization upon membrane binding. Although we found an insignificant difference between WT and K35N N-BAR in in vitro assays, depolymerizing actin in live cells allowed tubulation of plasma membranes through the K35N mutant. Our results provide insights into the membrane-involved pathophysiological mechanisms leading to human disease.

  6. Simple membrane-based model of the Min oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Min proteins in E. coli bacteria organize into a dynamic pattern oscillating between the two cell poles. This process identifies the middle of the cell and enables symmetric cell division. In an experimental model system consisting of a flat membrane with effectively infinite supply of proteins and energy source, the Min proteins assemble into travelling waves. Here we propose a simple one-dimensional model of the Min dynamics that, unlike the existing models, reproduces the sharp decrease of Min concentration when the majority of protein detaches from the membrane, and even the narrow MinE maximum immediately preceding the detachment. The proposed model thus provides a possible mechanism for the formation of the MinE ring known from cells. The model is restricted to one dimension, with protein interactions described by chemical kinetics allowing at most bimolecular reactions, and explicitly considering only three, membrane-bound, species. The bulk solution above the membrane is approximated as being well-mixed, with constant concentrations of all species. Unlike other models, our proposal does not require autocatalytic binding of MinD to the membrane. Instead, it is assumed that two MinE molecules are necessary to induce the dissociation of the MinD dimer and its subsequent detachment from the membrane. We investigate which reaction schemes lead to unstable homogeneous steady states and limit cycle oscillations, and how diffusion affects their stability. The suggested model qualitatively describes the shape of the Min waves observed on flat membranes, and agrees with the experimental dependence of the wave period on the MinE concentration. These results highlight the importance of MinE presence on the membrane without being bound to MinD, and of the reactions of Min proteins on the membrane.

  7. Simple membrane-based model of the Min oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Min proteins in E. coli bacteria organize into a dynamic pattern oscillating between the two cell poles. This process identifies the middle of the cell and enables symmetric cell division. In an experimental model system consisting of a flat membrane with effectively infinite supply of proteins and energy source, the Min proteins assemble into travelling waves. Here we propose a simple one-dimensional model of the Min dynamics that, unlike the existing models, reproduces the sharp decrease of Min concentration when the majority of protein detaches from the membrane, and even the narrow MinE maximum immediately preceding the detachment. The proposed model thus provides a possible mechanism for the formation of the MinE ring known from cells. The model is restricted to one dimension, with protein interactions described by chemical kinetics allowing at most bimolecular reactions, and explicitly considering only three, membrane-bound, species. The bulk solution above the membrane is approximated as being well-mixed, with constant concentrations of all species. Unlike other models, our proposal does not require autocatalytic binding of MinD to the membrane. Instead, it is assumed that two MinE molecules are necessary to induce the dissociation of the MinD dimer and its subsequent detachment from the membrane. We investigate which reaction schemes lead to unstable homogeneous steady states and limit cycle oscillations, and how diffusion affects their stability. The suggested model qualitatively describes the shape of the Min waves observed on flat membranes, and agrees with the experimental dependence of the wave period on the MinE concentration. These results highlight the importance of MinE presence on the membrane without being bound to MinD, and of the reactions of Min proteins on the membrane. (paper)

  8. Recent Insights in Islet Amyloid Polypeptide-Induced Membrane Disruption and Its Role in β-Cell Death in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Khemtémourian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of fibrillar protein deposits (amyloid of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans is thought to be related to death of the insulin-producing islet β-cells in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2. The mechanism of hIAPP-induced β-cell death is not understood. However, there is growing evidence that hIAPP-induced disruption of β-cell membranes is the cause of hIAPP cytotoxicity. Amyloid cytotoxicity by membrane damage has not only been suggested for hIAPP, but also for peptides and proteins related to other misfolding diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and prion diseases. Here we review the interaction of hIAPP with membranes, and discuss recent progress in the field, with a focus on hIAPP structure and on the proposed mechanisms of hIAPP-induced membrane damage in relation to β-cell death in DM2.

  9. Design and membrane-disruption mechanism of charge-enriched AMPs exhibiting cell selectivity, high-salt resistance, and anti-biofilm properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyo Mi; Gopal, Ramamourthy; Park, Yoonkyung

    2016-02-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are essential components of the innate immune system, offering protection against invading pathogenic bacteria. In nature, AMPs serve as antibiotics with broad-spectrum antimicrobial and anti-biofilm properties. However, low effective stability in high-salt environments and physiological instability in biological membranes limit the applicability of naturally occurring AMPs as novel therapeutics. We therefore designed short synthetic cationic peptides by substituting key residues in myxinidin, an AMP derived from the epidermal mucus of hagfish, with lysine (Lys, K), arginine (Arg, R), and tryptophan (Trp, W). The resultant myxinidin analogs exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains, even under high-salt conditions. Moreover, these peptides showed high binding affinity for both lipopolysaccharides and lipoteichoic acids and inhibited biofilm formation by most bacteria, but did not cause significant lysis of human red blood cells and were not cytotoxic to normal human keratinocytes. Circular dichroism analysis revealed that myxinidin and its analogs assumed α-helical or β-sheet structures within artificial liposomes and bacterial membranes. In addition, bacterial killing and membrane permeation experiments demonstrated that the myxinidin analogs permeated through bacterial membranes, leading to cytoplasmic disruption and cell death. Taken together, these findings suggest myxinidin analogs may be promising candidate antibiotic agents for therapeutic application against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  10. T-tubule disruption promotes calcium alternans in failing ventricular myocytes: mechanistic insights from computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivala, Michael; Song, Zhen; Weiss, James N; Qu, Zhilin

    2015-02-01

    In heart failure (HF), T-tubule (TT) disruption contributes to dyssynchronous calcium (Ca) release and impaired contraction, but its role in arrhythmogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the effects of TT disruption and other HF remodeling factors on Ca alternans in ventricular myocytes using computer modeling. A ventricular myocyte model with detailed spatiotemporal Ca cycling modeled by a coupled Ca release unit (CRU) network was used, in which the L-type Ca channels and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels were simulated by random Markov transitions. TT disruption, which removes the L-type Ca channels from the associated CRUs, results in "orphaned" RyR clusters and thus provides increased opportunity for spark-induced Ca sparks to occur. This effect combined with other HF remodeling factors promoted alternans by two distinct mechanisms: 1) for normal sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca ATPase (SERCA) activity, alternans was caused by both CRU refractoriness and coupling. The increased opportunity for spark-induced sparks by TT disruption combined with the enhanced CRU coupling by Ca elevation in the presence or absence of increased RyR leakiness facilitated spark synchronization on alternate beats to promote Ca alternans; 2) for down-regulated SERCA, alternans was caused by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load-dependent mechanism, independent of CRU refractoriness. TT disruption and increased RyR leakiness shifted and steepened the SR Ca release-load relationship, which combines with down-regulated SERCA to promote Ca alternans. In conclusion, the mechanisms of Ca alternans for normal and down-regulated SERCA are different, and TT disruption promotes Ca alternans by both mechanisms, which may contribute to alternans at different stages of HF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. There Is No Simple Model of the Plasma Membrane Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Schütz, Gerhard J.; Eggeling, Christian; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Ever since technologies enabled the characterization of eukaryotic plasma membranes, heterogeneities in the distributions of its constituents were observed. Over the years this led to the proposal of various models describing the plasma membrane organization such as lipid shells, picket-and-fences, lipid rafts, or protein islands, as addressed in numerous publications and reviews. Instead of emphasizing on one model we in this review give a brief overview over current models and highlight how current experimental work in one or the other way do not support the existence of a single overarching model. Instead, we highlight the vast variety of membrane properties and components, their influences and impacts. We believe that highlighting such controversial discoveries will stimulate unbiased research on plasma membrane organization and functionality, leading to a better understanding of this essential cellular structure. PMID:27747212

  12. A theoretical model for gas permeability in a composite membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, D. A

    2009-01-01

    We present in this work an analytical expression for permeability in a two-layer composite membrane, which was derived assuming the same hypothesis as those of Adzumi model for permeability in a homogeneous membrane. Whereas in Adzumi model permeability shows a linear dependence on the mean pressure, our model for a composite membrane related permeability to pressure through a rather complex expression, which covers the whole range of flow, from molecular-Knudsen to viscous-Poiseuille regimes. The expression obtained for permeability contained information of membrane structural properties as pore size, porosity and thickness of each layer, as well as gas nature and operational conditions. Our two-layer-model expression turns into Adzumi formula when the structure of the layers approach to each other. [es

  13. Modeling of a Membrane-Based Absorption Heat Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, J.; Pellegrino, J.; Kozubal, E.; Slayzak, S.; Burch, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a membrane heat pump is proposed and analyzed. Fundamentally, the proposed heat pump consists of an aqueous CaCl{sub 2} solution flow separated from a water flow by a vapor-permeable membrane. The low activity of the solution results in a net flux of water vapor across the membrane, which heats the solution stream and cools the water stream. This mechanism upgrades water-side low-temperature heat to solution-side high-temperature heat, creating a 'temperature lift.' The modeling results show that using two membranes and an air gap instead of a single membrane increases the temperature lift by 185%. The model predicts temperature lifts for the air-gap design of 24, 16, and 6 C for inlet temperatures of 55, 35, and 15 C, respectively. Membranes with lower thermal conductivities and higher porosities improve the performance of single-membrane designs while thinner membranes improve the performance of air-gap designs. This device can be used with a solar heating system which already uses concentrated salt solutions for liquid-desiccant cooling.

  14. QSAR models for reproductive toxicity and endocrine disruption in regulatory use – a preliminary investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gunde Egeskov; Niemelä, Jay Russell; Wedebye, Eva Bay

    2008-01-01

    the new legislation. This article focuses on a screening exercise by use of our own and commercial QSAR models for identification of possible reproductive toxicants. Three QSAR models were used for reproductive toxicity for the endpoints teratogenic risk to humans (based on animal tests, clinical data...... for humans owing to possible developmental toxic effects: Xn (Harmful) and R63 (Possible risk of harm to the unborn child). The chemicals were also screened in three models for endocrine disruption....

  15. Modeling resilience, friability, and cost of an airport affected by the large-scale disruptive event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janic, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with modeling resilience, friability, and cost of an airport affected by the largescale disruptive event. These events affecting the airport's operations individually or in combination can be bad weather, failures of particular crucial aiiport and ATC (Air Traffic Control)

  16. A theoretical model to address organizational human conflict and disruptive behavior in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes a theoretical model for leaders to use to address organizational human conflict and disruptive behavior in health care organizations. Leadership is needed to improve interpersonal relationships within the workforce. A workforce with a culture of internal conflict will be unable to achieve its full potential to delivery quality patient care.

  17. Dynamic modeling of ultrafiltration membranes for whey separation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saltık, M.B.; Özkan, Leyla; Jacobs, Marc; Padt, van der Albert

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a control relevant rigorous dynamic model for an ultrafiltration membrane unit in a whey separation process. The model consists of a set of differential algebraic equations and is developed for online model based applications such as model based control and process

  18. A model for technology assessment and commercialization for innovative disruptive technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KASSICIEH, SULEIMAN K.; WALSH, STEVE; MCWHORTER,PAUL J.; CUMMINGS JR.,JOHN C.; WILLIAMS,W. DAVID; ROMIG JR.,ALTON D.

    2000-05-17

    Disruptive technologies are scientific discoveries that break through the usual product technology capabilities and provide a basis for a new competitive paradigm as described by Anderson and Tushman [1990], Tushman and Rosenkopf [1992], and Bower and Christensen [1995]. Discontinuous innovations are products/processes/services that provide exponential improvements in the value received by the customer much in the same vein as Walsh [1996], Lynn, Morone and Paulson [1996], and Veryzer [1998]. For more on definitions of disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations, see Walsh and Linton [1999] who provide a number of definitions for disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations. Disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations present a unique challenge and opportunity for R and D organizations seeking to build their commercialization efforts and to reinvent the corporation. These technologies do not have a proven path from scientific discovery to mass production and therefore require novel approaches. These critically important technologies are the wellspring of wealth creation and new competency generation but are not readily accepted by the corporate community. They are alternatively embraced and eschewed by the commercial community. They are finally accepted when the technology has already affected the industry or when the technological horse has already flown out of the hanger. Many firms, especially larger firms, seem reluctant to familiarize themselves with these technologies quickly. The trend seems to be that these firms prefer to react to a proven disruptive technology that has changed the product market paradigm. If true, then there is cause for concern. This paper will review the literature on disruptive technologies presenting a model of the progression from scientific idea to mass production for disruptive technologies contrasted to the more copious incremental technologies. The paper will then describe Sandia National Laboratories

  19. Interaction of multiple biomimetic antimicrobial polymers with model bacterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baul, Upayan, E-mail: upayanb@imsc.res.in; Vemparala, Satyavani, E-mail: vani@imsc.res.in [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, C.I.T. Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India); Kuroda, Kenichi, E-mail: kkuroda@umich.edu [Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, interaction of multiple synthetic random copolymers based on methacrylates on prototypical bacterial membranes is investigated. The simulations show that the cationic polymers form a micellar aggregate in water phase and the aggregate, when interacting with the bacterial membrane, induces clustering of oppositely charged anionic lipid molecules to form clusters and enhances ordering of lipid chains. The model bacterial membrane, consequently, develops lateral inhomogeneity in membrane thickness profile compared to polymer-free system. The individual polymers in the aggregate are released into the bacterial membrane in a phased manner and the simulations suggest that the most probable location of the partitioned polymers is near the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) clusters. The partitioned polymers preferentially adopt facially amphiphilic conformations at lipid-water interface, despite lacking intrinsic secondary structures such as α-helix or β-sheet found in naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides.

  20. Phase-field theories for mathematical modeling of biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, Guillermo R; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Hernández-Machado, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex structures whose mechanics are usually described at a mesoscopic level, such as the Helfrich bending theory. In this article, we present the phase-field methods, a useful tool for studying complex membrane problems which can be applied to very different phenomena. We start with an overview of the general theory of elasticity, paying special attention to its derivation from a molecular scale. We then study the particular case of membrane elasticity, explicitly obtaining the Helfrich bending energy. Within the framework of this theory, we derive a phase-field model for biological membranes and explore its physical basis and interpretation in terms of membrane elasticity. We finally explain three examples of applications of these methods to membrane related problems. First, the case of vesicle pearling and tubulation, when lipidic vesicles are exposed to the presence of hydrophobic polymers that anchor to the membrane, inducing a shape instability. Finally, we study the behavior of red blood cells while flowing in narrow microchannels, focusing on the importance of membrane elasticity to the cell flow capabilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modelling erosion damage from low-energy plasma gun simulations of disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Hassanein, A.

    1993-10-01

    Energy transfer to material surfaces is dominated by photon radiation through low temperature plasma vapors if tokamak disruptions are due to low kinetic energy particles (approx-lt 100 eV). Simple models of radiation transport are derived and incorporated into a fast-running computer routine to model this process. The results of simulations are in good agreement with plasma gun erosion tests on several metal targets

  2. Evaluating Alzheimer’s disease progression by modeling crosstalk network disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haochen eLiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aβ, tau and P-tau have been widely accepted as reliable markers for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The crosstalk between these markers forms a complex network. AD may induce the integral variation and disruption of the network. The aim of this study was to develop a novel mathematic model based on a simplified crosstalk network to evaluate the disease progression of AD. The integral variation of the network is measured by three integral disruption parameters. The robustness of network is evaluated by network disruption probability. Presented results show that network disruption probability has a good linear relationship with Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE. The proposed model combined with Support vector machine (SVM achieves a relative high 10-fold cross-validated performance in classification of AD vs normal and mild cognitive impairment (MCI vs normal (95% accuracy, 95% sensitivity, 95% specificity for AD vs normal; 90% accuracy, 94% sensitivity, 83% specificity for MCI vs normal. This research evaluates the progression of AD and facilitates AD early diagnosis.

  3. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fengge; Miraoui, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    The fuel cell is a potential candidate for energy storage and conversion in our future energy mix. It is able to directly convert the chemical energy stored in fuel (e.g. hydrogen) into electricity, without undergoing different intermediary conversion steps. In the field of mobile and stationary applications, it is considered to be one of the future energy solutions.Among the different fuel cell types, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has shown great potential in mobile applications, due to its low operating temperature, solid-state electrolyte and compactness.This book pre

  4. A reliable facility location design model with site-dependent disruption in the imperfect information context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Lifen; Wang, Xifu; Fan, Hongqiang; Li, Xiaopeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a reliable facility location design model under imperfect information with site-dependent disruptions; i.e., each facility is subject to a unique disruption probability that varies across the space. In the imperfect information contexts, customers adopt a realistic “trial-and-error” strategy to visit facilities; i.e., they visit a number of pre-assigned facilities sequentially until they arrive at the first operational facility or give up looking for the service. This proposed model aims to balance initial facility investment and expected long-term operational cost by finding the optimal facility locations. A nonlinear integer programming model is proposed to describe this problem. We apply a linearization technique to reduce the difficulty of solving the proposed model. A number of problem instances are studied to illustrate the performance of the proposed model. The results indicate that our proposed model can reveal a number of interesting insights into the facility location design with site-dependent disruptions, including the benefit of backup facilities and system robustness against variation of the loss-of-service penalty. PMID:28486564

  5. Interplay of electrostatics and lipid packing determines the binding of charged polymer coated nanoparticles to model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Nupur; Bhattacharya, Rupak; Saha, Arindam; Jana, Nikhil R; Basu, Jaydeep K

    2015-10-07

    Understanding of nanoparticle-membrane interactions is useful for various applications of nanoparticles like drug delivery and imaging. Here we report on the studies of interaction between hydrophilic charged polymer coated semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles with model lipid membranes. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity measurements suggest that cationic nanoparticles bind and penetrate bilayers of zwitterionic lipids. Penetration and binding depend on the extent of lipid packing and result in the disruption of the lipid bilayer accompanied by enhanced lipid diffusion. On the other hand, anionic nanoparticles show minimal membrane binding although, curiously, their interaction leads to reduction in lipid diffusivity. It is suggested that the enhanced binding of cationic QDs at higher lipid packing can be understood in terms of the effective surface potential of the bilayers which is tunable through membrane lipid packing. Our results bring forth the subtle interplay of membrane lipid packing and electrostatics which determine nanoparticle binding and penetration of model membranes with further implications for real cell membranes.

  6. Ultrathin films of lipids to investigate the action of a flavonoid with cell membrane models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrreira, João Victor Narducci; Grecco, Simone Dos S; Lago, João Henrique G; Caseli, Luciano

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the role of natural compounds whose pharmaceutical activity is associated with cell membranes is fundamental to comprehending the biochemical processes that occur on membrane surfaces. In this work, we examined the action of 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,5,7-trihydroxy-4H-chromen-4-one, known as quercetin, QCT, in lipid Langmuir monolayers at the air-water interface, which served as a model for half of a membrane. The surface pressure-area isotherms for 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid monolayers exhibited a noticeable shift to higher areas in the presence of the flavonoid, which indicated the incorporation of QCT into the monolayer and expansion of the film. Also the flavonoid incorporation diminishes the monolayer surface elasticity for DPPC and causes a relative decrease of the intensity for C-H stretch bands, pointing to a disruption of the packed order of DPPC. These results can be associated to the interaction between QCT and cell membrane surfaces during biochemical processes, which may influence its pharmaceutical properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanism of Action of a Membrane-Active Quinoline-Based Antimicrobial on Natural and Model Bacterial Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Alasdair T M; Barker, Robert; Rehal, Reg; Vandera, Kalliopi-Kelli A; Harvey, Richard D; Coates, Anthony R M

    2017-02-28

    HT61 is a quinoline-derived antimicrobial, which exhibits bactericidal potency against both multiplying and quiescent methicillin resistant and sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, and has been proposed as an adjunct for other antimicrobials to extend their usefulness in the face of increasing antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we have examined HT61's effect on the permeability of S. aureus membranes and whether this putative activity can be attributed to an interaction with lipid bilayers. Using membrane potential and ATP release assays, we have shown that HT61 disrupts the membrane enough to result in depolarization of the membrane and release of intercellular constituents at concentrations above and below the minimum inhibitory concentration of the drug. Utilizing both monolayer subphase injection and neutron reflectometry, we have shown that increasing the anionic lipid content of the membrane leads to a more marked effect of the drug. In bilayers containing 25 mol % phosphatidylglycerol, neutron reflectometry data suggest that exposure to HT61 increases the level of solvent in the hydrophobic region of the membrane, which is indicative of gross structural damage. Increasing the proportion of PG elicits a concomitant level of membrane damage, resulting in almost total destruction when 75 mol % phosphatidylglycerol is present. We therefore propose that HT61's primary action is directed toward the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-positive bacteria.

  8. Development and application of QSAR models for mechanisms related to endocrine disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard Rosenberg, Sine

    is a background section, comprising 1) an introduction to the endocrine system with a focus on thyroid hormones (THs) and their essential function in neurodevelopment as well as a description of how chemicals may interference with endocrine mechanisms and cause adverse effects, 2) an introduction to the applied......Humans are daily exposed to a wide variety of man-made chemicals through food, consumer products, water, air inhalation etc. For the main part of these chemicals no or only very limited information is available on their potential to cause endocrine disruption. Traditionally such information has...... information on the mode of action of chemicals in a faster and cheaper way. The main purpose in this PhD project was to develop QSAR models for mechanisms related to endocrine disruption and apply the models to predict 10,000s of chemicals to which humans are potentially exposed. The first part of the thesis...

  9. A Dry Membrane Protection Technique to Allow Surface Acoustic Wave Biosensor Measurements of Biological Model Membrane Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Enachescu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Model membrane approaches have attracted much attention in biomedical sciences to investigate and simulate biological processes. The application of model membrane systems for biosensor measurements is partly restricted by the fact that the integrity of membranes critically depends on the maintenance of an aqueous surrounding, while various biosensors require a preconditioning of dry sensors. This is for example true for the well-established surface acoustic wave (SAW biosensor SAM®5 blue. Here, a simple drying procedure of sensor-supported model membranes is introduced using the protective disaccharide trehalose. Highly reproducible model membranes were prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, transferred to SAW sensors and supplemented with a trehalose solution. Membrane rehydration after dry incorporation into the SAW device becomes immediately evident by phase changes. Reconstituted model membranes maintain their full functionality, as indicated by biotin/avidin binding experiments. Atomic force microscopy confirmed the morphological invariability of dried and rehydrated membranes. Approximating to more physiological recognition phenomena, the site-directed immobilization of the integrin VLA-4 into the reconstituted model membrane and subsequent VCAM-1 ligand binding with nanomolar affinity were illustrated. This simple drying procedure is a novel way to combine the model membrane generation by Langmuir-Blodgett technique with SAW biosensor measurements, which extends the applicability of SAM®5 blue in biomedical sciences.

  10. Membrane Modeling, Simulation and Optimization for Propylene/Propane Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Alshehri, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Energy efficiency is critical for sustainable industrial growth and the reduction of environmental impacts. Energy consumption by the industrial sector accounts for more than half of the total global energy usage and, therefore, greater attention is focused on enhancing this sector’s energy efficiency. It is predicted that by 2020, more than 20% of today’s energy consumption can be avoided in countries that have effectively implemented an action plan towards efficient energy utilization. Breakthroughs in material synthesis of high selective membranes have enabled the technology to be more energy efficient. Hence, high selective membranes are increasingly replacing conventional energy intensive separation processes, such as distillation and adsorption units. Moreover, the technology offers more special features (which are essential for special applications) and its small footprint makes membrane technology suitable for platform operations (e.g., nitrogen enrichment for oil and gas offshore sites). In addition, its low maintenance characteristics allow the technology to be applied to remote operations. For these reasons, amongst other, the membrane technology market is forecast to reach $16 billion by 2017. This thesis is concerned with the engineering aspects of membrane technology and covers modeling, simulation and optimization of membranes as a stand-alone process or as a unit operation within a hybrid system. Incorporating the membrane model into a process modeling software simplifies the simulation and optimization of the different membrane processes and hybrid configurations, since all other unit operations are pre-configured. Various parametric analyses demonstrated that only the membrane selectivity and transmembrane pressure ratio parameters define a membrane’s ability to accomplish a certain separation task. Moreover, it was found that both membrane selectivity and pressure ratio exhibit a minimum value that is only defined by the feed composition

  11. STARD4 knockdown in HepG2 cells disrupts cholesterol trafficking associated with the plasma membrane, ER, and ERC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garbarino, J.; Pan, M. H.; Chin, H. F.

    2012-01-01

    STARD4, a member of the evolutionarily conserved START gene family, has been implicated in the non-vesicular intracellular transport of cholesterol. However, the direction of transport and the membranes with which this protein interacts are not clear. We present studies of STARD4 function using...... small hairpin RNA knockdown technology to reduce STARD4 expression in HepG2 cells. In a cholesterol-poor environment, we found that a reduction in STARD4 expression leads to retention of cholesterol at the plasma membrane, reduction of endoplasmic reticulum-associated cholesterol, and decreased ACAT...... synthesized cholesteryl esters. Furthermore, D4 KD cells exhibited a reduced rate of sterol transport to the endocytic recycling compartment after cholesterol repletion. Although these cells displayed normal endocytic trafficking in cholesterol-poor and replete conditions, cell surface low density lipoprotein...

  12. STARD4 knockdown in HepG2 cells disrupts cholesterol trafficking associated with the plasma membrane, ER, and ERC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, Jeanne; Pan, Meihui; Chin, Harvey F; Lund, Frederik W; Maxfield, Frederick R; Breslow, Jan L

    2012-12-01

    STARD4, a member of the evolutionarily conserved START gene family, has been implicated in the nonvesicular intracellular transport of cholesterol. However, the direction of transport and the membranes with which this protein interacts are not clear. We present studies of STARD4 function using small hairpin RNA knockdown technology to reduce STARD4 expression in HepG2 cells. In a cholesterol-poor environment, we found that a reduction in STARD4 expression leads to retention of cholesterol at the plasma membrane, reduction of endoplasmic reticulum-associated cholesterol, and decreased ACAT synthesized cholesteryl esters. Furthermore, D4 KD cells exhibited a reduced rate of sterol transport to the endocytic recycling compartment after cholesterol repletion. Although these cells displayed normal endocytic trafficking in cholesterol-poor and replete conditions, cell surface low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) levels were increased and decreased, respectively. We also observed a decrease in NPC1 protein expression, suggesting the induction of compensatory pathways to maintain cholesterol balance. These data indicate a role for STARD4 in nonvesicular transport of cholesterol from the plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment to the endoplasmic reticulum and perhaps other intracellular compartments as well.

  13. Modeling CO2-facilitated transport across a diethanolamine liquid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lihong Bao; Michael C. Trachtenberg [Carbozyme Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States)

    2005-12-15

    We compared experimental and model data for the facilitated transport of CO2 from a CO2-air mixture across an aqueous solution of diethanolamine (DEA) via a hollow fiber, contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) permeator. A two-step carbamate formation model was devised to analyze the data instead of the one-step mechanism used by previous investigators. The effects of DEA concentration, liquid membrane thickness and feed CO2 concentration were also studied. With a 20% (wt) DEA liquid membrane and feed of 15% CO2 in CO2-air mixture at atmosphere pressure, the permeance reached 1.51E-8 mol/m{sup 2} s Pa with a CO2/N2 selectivity of 115. Model predictions compared well with the experimental results at CO2 concentrations of industrial importance. Short-term stability of the HFCLM permeator performance was examined. The system was stable during 5-days of testing.

  14. Modeling of Hollow-Fiber Membrane System During Ultrafiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Bialy, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the performance of hollow fiber membrane module during ultrafiltration of aqueous solutions. The model is represented by a set of differential equations for permeate and residue pressure drop and volumetric flow rates in the axial direction, beside the principle equations of both solvent and solute fluxes through the membrane, while osmotic pressure was neglected in model equations. The shell and tube module type was considered where feed pass in the shell and permeate in the bore side. Tortousily factor of membrane pores in addition to concentration polarization modulus were taken into account in calculations. The model was solved numerically with the help of suitable program in both co current and countercurrent flow pattern and comparison of results were carried out

  15. Numerical modeling transport phenomena in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, DongMyung

    To study the coupled phenomena occurring in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, a two-phase, one-dimensional, non-isothermal model is developed in the chapter 1. The model includes water phase change, proton transport in the membrane and electro-osmotic effect. The thinnest, but most complex layer in the membrane electrode assembly, catalyst layer, is considered an interfacial boundary between the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Mass and heat transfer and electro-chemical reaction through the catalyst layer are formulated into equations, which are applied to boundary conditions for the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Detail accounts of the boundary equations and the numerical solving procedure used in this work are given. The polarization curve is calculated at different oxygen pressures and compared with the experimental results. When the operating condition is changed along the polarization curve, the change of physicochemical variables in the membrane electrode assembly is studied. In particular, the over-potential diagram presents the usage of the electrochemical energy at each layer of the membrane electrode assembly. Humidity in supplying gases is one of the most important factors to consider for improving the performance of PEMFE. Both high and low humidity conditions can result in a deteriorating cell performance. The effect of humidity on the cell performance is studied in the chapter 2. First, a numerical model based on computational fluid dynamics is developed. Second, the cell performances are simulated, when the relative humidity is changed from 0% to 100% in the anode and the cathode channel. The simulation results show how humidity in the reactant gases affects the water content distribution in the membrane, the over-potential at the catalyst layers and eventually the cell performance. In particular, the rapid enhancement in the cell performance caused by self-hydrating membrane is captured by the simulation. Fully humidifying either H2

  16. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  17. Model predictive control for ethanol steam reformers with membrane separation

    OpenAIRE

    Serra, Maria; Ocampo-Martínez, Carlos; Li, Mingming; Llorca Piqué, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    © 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ This paper focuses on the dynamic modelling and the predictive control of an ethanol steam reformer (ESR) with Pdsingle bondAg membrane separation stage for the generation of pure hydrogen. Hydrogen purity necessary to feed a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is required. A non-linear dynamic model of the ESR is developed together with a procedure f...

  18. Sleep disruption increases seizure susceptibility: Behavioral and EEG evaluation of an experimental model of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrnčić, Dragan; Grubač, Željko; Rašić-Marković, Aleksandra; Šutulović, Nikola; Šušić, Veselinka; Bjekić-Macut, Jelica; Stanojlović, Olivera

    2016-03-01

    Sleep disruption accompanies sleep apnea as one of its major symptoms. Obstructive sleep apnea is particularly common in patients with refractory epilepsy, but causing factors underlying this are far from being resolved. Therefore, translational studies regarding this issue are important. Our aim was to investigate the effects of sleep disruption on seizure susceptibility of rats using experimental model of lindane-induced refractory seizures. Sleep disruption in male Wistar rats with implanted EEG electrodes was achieved by treadmill method (belt speed set on 0.02 m/s for working and 0.00 m/s for stop mode, respectively). Animals were assigned to experimental conditions lasting 6h: 1) sleep disruption (sleep interrupted, SI; 30s working and 90 s stop mode every 2 min; 180 cycles in total); 2) activity control (AC, 10 min working and 30 min stop mode, 9 cycles in total); 3) treadmill chamber control (TC, only stop mode). Afterwards, the animals were intraperitoneally treated with lindane (L, 4 mg/kg, SI+L, AC+L and TC+L groups) or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO, SIc, ACc and TCc groups). Convulsive behavior was assessed by seizure incidence, latency time to first seizure, and its severity during 30 min after drug administration. Number and duration of ictal periods were determined in recorded EEGs. Incidence and severity of lindane-induced seizures were significantly increased, latency time significantly decreased in animals undergoing sleep disruption (SI+L group) compared with the animals from TC+L. Seizure latency was also significantly decreased in SI+L compared to AC+L groups. Number of ictal periods were increased and duration of it presented tendency to increase in SI+L comparing to AC+L. No convulsive signs were observed in TCc, ACc and SIc groups, as well as no ictal periods in EEG. These results indicate sleep disruption facilitates induction of epileptic activity in rodent model of lindane-epilepsy enabling translational research of this phenomenon. Copyright

  19. Flexoelectricity of model and living membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Alexander G

    2002-03-19

    The theory and experiments on model and biomembrane flexoelectricity are reviewed. Biological implications of flexoelectricity are underlined. Molecular machinery and molecular electronics applications are pointed out.

  20. A layer model of ethanol partitioning into lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizza, David T; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2009-06-01

    The effect of membrane composition on ethanol partitioning into lipid bilayers was assessed by headspace gas chromatography. A series of model membranes with different compositions have been investigated. Membranes were exposed to a physiological ethanol concentration of 20 mmol/l. The concentration of membranes was 20 wt% which roughly corresponds to values found in tissue. Partitioning depended on the chemical nature of polar groups at the lipid/water interface. Compared to phosphatidylcholine, lipids with headgroups containing phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin showed enhanced partitioning while headgroups containing phosphatidylethanolamine resulted in a lower partition coefficient. The molar partition coefficient was independent of a membrane's hydrophobic volume. This observation is in agreement with our previously published NMR results which showed that ethanol resides almost exclusively within the membrane/water interface. At an ethanol concentration of 20 mmol/l in water, ethanol concentrations at the lipid/water interface are in the range from 30-15 mmol/l, corresponding to one ethanol molecule per 100-200 lipids.

  1. Disrupting Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff; Bazzichelli, Tatiana

    Disruptive Business explores some of the interconnections between art, activism and the business concept of disruptive innovation. With a backdrop of the crisis of financial capitalism, austerity cuts in the cultural sphere, the idea is to focus on potential art strategies in relation to a broken...... economy. In a perverse way, we ask whether this presents new opportunities for cultural producers to achieve more autonomy over their production process. If it is indeed possible, or desirable, what alternative business models emerge? The book is concerned broadly with business as material for reinvention...

  2. Determining the prediction limits of models and classifiers with applications for disruption prediction in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Peluso, E.; Vega, J.; Gelfusa, M.; Lungaroni, M.; Gaudio, P.; Martínez, F. J.; Contributors, JET

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the many aspects of tokamak physics requires the development of quite sophisticated models. Moreover, in the operation of the devices, prediction of the future evolution of discharges can be of crucial importance, particularly in the case of the prediction of disruptions, which can cause serious damage to various parts of the machine. The determination of the limits of predictability is therefore an important issue for modelling, classifying and forecasting. In all these cases, once a certain level of performance has been reached, the question typically arises as to whether all the information available in the data has been exploited, or whether there are still margins for improvement of the tools being developed. In this paper, a theoretical information approach is proposed to address this issue. The excellent properties of the developed indicator, called the prediction factor (PF), have been proved with the help of a series of numerical tests. Its application to some typical behaviour relating to macroscopic instabilities in tokamaks has shown very positive results. The prediction factor has also been used to assess the performance of disruption predictors running in real time in the JET system, including the one systematically deployed in the feedback loop for mitigation purposes. The main conclusion is that the most advanced predictors basically exploit all the information contained in the locked mode signal on which they are based. Therefore, qualitative improvements in disruption prediction performance in JET would need the processing of additional signals, probably profiles.

  3. Modelling inter-supply chain competition with resource limitation and demand disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaobo; Teng, Chunxian; Zhang, Ding; Sun, Jiayi

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a comprehensive model for studying supply chain versus supply chain competition with resource limitation and demand disruption. We assume that there are supply chains with heterogeneous supply network structures that compete at multiple demand markets. Each supply chain is comprised of internal and external firms. The internal firms are coordinated in production and distribution and share some common but limited resources within the supply chain, whereas the external firms are independent and do not share the internal resources. The supply chain managers strive to develop optimal strategies in terms of production level and resource allocation in maximising their profit while facing competition at the end market. The Cournot-Nash equilibrium of this inter-supply chain competition is formulated as a variational inequality problem. We further study the case when there is demand disruption in the plan-execution phase. In such a case, the managers need to revise their planned strategy in order to maximise their profit with the new demand under disruption and minimise the cost of change. We present a bi-criteria decision-making model for supply chain managers and develop the optimal conditions in equilibrium, which again can be formulated by another variational inequality problem. Numerical examples are presented for illustrative purpose.

  4. Sleep Disruption Medical Intervention Forecasting (SDMIF) Module for the Integrated Medical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Brooker, John; Mallis, Melissa; Hursh, Steve; Caldwell, Lynn; Myers, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Integrated Medical Model (IMM) assesses the risk, including likelihood and impact of occurrence, of all credible in-flight medical conditions. Fatigue due to sleep disruption is a condition that could lead to operational errors, potentially resulting in loss of mission or crew. Pharmacological consumables are mitigation strategies used to manage the risks associated with sleep deficits. The likelihood of medical intervention due to sleep disruption was estimated with a well validated sleep model and a Monte Carlo computer simulation in an effort to optimize the quantity of consumables. METHODS: The key components of the model are the mission parameter program, the calculation of sleep intensity and the diagnosis and decision module. The mission parameter program was used to create simulated daily sleep/wake schedules for an ISS increment. The hypothetical schedules included critical events such as dockings and extravehicular activities and included actual sleep time and sleep quality. The schedules were used as inputs to the Sleep, Activity, Fatigue and Task Effectiveness (SAFTE) Model (IBR Inc., Baltimore MD), which calculated sleep intensity. Sleep data from an ISS study was used to relate calculated sleep intensity to the probability of sleep medication use, using a generalized linear model for binomial regression. A human yes/no decision process using a binomial random number was also factored into sleep medication use probability. RESULTS: These probability calculations were repeated 5000 times resulting in an estimate of the most likely amount of sleep aids used during an ISS mission and a 95% confidence interval. CONCLUSIONS: These results were transferred to the parent IMM for further weighting and integration with other medical conditions, to help inform operational decisions. This model is a potential planning tool for ensuring adequate sleep during sleep disrupted periods of a mission.

  5. Oncolytic Group B Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Mediates Non-apoptotic Cell Death with Membrane Disruption and Release of Inflammatory Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Dyer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Enadenotucirev (EnAd is a chimeric group B adenovirus isolated by bioselection from a library of adenovirus serotypes. It replicates selectively in and kills a diverse range of carcinoma cells, shows effective anticancer activity in preclinical systems, and is currently undergoing phase I/II clinical trials. EnAd kills cells more quickly than type 5 adenovirus, and speed of cytotoxicity is dose dependent. The EnAd death pathway does not involve p53, is predominantly caspase independent, and appears to involve a rapid fall in cellular ATP. Infected cells show early loss of membrane integrity; increased exposure of calreticulin; extracellular release of ATP, HSP70, and HMGB1; and influx of calcium. The virus also causes an obvious single membrane blister reminiscent of ischemic cell death by oncosis. In human tumor biopsies maintained in ex vivo culture, EnAd mediated release of pro-inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, IL-6, and HMGB1. In accordance with this, EnAd-infected tumor cells showed potent stimulation of dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells in a mixed tumor-leukocyte reaction in vitro. Whereas many viruses have evolved for efficient propagation with minimal inflammation, bioselection of EnAd for rapid killing has yielded a virus with a short life cycle that combines potent cytotoxicity with a proinflammatory mechanism of cell death.

  6. Modeling and Simulation for Fuel Cell Polymer Electrolyte Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Hayashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have established methods to evaluate key properties that are needed to commercialize polyelectrolyte membranes for fuel cell electric vehicles such as water diffusion, gas permeability, and mechanical strength. These methods are based on coarse-graining models. For calculating water diffusion and gas permeability through the membranes, the dissipative particle dynamics–Monte Carlo approach was applied, while mechanical strength of the hydrated membrane was simulated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics. As a result of our systematic search and analysis, we can now grasp the direction necessary to improve water diffusion, gas permeability, and mechanical strength. For water diffusion, a map that reveals the relationship between many kinds of molecular structures and diffusion constants was obtained, in which the direction to enhance the diffusivity by improving membrane structure can be clearly seen. In order to achieve high mechanical strength, the molecular structure should be such that the hydrated membrane contains narrow water channels, but these might decrease the proton conductivity. Therefore, an optimal design of the polymer structure is needed, and the developed models reviewed here make it possible to optimize these molecular structures.

  7. Interaction of Cytotoxic and Cytoprotective Bile Acids with Model Membranes: Influence of the Membrane Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, M; Ferreira, M J; Kozica, A; Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves da Silva, A; Saramago, B

    2015-08-18

    To understand the role of bile acids (BAs) in cell function, many authors have investigated their effect on biomembrane models which are less complex systems, but there are still many open questions. The present study aims to contribute for the deepening of the knowledge of the interaction between BAs and model membranes, in particular, focusing on the effect of BA mixtures. The cytotoxic deoxycholic acid (DCA), the cytoprotective ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and the equimolar mixture (DCA + UDCA) were investigated. Monolayers and liposomes were taken as model membranes with two lipid compositions: an equimolar mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (Chol)) traditionally associated with the formation of lipid rafts and an equimolar POPC/SM binary mixture. The obtained results showed that DCA causes the fluidization of monolayers and bilayers, leading to the eventual rupture of POPC/SM liposomes at high concentration. UDCA may provide a stabilization of POPC/SM membranes but has a negligible effect on the Chol-containing liposomes. In the case of equimolar mixture DCA/UDCA, the interactions depend not only on the lipid composition but also on the design of the experiment. The BA mixture has a greater impact on the monolayers than do pure BAs, suggesting a cooperative DCA-UDCA interaction that enhances the penetration of UDCA in both POPC/SM and POPC/SM/Chol monolayers. For the bilayers, the presence of UDCA in the mixture decreases the disturbing effect of DCA.

  8. Disruption of steroidogenesis: Cell models for mechanistic investigations and as screening tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odermatt, Alex; Strajhar, Petra; Engeli, Roger T

    2016-04-01

    In the modern world, humans are exposed during their whole life to a large number of synthetic chemicals. Some of these chemicals have the potential to disrupt endocrine functions and contribute to the development and/or progression of major diseases. Every year approximately 1000 novel chemicals, used in industrial production, agriculture, consumer products or as pharmaceuticals, are reaching the market, often with limited safety assessment regarding potential endocrine activities. Steroids are essential endocrine hormones, and the importance of the steroidogenesis pathway as a target for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has been recognized by leading scientists and authorities. Cell lines have a prominent role in the initial stages of toxicity assessment, i.e. for mechanistic investigations and for the medium to high throughput analysis of chemicals for potential steroidogenesis disrupting activities. Nevertheless, the users have to be aware of the limitations of the existing cell models in order to apply them properly, and there is a great demand for improved cell-based testing systems and protocols. This review intends to provide an overview of the available cell lines for studying effects of chemicals on gonadal and adrenal steroidogenesis, their use and limitations, as well as the need for future improvements of cell-based testing systems and protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thyroid Hormone Disruption Effects Lamination of the Neocortex but not the Cerebellum in a Model of Developmental Hypothyroidism and Hypothyroxinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Research on neurodevelopmental changes resulting from thyroid hormone (TH) disruption has important basic and clinical implications. We previously demonstrated, in a rodent model, that developmental hypothyroidism or hypothyroxinemia can cause ...

  10. Mathematical modelling of dextran filtration through hollow fibre membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank; Pinelo, Manuel; Brøns, Morten

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a mathematical model of an ultrafiltration process. The results of the model are produced using standard numerical techniques with Comsol Multiphysics. The model describes the fluid flow and separation in hollow fibre membranes. The flow of solute and solvent within...... dependent viscosity. The model shows that both the observed and intrinsic rejection increase when the inlet velocity increases. Moreover, the intrinsic rejection increases as a function of transmembrane pressure, but the observed rejection has a characteristic maximum. Therefore, the observed rejection can...... either increase or decrease as a function of pressure. The influence of a concentration dependent viscosity is to increase the concentration on the membrane surface. This leads to a decrease in both the observed and the intrinsic rejection, when compared to a constant viscosity. For small values...

  11. Mechanical algal disruption for efficient biodiesel extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, Joel David

    Biodiesel from algae provides several benefits over current biodiesel feedstocks, but the energy requirements of processing algae into a useable fuel are currently so high as to be prohibitive. One route to improving this is via disruption of the cells prior to lipid extraction, which can significantly increase energy recovery. Unfortunately, several obvious disruption techniques require more energy than can be gained. This dissertation examines the use of microbubbles to improve mechanical disruption of algal cells using experimental, theoretical, and computational methods. New laboratory experiments show that effective ultrasonic disruption of algae is achieved by adding microbubbles to an algal solution. The configuration studied flows the solution through a tube and insonifies a small section with a high-pressure ultrasound wave. Previous biomedical research has shown effective cell membrane damage on animal cells with similar methods, but the present research is the first to extend such study to algal cells. Results indicate that disruption increases with peak negative pressure between 1.90 and 3.07 MPa and with microbubble concentration up to 12.5 x 107 bubbles/ml. Energy estimates of this process suggest that it requires only one-fourth the currently most-efficient laboratory-scale disruption process. Estimates of the radius near each bubble that causes disruption (i.e. the disruption radius) suggest that it increases with peak negative pressure and is near 9--20 microm for all cases tested. It is anticipated that these procedures can be designed for better efficiency and efficacy, which will be facilitated by identifying the root mechanisms of the bubble-induced disruption. We therefore examine whether bubble expansion alone creates sufficient cell deformation for cell rupture. The spherically-symmetric Marmottant model for bubble dynamics allows estimation of the flow regime under experimental conditions. Bubble expansion is modeled as a point source of

  12. QSAR classification models for the screening of the endocrine-disrupting activity of perfluorinated compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarich, S; Papa, E; Li, J; Gramatica, P

    2012-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are a class of emerging pollutants still widely used in different materials as non-adhesives, waterproof fabrics, fire-fighting foams, etc. Their toxic effects include potential for endocrine-disrupting activity, but the amount of experimental data available for these pollutants is limited. The use of predictive strategies such as quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) is recommended under the REACH regulation, to fill data gaps and to screen and prioritize chemicals for further experimentation, with a consequent reduction of costs and number of tested animals. In this study, local classification models for PFCs were developed to predict their T4-TTR (thyroxin-transthyretin) competing potency. The best models were selected by maximizing the sensitivity and external predictive ability. These models, characterized by robustness, good predictive power and a defined applicability domain, were applied to predict the activity of 33 other PFCs of environmental concern. Finally, classification models recently published by our research group for T4-TTR binding of brominated flame retardants and for estrogenic and anti-androgenic activity were applied to the studied perfluorinated chemicals to compare results and to further evaluate the potential for these PFCs to cause endocrine disruption.

  13. Enhancement of the Computational Efficiency of Membrane Computing Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Das, Digendra K

    2007-01-01

    .... Membrane computing consists of cell-like membranes placed inside a unique skin membrane. In regions delimited by a membrane structure, cells are placed in multisets of objects which evolve according to evolution rules associated with the regions...

  14. Stochastic lattice model of synaptic membrane protein domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwei; Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2017-05-01

    Neurotransmitter receptor molecules, concentrated in synaptic membrane domains along with scaffolds and other kinds of proteins, are crucial for signal transmission across chemical synapses. In common with other membrane protein domains, synaptic domains are characterized by low protein copy numbers and protein crowding, with rapid stochastic turnover of individual molecules. We study here in detail a stochastic lattice model of the receptor-scaffold reaction-diffusion dynamics at synaptic domains that was found previously to capture, at the mean-field level, the self-assembly, stability, and characteristic size of synaptic domains observed in experiments. We show that our stochastic lattice model yields quantitative agreement with mean-field models of nonlinear diffusion in crowded membranes. Through a combination of analytic and numerical solutions of the master equation governing the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains, together with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we find substantial discrepancies between mean-field and stochastic models for the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains. Based on the reaction and diffusion properties of synaptic receptors and scaffolds suggested by previous experiments and mean-field calculations, we show that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic receptors and scaffolds provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the observed single-molecule trajectories, and spatial heterogeneity in the effective rates at which receptors and scaffolds are recycled at the cell membrane. Our work sheds light on the physical mechanisms and principles linking the collective properties of membrane protein domains to the stochastic dynamics that rule their molecular components.

  15. Stochastic lattice model of synaptic membrane protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwei; Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2017-05-01

    Neurotransmitter receptor molecules, concentrated in synaptic membrane domains along with scaffolds and other kinds of proteins, are crucial for signal transmission across chemical synapses. In common with other membrane protein domains, synaptic domains are characterized by low protein copy numbers and protein crowding, with rapid stochastic turnover of individual molecules. We study here in detail a stochastic lattice model of the receptor-scaffold reaction-diffusion dynamics at synaptic domains that was found previously to capture, at the mean-field level, the self-assembly, stability, and characteristic size of synaptic domains observed in experiments. We show that our stochastic lattice model yields quantitative agreement with mean-field models of nonlinear diffusion in crowded membranes. Through a combination of analytic and numerical solutions of the master equation governing the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains, together with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we find substantial discrepancies between mean-field and stochastic models for the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains. Based on the reaction and diffusion properties of synaptic receptors and scaffolds suggested by previous experiments and mean-field calculations, we show that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic receptors and scaffolds provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the observed single-molecule trajectories, and spatial heterogeneity in the effective rates at which receptors and scaffolds are recycled at the cell membrane. Our work sheds light on the physical mechanisms and principles linking the collective properties of membrane protein domains to the stochastic dynamics that rule their molecular components.

  16. Concanavalin A/IFN-gamma triggers autophagy-related necrotic hepatocyte death through IRGM1-mediated lysosomal membrane disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Peng Chang

    Full Text Available Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, a potent Th1 cytokine with multiple biological functions, can induce autophagy to enhance the clearance of the invading microorganism or cause cell death. We have reported that Concanavalin A (Con A can cause autophagic cell death in hepatocytes and induce both T cell-dependent and -independent acute hepatitis in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice, respectively. Although IFN-γ is known to enhance liver injury in Con A-induced hepatitis, its role in autophagy-related hepatocyte death is not clear. In this study we report that IFN-γ can enhance Con A-induced autophagic flux and cell death in hepatoma cell lines. A necrotic cell death with increased lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP is observed in Con A-treated hepatoma cells in the presence of IFN-γ. Cathepsin B and L were released from lysosomes to cause cell death. Furthermore, IFN-γ induces immunity related GTPase family M member 1(IRGM1 translocation to lysosomes and prolongs its activity in Con A-treated hepatoma cells. Knockdown of IRGM1 inhibits the IFN-γ/Con A-induced LMP change and cell death. Furthermore, IFN-γ(-/- mice are resistant to Con A-induced autophagy-associated necrotic hepatocyte death. We conclude that IFN-γ enhances Con A-induced autophagic flux and causes an IRGM1-dependent lysosome-mediated necrotic cell death in hepatocytes.

  17. Aluminium and Acrylamide Disrupt Cerebellum Redox States, Cholinergic Function and Membrane-Bound ATPase in Adult Rats and Their Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbel, Imen; Amara, Ibtissem Ben; Ktari, Naourez; Elwej, Awatef; Boudawara, Ons; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba

    2016-12-01

    Accumulation of aluminium and acrylamide in food is a major source of human exposure. Their adverse effects are well documented, but there is no information about the health problems arising from their combined exposure. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible neurotoxic effects after co-exposure of pregnant and lactating rats to aluminium and acrylamide in order to evaluate redox state, cholinergic function and membrane-bound ATPases in the cerebellum of adult rats and their progeny. Pregnant female rats have received aluminium (50 mg/kg body weight) via drinking water and acrylamide (20 mg/kg body weight) by gavage, either individually or in combination from the 14th day of pregnancy until day 14 after delivery. Exposure to these toxicants provoked an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) and advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) levels and a decrease in SOD, CAT, GPx, Na + K + -ATPase, Mg 2+ -ATPase and AChE activities in the cerebellum of mothers and their suckling pups. A reduction in GSH, NPSH and vitamin C levels was also observed. These changes were confirmed by histological results. Interestingly, co-exposure to these toxicants exhibited synergism based on physical and biochemical variables in the cerebellum of mothers and their progeny.

  18. An in vitro model of the glomerular capillary wall using electrospun collagen nanofibres in a bioartificial composite basement membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadie C Slater

    Full Text Available The filtering unit of the kidney, the glomerulus, contains capillaries whose walls function as a biological sieve, the glomerular filtration barrier. This comprises layers of two specialised cells, glomerular endothelial cells (GEnC and podocytes, separated by a basement membrane. Glomerular filtration barrier function, and dysfunction in disease, remains incompletely understood, partly due to difficulties in studying the relevant cell types in vitro. We have addressed this by generation of unique conditionally immortalised human GEnC and podocytes. However, because the glomerular filtration barrier functions as a whole, it is necessary to develop three dimensional co-culture models to maximise the benefit of the availability of these cells. Here we have developed the first two tri-layer models of the glomerular capillary wall. The first is based on tissue culture inserts and provides evidence of cell-cell interaction via soluble mediators. In the second model the synthetic support of the tissue culture insert is replaced with a novel composite bioartificial membrane. This consists of a nanofibre membrane containing collagen I, electrospun directly onto a micro-photoelectroformed fine nickel supporting mesh. GEnC and podocytes grew in monolayers on either side of the insert support or the novel membrane to form a tri-layer model recapitulating the human glomerular capillary in vitro. These models will advance the study of both the physiology of normal glomerular filtration and of its disruption in glomerular disease.

  19. Market disruption, cascading effects, and economic recovery:a life-cycle hypothesis model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprigg, James A.

    2004-11-01

    This paper builds upon previous work [Sprigg and Ehlen, 2004] by introducing a bond market into a model of production and employment. The previous paper described an economy in which households choose whether to enter the labor and product markets based on wages and prices. Firms experiment with prices and employment levels to maximize their profits. We developed agent-based simulations using Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool developed at Sandia, to demonstrate that multiple-firm economies converge toward the competitive equilibria typified by lower prices and higher output and employment, but also suffer from market noise stemming from consumer churn. In this paper we introduce a bond market as a mechanism for household savings. We simulate an economy of continuous overlapping generations in which each household grows older in the course of the simulation and continually revises its target level of savings according to a life-cycle hypothesis. Households can seek employment, earn income, purchase goods, and contribute to savings until they reach the mandatory retirement age; upon retirement households must draw from savings in order to purchase goods. This paper demonstrates the simultaneous convergence of product, labor, and savings markets to their calculated equilibria, and simulates how a disruption to a productive sector will create cascading effects in all markets. Subsequent work will use similar models to simulate how disruptions, such as terrorist attacks, would interplay with consumer confidence to affect financial markets and the broader economy.

  20. Antibacterial Activity and Membrane-Disruptive Mechanism of 3-p-trans-Coumaroyl-2-hydroxyquinic Acid, a Novel Phenolic Compound from Pine Needles of Cedrus deodara, against Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we reported that a novel phenolic compound isolated from Cedrus deodara, 3-p-trans-coumaroyl-2-hydroxyquinic acid (CHQA, exhibits a potent antioxidant activity. The present study aimed to evaluate the antibacterial activity of CHQA against eleven food-borne pathogens and to elucidate its mechanism of action against Staphylococcus aureus. The results from minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC determinations showed that CHQA exhibited moderate inhibitory effects on all of the tested pathogens with MIC values ranging from 2.5–10 mg/mL. Membrane potential measurements and flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that CHQA damaged the cytoplasmic membrane of S. aureus, causing a significant membrane hyperpolarization with a loss of membrane integrity. Moreover, CHQA induced an increase in membrane fluidity and conformational changes in membrane protein of S. aureus, suggesting that CHQA probably acts on the cell membrane by interactions with membrane lipid and protein. Transmission electron microscopic observations further confirmed that CHQA disrupted the cell membrane of S. aureus and caused severe morphological changes, which even led to leakage of intracellular constituents. These findings indicated that CHQA could have the potential to serve as a natural antibacterial agent to control and prevent the growth of pathogens in food and in food-processing environments.

  1. Influence of chain rigidity on the conformation of model lipid membranes in the presence of cylindrical nanoparticle inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diloreto, Chris; Wickham, Robert

    2012-02-01

    We employ real-space self-consistent field theory to study the conformation of model lipid membranes in the presence of solvent and cylindrical nanoparticle inclusions (''peptides''). Whereas it is common to employ a polymeric Gaussian chain model for the lipids, here we model the lipids as persistent, worm-like chains. Our motivation is to develop a more realistic field theory to describe the action of pore-forming anti-microbial peptides that disrupt the bacterial cell membrane. We employ operator-splitting and a pseudo-spectral algorithm, using SpharmonicKit for the chain tangent degrees of freedom, to solve for the worm-like chain propagator. The peptides, modelled using a mask function, have a surface patterned with hydrophobic and hydrophillic patches, but no charge. We examine the role chain rigidity plays in the hydrophobic mismatch, the membrane-mediated interaction between two peptides, the size and structure of pores formed by peptide aggregates, and the free-energy barrier for peptide insertion into the membrane. Our results suggest that chain rigidity influences both the pore structure and the mechanism of pore formation.

  2. Modeling and simulation of melt-layer erosion during a plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Belan, V.; Konkashbaev, I.; Nikandrov, L.; Safronov, V.; Zhitlukhin, A.; Litunovsky, V.

    1997-01-01

    Metallic plasma-facing components (PFCs) e.g. beryllium and tungsten, will be subjected to severe melting during plasma instabilities such as disruptions, edge-localized modes and high power excursions. Because of the greater thickness of the resulting melt layers relative to that of the surface vaporization, the potential loss of the developing melt-layer can significantly shorten PFC lifetime, severely contaminate the plasma and potentially prevent successful operation of the tokamak reactor. Mechanisms responsible for melt-layer loss during plasma instabilities are being modeled and evaluated. Of particular importance are hydrodynamic instabilities developed in the liquid layer due to various forces such as those from magnetic fields, plasma impact momentum, vapor recoil and surface tension. Another mechanism found to contribute to melt-layer splashing loss is volume bubble boiling, which can result from overheating of the liquid layer. To benchmark these models, several new experiments were designed and performed in different laboratory devices for this work; the SPLASH codes) are generally in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of in-reactor disruption conditions, which do not exist in simulation experiments, on melt-layer erosion is discussed. (orig.)

  3. Disrupted cortical connectivity theory as an explanatory model for autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana, Rajesh K.; Libero, Lauren E.; Moore, Marie S.

    2011-12-01

    such as Theory-of-Mind, cognitive flexibility, and information processing; and 2) how connection abnormalities relate to, and may determine, behavioral symptoms hallmarked by the triad of Impairments in ASD. Furthermore, we will relate the disrupted cortical connectivity model to existing cognitive and neural models of ASD.

  4. Basal membrane complex architecture is disrupted during posterior subcapsular cataract formation in Royal College of Surgeons rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies detailing the development of posterior subcapsular cataracts (PSC) in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats have shown that aberrant fiber-end migration underlies the structural compromise. This investigation was conducted to examine the distribution of select basal membrane complex (BMC) components and to assess the intravitreal levels of specific cytokines during PSC formation. Methods Lenses from 52 RCS dystrophic rats (RCS/Lav) and 28 genetically matched control animals (RCS-rdy+/Lav) from 2 to 8 weeks old were used. After enucleation, vitreous was collected for eventual cytokine level analyses; lenses were then removed and processed for immunocytochemical localization of actin, cadherin, β integrin, vinculin, and cell nuclei. Results At 2–3 weeks postnatal, dystrophic lenses showed normal BMC distribution of actin, cadherin, and vinculin; however β integrin distribution was altered as compared to controls. By 4–6 weeks of age, F-actin was visible as bright foci arranged in a “rosette” pattern around fiber-end profiles. Concurrently, vinculin was rearranged into a diffuse pattern within the BMC. Cadherin delineated the fiber ends in dystrophic lenses until 5 weeks postnatal, after which it displayed diffuse cytoplasmic staining with more definitive labeling at the BMC periphery. β integrin was initially distributed as punctuate spots at 2–3 weeks postnatal; however, by 4–6 weeks it was co-localized with F-actin around the periphery of fiber ends. The distribution of F-actin, cadherin, and β integrin components did not undergo further changes after 6 weeks of age; however, vinculin was present predominantly at the periphery of the BMC in 7–8-week-old dystrophic lenses. Intravitreal cytokine levels were assessed for interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interferon (IFN)-γ. Levels of IL-1α, IL-4, TNF, and IFN-γ demonstrated a similar pattern, with concentrations increasing from 2 to 6

  5. Modeling Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    The objective of this doctoral thesis was to develop reliable steady-state and transient component models suitable to asses-, develop- and optimize proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Several components in PEM fuel cell systems were characterized and modeled. The developed component......- and system models match experimental data from the literature. However, limited data were available for verification so further work is necessary to confirm detailed aspects of the models. It is nonetheless expected that the developed models will be useful for system modeling and optimization of PEM fuel...... cell systems. Consequences of indirectly fueling PEM stacks with hydrocarbons using reforming technology were investigated using a PEM stack model including CO poisoning kinetics and a transient Simulink steam reforming system model. Aspects regarding the optimization of PEM fuel cell systems...

  6. Experimental simulation and numerical modeling of vapor shield formation and divertor material erosion for ITER typical plasma disruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuerz, H. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INR, Postfach 36 40, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Arkhipov, N.I. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Bakhtin, V.P. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Konkashbaev, I. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Landman, I. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Toporkov, D.A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-04-01

    The high divertor heat load during a tokamak plasma disruption results in sudden evaporation of a thin layer of divertor plate material, which acts as vapor shield and protects the target from further excessive evaporation. Formation and effectiveness of the vapor shield are theoretically modeled and are experimentally analyzed at the 2MK-200 facility under conditions simulating the thermal quench phase of ITER tokamak plasma disruptions. ((orig.)).

  7. Estrogen-induced disruption of intracellular iron metabolism leads to oxidative stress, membrane damage, and cell cycle arrest in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajbouj, Khuloud; Shafarin, Jasmin; Abdalla, Maher Y; Ahmad, Iman M; Hamad, Mawieh

    2017-10-01

    It is well established that several forms of cancer associate with significant iron overload. Recent studies have suggested that estrogen (E2) disrupts intracellular iron homeostasis by reducing hepcidin synthesis and maintaining ferroportin integrity. Here, the ability of E2 to alter intracellular iron status and cell growth potential was investigated in MCF-7 cells treated with increasing concentrations of E2. Treated cells were assessed for intracellular iron status, the expression of key proteins involved in iron metabolism, oxidative stress, cell survival, growth, and apoptosis. E2 treatment resulted in a significant reduction in hepcidin expression and a significant increase in hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha, ferroportin, transferrin receptor, and ferritin expression; a transient decrease in labile iron pool; and a significant increase in total intracellular iron content mainly at 20 nM/48 h E2 dose. Treated cells also showed increased total glutathione and oxidized glutathione levels, increased superoxide dismutase activity, and increased hemoxygenase 1 expression. Treatment with E2 at 20 nM for 48 h resulted in a significant reduction in cell growth (0.35/1 migration rate) and decreased cell survival (iron metabolism and precipitates adverse effects concerning cell viability, membrane integrity, and growth potential.

  8. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Autophagic Cell Death via Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Disruption in Normal Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chang, Seung-Hee; Park, Soo Jin; Lim, Joohyun; Lee, Jinkyu; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Kim, Jun-Sung; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are used in diverse fields including food, cosmetic, and medical industries. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) are widely used, but their effects on biological systems and mechanism of toxicity have not been elucidated fully. Here, we report the toxicological mechanism of TiO2-NP in cell organelles. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-) were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/mL TiO2-NP for 24 and 48 h. Our results showed that TiO2-NP induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the cells and disrupted the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAMs) and calcium ion balance, thereby increasing autophagy. In contrast, an inhibitor of ER stress, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), mitigated the cellular toxic response, suggesting that TiO2-NP promoted toxicity via ER stress. This novel mechanism of TiO2-NP toxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells suggests that further exhaustive research on the harmful effects of these nanoparticles in relevant organisms is needed for their safe application. PMID:26121477

  9. Disruption of an M. tuberculosis membrane protein causes a magnesium-dependent cell division defect and failure to persist in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichole Goodsmith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes necessary for persistence in vivo provides insight into bacterial biology as well as host defense strategies. We show that disruption of M. tuberculosis membrane protein PerM (Rv0955 resulted in an IFN-γ-dependent persistence defect in chronic mouse infection despite the mutant's near normal growth during acute infection. The perM mutant required increased magnesium for replication and survival; incubation in low magnesium media resulted in cell elongation and lysis. Transcriptome analysis of the perM mutant grown in reduced magnesium revealed upregulation of cell division and cell wall biosynthesis genes, and live cell imaging showed PerM accumulation at the division septa in M. smegmatis. The mutant was acutely sensitive to β-lactam antibiotics, including specific inhibitors of cell division-associated peptidoglycan transpeptidase FtsI. Together, these data implicate PerM as a novel player in mycobacterial cell division and pathogenesis, and are consistent with the hypothesis that immune activation deprives M. tuberculosis of magnesium.

  10. Experimental Validation of a Permeability Model for Enrichment Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellano, Pablo; Brasnarof, Daniel; Florido Pablo

    2003-01-01

    An experimental loop with a real scale diffuser, in a single enrichment-stage configuration, was operated with air at different process conditions, in order to characterize the membrane permeability.Using these experimental data, an analytical geometric-and-morphologic-based model was validated.It is conclude that a new set of independent measurements, i.e. enrichment, is necessary in order to fully characterize diffusers, because of its internal parameters are not univocally determinated with permeability experimental data only

  11. Passive Control of Flow behind a Two-dimensional Model Vehicle for Drag Reduction Using Wake Disrupter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Haecheon; Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Jin; Jeon, Woo-Pyung

    2004-11-01

    A wind-tunnel experiment is performed to control flow behind a two-dimensional model vehicle, which has a fixed separation point, with a newly proposed passive device, wake disrupter. The wake disrupter is a small-size rectangular body attached to the upper and lower trailing edges, designed to perturb an essentially two-dimensional nature of wake. The effect of the wake disrupter on the base pressure of the model vehicle is tested for various configurations by varying its size and spanwise spacing. The experiments are conducted at the Reynolds numbers of 20000, 40000 and 80000 based on the free stream velocity and model height. The optimal configuration of wake disrupter produces 33% increase in the base pressure, whose amount is much larger than that by single optimal pair(22%). A hot-wire measurement is also carried out to examine the characteristics of turbulent flow disturbed by the wake disrupter. It shows that the wake disrupter significantly increases the length and width of vortex formation along the entire spanwise direction, which is closely related to the pressure recovery at the base surface.

  12. Artificial plasma membrane models based on lipidomic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaid, Donia; Rosilio, Véronique; Daghildjian, Katia; Solgadi, Audrey; Vergnaud, Juliette; Kasselouri, Athena; Chaminade, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    Phospholipid monolayers are often described as membrane models for analyzing drug-lipid interactions. In many works, a single phosphatidylcholine is chosen, sometimes with one or two additional components. Drug penetration is studied at 30mN/m, a surface pressure considered as corresponding to the pressure in bilayers, independently of the density of lipid molecular packing. In this work, we have extracted, identified, and quantified the major lipids constituting the lipidome of plasma and mitochondrial membranes of retinoblastoma (Y79) and retinal pigment epithelium cells (ARPE-19), using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The results obtained from this lipidomic analysis were used in an attempt to build an artificial lipid monolayer with a composition mimicking that of the plasma membrane of Y79 cells, better than a single phospholipid. The variety and number of lipid classes and species in cell extracts monolayers exceeding by far those of the phospholipids chosen to mimic them, the π-A isotherms of model monolayers differed from those of lipid extracts in shape and apparent packing density. We propose a model monolayer based on the most abundant species identified in the extracts, with a surface compressional modulus at 30mN/m close to the one of the lipid extracts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Price competition model in decentralized and centralized supply chains with demand disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Wenlong

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper studies the price competition of a supply chain with one supplier and two competing retailers under occasional demand disruption.Design/methodology/approach: The supply chain is either decentralized or centralized. The demand disruption for two retailers occurs with different probability. We analyze the effect of occurrence probability of demand disruption on the optimal prices of the supplier and two retailers.Findings: We find that the profits of supplier, retailers and supply chain are decreasing with the occurrence probability of demand disruption.Originality/value: It is helpful for supply chain members to adjust the original contracts to demand disruption.

  14. Modeling and optimization of membrane lifetime in dead-end ultra filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zondervan, Edwin; Roffel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a membrane lifetime model is developed and experimentally validated. The lifetime model is based on the Weibull probability density function. The lifetime model can be used to determine an unambiguous characteristic membrane lifetime. Experimental results showed that membrane lifetime

  15. Circadian desynchrony promotes metabolic disruption in a mouse model of shiftwork.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna L Barclay

    Full Text Available Shiftwork is associated with adverse metabolic pathophysiology, and the rising incidence of shiftwork in modern societies is thought to contribute to the worldwide increase in obesity and metabolic syndrome. The underlying mechanisms are largely unknown, but may involve direct physiological effects of nocturnal light exposure, or indirect consequences of perturbed endogenous circadian clocks. This study employs a two-week paradigm in mice to model the early molecular and physiological effects of shiftwork. Two weeks of timed sleep restriction has moderate effects on diurnal activity patterns, feeding behavior, and clock gene regulation in the circadian pacemaker of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. In contrast, microarray analyses reveal global disruption of diurnal liver transcriptome rhythms, enriched for pathways involved in glucose and lipid metabolism and correlating with first indications of altered metabolism. Although altered food timing itself is not sufficient to provoke these effects, stabilizing peripheral clocks by timed food access can restore molecular rhythms and metabolic function under sleep restriction conditions. This study suggests that peripheral circadian desynchrony marks an early event in the metabolic disruption associated with chronic shiftwork. Thus, strengthening the peripheral circadian system by minimizing food intake during night shifts may counteract the adverse physiological consequences frequently observed in human shift workers.

  16. Dimer-based model for heptaspanning membrane receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antonio; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2005-07-01

    The existence of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions for heptaspanning membrane receptors is now fully accepted, but a model considering dimers as the basic unit that binds to two ligand molecules is lacking. Here, we propose a two-state-dimer model in which the ligand-induced conformational changes from one component of the dimer are communicated to the other. Our model predicts cooperativity in binding, which is relevant because the other current models fail to address this phenomenon satisfactorily. Our two-state-dimer model also predicts the variety of responses elicited by full or partial agonists, neutral antagonists and inverse agonists. This model can aid our understanding of the operation of heptaspanning receptors and receptor channels, and, potentially, be important for improving the treatment of cardiovascular, neurological and neuropsychyatric diseases.

  17. Challenges in commercializing biomimetic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Madsen, Steen Ulrik; Jørgensen, Tine Elkjær

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of selective water channel proteins—aquaporins—has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One...... of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments...... relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes....

  18. Validation of kinetic modeling of progesterone release from polymeric membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analia Irma Romero

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling in drug release systems is fundamental in development and optimization of these systems, since it allows to predict drug release rates and to elucidate the physical transport mechanisms involved. In this paper we validate a novel mathematical model that describes progesterone (Prg controlled release from poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB membranes. A statistical analysis was conducted to compare the fitting of our model with six different models and the Akaike information criterion (AIC was used to find the equation with best-fit. A simple relation between mass and drug released rate was found, which allows predicting the effect of Prg loads on the release behavior. Our proposed model was the one with minimum AIC value, and therefore it was the one that statistically fitted better the experimental data obtained for all the Prg loads tested. Furthermore, the initial release rate was calculated and therefore, the interface mass transfer coefficient estimated and the equilibrium distribution constant of Prg between the PHB and the release medium was also determined. The results lead us to conclude that our proposed model is the one which best fits the experimental data and can be successfully used to describe Prg drug release in PHB membranes.

  19. Computer-aided modeling framework – a generic modeling template for catalytic membrane fixed bed reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorova, Marina; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on development of computer-aided modeling framework. The framework is a knowledge-based system that is built on a generic modeling language and structured based on workflows for different general modeling tasks. The overall objective of this work is to support the model develope...... membrane fixed bed models is developed. The application of the modeling template is highlighted with a case study related to the modeling of a catalytic membrane reactor coupling dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with hydrogenation of nitrobenzene....

  20. Multiset-based Tree Model for Membrane Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a new paradigm - multiset-based tree model. We show that trees can be represented in the form of wellfounded multisets. We also show that the conventional approach for this representation is not injective from a set of trees to the class of multisets representing such trees. We establish a one-to-one correspondence between trees and suitable permutations of a wellfounded multiset, which we call \\textit{tree structures}. We give formal definitions of a \\textit{tree structure} and a \\textit{subtree structure} of a tree structure. Finally, we represent membrane structures in the form of tree structures - a form in which membrane structures can suitably be represented at programming level.

  1. Picornavirus RNA is protected from cleavage by ribonuclease during virion uncoating and transfer across cellular and model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Groppelli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Picornaviruses are non-enveloped RNA viruses that enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Because they lack an envelope, picornaviruses face the challenge of delivering their RNA genomes across the membrane of the endocytic vesicle into the cytoplasm to initiate infection. Currently, the mechanism of genome release and translocation across membranes remains poorly understood. Within the enterovirus genus, poliovirus, rhinovirus 2, and rhinovirus 16 have been proposed to release their genomes across intact endosomal membranes through virally induced pores, whereas one study has proposed that rhinovirus 14 releases its RNA following disruption of endosomal membranes. For the more distantly related aphthovirus genus (e.g. foot-and-mouth disease viruses and equine rhinitis A virus acidification of endosomes results in the disassembly of the virion into pentamers and in the release of the viral RNA into the lumen of the endosome, but no details have been elucidated as how the RNA crosses the vesicle membrane. However, more recent studies suggest aphthovirus RNA is released from intact particles and the dissociation to pentamers may be a late event. In this study we have investigated the RNase A sensitivity of genome translocation of poliovirus using a receptor-decorated-liposome model and the sensitivity of infection of poliovirus and equine-rhinitis A virus to co-internalized RNase A. We show that poliovirus genome translocation is insensitive to RNase A and results in little or no release into the medium in the liposome model. We also show that infectivity is not reduced by co-internalized RNase A for poliovirus and equine rhinitis A virus. Additionally, we show that all poliovirus genomes that are internalized into cells, not just those resulting in infection, are protected from RNase A. These results support a finely coordinated, directional model of viral RNA delivery that involves viral proteins and cellular membranes.

  2. A Rat α-Fetoprotein Binding Activity Prediction Model to Facilitate Assessment of the Endocrine Disruption Potential of Environmental Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixiao Hong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruptors such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, diethylstilbestrol (DES and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT are agents that interfere with the endocrine system and cause adverse health effects. Huge public health concern about endocrine disruptors has arisen. One of the mechanisms of endocrine disruption is through binding of endocrine disruptors with the hormone receptors in the target cells. Entrance of endocrine disruptors into target cells is the precondition of endocrine disruption. The binding capability of a chemical with proteins in the blood affects its entrance into the target cells and, thus, is very informative for the assessment of potential endocrine disruption of chemicals. α-fetoprotein is one of the major serum proteins that binds to a variety of chemicals such as estrogens. To better facilitate assessment of endocrine disruption of environmental chemicals, we developed a model for α-fetoprotein binding activity prediction using the novel pattern recognition method (Decision Forest and the molecular descriptors calculated from two-dimensional structures by Mold2 software. The predictive capability of the model has been evaluated through internal validation using 125 training chemicals (average balanced accuracy of 69% and external validations using 22 chemicals (balanced accuracy of 71%. Prediction confidence analysis revealed the model performed much better at high prediction confidence. Our results indicate that the model is useful (when predictions are in high confidence in endocrine disruption risk assessment of environmental chemicals though improvement by increasing number of training chemicals is needed.

  3. An Approach to Modeling Complex Socio-Economic Impacts and Responses to Climate Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikas, C. K.; Nix, M.; Ihde, A. G.; Weiss, M.; Simpkins, S.; Fountain, G. H.; Paxton, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we describe the application of a proven methodology for modeling the complex social and economic interactions of a system under stress to the issues that are arising and will arise from global climate disruption. There is a long history in the Defense community of using what are known as strategic simulations or "wargames" to model the complex interactions between the environment, people, resources, infrastructure and the economy in a competitive environment. We describe in this paper, work that we have done on understanding how this heritage can be repurposed to help us explore how the complex interplay between climate disruption and our socio/political and economic structures will affect our future. These strategic simulations would be done under the auspices of the GAIA project (http://gaia.jhuapl.edu). While these simulations cannot definitively predict what will happen, they do illuminate non-linear feedbacks between human choices and the environment. These simulations can be focused on the global, regional, or local environment and capture the various actors (governments, agencies, resources, industries, religious/political groups, etc.) that compete to achieve their particular goals. We note that these simulations are not "zero sum" games - there need not be a winner and a loser. They are, however, competitive influence games: they represent the tools that a nation, state, faction or group has at its disposal to influence policy (diplomacy), finances, industry (economy), infrastructure, information, etc to achieve their particular goals. In the simulation, humans play various roles and understand that not everyone shares the same definition of a successful or favorable outcome. Rigorous post-analysis is used to illuminate where decisions were made that enabled or prevented a particular outcome from occurring. In addition, the simulations allow us to investigate how effective "technology injects" can be in achieving a particular, desired end

  4. Mixtures of endocrine disrupting contaminants modelled on human high end exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Kortenkamp, A.; Petersen, Marta Axelstad

    2012-01-01

    though each individual chemical is present at low, ineffective doses, but the effects of mixtures modelled based on human intakes have not previously been investigated. To address this issue for the first time, we selected 13 chemicals for a developmental mixture toxicity study in rats where data about...... in vivo endocrine disrupting effects and information about human exposures was available, including phthalates, pesticides, UV‐filters, bisphenol A, parabens and the drug paracetamol. The mixture ratio was chosen to reflect high end human intakes. To make decisions about the dose levels for studies...... in the rat, we employed the point of departure index (PODI) approach, which sums up ratios between estimated exposure levels and no‐observed‐adverse‐effect‐level (NOAEL) values of individual substances. For high end human exposures to the 13 selected chemicals, we calculated a PODI of 0.016. As only a PODI...

  5. A multi-objective reliable programming model for disruption in supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emran Mohammadi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary concerns on supply chain management is to handle risk components, properly. There are various reasons for having risk in supply chain such as natural disasters, unexpected incidents, etc. When a series of facilities are built and deployed, one or a number of them could probably fail at any time due to bad weather conditions, labor strikes, economic crises, sabotage or terrorist attacks and changes in ownership of the system. The objective of risk management is to reduce the effects of different domains to an acceptable level. To overcome the risk, we propose a reliable capacitated supply chain network design (RSCND model by considering random disruptions risk in both distribution centers and suppliers. The proposed study of this paper considers three objective functions and the implementation is verified using some instance.

  6. Dendritic Homeostasis Disruption in a Novel Frontotemporal Dementia Mouse Model Expressing Cytoplasmic Fused in Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Shiihashi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic aggregation of fused in sarcoma (FUS is detected in brain regions affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD, which compose the disease spectrum, FUS proteinopathy. To understand the pathomechanism of ALS-FTD-associated FUS, we examined the behavior and cellular properties of an ALS mouse model overexpressing FUS with nuclear localization signal deletion. Mutant FUS transgenic mice showed hyperactivity, social interactional deficits, and impaired fear memory retrieval, all of which are compatible with FTD phenotypes. Histological analyses showed decreased dendritic spine and synaptic density in the frontal cortex before neuronal loss. Examination of cultured cells confirmed that mutant but not wild-type FUS was associated with decreased dendritic growth, mRNA levels, and protein synthesis in dendrites. These data suggest that cytoplasmic FUS aggregates impair dendritic mRNA trafficking and translation, in turn leading to dendritic homeostasis disruption and the development of FTD phenotypes.

  7. A new relativistic model for tidal stream evolution during tidal disruption events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servin, Juan; Kesden, Michael

    2018-01-01

    When stars are tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole, approximately half of their original mass becomes gravitationally bound and may eventually produce a tidal flare. The stellar debris evolves into streams that can self-intersect due to relativistic pericenter precession. Energy loss in these inelastic collisions both circularizes the stream and contributes to the tidal flare. Models of this process often assume that all elements of the tidal stream have the same specific energy and angular momentum as the most bound debris element. Real tidal debris possesses a distribution of binding energies, however, which grants it a distribution of orbits. We propose a new treatment for this debris, wherein we evolve the elements of the stream individually. We determine the radial distance (from the black hole) and the time (after the disruption) of the stream collisions as a function of black-hole mass under both Newtonian gravity (N+1PN) and general relativity (GR). We also use the Lane-Emden equation to account for the mass differences among the debris elements when calculating the energy loss in the inelastic collisions. For the N+1PN method, we evolve the stream using Newtonian orbital mechanics and apply pericenter precession after each pericenter passage using a first-order post-Newtonian approximation. Our relativistic method directly integrates the geodesic equations of motion. We see that the higher precession in the fully relativistic method results in more prompt collisions, and that assuming equal masses for the colliding debris elements greatly overestimates the energy loss resulting from these collisions. We also provide light curves for the corresponding flares and compare our predictions to those of previous models.

  8. Influence of the bilayer composition on the binding and membrane disrupting effect of Polybia-MP1, an antimicrobial mastoparan peptide with leukemic T-lymphocyte cell selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Cabrera, Marcia Perez; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Gorjão, Renata; Leite, Natália Bueno; de Souza, Bibiana Monson; Curi, Rui; Procopio, Joaquim; Ruggiero Neto, João; Palma, Mario Sérgio

    2012-06-19

    This study shows that MP-1, a peptide from the venom of the Polybia paulista wasp, is more toxic to human leukemic T-lymphocytes than to human primary lymphocytes. By using model membranes and electrophysiology measurements to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying this selective action, the porelike activity of MP-1 was identified with several bilayer compositions. The highest average conductance was found in bilayers formed by phosphatidylcholine or a mixture of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine (70:30). The presence of cholesterol or cardiolipin substantially decreases the MP-1 pore activity, suggesting that the membrane fluidity influences the mechanism of selective toxicity. The determination of partition coefficients from the anisotropy of Trp indicated higher coefficients for the anionic bilayers. The partition coefficients were found to be 1 order of magnitude smaller when the bilayers contain cholesterol or a mixture of cholesterol and sphingomyelin. The blue shift fluorescence, anisotropy values, and Stern-Volmer constants are indications of a deeper penetration of MP-1 into anionic bilayers than into zwitterionic bilayers. Our results indicate that MP-1 prefers to target leukemic cell membranes, and its toxicity is probably related to the induction of necrosis and not to DNA fragmentation. This mode of action can be interpreted considering a number of bilayer properties like fluidity, lipid charge, and domain formation. Cholesterol-containing bilayers are less fluid and less charged and have a tendency to form domains. In comparison to healthy cells, leukemic T-lymphocyte membranes are deprived of this lipid, resulting in decreased peptide binding and lower conductance. We showed that the higher content of anionic lipids increases the level of binding of the peptide to bilayers. Additionally, the absence of cholesterol resulted in enhanced pore activity. These findings may drive the selective toxicity of MP-1 to Jurkat cells.

  9. Disrupted membrane structure and intracellular Ca²⁺ signaling in adult skeletal muscle with acute knockdown of Bin1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andoria Tjondrokoesoemo

    Full Text Available Efficient intracellular Ca²⁺ ([Ca²⁺]i homeostasis in skeletal muscle requires intact triad junctional complexes comprised of t-tubule invaginations of plasma membrane and terminal cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum. Bin1 consists of a specialized BAR domain that is associated with t-tubule development in skeletal muscle and involved in tethering the dihydropyridine receptors (DHPR to the t-tubule. Here, we show that Bin1 is important for Ca²⁺ homeostasis in adult skeletal muscle. Since systemic ablation of Bin1 in mice results in postnatal lethality, in vivo electroporation mediated transfection method was used to deliver RFP-tagged plasmid that produced short -hairpin (shRNA targeting Bin1 (shRNA-Bin1 to study the effect of Bin1 knockdown in adult mouse FDB skeletal muscle. Upon confirming the reduction of endogenous Bin1 expression, we showed that shRNA-Bin1 muscle displayed swollen t-tubule structures, indicating that Bin1 is required for the maintenance of intact membrane structure in adult skeletal muscle. Reduced Bin1 expression led to disruption of t-tubule structure that was linked with alterations to intracellular Ca²⁺ release. Voltage-induced Ca²⁺ released in isolated single muscle fibers of shRNA-Bin1 showed that both the mean amplitude of Ca²⁺ current and SR Ca²⁺ transient were reduced when compared to the shRNA-control, indicating compromised coupling between DHPR and ryanodine receptor 1. The mean frequency of osmotic stress induced Ca²⁺ sparks was reduced in shRNA-Bin1, indicating compromised DHPR activation. ShRNA-Bin1 fibers also displayed reduced Ca²⁺ sparks' amplitude that was attributed to decreased total Ca²⁺ stores in the shRNA-Bin1 fibers. Human mutation of Bin1 is associated with centronuclear myopathy and SH3 domain of Bin1 is important for sarcomeric protein organization in skeletal muscle. Our study showing the importance of Bin1 in the maintenance of intact t-tubule structure and ([Ca

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    UM,SUKKEE; WANG,C.Y.; CHEN,KEN S.

    2000-02-11

    A transient, multi-dimensional model has been developed to simulate proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The model accounts simultaneously for electrochemical kinetics, current distribution, hydrodynamics and multi-component transport. A single set of conservation equations valid for flow channels, gas-diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane region are developed and numerically solved using a finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The numerical model is validated against published experimental data with good agreement. Subsequently, the model is applied to explore hydrogen dilution effects in the anode feed. The predicted polarization cubes under hydrogen dilution conditions are found to be in qualitative agreement with recent experiments reported in the literature. The detailed two-dimensional electrochemical and flow/transport simulations further reveal that in the presence of hydrogen dilution in the fuel stream, hydrogen is depleted at the reaction surface resulting in substantial kinetic polarization and hence a lower current density that is limited by hydrogen transport from the fuel stream to the reaction site.

  11. Applications of type I antifreeze proteins: studies with model membranes & cryoprotectant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Steven R; Turner, Jennifer J; Harding, Margaret M

    2006-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), found in the body fluids of many species of polar fish allow them to survive in waters colder than the equilibrium freezing point of their blood and other internal fluids. Despite their structural diversity, all AF(G)Ps kinetically depress the temperature at which ice grows in a non-colligative manner and hence exhibit thermal hysteresis. AF(G)Ps also share the ability to interact with and protect mammalian cells and tissues from hypothermic damage (e.g., improved storage of human blood platelets at low temperatures), and are able to stabilize or disrupt membrane composition during low temperature and freezing stress (e.g., cryoprotectant properties in stabilization of sperm and oocytes). This review will summarize studies of AFPs with phospholipids and plant lipids, proposed mechanisms for inhibition of leakage from membranes, and cryoprotectant studies with biological samples. The major focus will be on the alpha-helical type I antifreeze proteins, and synthetic mutants, that have been most widely studied. For completeness, data on glycoproteins will also be presented. While a number of models to explain stabilization and destabilization of different lipid systems have been proposed, it is currently not possible to predict whether a particular AFP will stabilize or destabilize a given lipid system. Furthermore the relationship between the antifreeze property of thermal hysteresis and membrane stabilization is unknown. This lack of detailed knowledge about how AFPs function in the presence of different types of materials has hampered progress toward the development of antifreezes for cold storage of cells, tissues, and organs.

  12. Monocrotaline pyrrole-induced megalocytosis of lung and breast epithelial cells: Disruption of plasma membrane and Golgi dynamics and an enhanced unfolded protein response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Shah, Mehul; Patel, Kirit; Sehgal, Pravin B.

    2006-01-01

    The pyrrolizidine alkaloid monocrotaline (MCT) initiates pulmonary hypertension by inducing a 'megalocytosis' phenotype in target pulmonary arterial endothelial, smooth muscle and Type II alveolar epithelial cells. In cultured endothelial cells, a single exposure to the pyrrolic derivative of monocrotaline (MCTP) results in large cells with enlarged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi and increased vacuoles. However, these cells fail to enter mitosis. Largely based upon data from endothelial cells, we proposed earlier that a disruption of the trafficking and mitosis-sensor functions of the Golgi (the 'Golgi blockade' hypothesis) may represent the subcellular mechanism leading to MCTP-induced megalocytosis. In the present study, we investigated the applicability of the Golgi blockade hypothesis to epithelial cells. MCTP induced marked megalocytosis in cultures of lung A549 and breast MCF-7 cells. This was associated with a change in the distribution of the cis-Golgi scaffolding protein GM130 from a discrete juxtanuclear localization to a circumnuclear distribution consistent with an anterograde block of GM130 trafficking to/through the Golgi. There was also a loss of plasma membrane caveolin-1 and E-cadherin, cortical actin together with a circumnuclear accumulation of clathrin heavy chain (CHC) and α-tubulin. Flotation analyses revealed losses/alterations in the association of caveolin-1, E-cadherin and CHC with raft microdomains. Moreover, megalocytosis was accompanied by an enhanced unfolded protein response (UPR) as evidenced by nuclear translocation of Ire1α and glucose regulated protein 58 (GRP58/ER-60/ERp57) and a circumnuclear accumulation of PERK kinase and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). These data further support the hypothesis that an MCTP-induced Golgi blockade and enhanced UPR may represent the subcellular mechanism leading to enlargement of ER and Golgi and subsequent megalocytosis

  13. QSAR classification models for the prediction of endocrine disrupting activity of brominated flame retardants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarich, Simona; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-06-15

    The identification of potential endocrine disrupting (ED) chemicals is an important task for the scientific community due to their diffusion in the environment; the production and use of such compounds will be strictly regulated through the authorization process of the REACH regulation. To overcome the problem of insufficient experimental data, the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) approach is applied to predict the ED activity of new chemicals. In the present study QSAR classification models are developed, according to the OECD principles, to predict the ED potency for a class of emerging ubiquitary pollutants, viz. brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Different endpoints related to ED activity (i.e. aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonism and antagonism, estrogen receptor agonism and antagonism, androgen and progesterone receptor antagonism, T4-TTR competition, E2SULT inhibition) are modeled using the k-NN classification method. The best models are selected by maximizing the sensitivity and external predictive ability. We propose simple QSARs (based on few descriptors) characterized by internal stability, good predictive power and with a verified applicability domain. These models are simple tools that are applicable to screen BFRs in relation to their ED activity, and also to design safer alternatives, in agreement with the requirements of REACH regulation at the authorization step. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Exponential Decay of Covariances for the Supercritical Membrane Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolthausen, Erwin; Cipriani, Alessandra; Kurt, Noemi

    2017-08-01

    We consider the membrane model, that is the centered Gaussian field on {\\mathbb{Z}^d} whose covariance matrix is given by the inverse of the discrete Bilaplacian. We impose a {δ}-pinning condition, giving a reward of strength {\\varepsilon} for the field to be 0 at any site of the lattice. In this paper we prove that in dimensions {d≥ 5} covariances of the pinned field decay at least exponentially, as opposed to the field without pinning, where the decay is polynomial. The proof is based on estimates for certain discrete weighted norms, a percolation argument and on a Bernoulli domination result.

  15. Towards improved animal models for evaluating social cognition and its disruption in schizophrenia: the CNTRICS initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, Mark J; Bales, Karen L

    2013-11-01

    Social cognition refers to processes used to monitor and interpret social signals from others, to decipher their state of mind, emotional status and intentions, and select appropriate social behaviour. Social cognition is sophisticated in humans, being embedded with verbal language and enacted in a complex cultural environment. Its disruption characterises the entire course of schizophrenia and is correlated with poor functional outcome. Further, deficits in social cognition are related to impairment in other cognitive domains, positive symptoms (paranoia and delusions) and negative symptoms (social withdrawal and reduced motivation). In light of the significance and inadequate management of social cognition deficits, there is a need for translatable experimental procedures for their study, and identification of effective pharmacotherapy. No single paradigm captures the multi-dimensional nature of social cognition, and procedures for assessing ability to infer mental states are not well-developed for experimental therapeutic settings. Accordingly, a recent CNTRICS meeting prioritised procedures for measuring a specific construct: "acquisition and recognition of affective (emotional) states", coupled to individual recognition. Two complementary paradigms for refinement were identified: social recognition/preference in rodents, and visual tracking of social scenes in non-human primates (NHPs). Social recognition is disrupted in genetic, developmental or pharmacological disease models for schizophrenia, and performance in both procedures is improved by the neuropeptide oxytocin. The present article surveys a broad range of procedures for studying social cognition in rodents and NHPs, discusses advantages and drawbacks, and focuses on development of social recognition/preference and gaze-following paradigms for improved study of social cognition deficits in schizophrenia and their potential treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analytical model describes ion conduction in fuel cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Daniel; Tse, Steve; Witten, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Many fuel cell designs employ polyelectrolyte membranes, but little is known about how to tune the parameters (water level, morphology, etc.) to maximize ion conductivity. We came up with a simple model based on a random, discrete water distribution and ion confinement due to neighboring polymer. The results quantitatively agree with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and explain experimental observations. We find that when the ratio of water volume to polymer volume, Vw /Vp , is small, the predicted ion self-diffusion coefficient scales roughly as Dw T√{Vw /Vp } exp(- ⋯Vp /Vw) , where Dw T is the limiting value in pure water at temperature T . At high water levels the model also agrees with MD simulation, plateauing to Dw T . The model predicts a maximum conductivity at a water level higher than is typically used, and that it would be beneficial to increase water retention even at the expense of lower ion concentration. Also, membranes would conduct better if they phase-separated into water-rich and polymer-rich regions. US ARMY MURI #W911NF-10-1-0520.

  17. QSAR modeling and prediction of the endocrine-disrupting potencies of brominated flame retardants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Ester; Kovarich, Simona; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-17

    In the European Union REACH regulation, the chemicals with particularly harmful behaviors, such as endocrine disruptors (EDs), are subject to authorization, and the identification of safer alternatives to these chemicals is required. In this context, the use of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) becomes particularly useful to fill the data gap due to the very small number of experimental data available to characterize the environmental and toxicological profiles of new and emerging pollutants with ED behavior such as brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In this study, different QSAR models were developed on different responses of endocrine disruption measured for several BFRs. The multiple linear regression approach was applied to a variety of theoretical molecular descriptors, and the best models, which were identified from all of the possible combinations of the structural variables, were internally validated for their performance using the leave-one-out (Q(LOO)(2) = 73-91%) procedure and scrambling of the responses. External validation was provided, when possible, by splitting the data sets in training and test sets (range of Q(EXT)(2) = 76-90%), which confirmed the predictive ability of the proposed equations. These models, which were developed according to the principles defined by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development to improve the regulatory acceptance of QSARs, represent a simple tool for the screening and characterization of BFRs.

  18. Magnetic characterization of superparamagnetic nanoparticles pulled through model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Allison L; Wassel, Ronald A; Mondalek, Fadee; Chen, Kejian; Dormer, Kenneth J; Kopke, Richard D

    2007-01-04

    To quantitatively compare in-vitro and in vivo membrane transport studies of targeted delivery, one needs characterization of the magnetically-induced mobility of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION). Flux densities, gradients, and nanoparticle properties were measured in order to quantify the magnetic force on the SPION in both an artificial cochlear round window membrane (RWM) model and the guinea pig RWM. Three-dimensional maps were created for flux density and magnetic gradient produced by a 24-well casing of 4.1 kilo-Gauss neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) disc magnets. The casing was used to pull SPION through a three-layer cell culture RWM model. Similar maps were created for a 4 inch (10.16 cm) cube 48 MGOe NdFeB magnet used to pull polymeric-nanoparticles through the RWM of anesthetized guinea pigs. Other parameters needed to compute magnetic force were nanoparticle and polymer properties, including average radius, density, magnetic susceptibility, and volume fraction of magnetite. A minimum force of 5.04 x 10(-16) N was determined to adequately pull nanoparticles through the in-vitro model. For the guinea pig RWM, the magnetic force on the polymeric nanoparticles was 9.69 x 10-20 N. Electron microscopy confirmed the movement of the particles through both RWM models. As prospective carriers of therapeutic substances, polymers containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were succesfully pulled through the live RWM. The force required to achieve in vivo transport was significantly lower than that required to pull nanoparticles through the in-vitro RWM model. Indeed very little force was required to accomplish measurable delivery of polymeric-SPION composite nanoparticles across the RWM, suggesting that therapeutic delivery to the inner ear by SPION is feasible.

  19. Aroma Stripping under various Forms of Membrane Distillation Processes: Experiments and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    such as volatility, activity coefficient and vapor pressure, it is important to know how these aroma compounds will eventually pass through the membrane. Experiments have been made on an aroma model solution and on black currant juice in a lab scale membrane distillation set up which can be operated in various types...... of MD configurations: Vacuum Membrane Distillation , Sweeping Gas Membrane Distillation , Direct Contact Membrane Distillation and Osmotic Membrane Distillation. The influence of feed temperature and feed flow rate on the permeate flux and concentration factor for different types of aroma compounds have...

  20. Modeling uncertainties in workforce disruptions from influenza pandemics using dynamic input-output analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haimar, Amine; Santos, Joost R

    2014-03-01

    Influenza pandemic is a serious disaster that can pose significant disruptions to the workforce and associated economic sectors. This article examines the impact of influenza pandemic on workforce availability within an interdependent set of economic sectors. We introduce a simulation model based on the dynamic input-output model to capture the propagation of pandemic consequences through the National Capital Region (NCR). The analysis conducted in this article is based on the 2009 H1N1 pandemic data. Two metrics were used to assess the impacts of the influenza pandemic on the economic sectors: (i) inoperability, which measures the percentage gap between the as-planned output and the actual output of a sector, and (ii) economic loss, which quantifies the associated monetary value of the degraded output. The inoperability and economic loss metrics generate two different rankings of the critical economic sectors. Results show that most of the critical sectors in terms of inoperability are sectors that are related to hospitals and health-care providers. On the other hand, most of the sectors that are critically ranked in terms of economic loss are sectors with significant total production outputs in the NCR such as federal government agencies. Therefore, policy recommendations relating to potential mitigation and recovery strategies should take into account the balance between the inoperability and economic loss metrics. © 2013 Society for Risk Analysis.

  1. The disruptive impact of digitalization on the automotive ecosystem: a research agenda on business models, platforms and consumer issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Athanasopoulou, A.; Bouwman, W.A.G.A.; Nikayin, F.A.; de Reuver, G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Digital technologies are transforming the automotive industry, and disrupting traditional business models based on ownership of cars. With the emergence of connected cars, mobility services and servitization, questions arise on how these enabling technologies affect the ecosystem. In this paper, we

  2. Digital pulley reconstruction with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane at the time of tenorrhaphy in an experimental animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semer, N B; Bartle, B K; Telepun, G M; Goldberg, N H

    1992-05-01

    Digital pulley reconstruction with a synthetic material, PTFE membrane, was compared with suture repair of the native A3 pulley at the time of tenorrhaphy in the chicken model. The surgically treated foot was immobilized in flexion for either 28 or 35 days and then allowed full ambulation for periods of up to 42 days postoperatively. At sacrifice digits underwent range-of-motion testing, and the pulley and tenorrhaphy sites were explored. No disruptions were noted in the reconstructed PTFE pulleys. The number of tenorrhaphy disruptions was similar between the PTFE pulley group (11%) and the suture repair of the native pulley group (14%). No decrease in range of motion was demonstrated in the PTFE pulley digits, and no deleterious effect of increasing immobilization time (35 days versus 28 days) was noted. The results indicate that this synthetic pulley did not interfere with normal tendon healing processes. PTFE membrane may prove to be a promising reconstructive alternative when the native pulley is irreparably damaged.

  3. Limitations of membrane cultures as a model solid-state fermentation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahardjo, Y.S.P.; Korona, D.; Haemers, S.; Weber, F.J.; Tramper, J.; Rinzema, A.

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To examine the reliability of membrane cultures as a model solid-state fermentation (SSF) system. Methods and Results: In overcultures of Aspergillus oryzae on sterilized wheat flour discs overlaid with a polycarbonate membrane, we demonstrated that the presence of membrane filters reduced the

  4. Pervaporation : membranes and models for the dehydration of ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitzen, Johannes Wilhelmus Franciscus

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis the dehydration of ethanol/water mixtures by pervaporation using homogeneous membranes is studied. Both the general transport mechanism as well as the development of highly selective membranes for ethanol/water separation are investigated.

  5. Zeolite Membranes : Ozone Detemplation, Modeling, and Performance Characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, J.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane technology plays an increasingly important role in developing a more sustainable process industry. Zeolites are a novel class of membrane materials with unique properties enabling molecular sieving and affinity based separations. This thesis proposes some new concepts in zeolite membrane

  6. Isoeugenol has a non-Disruptive Detergent-like Mechanism of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten eHyldgaard

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Isoeugenol is an essential oil constituent of nutmeg, clove, and cinnamon. Despite isoeugenol’s promising antimicrobial activity, no studies have yet investigated its mode of antibacterial action at the molecular level. The aim of this study is to clarify isoeugenol’s antibacterial mode of action using the Gram-negative and Gram-positive model organisms Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua, respectively. We determined the antimicrobial activity of isoeugenol against the model organisms, and examined how isoeugenol affects cell morphology, cell membrane permeabilization, and how isoeugenol interacts with phospholipid membranes using vesicle and supported lipid bilayer models.Isoeugenol demonstrated a bactericidal activity against E. coli and L. innocua that did not affect cell morphology, although the cell membrane was permeabilized. We hypothesized that the cell membrane was the primary site of action, and studied this interaction in further detail using purified membrane model systems. Isoeugenol’s permeabilization of calcein-encapsulated vesicles was concentration dependent, and isoeugenol’s interaction with giant unilamellar vesicles indicated increased membrane fluidity and a non-disruptive permeabilization mechanism. This contradicted membrane fluidity measurements on supported lipid bilayers, which indicated decreased membrane fluidity. However, further investigations demonstrated that the interaction between isoeugenol and bilayers was reversible, and caused membranes to display heterogeneous topography, an increased mass, and a higher degree of hydration. In conclusion, we propose that isoeugenol interacts with membranes in a reversible non-disruptive detergent-like manner, which causes membrane destabilization. Furthermore, we argue that isoeugenol increases membrane fluidity.

  7. Membrane Trafficking in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Feyder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM, or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC, and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway. Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway. Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes.

  8. Defective membrane remodeling in neuromuscular diseases: insights from animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda S Cowling

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in membrane remodeling play an essential role in a plethora of cell functions including endocytosis and intracellular transport. Defects in several of them lead to human diseases. Myotubularins, amphiphysins, and dynamins are all proteins implicated in membrane trafficking and/or remodeling. Mutations in myotubularin, amphiphysin 2 (BIN1, and dynamin 2 lead to different forms of centronuclear myopathy, while mutations in myotubularin-related proteins cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. In addition to centronuclear myopathy, dynamin 2 is also mutated in a dominant form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. While several proteins from these different families are implicated in similar diseases, mutations in close homologues or in the same protein in the case of dynamin 2 lead to diseases affecting different tissues. This suggests (1 a common molecular pathway underlying these different neuromuscular diseases, and (2 tissue-specific regulation of these proteins. This review discusses the pathophysiology of the related neuromuscular diseases on the basis of animal models developed for proteins of the myotubularin, amphiphysin, and dynamin families. A better understanding of the common mechanisms between these neuromuscular disorders will lead to more specific health care and therapeutic approaches.

  9. Redistribution of Cholesterol in Model Lipid Membranes in Response to the Membrane-Active Peptide Alamethicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, William; Qian, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    The cellular membrane is a heterogeneous, dynamic mixture of molecules and macromolecules that self-assemble into a tightly-regulated functional unit that provides a semipermeable barrier between the cell and its environment. Among the many compositional differences between mammalian and bacterial cell membranes that impact its physical properties, one key difference is cholesterol content, which is more prevalent in mammals. Cholesterol is an amphiphile that associates with membranes and serves to maintain its fluidity and permeability. Membrane-active peptides, such as the alpha-helical peptide alamethicin, interact with membranes in a concentration- and composition-dependent manner to form transmembrane pores that are responsible for the lytic action of the peptide. Through the use of small-angle neutron scattering and deuterium labeling, it was possible to observe a redistribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles in response to the presence of alamethicin at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1/200. The results demonstrate that the membrane remodeling powers of alamethicin reach beyond the membrane thinning effect to altering the localization of specific components in the bilayer, complementing the accepted two-state mechanism of pore formation. Research was supported by U. S. DOE-OBER (CSMB; FWP ERKP291) and the U. S. DOE-BES Scientific User Facilities Division (ORNL's SNS and HFIR).

  10. Severe and protracted sleep disruptions in mouse model of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep; Thakkar, Mahesh M

    2018-03-01

    Increasing evidences suggest that the predator threat model is a valid animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, sleep has never been examined in this model. Since sleep disturbances, including insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness, are severe and protracted symptoms of PTSD, we hypothesized that mice exposed to predator odor trauma (POT) will display contextual fear conditioning along with severe and protracted sleep disruptions. Adult male C57BL/6J mice, instrumented with wire electrodes (to record hippocampal local field potentials [LFP] and nuchal muscle [electromyogram, EMG] activity), were exposed to contextual conditioning using soiled cat litter as unconditional stimulus (US). On day 1, fear memory acquisition (FMA) training was performed by exposing mice to contextual cage (conditional stimulus; CS) for 30 min followed by exposure to CS + US for 90 min. On day 5, fear memory recall (FMR) testing was performed by exposing mice to CS (without US) for 120 min. LFP and EMG were recorded continuously for 5 days. Mice exposed to POT displayed as follows: (1) hyperarousal coupled with electrophysiological indicators of memory acquisition and retrieval (increased hippocampal θ and γ power) during FMA and FMR; (2) increased nonrapid eye movement (NREM) δ and rapid eye movement θ power during sleep post FMA, indicating memory consolidation; (3) protracted sleep disturbances as evident by increased wakefulness, reduced NREM sleep and NREM δ power, increased NREM β power during light (sleep) period, and increased sleep during dark (active) period. Based on these results, we suggest that mice exposed to POT display severe and protracted sleep disturbances mimicking sleep disturbance observed in human PTSD.

  11. Disruption of the Serotonergic System after Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia in a Rodent Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M. Buller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying which specific neuronal phenotypes are vulnerable to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia, where in the brain they are damaged, and the mechanisms that produce neuronal losses are critical to determine the anatomical substrates responsible for neurological impairments in hypoxic-ischemic brain-injured neonates. Here we describe our current work investigating how the serotonergic network in the brain is disrupted in a rodent model of preterm hypoxia-ischemia. One week after postnatal day 3 hypoxia-ischemia, losses of serotonergic raphé neurons, reductions in serotonin levels in the brain, and reduced serotonin transporter expression are evident. These changes can be prevented using two anti-inflammatory interventions; the postinsult administration of minocycline or ibuprofen. However, each drug has its own limitations and benefits for use in neonates to stem damage to the serotonergic network after hypoxia-ischemia. By understanding the fundamental mechanisms underpinning hypoxia-ischemia-induced serotonergic damage we will hopefully move closer to developing a successful clinical intervention to treat neonatal brain injury.

  12. SMN deficiency disrupts brain development in a mouse model of severe spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, Thomas M.; Huang, Jack P.-W.; Murray, Lyndsay M.; Lamont, Douglas J.; Mutsaers, Chantal A.; Ross, Jenny; Geldsetzer, Pascal; Ansorge, Olaf; Talbot, Kevin; Parson, Simon H.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Reduced expression of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene causes the childhood motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Low levels of ubiquitously expressed SMN protein result in the degeneration of lower motor neurons, but it remains unclear whether other regions of the nervous system are also affected. Here we show that reduced levels of SMN lead to impaired perinatal brain development in a mouse model of severe SMA. Regionally selective changes in brain morphology were apparent in areas normally associated with higher SMN levels in the healthy postnatal brain, including the hippocampus, and were associated with decreased cell density, reduced cell proliferation and impaired hippocampal neurogenesis. A comparative proteomics analysis of the hippocampus from SMA and wild-type littermate mice revealed widespread modifications in expression levels of proteins regulating cellular proliferation, migration and development when SMN levels were reduced. This study reveals novel roles for SMN protein in brain development and maintenance and provides the first insights into cellular and molecular pathways disrupted in the brain in a severe form of SMA. PMID:20705736

  13. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...

  14. Advanced Wastewater Treatment Engineering—Investigating Membrane Fouling in both Rotational and Static Membrane Bioreactor Systems Using Empirical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced wastewater treatment using membranes are popular environmental system processes since they allow reuse and recycling. However, fouling is a key limiting factor and so proprietary systems such as Avanti’s RPU-185 Flexidisks membrane bioreactor (MBR use novel rotating membranes to assist in ameliorating it. In earlier research, this rotating process was studied by creating a simulation model based on first principles and traditional fouling mechanisms. In order to directly compare the potential benefits of this rotational system, this follow-up study was carried out using Avanti’s newly developed static (non-rotating Flexidisks MBR system. The results from operating the static pilot unit were simulated and modelled using the rotational fouling model developed earlier however with rotational switching functions turned off and rotational parameters set to a static mode. The study concluded that a rotating MBR system could increase flux throughput when compared against a similar static system. It is thought that although the slowly rotating spindle induces a weak crossflow shear, it is still able to even out cake build up across the membrane surface, thus reducing the likelihood of localised critical flux being exceeded at the micro level and lessening the potential of rapid trans-membrane pressure increases at the macro level.

  15. Modelling membrane hydration and water balance of a pem fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2015-01-01

    propose a novel mathematical zero-dimensional model for water mass balance of a polymer electrolyte membrane. Physical and electrochemical processes occurring in the membrane electrolyte are included; water adsorption/desorption phenomena are also considered. The effect of diffusivity, surface roughness...... of water transport when membrane absorption/desorption is considered in the model. The model becomes useful when studying fuel cell systems in dynamic conditions....

  16. Optimization of bead milling parameters for the cell disruption of microalgae: process modeling and application to Porphyridium cruentum and Nannochloropsis oculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalescot, V; Rinaldi, T; Touchard, R; Jubeau, S; Frappart, M; Jaouen, P; Bourseau, P; Marchal, L

    2015-11-01

    A study of cell disruption by bead milling for two microalgae, Nannochloropsis oculata and Porphyridium cruentum, was performed. Strains robustness was quantified by high-pressure disruption assays. The hydrodynamics in the bead mill grinding chamber was studied by Residence Time Distribution modeling. Operating parameters effects were analyzed and modeled in terms of stress intensities and stress number. RTD corresponded to a 2 CSTR in series model. First order kinetics cell disruption was modeled in consequence. Continuous bead milling was efficient for both strains disruption. SI-SN modeling was successfully adapted to microalgae. As predicted by high pressure assays, N. oculata was more resistant than P. cruentum. The critical stress intensity was twice more important for N. oculata than for P. cruentum. SI-SN modeling allows the determination of operating parameters minimizing energy consumption and gives a scalable approach to develop and optimize microalgal disruption by bead milling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces membrane fluidity, inhibits cholesterol domain formation, and normalizes bilayer width in atherosclerotic-like model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol crystalline domains characterize atherosclerotic membranes, altering vascular signaling and function. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce membrane lipid peroxidation and subsequent cholesterol domain formation. We evaluated non-peroxidation-mediated effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), other TG-lowering agents, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and other long-chain fatty acids on membrane fluidity, bilayer width, and cholesterol domain formation in model membranes. In membranes prepared at 1.5:1 cholesterol-to-phospholipid (C/P) mole ratio (creating pre-existing domains), EPA, glycyrrhizin, arachidonic acid, and alpha linolenic acid promoted the greatest reductions in cholesterol domains (by 65.5%, 54.9%, 46.8%, and 45.2%, respectively) compared to controls; other treatments had modest effects. EPA effects on cholesterol domain formation were dose-dependent. In membranes with 1:1 C/P (predisposing domain formation), DHA, but not EPA, dose-dependently increased membrane fluidity. DHA also induced cholesterol domain formation without affecting temperature-induced changes in-bilayer unit cell periodicity relative to controls (d-space; 57Å-55Å over 15-30°C). Together, these data suggest simultaneous formation of distinct cholesterol-rich ordered domains and cholesterol-poor disordered domains in the presence of DHA. By contrast, EPA had no effect on cholesterol domain formation and produced larger d-space values relative to controls (60Å-57Å; pacids with differing chain length or unsaturation may differentially influence membrane lipid dynamics and structural organization as a result of distinct phospholipid/sterol interactions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. The disruptive impact of digitalization on the automotive ecosystem: a research agenda on business models, platforms and consumer issues

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasopoulou, A.; Bouwman, W.A.G.A.; Nikayin, F.A.; de Reuver, G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Digital technologies are transforming the automotive industry, and disrupting traditional business models based on ownership of cars. With the emergence of connected cars, mobility services and servitization, questions arise on how these enabling technologies affect the ecosystem. In this paper, we propose a research agenda for the digitalized automotive ecosystem. In this research agenda we raise research questions on the impacts of digitalization on business models (i.e. how to move from tr...

  19. The fornix provides multiple biomarkers to characterize circuit disruption in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, Alexandra; Kane, Lauren; Anderson, Robert J; Qi, Yi; Foster, Mark; Cofer, Gary P; Medvitz, Neil; Buckley, Anne F; Badea, Andreas K; Wetsel, William C; Colton, Carol A

    2016-11-15

    Multivariate biomarkers are needed for detecting Alzheimer's disease (AD), understanding its etiology, and quantifying the effect of therapies. Mouse models provide opportunities to study characteristics of AD in well-controlled environments that can help facilitate development of early interventions. The CVN-AD mouse model replicates multiple AD hallmark pathologies, and we identified multivariate biomarkers characterizing a brain circuit disruption predictive of cognitive decline. In vivo and ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that CVN-AD mice replicate the hippocampal atrophy (6%), characteristic of humans with AD, and also present changes in subcortical areas. The largest effect was in the fornix (23% smaller), which connects the septum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. In characterizing the fornix with diffusion tensor imaging, fractional anisotropy was most sensitive (20% reduction), followed by radial (15%) and axial diffusivity (2%), in detecting pathological changes. These findings were strengthened by optical microscopy and ultrastructural analyses. Ultrastructual analysis provided estimates of axonal density, diameters, and myelination-through the g-ratio, defined as the ratio between the axonal diameter, and the diameter of the axon plus the myelin sheath. The fornix had reduced axonal density (47% fewer), axonal degeneration (13% larger axons), and abnormal myelination (1.5% smaller g-ratios). CD68 staining showed that white matter pathology could be secondary to neuronal degeneration, or due to direct microglial attack. In conclusion, these findings strengthen the hypothesis that the fornix plays a role in AD, and can be used as a disease biomarker and as a target for therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigating Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard, Stine Schmieg; Rosenstand, Claus Andreas Foss

    This book shares knowledge collected from 2015 and onward within the Consortium for Digital Disruption anchored at Aalborg University (www.dd.aau.dk). Evidenced by this publication, the field of disruptive innovation research has gone through several stages of operationalizing the theory. In recent...... years, researchers are increasingly looking back towards the origins of the theory in attempts to cure it from its most obvious flaws. This is especially true for the use of the theory in making predictions about future disruptions. In order to continue to develop a valuable theory of disruption, we...... find it useful to first review what the theory of disruptive innovation initially was, how it has developed, and where we are now. A cross section of disruptive innovation literature has been reviewed in order to form a general foundation from which we might better understand the changing world...

  1. Modelling and validation of Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, A. K. M.; Basran, N.; Khan, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is the outcome of a small scale fuel cell project. Fuel cell is an electrochemical device that converts energy from chemical reaction to electrical work. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the different types of fuel cell, which is more efficient, having low operational temperature and fast start up capability results in high energy density. In this study, a mathematical model of 1.2 W PEMFC is developed and simulated using MATLAB software. This model describes the PEMFC behaviour under steady-state condition. This mathematical modeling of PEMFC determines the polarization curve, power generated, and the efficiency of the fuel cell. Simulation results were validated by comparing with experimental results obtained from the test of a single PEMFC with a 3 V motor. The performance of experimental PEMFC is little lower compared to simulated PEMFC, however both results were found in good agreement. Experiments on hydrogen flow rate also been conducted to obtain the amount of hydrogen consumed to produce electrical work on PEMFC.

  2. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: A lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, David A.; Chapman, Dennis

    1979-01-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure—area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T0, which locates the gel—fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a “smooth” homogeneous surface (“cholesterol-like”) and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T0 can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken “annulus” of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T0 does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10-7 sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed. PMID:286996

  3. Mechanics and dynamics of triglyceride-phospholipid model membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi I.; Duelund, Lars; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate here that triolein alters the mechanical properties of phospholipid membranes and induces extraordinary conformational dynamics. Triolein containing membranes exhibit fluctuations up to size range of 100µm and with the help of these are e.g. able to squeeze through narrow passages...... with larger lamellar distances observed in the TOPOPC membranes. These findings suggest repulsion between adjacent membranes. We provide a comprehensive discussion on the possible explanations for the observed mechanics and dynamics in the TOPOPC system and on their potential cellular implications....

  4. The practical use of resistance modelling to interpret the gas separation properties of hollow fiber membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Fauzi Ismail; Shilton, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    A simple resistance modelling methodology is presented for gas transport through asymmetric polymeric membranes. The methodology allows fine structural properties such as active layer thickness and surface porosity, to be determined from experimental gas permeation data. This paper, which could be regarded as a practical guide, shows that resistance modeling, if accompanied by realistic working assumptions, need not be difficult and can provide a valuable insight into the relationships between the membrane fabrication conditions and performance of gas separation membranes. (Author)

  5. An advanced simulation model for membrane bioreactors: development, calibration and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, T; Gaida, D; Keysers, C; Pinnekamp, J; Bongards, M; Kern, P; Wolf, C; Sousa Brito, A L

    2012-01-01

    Membrane wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have several advantages compared with conventionally designed WWTPs with classical purification techniques. The filtration process is the key to their commercial success in Germany with respect to energy consumption and effectiveness, enabled by the optimization of filtration using a dynamic simulation model. This work is focused on the development of a robust, flexible and practically applicable membrane simulation model for submerged hollow-fibre and flat-sheet membrane modules. The model is based on standard parameters usually measured on membrane WWTPs. The performance of the model is demonstrated by successful calibration and validation for three different full-scale membrane WWTPs achieving good results. Furthermore, the model is combinable with Activated Sludge Models.

  6. Parametric linear modeling of circular cMUT membranes in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köymen, Hayrettin; Senlik, Muhammed N; Atalar, Abdullah; Olcum, Selim

    2007-06-01

    We present a lumped element parametric model for the clamped circular membrane of a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT). The model incorporates an electrical port and two sets of acoustic ports, through which the cMUT couples to the medium. The modeling approach is based on matching a lumped element model and the mechanical impedance of the cMUT membrane at the resonance frequencies in vacuum. Very good agreement between finite element simulation results and model impedance is obtained. Equivalent circuit model parameters can be found from material properties and membrane dimensions without a need for finite element simulation.

  7. An averaged polarizable potential for multiscale modeling in phospholipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witzke, Sarah; List, Nanna Holmgaard; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2017-01-01

    is underlined for the description of larger assemblies of lipids, that is, membranes. In conclusion, we find that specially developed polarizable parameters are needed for embedding calculations in membranes, while common non-polarizable point-charge force fields usually perform well enough for structural...

  8. Handling Disruptions in Supply Chains : An Integrated Framework and an Agent-based Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behdani, B.

    2013-01-01

    The degree of supply chain risk faced by many companies has risen dramatically and the impact of disruptions can cascade easily across companies’ and countries’ borders. To handle this increased vulnerability, systematic approaches and decision making tools are needed to provide support in managing

  9. Genetic and environmental models of circadian disruption link SRC-2 function to hepatic pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circadian rhythmicity is a fundamental process that synchronizes behavioral cues with metabolic homeostasis. Disruption of daily cycles due to jet lag or shift work results in severe physiological consequences including advanced aging, metabolic syndrome, and even cancer. Our understanding of the mo...

  10. Aroma Stripping under various Forms of Membrane Distillation Processes: Experiments and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    Concentration of fruit juices by membrane distillation is an interesting process as it can be done at low temperature giving a gentle concentration process with little deterioration of the juices. Since the juices contains many different aroma compounds with a wide range of chemical properties...... such as volatility, activity coefficient and vapor pressure, it is important to know how these aroma compounds will eventually pass through the membrane. Experiments have been made on an aroma model solution and on black currant juice in a lab scale membrane distillation set up which can be operated in various types...... of MD configurations: Vacuum Membrane Distillation , Sweeping Gas Membrane Distillation , Direct Contact Membrane Distillation and Osmotic Membrane Distillation. The influence of feed temperature and feed flow rate on the permeate flux and concentration factor for different types of aroma compounds have...

  11. An Analytical Model for CMUTs with Square Multilayer Membranes Using the Ritz Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT multilayer membrane plays an important role in the performance metrics including the transmitting efficiency and the receiving sensitivity. However, there are few studies of the multilayer membranes. Some analytical models simplify the multilayer membrane as monolayer, which results in inaccuracies. This paper presents a new analytical model for CMUTs with multilayer membranes, which can rapidly and accurately predict static deflection and response frequency of the multilayer membrane under external pressures. The derivation is based on the Ritz method and Hamilton’s principle. The mathematical relationships between the external pressure, static deflection, and response frequency are obtained. Relevant residual stress compensation method is derived. The model has been verified for three-layer and double-layer CMUT membranes by comparing its results with finite element method (FEM simulations, experimental data, and other monolayer models that treat CMUTs as monolayer plates/membranes. For three-layer CMUT membranes, the relative errors are ranging from 0.71%–3.51% for the static deflection profiles, and 0.35%–4.96% for the response frequencies, respectively. For the double-layer CMUT membrane, the relative error with residual stress compensation is 4.14% for the central deflection, and −1.17% for the response frequencies, respectively. This proposed analytical model can serve as a reliable reference and an accurate tool for CMUT design and optimization.

  12. Testing the effects of safety climate and disruptive children behavior on school bus drivers performance: A multilevel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Dov; Lee, Jin

    2016-10-01

    The study was designed to test a multilevel path model whose variables exert opposing effects on school bus drivers' performance. Whereas departmental safety climate was expected to improve driving safety, the opposite was true for in-vehicle disruptive children behavior. The driving safety path in this model consists of increasing risk-taking practices starting with safety shortcuts leading to rule violations and to near-miss events. The study used a sample of 474 school bus drivers in rural areas, driving children to school and school-related activities. Newly developed scales for measuring predictor, mediator and outcome variables were validated with video data taken from inner and outer cameras, which were installed in 29 buses. Results partially supported the model by indicating that group-level safety climate and individual-level children distraction exerted opposite effects on the driving safety path. Furthermore, as hypothesized, children disruption moderated the strength of the safety rule violation-near miss relationship, resulting in greater strength under high disruptiveness. At the same time, the hypothesized interaction between the two predictor variables was not supported. Theoretical and practical implications for studying safety climate in general and distracted driving in particular for professional drivers are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Understanding Detergent Effects on Lipid Membranes: A Model Study of Lysolipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Feldborg, Lise Nørkjær

    2010-01-01

    in terms of a phenomenological model based on continuum elastic theory, which yields information about the curvature-inducing properties of the LPC molecule. The results reveal: 1), an increase in the partition coefficient with increasing LPC acyl-chain length; and 2), that the degree of acyl-chain...... mismatch between LPC and POPC determines the magnitude of the membrane mechanical perturbation per LPC molecule in the membrane. Finally, the three-stage model describing detergent membrane interaction has been extended by a parameter D-MCI, which governs the membrane curvature stability in the detergent...... concentration range below the cmc-value of the LPC molecule....

  14. Key factors regulating the mass delivery of macromolecules to model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Richard A.; Watkins, Erik B.; Jagalski, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    We show that both gravity and electrostatics are key factors regulating interactions between model cell membranes and self-assembled liquid crystalline aggregates of dendrimers and phospholipids. The system is a proxy for the trafficking of reservoirs of therapeutic drugs to cell membranes for sl...... of the aggregates to activate endocytosis pathways on specific cell types is discussed in the context of targeted drug delivery applications.......We show that both gravity and electrostatics are key factors regulating interactions between model cell membranes and self-assembled liquid crystalline aggregates of dendrimers and phospholipids. The system is a proxy for the trafficking of reservoirs of therapeutic drugs to cell membranes for slow...

  15. Mass and Heat Transfer Analysis of Membrane Humidifier with a Simple Lumped Mass Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Duk; Bae, Ho June; Ahn, Kook Young; Yu, Sang Seok; Hwang, Joon Young

    2009-01-01

    The performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is seriously changed by the humidification condition which is intrinsic characteristics of the PEMFC. Typically, the humidification of fuel cell is carried out with internal or external humidifier. A membrane humidifier is applied to the external humidification of residential power generation fuel cell due to its convenience and high performance. In this study, a simple static model is constructed to understand the physical phenomena of the membrane humidifier in terms of geometric parameters and operating parameters. The model utilizes the concept of shell and tube heat exchanger but the model is also able to estimate the mass transport through the membrane. Model is constructed with FORTRAN under Matlab/Simulink □ environment to keep consistency with other components model which we already developed. Results shows that the humidity of wet gas and membrane thickness are critical parameters to improve the performance of the humidifier

  16. Replica Ornstein-Zernike Theory Applied for Studying the Equilibrium Distribution of Electrolytes across Model Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Lukšič, Miha

    2018-01-24

    By means of replica Ornstein-Zernike theory (supplemented in a few cases by Monte Carlo simulations) we examined the distribution of an annealed primitive model +1:-1 electrolyte in a mixture with uncharged hard spheres, or another model +1:-1 or +2:-1 electrolyte inside and outside the quenched vesicles, decorated by a model membrane, and across the membrane phase. We explored the influence of the size and charge of the annealed fluid on the partition equilibrium, as well as the effect of the vesicle size and membrane interaction parameters (repulsive barrier height, attractive depth, and membrane width). A hydrophobic cation, present in the mixture with NaCl, slightly enhanced the concentration of sodium ions inside the model vesicle, compared to pure NaCl solution. The replica theory was in good agreement with computer simulations and as such adequate for studying partitioning of small and hydrophobic ions or hydrophobic solutes across model membranes.

  17. Characterisation of the effects of caffeine on sleep in the rat: a potential model of sleep disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, L M; Wilson, S J; Nutt, D J; Hutson, P H; Ivarsson, M

    2009-07-01

    Caffeine is known to disrupt sleep and its administration to human subjects has been used to model sleep disruption. We previously showed that its effects on sleep onset latency are comparable between rats and humans. This study evaluated the potential use of caffeine as a model of sleep disruption in the rat, by assessing its effects on sleep architecture and electroencephalogram (EEG) frequency spectrum, and using sleep-promoting drugs to reverse these effects. Rats were implanted with radiotelemetry devices for body temperature, EEG, electromyogram and locomotor activity. Following recovery, animals were dosed with caffeine (10 mg/kg) alone or in combination with zolpidem (10 mg/kg) or trazodone (20 mg/kg). Sleep was scored for the subsequent 12 h using automated analysis software. Caffeine dose-dependently disrupted sleep: it increased WAKE time, decreased NREM (non-REM) sleep time and NREM bout duration (but not bout number), and decreased delta activity in NREM sleep. It also dose-dependently increased locomotor activity and body temperature. When given alone, zolpidem suppressed REM whilst trazodone increased NREM sleep time at the expense of WAKE, increased NREM bout duration, increased delta activity in NREM sleep and reduced body temperature. In combination, zolpidem attenuated caffeine's effects on WAKE, whilst trazodone attenuated its effects on NREM sleep, NREM bout duration, delta activity, body temperature and locomotor activity. Caffeine administration produced many of the signs of insomnia that were improved by two of its most successful current treatments. This model may therefore be useful in the study of new drugs for the treatment of sleep disturbance.

  18. Chemo-mechanical model of biological membranes for actuation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Vishnu-Baba; Leo, Donald J.

    2005-05-01

    Plants have the ability to develop large mechanical force from chemical energy available with bio-fuels. The energy released by ATP hydrolysis assists the transport of ions and fluids to achieve volumetric expansion and homeostasis. Materials that develop pressure and hence strain similar to bio-materials are classified as nastic materials. Recent calculations for controlled actuation of an active material inspired by biological transport mechanism demonstrated the feasibility of developing such a material with actuation energy densities on the order of 100 kJ/m3. Our initial investigation was based on capsules that generate pressure thus causing strain in the surrounding matrix material. Our present work focuses on our efforts to fabricate a representative actuation structure and describes the chemo-mechanical constitutive equation for such a material. The actuator considered in this work is a laminated arrangement of a hydraulic actuator plate with microscopic barrels and a fluid reservoir kept separated by a semi-permeable membrane dispersed with biological transporters. We present here our initial design and a mathematical model to predict the fluid flux and strain developed in such an actuator.

  19. Theoretical modeling and experimental validation of transport and separation properties of carbon nanotube electrospun membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jung Gil

    2016-12-27

    Developing a high flux and selective membrane is required to make membrane distillation (MD) a more attractive desalination process. Amongst other characteristics membrane hydrophobicity is significantly important to get high vapor transport and low wettability. In this study, a laboratory fabricated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite electrospun (E-CNT) membrane was tested and has showed a higher permeate flux compared to poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PH) electrospun membrane (E-PH membrane) in a direct contact MD (DCMD) configuration. Only 1% and 2% of CNTs incorporation resulted in an enhanced permeate flux with lower sensitivity to feed salinity while treating a 35 and 70 g/L NaCl solutions. Experimental results and the mechanisms of E-CNT membrane were validated by a proposed new step-modeling approach. The increased vapor transport in E-CNT membranes could not be elucidated by an enhancement of mass transfer only at a given physico-chemical properties. However, the theoretical modeling approach considering the heat and mass transfers simultaneously enabled to explain successfully the enhanced flux in the DCMD process using E-CNT membranes. This indicates that both mass and heat transfers improved by CNTs are attributed to the enhanced vapor transport in the E-CNT membrane.

  20. Disruption of lolCDE, Encoding an ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter, Is Lethal for Escherichia coli and Prevents Release of Lipoproteins from the Inner Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tanaka, Kimie; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter LolCDE was previously identified, by using reconstituted proteoliposomes, as an apparatus catalyzing the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. Mutations resulting in defective LolD were previously shown to be lethal for E. coli. The amino acid sequences of LolC and LolE are similar to each other, but the necessity of both proteins for lipoprotein release has not been proved. Moreover, previous reconstituti...

  1. Pore-scale modeling and simulation of flow, transport, and adsorptive or osmotic effects in membranes: the influence of membrane microstructure

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.

    2015-07-17

    The selection of an appropriate membrane for a particular application is a complex and expensive process. Computational modeling can significantly aid membrane researchers and manufacturers in this process. The membrane morphology is highly influential on its efficiency within several applications, but is often overlooked in simulation. Two such applications which are very important in the provision of clean water are forward osmosis and filtration using functionalized micro/ultra/nano-filtration membranes. Herein, we investigate the effect of the membrane morphology in these two applications. First we present results of the separation process using resolved finger- and sponge-like support layers. Second, we represent the functionalization of a typical microfiltration membrane using absorptive pore walls, and illustrate the effect of different microstructures on the reactive process. Such numerical modeling will aid manufacturers in optimizing operating conditions and designing efficient membranes.

  2. Multiscale Modeling of Polymer Membranes for Soldiers Protective Clothing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andzelm, Jan; Sloan, James; Napadensky, Eugene; Beyer, Rick; Snyder, James; McKnight, Steven; Chung, Peter W

    2006-01-01

    .... These simulations lead to the prediction of the architecture and morphology of the membrane. We have also studied mesoscale morphology of the copolymer constrained by a surface or the nanopore...

  3. A Sound Processor for Cochlear Implant Using a Simple Dual Path Nonlinear Model of Basilar Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Ho

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new active nonlinear model of the frequency response of the basilar membrane in biological cochlea called the simple dual path nonlinear (SDPN) model and a novel sound processing strategy for cochlear implants (CIs) based upon this model. The SDPN model was developed to utilize the advantages of the level-dependent frequency response characteristics of the basilar membrane for robust formant representation under noisy conditions. In comparison to the dual resonance nonlinear mode...

  4. Experimental Support for a Predictive Osmotic Model of Clay Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, S.J.

    2001-01-01

    Osmosis has been cited as a mechanism for explaining anomalously high fluid pressures in the subsurface. Clays and shales act as membranes, and osmotic flux across these units may result in pressures sufficiently high to explain these anomalies. The theoretical osmotic pressures as calculated solely from solution properties can be quite large; however, it is not yet resolved whether these geologic membranes are sufficiently ideal to generate such pressures

  5. Binding dynamics of hepatitis C virus' NS5A amphipathic peptide to cell and model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam-Joon; Cheong, Kwang Ho; Lee, ChoongHo; Frank, Curtis W; Glenn, Jeffrey S

    2007-06-01

    Membrane association of the hepatitis C virus NS5A protein is required for viral replication. This association is dependent on an N-terminal amphipathic helix (AH) within NS5A and is restricted to a subset of host cell intracellular membranes. The mechanism underlying this specificity is not known, but it may suggest a novel strategy for developing specific antiviral therapy. Here we have probed the mechanistic details of NS5A AH-mediated binding to both cell-derived and model membranes by use of biochemical membrane flotation and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) with dissipation. With both assays, we observed AH-mediated binding to model lipid bilayers. When cell-derived membranes were coated on the quartz nanosensor, however, significantly more binding was detected, and the QCM-derived kinetic measurements suggested the existence of an interacting receptor in the target membranes. Biochemical flotation assays performed with trypsin-treated cell-derived membranes exhibited reduced AH-mediated membrane binding, while membrane binding of control cytochrome b5 remained unaffected. Similarly, trypsin treatment of the nanosensor coated with cellular membranes abolished AH peptide binding to the cellular membranes but did not affect the binding of a control lipid-binding peptide. These results therefore suggest that a protein plays a critical role in mediating and stabilizing the binding of NS5A's AH to its target membrane. These results also demonstrate the successful development of a new nanosensor technology ideal both for studying the interaction between a protein and its target membrane and for developing inhibitors of that interaction.

  6. Caffeine blocks disruption of blood brain barrier in a rabbit model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghribi Othman

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High levels of serum cholesterol and disruptions of the blood brain barrier (BBB have all been implicated as underlying mechanisms in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Results from studies conducted in animals and humans suggest that caffeine might be protective against Alzheimer's disease but by poorly understood mechanisms. Using rabbits fed a cholesterol-enriched diet, we tested our hypothesis that chronic ingestion of caffeine protects against high cholesterol diet-induced disruptions of the BBB. New Zealand rabbits were fed a 2% cholesterol-enriched diet, and 3 mg caffeine was administered daily in drinking water for 12 weeks. Total cholesterol and caffeine concentrations from blood were measured. Olfactory bulbs (and for some studies hippocampus and cerebral cortex as well were evaluated for BBB leakage, BBB tight junction protein expression levels, activation of astrocytes, and microglia density using histological, immunostaining and immunoblotting techniques. We found that caffeine blocked high cholesterol diet-induced increases in extravasation of IgG and fibrinogen, increases in leakage of Evan's blue dye, decreases in levels of the tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1, increases in astrocytes activation and microglia density where IgG extravasation was present. Chronic ingestion of caffeine protects against high cholesterol diet-induced increases in disruptions of the BBB, and caffeine and drugs similar to caffeine might be useful in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. A Model of Direct Contact Membrane Distillation of Black Currant Juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Busch; Christensen, Knud Villy; Andrésen, René

    2011-01-01

    A numerical model to describe a direct contact membrane distillation proces has been developed. Said model is based on the Dusty Gas model and shell mass and energy balances over a tubular membrane module.  "The solution is applicable to laminar, incompressible and continuous flow in shell......-side spacing of tubular-type unit."  Turtuosity and porosity are characteristics of the membrane in use and have been estimated base don eksperimental studies on destillation of pure water. The fitted model shows a good fit to experimental data obtained by destillation of black currant juice....

  8. Pervaporation separation of n-heptane/thiophene mixtures by polyethylene glycol membranes: Modeling and experimental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ligang; Zhang, Yuzhong; Kong, Ying

    2009-11-01

    Gasoline desulfurization by membrane processes is a newly emerged technology, which has provided an efficient new approach for sulfur removal and gained increasing attention of the membrane and petrochemical field. A deep understanding of the solution/diffusion of gasoline molecules on/in the membrane can provide helpful information in improving or optimizing membrane performance. In this study, a desulfurization mechanism of polyethylene glycol (PEG) membranes has been investigated by the study of sorption and diffusion behavior of typical sulfur and hydrocarbon species through PEG membranes. A solution-diffusion model based on UNIFAC and free volume theory has been established. Pervaporation (PV) and sorption experiments were conducted to compare with the model calculation results and to analyze the mass transport behavior. The dynamic sorption curves for pure components and the sorption experiments for binary mixtures showed that thiophene, which had a higher solubility coefficient than n-heptane, was the preferential sorption component, which is key in the separation of thiophene/hydrocarbon mixtures. In all cases, the model calculation results fit well the experimental data. The UNIFAC model was a sound way to predict the solubility of solvents in membranes. The established model can predict the removal of thiophene species from hydrocarbon compounds by PEG membranes effectively.

  9. Scale-Up Design Analysis and Modelling of Cobalt Oxide Silica Membrane Module for Hydrogen Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozhao Ji

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the application of a validated mathematical model for gas permeation at high temperatures focusing on demonstrated scale-up design for H2 processing. The model considered the driving force variation with spatial coordinates and the mass transfer across the molecular sieve cobalt oxide silica membrane to predict the separation performance. The model was used to study the process of H2 separation at 500 °C in single and multi-tube membrane modules. Parameters of interest included the H2 purity in the permeate stream, H2 recovery and H2 yield as a function of the membrane length, number of tubes in a membrane module, space velocity and H2 feed molar fraction. For a single tubular membrane, increasing the length of a membrane tube led to higher H2 yield and H2 recovery, owing to the increase of the membrane area. However, the H2 purity decreased as H2 fraction was depleted, thus reducing the driving force for H2 permeation. By keeping the membrane length constant in a multi-tube arrangement, the H2 yield and H2 recovery increase was attributed to the higher membrane area, but the H2 purity was again compromised. Increasing the space velocity avoided the reduction of H2 purity and still delivered higher H2 yield and H2 recovery than in a single membrane arrangement. Essentially, if the membrane surface is too large, the driving force becomes lower at the expense of H2 purity. In this case, the membrane module is over designed. Hence, maintaining a driving force is of utmost importance to deliver the functionality of process separation.

  10. Petri Net-Based Model of Helicobacter pylori Mediated Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins in Stomach Lining during Gastric Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anam Naz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tight junctions help prevent the passage of digestive enzymes and microorganisms through the space between adjacent epithelial cells lining. However, Helicobacter pylori encoded virulence factors negatively regulate these tight junctions and contribute to dysfunction of gastric mucosa. Here, we have predicted the regulation of important tight junction proteins, such as Zonula occludens-1, Claudin-2 and Connexin32 in the presence of pathogenic proteins. Molecular events such as post translational modifications and crosstalk between phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, palmitoylation and methylation are explored which may compromise the integrity of these tight junction proteins. Furthermore, the signaling pathways disrupted by dysregulated kinases, proteins and post-translational modifications are reviewed to design an abstracted computational model showing the situation-dependent dynamic behaviors of these biological processes and entities. A qualitative hybrid Petri Net model is therefore constructed showing the altered host pathways in the presence of virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A, leading to the disruption of tight junction proteins. The model is qualitative logic-based, which does not depend on any kinetic parameter and quantitative data and depends on knowledge derived from experiments. The designed model provides insights into the tight junction disruption and disease progression. Model is then verified by the available experimental data, nevertheless formal in vitro experimentation is a promising way to ensure its validation. The major findings propose that H. pylori activated kinases are responsible to trigger specific post translational modifications within tight junction proteins, at specific sites. These modifications may favor alterations in gastric barrier and provide a route to bacterial invasion into host cells.

  11. Particle-based membrane model for mesoscopic simulation of cellular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mohsen; Weikl, Thomas R.; Noé, Frank

    2018-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient coarse-grained and solvent-free model for simulating lipid bilayer membranes. In order to be used in concert with particle-based reaction-diffusion simulations, the model is purely based on interacting and reacting particles, each representing a coarse patch of a lipid monolayer. Particle interactions include nearest-neighbor bond-stretching and angle-bending and are parameterized so as to reproduce the local membrane mechanics given by the Helfrich energy density over a range of relevant curvatures. In-plane fluidity is implemented with Monte Carlo bond-flipping moves. The physical accuracy of the model is verified by five tests: (i) Power spectrum analysis of equilibrium thermal undulations is used to verify that the particle-based representation correctly captures the dynamics predicted by the continuum model of fluid membranes. (ii) It is verified that the input bending stiffness, against which the potential parameters are optimized, is accurately recovered. (iii) Isothermal area compressibility modulus of the membrane is calculated and is shown to be tunable to reproduce available values for different lipid bilayers, independent of the bending rigidity. (iv) Simulation of two-dimensional shear flow under a gravity force is employed to measure the effective in-plane viscosity of the membrane model and show the possibility of modeling membranes with specified viscosities. (v) Interaction of the bilayer membrane with a spherical nanoparticle is modeled as a test case for large membrane deformations and budding involved in cellular processes such as endocytosis. The results are shown to coincide well with the predicted behavior of continuum models, and the membrane model successfully mimics the expected budding behavior. We expect our model to be of high practical usability for ultra coarse-grained molecular dynamics or particle-based reaction-diffusion simulations of biological systems.

  12. (CryoTransmission Electron Microscopy of Phospholipid Model Membranes Interacting with Amphiphilic and Polyphilic Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Meister

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipid membranes can incorporate amphiphilic or polyphilic molecules leading to specific functionalities and to adaptable properties of the lipid bilayer host. The insertion of guest molecules into membranes frequently induces changes in the shape of the lipid matrix that can be visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM techniques. Here, we review the use of stained and vitrified specimens in (cryoTEM to characterize the morphology of amphiphilic and polyphilic molecules upon insertion into phospholipid model membranes. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of novel synthetic amphiphilic and polyphilic bolalipids and polymers on membrane integrity and shape stability.

  13. Modeling of hydrodynamics in hollow fiber membrane bioreactor for mammalian cells cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Menshutina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical modelling in CFD-packages are powerfull instrument for design and calculation of any engineering tasks. CFD-package contains the set of programs that allow to model the different objects behavior based on the mathematical lows. ANSYS Fluent are widely used for modelling of biotechnological and chemical-technological processes. This package is convenient to describe their hydrodynamics. As cell cultivation is one of the actual scientific direction in modern biotechnology ANSYS Fluent was used to create the model of hollow fiber membrane bioreactor. The fibers are hollow cylindrical membrane to be used for cell cultivation. The criterion of process effectiveness for cell growth is full filling of the membrane surface by cells in the bioreactor. While the cell growth the fiber permeability is decreased which effects to feed flow through membrane pores. The specific feature of this process is to ensure such feed flow to deliver the optimal nutrition for the cells on the external membrane surface. The velocity distribution inside the fiber and in all bioreactor as a whole has been calculated based on mass an impulse conservation equations taking into account the mathematical model assumptions. The hydrodynamics analysis in hollow fiber membrane bioreactor is described by the three-dimensional model created in ANSYS Fluent. The specific features of one membrane model are considered and for whole bioreactor too.

  14. Modeling bidirectional transport of quantum dot nanoparticles in membrane nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A V

    2011-08-01

    This paper develops a model of transport of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles in membrane nanotubes (MNTs). It is assumed that QDs are transported inside intracellular organelles (called here nanoparticle-loaded vesicles, NLVs) that are propelled by either kinesin or dynein molecular motors while moving on microtubules (MTs). A vesicle may have both types of motors attached to it, but the motors are assumed to work in a cooperative fashion, meaning that at a given time the vesicle is moved by either kinesin or dynein motors. The motors are assumed not to work against each other, when one type of motors is pulling the vesicle, the other type is inactive. From time to time the motors may switch their roles: passive motors can become active motors and vice versa, resulting in the change of the vesicle's direction of motion. It is further assumed that QDs can escape NLVs and become free QDs, which are then transported by diffusion. Free QDs can be internalized by NLVs. The effects of two possible types of MT orientation in MNTs are investigated: when all MTs have a uniform polarity orientation, with their plus-ends directed toward one of the cells connected by an MNT, and when MTs have a mixed polarity orientation, with half of MTs having their plus-ends directed toward one of the cells and the other half having their plus-ends directed toward the other cell. Computational results are presented for three cases. The first case is when organelles are as likely to be transported by kinesin motors as by dynein motors. The second case is when organelles are more likely to be transported by kinesin motors than by dynein motors, and the third case is when NLVs do not associate with dynein motors at all. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dysphagia and disrupted cranial nerve development in a mouse model of DiGeorge (22q11 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly A. Karpinski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We assessed feeding-related developmental anomalies in the LgDel mouse model of chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS, a common developmental disorder that frequently includes perinatal dysphagia – debilitating feeding, swallowing and nutrition difficulties from birth onward – within its phenotypic spectrum. LgDel pups gain significantly less weight during the first postnatal weeks, and have several signs of respiratory infections due to food aspiration. Most 22q11 genes are expressed in anlagen of craniofacial and brainstem regions critical for feeding and swallowing, and diminished expression in LgDel embryos apparently compromises development of these regions. Palate and jaw anomalies indicate divergent oro-facial morphogenesis. Altered expression and patterning of hindbrain transcriptional regulators, especially those related to retinoic acid (RA signaling, prefigures these disruptions. Subsequently, gene expression, axon growth and sensory ganglion formation in the trigeminal (V, glossopharyngeal (IX or vagus (X cranial nerves (CNs that innervate targets essential for feeding, swallowing and digestion are disrupted. Posterior CN IX and X ganglia anomalies primarily reflect diminished dosage of the 22q11DS candidate gene Tbx1. Genetic modification of RA signaling in LgDel embryos rescues the anterior CN V phenotype and returns expression levels or pattern of RA-sensitive genes to those in wild-type embryos. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage, including but not limited to Tbx1, disrupts oro-facial and CN development by modifying RA-modulated anterior-posterior hindbrain differentiation. These disruptions likely contribute to dysphagia in infants and young children with 22q11DS.

  16. Evaluation of novel resorbable membranes for bone augmentation in a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, N.; van Leeuwen, A.C.; Yuan, Huipin; Bos, R.R.M.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our study compared two novel, biodegradable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) barrier membranes to clinically applied barrier membranes in maintaining volume of block autologous bone grafts in a rat mandible model. Material and methods Two hundred and forty rats were included in this

  17. Evaluation of novel resorbable membranes for bone augmentation in a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni; van Leeuwen, Anne; Yuan, Huipin; Bos, Ruud R M; Grijpma, Dirk W; Kuijer, Roelof

    ObjectivesOur study compared two novel, biodegradable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) barrier membranes to clinically applied barrier membranes in maintaining volume of block autologous bone grafts in a rat mandible model. Material and methodsTwo hundred and forty rats were included in this

  18. Air gap membrane distillation. 2. Model validation and hollow fibre module performance analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, C.M.; Meindersma, G.W.; Reith, T.; de Haan, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the experimental results of counter current flow air gap membrane distillation experiments are presented and compared with predictive model calculations. Measurements were carried out with a cylindrical test module containing a single hollow fibre membrane in the centre and a

  19. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jimin; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-01-01

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed

  20. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jimin, E-mail: jimin.wang@yale.edu; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo, E-mail: yorgo.modis@yale.edu

    2014-04-15

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed.

  1. Interaction pathways between soft lipid nanodiscs and plasma membranes: A molecular modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shixin; Luo, Zhen; Xu, Yan; Ren, Hao; Deng, Li; Zhang, Xianren; Huang, Fang; Yue, Tongtao

    2017-10-01

    Lipid nanodisc, a model membrane platform originally synthesized for study of membrane proteins, has recently been used as the carrier to deliver amphiphilic drugs into target tumor cells. However, the central question of how cells interact with such emerging nanomaterials remains unclear and deserves our research for both improving the delivery efficiency and reducing the side effect. In this work, a binary lipid nanodisc is designed as the minimum model to investigate its interactions with plasma membranes by using the dissipative particle dynamics method. Three typical interaction pathways, including the membrane attachment with lipid domain exchange of nanodiscs, the partial membrane wrapping with nanodisc vesiculation, and the receptor-mediated endocytosis, are discovered. For the first pathway, the boundary normal lipids acting as ligands diffuse along the nanodisc rim to gather at the membrane interface, repelling the central bola lipids to reach a stable membrane attachment. If bola lipids are positioned at the periphery and act as ligands, they diffuse to form a large aggregate being wrapped by the membrane, leaving the normal lipids exposed on the membrane exterior by assembling into a vesicle. Finally, by setting both central normal lipids and boundary bola lipids as ligands, the receptor-mediated endocytosis occurs via both deformation and self-rotation of the nanodiscs. All above pathways for soft lipid nanodiscs are quite different from those for rigid nanoparticles, which may provide useful guidelines for design of soft lipid nanodiscs in widespread biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Bioinspired model of mechanical energy harvesting based on flexoelectric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Alejandro D; Servio, P; Herrera-Valencia, E E

    2013-02-01

    Membrane flexoelectricity is an electromechanical coupling process that describes membrane electrical polarization due to bending and membrane bending under electric fields. In this paper we propose, formulate, and characterize a mechanical energy harvesting system consisting of a deformable soft flexoelectric thin membrane subjected to harmonic forcing from contacting bulk fluids. The key elements of the energy harvester are formulated and characterized, including (i) the mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency, (ii) the electromechanical shape equation connecting fluid forces with membrane curvature and electric displacement, and (iii) the electric power generation and efficiency. The energy conversion efficiency is cast as the ratio of flexoelectric coupling to the product of electric and bending elasticity. The device is described by a second-order curvature dynamics coupled to the electric displacement equation and as such results in mechanical power absorption with a resonant peak whose amplitude decreases with bending viscosity. The electric power generation is proportional to the conversion factor and the power efficiency decreases with frequency. Under high bending viscosity, the power efficiency increases with the conversion factor and under low viscosities it decreases with the conversion factor. The theoretical results presented contribute to the ongoing experimental efforts to develop mechanical energy harvesting from fluid flow energy through solid-fluid interactions and electromechanical transduction.

  3. Scale-Up Design Analysis and Modelling of Cobalt Oxide Silica Membrane Module for Hydrogen Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Guozhao Ji; Guoxiong Wang; Kamel Hooman; Suresh K. Bhatia; João C. Diniz da Costa

    2013-01-01

    This work shows the application of a validated mathematical model for gas permeation at high temperatures focusing on demonstrated scale-up design for H2 processing. The model considered the driving force variation with spatial coordinates and the mass transfer across the molecular sieve cobalt oxide silica membrane to predict the separation performance. The model was used to study the process of H2 separation at 500 °C in single and multi-tube membrane modules. Parameters of interest include...

  4. Burnout Disrupts Anxiety Buffer Functioning Among Nurses: A Three-Way Interaction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Trifiletti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, job burnout has attracted a great deal of attention among researchers and practitioners and, after decades of research and interventions, it is still regarded as an important issue. With the aim of extending the Anxiety Buffer Disruption Theory (ABDT, in this paper we argue that high levels of burnout may disrupt the anxiety buffer functioning that protects people from death concerns. ABDT was developed from Terror Management Theory (TMT. According to TMT, reminders of one’s mortality are an essential part of humans’ daily experience and have the potential to awake paralyzing fear and anxiety. In order to cope with death concerns, people typically activate an anxiety-buffering system centered on their cultural worldview and self-esteem. Recent ABDT research shows that individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder are unable to activate such anxiety buffering defenses. In line with these results, we hypothesized that the burnout syndrome may have similar effects, and that individuals with higher levels of burnout will be less likely to activate an anxiety buffering response when their mortality is made salient. Participants were 418 nurses, who completed a questionnaire including: a mortality salience (MS manipulation, a delay manipulation, and measures of burnout, work-related self-efficacy, and representation of oneself as a valuable caregiver. Nurses are daily exposed both to the risk of burnout and to mortality reminders, and thus constituted an ideal population for this study. In line with an anxiety buffer disruption hypothesis, we found a significant three-way interaction between burnout, MS and delay. Participants with lower levels of burnout reported higher levels of self-efficacy and a more positive representation as caregivers in the MS condition compared to the control condition, when there was a delay between MS manipulation and the assessment of the dependent measures. The difference was non

  5. An Equivalent Electrical Circuit Model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Mathematical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh An Nguyen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC models proposed in the literature consist of mathematical equations. However, they are not adequately practical for simulating power systems. The proposed model takes into account phenomena such as activation polarization, ohmic polarization, double layer capacitance and mass transport effects present in a PEM fuel cell. Using electrical analogies and a mathematical modeling of PEMFC, the circuit model is established. To evaluate the effectiveness of the circuit model, its static and dynamic performances under load step changes are simulated and compared to the numerical results obtained by solving the mathematical model. Finally, the applicability of our model is demonstrated by simulating a practical system.

  6. Interactions of a Photochromic Spiropyran with Liposome Model Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Jonsson, Fabian

    2013-02-19

    The interactions between anionic or zwitterionic liposomes and a water-soluble, DNA-binding photochromic spiropyran are studied using UV/vis absorption and linear dichroism (LD) spectroscopy. The spectral characteristics as well as the kinetics of the thermal isomerization process in the absence and presence of the two different liposome types provide information about the environment and whether or not the spiropyran resides in the liposome membrane. By measuring LD on liposomes deformed and aligned by shear flow, further insight is obtained about interaction and binding geometry of the spiropyran at the lipid membranes. We show that the membrane interactions differ between the two types of liposomes used as well as the isomeric forms of the spiropyran photoswitch. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. A collaborative model of training for parents of children with disruptive behaviour disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, M

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the heavy costs to individuals, families and the community of the disruptive behaviour disorders of childhood and adolescence. The financial costs of these potentially long-term behavioural problems bear down heavily on the health, social and education services. The human suffering they cause is immeasurable. However, not all is gloom. Psychological therapies, based broadly on social learning theory, have been shown to be effective in mitigating such problems for a significant number of children and their families. These methods, imbedded in a collaborative approach to training parents of children with conduct disorders, are illustrated in terms of their theoretical context and practical applications.

  8. The Vessel Schedule Recovery Problem (VSRP) – A MIP model for handling disruptions in liner shipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouer, Berit Dangaard; Dirksen, Jakob; Pisinger, David

    2013-01-01

    or even omitting one. We present the Vessel Schedule Recovery Problem (VSRP) to evaluate a given disruption scenario and to select a recovery action balancing the trade off between increased bunker consumption and the impact on cargo in the remaining network and the customer service level. It is proven......Containerized transport by liner shipping companies is a multi billion dollar industry carrying a major part of the world trade between suppliers and customers. The liner shipping industry has come under stress in the last few years due to the economic crisis, increasing fuel costs, and capacity...

  9. Analysis of mass transfer characteristics in a tubular membrane using CFD modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jixiang; Vedantam, Sreepriya; Spanjers, Henri; Nopens, Ingmar; van Lier, Jules B

    2012-10-01

    In contrast to the large amount of research into aerobic membrane bioreactors, little work has been reported on anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AMBRs). As to the application of membrane bioreactors, membrane fouling is a key issue. Membrane fouling generally occurs more seriously in AMBRs than in aerobic membrane bioreactors. However, membrane fouling could be managed through the application of suitable shear stress that can be introduced by the application of a two-phase flow. When the two-phase flow is applied in AMBRs, little is known about the mass transfer characteristics, which is of particular importance, in tubular membranes of AMBRs. In our present work, we have employed fluid dynamic modeling to analyze the mass transfer characteristics in the tubular membrane of a side stream AMBR in which, gas-lift two-phase flow was applied. The modeling indicated that the mass transfer capacity at the membrane surface at the noses of gas bubbles was higher than the mass transfer capacity at the tails of the bubbles, which is in contrast to the results when water instead of sludge is applied. At the given mass transfer rate, the filterability of the sludge was found to have a strong influence on the transmembrane pressure at a steady flux. In addition, the model also showed that the shear stress in the internal space of the tubular membrane was mainly around 20 Pa but could be as high as about 40 Pa due to gas bubble movements. Nonetheless, at these shear stresses a stable particle size distribution was found for sludge particles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic disruption of calpain correlates with loss of membrane blebbing and differential expression of RhoGDI-1, cofilin and tropomyosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Karina; Lametsch, Rene; Elce, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of the actin-cytoskeleton is essential to cell motility, spreading, and the formation of membrane surface extensions like lamellipodia, ruffles and blebs. The ubiquitous calpains contribute to integrin-mediated cytoskeletal remodelling during cell migration and spreading, by cl...

  11. Digital Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstand, Claus Andreas Foss

    Disruption var frem til slutningen af 2016 i Danmark et ord, som kun få kendte og endnu færre havde en holdning til. Nu er der imidlertid sat fokus på begrebet fra allerhøjeste nationale sted, idet regeringen har taget initiativ til nedsættelse af det, Statsminister Lars Løkke Rasmussen indtil...... videre kalder et ”disruption-råd”. Faktisk er rådet skrevet ind i 2016 regeringsgrundlaget for VLK-regeringen. Disruption af organisationer er ikke et nyt fænomen; men hastigheden, hvormed det sker, er stadig accelererende. Årsagen er den globale mega-trend: Digitalisering. Og derfor er specielt digital...... disruption en sag for os alle. Derfor er det også for vigtigt et emne til, at det udelukkende behandles i elitære videnskabelige, industrielle og politiske kredse. Der er behov for en bredere samfundsdebat; og bogen er et forskningsbaseret bidrag ind i denne debat. For a kvalificere debatten om disruption i...

  12. Endocrine disrupting compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, I B; Christensen, P; Dantzer, V

    2001-01-01

    processes, and exposure during critical periods of prenatal development might affect reproductive performance over several generations. Alkylphenols and their metabolites are lipophilic substances exerting apparent estrogenic action in in vitro and in vivo testing systems. With the widespread industrial use...... or embryo models for the evaluation of possible consequences of human exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds is discussed. Furthermore, possible consequences of exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds for the embryo transfer industry are addressed....

  13. Effect of amniotic membrane to reduce postlaminectomy epidural adhesion on a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyu Jin; Kim, Kyoung Beom; Kwon, Young-Min

    2011-06-01

    Epidural fibrosis and adhesion are the main reasons for post-laminectomy sustained pain and functional disability. In this study, the authors investigate the effect of irradiated freeze-dried human amniotic membrane on reducing epidural adhesion after laminectomy on a rat model. A total of 20 rats were divided into two groups. The group A did not receive human amniotic membrane implantation after laminectomy and group B underwent human amniotic membrane implantation after laminectomy. Gross and microscopic findings were evaluated and compared at postoperative 1, 3 and 8 weeks. The amount of scar tissue and tenacity were reduced grossly in group of rats with human amniotic membrane implantation (group B). On a microscopic evaluation, there were less inflammatory cell infiltration and fibroblast proliferation in group B. This experimental study shows that implantation of irradiated freeze-dried human amniotic membrane reduce epidural fibrosis and adhesion after spinal laminectomy in a rat model.

  14. Ice formation in model biological membranes in the presence of cryoprotectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiselev, M.A. E-mail: kiselev@nf.jinr.ru; Lesieur, P.; Kisselev, A.M.; Ollivon, M

    2000-06-21

    Ice formation in model biological membranes is studied by SAXS and WAXS in the presence of cryoprotectors: dimethyl sulfoxide and glycerol. Three types of phospholipid membranes: DPPC, DMPC, DSPC are chosen for the investigation as well-studied model biological membranes. A special cryostat is used for sample cooling from 14.1 deg. C to -55.4 deg. C. The ice formation is detected only by WAXS in binary phospholipid/water and ternary phospholipid/cryoprotector/water systems in the condition of excess solvent. Ice formation in a binary phospholipid/water system creates an abrupt decrease of the membrane repeat distance by {delta}d, the so-called ice-induced dehydration of intermembrane space. The value of {delta}d decreases as the cryoprotector concentration increases. The formation of ice does not influence the membrane structure ({delta}d=0) for cryoprotector mole fractions higher than 0.05.

  15. Direct observation of intermediate states in model membrane fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidel, Andrea; Bartsch, Tobias F.; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel assay for membrane fusion of solid supported membranes on silica beads and on coverslips. Fusion of the lipid bilayers is induced by bringing an optically trapped bead in contact with the coverslip surface while observing the bead’s thermal motion with microsecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution using a three-dimensional position detector. The probability of fusion is controlled by the membrane tension on the particle. We show that the progression of fusion can be monitored by changes in the three-dimensional position histograms of the bead and in its rate of diffusion. We were able to observe all fusion intermediates including transient fusion, formation of a stalk, hemifusion and the completion of a fusion pore. Fusion intermediates are characterized by axial but not lateral confinement of the motion of the bead and independently by the change of its rate of diffusion due to the additional drag from the stalk-like connection between the two membranes. The detailed information provided by this assay makes it ideally suited for studies of early events in pure lipid bilayer fusion or fusion assisted by fusogenic molecules. PMID:27029285

  16. Protein modeling of apical membrane antigen-1(AMA-1) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apical membrane Antigen-1(AMA-1), an asexual blood stage antigen of Plasmodium cynomolgi, is an important candidate for testing as a component of malarial vaccine. The degree of conservation of. AMA-1 sequences implies a conserved function for this molecule across different species of Plasmodium. Since the AMA-1 ...

  17. Modelling of biohydrogen production and recovery by membrane gas separation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Búcsú, D.; Nemestóthy, N.; Pientka, Zbyněk; Gubicza, L.; Bélafi-Bakó, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 240, 1-3 (2009), s. 306-310 ISSN 0011-9164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1207 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : integrated system * Escherichia coli * PES-PI membrane Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.034, year: 2009

  18. α-Synuclein oligomers distinctively permeabilize complex model membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefanovic, Anja N D; Stöckl, Martin T; Claessens, Mireille M A E; Subramaniam, Vinod

    α-Synuclein oligomers are increasingly considered to be responsible for the death of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. The toxicity mechanism of α-synuclein oligomers likely involves membrane permeabilization. Even though it is well established that α-synuclein oligomers bind and

  19. Anode partial flooding modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Model development and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Lei; Du, Shangfeng; Chen, Rui; Mamlouk, Mohamed; Scott, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional along-the-channel CFD (computational fluid dynamic) model, coupled with a two-phase flow model of liquid water and gas transport for a PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell is described. The model considers non-isothermal operation and thus the non-uniform temperature distribution in the cell structure. Water phase-transfer between the vapour, liquid water and dissolved phase is modelled with the combinational transport mechanism through the membrane. Liquid water saturation is simulated inside the electrodes and channels at both the anode and cathode sides. Three types of models are compared for the HOR (hydrogen oxidation reaction) and ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) in catalyst layers, including Butler–Volmer (B–V), liquid water saturation corrected B–V and agglomerate mechanisms. Temperature changes in MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and channels due to electrochemical reaction, ohmic resistance and water phase-transfer are analysed as a function of current density. Nonlinear relations of liquid water saturations with respect to current densities at both the anode and cathode are regressed. At low and high current densities, liquid water saturation at the anode linearly increases as a consequence of the linear increase of liquid water saturation at the cathode. In contrast, exponential relation is found to be more accurate at medium current densities. - Highlights: • A fully coupled 2D, along-the-channel, two-phase flow, non-isothermal, CFD model is developed. • Temperature rise due to electrochemical reactions, ohmic resistance and water phase-transfer is analysed. • Mathematical expressions of liquid water saturation against current density at anode and cathode are regressed. • Relationship between the liquid water saturation at anode and cathode is built.

  20. NSTX Disruption Simulations of Detailed Divertor and Passive Plate Models by Vector Potential Transfer from OPERA Global Analysis Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. H. Titus, S. Avasaralla, A.Brooks, R. Hatcher

    2010-09-22

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) project is planning upgrades to the toroidal field, plasma current and pulse length. This involves the replacement of the center-stack, including the inner legs of the TF, OH, and inner PF coils. A second neutral beam will also be added. The increased performance of the upgrade requires qualification of the remaining components including the vessel, passive plates, and divertor for higher disruption loads. The hardware needing qualification is more complex than is typically accessible by large scale electromagnetic (EM) simulations of the plasma disruptions. The usual method is to include simplified representations of components in the large EM models and attempt to extract forces to apply to more detailed models. This paper describes a more efficient approach of combining comprehensive modeling of the plasma and tokamak conducting structures, using the 2D OPERA code, with much more detailed treatment of individual components using ANSYS electromagnetic (EM) and mechanical analysis. This capture local eddy currents and resulting loads in complex details, and allows efficient non-linear, and dynamic structural analyses.

  1. NSTX Disruption Simulations of Detailed Divertor and Passive Plate Models by Vector Potential Transfer from OPERA Global Analysis Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titus, P.H.; Avasaralla, S.; Brooks, A.; Hatcher, R.

    2010-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) project is planning upgrades to the toroidal field, plasma current and pulse length. This involves the replacement of the center-stack, including the inner legs of the TF, OH, and inner PF coils. A second neutral beam will also be added. The increased performance of the upgrade requires qualification of the remaining components including the vessel, passive plates, and divertor for higher disruption loads. The hardware needing qualification is more complex than is typically accessible by large scale electromagnetic (EM) simulations of the plasma disruptions. The usual method is to include simplified representations of components in the large EM models and attempt to extract forces to apply to more detailed models. This paper describes a more efficient approach of combining comprehensive modeling of the plasma and tokamak conducting structures, using the 2D OPERA code, with much more detailed treatment of individual components using ANSYS electromagnetic (EM) and mechanical analysis. This capture local eddy currents and resulting loads in complex details, and allows efficient non-linear, and dynamic structural analyses.

  2. Numerical modeling and experimental simulation of vapor shield formation and divertor material erosion for ITER typical plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhin, V.P.; Goel, B.; Hoebel, W.; Konkashbaev, I.; Landman, I.; Piazza, G.; Safronov, V.M.; Sherbakov, A.R.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The high divertor heat load during a tokamak plasma disruption results in sudden evaporation of a thin layer of divertor plate material, which acts as vapor shield and protects the target from further excessive evaporation. Formation and effectiveness of the vapor shield are theoretically modeled and experimentally investigated at the 2MK-200 facility under conditions simulating the thermal quench phase of ITER tokamak plasma disruptions. In the optical wavelength range C II, C III, C IV emission lines for graphite, Cu I, Cu II lines for copper and continuum radiation for tungsten samples are observed in the target plasma. The plasma expands along the magnetic field lines with velocities of (4±1)x10 6 cm/s for graphite and 10 5 cm/s for copper. Modeling was done with a radiation hydrodynamics code in one-dimensional planar geometry. The multifrequency radiation transport is treated in flux limited diffusion and in forward reverse transport approximation. In these first modeling studies the overall shielding efficiency for carbon and tungsten defined as ratio of the incident energy and the vaporization energy for power densities of 10 MW/cm 2 exceeds a factor of 30. The vapor shield is established within 2 μs, the power fraction to the target after 10 μs is below 3% and reaches in the stationary state after about 20 μs a value of around 1.5%. ((orig.))

  3. α-Synuclein-induced lysosomal dysfunction occurs through disruptions in protein trafficking in human midbrain synucleinopathy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzulli, Joseph R; Zunke, Friederike; Isacson, Ole; Studer, Lorenz; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-02-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates comprised of α-synuclein (α-syn). A major barrier in treatment discovery for PD is the lack of identifiable therapeutic pathways capable of reducing aggregates in human neuronal model systems. Mutations in key components of protein trafficking and cellular degradation machinery represent important risk factors for PD; however, their precise role in disease progression and interaction with α-syn remains unclear. Here, we find that α-syn accumulation reduced lysosomal degradation capacity in human midbrain dopamine models of synucleinopathies through disrupting hydrolase trafficking. Accumulation of α-syn at the cell body resulted in aberrant association with cis-Golgi-tethering factor GM130 and disrupted the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi localization of rab1a, a key mediator of vesicular transport. Overexpression of rab1a restored Golgi structure, improved hydrolase trafficking and activity, and reduced pathological α-syn in patient neurons. Our work suggests that enhancement of lysosomal hydrolase trafficking may prove beneficial in synucleinopathies and indicates that human midbrain disease models may be useful for identifying critical therapeutic pathways in PD and related disorders.

  4. Expansion of thermodynamic model of solute permeation through reverse osmosis membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimaki, Kenzo; Koyama, Akio

    1994-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on permeation mechanism of solute and solvent in membrane separation process like reverse osmosis or ultrafiltration, and several models of solute/solvent permeation through membrane are proposed. Among these models, Kedem and Katchalsky, based on the theory of thermodynamics of irreversible processes, formulated the one-solute permeation process in their mathematical model, which treats membrane as a black box, not giving consideration to membrane structure and to interaction between membrane material and permeates, viz. solute and solvent. According to this theory, the driving force of solute/solvent permeation through membrane is the difference of their chemical potential between both sides of membrane, and the linear phenomenological equation is applied to describing the relation between driving force and flux of solute/solvent. This equation can be applied to the irreversible process only when the process is almost in equilibrium. This condition is supposed to be satisfied in the solute/solvent permeation process through compact membrane with fine pores like reverse osmosis membrane. When reverse osmosis is applied to treatment process for liquid waste, which usually contains a lot of solutes as contaminants, we can not predict the behavior of contaminants by the above one-solute process model. In the case of multi-solutes permeation process for liquid waste, the number of parameter in thermodynamic model increases rapidly with the number of solute, because of coupling phenomenon among solutes. In this study, we expanded the above thermodynamic model to multi-solute process applying operational calculus to the differential equations which describe the irreversible process of the system, and expressed concisely solute concentration vector as a matrix product. In this way, we predict the behavior of solutes in multi-solutes process, using values of parameters obtained in two-solutes process. (author)

  5. Politisk disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Dette blogindlæg giver en kort analyse af hvordan de sociale medier ved at give en ny tid har åbnet for den disruption af de politiske processer som især Trump stå som et eksempel på.......Dette blogindlæg giver en kort analyse af hvordan de sociale medier ved at give en ny tid har åbnet for den disruption af de politiske processer som især Trump stå som et eksempel på....

  6. Analysis and optimization of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell using modeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre Valdés, Ing. Raciel de la; García Parra, MSc. Lázaro Roger; González Rodríguez, MSc. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional, non-isothermal and steady-state model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell using Computational Fluid Dynamic techniques, specifically ANSYS FLUENT 14.5. It's considered multicomponent diffusion and two-phasic flow. The model was compared with experimental published data and with another model. The operation parameters: reactants pressure and temperature, gases flow direction, gas diffusion layer and catalyst layer porosity, reactants humidification and oxygen concentration are analyzed. The model allows the fuel cell design optimization taking in consideration the channels dimensions, the channels length and the membrane thickness. Furthermore, fuel cell performance is analyzed working with SPEEK membrane, an alternative electrolyte to Nafion. In order to carry on membrane material study, it's necessary to modify the expression that describes the electrolyte ionic conductivity. It's found that the device performance has got a great sensibility to pressure, temperature, reactant humidification and oxygen concentration variations. (author)

  7. Electrochemistry Modeling of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Water Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Ni; Michael KH Leung; Dennis YC Leung

    2006-01-01

    An electrochemistry model was developed to analyse the J-V characteristics of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) water electrolyzer for hydrogen production. The Butler-Volmer equation and water transport characteristics through electrolyte membrane were employed to simulate the electrode activation over-potential and membrane ohmic over-potential, respectively. The modeling results are found to agree reasonably well with experimental data published in the literature. The parametric simulations show that the ohmic over-potential is relatively small with typical water content in the membrane. Compared with the cathode over-potential, the anode over-potential is more significant and constitutes the major source of voltage loss. The high anode over-potential is due to the relatively slow oxidation kinetics, which is related to anode material property and microstructure. This model can be integrated with a photovoltaic or wind turbine model to predict the performance of sustainable hydrogen production systems and optimise their designs. (authors)

  8. Exploring large-scale phenomena in composite membranes through an efficient implicit-solvent model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laradji, Mohamed; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Spangler, Eric J.

    2016-07-01

    Several microscopic and mesoscale models have been introduced in the past to investigate various phenomena in lipid membranes. Most of these models account for the solvent explicitly. Since in a typical molecular dynamics simulation, the majority of particles belong to the solvent, much of the computational effort in these simulations is devoted for calculating forces between solvent particles. To overcome this problem, several implicit-solvent mesoscale models for lipid membranes have been proposed during the last few years. In the present article, we review an efficient coarse-grained implicit-solvent model we introduced earlier for studies of lipid membranes. In this model, lipid molecules are coarse-grained into short semi-flexible chains of beads with soft interactions. Through molecular dynamics simulations, the model is used to investigate the thermal, structural and elastic properties of lipid membranes. We will also review here few studies, based on this model, of the phase behavior of nanoscale liposomes, cytoskeleton-induced blebbing in lipid membranes, as well as nanoparticles wrapping and endocytosis by tensionless lipid membranes. Topical Review article submitted to the Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, May 9, 2016

  9. Exploring large-scale phenomena in composite membranes through an efficient implicit-solvent model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laradji, Mohamed; Sunil Kumar, P B; Spangler, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Several microscopic and mesoscale models have been introduced in the past to investigate various phenomena in lipid membranes. Most of these models account for the solvent explicitly. Since in a typical molecular dynamics simulation, the majority of particles belong to the solvent, much of the computational effort in these simulations is devoted for calculating forces between solvent particles. To overcome this problem, several implicit-solvent mesoscale models for lipid membranes have been proposed during the last few years. In the present article, we review an efficient coarse-grained implicit-solvent model we introduced earlier for studies of lipid membranes. In this model, lipid molecules are coarse-grained into short semi-flexible chains of beads with soft interactions. Through molecular dynamics simulations, the model is used to investigate the thermal, structural and elastic properties of lipid membranes. We will also review here few studies, based on this model, of the phase behavior of nanoscale liposomes, cytoskeleton-induced blebbing in lipid membranes, as well as nanoparticles wrapping and endocytosis by tensionless lipid membranes. (topical review)

  10. A macroscopic model of proton transport through the membrane-ionomer interface of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Milan; Edwards, Brian J.; Paddison, Stephen J.

    2013-02-01

    The membrane-ionomer interface is the critical interlink of the electrodes and catalyst to the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM); together forming the membrane electrode assembly in current state-of-the-art PEM fuel cells. In this paper, proton conduction through the interface is investigated to understand its effect on the performance of a PEM fuel cell. The water containing domains at this interface were modeled as cylindrical pores/channels with the anionic groups (i.e., -SO3-) assumed to be fixed on the pore wall. The interactions of each species with all other species and an applied external field were examined. Molecular-based interaction potential energies were computed in a small test element of the pore and were scaled up in terms of macroscopic variables. Evolution equations of the density and momentum of the species (water molecules and hydronium ions) were derived within a framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The resulting evolution equations for the species were solved analytically using an order-of-magnitude analysis to obtain an expression for the proton conductivity. Results show that the conductivity increases with increasing water content and pore radius, and strongly depends on the separation distance between the sulfonate groups and their distribution on the pore wall. It was also determined that the conductivity of two similar pores of different radii in series is limited by the pore with the smaller radius.

  11. Modeling and Design Optimization of Multifunctional Membrane Reactors for Direct Methane Aromatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouty, Nicholas J; Carrasco, Juan C; Lima, Fernando V

    2017-08-29

    Due to the recent increase of natural gas production in the U.S., utilizing natural gas for higher-value chemicals has become imperative. Direct methane aromatization (DMA) is a promising process used to convert methane to benzene, but it is limited by low conversion of methane and rapid catalyst deactivation by coking. Past work has shown that membrane separation of the hydrogen produced in the DMA reactions can dramatically increase the methane conversion by shifting the equilibrium toward the products, but it also increases coke production. Oxygen introduction into the system has been shown to inhibit this coke production while not inhibiting the benzene production. This paper introduces a novel mathematical model and design to employ both methods in a multifunctional membrane reactor to push the DMA process into further viability. Multifunctional membrane reactors, in this case, are reactors where two different separations occur using two differently selective membranes, on which no systems studies have been found. The proposed multifunctional membrane design incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane on the outer wall of the reaction zone, and an inner tube filled with airflow surrounded by an oxygen-selective membrane in the middle of the reactor. The design is shown to increase conversion via hydrogen removal by around 100%, and decrease coke production via oxygen addition by 10% when compared to a tubular reactor without any membranes. Optimization studies are performed to determine the best reactor design based on methane conversion, along with coke and benzene production. The obtained optimal design considers a small reactor (length = 25 cm, diameter of reaction tube = 0.7 cm) to subvert coke production and consumption of the product benzene as well as a high permeance (0.01 mol/s·m²·atm 1/4 ) through the hydrogen-permeable membrane. This modeling and design approach sets the stage for guiding further development of multifunctional membrane reactor

  12. Solar photocatalytic degradation of resorcinol a model endocrine disrupter in water using zinc oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardeshi, S K; Patil, A B

    2009-04-15

    Photocatalytic degradation (PCD) of resorcinol a potent endocrine disrupting chemical in aqueous medium was investigated by ZnO under sunlight irradiation in a batch photoreactor. The influence of various parameters such as photocatalyst amount, initial concentration of resorcinol and pH was examined for maximum PCD of resorcinol. A considerable influence of pH upon the chemical oxygen demand (COD) disappearance was observed. In general, neutral or basic pH is favorable for COD removal of resorcinol. PCD intermediates were identified using FTIR and GC/MS. Two of the initial oxidation intermediates detected were 1,2,4-trihydroxy-benzene and 1,2,3-trihydroxy-benzene. FTIR studies revealed 1,2,4-trihydroxy-benzene as the major PCD intermediate. A working photodegradation mechanism is also suggested for PCD of resorcinol. This work envisages the great potential that sunlight mediated photocatalysis has in the removal of resorcinol from waste water.

  13. Experimental measurement of tympanic membrane response for finite element model validation of a human middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Tae-Soo; Baek, Moo-Jin; Lee, Dooho

    2013-01-01

    The middle ear consists of a tympanic membrane, ligaments, tendons, and three ossicles. An important function of the tympanic membrane is to deliver exterior sound stimulus to the ossicles and inner ear. In this study, the responses of the tympanic membrane in a human ear were measured and compared with those of a finite element model of the middle ear. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was used to measure the dynamic responses of the tympanic membrane, which had the measurement point on the cone of light of the tympanic membrane. The measured subjects were five Korean male adults and a cadaver. The tympanic membranes were stimulated using pure-tone sine waves at 18 center frequencies of one-third octave band over a frequency range of 200 Hz ~10 kHz with 60 and 80 dB sound pressure levels. The measured responses were converted into the umbo displacement transfer function (UDTF) with a linearity assumption. The measured UDTFs were compared with the calculated UDTFs using a finite element model for the Korean human middle ear. The finite element model of the middle ear consists of three ossicles, a tympanic membrane, ligaments, and tendons. In the finite element model, the umbo displacements were calculated under a unit sound pressure on the tympanic membrane. The UDTF of the finite element model exhibited good agreement with that of the experimental one in low frequency range, whereas in higher frequency band, the two response functions deviated from each other, which demonstrates that the finite element model should be updated with more accurate material properties and/or a frequency dependent material model.

  14. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport

  15. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-08-04

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport.

  16. Atomistic simulations of anionic Au-144(SR)(60) nanoparticles interacting with asymmetric model lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental observations indicate that the interaction between nanoparticles and lipid membranes varies according to the nanoparticle charge and the chemical nature of their protecting side groups. We report atomistic simulations of an anionic Au nanoparticle (AuNP-) interacting with membranes...... whose lipid composition and transmembrane distribution are to a large extent consistent with real plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells. To this end, we use a model system which comprises two cellular compartments, extracellular and cytosolic, divided by two asymmetric lipid bilayers. The simulations...... clearly show that AuNP- attaches to the extracellular membrane surface within a few tens of nanoseconds, while it avoids contact with the membrane on the cytosolic side. This behavior stems from several factors. In essence, when the nanoparticle interacts with lipids in the extracellular compartment...

  17. Modeling and parametric analysis of hollow fiber membrane system for carbon capture from multicomponent flue gas

    KAUST Repository

    Khalilpour, Rajab

    2011-08-12

    The modeling and optimal design/operation of gas membranes for postcombustion carbon capture (PCC) is presented. A systematic methodology is presented for analysis of membrane systems considering multicomponent flue gas with CO 2 as target component. Simplifying assumptions is avoided by namely multicomponent flue gas represented by CO 2/N 2 binary mixture or considering the co/countercurrent flow pattern of hollow-fiber membrane system as mixed flow. Optimal regions of flue gas pressures and membrane area were found within which a technoeconomical process system design could be carried out. High selectivity was found to not necessarily have notable impact on PCC membrane performance, rather, a medium selectivity combined with medium or high permeance could be more advantageous. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  18. Enhancement of the Computational Efficiency of Membrane Computing Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    Information Retrieval, SPIRE 2000, La Coruna, Spain, 64-74. [9] S.N. Krishna, R. Rama: P Systems with Replicated Rewriting. Journal of Automata Languages...Paraschiv. Membrane software. A P system simulator. Fundamental Informaticae , 49(13):61-66, 2002. [25] P. Fitzgibbons, D. Das, and T. Renz, “Bio...systems with worm-objects, IEEE 7th International Conference on String Processing and Information Retrieval, SPIRE, La Coruna, Spain, 2000, pp. 64

  19. Comparison of the Modeling Approach between Membrane Bioreactor and Conventional Activated Sludge Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Tao; Sin, Gürkan; Spanjers, Henri

    2009-01-01

    Activated sludge models (ASM) have been developed and largely applied in conventional activated sludge (CAS) systems. The applicability of ASM to model membrane bioreactors (MBR) and the differences in modeling approaches have not been studied in detail. A laboratory-scale MBR was modeled using ASM......2d. It was found that the ASM2d model structure can still be used for MBR modeling. There are significant differences related to ASM modeling. First, a lower maximum specific growth rate for MBR nitrifiers was estimated. Independent experiments demonstrated that this might be attributed...... to the inhibition effect of soluble microbial products (SMP) at elevated concentration. Second, a greater biomass affinity to oxygen and ammonium was found, which was probably related to smaller MBR sludge flocs. Finally, the membrane throughput during membrane backwashing/relaxation can be normalized...

  20. Parameter estimation in neuronal stochastic differential equation models from intracellular recordings of membrane potentials in single neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Samson, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    Dynamics of the membrane potential in a single neuron can be studied by estimating biophysical parameters from intracellular recordings. Diffusion processes, given as continuous solutions to stochastic differential equations, are widely applied as models for the neuronal membrane potential evolut...

  1. Disruption of Rab11 activity in a knock-in mouse model of Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueyi; Sapp, Ellen; Chase, Kathryn; Comer-Tierney, Laryssa A.; Masso, Nicholas; Alexander, Jonathan; Reeves, Patrick; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Valencia, Antonio; Esteves, Miguel; Aronin, Neil; DiFiglia, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Summary The Huntington's disease (HD) mutation causes polyglutamine expansion in huntingtin (Htt) and neurodegeneration. Htt interacts with a complex containing Rab11GDP and is involved in activation of Rab11, which functions in endosomal recycling and neurite growth and long-term potentiation. Like other Rab proteins, Rab11GDP undergoes nucleotide exchange to Rab11GTP for its activation. Here we show that striatal membranes of HD140Q/140Q knock-in mice are impaired in supporting conversion of Rab11GDP to Rab11GTP. Dominant negative Rab11 expressed in the striatum and cortex of normal mice caused neuropathology and motor dysfunction, suggesting that a deficiency in Rab11 activity is pathogenic in vivo. Primary cortical neurons from HD140Q/140Q mice were delayed in recycling transferrin receptors back to the plasma membrane. Partial rescue from glutamate induced cell death occurred in HD neurons expressing dominant active Rab11. We propose a novel mechanism of HD pathogenesis arising from diminished Rab11 activity at recycling endosomes. PMID:19699304

  2. Ascending central canal dilation and progressive ependymal disruption in a contusion model of rodent chronic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keirstead Hans S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI can lead to an insidious decline in motor and sensory function in individuals even years after the initial injury and is accompanied by a slow and progressive cytoarchitectural destruction. At present, no pathological mechanisms satisfactorily explain the ongoing degeneration. Methods Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized laminectomized at T10 and received spinal cord contusion injuries with a force of 250 kilodynes using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Animals were randomly distributed into 5 groups and killed 1 (n = 4, 28 (n = 4, 120 (n = 4, 450 (n = 5, or 540 (n = 5 days after injury. Morphometric and immunohistochemical studies were then performed on 1 mm block sections, 6 mm cranial and 6 mm caudal to the lesion epicenter. The SPSS 11.5 t test was used to determine differences between quantitative measures. Results Here, we document the first report of an ascending central canal dilation and progressive ependymal disruption cranial to the epicenter of injury in a contusion model of chronic SCI, which was characterized by extensive dural fibrosis and intraparenchymal cystic cavitation. Expansion of the central canal lumen beyond a critical diameter corresponded with ependymal cell ciliary loss, an empirically predictable thinning of the ependymal region, and a decrease in cell proliferation in the ependymal region. Large, aneurysmal dilations of the central canal were accompanied by disruptions in the ependymal layer, periependymal edema and gliosis, and destruction of the adjacent neuropil. Conclusion Cells of the ependymal region play an important role in CSF homeostasis, cellular signaling and wound repair in the spinal cord. The possible effects of this ascending pathology on ependymal function are discussed. Our studies suggest central canal dilation and ependymal region disruption as steps in the pathogenesis of chronic SCI, identify central canal dilation as a marker of

  3. Testing the limits of model membrane simulations-bilayer composition and pressure scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Nikoleta; Ivanova, Anela

    2018-03-30

    Studying transfer of bioactive compounds across cell membranes by simulations attracts growing attention. To perform such calculations accurately, it is necessary to verify the validity of computational protocols established for description of unperturbed lipid bilayers also with translocating substances present. The current work reports the results from 1 μs long atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two types of model plasma membranes-one built of a single phospholipid (DPPC) and one constructed of four types of phospholipids-in the presence of a drug-peptide complex experimentally known to cross cell membranes. The influence of membrane composition and of applied pressure scaling algorithm on the simulations outcome is analyzed with particular focus on membrane structure and on complex-lipid interactions during the initial penetration stage. It is found that the mixed composition of the membrane is important for correct assessment of the interactions with the complex both from purely structural perspective and because of the uneven charge distribution. The structure of the mixed lipid bilayer is affected more markedly by the pressure scaling algorithm. When the pressure is isotropically scaled, lipids are distributed almost homogeneously along the membrane in liquid ordered state. On semi-isotropic scaling, the lipid tails undergo significant rearrangement and a long-range ordered state is established. This results in "freezing" of the membrane and expulsion of the complex. The statistical analysis of the MD data points to the conclusion that a mixed-lipid membrane model with isotropic pressure scaling would be more suitable for describing the process of complex translocation across neoplastic membranes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A study of the isobutane dehydrogenation in a porous membrane catalytic reactor: design, use and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casanave, D.

    1996-01-26

    The aim of this study was to set up and model a catalytic fixed-bed membrane reactor for the isobutane dehydrogenation. The catalyst, developed at Catalysis Research Institute (IRC), was a silicalite-supported Pt-based catalyst. Their catalytic performances (activity, selectivity, stability) where found better adapted to the membrane reactor, when compared with commercial Pt or Cr based catalysts. The kinetic study of the reaction has been performed in a differential reactor and led to the determination of a kinetic law, suitable when the catalyst is used near thermodynamic equilibrium. The mass transfer mechanisms were determined in meso-porous and microporous membranes through both permeability and gas mixtures (iC{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) separation measurements. For the meso-porous {gamma}-alumina, the mass transfer is ensured by a Knudsen diffusion mechanism which can compete with surface diffusion for condensable gas like isobutane. The resulting permselectivity H{sub 2}/iC4 of this membrane is low ({approx} 4). For the microporous zeolite membrane, molecular sieving occurs due to steric hindrance, leading to higher permselectivity {approx}14. Catalyst/membrane associations were compared in terms of isobutane dehydrogenation performances, for both types of membranes (meso-porous and microporous) and for two different reactor configurations (co-current and counter-current sweep gas flow). The best experimental results were obtained with the zeolite membrane, when sweeping the outer compartment in a co-current flow. The equilibrium displacement observed with the {gamma}-alumina membrane was lower and mainly due to a dilution effect of the reaction mixture by the sweep gas. A mathematical model was developed, which correctly describes all the experimental results obtained with the zeolite membrane, when the co-current mode is used. (Abstract Truncated)

  5. Investigation of membrane mechanics using spring networks: application to red-blood-cell modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingzhu; Boyle, Fergal J

    2014-10-01

    In recent years a number of red-blood-cell (RBC) models have been proposed using spring networks to represent the RBC membrane. Some results predicted by these models agree well with experimental measurements. However, the suitability of these membrane models has been questioned. The RBC membrane, like a continuum membrane, is mechanically isotropic throughout its surface, but the mechanical properties of a spring network vary on the network surface and change with deformation. In this work spring-network mechanics are investigated in large deformation for the first time via an assessment of the effect of network parameters, i.e. network mesh, spring type and surface constraint. It is found that a spring network is conditionally equivalent to a continuum membrane. In addition, spring networks are employed for RBC modelling to replicate the optical tweezers test. It is found that a spring network is sufficient for modelling the RBC membrane but strain-hardening springs are required. Moreover, the deformation profile of a spring network is presented for the first time via the degree of shear. It is found that spring-network deformation approaches continuous as the mesh density increases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A mathematical model for predicting the life of polymer electrolyte fuel cell membranes subjected to hydration cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlatsky, S. F.; Gummalla, M.; O'Neill, J.; Atrazhev, V. V.; Varyukhin, A. N.; Dmitriev, D. V.; Erikhman, N. S.

    2012-10-01

    Under typical Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) fuel cell operating conditions, part of the membrane electrode assembly is subjected to humidity cycling due to variation of inlet gas RH and/or flow rate. Cyclic membrane hydration/dehydration would cause cyclic swelling/shrinking of the unconstrained membrane. In a constrained membrane, it causes cyclic stress resulting in mechanical failure in the area adjacent to the gas inlet. A mathematical modeling framework for prediction of the lifetime of a PEMFC membrane subjected to hydration cycling is developed in this paper. The model predicts membrane lifetime as a function of RH cycling amplitude and membrane mechanical properties. The modeling framework consists of three model components: a fuel cell RH distribution model, a hydration/dehydration induced stress model that predicts stress distribution in the membrane, and a damage accrual model that predicts membrane lifetime. Short descriptions of the model components along with overall framework are presented in the paper. The model was used for lifetime prediction of a GORE-SELECT membrane.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  8. Antimicrobial mechanism of flavonoids against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 by model membrane study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Mengying; Wu, Ting; Pan, Siyi; Xu, Xiaoyun

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial mechanism of four flavonoids (kaempferol, hesperitin, (+)-catechin hydrate, biochanin A) against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was investigated through cell membranes and a liposome model. The release of bacterial protein and images from transmission electron microscopy demonstrated damage to the E. coli ATCC 25922 membrane. A liposome model with dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) (0.6 molar ratio) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) (0.4 molar ratio), representative of the phospholipid membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922, was used to specify the mode of action of four selected flavonoids through Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is suggested that for flavonoids, to be effective antimicrobials, interaction with the polar head-group of the model membrane followed by penetration into the hydrophobic regions must occur. The antimicrobial efficacies of the flavonoids were consistent with liposome interaction activities, kaempferol > hesperitin > (+)-catechin hydrate > biochanin A. This study provides a liposome model capable of mimicking the cell membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922. The findings are important in understanding the antibacterial mechanism on cell membranes.

  9. Antimicrobial mechanism of flavonoids against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 by model membrane study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Mengying; Wu, Ting; Pan, Siyi; Xu, Xiaoyun, E-mail: xiaoyunxu88@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    Antimicrobial mechanism of four flavonoids (kaempferol, hesperitin, (+)-catechin hydrate, biochanin A) against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was investigated through cell membranes and a liposome model. The release of bacterial protein and images from transmission electron microscopy demonstrated damage to the E. coli ATCC 25922 membrane. A liposome model with dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) (0.6 molar ratio) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) (0.4 molar ratio), representative of the phospholipid membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922, was used to specify the mode of action of four selected flavonoids through Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is suggested that for flavonoids, to be effective antimicrobials, interaction with the polar head-group of the model membrane followed by penetration into the hydrophobic regions must occur. The antimicrobial efficacies of the flavonoids were consistent with liposome interaction activities, kaempferol > hesperitin > (+)-catechin hydrate > biochanin A. This study provides a liposome model capable of mimicking the cell membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922. The findings are important in understanding the antibacterial mechanism on cell membranes.

  10. Use of medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a model teleost to identify reproductive endpoints indicative of exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papoulias, D.M.; Tillitt, D.; Jones, S. [National Biological Service, Columbia, MO (United States); Noltie, D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this research is to identify effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on the reproductive system of fish at various stages of sexual differentiation and development. The model teleost used was the d-rR strain of medaka (Oryzias latipes) which has a heritable sex-linked color gene. In medaka, sex differences are first detected at the cellular level at hatch. In males, the mitotic activity of the primordial germ cells (PGC) is arrested while the PGCs of the females continue to divide. The germ cells of the gonochoristic medaka have been demonstrated to be totipotent with respective to gonia production. Because endogenous sex steroid hormones are believed to regulate this early process of sexual differentiation, the authors have hypothesized that mitotic activity in males and females exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals will be different than unexposed individuals. Results are presented for tests conducted by injecting medaka eggs within 36 hours post-hatch with 3 doses of 2,3,7,8-TCDD (nominally 2.3, 1.3, 0.2 pg/embryo), a known anti-estrogen, dissolved in triolein.

  11. Development of a dynamic model for cleaning ultra filtration membranes fouled by surface water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zondervan, E.; Betlem, Bernardus H.L.; Roffel, B.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a dynamic model for cleaning ultra filtration membranes fouled by surface water is proposed. A model that captures the dynamics well is valuable for the optimization of the cleaning process. The proposed model is based on component balances and contains three parameters that can be

  12. Model studies of lipid flip-flop in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parisio, Giulia; Ferrarini, Alberta; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    , and growth heavily depend. Such transverse motion—commonly called flip-flop—has been studied both experimentally and computationally. Experimental investigations face difficulties related to time-scales and probe-induced membrane perturbation issues. Molecular dynamics simulations play an important role...... for the molecular-level understanding of flip-flop. In this review we present a summary of the state of the art of computational studies of spontaneous flip-flop of phospholipids, sterols and fatty acids. Also, we highlight critical issues and strategies that have been developed to solve them, and what remains...

  13. Modeling of air-gap membrane distillation process: A theoretical and experimental study

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaadi, Ahmad Salem

    2013-06-03

    A one dimensional (1-D) air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) model for flat sheet type modules has been developed. This model is based on mathematical equations that describe the heat and mass transfer mechanisms of a single-stage AGMD process. It can simulate AGMD modules in both co-current and counter-current flow regimes. The theoretical model was validated using AGMD experimental data obtained under different operating conditions and parameters. The predicted water vapor flux was compared to the flux measured at five different feed water temperatures, two different feed water salinities, three different air gap widths and two MD membranes with different average pore sizes. This comparison showed that the model flux predictions are strongly correlated with the experimental data, with model predictions being within +10% of the experimentally determined values. The model was then used to study and analyze the parameters that have significant effect on scaling-up the AGMD process such as the effect of increasing the membrane length, and feed and coolant flow rates. The model was also used to analyze the maximum thermal efficiency of the AGMD process by tracing changes in water production rate and the heat input to the process along the membrane length. This was used to understand the gain in both process production and thermal efficiency for different membrane surface areas and the resultant increases in process capital and water unit cost. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Modelling and sequential simulation of multi-tubular metallic membrane and techno-economics of a hydrogen production process employing thin-layer membrane reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Shafiee, Alireza

    2016-09-24

    A theoretical model for multi-tubular palladium-based membrane is proposed in this paper and validated against experimental data for two different sized membrane modules that operate at high temperatures. The model is used in a sequential simulation format to describe and analyse pure hydrogen and hydrogen binary mixture separations, and then extended to simulate an industrial scale membrane unit. This model is used as a sub-routine within an ASPEN Plus model to simulate a membrane reactor in a steam reforming hydrogen production plant. A techno-economic analysis is then conducted using the validated model for a plant producing 300 TPD of hydrogen. The plant utilises a thin (2.5 μm) defect-free and selective layer (Pd75Ag25 alloy) membrane reactor. The economic sensitivity analysis results show usefulness in finding the optimum operating condition that achieves minimum hydrogen production cost at break-even point. A hydrogen production cost of 1.98 $/kg is estimated while the cost of the thin-layer selective membrane is found to constitute 29% of total process capital cost. These results indicate the competiveness of this thin-layer membrane process against conventional methods of hydrogen production. © 2016 Hydrogen Energy Publications LLC

  15. Electrical Thermal Network for Direct Contact Membrane Distillation Modeling and Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Karam, Ayman M.

    2015-02-04

    Membrane distillation is an emerging water distillation technology that offers several advantages compared to conventional water desalination processes. Although progress has been made to model and understand the physics of the process, many studies are based on steady-state assumptions or are computationally not appropriate for real time control. This paper presents the derivation of a novel dynamical model, based on analogy between electrical and thermal systems, for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). The proposed model captures the dynamics of temperature distribution and distilled water flux. To demonstrate the adequacy of the proposed model, validation with transient and steady-state experimental data is presented.

  16. Polyamide Thin-Film Composite Membranes for Potential Raw Biogas Purification: Experiments and Modelling.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimčík, Miroslav; Růžička, Marek; Kárászová, Magda; Sedláková, Zuzana; Vejražka, Jiří; Veselý, M.; Čapek, P.; Friess, K.; Izák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 167, JUL 14 (2016), s. 163-173 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-12695S; GA TA ČR TE01020080; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018; GA MŠk LH14006 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thin film composite membrane * biogas membrane separation * transport model ing Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.359, year: 2016

  17. Polyamide Thin-Film Composite Membranes for Potential Raw Biogas Purification: Experiments and Modelling.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimčík, Miroslav; Růžička, Marek; Kárászová, Magda; Sedláková, Zuzana; Vejražka, Jiří; Veselý, M.; Čapek, P.; Friess, K.; Izák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 167, JUL 14 (2016), s. 163-173 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-12695S; GA TA ČR TE01020080; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018; GA MŠk LH14006 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thin film composite membrane * biogas membrane separation * transport modeling Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.359, year: 2016

  18. Function and failure of the fetal membrane: Modelling the mechanics of the chorion and amnion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefaan W Verbruggen

    Full Text Available The fetal membrane surrounds the fetus during pregnancy and is a thin tissue composed of two layers, the chorion and the amnion. While rupture of this membrane normally occurs at term, preterm rupture can result in increased risk of fetal mortality and morbidity, as well as danger of infection in the mother. Although structural changes have been observed in the membrane in such cases, the mechanical behaviour of the human fetal membrane in vivo remains poorly understood and is challenging to investigate experimentally. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop simplified finite element models to investigate the mechanical behaviour and rupture of the fetal membrane, particularly its constituent layers, under various physiological conditions. It was found that modelling the chorion and amnion as a single layer predicts remarkably different behaviour compared with a more anatomically-accurate bilayer, significantly underestimating stress in the amnion and under-predicting the risk of membrane rupture. Additionally, reductions in chorion-amnion interface lubrication and chorion thickness (reported in cases of preterm rupture both resulted in increased membrane stress. Interestingly, the inclusion of a weak zone in the fetal membrane that has been observed to develop overlying the cervix would likely cause it to fail at term, during labour. Finally, these findings support the theory that the amnion is the dominant structural component of the fetal membrane and is required to maintain its integrity. The results provide a novel insight into the mechanical effect of structural changes in the chorion and amnion, in cases of both normal and preterm rupture.

  19. Mucosal tolerance disruption favors disease progression in an extraorbital lacrimal gland excision model of murine dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Mauricio; Keitelman, Irene; Sabbione, Florencia; Trevani, Analía S; Giordano, Mirta N; Galletti, Jeremías G

    2016-10-01

    Dry eye is a highly prevalent immune disorder characterized by a dysfunctional tear film and a Th1/Th17 T cell response at the ocular surface. The specificity of these pathogenic effector T cells remains to be determined, but auto-reactivity is considered likely. However, we have previously shown that ocular mucosal tolerance to an exogenous antigen is disrupted in a scopolamine-induced murine dry eye model and that it is actually responsible for disease progression. Here we report comparable findings in an entirely different murine model of dry eye that involves resection of the extraorbital lacrimal glands but no systemic muscarinic receptor blockade. Upon ocular instillation of ovalbumin, a delayed breakdown in mucosal tolerance to this antigen was observed in excised but not in sham-operated mice, which was mediated by interferon γ- and interleukin 17-producing antigen-specific T cells. Consistently, antigen-specific regulatory T cells were detectable in sham-operated but not in excised mice. As for other models of ocular surface disorders, epithelial activation of the NF-κB pathway by desiccating stress was determinant in the mucosal immune outcome. Underscoring the role of mucosal tolerance disruption in dry eye pathogenesis, its prevention by a topical NF-κB inhibitor led to reduced corneal damage in excised mice. Altogether these results show that surgically originated desiccating stress also initiates an abnormal Th1/Th17 T cell response to harmless exogenous antigens that reach the ocular surface. This event might actually contribute to corneal damage and challenges the conception of dry eye as a strictly autoimmune disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stochastic approach to model fouling in membrane filters with complex pore morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Gu, Binan; Kondic, Lou; Cummings, Linda J.

    2017-11-01

    Membrane filters are widely used in industrial applications to remove contaminants and undesired impurities (particles) from a solvent. During the filtration process the membrane internal void area becomes fouled with impurities and as a consequence the filter performance deteriorates, a process that depends on filter internal structure, particle concentration and flow dynamics. The complexity of membrane internal morphology and the random nature of the particle dynamics in the flow make the filtration and fouling challenging to predict; nonetheless, mathematical modeling can play a key role in investigating filter fouling, and in suggesting design modifications for more efficient filtration. To date, many models have been proposed to describe the effects of complexity of membrane structure, and the stochasticity of particle dynamics individually but very few studies focus on both together. In this work, we present an idealized mathematical model, in which a membrane consists of a series of bifurcating pores. Pores decrease in size as the membrane is traversed and particles are removed from the feed by adsorption within pores (which shrinks them) and stochastic sieving (pore blocking by large particles). NSF DMS 1615719.

  1. Modelling a full scale membrane bioreactor using Activated Sludge Model No.1: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrue, F; Choubert, J M; Stricker, A E; Spérandio, M; Mietton-Peuchot, M; Racault, Y

    2010-01-01

    A full-scale membrane bioreactor (1,600 m(3) d(-1)) was monitored for modelling purposes during the summer of 2006. A complete calibration of the ASM1 model is presented, in which the key points were the wastewater characterisation, the oxygen transfer and the biomass kinetics. Total BOD tests were not able to correctly estimate the biodegradable fraction of the wastewater. Therefore the wastewater fractionation was identified by adjusting the simulated sludge production rate to the measured value. MLVSS and MLSS were accurately predicted during both calibration and validation periods (20 and 30 days). Because the membranes were immerged in the aeration tank, the coarse bubble and fine bubble diffusion systems coexisted in the same tank. This allowed five different aeration combinations, depending whether the 2 systems were operating separately or simultaneously, and at low speed or high speed. The aeration control maintained low DO concentrations, allowing simultaneous nitrification and denitrification. This made it difficult to calibrate the oxygen transfer. The nitrogen removal kinetics were determined using maximum nitrification rate tests and an 8-hour intensive sampling campaign. Despite the challenges encountered, a calibrated set of parameters was identified for ASM1 that gave very satisfactory results for the calibration period. Matching simulated and measured data became more difficult during the validation period, mainly because the dominant aeration configuration had changed. However, the merit of this study is to be the first effort to simulate a full-scale MBR plant.

  2. Modelling Protein-induced Membrane Deformation using Monte Carlo and Langevin Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Agrawal, N.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Liu, J.

    2010-11-01

    In eukaryotic cells, internalization of extracellular cargo via the cellular process of endocytosis is orchestrated by a variety of proteins, many of which are implicated in membrane deformation/bending. We model the energetics of deformations membranes by using the Helfrich Hamiltonian using two different formalisms: (i) Cartesian or Monge Gauge using Langevin dynamics; (ii) Curvilinear coordinate system using Monte Carlo (MC). Monge gauge approach which has been extensively studied is limited to small deformations of the membrane and cannot describe extreme deformations. Curvilinear coordinate approach can handle large deformation limits as well as finite-temperature membrane fluctuations; here we employ an unstructured triangular mesh to compute the local curvature tensor, and we evolve the membrane surface using a MC method. In our application, we compare the two approaches (i and ii above) to study how the spatial assembly of curvature inducing proteins leads to vesicle budding from a planar membrane. We also quantify how the curvature field of the membrane impacts the spatial segregation of proteins.

  3. Development of a Comprehensive Fouling Model for a Rotating Membrane Bioreactor System Treating Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane bioreactors (MBRs are now main stream wastewater treatment technologies. In recent times, novel pressure driven rotating membrane disc modules have been specially developed that induce high shear on the membrane surface, thereby reducing fouling. Previous research has produced dead-end filtration fouling model which combines all three classical mechanisms that was later used by another researcher as a starting point for a greatly refined model of a cross flow side-stream MBR that incorporated both hydrodynamics and soluble microbial products’ (SMP effects. In this study, a comprehensive fouling model was created based on this earlier work that incorporated all three classical fouling mechanisms for a rotating MBR system. It was tested and validated for best fit using appropriate data sets. The initial model fit appeared good for all simulations, although it still needs to be calibrated using further appropriate data sets.

  4. Exploring metabolic pathway disruption in the subchronic phencyclidine model of schizophrenia with the Generalized Singular Value Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Brian J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quantification of experimentally-induced alterations in biological pathways remains a major challenge in systems biology. One example of this is the quantitative characterization of alterations in defined, established metabolic pathways from complex metabolomic data. At present, the disruption of a given metabolic pathway is inferred from metabolomic data by observing an alteration in the level of one or more individual metabolites present within that pathway. Not only is this approach open to subjectivity, as metabolites participate in multiple pathways, but it also ignores useful information available through the pairwise correlations between metabolites. This extra information may be incorporated using a higher-level approach that looks for alterations between a pair of correlation networks. In this way experimentally-induced alterations in metabolic pathways can be quantitatively defined by characterizing group differences in metabolite clustering. Taking this approach increases the objectivity of interpreting alterations in metabolic pathways from metabolomic data. Results We present and justify a new technique for comparing pairs of networks--in our case these networks are based on the same set of nodes and there are two distinct types of weighted edges. The algorithm is based on the Generalized Singular Value Decomposition (GSVD, which may be regarded as an extension of Principle Components Analysis to the case of two data sets. We show how the GSVD can be interpreted as a technique for reordering the two networks in order to reveal clusters that are exclusive to only one. Here we apply this algorithm to a new set of metabolomic data from the prefrontal cortex (PFC of a translational model relevant to schizophrenia, rats treated subchronically with the N-methyl-D-Aspartic acid (NMDA receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP. This provides us with a means to quantify which predefined metabolic pathways (Kyoto

  5. A stochastic mathematical model to locate field hospitals under disruption uncertainty for large-scale disaster preparedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezir Aydin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we consider field hospital location decisions for emergency treatment points in response to large scale disasters. Specifically, we developed a two-stage stochastic model that determines the number and locations of field hospitals and the allocation of injured victims to these field hospitals. Our model considers the locations as well as the failings of the existing public hospitals while deciding on the location of field hospitals that are anticipated to be opened. The model that we developed is a variant of the P-median location model and it integrates capacity restrictions both on field hospitals that are planned to be opened and the disruptions that occur in existing public hospitals. We conducted experiments to demonstrate how the proposed model can be utilized in practice in a real life problem case scenario. Results show the effects of the failings of existing hospitals, the level of failure probability and the capacity of projected field hospitals to deal with the assessment of any given emergency treatment system’s performance. Crucially, it also specifically provides an assessment on the average distance within which a victim needs to be transferred in order to be treated properly and then from this assessment, the proportion of total satisfied demand is then calculated.

  6. Light radiation pressure upon a wrinkled membrane – parametrization of an optically orthotropic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerovny, N. A.; Zimin, V. N.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the problem of representing the light pressure force upon the surface of a thin wrinkled film is discussed. The common source of wrinkles is the shear deformation of the membrane sample. The optical model of such a membrane is assumed to be optically orthotropic and an analytic equation for infinitesimal light pressure force is written. A linear regression model in the case of wrinkle geometry, where a surface element can have different optical parameters, is constructed and the Bayesian approach is used to calculate the parameters of this model.

  7. Modelling of a tubular membrane contactor for pre-combustion CO2 capture using ionic liquids: Influence of the membrane configuration, absorbent properties and operation parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongde Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A membrane contactor using ionic liquids (ILs as solvent for pre-combustion capture CO2 at elevated temperature (303–393 K and pressure (20 bar has been studied using mathematic model in the present work. A comprehensive two-dimensional (2D mass-transfer model was developed based on finite element method. The effects of liquid properties, membrane configurations, as well as operation parameters on the CO2 removal efficiency were systematically studied. The simulation results show that CO2 can be effectively removed in this process. In addition, it is found that the liquid phase mass transfer dominated the overall mass transfer. Membranes with high porosity and small thickness could apparently reduce the membrane resistance and thus increase the separation efficiency. On the other hand, the membrane diameter and membrane length have a relatively small influence on separation performance within the operation range. Keywords: CO2 capture, Pre-combustion, Membrane contactor, Ionic liquids, Modelling

  8. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions of Indolicidin with Model Membranes and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    The cell membrane is the first barrier and quite often the primary target that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have to destroy or penetrate to fulfill their mission. Upon penetrating through the membrane, the peptides can further attack intracellular targets, in particular DNA. Studying the interaction of an antimicrobial peptide with a cell membrane and DNA holds keys to understanding its killing mechanisms. Commonly, these interactions are studied by using optical or scanning electron microscopy and appropriately labeled peptides. However, labeling can significantly affect the hydrophobicity, conformation, and size of the peptide, hence altering the interaction significantly. Here, we describe the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for a label-free study of the interactions of peptides with model membranes under physiological conditions and DNA as a possible intracellular target.

  9. Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal in membrane bioreactors: model development and parameter estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosenza, Alida; Mannina, Giorgio; Neumann, Marc B; Viviani, Gaspare; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2013-04-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR) are being increasingly used for wastewater treatment. Mathematical modeling of MBR systems plays a key role in order to better explain their characteristics. Several MBR models have been presented in the literature focusing on different aspects: biological models, models which include soluble microbial products (SMP), physical models able to describe the membrane fouling and integrated models which couple the SMP models with the physical models. However, only a few integrated models have been developed which take into account the relationships between membrane fouling and biological processes. With respect to biological phosphorus removal in MBR systems, due to the complexity of the process, practical use of the models is still limited. There is a vast knowledge (and consequently vast amount of data) on nutrient removal for conventional-activated sludge systems but only limited information on phosphorus removal for MBRs. Calibration of these complex integrated models still remains the main bottleneck to their employment. The paper presents an integrated mathematical model able to simultaneously describe biological phosphorus removal, SMP formation/degradation and physical processes which also include the removal of organic matter. The model has been calibrated with data collected in a UCT-MBR pilot plant, located at the Palermo wastewater treatment plant, applying a modified version of a recently developed calibration protocol. The calibrated model provides acceptable correspondence with experimental data and can be considered a useful tool for MBR design and operation.

  10. Mathematical modelling of a flow-injection system with a membrane separation module

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolev, S.D.; Kolev, Spas D.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical model for a flow-injection system with a membrane separation module based on the axially dispersed plug flow model was developed. It takes into account the geometrical dimensions and dispersion properties of the main sections of the manifold, the mass transfer in the channels of the

  11. Model-based fault detection for proton exchange membrane fuel cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, an intelligent model-based fault detection (FD) is developed for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) dynamic systems using an independent radial basis function (RBF) networks. The novelty is that this RBF networks is used to model the PEMFC dynamic systems and residuals are generated based ...

  12. On the study of catalytic membrane reactor for water detritiation: Modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liger, Karine, E-mail: karine.liger@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France); Mascarade, Jérémy [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France); Joulia, Xavier; Meyer, Xuan-Mi [Université de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, 4, Allée Emile Monso, Toulouse F-31030 (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, Toulouse F-31030 (France); Troulay, Michèle; Perrais, Christophe [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Experimental results for the conversion of tritiated water (using deuterium as a simulant of tritium) by means of a catalytic membrane reactor in view of tritium recovery. • Phenomenological 2D model to represent catalytic membrane reactor behavior including the determination of the compositions of gaseous effluents. • Good agreement between the simulation results and experimental measurements performed on the dedicated facility. • Explanation of the unexpected behavior of the catalytic membrane reactor by the modeling results and in particular the gas composition estimation. - Abstract: In the framework of tritium recovery from tritiated water, efficiency of packed bed membrane reactors have been successfully demonstrated. Thanks to protium isotope swamping, tritium bonded water can be recovered under the valuable Q{sub 2} form (Q = H, D or T) by means of isotope exchange reactions occurring on catalyst surface. The use of permselective Pd-based membrane allows withdrawal of reactions products all along the reactor, and thus limits reverse reaction rate to the benefit of the direct one (shift effect). The reactions kinetics, which are still little known or unknown, are generally assumed to be largely greater than the permeation ones so that thermodynamic equilibriums of isotope exchange reactions are generally assumed. This paper proposes a new phenomenological 2D model to represent catalytic membrane reactor behavior with the determination of gas effluents compositions. A good agreement was obtained between the simulation results and experimental measurements performed on a dedicated facility. Furthermore, the gas composition estimation permits to interpret unexpected behavior of the catalytic membrane reactor. In the next future, further sensitivity analysis will be performed to determine the limits of the model and a kinetics study will be conducted to assess the thermodynamic equilibrium of reactions.

  13. Experimental investigation and modeling of industrial oily wastewater treatment using modified polyethersulfone ultrafiltration hollow fiber membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahi, Abdolhamid; Mohammadi, Toraj; Behbahani, Reza Mosayebi; Hemmati, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Hollow fiber membranes were prepared from polyethersulfone/additives/NMP and DMSO system via phase inversion induced by precipitation in non-solvent coagulation bath. The interaction effects of polyethylene-glycol (PEG), propionic-acid (PA), Tween-20, PEG molecular weight and polyvinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP) on morphology and performance of synthesized membranes were investigated. Taguchi method (L 16 orthogonal array) was used initially to plan a minimum number of experiments. 32 membranes were synthesized (with two replications) and their permeation flux and TOC rejection properties to oily wastewater treatment were studied. The obtained results indicated that addition of PA to spinning dope decreases flux while it increases TOC rejection of prepared membranes. Also, the result shows that addition of PVP, Tween-20 and PEG content in spinning dope enhances permeation flux while reducing TOC rejection. The obtained results indicated that the synthesized membranes was effective and suitable for treatment of the oily wastewater to achieve up to 92.6, 98.2, and 98.5% removal of TOC, TSS, and OGC, respectively with a flux of 247.19 L/(m 2 h). Moreover, Hermia's models were used for permeation flux decline prediction. Experimental data and models predictions were compared. The results showed that there is reasonable agreement between experimental data and the cake layer model followed by the intermediate blocking model

  14. Experimental investigation and modeling of industrial oily wastewater treatment using modified polyethersulfone ultrafiltration hollow fiber membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salahi, Abdolhamid; Mohammadi, Toraj [Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behbahani, Reza Mosayebi [Petroleum University of Technology (PUT), Ahwaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hemmati, Mahmood [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Hollow fiber membranes were prepared from polyethersulfone/additives/NMP and DMSO system via phase inversion induced by precipitation in non-solvent coagulation bath. The interaction effects of polyethylene-glycol (PEG), propionic-acid (PA), Tween-20, PEG molecular weight and polyvinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP) on morphology and performance of synthesized membranes were investigated. Taguchi method (L{sub 16} orthogonal array) was used initially to plan a minimum number of experiments. 32 membranes were synthesized (with two replications) and their permeation flux and TOC rejection properties to oily wastewater treatment were studied. The obtained results indicated that addition of PA to spinning dope decreases flux while it increases TOC rejection of prepared membranes. Also, the result shows that addition of PVP, Tween-20 and PEG content in spinning dope enhances permeation flux while reducing TOC rejection. The obtained results indicated that the synthesized membranes was effective and suitable for treatment of the oily wastewater to achieve up to 92.6, 98.2, and 98.5% removal of TOC, TSS, and OGC, respectively with a flux of 247.19 L/(m{sup 2}h). Moreover, Hermia's models were used for permeation flux decline prediction. Experimental data and models predictions were compared. The results showed that there is reasonable agreement between experimental data and the cake layer model followed by the intermediate blocking model.

  15. Nuclide separation modeling through reverse osmosis membranes in radioactive liquid waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Sik Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate the transport mechanism of radioactive nuclides through the reverse osmosis (RO membrane and to estimate its effectiveness for nuclide separation from radioactive liquid waste. An analytical model is developed to simulate the RO separation, and a series of experiments are set up to confirm its estimated separation behavior. The model is based on the extended Nernst–Plank equation, which handles the convective flux, diffusive flux, and electromigration flux under electroneutrality and zero electric current conditions. The distribution coefficient which arises due to ion interactions with the membrane material and the electric potential jump at the membrane interface are included as boundary conditions in solving the equation. A high Peclet approximation is adopted to simplify the calculation, but the effect of concentration polarization is included for a more accurate prediction of separation. Cobalt and cesium are specifically selected for the experiments in order to check the separation mechanism from liquid waste composed of various radioactive nuclides and nonradioactive substances, and the results are compared with the estimated cobalt and cesium rejections of the RO membrane using the model. Experimental and calculated results are shown to be in excellent agreement. The proposed model will be very useful for the prediction of separation behavior of various radioactive nuclides by the RO membrane.

  16. Disruption of TCA Cycle and Glutamate Metabolism Identified by Metabolomics in an In Vitro Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrat-Durebex, Charlotte; Corcia, Philippe; Piver, Eric; Devos, David; Dangoumau, Audrey; Gouel, Flore; Vourc'h, Patrick; Emond, Patrick; Laumonnier, Frédéric; Nadal-Desbarats, Lydie; Gordon, Paul H; Andres, Christian R; Blasco, Hélène

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to develop a cellular metabolomics model that reproduces the pathophysiological conditions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in order to improve knowledge of disease physiology. We used a co-culture model combining the motor neuron-like cell line NSC-34 and the astrocyte clone C8-D1A, with each over-expressing wild-type or G93C mutant human SOD1, to examine amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) physiology. We focused on the effects of mutant human SOD1 as well as oxidative stress induced by menadione on intracellular metabolism using a metabolomics approach through gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Preliminary non-supervised analysis by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) revealed that cell type, genetic environment, and time of culture influenced the metabolomics profiles. Supervised analysis using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) on data from intracellular metabolomics profiles of SOD1 G93C co-cultures produced metabolites involved in glutamate metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle. This study revealed the feasibility of using a metabolomics approach in a cellular model of ALS. We identified potential disruption of the TCA cycle and glutamate metabolism under oxidative stress, which is consistent with prior research in the disease. Analysis of metabolic alterations in an in vitro model is a novel approach to investigation of disease physiology.

  17. The problem of fouling in submerged membrane bioreactors - Model validation and experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibranska, Irene; Vlaev, Serafim; Tylkowski, Bartosz

    2018-01-01

    Integrating biological treatment with membrane separation has found a broad area of applications and industrial attention. Submerged membrane bioreactors (SMBRs), based on membrane modules immersed in the bioreactor, or side stream ones connected in recycle have been employed in different biotechnological processes for separation of thermally unstable products. Fouling is one of the most important challenges in the integrated SMBRs. A number of works are devoted to fouling analysis and its treatment, especially exploring the opportunity for enhanced fouling control in SMBRs. The main goal of the review is to provide a comprehensive yet concise overview of modeling the fouling in SMBRs in view of the problematics of model validation, either by real system measurements at different scales or by analysis of the obtained theoretical results. The review is focused on the current state of research applying computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling techniques.

  18. Mathematical models of membrane fouling in cross-flow micro-filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Jimena Ortíz Jerez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The greatest difficulty arising during cross-flow micro-filtration is the formation of a cake layer on the membrane sur-face (also called fouling, thereby affecting system performance. Fouling has been related to permeate flux decay re-sulting from changes in operating variables. Many articles have been published in an attempt to explain this phe-nomenon but it has not yet been fully understood because it depends on specific solution/membrane interactions and differing parameters. This work was aimed at presenting an analytical review of recently published mathematical models to explain fouling. Although the reviewed models can be adjusted to any type of application, a simple “con-centration polarisation” model is advisable in the particular case of tropical fruit juices for describing the insoluble solids being deposited on membrane surface.

  19. Fundamental Studies of Novel Zwitterionic Hybrid Membranes: Kinetic Model and Mechanism Insights into Strontium Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Wen Zhu; Junsheng Liu; Meng Li

    2014-01-01

    A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models). Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was foun...

  20. The Japanese Quail as an avian model for testing endocrine disrupting chemicals: endocrine and behavioral end points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, M.A.; Abdelnabi, M.A.; Thompson, N.; Wu, J.; Henry, K.; Humphries, E.; Henry, P.F.P.

    2000-01-01

    Birds have extremely varied reproductive strategies. As such, the impact of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can greatly differ across avian species. Precocial species, such as Japanese quail appear to be most sensitive to EDC effects during embryonic development, particularly sexual differentiation. A great deal is known about the ontogeny of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) relative to endocrine, neuro-endocrine, and behavioral components of reproduction. Therefore, this species provides an excellent model for understanding effects of EDCs on reproductive biology with exposure at specific stages of the life cycle. The purpose of these experiments was to conduct a 1- or 2- generation experiment with positive or negative control chemicals and to determine changes in selected end points. Japanese quail embryos were exposed to estradiol benzoate (EB; positive control) in a 2-generation design or to fadrozole (FAD; negative control) in a 1-generation design. Embryonic EB treatment resulted in significant reductions (p< 0.5) in hen day production (90.2 vs 54.1; control vs EB, resp.) and fertility (85.3 vs 33.4%, control vs EB, resp.). Males showed sharply reduced courtship and mating behaviors as well as increased lag time (26 vs 148 sec; control vs EB) in behavioral tests. Fadrozole exposure resulted in reduced hatchability of fertile eggs, particularly at higher doses. There were no significant effects on courtship and mating behavior of males although males showed an increased lag time in their responses, nally, a behavioral test for studying motor and fear responses in young chicks was used; chicks exposed to an estrogenic pesticide (methoxychlor) showed some deficits. In summary, the use of appropriate and reliable end points that are responsive to endocrine disruption are critical for assessment of EDCs. Supported in part by EPA grant R826134.

  1. Induced mitochondrial membrane potential for modeling solitonic conduction of electrotonic signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Poznanski

    Full Text Available A cable model that includes polarization-induced capacitive current is derived for modeling the solitonic conduction of electrotonic potentials in neuronal branchlets with microstructure containing endoplasmic membranes. A solution of the nonlinear cable equation modified for fissured intracellular medium with a source term representing charge 'soakage' is used to show how intracellular capacitive effects of bound electrical charges within mitochondrial membranes can influence electrotonic signals expressed as solitary waves. The elastic collision resulting from a head-on collision of two solitary waves results in localized and non-dispersing electrical solitons created by the nonlinearity of the source term. It has been shown that solitons in neurons with mitochondrial membrane and quasi-electrostatic interactions of charges held by the microstructure (i.e., charge 'soakage' have a slower velocity of propagation compared with solitons in neurons with microstructure, but without endoplasmic membranes. When the equilibrium potential is a small deviation from rest, the nonohmic conductance acts as a leaky channel and the solitons are small compared when the equilibrium potential is large and the outer mitochondrial membrane acts as an amplifier, boosting the amplitude of the endogenously generated solitons. These findings demonstrate a functional role of quasi-electrostatic interactions of bound electrical charges held by microstructure for sustaining solitons with robust self-regulation in their amplitude through changes in the mitochondrial membrane equilibrium potential. The implication of our results indicate that a phenomenological description of ionic current can be successfully modeled with displacement current in Maxwell's equations as a conduction process involving quasi-electrostatic interactions without the inclusion of diffusive current. This is the first study in which solitonic conduction of electrotonic potentials are generated by

  2. RNA Sequencing Reveals that Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Disruption of Membrane Integrity Underlie Dimethyl Trisulfide Toxicity against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Tropical Race 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunwu Zuo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium wilt of banana, a destructive disease that affects banana production, is caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4 (Foc TR4. In a previous study, we confirmed the strong inhibitory effects of Chinese leek (Allium tuberosum on the incidence of this disease. Sulfur compounds are the primary antifungal constituents of Chinese leek. Among these, dimethyl trisulfide (DT was the most abundant and exhibited the strongest inhibition of Foc TR4 growth and development. In the present study, the global gene expression profiles of Foc TR4 isolates treated with DT at 4,000-folds dilution (concentration of 1/4,000, v/v for 1.5, 6, and 12 h were investigated by using RNA sequencing. The expression patterns of 15 DEGs were validated based on quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR assay. Untreated sample presented 2,556, 1,691, and 1,150 differentially expressed genes (DEGs at 1.5, 6, and 12 h after the onset of the experiment, respectively, whereas DT-treated isolates presented 2,823, 3,546, and 6,197 DEGs. Based on Gene Ontology (GO annotation and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG enrichment analysis, DEGs involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER, glycosylation, and steroid biosynthesis were significantly inhibited by DT exposure. The similar expressional patterns of 15 DEGs between RNA-seq and qRT-PCR assays indicated the reliability of the RNA-seq data. In conclusion, ER stress related to glycosylation inhibition and damage to cell membrane integrity might contribute to the toxicity of DT against Foc TR4. As the results presented here evidenced changes in gene expression associated with DT exposure, which might be used to develop new approaches for controlling FWB.

  3. Global sensitivity analysis of a filtration model for submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, A; Ruano, M V; Ribes, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2014-04-01

    The results of a global sensitivity analysis of a filtration model for submerged anaerobic MBRs (AnMBRs) are assessed in this paper. This study aimed to (1) identify the less- (or non-) influential factors of the model in order to facilitate model calibration and (2) validate the modelling approach (i.e. to determine the need for each of the proposed factors to be included in the model). The sensitivity analysis was conducted using a revised version of the Morris screening method. The dynamic simulations were conducted using long-term data obtained from an AnMBR plant fitted with industrial-scale hollow-fibre membranes. Of the 14 factors in the model, six were identified as influential, i.e. those calibrated using off-line protocols. A dynamic calibration (based on optimisation algorithms) of these influential factors was conducted. The resulting estimated model factors accurately predicted membrane performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Solving Problem of Graph Isomorphism by Membrane-Quantum Hybrid Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artiom Alhazov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the application of new parallelization methods based on membrane-quantum hybrid computing to graph isomorphism problem solving. Applied membrane-quantum hybrid computational model was developed by authors. Massive parallelism of unconventional computing is used to implement classic brute force algorithm efficiently. This approach does not suppose any restrictions of considered graphs types. The estimated performance of the model is less then quadratic that makes a very good result for the problem of \\textbf{NP} complexity.

  5. Ions transfer modeling through monopolar and bipolar membranes: Treatment of wastewater containing ammonium nitrate by electrodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Amine Ben Ali

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a mathematical model was proposed to illustrate the different transport modes contributing in transfer of all involved species through anion, cation and bipolar membranes. This study was led on a wastewater containing ammonium nitrate treated by bipolar membrane electrodialysis (BPMED. In this electrodialysis, different species are involved, in particular, ammonium ions NH4+, nitrates NO3-, ammoniac NH3, water H2O and protons H+. Calculations led from the material balance sheets equations obtained in bath mode, allowed to validate the proposed transfer model and to check balance sheets material on all involved species during electrodialysis.

  6. [Modelling of pattern formation and oscillations in pH and transmembrane potential near the cell membrane of Chara corallina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliusnina, T Iu; Lavrova, A I; Riznichenko, G Iu; Rubin, A B

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model of potencial-dependent proton transfer across the membrane of Chara corallina cells is considered. To construct the model, partial differential equations describing the system dynamics in time and in space were used. The variables of the model are the proton concentration and membrane potential. The model describes the experimentally observed inhomogeneous distribution of transmembrane potential and pH along the membrane and oscillations of the potential and pH in time. A mechanism of the distribution of pH and membrane potential along the Chara corallina cell is suggested.

  7. A generalized Born formalism for heterogeneous dielectric environments: application to the implicit modeling of biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Seiichiro; Feig, Michael

    2005-03-22

    Reliable computer simulations of complex biological environments such as integral membrane proteins with explicit water and lipid molecules remain a challenging task. We propose a modification of the standard generalized Born theory of homogeneous solvent for modeling the heterogeneous dielectric environments such as lipid/water interfaces. Our model allows the representation of biological membranes in the form of multiple layered dielectric regions with dielectric constants that are different from the solute cavity. The proposed new formalism is shown to predict the electrostatic component of solvation free energy with a relative error of 0.17% compared to exact finite-difference solutions of the Poisson equation for a transmembrane helix test system. Molecular dynamics simulations of melittin and bacteriorhodopsin are carried out and performed over 10 ns and 7 ns of simulation time, respectively. The center of melittin along the membrane normal in these stable simulations is in excellent agreement with the relevant experimental data. Simulations of bacteriorhodopsin started from the experimental structure remained stable and in close agreement with experiment. We also examined the free energy profiles of water and amino acid side chain analogs upon membrane insertion. The results with our implicit membrane model agree well with the experimental transfer free energy data from cyclohexane to water as well as explicit solvent simulations of water and selected side chain analogs.

  8. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jimin; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-01-01

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. PMID:24725935

  9. Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework-8 Membrane for H2/CO2 Separation: Experimental and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, L. S.; Yeong, Y. F.; Lau, K. K.; Azmi, M. S.; Chew, T. L.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, ZIF-8 membrane synthesized through solvent evaporation secondary seeded growth was tested for single gas permeation and binary gases separation of H2 and CO2. Subsequently, a modified mathematical modeling combining the effects of membrane and support layers was applied to represent the gas transport properties of ZIF-8 membrane. Results showed that, the membrane has exhibited H2/CO2 ideal selectivity of 5.83 and separation factor of 3.28 at 100 kPa and 303 K. Besides, the experimental results were fitted well with the simulated results by demonstrating means absolute error (MAE) values ranged from 1.13 % to 3.88 % for single gas permeation and 10.81 % to 21.22 % for binary gases separation. Based on the simulated data, most of the H2 and CO2 gas molecules have transported through the molecular pores of membrane layer, which was up to 70 %. Thus, the gas transport of the gases is mainly dominated by adsorption and diffusion across the membrane.

  10. Role of charge screening and delocalization for lipophilic cation permeability of model and mitochondrial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trendeleva, Tatiana A; Sukhanova, Evgenia I; Rogov, Anton G; Zvyagilskaya, Renata A; Seveina, Inna I; Ilyasova, Tatiana M; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2013-09-01

    The effects of the mitochondria-targeted lipophilic cation dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (C12TPP, the charge is delocalized and screened by bulky hydrophobic residues) and those of lipophilic cations decyltriethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (C10TEA and C16TMA, the charges are localized and screened by less bulky residues) on bilayer planar phospholipid membranes and tightly-coupled mitochondria from the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica have been compared. In planar membranes, C12TPP was found to generate a diffusion potential as if it easily penetrates these membranes. In the presence of palmitate, C12TPP induced H(+) permeability like plastoquinonyl decyltriphenilphosphonium that facilitates transfer of fatty acid anions (Severin et al., PNAS, 2010, 107, 663-668). C12TPP was shown to stimulate State 4 respiration of mitochondria and caused a mitochondrial membrane depolarization with a half-maximal effect at 6μM. Besides, C12TPP profoundly potentiated the uncoupling effect of endogenous or added fatty acids. C10TEA and C16TMA inhibited State 4 respiration and decreased the membrane potential, though at much higher concentrations than C12TPP, and they did not promote the uncoupling action of fatty acids. These relationships were modeled by molecular dynamics. They can be explained by different membrane permeabilities for studied cations, which in turn are due to different availabilities of the positive charge in these cations to water dipoles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Tissuepatch is biocompatible and seals iatrogenic membrane defects in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Alexander C; Joyeux, Luc; Van der Merwe, Johannes; Jimenez, Julio; Prapanus, Savitree; Barrett, David W; Connon, Che; Chowdhury, Tina T; David, Anna L; Deprest, Jan

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate novel sealing techniques for their biocompatibility and sealing capacity of iatrogenic fetal membrane defects in a pregnant rabbit model. At day 23 of gestation (term = d31), a standardized fetoscopy was performed through a 14G cannula. The resulting fetal membrane defect was closed with condensed collagen, collagen with fibrinogen, Tissuepatch, Duraseal, or a conventional collagen plug (Lyostypt) as reference. At d30, the fetuses were harvested and full thickness fetal membrane samples were analyzed. The study consisted of 2 consecutive parts: (1) biocompatibility testing by fetal survival, apoptosis, and infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells in the membranes and (2) the efficacy to seal fetal membrane defects. Three sealants (collagen with fibrinogen, Duraseal, or Lyostypt) were associated with a higher fetal mortality compared to control unmanipulated littermates and hence were excluded from further analysis. Tissuepatch was biocompatible, and amniotic fluid levels were comparable to those of control untouched littermates. Compared to the condensed collagen, Tissuepatch was also easier in surgical handling and induced limited cell proliferation. Tissuepatch had the best biocompatibility and efficacy in sealing an iatrogenic fetal membrane defect in the pregnant rabbit compared to other readily available sealants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Selective Interaction of a Cationic Polyfluorene with Model Lipid Membranes: Anionic versus Zwitterionic Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Kahveci

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the interaction mechanism between the conjugated polyelectrolyte {[9,9-bis(6'-N,N,N-trimethylammoniumhexyl]fluorene-phenylene}bromide (HTMA-PFP and model lipid membranes. The study was carried out using different biophysical techniques, mainly fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. Results show that despite the preferential interaction of HTMA-PFP with anionic lipids, HTMA-PFP shows affinity for zwitterionic lipids; although the interaction mechanism is different as well as HTMA-PFP’s final membrane location. Whilst the polyelectrolyte is embedded within the lipid bilayer in the anionic membrane, it remains close to the surface, forming aggregates that are sensitive to the physical state of the lipid bilayer in the zwitterionic system. The different interaction mechanism is reflected in the polyelectrolyte fluorescence spectrum, since the maximum shifts to longer wavelengths in the zwitterionic system. The intrinsic fluorescence of HTMA-PFP was used to visualize the interaction between polymer and vesicles via fluorescence microscopy, thanks to its high quantum yield and photostability. This technique allows the selectivity of the polyelectrolyte and higher affinity for anionic membranes to be observed. The results confirmed the appropriateness of using HTMA-PFP as a membrane fluorescent marker and suggest that, given its different behaviour towards anionic and zwitterionic membranes, HTMA-PFP could be used for selective recognition and imaging of bacteria over mammalian cells.

  13. The π Configuration of the WWW Motif of a Short Trp-Rich Peptide Is Critical for Targeting Bacterial Membranes, Disrupting Preformed Biofilms, and Killing Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarena, D; Mishra, Biswajit; Lushnikova, Tamara; Wang, Fangyu; Wang, Guangshun

    2017-08-08

    Tryptophan-rich peptides, being short and suitable for large-scale chemical synthesis, are attractive candidates for developing a new generation of antimicrobials to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria (superbugs). Although there are numerous pictures of the membrane-bound structure of a single tryptophan (W), how multiple Trp amino acids assemble themselves and interact with bacterial membranes is poorly understood. This communication presents the three-dimensional structure of an eight-residue Trp-rich peptide (WWWLRKIW-NH 2 with 50% W) determined by the improved two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance method, which includes the measurements of 13 C and 15 N chemical shifts at natural abundance. This peptide forms the shortest two-turn helix with a distinct amphipathic feature. A unique structural arrangement is identified for the Trp triplet, WWW, that forms a π configuration with W2 as the horizontal bar and W1/W3 forming the two legs. An arginine scan reveals that the WWW motif is essential for killing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and disrupting preformed bacterial biofilms. This unique π configuration for the WWW motif is stabilized by aromatic-aromatic interactions as evidenced by ring current shifts as well as nuclear Overhauser effects. Because the WWW motif is maintained, a change of I7 to R led to a potent antimicrobial and antibiofilm peptide with 4-fold improvement in cell selectivity. Collectively, this study elucidated the structural basis of antibiofilm activity of the peptide, identified a better peptide candidate via structure-activity relationship studies, and laid the foundation for engineering future antibiotics based on the WWW motif.

  14. Formation and disruption of tonotopy in a large-scale model of the auditory cortex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomková, M.; Tomek, J.; Novák, Ondřej; Zelenka, Ondřej; Syka, Josef; Brom, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 2 (2015), s. 131-153 ISSN 0929-5313 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1347 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : auditory cortex * large-scale model * spiking neuron * oscillation * STDP * tonotopy Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.871, year: 2015

  15. Effects of phenylpropanolamine (PPA) on in vitro human erythrocyte membranes and molecular models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwalsky, Mario; Zambrano, Pablo; Mennickent, Sigrid; Villena, Fernando; Sotomayor, Carlos P.; Aguilar, Luis F.; Bolognin, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → PPA is a common ingredient in cough-cold medication and appetite suppressants. → Reports on its effects on human erythrocytes are very scarce. → We found that PPA induced in vitro morphological changes to human erythrocytes. → PPA interacted with isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes. → PPA interacted with class of lipid present in the erythrocyte membrane outer monolayer. -- Abstract: Norephedrine, also called phenylpropanolamine (PPA), is a synthetic form of the ephedrine alkaloid. After reports of the occurrence of intracranial hemorrhage and other adverse effects, including several deaths, PPA is no longer sold in USA and Canada. Despite the extensive information about PPA toxicity, reports on its effects on cell membranes are scarce. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of PPA with cell membranes, ranges of concentrations were incubated with intact human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), and molecular models of cell membranes. The latter consisted in bilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), phospholipid classes present in the outer and inner monolayers of most plasmatic cell membranes, respectively. The capacity of PPA to perturb the bilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was assessed by X-ray diffraction, DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) and IUM were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, and intact human erythrocytes were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study presents evidence that PPA affects human red cell membranes as follows: (a) in SEM studies on human erythrocytes it was observed that 0.5 mM PPA induced shape changes; (b) in IUM PPA induced a sharp decrease in the fluorescence anisotropy in the lipid bilayer acyl chains in a concentration range lower than 100 μM; (c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that PPA in the 0.1-0.5 mM range induced increasing

  16. Degradation pattern of a porcine collagen membrane in an in vivo model of guided bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calciolari, E; Ravanetti, F; Strange, A; Mardas, N; Bozec, L; Cacchioli, A; Kostomitsopoulos, N; Donos, N

    2018-02-15

    Although collagen membranes have been clinically applied for guided tissue/bone regeneration for more than 30 years, their in vivo degradation pattern has never been fully clarified. A better understanding of the different stages of in vivo degradation of collagen membranes is extremely important, considering that the biology of bone regeneration requires the presence of a stable and cell/tissue-occlusive barrier during the healing stages in order to ensure a predictable result. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the degradation pattern of a porcine non-cross-linked collagen membrane in an in vivo model of guided bone regeneration (GBR). Decalcified and paraffin-embedded specimens from calvarial defects of 18, 10-month-old Wistar rats were used. The defects were treated with a double layer of collagen membrane and a deproteinized bovine bone mineral particulate graft. At 7, 14 and 30 days of healing, qualitative evaluation with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and histomorphometric measurements were performed. Markers of collagenase activity and bone formation were investigated using an immunofluorescence technique. A significant reduction of membrane thickness was observed from 7 to 30 days of healing, which was associated with progressive loss of collagen alignment, increased collagen remodeling and progressive invasion of woven bone inside the membranes. A limited inflammatory infiltrate was observed at all time points of healing. The collagen membrane investigated was biocompatible and able to promote bone regeneration. However, pronounced signs of degradation were observed starting from day 30. Since successful regeneration is obtained only when cell occlusion and space maintenance exist for the healing time needed by the bone progenitor cells to repopulate the defect, the suitability of collagen membranes in cases where long-lasting barriers are needed needs to be further reviewed. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A

  17. Sustainable Disruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Kjær, Lykke Bloch

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 the Sustainable Disruptions (SD) project at the Laboratory for Sustainability at Design School Kolding (DK) has developed and tested a set of design thinking tools, specifically targeting the barriers to economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable business development...... invested in the issue of sustainable business development, in particular the leaders and employees of SMEs, but also to design education seeking new ways to consciously handle and teach the complexity inherent in sustainable transformation. Findings indicate that the SD design thinking approach contributes....... The tools have been applied in practice in collaboration with 11 small and medium sized companies (SMEs). The study investigates these approaches to further understand how design thinking can contribute to sustainable transition in a business context. The study and the findings are relevant to organizations...

  18. Disrupted Disclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause Hansen, Hans; Uldam, Julie

    , and onongoing research in the extractive industries and social movements, this work-in-progress sets outto examine (a) why and how transparency has been constructed and mobilized in recentinternational attempts to regulate the extractive industries, specifically oil and gas companies; (b)how companies’ normal...... appearances become challenged through disruptive disclosures in mediaenvironments characterized by multiple levels of visibility, with companies both observing andbeing observed by civil society groups that criticize them; (c) why and how the mobilization aroundtransparency and ensuing practices......While projects of governance by transparency have become widespread over the past decades, theyare usually investigated and theorized in isolation from the wider field of visibility and surveillancein which they are embedded. Building on theories of governance, visibility and surveillance...

  19. Rapid actions of xenoestrogens disrupt normal estrogenic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Cheryl S; Hu, Guangzhen; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A

    2014-03-01

    Some chemicals used in consumer products or manufacturing (e.g. plastics, surfactants, pesticides, resins) have estrogenic activities; these xenoestrogens (XEs) chemically resemble physiological estrogens and are one of the major categories of synthesized compounds that disrupt endocrine actions. Potent rapid actions of XEs via nongenomic mechanisms contribute significantly to their disruptive effects on functional endpoints (e.g. cell proliferation/death, transport, peptide release). Membrane-initiated hormonal signaling in our pituitary cell model is predominantly driven by mERα with mERβ and GPR30 participation. We visualized ERα on plasma membranes using many techniques in the past (impeded ligands, antibodies to ERα) and now add observations of epitope proximity with other membrane signaling proteins. We have demonstrated a range of rapid signals/protein activations by XEs including: calcium channels, cAMP/PKA, MAPKs, G proteins, caspases, and transcription factors. XEs can cause disruptions of the oscillating temporal patterns of nongenomic signaling elicited by endogenous estrogens. Concentration effects of XEs are nonmonotonic (a trait shared with natural hormones), making it difficult to design efficient (single concentration) toxicology tests to monitor their harmful effects. A plastics monomer, bisphenol A, modified by waste treatment (chlorination) and other processes causes dephosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases, in contrast to having no effects as it does in genomic signaling. Mixtures of XEs, commonly found in contaminated environments, disrupt the signaling actions of physiological estrogens even more severely than do single XEs. Understanding the features of XEs that drive these disruptive mechanisms will allow us to redesign useful chemicals that exclude estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Animal Models for Muscular Dystrophy Show Different Patterns of Sarcolemmal Disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Straub, Volker; Rafael, Jill A.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.; Campbell, Kevin P.

    1997-01-01

    Genetic defects in a number of components of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex (DGC) lead to distinct forms of muscular dystrophy. However, little is known about how alterations in the DGC are manifested in the pathophysiology present in dystrophic muscle tissue. One hypothesis is that the DGC protects the sarcolemma from contraction-induced damage. Using tracer molecules, we compared sarcolemmal integrity in animal models for muscular dystrophy and in muscular dystrophy patient samples. Ev...

  1. An Agent-Based Modeling Approach to Integrate Tsunami Science, Human Behavior, and Unplanned Network Disruptions for Nearfield Tsunami Evacuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D. T.; Wang, H.; Cramer, L.; Mostafizi, A.; Park, H.

    2016-12-01

    For the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) and other extreme near-field tsunami hazards, coastal residents and tourist must evacuate within 15 to 30 minutes immediately following intense ground-shaking and will be confronted with an array of choices: Should I evacuate on foot or by car? Alone, or find friends and family first? Head for high ground far away, or seek shelter a nearby building? How will the roads and bridges be affected by the preceding earthquake? In this project, we integrate the disciplines of tsunami inundation science, sociology, and civil engineering to investigate how decision-making by individual evacuees with respect to milling time, mode choice, and destination affects their life safety. We use an Agent-Based Model (ABM) to create credible scenarios for near-field tsunami evacuation. The ABM integrates (1) the time-dependent tsunami inundation computed separately using NOAA's ComMIT/MOST model, (2) population layers to account for variations in population density of residents and tourist, (3) evacuation route network including roads, bridges and foot paths for multi-modal transportation, and (4) evacuation destinations for horizontal and vertical evacuation. For this project, we apply the ABM at two locations: the city Seaside, OR, and South Beach State Park in Newport, OR. In the Seaside scenario, we show how unplanned network disruption - e.g. the partial or total failure of bridges due to the preceding earthquake - will affect life safety and show how the ABM can be used to provide retrofit strategies. For South Beach, we show how alternative routing can have a substantial impact on life safety. The ABM shows results that are initially counterintuitive. For the Seaside example, resource allocation for bridge retrofit favors investments in nodes and links not necessarily in close proximity to population centers. For the South Beach example, the routes which provide for the lowest risk (maximum life safety) are not always those with the

  2. Cyto-Sim: a formal language model and stochastic simulator of membrane-enclosed biochemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedwards, Sean; Mazza, Tommaso

    2007-10-15

    Compartments and membranes are the basis of cell topology and more than 30% of the human genome codes for membrane proteins. While it is possible to represent compartments and membrane proteins in a nominal way with many mathematical formalisms used in systems biology, few, if any, explicitly model the topology of the membranes themselves. Discrete stochastic simulation potentially offers the most accurate representation of cell dynamics. Since the details of every molecular interaction in a pathway are often not known, the relationship between chemical species in not necessarily best described at the lowest level, i.e. by mass action. Simulation is a form of computer-aided analysis, relying on human interpretation to derive meaning. To improve efficiency and gain meaning in an automatic way, it is necessary to have a formalism based on a model which has decidable properties. We present Cyto-Sim, a stochastic simulator of membrane-enclosed hierarchies of biochemical processes, where the membranes comprise an inner, outer and integral layer. The underlying model is based on formal language theory and has been shown to have decidable properties (Cavaliere and Sedwards, 2006), allowing formal analysis in addition to simulation. The simulator provides variable levels of abstraction via arbitrary chemical kinetics which link to ordinary differential equations. In addition to its compact native syntax, Cyto-Sim currently supports models described as Petri nets, can import all versions of SBML and can export SBML and MATLAB m-files. Cyto-Sim is available free, either as an applet or a stand-alone Java program via the web page (http://www.cosbi.eu/Rpty_Soft_CytoSim.php). Other versions can be made available upon request.

  3. Probing the interaction of brain fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP with model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Dyszy

    Full Text Available Brain fatty acid-binding protein (B-FABP interacts with biological membranes and delivers polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs via a collisional mechanism. The binding of FAs in the protein and the interaction with membranes involve a motif called "portal region", formed by two small α-helices, A1 and A2, connected by a loop. We used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and electron spin resonance to probe the changes in the protein and in the membrane model induced by their interaction. Spin labeled B-FABP mutants and lipidic spin probes incorporated into a membrane model confirmed that B-FABP interacts with micelles through the portal region and led to structural changes in the protein as well in the micelles. These changes were greater in the presence of LPG when compared to the LPC models. ESR spectra of B-FABP labeled mutants showed the presence of two groups of residues that responded to the presence of micelles in opposite ways. In the presence of lysophospholipids, group I of residues, whose side chains point outwards from the contact region between the helices, had their mobility decreased in an environment of lower polarity when compared to the same residues in solution. The second group, composed by residues with side chains situated at the interface between the α-helices, experienced an increase in mobility in the presence of the model membranes. These modifications in the ESR spectra of B-FABP mutants are compatible with a less ordered structure of the portal region inner residues (group II that is likely to facilitate the delivery of FAs to target membranes. On the other hand, residues in group I and micelle components have their mobilities decreased probably as a result of the formation of a collisional complex. Our results bring new insights for the understanding of the gating and delivery mechanisms of FABPs.

  4. QSAR models for reproductive toxicity and endocrine disruption in regulatory use - a preliminary investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gunde Egeskov; Niemela, J.R.; Wedebye, Eva Bay

    2008-01-01

    and epidemiological human studies), dominant lethal effect in rodents (in vivo) and Drosophila melanogaster sex-linked recessive lethal effect. A structure set of 57,014 European Inventory of Existing Chemical Substances (EINECS) chemicals was screened. A total of 5240 EINECS chemicals, corresponding to 9.2%, were...... predicted as reproductive toxicants by one or more of the models. The chemicals predicted positive for reproductive toxicity will be submitted to the Danish Environmental Protection Agency as scientific input for a future updated advisory classification list with advisory classifications for concern...

  5. Bisection method for accurate modeling and simulation of fouling in hollow fiber membrane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Yubo; Zhang, Jian; Song, Lianfa

    2017-06-01

    Accurate description and modeling of fouling on hollow fibers imposes a serious challenge to more effective fouling mitigation and performance optimization of the membrane system. Although the governing equations for membrane fouling can be constructed based on the known theories from membrane filtration and fluid dynamics, they are unsolvable analytically due to the complex spatially and temporally varying nature of fouling on hollow fibers. The current available numerical solutions for the governing equations are either unreliable or inconvenient to use because of the uses of unfounded assumptions or cumbersome calculation methods. This work presented for the first time a rigorous numerical procedure to solve the governing equations for fouling development on hollow fibers. A critical step to achieve the goal is the use of bisection method to determine the transmembrane pressure at the dead end of the fibers. With this procedure, fouling behavior in the hollow fiber membrane system under a given condition can be simulated within a second. The model simulations were well calibrated and verified with the published experimental data from literature. Also presented in the paper were simulations for performances of the hollow fiber membrane system under various operation conditions. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  6. Sexual Conspecific Aggressive Response (SCAR): A Model of Sexual Trauma that Disrupts Maternal Learning and Plasticity in the Female Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shors, Tracey J; Tobόn, Krishna; DiFeo, Gina; Durham, Demetrius M; Chang, Han Yan M

    2016-01-25

    Sexual aggression can disrupt processes related to learning as females emerge from puberty into young adulthood. To model these experiences in laboratory studies, we developed SCAR, which stands for Sexual Conspecific Aggressive Response. During puberty, a rodent female is paired daily for 30-min with a sexually-experienced adult male. During the SCAR experience, the male tracks the anogenital region of the female as she escapes from pins. Concentrations of the stress hormone corticosterone were significantly elevated during and after the experience. Moreover, females that were exposed to the adult male throughout puberty did not perform well during training with an associative learning task nor did they learn well to express maternal behaviors during maternal sensitization. Most females that were exposed to the adult male did not learn to care for offspring over the course of 17 days. Finally, females that did not express maternal behaviors retained fewer newly-generated cells in their hippocampus whereas those that did express maternal behaviors retained more cells, most of which would differentiate into neurons within weeks. Together these data support SCAR as a useful laboratory model for studying the potential consequences of sexual aggression and trauma for the female brain during puberty and young adulthood.

  7. Mutation of Semaphorin-6A disrupts limbic and cortical connectivity and models neurodevelopmental psychopathology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism are characterised by cellular disorganisation and dysconnectivity across the brain and can be caused by mutations in genes that control neurodevelopmental processes. To examine how neurodevelopmental defects can affect brain function and behaviour, we have comprehensively investigated the consequences of mutation of one such gene, Semaphorin-6A, on cellular organisation, axonal projection patterns, behaviour and physiology in mice. These analyses reveal a spectrum of widespread but subtle anatomical defects in Sema6A mutants, notably in limbic and cortical cellular organisation, lamination and connectivity. These mutants display concomitant alterations in the electroencephalogram and hyper-exploratory behaviour, which are characteristic of models of psychosis and reversible by the antipsychotic clozapine. They also show altered social interaction and deficits in object recognition and working memory. Mice with mutations in Sema6A or the interacting genes may thus represent a highly informative model for how neurodevelopmental defects can lead to anatomical dysconnectivity, resulting, either directly or through reactive mechanisms, in dysfunction at the level of neuronal networks with associated behavioural phenotypes of relevance to psychiatric disorders. The biological data presented here also make these genes plausible candidates to explain human linkage findings for schizophrenia and autism.

  8. Adrenal Chromaffin Cells Exposed to 5-ns Pulses Require Higher Electric Fields to Porate Intracellular Membranes than the Plasma Membrane: An Experimental and Modeling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaklit, Josette; Craviso, Gale L; Leblanc, Normand; Yang, Lisha; Vernier, P Thomas; Chatterjee, Indira

    2017-10-01

    Nanosecond-duration electric pulses (NEPs) can permeabilize the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), causing release of Ca 2+ into the cytoplasm. This study used experimentation coupled with numerical modeling to understand the lack of Ca 2+ mobilization from Ca 2+ -storing organelles in catecholamine-secreting adrenal chromaffin cells exposed to 5-ns pulses. Fluorescence imaging determined a threshold electric (E) field of 8 MV/m for mobilizing intracellular Ca 2+ whereas whole-cell recordings of membrane conductance determined a threshold E-field of 3 MV/m for causing plasma membrane permeabilization. In contrast, a 2D numerical model of a chromaffin cell, which was constructed with internal structures representing a nucleus, mitochondrion, ER, and secretory granule, predicted that exposing the cell to the same 5-ns pulse electroporated the plasma and ER membranes at the same E-field amplitude, 3-4 MV/m. Agreement of the numerical simulations with the experimental results was obtained only when the ER interior conductivity was 30-fold lower than that of the cytoplasm and the ER membrane permittivity was twice that of the plasma membrane. A more realistic intracellular geometry for chromaffin cells in which structures representing multiple secretory granules and an ER showed slight differences in the thresholds necessary to porate the membranes of the secretory granules. We conclude that more sophisticated cell models together with knowledge of accurate dielectric properties are needed to understand the effects of NEPs on intracellular membranes in chromaffin cells, information that will be important for elucidating how NEPs porate organelle membranes in other cell types having a similarly complex cytoplasmic ultrastructure.

  9. Coastal flooding impact evaluation using an INtegrated DisRuption Assessment (INDRA) model for Varna region, Western Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Nataliya; Eftimova, Petya; Valchev, Nikolay; Prodanov, Bogdan

    2017-04-01

    The study presents evaluation and comparative analysis of storm induced flooding impacts on different coastal receptors at a scale of Varna region using INtegrated DisRuption Assessment (INDRA) model. The model was developed within the FP7 RISC-KIT project, as a part of Coastal Risk Assessment Framework (CRAF) consisting of two phases. CRAF Phase 1 is a screening process that evaluates coastal risk at a regional scale by means of coastal indices approach, which helps to identify potentially vulnerable coastal sectors: hot spots (HS). CRAF Phase 2 has the objective to assess and rank identified hotspots by detailed risk analysis done by jointly performing a hazard assessment and an impact evaluation on different categories (population, businesses, ecosystems, transport and utilities) using INDRA model at a regional level. Basically, the model assess the shock of events by estimating the impact on directly exposed to flooding hazard receptors of different vulnerability, as well as the potential ripple effects during an event in order to assess the "indirect" impacts, which occur outside the hazard area and/or continue after the event for all considered categories. The potential impacts are expressed in terms of uniform "Impact Indicators", which independently score the indirect impacts of these categories assessing disruption and recovery of the receptors. The ultimate hotspot ranking is obtained through the use of a Multi Criteria analysis (MCA) incorporated in the model, considering preferences of stakeholders. The case study area - Varna regional coast - is located on the western Black Sea, Bulgaria. The coastline, with a length of about 70 km, stretches from cape Ekrene to cape St. Atanas and includes Varna Bay. After application of CRAF Phase 1 three hotspots were selected for further analysis: Kabakum beach (HS1), Varna Central beach plus Port wall (HS2) and Artificial Island (HS3). For first two hotspots beaches and associated infrastructure are the assets

  10. Fundamental studies of novel zwitterionic hybrid membranes: kinetic model and mechanism insights into strontium removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen; Liu, Junsheng; Li, Meng

    2014-01-01

    A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models). Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was found that the adsorption of strontium ions on these zwitterionic hybrid membranes fitted well with the Lagergren pseudo-second order model. Mechanism insights suggested that diffusion-chemisorption was one of the main adsorption mechanisms. Boyd equation exhibited that film-diffusion mechanism might be the control process during the starting period. These findings are very useful in strontium removal from the stimulated radioactive wastewater.

  11. Fundamental Studies of Novel Zwitterionic Hybrid Membranes: Kinetic Model and Mechanism Insights into Strontium Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models. Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was found that the adsorption of strontium ions on these zwitterionic hybrid membranes fitted well with the Lagergren pseudo-second order model. Mechanism insights suggested that diffusion-chemisorption was one of the main adsorption mechanisms. Boyd equation exhibited that film-diffusion mechanism might be the control process during the starting period. These findings are very useful in strontium removal from the stimulated radioactive wastewater.

  12. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes. Copyright © 2013

  13. Chronic subordination stress induces hyperphagia and disrupts eating behavior in mice modeling binge-eating-like disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eRazzoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eating disorders are associated with physical morbidity and appear to have causal factors like stressful life events and negative affect. Binge eating disorder (BED is characterized by eating in a discrete period of time a larger than normal amount of food, a sense of lack of control over eating, and marked distress. There are still unmet needs for the identification of mechanisms regulating excessive eating, which is in part due to the lack of appropriate animal models. We developed a naturalistic murine model of subordination stress induced hyperphagia associated with the development of obesity. Here we tested the hypotheses that the eating responses of subordinate mice recapitulate the BED and that limiting hyperphagia could prevent stress-associated metabolic changes. Methods: Adult male mice were exposed to a model of chronic subordination stress associated with the automated acquisition of food intake and we performed a detailed meal pattern analysis. Additionally, using a pair-feeding protocol was test the hypothesis that the manifestation of obesity and the metabolic syndrome could be prevented by limiting hyperphagia. Results: The architecture of feeding of subordinate mice was disrupted during the stress protocol due to disproportionate amount of food ingested at higher rate and with shorter satiety ratio than control mice. Subordinate mice hyperphagia was further exacerbated in response to either hunger or to the acute application of a social defeat. Notably, the obese phenotype but not the fasting hyperglycemia of subordinate mice was abrogated by preventing hyperphagia in a pair feeding paradigm. Conclusion: Overall these results support the validity of our chronic subordination stress to model binge eating disorder allowing for the determination of the underlying molecular mechanisms and the generation of testable predictions for innovative therapies, based on the understanding of the regulation and the control of food

  14. Chronic subordination stress induces hyperphagia and disrupts eating behavior in mice modeling binge-eating-like disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzoli, Maria; Sanghez, Valentina; Bartolomucci, Alessandro

    Eating disorders are associated with physical morbidity and appear to have causal factors like stressful life events and negative affect. Binge eating disorder (BED) is characterized by eating in a discrete period of time a larger than normal amount of food, a sense of lack of control over eating, and marked distress. There are still unmet needs for the identification of mechanisms regulating excessive eating, which is in part due to the lack of appropriate animal models. We developed a naturalistic murine model of subordination stress induced hyperphagia associated with the development of obesity. Here we tested the hypotheses that the eating responses of subordinate mice recapitulate the BED and that limiting hyperphagia could prevent stress-associated metabolic changes. Adult male mice were exposed to a model of chronic subordination stress associated with the automated acquisition of food intake and we performed a detailed meal pattern analysis. Additionally, using a pair-feeding protocol was test the hypothesis that the manifestation of obesity and the metabolic syndrome could be prevented by limiting hyperphagia. The architecture of feeding of subordinate mice was disrupted during the stress protocol due to disproportionate amount of food ingested at higher rate and with shorter satiety ratio than control mice. Subordinate mice hyperphagia was further exacerbated in response to either hunger or to the acute application of a social defeat. Notably, the obese phenotype but not the fasting hyperglycemia of subordinate mice was abrogated by preventing hyperphagia in a pair feeding paradigm. Overall these results support the validity of our chronic subordination stress to model binge eating disorder allowing for the determination of the underlying molecular mechanisms and the generation of testable predictions for innovative therapies, based on the understanding of the regulation and the control of food intake.

  15. Conformational study of melectin and antapin antimicrobial peptides in model membrane environments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kocourková, L.; Novotná, P.; Čujová, Sabína; Čeřovský, Václav; Urbanová, M.; Setnička, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 170, Jan 5 (2017), s. 247-255 ISSN 1386-1425 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : antimicrobial peptides * conformation * liposomes * model membranes * circular dichroism * infrared spectroscopy Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 2.536, year: 2016

  16. Basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan alterations in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehara, T; Carone, F A; McCarthy, K J

    1994-01-01

    Alterations in basement membrane components, notably proteoglycans, in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease have been investigated. Rats were fed phenol II (2-amino-4-hydroxyphenyl-5-phenyl thiazole) for 4 days and then changed to normal diet for a 7-day recovery period. Marked dilation of di...

  17. Development and Testing of a Fully Adaptable Membrane Bioreactor Fouling Model for a Sidestream Configuration System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A dead-end filtration model that includes the three main fouling mechanisms mentioned in Hermia (i.e., cake build-up, complete pore blocking, and pore constriction and that was based on a constant trans-membrane pressure (TMP operation was extensively modified so it could be used for a sidestream configuration membrane bioreactor (MBR situation. Modifications and add-ons to this basic model included: alteration so that it could be used for varying flux and varying TMP operations; inclusion of a backwash mode; it described pore constriction (i.e., irreversible fouling in relation to the concentration of soluble microbial products (SMP in the liquor; and, it could be used in a cross flow scenario by the addition of scouring terms in the model formulation. The additional terms in this modified model were checked against an already published model to see if they made sense, physically speaking. Next this modified model was calibrated and validated in Matlab© using data collected by carrying out flux stepping tests on both a pilot sidestream MBR plant, and then a pilot membrane filtration unit. The model fit proved good, especially for the pilot filtration unit data. In conclusion, this model formulation is of the right level of complexity to be used for most practical MBR situations.

  18. Maternal Fructose Consumption Disrupts Brain Development of Offspring in a Murine Model of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Antonio F; Alshehri, Wael; Lei, Jun; Kechichian, Talar B; Gamble, Phyllis; Alhejaily, Nader; Shabi, Yahya; Saade, George R; Costantine, Maged M; Burd, Irina

    2016-12-01

    Objective  The objective of this study was to localize by neuroimaging the altered structural brain development of these offspring using an autism model of transgenic mice lacking contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Cntnap2). Materials and Methods  Pregnant dams were randomly allocated to fructose solution (10% W/V) as only drinking fluid or water. Cntnap2 heterozygous (+/-) offspring from each group were euthanized at 6 months of age and their whole brains evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. T2-weighted images were acquired to evaluate the volumes of 29 regions of interest involved in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) pathogenesis. Whole brains were washed and processed for Nissl staining. Mann-Whitney U test and one-way analysis of variance were used for statistical analysis (significance: p  brain alterations were found in the female counterparts. Nissl staining of the caudate putamen revealed higher neuronal cell count in the male fructose offspring. Female group revealed an increase in caudate putamen neuronal cell count. Conclusion  Metabolic dysregulation in pregnancy alters fetal brain development in genetically predisposed offspring. This is consistent with findings in human studies and supports the role of intrauterine factors in the etiology of autism. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Antimycotic activity of fengycin C biosurfactant and its interaction with phosphatidylcholine model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Jaramillo, Lina María; Aranda, Francisco José; Teruel, José Antonio; Villegas-Escobar, Valeska; Ortiz, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    Lipopeptide biosurfactants constitute one of the most promising groups of compounds for the treatment and prevention of fungal diseases in plants. Bacillus subtilis strain EA-CB0015 produces iturin A, fengycin C and surfactin and it has been proven useful for the treatment of black Sigatoka disease in banana plants, an important pathology caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Morelet). We have found that B. subtilis EA-CB0015 cell free supernatants and purified fractions inhibit M. fijiensis cellular growth. The effect of the purified lipopeptides mentioned above on fungal growth has been also evaluated, observing that iturin A and fengycin C inhibit mycelial growth and ascospore germination, whereas surfactin is not effective. On the hypothesis that the antifungal action of the lipopeptides is associated to their incorporation into biological membranes, ultimately leading to membrane permeabilization, a detailed biophysical study on the interaction of a new isoform of fengycin C with model dipalmitoyphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) membranes has been carried out. Differential scanning calorimetry shows that fengycin C alters the thermotropic phase transitions of DPPC, and is laterally segregated in the fluid bilayer forming domains. Fluorescent probe polarization measurements show that fengycin C does not affect the hydrophobic interior of the membrane. This latter perturbation is concomitant with a strong dehydration of the polar region of DPPC, as shown by FTIR. Fengycin-rich domains, where the surrounding DPPC molecules are highly dehydrated, may well constitute sites of membrane permeabilization leading to a leaky target membrane. These results are a solid support to explain the membrane perturbing action of fengycin, which has been related to its antifungal activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Unconditionally energy stable numerical schemes for phase-field vesicle membrane model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén-González, F.; Tierra, G.

    2018-02-01

    Numerical schemes to simulate the deformation of vesicles membranes via minimizing the bending energy have been widely studied in recent times due to its connection with many biological motivated problems. In this work we propose a new unconditionally energy stable numerical scheme for a vesicle membrane model that satisfies exactly the conservation of volume constraint and penalizes the surface area constraint. Moreover, we extend these ideas to present an unconditionally energy stable splitting scheme decoupling the interaction of the vesicle with a surrounding fluid. Finally, the well behavior of the proposed schemes are illustrated through several computational experiments.

  1. An articulated predictive model for fluid-free artificial basilar membrane as broadband frequency sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Riaz; Banerjee, Sourav

    2018-02-01

    In this article, an extremely versatile predictive model for a newly developed Basilar meta-Membrane (BM2) sensors is reported with variable engineering parameters that contribute to it's frequency selection capabilities. The predictive model reported herein is for advancement over existing method by incorporating versatile and nonhomogeneous (e.g. functionally graded) model parameters that could not only exploit the possibilities of creating complex combinations of broadband frequency sensors but also explain the unique unexplained physical phenomenon that prevails in BM2, e.g. tailgating waves. In recent years, few notable attempts were made to fabricate the artificial basilar membrane, mimicking the mechanics of the human cochlea within a very short range of frequencies. To explain the operation of these sensors a few models were proposed. But, we fundamentally argue the "fabrication to explanation" approach and proposed the model driven predictive design process for the design any (BM2) as broadband sensors. Inspired by the physics of basilar membrane, frequency domain predictive model is proposed where both the material and geometrical parameters can be arbitrarily varied. Broadband frequency is applicable in many fields of science, engineering and technology, such as, sensors for chemical, biological and acoustic applications. With the proposed model, which is three times faster than its FEM counterpart, it is possible to alter the attributes of the selected length of the designed sensor using complex combinations of model parameters, based on target frequency applications. Finally, the tailgating wave peaks in the artificial basilar membranes that prevails in the previously reported experimental studies are also explained using the proposed model.

  2. In vivo deiodinase inhibition by iopanoic acid causes thyroid axis disruption and dysmorphogenesis in model amphibian species Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiodinase (DIO) enzymes activate, deactivate and catabolize thyroid hormones (THs) and play an important role in thyroid-mediated amphibian metamorphosis. DIOs have been implicated as putative targets of xenobiotics leading to thyroid disruption. In an effort to characterize bi...

  3. Modelling the transport of carbonic acid anions through anion-exchange membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonenko, V.; Lebedev, K.; Manzanares, J.A.; Pourcelly, G.

    2003-01-01

    Electrodiffusion of carbonate and bicarbonate anions through anion-exchange membranes (AEM) is described on the basis of the Nernst-Planck equations taking into account coupled hydrolysis reactions in the external diffusion boundary layers (DBLs) and internal pore solution. The model supposes local electroneutrality as well as chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium. The transport is considered in three layers being an anion exchange membrane and two adjoining diffusion layers. A mechanism of competitive transport of HCO 3 - and CO 3 2- anions through the membrane which takes into account Donnan exclusion of H + ions is proposed. It is predicted that the pH of the depleting solution decreases and that of the concentrating solution increases during electrodialysis (ED). Eventual deviations from local electroneutrality and local chemical equilibrium are discussed

  4. Transport phenomena and fouling in vacuum enhanced direct contact membrane distillation: Experimental and modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Naidu, Gayathri

    2016-08-27

    The application of vacuum to direct contact membrane distillation (vacuum enhanced direct contact membrane distillation, V-DCMD) removed condensable gasses and reduced partial pressure in the membrane pores, achieving 37.6% higher flux than DCMD at the same feed temperature. Transfer mechanism and temperature distribution profile in V-DCMD were studied. The empirical flux decline (EFD) model represented fouling profiles of V-DCMD. In a continuous V-DCMD operation with moderate temperature (55 degrees C) and permeate pressure (300 mbar) for treating wastewater ROC, a flux of 16.0 +/- 0.3 L/m(2) h and high quality distillate were achieved with water flushing, showing the suitability of V-DCMD for ROC treatment. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Modeling of gadolinium recovery from nitrate medium with 8-hydroxyquinoline by emulsion liquid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M.A.; Aglan, R.F.; El-Reefy, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    The extraction equilibrium of Gd(III) from nitrate medium by 8-hydroxyquinoline (HOX) in toluene was studied. Liquid-liquid investigations were first carried out. Based on the equilibrium results, the extraction of Gd(III) from aqueous nitrate medium into an emulsion liquid membrane system (ELM) containing 8-hydroxyquinoline in toluene as extractant, HNO 3 as stripping solution, Span-80 as surfactant was studied. The stability of the prepared ELM was studied in terms of the degree of membrane breakage. The different parameters affecting the permeation of gadolinium (III) were also studied. A general permeation model for the recovery of Gd(III) by the selected membrane is presented. The internal mass transfer in the water in oil (W/O) emulsion drop, the external mass transfer around the drop, the rates of formation and decomposition of the complex at the external aqueous-organic interface were considered.

  6. Nonlinear Shell Modeling of Thin Membranes with Emphasis on Structural Wrinkling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessler, Alexander; Sleight, David W.; Wang, John T.

    2003-01-01

    Thin solar sail membranes of very large span are being envisioned for near-term space missions. One major design issue that is inherent to these very flexible structures is the formation of wrinkling patterns. Structural wrinkles may deteriorate a solar sail's performance and, in certain cases, structural integrity. In this paper, a geometrically nonlinear, updated Lagrangian shell formulation is employed using the ABAQUS finite element code to simulate the formation of wrinkled deformations in thin-film membranes. The restrictive assumptions of true membranes, i.e. Tension Field theory (TF), are not invoked. Two effective modeling strategies are introduced to facilitate convergent solutions of wrinkled equilibrium states. Several numerical studies are carried out, and the results are compared with recent experimental data. Good agreement is observed between the numerical simulations and experimental data.

  7. Sphingomyelinase D activity in model membranes: structural effects of in situ generation of ceramide-1-phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stock, Roberto; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Wagner, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model...... membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy...... and dynamic light scattering) and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing...

  8. Structure and interaction with lipid membrane models of Semliki Forest virus fusion peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopian, A; Quetin, M; Castano, S

    2016-11-01

    Semliki Forest virus (SFV) is a well-characterized alphavirus that infects cells via endocytosis and an acid-triggered fusion step using class II fusion proteins. Membrane fusion is mediated by the viral spike protein, a heterotrimer of two transmembrane subunits, E1 and E2, and a peripheral protein, E3. Sequence analysis of the E1 ectodomain of a number of alphaviruses demonstrated the presence of a highly conserved hydrophobic domain on the E1 ectodomain. This sequence was proposed to be the fusion peptide of SFV and is believed to be the domain of E1 that interacts with the target membrane and triggers fusion. Here, we investigate the structure and the interaction with lipid membrane models of 76 YQCKVYTGVYPFMWGGAYCFC 96 sequence from SFV, named SFV21, using optical method (ellipsometry) and vibrational spectroscopiy approaches (Polarization Modulation infra-Red Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy, PMIRRAS, and polarized ATR-FTIR). We demonstrate a structural flexibility of SFV21 sequence whether the lateral pressure and the lipid environment. In a lipid environment that mimics eukaryotic cell membranes, a conformational transition from an α-helix to a β-sheet is induced in the presence of lipid by increasing the peptide to lipid ratio, which leads to important perturbations in the membrane organisation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A theoretical model for evaluation of the design of a hollow-fiber membrane oxygenator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabesh, Hadi; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Poorkhalil, Ali; Khachab, Ali; Kashefi, Ali; Mottaghy, Khosrow

    2012-12-01

    Geometric data are fundamental to the design of a contactor. The efficiency of a membrane contactor is mainly defined by its mass-transfer coefficient. However, design modifications also have significant effects on the performance of membrane contactors. In a hollow-fiber membrane oxygenator (HFMO), properties such as priming volume and effective membrane surface area (referred to as design specifications) can be determined. In this study, an extensive theoretical model for calculation of geometric data and configuration properties, and, consequently, optimization of the design of an HFMO, is presented. Calculations were performed for Oxyphan(®) hollow-fiber micro-porous membranes, which are frequently used in current HFMOs because of their high gas exchange performance. The results reveal how to regulate both the transverse and longitudinal pitches of fiber bundles to obtain a lower rand width and a greater number of windings. Such modifications assist optimization of module design and, consequently, substantially increase the efficiency of an HFMO. On the basis of these considerations, three values, called efficiency factors, are proposed for evaluation of the design specifications of an HFMO with regard with its performance characteristics (i.e. oxygen-transfer rate and blood pressure drop). Moreover, the performance characteristics of six different commercial HFMOs were measured experimentally, in vitro, under the same standard conditions. Comparison of calculated efficiency factors reveals Quadrox(®) is the oxygenator with the most efficient design with regard with its performance among the oxygenators tested.

  10. Model lipid bilayers mimic non-specific interactions of gold nanoparticles with macrophage plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montis, Costanza; Generini, Viola; Boccalini, Giulia; Bergese, Paolo; Bani, Daniele; Berti, Debora

    2018-04-15

    Understanding the interaction between nanomaterials and biological interfaces is a key unmet goal that still hampers clinical translation of nanomedicine. Here we investigate and compare non-specific interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with synthetic lipid and wild type macrophage membranes. A comprehensive data set was generated by systematically varying the structural and physicochemical properties of the AuNPs (size, shape, charge, surface functionalization) and of the synthetic membranes (composition, fluidity, bending properties and surface charge), which allowed to unveil the matching conditions for the interaction of the AuNPs with macrophage plasma membranes in vitro. This effort directly proved for the first time that synthetic bilayers can be set to mimic and predict with high fidelity key aspects of nanoparticle interaction with macrophage eukaryotic plasma membranes. It then allowed to model the experimental observations according to classical interface thermodynamics and in turn determine the paramount role played by non-specific contributions, primarily electrostatic, Van der Waals and bending energy, in driving nanoparticle-plasma membrane interactions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sphingomyelinase D activity in model membranes: structural effects of in situ generation of ceramide-1-phosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto P Stock

    Full Text Available The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1 ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2 the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3 in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes.

  12. Sphingomyelinase D activity in model membranes: structural effects of in situ generation of ceramide-1-phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Roberto P; Brewer, Jonathan; Wagner, Kerstin; Ramos-Cerrillo, Blanca; Duelund, Lars; Jernshøj, Kit Drescher; Olsen, Lars Folke; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering) and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1) ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate) can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2) the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3) in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes.

  13. Schizophrenia-Like Phenotype Inherited by the F2 Generation of a Gestational Disruption Model of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Stephanie M; Aguilar, David D; Neary, Jennifer L; Carless, Melanie A; Giuffrida, Andrea; Lodge, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to schizophrenia; however, the exact etiology of this disorder is not known. Animal models are utilized to better understand the mechanisms associated with neuropsychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia. One of these involves gestational administration of methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) to induce a developmental disruption, which in turn produces a schizophrenia-like phenotype in post-pubertal rats. The mechanisms by which MAM produces this phenotype are not clear; however, we now demonstrate that MAM induces differential DNA methylation, which may be heritable. Here we demonstrate that a subset of both second (F2) and third (F3) filial generations of MAM-treated rats displays a schizophrenia-like phenotype and hypermethylation of the transcription factor, Sp5. Specifically, ventral tegmental area of dopamine neuron activity was examined using electrophysiology as a correlate for the dopamine hyperfunction thought to underlie psychosis in patients. Interestingly, only a subset of F2 and F3 MAM rats exhibited increases in dopamine neuron population activity, indicating that this may be a unique model with a susceptibility to develop a schizophrenia-like phenotype. An increase in dopamine system function in rodent models has been previously associated with decreases in hippocampal GABAergic transmission. In line with these observations, we found a significant correlation between hippocampal parvalbumin expression and dopamine neuron activity in F2 rats. These data therefore provide evidence that offspring born from MAM-treated rats possess a susceptibility to develop aspects of a schizophrenia-like phenotype and may provide a useful tool to investigate gene-environment interactions.

  14. Human Primary Trophoblast Cell Culture Model to Study the Protective Effects of Melatonin Against Hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagrillo-Fagundes, Lucas; Clabault, Hélène; Laurent, Laetitia; Hudon-Thibeault, Andrée-Anne; Salustiano, Eugênia Maria Assunção; Fortier, Marlène; Bienvenue-Pariseault, Josianne; Wong Yen, Philippe; Sanderson, J Thomas; Vaillancourt, Cathy

    2016-07-30

    This protocol describes how villous cytotrophoblast cells are isolated from placentas at term by successive enzymatic digestions, followed by density centrifugation, media gradient isolation and immunomagnetic purification. As observed in vivo, mononucleated villous cytotrophoblast cells in primary culture differentiate into multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast cells after 72 hr. Compared to normoxia (8% O2), villous cytotrophoblast cells that undergo hypoxia/reoxygenation (0.5% / 8% O2) undergo increased oxidative stress and intrinsic apoptosis, similar to that observed in vivo in pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, preterm birth, and intrauterine growth restriction. In this context, primary villous trophoblasts cultured under hypoxia/reoxygenation conditions represent a unique experimental system to better understand the mechanisms and signalling pathways that are altered in human placenta and facilitate the search for effective drugs that protect against certain pregnancy disorders. Human villous trophoblasts produce melatonin and express its synthesizing enzymes and receptors. Melatonin has been suggested as a treatment for preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction because of its protective antioxidant effects. In the primary villous cytotrophoblast cell model described in this paper, melatonin has no effect on trophoblast cells in normoxic state but restores the redox balance of syncytiotrophoblast cells disrupted by hypoxia/reoxygenation. Thus, human villous trophoblast cells in primary culture are an excellent approach to study the mechanisms behind the protective effects of melatonin on placental function during hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  15. Disruption of the glutamate-glutamine cycle involving astrocytes in an animal model of depression for males and females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Rappeneau

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women are twice as likely as men to develop major depression (MD. The brain mechanisms underlying this sex disparity are not clear. Disruption of the glutamate-glutamine cycle has been implicated in psychiatric disturbances. This study identifies sex-based impairments in the glutamate-glutamine cycle involving astrocytes using an animal model of depression. Methods: Male and female adult Long-Evans rats were exposed to chronic social defeat stress (CSDS for 21 days, using a modified resident-intruder paradigm. Territorial aggression was used for males and maternal aggression was used for females to induce depressive-like deficits for intruders. The depressive-like phenotype was assessed with intake for saccharin solution, weight gain, estrous cycle, and corticosterone (CORT. Behaviors displayed by the intruders during daily encounters with residents were characterized. Rats with daily handling were used as controls for each sex. Ten days after the last encounter, both the intruders and controls were subjected to a no-net-flux in vivo microdialysis to assess glutamate accumulation and extracellular glutamine in the nucleus accumbens (NAc. The contralateral hemispheres were used for determining changes in astrocytic markers, including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1. Results: Both male and female intruders reduced saccharin intake over the course of CSDS, compared to their pre-stress period and to their respective controls. Male intruders exhibited submissive/defensive behaviors to territorial aggression by receiving sideways threats and bites. These males showed reductions in striatal GLT-1 and spontaneous glutamine in the NAc, compared to controls. Female intruders exhibited isolated behaviors to maternal aggression, including immobility, rearing, and self-grooming. Their non-reproductive days were extended. Also, they showed reductions in prefrontal and accumbal GFAP+ cells and prefrontal GLT

  16. A Sound Processor for Cochlear Implant Using a Simple Dual Path Nonlinear Model of Basilar Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Hwan Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new active nonlinear model of the frequency response of the basilar membrane in biological cochlea called the simple dual path nonlinear (SDPN model and a novel sound processing strategy for cochlear implants (CIs based upon this model. The SDPN model was developed to utilize the advantages of the level-dependent frequency response characteristics of the basilar membrane for robust formant representation under noisy conditions. In comparison to the dual resonance nonlinear model (DRNL which was previously proposed as an active nonlinear model of the basilar membrane, the SDPN model can reproduce similar level-dependent frequency responses with a much simpler structure and is thus better suited for incorporation into CI sound processors. By the analysis of dominant frequency component, it was confirmed that the formants of speech are more robustly represented after frequency decomposition by the nonlinear filterbank using SDPN, compared to a linear bandpass filter array which is used in conventional strategies. Acoustic simulation and hearing experiments in subjects with normal hearing showed that the proposed strategy results in better syllable recognition under speech-shaped noise compared to the conventional strategy based on fixed linear bandpass filters.

  17. A Model of Electrostimulation Based on the Membrane Capacitance as Electromechanical Transducer for Pore Gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irnich, Werner; Kroll, Mark W

    2015-07-01

    Electrostimulation has gained enormous importance in modern medicine, for example, in implantable pacemakers and defibrillators, pain stimulators, and cochlear implants. Most electrostimulation macromodels use the electrical current as the primary parameter to describe the conventional strength-duration relationship of the output of a generator. These models normally assume that the stimulation pulse charges up the passive cell membrane capacitance, and then the increased (less-negative) transmembrane potential activates voltage-gated sodium channels. However, this model has mechanistic and accuracy limitations. Our model assumes that the membrane capacitance is an electromechanical transducer and that the membrane is compressed by the endogenous electric field. The pressure is quadratically correlated with the transmembrane voltage. If the pressure is reduced by an exogenous field, the compression is released and, thus, opening the pores for Na(+) influx initiates excitation. The exogenous electric field must always be equal to or greater than the rheobase field strength (rheobase condition). This concept yields a final result that the voltage-pulse-content produced by the exogenous field between the two ends of a cell is a linear function of the pulse duration at threshold level. Thus, the model yields mathematical formulations that can describe and explain the characteristic features of electrostimulation. Our model of electrostimulation can describe and explain electrostimulation at cellular level. The model's predictions are consistent with published experimental studies. Practical applications in cardiology are discussed in the light of this model of electrostimulation. ©2015 The Authors. Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Analysis of direct contact membrane distillation based on a lumped-parameter dynamic predictive model

    KAUST Repository

    Karam, Ayman M.

    2016-10-03

    Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology that has a great potential for sustainable water desalination. In order to pave the way for successful commercialization of MD-based water desalination techniques, adequate and accurate dynamical models of the process are essential. This paper presents the predictive capabilities of a lumped-parameter dynamic model for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) and discusses the results under wide range of steady-state and dynamic conditions. Unlike previous studies, the proposed model captures the time response of the spacial temperature distribution along the flow direction. It also directly solves for the local temperatures at the membrane interfaces, which allows to accurately model and calculate local flux values along with other intrinsic variables of great influence on the process, like the temperature polarization coefficient (TPC). The proposed model is based on energy and mass conservation principles and analogy between thermal and electrical systems. Experimental data was collected to validated the steady-state and dynamic responses of the model. The obtained results shows great agreement with the experimental data. The paper discusses the results of several simulations under various conditions to optimize the DCMD process efficiency and analyze its response. This demonstrates some potential applications of the proposed model to carry out scale up and design studies. © 2016

  19. Modeling and Simulation of Membrane-Based Dehumidification and Energy Recovery Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Qu, Ming [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a first-order physics-based model that accounts for the fundamental heat and mass transfer between a humid-air vapor stream on feed side to another flow stream on permeate side. The model comprises a few optional submodels for membrane mass transport; and it adopts a segment-by-segment method for discretizing heat and mass transfer governing equations for flow streams on feed and permeate sides. The model is able to simulate both dehumidifiers and energy recovery ventilators in parallel-flow, cross-flow, and counter-flow configurations. The predicted tresults are compared reasonably well with the measurements. The open-source codes are written in C++. The model and open-source codes are expected to become a fundament tool for the analysis of membrane-based dehumidification in the future.

  20. The interactions of squalene, alkanes and other mineral oils with model membranes; effects on membrane heterogeneity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richens, Joanna L; Lane, Jordan S; Mather, Melissa L; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) offer many favourable facets as an artificial membrane system but the influence of any residual oil that remains in the bilayer following preparation is ill-defined. In this study the fluorescent membrane probes di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (Di-8-ANEPPS) and Fluoresceinphosphatidylethanolamine (FPE) were used to help understand the nature of the phospholipid-oil interaction and to examine any structural and functional consequences of such interactions on membrane bilayer properties. Concentration-dependent modifications of the membrane dipole potential were found to occur in phospholipid vesicles exposed to a variety of different oils. Incorporation of oil into the lipid bilayer was shown to have no significant effect on the movement of fatty acids across the lipid bilayer. Changes in membrane heterogeneity were, however, demonstrated with increased microdomain formation being visible in the bilayer following exposure to mineral oil, pentadecane and squalene. As it is important that artificial systems provide an accurate representation of the membrane environment, careful consideration should be taken prior to the application of DIBs in studies of membrane structure and organisation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modelling carbon membranes for gas and isotope separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yan; Du, Aijun; Hankel, Marlies; Smith, Sean C

    2013-04-14

    Molecular modelling has become a useful and widely applied tool to investigate separation and diffusion behavior of gas molecules through nano-porous low dimensional carbon materials, including quasi-1D carbon nanotubes and 2D graphene-like carbon allotropes. These simulations provide detailed, molecular level information about the carbon framework structure as well as dynamics and mechanistic insights, i.e. size sieving, quantum sieving, and chemical affinity sieving. In this perspective, we revisit recent advances in this field and summarize separation mechanisms for multicomponent systems from kinetic and equilibrium molecular simulations, elucidating also anomalous diffusion effects induced by the confining pore structure and outlining perspectives for future directions in this field.

  2. In an in-vitro model using human fetal membranes, 17-α hydroxyprogesterone caproate is not an optimal progestogen for inhibition of fetal membrane weakening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Moore, Robert M; Mercer, Brian M; Mansour, Joseph M; Mesiano, Sam; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles J; Moore, John J

    2017-12-01

    The progestogen 17-α hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC) is 1 of only 2 agents recommended for clinical use in the prevention of spontaneous preterm delivery, and studies of its efficacy have been conflicting. We have developed an in-vitro model to study the fetal membrane weakening process that leads to rupture in preterm premature rupture of the fetal membranes (pPROM). Inflammation/infection associated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induction and decidual bleeding/abruption associated thrombin release are leading causes of preterm premature rupture of the fetal membranes. Both agents (TNF-α and thrombin) cause fetal membrane weakening in the model system. Furthermore, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a critical intermediate for both TNF-α and thrombin-induced fetal membrane weakening. In a previous report, we demonstrated that 3 progestogens, progesterone, 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), each inhibit both TNF-α- and thrombin-induced fetal membrane weakening at 2 distinct points of the fetal membrane weakening pathway. Each block both the production of and the downstream action of the critical intermediate granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The objective of the study was to characterize the inhibitory effects of 17-OHPC on TNF-α- and thrombin-induced fetal membrane weakening in vitro. Full-thickness human fetal membrane fragments from uncomplicated term repeat cesarean deliveries were mounted in 2.5 cm Transwell inserts and cultured with/without 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate (10 -9 to 10 -7 M). After 24 hours, medium (supernatant) was removed and replaced with/without the addition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (20 ng/mL) or thrombin (10 U/mL) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (200 ng/mL). After 48 hours of culture, medium from the maternal side compartment of the model was assayed for granulocyte-macrophage colony

  3. Membrane capacitive memory alters spiking in neurons described by the fractional-order Hodgkin-Huxley model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth H Weinberg

    Full Text Available Excitable cells and cell membranes are often modeled by the simple yet elegant parallel resistor-capacitor circuit. However, studies have shown that the passive properties of membranes may be more appropriately modeled with a non-ideal capacitor, in which the current-voltage relationship is given by a fractional-order derivative. Fractional-order membrane potential dynamics introduce capacitive memory effects, i.e., dynamics are influenced by a weighted sum of the membrane potential prior history. However, it is not clear to what extent fractional-order dynamics may alter the properties of active excitable cells. In this study, we investigate the spiking properties of the neuronal membrane patch, nerve axon, and neural networks described by the fractional-order Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. We find that in the membrane patch model, as fractional-order decreases, i.e., a greater influence of membrane potential memory, peak sodium and potassium currents are altered, and spike frequency and amplitude are generally reduced. In the nerve axon, the velocity of spike propagation increases as fractional-order decreases, while in a neural network, electrical activity is more likely to cease for smaller fractional-order. Importantly, we demonstrate that the modulation of the peak ionic currents that occurs for reduced fractional-order alone fails to reproduce many of the key alterations in spiking properties, suggesting that membrane capacitive memory and fractional-order membrane potential dynamics are important and necessary to reproduce neuronal electrical activity.

  4. Membrane capacitive memory alters spiking in neurons described by the fractional-order Hodgkin-Huxley model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Seth H

    2015-01-01

    Excitable cells and cell membranes are often modeled by the simple yet elegant parallel resistor-capacitor circuit. However, studies have shown that the passive properties of membranes may be more appropriately modeled with a non-ideal capacitor, in which the current-voltage relationship is given by a fractional-order derivative. Fractional-order membrane potential dynamics introduce capacitive memory effects, i.e., dynamics are influenced by a weighted sum of the membrane potential prior history. However, it is not clear to what extent fractional-order dynamics may alter the properties of active excitable cells. In this study, we investigate the spiking properties of the neuronal membrane patch, nerve axon, and neural networks described by the fractional-order Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. We find that in the membrane patch model, as fractional-order decreases, i.e., a greater influence of membrane potential memory, peak sodium and potassium currents are altered, and spike frequency and amplitude are generally reduced. In the nerve axon, the velocity of spike propagation increases as fractional-order decreases, while in a neural network, electrical activity is more likely to cease for smaller fractional-order. Importantly, we demonstrate that the modulation of the peak ionic currents that occurs for reduced fractional-order alone fails to reproduce many of the key alterations in spiking properties, suggesting that membrane capacitive memory and fractional-order membrane potential dynamics are important and necessary to reproduce neuronal electrical activity.

  5. BSM-MBR: a benchmark simulation model to compare control and operational strategies for membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maere, Thomas; Verrecht, Bart; Moerenhout, Stefanie; Judd, Simon; Nopens, Ingmar

    2011-03-01

    A benchmark simulation model for membrane bioreactors (BSM-MBR) was developed to evaluate operational and control strategies in terms of effluent quality and operational costs. The configuration of the existing BSM1 for conventional wastewater treatment plants was adapted using reactor volumes, pumped sludge flows and membrane filtration for the water-sludge separation. The BSM1 performance criteria were extended for an MBR taking into account additional pumping requirements for permeate production and aeration requirements for membrane fouling prevention. To incorporate the effects of elevated sludge concentrations on aeration efficiency and costs a dedicated aeration model was adopted. Steady-state and dynamic simulations revealed BSM-MBR, as expected, to out-perform BSM1 for effluent quality, mainly due to complete retention of solids and improved ammonium removal from extensive aeration combined with higher biomass levels. However, this was at the expense of significantly higher operational costs. A comparison with three large-scale MBRs showed BSM-MBR energy costs to be realistic. The membrane aeration costs for the open loop simulations were rather high, attributed to non-optimization of BSM-MBR. As proof of concept two closed loop simulations were run to demonstrate the usefulness of BSM-MBR for identifying control strategies to lower operational costs without compromising effluent quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The influence of NBD fluorescent probe on model membranes containing POPC and DPPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chi-Jung; Wu, Ju-Ping; Kuo, Ming-Yen; Hsueh, Ya-Wei

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effect of fluorescent probe on the properties of membranes, we studied model membranes composed of 1,2- dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1-palmitoyl 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) in the presence and absence of fluorescent probe. The morphology of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) has been observed as a function of temperature and composition by fluorescence microscopy using NBD-DOPE or C 6 -NBD-PC as the probe. The phase behavior of model membranes containing no fluorescent probe was investigated by 2 H-NMR spectroscopy. We found that the bright phase observed on GUVs was the fluid phase enriched in POPC and the dark phase was the gel phase enriched in DPPC. NBD-DOPE and C 6 -NBD-PC preferentially participated in the fluid-phase domains when GUVs were in the gel + fluid phase coexistence. Inclusion of both fluorescent probes (1 mol%) lowered the transition temperature of POPC/DPPC membranes. In addition, C 6 -NBD-PC exhibited a stronger effect than NBD-DOPE, which was considered to be associated with the structures of fluorescent molecules.

  7. Mullite ceramic membranes for industrial oily wastewater treatment: experimental and neural network modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrkar, H; Salahi, A; Kasiri, N; Mohammadi, T

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, results of an experimental and modeling of separation of oil from industrial oily wastewaters (desalter unit effluent of Seraje, Ghom gas wells, Iran) with mullite ceramic membranes are presented. Mullite microfiltration symmetric membranes were synthesized from kaolin clay and alpha-alumina powder. The results show that the mullite ceramic membrane has a high total organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand rejection (94 and 89%, respectively), a low fouling resistance (30%) and a high final permeation flux (75 L/m2 h). Also, an artificial neural network, a predictive tool for tracking the inputs and outputs of a non-linear problem, is used to model the permeation flux decline during microfiltration of oily wastewater. The aim was to predict the permeation flux as a function of feed temperature, trans-membrane pressure, cross-flow velocity, oil concentration and filtration time, using a feed-forward neural network. Finally the structure of hidden layers and nodes in each layer with minimum error were reported leading to a 4-15 structure which demonstrated good agreement with the experimental measurements with an average error of less than 2%.

  8. Solution Approach for a Mathematical Model Developed for Membrane Separation of a Gas Hydrocarbon Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujeni, Mahdi K.; Goodarzi, F.

    2011-09-01

    In present study, a special mathematical model for membrane separation processes was studied. Mathematical model was developed for propylene/propane system and was solved using finite difference solution approach. In this study, membrane length is shared into a number of nodes and required equations are written for each node, separately. Also, golden section method was used for suitable step size selection. It is prescience that the results accuracy and calculation time, depend on number of meshes. Therefore 20 meshes were obtained as an optimum number. The effect of pressure drop equation on solution procedure of the model was also investigated and it was found that the pressure drop equation has a negligible effect on it.

  9. Finsler Geometry Modeling of Phase Separation in Multi-Component Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Usui

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A Finsler geometric surface model is studied as a coarse-grained model for membranes of three components, such as zwitterionic phospholipid (DOPC, lipid (DPPC and an organic molecule (cholesterol. To understand the phase separation of liquid-ordered (DPPC rich L o and liquid-disordered (DOPC rich L d , we introduce a binary variable σ ( = ± 1 into the triangulated surface model. We numerically determine that two circular and stripe domains appear on the surface. The dependence of the morphological change on the area fraction of L o is consistent with existing experimental results. This provides us with a clear understanding of the origin of the line tension energy, which has been used to understand these morphological changes in three-component membranes. In addition to these two circular and stripe domains, a raft-like domain and budding domain are also observed, and the several corresponding phase diagrams are obtained.

  10. Viscoelastic properties of the human tympanic membrane studied with stroboscopic holography and finite element modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Greef, Daniel; Aernouts, Jef; Aerts, Johan; Cheng, Jeffrey Tao; Horwitz, Rachelle; Rosowski, John J; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2014-06-01

    A new anatomically-accurate Finite Element (FE) model of the tympanic membrane (TM) and malleus was combined with measurements of the sound-induced motion of the TM surface and the bony manubrium, in an isolated TM-malleus preparation. Using the results, we were able to address two issues related to how sound is coupled to the ossicular chain: (i) Estimate the viscous damping within the tympanic membrane itself, the presence of which may help smooth the broadband response of a potentially highly resonant TM, and (ii) Investigate the function of a peculiar feature of human middle-ear anatomy, the thin mucosal epithelial fold that couples the mid part of the human manubrium to the TM. Sound induced motions of the surface of ex vivo human eardrums and mallei were measured with stroboscopic holography, which yields maps of the amplitude and phase of the displacement of the entire membrane surface at selected frequencies. The results of these measurements were similar, but not identical to measurements made in intact ears. The holography measurements were complemented by laser-Doppler vibrometer measurements of sound-induced umbo velocity, which were made with fine-frequency resolution. Comparisons of these measurements to predictions from a new anatomically accurate FE model with varied membrane characteristics suggest the TM contains viscous elements, which provide relatively low damping, and that the epithelial fold that connects the central section of the human manubrium to the TM only loosely couples the TM to the manubrium. The laser-Doppler measurements in two preparations also suggested the presence of significant variation in the complex modulus of the TM between specimens. Some animations illustrating the model results are available at our website (www.uantwerp.be/en/rg/bimef/downloads/tympanic-membrane-motion). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... Hormones and Health › Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) EDCs Myth vs. ...

  12. A Two‐Fluid model study of hydrogen production via water gas shift in fluidized bed membrane reactors

    OpenAIRE

    J.W. Voncken, Ramon; Roghair, Ivo; Van Sint Annaland, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Fluidized bed membrane reactors have been proposed as a promising reactor concept for the production of ultra-pure hydrogen via Water Gas Shift (WGS). High-flux thin-film dense palladium-based membranes are used to selectively extract hydrogen from the reaction medium, which shifts the thermodynamic equilibrium towards the products’ side, increasing the conversion. A Two-Fluid Model (TFM) has been used to investigate the effect of hydrogen extraction via perm-selective membranes on the WGS re...

  13. Modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cell with variable distance gas flow in anode and cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Shahbudin Masdar; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Jaafar Sahari

    2006-01-01

    A number of fundamental studies have been directed towards increasing our understanding of PEM fuel cell and their performance. Mathematical modeling is one of the way and very essential component in the development of this fuel cell. Model validation is presented, the validated model is then used to investigate the behavior of mole fraction of gases, current density, and the performances of stack using polarization curve depending on distance gases flow in channel. The model incorporates a complete cell with both the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and the serpentine gas distributor channel. Finally, the parametric studies in single stack design are illustrated

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Hollow-Fiber Membrane System in Biological Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian PENG

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A set of mathematical models were derived based on the bio-kinetics and material balance principles to describe the performance of membrane system in this research. A synthetic wastewater and a meat packing wastewater were processed through a lab-scale membrane bioreactor system to generate experimental data for calibration and verification of the derived models. For the synthetic wastewater treatment, a high and stable Total Organic Carbon (TOC removal was achieved with volumetric organic loading from 0.2 to 24.2 kg TOC/m3ƒ(d. It was found that the derived system models fit the experimental data well. The bio-kinetic coefficients of k, Ks, Y and kd in the models were found to be 0.16 d-1, 1.0 mg/L, 1.75 mg Mixed Liquor Volatile Suspended Solids (MLVSS/mg TOC and 0.11 d-1, respectively. For the meat packing wastewater treatment, the bio-kinetic coefficients of k, Ks, Y and kd were found to be 0.48 d-1, 56.3 mg/L, 0.53 mg MLVSS/mg COD and 0.04 d-1, respectively. F/M ratio of 0.08 was found to be the proper operating condition for the system. Based on the proposed system models, the optimum MLSS concentration and F/M ratio can be computed to yield minimum cost of a membrane bioreactor system without excess biomass production.

  15. Experimental type II diabetes and related models of impaired glucose metabolism differentially regulate glucose transporters at the proximal tubule brush border membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichger, Havovi; Cleasby, Mark E; Srai, Surjit K; Unwin, Robert J; Debnam, Edward S; Marks, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? Although SGLT2 inhibitors represent a promising treatment for patients suffering from diabetic nephropathy, the influence of metabolic disruption on the expression and function of glucose transporters is largely unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? In vivo models of metabolic disruption (Goto-Kakizaki type II diabetic rat and junk-food diet) demonstrate increased expression of SGLT1, SGLT2 and GLUT2 in the proximal tubule brush border. In the type II diabetic model, this is accompanied by increased SGLT- and GLUT-mediated glucose uptake. A fasted model of metabolic disruption (high-fat diet) demonstrated increased GLUT2 expression only. The differential alterations of glucose transporters in response to varying metabolic stress offer insight into the therapeutic value of inhibitors. SGLT2 inhibitors are now in clinical use to reduce hyperglycaemia in type II diabetes. However, renal glucose reabsorption across the brush border membrane (BBM) is not completely understood in diabetes. Increased consumption of a Western diet is strongly linked to type II diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the adaptations that occur in renal glucose transporters in response to experimental models of diet-induced insulin resistance. The study used Goto-Kakizaki type II diabetic rats and normal rats rendered insulin resistant using junk-food or high-fat diets. Levels of protein kinase C-βI (PKC-βI), GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2 were determined by Western blotting of purified renal BBM. GLUT- and SGLT-mediated d-[(3) H]glucose uptake by BBM vesicles was measured in the presence and absence of the SGLT inhibitor phlorizin. GLUT- and SGLT-mediated glucose transport was elevated in type II diabetic rats, accompanied by increased expression of GLUT2, its upstream regulator PKC-βI and SGLT1 protein. Junk-food and high-fat diet feeding also caused higher membrane expression of GLUT2 and its upstream regulator PKC

  16. Study of Separation and Fouling of Reverse Osmosis Membranes during Model Hydrolysate Solution Filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olumoye Ajao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Prehydrolysate, a dilute solution consisting mainly of pentoses, hexoses, and lesser quantities of organic acids, furfural and phenolics, is generated in the Kraft dissolving pulp process. An obstacle facing the valorization of the solution in hemicellulose biorefineries, by conversion of the sugars into bioproducts such as furfural, is the low sugar concentration. Membrane filtration is typically proposed in several hemicellulose based biorefineries for concentrating the solution, although they are usually generated using different wood species, pretreatment methods, and operating conditions. However, the chemical composition of the solutions is generally not considered. Also, the combined effect of composition and operating conditions is rarely investigated for biorefinery applications. The purpose of this work was to determine the impact of the prehydrolysate composition and operating parameters on the component separation and permeate flux during membrane filtration. Using model prehydrolysate solutions, two commercial reverse osmosis (RO membranes were screened, and one was selected for use, based on its higher sugar and acetic acid retention. A Taguchi L18 experimental design array was then applied to determine the dominant parameters and limiting factors. Results showed that the feed pressure and temperature have the highest impact on permeate flux, but the least effect on sugar retention. Further experiments to quantify flux decline, due to fouling and osmotic pressure, showed that furfural has the highest membrane fouling tendency, and can limit the lifetime of the membrane. Regeneration of the membrane by cleaning with a sodium hydroxide solution is also effective for reversing fouling. It has been demonstrated that RO can efficiently and sustainably concentrate wood prehydrolysate.

  17. Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Mourokh, Lev G [Department of Physics, Queens College, The City University of New York, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We present two models for electron-driven uphill proton transport across lipid membranes, with the electron energy converted to the proton gradient via the electrostatic interaction. In the first model, associated with the cytochrome c oxidase complex in the inner mitochondria membranes, the electrostatic coupling to the site occupied by an electron lowers the energy level of the proton-binding site, making proton transfer possible. In the second model, roughly describing the redox loop in a nitrate respiration of E. coli bacteria, an electron displaces a proton from the negative side of the membrane to a shuttle, which subsequently diffuses across the membrane and unloads the proton to its positive side. We show that both models can be described by the same approach, which can be significantly simplified if the system is separated into several clusters, with strong Coulomb interaction inside each cluster and weak transfer couplings between them. We derive and solve the equations of motion for the electron and proton creation/annihilation operators, taking into account the appropriate Coulomb terms, tunnel couplings, and the interaction with the environment. For the second model, these equations of motion are solved jointly with a Langevin-type equation for the shuttle position. We obtain expressions for the electron and proton currents and determine their dependence on the electron and proton voltage build-ups, on-site charging energies, reorganization energies, temperature, and other system parameters. We show that the quantum yield in our models can be up to 100% and the power-conversion efficiency can reach 35%.

  18. Modeling and simulation of the dynamic behavior of portable proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, C.

    2005-07-01

    In order to analyze the operational behavior, a mathematical model of planar self-breathing fuel cells is developed and validated in Chapter 3 of this thesis. The multicomponent transport of the species is considered as well as the couplings between the transport processes of heat, charge, and mass and the electrochemical reactions. Furthermore, to explain the oxygen mass transport limitation in the porous electrode of the cathode side an agglomerate model for the oxygen reduction reaction is developed. In Chapter 4 the important issue of liquid water generation and transport in PEMFCs is addressed. One of the major tasks when operating this type of fuel cell is avoiding the complete flooding of the PEMFC during operation. A one-dimensional and isothermal model is developed that is based on a coupled system of partial differential equations. The model contains a dynamic and two-phase description of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The mass transport in the gas phase and in the liquid phase is considered as well as the phase transition between liquid water and water vapor. The transport of charges and the electrochemical reactions are part of the model. Flooding effects that are caused by liquid water accumulation are described by this model. Moreover, the model contains a time-dependent description of the membrane that accounts for Schroeder's paradox. The model is applied to simulate cyclic voltammograms. Chapter 5 is focused on the dynamic investigation of PEMFC stacks. Understanding the dynamic behavior of fuel cell stacks is important for the operation and control of fuel cell stacks. Using the single cell model of Chapter 3 and the dynamic model of Chapter 4 as basis, a mathematical model of a PEMFC stack is developed. However, due to the complexity of a fuel cell stack, the spatial resolution and dynamic description of the liquid water transport are not accounted for. These restrictions allow for direct comparison between the solution variables of

  19. Meso-scale Modeling of Block Copolymers Self-Assembly in Casting Solutions for Membrane Manufacture

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Isoporous membranes manufactured from diblock copolymer are successfully produced at laboratory scale under controlled conditions. Because of the complex phenomena involved, membrane preparation requires trial and error methodologies to find the optimal conditions, leading to a considerable demand of resources. Experimental insights demonstrate that the self-assembly of the block copolymers in solution has an effect on the final membrane structure. Nevertheless, the complete understanding of these multi-scale phenomena is elusive. Herein we use the coarse-grained method Dissipative Particle Dynamics to study the self-assembly of block copolymers that are used for the preparation of the membranes. To simulate representative time and length scales, we introduce a framework for model reduction of polymer chain representations for dissipative particle dynamics, which preserves the properties governing the phase equilibria. We reduce the number of degrees of freedom by accounting for the correlation between beads in fine-grained models via power laws and the consistent scaling of the simulation parameters. The coarse-graining models are consistent with the experimental evidence, showing a morphological transition of the aggregates as the polymer concentration and solvent affinity change. We show that hexagonal packing of the micelles can occur in solution within different windows of polymer concentration depending on the solvent affinity. However, the shape and size dispersion of the micelles determine the characteristic arrangement. We describe the order of crew-cut micelles using a rigid-sphere approximation and propose different phase parameters that characterize the emergence of monodisperse-spherical micelles in solution. Additionally, we investigate the effect of blending asymmetric diblock copolymers (AB/AC) over the properties of the membranes. We observe that the co-assembly mechanism localizes the AC molecules at the interface of A and B domains, and induces

  20. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND RESPONSE SURFACE MODELING OF PI/PES-ZEOLITE 4A MIXED MATRIX MEMBRANE FOR CO2 SEPARATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. KUSWORO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of preparation of polyimide/polyethersulfone (PI/PES blending-zeolite mixed matrix membrane through the manipulation of membrane production variables such as polymer concentration, blending composition and zeolite loading. Combination of central composite design and response surface methodology were applied to determine the main effect and interaction effects of these variables on membrane separation performance. The quadratic models between each response and the independent parameters were developed and the response surface models were tested with analysis of variance (ANOVA. In this study, PI/ (PES–zeolite 4A mixed matrix membranes were casted using dry/wet phase inversion technique. The separation performance of mixed matrix membrane had been tested using pure gases such as CO2 and CH4. The results showed that zeolite loading was the most significant variable that influenced the CO2/CH4 selectivity among three variables and the experimental results were in good agreement with those predicted by the proposed regression models. The gas separation performance of the membrane was relatively higher as compare to polymeric membrane. Therefore, combination of central composite design and response surface methodology can be used to prepare optimal condition for mixed matrix membrane fabrication. The incorporation of 20 wt% zeolite 4A into 25 wt% of PI/PES matrix had resulted in a high separation performance of membrane material.

  1. Membrane paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Thorne, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    The membrane paradigm is a modified frozen star approach to modeling black holes, with particles and fields assuming a complex, static, boundary-layer type structure (membrane) near the event horizon. The membrane has no effects on the present or future evolution of particles and fields above itself. The mathematical representation is a combination of a formalism containing terms for the shear and bulk viscosity, surface pressure, momentum, temperature, entropy, etc., of the horizon and the 3+1 formalism. The latter model considers a family of three-dimensional spacelike hypersurfaces in one-dimensional time. The membrane model considers a magnetic field threading the hole and undergoing torque from the hole rotation. The field is cleaned by the horizon and distributed over the horizon so that ohmic dissipation is minimized. The membrane paradigm is invalid inside the horizon, but is useful for theoretically probing the properties of slowly evolving black holes

  2. A mathematical and empirical model of the performance of a membrane-coupled anaerobic fermentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Oh; Chung, Jinwook

    2011-09-01

    A mathematical model was developed to describe the performance of a membrane-coupled anaerobic fermentor (MCAF)-based process. In our experimental results, higher volatile fatty acid (VFA) recovery ratios were obtained at greater filtration ratios. The VFA recovery ratio peaked at an HRT of 12 h and a membrane filtration ratio of 0.95 at a constant SRT. Based on our simulation, the HRT and filtration ratio should be maintained at less than 1 day and above 0.9, respectively, to exceed an organic materials recovery ratio of 35% at a constant SRT of 10 days. Our empirical model, which predicts the effluent VFA concentration (C(o)), described the performance of the MCAF adequately. The model demonstrated that the outlet VFA concentration was a function of three independent parameters -HLR, input organic concentration (C(i)) and membrane filtration ratio (Φ). Multiple regression analyses were conducted using 50 measurements of the MCAF, yielding the following relationship: C(o) = 0.278Φ(1.13) C(i) (1.93) HLR(0.11). The correlation coefficient (R(2)) was 0.90. The simulation results were consistent with the observed data; therefore, due to its simplicity, this model predicts the effluent VFA concentration of an MCAF adequately.

  3. Modeling flow in nanoporous, membrane reservoirs and interpretation of coupled fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geren, Filiz

    The average pore size in unconventional, tight-oil reservoirs is estimated to be less than 100 nm. At this pore size, Darcy flow is no longer the dominating flow mechanism and a combination of diffusive flows determines the flow characteristics. Concentration driven self-diffusion has been well known and included in the flow and transport models in porous media. However, when the sizes of the pores and pore-throats decrease down to the size of the hydrocarbon molecules, the porous medium acts like a semi-permeable membrane, and the size of the pore openings dictates the direction of transport between adjacent pores. Accordingly, characterization of flow and transport in tight unconventional plays requires understanding of their membrane properties. This Master of Science thesis first highlights the membrane properties of nanoporous, unconventional reservoirs and then discusses how filtration effects can be incorporated into the models of transport in nanoporous media within the coupled flux concept. The effect of filtration on fluid composition and its impact on black-oil fluid properties like bubble point pressure is also demonstrated. To define filtration and filtration pressure in unconventional, tight-oil reservoirs, analogy to chemical osmosis is applied two pore systems connected with a pore throat, which shows membrane properties. Because the pore throat selectivity permits the passage of fluid molecules by their sizes, given a filtration pressure difference between the two pore systems, the concentration difference between the systems is determined by flash calculations. The results are expressed in the form of filtration (membrane) efficiency, which is essential parameter to define coupled fluxes for porous media flow.

  4. Interaction study between maltose-modified PPI dendrimers and lipidic model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Dominika; Appelhans, Dietmar; Signorelli, Marco; Wiesner, Brigitte; Fessas, Dimitrios; Scheler, Ulrich; Voit, Brigitte; Maly, Jan

    2015-07-01

    The influence of maltose-modified poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPC/DMPG) (3%) liposomes was studied. Fourth generation (G4) PPI dendrimers with primary amino surface groups were partially (open shell glycodendrimers - OS) or completely (dense shell glycodendrimers - DS) modified with maltose residues. As a model membrane, two types of 100nm diameter liposomes were used to observe differences in the interactions between neutral DMPC and negatively charged DMPC/DMPG bilayers. Interactions were studied using fluorescence spectroscopy to evaluate the membrane fluidity of both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of the lipid bilayer and using differential scanning calorimetry to investigate thermodynamic parameter changes. Pulsed-filed gradient NMR experiments were carried out to evaluate common diffusion coefficient of DMPG and DS PPI in D2O when using below critical micelle concentration of DMPG. Both OS and DS PPI G4 dendrimers show interactions with liposomes. Neutral DS dendrimers exhibit stronger changes in membrane fluidity compared to OS dendrimers. The bilayer structure seems more rigid in the case of anionic DMPC/DMPG liposomes in comparison to pure and neutral DMPC liposomes. Generally, interactions of dendrimers with anionic DMPC/DMPG and neutral DMPC liposomes were at the same level. Higher concentrations of positively charged OS dendrimers induced the aggregation process with negatively charged liposomes. For all types of experiments, the presence of NaCl decreased the strength of the interactions between glycodendrimers and liposomes. Based on NMR diffusion experiments we suggest that apart from electrostatic interactions for OS PPI hydrogen bonds play a major role in maltose-modified PPI dendrimer interactions with anionic and neutral model membranes where a contact surface is needed for undergoing multiple H-bond interactions between

  5. Modeling and simulation of membrane separation process using computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Tahvildari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Separation of CO2 from air was simulated in this work. The considered process for removal of CO2 was a hollow-fiber membrane contactor and an aqueous solution of 2-amino-2-metyl-1-propanol (AMP as absorbent. The model was developed based on mass transfer as well as chemical reaction for CO2 and solvent in the contactor. The equations of model were solved using finite element method. Simulation results were compared with experimental data, and good agreement was observed. The results revealed that increasing solvent velocity enhances removal of CO2 in the hollow-fiber membrane contactor. Moreover, it was found that counter-current process mode is more favorable to achieve the highest separation efficiency.

  6. Evaluation of the interaction of surfactants with stratum corneum model membrane from Bothrops jararaca by DSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, André Rolim; Lacerda, Aurea Cristina Lemos; Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles; Lopes, Patrícia Santos; Kawano, Yoshio; Kaneko, Telma Mary

    2006-07-06

    The interaction of surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) and lauryl alcohol ethoxylated (12 mol ethylene oxide) (LAE-12OE) was evaluated on the stratum corneum (SC) of shed snake skins from Bothrops jararaca, used as model membrane, and thermal characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Surfactant solutions were employed above of the critical micellar concentration (CMC) with treatment time of 8h. The SDS interaction with the SC model membrane has increased the characteristic transition temperature of 130 degrees C in approximately 10 degrees C for the water loss and keratin denaturation, indicating an augmentation of the water content. Samples treated with CTAC have a decrease of the water loss temperature, while, for the LAE-12OE treated samples, changes on the transition temperature have not been observed.

  7. Mathematical models for biomass in membrane-BNR process for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J Y; Kwon, K H; Kim, S W; Min, K S; Yun, Z

    2010-01-01

    The equation of biomass is related to the mass-balance equation of substrate. This equation of substrate is expressed according to a model using the Monod equation, which indicates some limits for calculating the amounts of VSS in the MBR process. Some degradation of biomass which is caused by long SRT might result in the generation of substrate based on COD. Research was conducted by lab-scale tests with two membrane-BNR (Biological Nutrients Removal) processes. These were composed of multi-reactors as anaerobic, anoxic, aerobic tank and oxygen exhauster. The aerobic tank was also divided into 3 reactors, which were oxic for nitrification, oxic-media containing fluidized sponge typed media for simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, and oxic-membrane for submerged membrane. This membrane-BNR process could remove most of the organics, suspended solids and nutrient substances like nitrogen thus satisfying the reuse guidelines issued by the Korean Ministry of Environment. The value measured of VSS (X(v)) through the experiment with SRT of 35 days was similar to the biomass using the conventional equation while the one with SRT of 60 days was close to the concentration of VSS calculated by a revised equation which considered the biomass degraded with long SRT.

  8. Effect of Organic Tin Compounds on Electric Properties of Model Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podolak, M.; Engel, G.; Man, D. [Inst. of Physics, Opole Univ., Opole (Poland)

    2006-05-15

    The objective of the present work was to investigate the effect of selected organic tin compounds and potassium chloride (used as a reference substance) on the trans-membrane electric voltage and electric resistance of model membranes, the latter being nitrocellulose filters impregnated with butylene ester of lauric acid. The increasing KCl concentration (in the measurement chambers) caused a rapid rise of the negative trans-membrane voltage, whose value stabilized afterwards. In the case of (C{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 3}SnCl an abrupt maximum of the negative voltage was observed followed by a monotonic drop to zero. In the case of highest concentrations of this compound the voltages, after having reached zero, changed their polarization to the opposite. Within the range of small concentrations two slight voltage maxima were observed. Non-ionic tin compounds like (CH{sub 3}){sub 4}Sn and (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 4}Sn had an insignificant influence on the electric properties of the studied membranes. (orig.)

  9. A membrane topology model for human interferon inducible transmembrane protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Weston

    Full Text Available InterFeron Inducible TransMembrane proteins 1-3 (IFITM1, IFITM2 and IFITM3 are a family of proteins capable of inhibiting the cellular entry of numerous human and animal viruses. IFITM1-3 are unique amongst the currently described viral restriction factors in their apparent ability to block viral entry. This restrictive property is dependant on the localisation of the proteins to plasma and endosomal membranes, which constitute the main portals of viral entry into cells. The topology of the IFITM proteins within cell membranes is an unresolved aspect of their biology. Here we present data from immunofluorescence microscopy, protease cleavage, biotin-labelling and immuno-electron microscopy assays, showing that human IFITM1 has a membrane topology in which the N-terminal domain resides in the cytoplasm, and the C-terminal domain is extracellular. Furthermore, we provide evidence that this topology is conserved for all of the human interferon-induced IFITM proteins. This model is consistent with that recently proposed for murine IFITM3, but differs from that proposed for murine IFITM1.

  10. Choline Modulation of the Aβ P1-40 Channel Reconstituted into a Model Lipid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Meleleo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs, implicated in memory and learning, in subjects affected by Alzheimer's disease result altered. Stimulation of α7-nAChRs inhibits amyloid plaques and increases ACh release. β-amyloid peptide (AβP forms ion channels in the cell and model phospholipid membranes that are retained responsible in Alzheimer disease. We tested if choline, precursor of ACh, could affect the AβP1-40 channels in oxidized cholesterol (OxCh and in palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC:Ch lipid bilayers. Choline concentrations of 5 × 10−11 M–1.5 × 10−8 M added to the cis- or trans-side of membrane quickly increased AβP1-40 ion channel frequency (events/min and ion conductance in OxCh membranes, but not in POPC:Ch membranes. Circular Dichroism (CD spectroscopy shows that after 24 and 48 hours of incubation with AβP1-40, choline stabilizes the random coil conformation of the peptide, making it less prone to fibrillate. These actions seem to be specific in that ACh is ineffective either in solution or on AβP1-40 channel incorporated into PLMs.

  11. [Effects of silver nitrate on the phase state of model multibilayer membranes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashchenko, O V; Iermak, Yu L; Krasnikova, A O; Lisetski, L N

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effects caused by silver nitrate (AgNO3) on model lipid membranes, we studied multibilayer membranes based on L-α-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and AgNO3 aqueous soluitions in a wide concentration range (up to 30 wt%) by means of differential scanning calorimetry. It has been shown that the presence of AgNO3 leads both to an increase in the main phase transition temperature (T(m)) and appearance of an additional phase transition peak (T(m)), suggesting increasing of both density and heterogeneity of the lipid membrane. The effect of nitrate ions (NO ) was shown to be of the opposite nature (bilayer fluidizing), so the integral densifying effect of AgNO3 can be referred solely to the action of silver ions (Ag(+)). With increasing AgNO3 concentration, the tendency was observed to opposite changes in T(m) and T'(m) peaks intensity, thereby at about 26. wt% of AgNO3 the initial peak (T(m)) disappeared. In the range of Ag+ therapeutic concentrations (up to 2 wt%) no significant changes in the DPPC membrane were revealed. This can be one of the reasons of the absence of a damaging effect of silver drugs on a host organism with simultaneous pronounced bactericidal effect.

  12. Conformational study of melectin and antapin antimicrobial peptides in model membrane environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocourková, Lucie; Novotná, Pavlína; Čujová, Sabína; Čeřovský, Václav; Urbanová, Marie; Setnička, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have long been considered as promising compounds against drug-resistant pathogens. In this work, we studied the secondary structure of antimicrobial peptides melectin and antapin using electronic (ECD) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopies that are sensitive to peptide secondary structures. The results from quantitative ECD spectral evaluation by Dichroweb and CDNN program and from the qualitative evaluation of the VCD spectra were compared. The antimicrobial activity of the selected peptides depends on their ability to adopt an amphipathic α-helical conformation on the surface of the bacterial membrane. Hence, solutions of different zwitterionic and negatively charged liposomes and micelles were used to mimic the eukaryotic and bacterial biological membranes. The results show a significant content of α-helical conformation in the solutions of negatively charged liposomes mimicking the bacterial membrane, thus correlating with the antimicrobial activity of the studied peptides. On the other hand in the solutions of zwitterionic liposomes used as models of the eukaryotic membranes, the fraction of α-helical conformation was lower, which corresponds with their moderate hemolytic activity.

  13. What determines the activity of antimicrobial and cytolytic peptides in model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kim S; Svetlovics, James; McKeown, Alesia N; Huskins, Laura; Almeida, Paulo F

    2011-09-20

    We previously proposed three hypotheses relating the mechanism of antimicrobial and cytolytic peptides in model membranes to the Gibbs free energies of binding and insertion into the membrane [Almeida, P. F., and Pokorny, A. (2009) Biochemistry 48, 8083-8093]. Two sets of peptides were designed to test those hypotheses, by mutating of the sequences of δ-lysin, cecropin A, and magainin 2. Peptide binding and activity were measured on phosphatidylcholine membranes. In the first set, the peptide charge was changed by mutating basic to acidic residues or vice versa, but the amino acid sequence was not altered much otherwise. The type of dye release changed from graded to all-or-none according to prediction. However, location of charged residues in the sequence with the correct spacing to form salt bridges failed to improve binding. In the second set, the charged and other key residues were kept in the same positions, whereas most of the sequence was significantly but conservatively simplified, maintaining the same hydrophobicity and amphipathicity. This set behaved completely different from predicted. The type of release, which was expected to be maintained, changed dramatically from all-or-none to graded in the mutants of cecropin and magainin. Finally, contrary to the hypotheses, the results indicate that the Gibbs energy of binding to the membrane, not the Gibbs energy of insertion, is the primary determinant of peptide activity. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  14. Deformation of Two-Dimensional Nonuniform-Membrane Red Blood Cells Simulated by a Lattice Boltzmann Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua-Bing, Li; Li, Jin; Bing, Qiu

    2008-01-01

    To study two-dimensional red blood cells deforming in a shear Bow with the membrane nonuniform on the rigidity and mass, the membrane is discretized into equilength segments. The fluid inside and outside the red blood cell is simulated by the D2Q9 lattice Boltzmann model and the hydrodynamic forces exerted on the membrane from the inner and outer of the red blood cell are calculated by a stress-integration method. Through the global deviation from the curvature of uniform-membrane, we find that when the membrane is nonuniform on the rigidity, the deviation first decreases with the time increases and implies that the terminal profile of the red blood cell is static. To a red blood cell with the mass nonuniform on the membrane, the deviation becomes more large, and the mass distribution affects the profile of the two sides of the flattened red blood cell in a shear flow. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  15. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Modelling Using Moving Least Squares Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Tirnovan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Proton exchange membrane fuel cell, with low polluting emissions, is a great alternative to replace the traditional electrical power sources for automotive applications or for small stationary consumers. This paper presents a numerical method, for the fuel cell modelling, based on moving least squares (MLS. Experimental data have been used for developing an approximated model of the PEMFC function of the current density, air inlet pressure and operating temperature of the fuel cell. The method can be applied for modelling others fuel cell sub-systems, such as the compressor. The method can be used for off-line or on-line identification of the PEMFC stack.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation for statistical mechanics model of ion-channel cooperativity in cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Riza; Aydiner, Ekrem

    2009-03-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are key molecules for the generation and propagation of electrical signals in excitable cell membranes. The voltage-dependent switching of these channels between conducting and nonconducting states is a major factor in controlling the transmembrane voltage. In this study, a statistical mechanics model of these molecules has been discussed on the basis of a two-dimensional spin model. A new Hamiltonian and a new Monte Carlo simulation algorithm are introduced to simulate such a model. It was shown that the results well match the experimental data obtained from batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels in the squid giant axon using the cut-open axon technique.

  17. Model Biological Membranes and Possibilities of Application of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy for Their Characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalová, Štěpánka; Vyskočil, V.; Barek, J.; Navrátil, Tomáš

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 2 (2018), s. 207-219 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-05387S; GA ČR GA17-03868S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) * Liposomes * Model membrane * Phospholipid bilayer * Planar lipid bilayer * Supported lipid bilayers * Tethered lipid bilayers Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 2.851, year: 2016

  18. Electrical equivalent thermal network for direct contact membrane distillation modeling and analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Karam, Ayman M.

    2016-09-19

    Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging water desalination technology that offers several advantages compared to conventional desalination methods. Although progress has been made to model the physics of the process, there are two common limitations of existing models. Firstly, many of the models are based on the steady-state analysis of the process and secondly, some of the models are based on partial differential equations, which when discretized introduce many states which are not accessible in practice. This paper presents the derivation of a novel dynamic model, based on the analogy between electrical and thermal systems, for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). An analogous electrical thermal network is constructed and its elements are parameterized such that the response of the network models the DCMD process. The proposed model captures the spatial and temporal responses of the temperature distribution along the flow direction and is able to accurately predict the distilled water flux output. To demonstrate the adequacy of the proposed model, validation with time varying and steady-state experimental data is presented. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparing and Contrasting Traditional Membrane Bioreactor Models with Novel Ones Based on Time Series Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The computer modelling and simulation of wastewater treatment plant and their specific technologies, such as membrane bioreactors (MBRs, are becoming increasingly useful to consultant engineers when designing, upgrading, retrofitting, operating and controlling these plant. This research uses traditional phenomenological mechanistic models based on MBR filtration and biochemical processes to measure the effectiveness of alternative and novel time series models based upon input–output system identification methods. Both model types are calibrated and validated using similar plant layouts and data sets derived for this purpose. Results prove that although both approaches have their advantages, they also have specific disadvantages as well. In conclusion, the MBR plant designer and/or operator who wishes to use good quality, calibrated models to gain a better understanding of their process, should carefully consider which model type is selected based upon on what their initial modelling objectives are. Each situation usually proves unique.

  20. Mitochondrial cristae remodelling is associated with disrupted OPA1 oligomerisation in the Huntington's disease R6/2 fragment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Tanja; Kojer, Kerstin; Birth, Nathalie; Hallitsch, Jaqueline; Taanman, Jan-Willem; Orth, Michael

    2017-02-01

    There is evidence of an imbalance of mitochondrial fission and fusion in patients with Huntington's disease (HD) and HD animal models. Fission and fusion are important for mitochondrial homeostasis including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance and may be relevant for the selective striatal mtDNA depletion that we observed in the R6/2 fragment HD mouse model. We aimed to investigate the fission/fusion balance and the integrity of the mitochondrial membrane system in cortex and striatum of end-stage R6/2 mice and wild-type animals. Mitochondrial morphology was determined using electron microscopy, and transcript and protein levels of factors that play a key role in fission and fusion, including DRP1, mitofusin 1 and 2, mitofilin and OPA1, and cytochrome c and caspase 3 were assessed by RT-qPCR and immunoblotting. OPA1 oligomerisation was evaluated using blue native gels. In striatum and cortex of R6/2 mice, mitochondrial cristae morphology was abnormal. Mitofilin and the overall levels of the fission and fusion factors were unaffected; however, OPA1 oligomerisation was abnormal in striatum and cortex of R6/2 mice. Mitochondrial and cytoplasmic cytochrome c levels were similar in R6/2 and wild-type mice with no significant increase of activated caspase 3. Our results indicate that the integrity of the mitochondrial cristae is compromised in striatum and cortex of the R6/2 mice and that this is most likely caused by impaired OPA1 oligomerisation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A coculture model mimicking the intestinal mucosa reveals a regulatory role for myofibroblasts in immune-mediated barrier disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, L. E. M.; Schreurs, C. C. H. M.; Kroes, H.; Spillenaar Bilgen, E. J.; van Deventer, S. J. H.; van Tol, E. A. F.

    2002-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease involves a mucosal inflammatory response affecting the barrier function of the gut. Myofibroblasts directly underlining the intestinal epithelium may have a regulatory role in immune-mediated barrier disruption. A coculture system of T84 epithelial and CCD-18Co

  2. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M.; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2016-04-07

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highly differentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified in these membrane systems, and a comprehensive catalog of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared to the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared to a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Overall, the protein composition of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane is quite similar to the E.coli plasma membrane and Arabidopsis thylakoid membrane, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a gram-negative bacterium that has an additional internal membrane system that fulfils the energetic requirements of the cell.

  3. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M.; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2016-04-07

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highlydifferentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems in cyanobacteria, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified, and a comprehensive catalogue of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 differentially localized proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared with the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared with a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Thus, our data clearly define the two membrane systems with distinct functions. Overall, the protein compositions of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane are quite similar to that of the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli and thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis chloroplasts, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a Gram

  4. Astrocyte membrane properties are altered in a rat model of developmental cortical malformation but single-cell astrocytic glutamate uptake is robust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Elizabeth; Danbolt, Niels Christian; Dulla, Chris G

    2016-05-01

    Developmental cortical malformations (DCMs) are linked with severe epilepsy and are caused by both genetic and environmental insults. DCMs include several neurological diseases, such as focal cortical dysplasia, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, and others. Human studies have implicated astrocyte reactivity and dysfunction in the pathophysiology of DCMs, but their specific role is unknown. As astrocytes powerfully regulate glutamate neurotransmission, and glutamate levels are known to be increased in human epileptic foci, understanding the role of astrocytes in the pathological sequelae of DCMs is extremely important. Additionally, recent studies examining astrocyte glutamate uptake in DCMs have reported conflicting results, adding confusion to the field. In this study we utilized the freeze lesion (FL) model of DCM, which is known to induce reactive astrocytosis and cause significant changes in astrocyte morphology, proliferation, and distribution. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording from astrocytes, we recorded both UV-uncaging and synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents (TCs), widely accepted assays of functional glutamate transport by astrocytes. With this approach, we set out to test the hypothesis that astrocyte membrane properties and glutamate transport were disrupted in this model of DCM. Though we found that the developmental maturation of astrocyte membrane resistance was disrupted by FL, glutamate uptake by individual astrocytes was robust throughout FL development. Interestingly, using an immunolabeling approach, we observed spatial and developmental differences in excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) expression in FL cortex. Spatially specific differences in EAAT2 (GLT-1) and EAAT1 (GLAST) expression suggest that the relative contribution of each EAAT to astrocytic glutamate uptake may be altered in FL cortex. Lastly, we carefully analyzed the amplitudes and onset times of both synaptically- and UV uncaging-evoked TCs. We found that in

  5. Structure and orientation study of Ebola fusion peptide inserted in lipid membrane models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopian, Audrey; Castano, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The fusion peptide of Ebola virus comprises a highly hydrophobic sequence located downstream from the N-terminus of the glycoprotein GP2 responsible for virus-host membrane fusion. The internal fusion peptide of GP2 inserts into membranes of infected cell to mediate the viral and the host cell membrane fusion. Since the sequence length of Ebola fusion peptide is still not clear, we study in the present work the behavior of two fusion peptides of different lengths which were named EBO17 and EBO24 referring to their amino acid length. The secondary structure and orientation of both peptides in lipid model systems made of DMPC:DMPG:cholesterol:DMPE (6:2:5:3) were investigated using PMIRRAS and polarized ATR spectroscopy coupled with Brewster angle microscopy. The infrared results showed a structural flexibility of both fusion peptides which are able to transit reversibly from an α-helix to antiparallel β-sheets. Ellipsometry results corroborate together with isotherm measurements that EBO peptides interacting with lipid monolayer highly affected the lipid organization. When interacting with a single lipid bilayer, at low peptide content, EBO peptides insert as mostly α-helices mainly perpendicular into the lipid membrane thus tend to organize the lipid acyl chains. Inserted in multilamellar vesicles at higher peptide content, EBO peptides are mostly in β-sheet structures and induce a disorganization of the lipid chain order. In this paper, we show that the secondary structure of the Ebola fusion peptide is reversibly flexible between α-helical and β-sheet conformations, this feature being dependent on its concentration in lipids, eventually inducing membrane fusion. © 2013.

  6. Correlating antimicrobial activity and model membrane leakage induced by nylon-3 polymers and detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovakeemian, Sara G; Liu, Runhui; Gellman, Samuel H; Heerklotz, Heiko

    2015-09-14

    Most antimicrobial peptides act upon target microorganisms by permeabilizing their membranes. The mode of action is often assessed by vesicle leakage experiments that use model membranes, with the assumption that biological activity correlates with the permeabilization of the lipid bilayer. The current work aims to extend the interpretation of vesicle leakage results and examine the correlation between vesicle leakage and antimicrobial activity. To this end, we used a lifetime-based leakage assay with calcein-loaded vesicles to study the membrane permeabilizing properties of a novel antifungal polymer poly-NM, two of its analogs, and a series of detergents. In conjunction, the biological activities of these compounds against Candida albicans were assessed and correlated with data from vesicle leakage. Poly-NM induces all-or-none leakage in polar yeast lipid vesicles at the polymer's MIC, 3 μg mL(-1). At this and higher concentrations, complete leakage after an initial lag time was observed. Concerted activity tests imply that this polymer acts independently of the detergent octyl glucoside (OG) for both vesicle leakage and activity against C. albicans spheroplasts. In addition, poly-NM was found to have negligible activity against zwitterionic vesicles and red blood cells. Our results provide a consistent, detailed picture of the mode of action of poly-NM: this polymer induces membrane leakage by electrostatic lipid clustering. In contrast, poly-MM:CO, a nylon-3 polymer comprised of both cationic and hydrophobic segments, seems to act by a different mechanism that involves membrane asymmetry stress. Vesicle leakage for this polymer is transient (limited to nylon-3 polymers we examined act via similar mechanisms; it is surprising that their mechanisms are so distinct. Some, but not all mechanisms of vesicle permeabilization allow for antimicrobial activity.

  7. Kinetic Defects Induced by Melittin in Model Lipid Membranes: A Solution Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Khadka, Nawal K

    2016-05-26

    Quantitative characterization of membrane defects (pores) is important for elucidating the molecular basis of many membrane-active peptides. We study kinetic defects induced by melittin in vesicular and planar lipid bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements indicate that melittin induces time-dependent calcein leakage. Solution atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to visualize melittin-induced membrane defects. After initial equilibration, the most probable defect radius is ∼3.8 nm in 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC) bilayers. Unexpectedly, defects become larger with longer incubation, accompanied by substantial shape transformation. The initial defect radius is ∼4.7 nm in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Addition of 30 mol % cholesterol to DOPC bilayers suppresses defect kinetics, although the inhibitory impact is negated by longer incubation. Overall, the kinetic rate of defect development follows DLPC > DOPC > DOPC/cholesterol. Kinetic defects are also observed when anionic lipids are present. Based on the observation that defects can occupy as large as 40% of the bilayer surface, we propose a kinetic defect growth model. We also study the effect of melittin on the phase behavior of DOPC/egg-sphingomyelin/cholesterol bilayers. We find that melittin initially suppresses or eliminates liquid-ordered (Lo) domains; Lo domains gradually emerge and become the dominant species with longer incubation; and defects in phase-coexisting bilayers have a most probable radius of ∼5 nm and are exclusively localized in the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase. Our experimental data highlight that melittin-induced membrane defects are not static; conversely, spontaneous defect growth is intrinsically associated with membrane permeabilization exerted by melittin.

  8. Diphytanoyl lipids as model systems for studying membrane-active peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Sezgin; Afonin, Sergii; Babii, Oleg; Tkachenko, Anton N; Komarov, Igor V; Ulrich, Anne S

    2017-10-01

    The branched chains in diphytanoyl lipids provide membranes with unique properties, such as high chemical/physical stability, low water permeability, and no gel-to-fluid phase transition at ambient temperature. Synthetic diphytanoyl phospholipids are often used as model membranes for electrophysiological experiments. To evaluate whether these sturdy lipids are also suitable for solid-state NMR, we have examined their interactions with a typical amphiphilic peptide in comparison with straight-chain lipids. First, their phase properties were monitored using 31 P NMR, and the structural behaviour of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa was studied by 19 F NMR and circular dichroism in oriented membrane samples. Only lipids with choline headgroups (DPhPC) were found to form stable lipid bilayers in oriented samples, while DPhPG, DPhPE and DPhPS display non-lamellar structures. Hence, the experimental temperature and hydration are crucial factors when using supported diphytanoyl lipids, as both parameters must be maintained in an appropriate range to avoid the formation of non-bilayer structures. For the same reason, a high content of other diphytanoyl lipids besides DPhPC in mixed lipid systems is not favourable. Unlike the situation in straight-chain membranes, we found that the α-helical PGLa was not able to insert into the tightly packed fluid bilayer of DPhPC but remained in a surface-bound state even at very high peptide concentration. This behaviour can be explained by the high cohesivity and the negative spontaneous curvature of the diphytanoyl lipids. These characteristic features must therefore be taken into consideration, both, in electrophysiological studies, and when interpreting the structural behaviour of membrane-active peptides in such lipid environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Brief report: Examining children's disruptive behavior in the wake of trauma - A two-piece growth curve model before and after a school shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yue; Shonkoff, Eleanor T; Barnett, Elizabeth; Wen, C K Fred; Miller, Kimberly A; Eddy, J Mark

    2015-10-01

    School shootings may have serious negative impacts on children years after the event. Previous research suggests that children exposed to traumatic events experience heightened fear, anxiety, and feelings of vulnerability, but little research has examined potential aggressive and disruptive behavioral reactions. Utilizing a longitudinal dataset in which a local school shooting occurred during the course of data collection, this study sought to investigate whether the trajectory of disruptive behaviors was affected by the shooting. A two-piece growth curve model was used to examine the trajectory of disruptive behaviors during the pre-shooting years (i.e., piece one) and post-shooting years (i.e., piece two). Results indicated that the two-piece growth curve model fit the data better than the one-piece model and that the school shooting precipitated a faster decline in aggressive behaviors. This study demonstrated a novel approach to examining effects of an unexpected traumatic event on behavioral trajectories using an existing longitudinal data set. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Brief Report: Examining children’s disruptive behavior in the wake of trauma - A two-piece growth curve model before and after a school shooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yue; Shonkoff, Eleanor T.; Barnett, Elizabeth; Wen, CK Fred; Miller, Kimberly A.; Eddy, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    School shootings may have serious negative impacts on children years after the event. Previous research suggests that children exposed to traumatic events experience heightened fear, anxiety, and feelings of vulnerability, but little research has examined potential aggressive and disruptive behavioral reactions. Utilizing a longitudinal dataset in which a local school shooting occurred during the course of data collection, this study sought to investigate whether the trajectory of disruptive behaviors was affected by the shooting. A two-piece growth curve model was used to examine the trajectory of disruptive behaviors during the pre-shooting years (i.e., piece one) and post-shooting years (i.e., piece two). Results indicated that the two-piece growth curve model fit the data better than the one-piece model and that the school shooting precipitated a faster decline in aggressive behaviors. This study demonstrated a novel approach to examining effects of an unexpected traumatic event on behavioral trajectories using an existing longitudinal data set. PMID:26298676

  11. Three-dimensional dynamic modelling of Polymer-Electrolyte-Membrane-Fuel-Cell-Systems; Dreidimensionale dynamische Modellierung und Berechnung von Polymer-Elektrolyt-Membran-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vath, Andreas

    2008-12-15

    This thesis deals with dynamic and multi-dimensional modelling of Polymer- Electrolyte-Membrane-Fuel-Cells (PEMFC). The developed models include all the different layers of the fuel cell e.g. flow field, gas diffusion layer, catalyst layer and membrane with their particular physical, chemical and electrical characteristics. The simulation results have been verified by detailed measurements performed at the research centre for hydrogen and solar energy in Ulm (ZSW Ulm). The developed three dimensional model describes the time- and spatial-dependent charge and mass transport in a fuel cell. Additionally, this model allows the analysis of critical operating conditions. For example, the current density distribution for different membranes is shown during insufficient humidification which results in local overstraining and degradation. The model also allows to analyse extreme critical operating conditions, e.g. short time breakdown of the humidification. Furthermore, the model shows the available potential of improvement opportunities in power density and efficiency of PEMFC due to optimisation of the gas diffusion layer, the catalyst and membrane. In the second part of the work the application of PEMFC systems for combined heat and power units is described by one-dimensional models for an electrical power range between 1 kW and 5 kW. This model contains the necessary components, e.g. gas processing, humidification, gas supply, fuel cell stack, heat storage, pumps, auxiliary burner, power inverter und additional aggregates. As a main result, it is possible to distinctly reduce the energy demand and the carbon dioxide exhaust for different load profiles. Today the costs for fuel cell systems are considerably higher than that of the conventional electrical energy supply. (orig.)

  12. Coarse-grained model of nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton transport in Nafion membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Mao, Runfang; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2018-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained model of the acid form of Nafion membrane that explicitly includes proton transport. This model is based on a soft-core bead representation of the polymer implemented into the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation framework. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with water beads. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss hopping mechanism of proton transport. The proposed DPD model is parameterized to account for the specifics of the conformations and flexibility of the Nafion backbone and sidechains; it treats electrostatic interactions in the smeared charge approximation. The simulation results qualitatively, and in many respects quantitatively, predict the specifics of nanoscale segregation in the hydrated Nafion membrane into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from a collection of isolated water clusters to a 3D network of pores filled with water embedded in the hydrophobic matrix. The segregated morphology is characterized in terms of the pore size distribution with the average size growing with hydration from ˜1 to ˜4 nm. Comparison of the predicted water diffusivity with the experimental data taken from different sources shows good agreement at high and moderate hydration and substantial deviation at low hydration, around and below the percolation threshold. This discrepancy is attributed to the dynamic percolation effects of formation and rupture of merging bridges between the water clusters, which become progressively important at low hydration, when the coarse-grained model is unable to mimic the fine structure of water network that includes singe molecule bridges. Selected simulations of water diffusion are performed for the alkali metal substituted membrane which demonstrate the effects of the counter-ions on

  13. Greenhouse gases from membrane bioreactors: Mathematical modelling, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannina, Giorgio; Cosenza, Alida; Ekama, George A

    2017-09-01

    In this study a new mathematical model to quantify greenhouse gas emissions (namely, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide) from membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is presented. The model has been adopted to predict the key processes of a pilot plant with pre-denitrification MBR scheme, filled with domestic and saline wastewater. The model was calibrated by adopting an advanced protocol based on an extensive dataset. In terms of nitrous oxide, the results show that an important role is played by the half saturation coefficients related to nitrogen removal processes and the model factors affecting the oxygen transfer rate in the aerobic and MBR tanks. Uncertainty analysis showed that for the gaseous model outputs 88-93% of the measured data lays inside the confidence bands showing an accurate model prediction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling the Mechanics of Cell Division: Influence of Spontaneous Membrane Curvature, Surface Tension, and Osmotic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Beltrán-Heredia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many cell division processes have been conserved throughout evolution and are being revealed by studies on model organisms such as bacteria, yeasts, and protozoa. Cellular membrane constriction is one of these processes, observed almost universally during cell division. It happens similarly in all organisms through a mechanical pathway synchronized with the sequence of cytokinetic events in the cell interior. Arguably, such a mechanical process is mastered by the coordinated action of a constriction machinery fueled by biochemical energy in conjunction with the passive mechanics of the cellular membrane. Independently of the details of the constriction engine, the membrane component responds against deformation by minimizing the elastic energy at every constriction state following a pathway still unknown. In this paper, we address a theoretical study of the mechanics of membrane constriction in a simplified model that describes a homogeneous membrane vesicle in the regime where mechanical work due to osmotic pressure, surface tension, and bending energy are comparable. We develop a general method to find approximate analytical expressions for the main descriptors of a symmetrically constricted vesicle. Analytical solutions are obtained by combining a perturbative expansion for small deformations with a variational approach that was previously demonstrated valid at the reference state of an initially spherical vesicle at isotonic conditions. The analytic approximate results are compared with the exact solution obtained from numerical computations, getting a good agreement for all the computed quantities (energy, area, volume, constriction force. We analyze the effects of the spontaneous curvature, the surface tension and the osmotic pressure in these quantities, focusing especially on the constriction force. The more favorable conditions for vesicle constriction are determined, obtaining that smaller constriction forces are required for positive

  15. Disrupted bone remodeling leads to cochlear overgrowth and hearing loss in a mouse model of fibrous dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Akil

    Full Text Available Normal hearing requires exquisite cooperation between bony and sensorineural structures within the cochlea. For example, the inner ear secretes proteins such as osteoprotegrin (OPG that can prevent cochlear bone remodeling. Accordingly, diseases that affect bone regulation can also result in hearing loss. Patients with fibrous dysplasia develop trabecular bone overgrowth resulting in hearing loss if the lesions affect the temporal bones. Unfortunately, the mechanisms responsible for this hearing loss, which could be sensorineural and/or conductive, remain unclear. In this study, we used a unique transgenic mouse model of increased Gs G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR signaling induced by expression of an engineered receptor, Rs1, in osteoblastic cells. These ColI(2.3+/Rs1+ mice showed dramatic bone lesions that histologically and radiologically resembled fibrous dysplasia. We found that ColI(2.3+/Rs1+ mice showed progressive and severe conductive hearing loss. Ossicular chain impingement increased with the size and number of dysplastic lesions. While sensorineural structures were unaffected, ColI(2.3+/Rs1+ cochleae had abnormally high osteoclast activity, together with elevated tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP activity and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (Rankl mRNA expression. ColI(2.3+/Rs1+ cochleae also showed decreased expression of Sclerostin (Sost, an antagonist of the Wnt signaling pathway that normally increases bone formation. The osteocyte canalicular networks of ColI(2.3+/Rs1+ cochleae were disrupted and showed abnormal osteocyte morphology. The osteocytes in the ColI(2.3+/Rs1+ cochleae showed increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13 and TRAP, both of which can support osteocyte-mediated peri-lacunar remodeling. Thus, while the ossicular chain impingement is sufficient to account for the progressive hearing loss in fibrous dysplasia, the deregulation of bone remodeling extends to the

  16. Models of plasma membrane organization can be applied to mitochondrial membranes to target human health and disease with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza Shaikh, Saame; Brown, David A

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), abundant in fish oil, have potential for treating symptoms associated with inflammatory and metabolic disorders; therefore, it is essential to determine their fundamental molecular mechanisms. Recently, several labs have demonstrated the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts anti-inflammatory effects by targeting the molecular organization of plasma membrane microdomains. Here we briefly review the evidence that DHA reorganizes the spatial distribution of microdomains in several model systems. We then emphasize how models on DHA and plasma membrane microdomains can be applied to mitochondrial membranes. We discuss the role of DHA acyl chains in regulating mitochondrial lipid-protein clustering, and how these changes alter several aspects of mitochondrial function. In particular, we summarize effects of DHA on mitochondrial respiration, electron leak, permeability transition, and mitochondrial calcium handling. Finally, we conclude by postulating future experiments that will augment our understanding of DHA-dependent membrane organization in health and disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Changing perspectives in medical practice: disruptive innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterick, Zachary R; Pradhan, Sala R; Paterick, Timothy E; Waterhouse, Blake E

    2009-01-01

    Disruptive innovation represents a business model that identifies a market location and increases consumer options. Retail clinics may represent a disruptive healthcare innovation that identifies strategies to reduce the cost of healthcare at the primary care level. The future of healthcare demands disruptive innovation that will allow for the 50 million uninsured members of our society to receive medical care. Disruptive innovative solutions need to ensure access, quality, and reasonable cost. Retail clinics represent the tip of the iceberg in disruptive innovative thinking. The obstacles that retail clinics must solve will be lessons learned for those that identify future innovative techniques.

  18. Evaluating the economic damages of transport disruptions using a transnational and interregional input-output model for Japan, China, and South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimoto, Hiroshi; Shibusawa, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Yuzuru

    2017-10-01

    Damage to transportation networks as a result of natural disasters can lead to economic losses due to lost trade along those links in addition to the costs of damage to the infrastructure itself. This study evaluates the economic damages of transport disruptions such as highways, tunnels, bridges, and ports using a transnational and interregional Input-Output Model that divides the world into 23 regions: 9 regions in Japan, 7 regions in China, and 4 regions in Korea, Taiwan, ASEAN5, and the USA to allow us to focus on Japan's regional and international links. In our simulation, economic ripple effects of both international and interregional transport disruptions are measured by changes in the trade coefficients in the input-output model. The simulation showed that, in the case of regional links in Japan, a transport disruption in the Kanmon Straits causes the most damage to our targeted world, resulting in economic damage of approximately 36.3 billion. In the case of international links among Japan, China, and Korea, damage to the link between Kanto in Japan and Huabei in China causes economic losses of approximately 31.1 billion. Our result highlights the importance of disaster prevention in the Kanmon Straits, Kanto, and Huabei to help ensure economic resilience.

  19. Short-term exposure to dim light at night disrupts rhythmic behaviors and causes neurodegeneration in fly models of tauopathy and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mari; Subramanian, Manivannan; Cho, Yun-Ho; Kim, Gye-Hyeong; Lee, Eunil; Park, Joong-Jean

    2018-01-08

    The accumulation and aggregation of phosphorylated tau proteins in the brain are the hallmarks for the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition, disruptions in circadian rhythms (CRs) with altered sleep-wake cycles, dysregulation of locomotion, and increased memory defects have been reported in patients with AD. Drosophila flies that have an overexpression of human tau protein in neurons exhibit most of the symptoms of human patients with AD, including locomotion defects and neurodegeneration. Using the fly model for tauopathy/AD, we investigated the effects of an exposure to dim light at night on AD symptoms. We used a light intensity of 10 lux, which is considered the lower limit of light pollution in many countries. After the tauopathy flies were exposed to the dim light at night for 3 days, the flies showed disrupted CRs, altered sleep-wake cycles due to increased pTau proteins and neurodegeneration, in the brains of the AD flies. The results indicate that the nighttime exposure of tauopathy/AD model Drosophila flies to dim light disrupted CR and sleep-wake behavior and promoted neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Interaction of a peptide derived from C-terminus of human TRPA1 channel with model membranes mimicking the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witschas, Katja; Jobin, Marie-Lise; Korkut, Dursun Nizam; Vladan, Maria Magdalena; Salgado, Gilmar; Lecomte, Sophie; Vlachova, Viktorie; Alves, Isabel D

    2015-05-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel (TRPA1) belongs to the TRP cation channel superfamily that responds to a panoply of stimuli such as changes in temperature, calcium levels, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and lipid mediators among others. The TRP superfamily has been implicated in diverse pathological states including neurodegenerative disorders, kidney diseases, inflammation, pain and cancer. The intracellular C-terminus is an important regulator of TRP channel activity. Studies with this and other TRP superfamily members have shown that the C-terminus association with lipid bilayer alters channel sensitivity and activation, especially interactions occurring through basic residues. Nevertheless, it is not yet clear how this process takes place and which regions in the C-terminus would be responsible for such membrane recognition. With that in mind, herein the first putative membrane interacting region of the C-terminus of human TRPA1, (corresponding to a 29 residue peptide, IAEVQKHASLKRIAMQVELHTSLEKKLPL) named H1 due to its potential helical character was chosen for studies of membrane interaction. The affinity of H1 to lipid membranes, H1 structural changes occurring upon this interaction as well as effects of this interaction in lipid organization and integrity were investigated using a biophysical approach. Lipid models systems composed of zwitterionic and anionic lipids, namely those present in the lipid membrane inner leaflet, where H1 is prone to interact, where used. The study reveals a strong interaction and affinity of H1 as well as peptide structuration especially with membranes containing anionic lipids. Moreover, the interactions and peptide structure adoption are headgroup specific. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of the mass-based UNIQUAC model to membrane systems: A critical revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chovau, S.; Van der Bruggen, B.; Luis, P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► UNIQUAC model in mass-based terms is considered for the description of sorption equilibria in membrane systems. ► Model validation of molar and mass-based model is performed on simple (vapor + liquid) equilibrium. ► Discrepancy is found between molar and mass-based model, which is attributed to an incorrect conversion. ► Novel model based on correct thermodynamics is provided for future research. - Abstract: The UNIQUAC model is very suitable in describing (liquid + liquid) as well as (vapor + liquid) equilibrium for a wide range of systems. It can be extended to (solvent + polymer) systems for describing sorption equilibria. The original model is expressed in molar-based terms, but requires knowledge of structural parameters and molar masses of all components. Since these cannot always be easily determined for membranes, a conversion to mass-based terms is often performed, which eliminates this issue. Many studies use this model to calculate sorption equilibria in (solvent + polymer) systems. Nevertheless, in this work the conversion from molar to mass-based parameters is postulated to be erroneous. This even leads to an incorrect description of simple (vapor + liquid) equilibrium of pure liquid mixtures and hence it is advised not to use this model for further modeling of sorption equilibrium in (solvent + polymer) systems. In this paper, the errors in the conversion are pinpointed, and the effects it can have on the description of (vapor + liquid) equilibrium, if used improvident, are demonstrated. Furthermore, it is shown that in fact a simple and straightforward conversion can be performed. Finally, in the case when polymers are involved, an adaption and simplification to the model was successfully applied.

  2. Investigation of biological and fouling characteristics of submerged membrane bioreactor process for wastewater treatment by model sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J W; Ahn, K H; Lee, Y H; Lim, B R; Kim, J Y

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a mathematical model for the submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) was developed. The activated sludge model No. 1 (ASM1) was modified to be suitable for describing the characteristics of the SMBR, and the resistance-in-series model was integrated into the ASM1 to describe membrane fouling. Using the newly developed model, the biological and fouling characteristics of the submerged membrane bioreactor process for wastewater treatment was investigated by sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity of effluent COD and nitrogen, TSS in the reactor and membrane flux with respect to each parameter (K(h), mu(H), K(S), K(NHH), K(NOH), b(H), Y(H), mu(A), K(NHA), b(A), Y(A), K(m) and alpha) was investigated by model simulation. As a result, the most important factors affecting membrane fouling were hydrolysis rate constant (K(h)) and cross-flow effect coefficient (K(m)). Heterotrophic yield coefficient (Y(H)) had a great influence on effluent quality. Effluent quality was also somewhat sensitive to K(h). Peculiar operating conditions of the SMBR such as long solids retention time (SRT), absolute retention of solids by membrane and high biomass concentration in bioreactor could explain these model simulation results. The model developed in this study would be very helpful to optimize operating conditions as well as design parameters for a SMBR system.

  3. Oxygen Transfer Model for a Flow-Through Hollow-Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, K. R.; Little, J. C.; Smets, Barth F.

    2009-01-01

    A mechanistic oxygen transfer model was developed and applied to a flow-through hollow-fiber membrane-aerated biofilm reactor. Model results are compared to conventional clean water test results as well as performance data obtained when an actively nitrifying biofilm was present on the fibers......-liquid interface was the most accurate of the predictive models (overpredicted by a factor of 1.1) while a coefficient determined by measuring bulk liquid dissolved oxygen underpredicted the oxygen transfer by a factor of 3. The mechanistic model was found to be an adequate tool for design because it used....... With the biofilm present, oxygen transfer efficiencies between 30 and 55% were calculated from the measured data including the outlet gas oxygen concentration, ammonia consumption stoichiometry, and oxidized nitrogen production stoichiometry, all of which were in reasonable agreement. The mechanistic model...

  4. Dynamic Model of the High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    The present work involves the development of a model for predicting the dynamic temperature of a high temperature proton exchange membrane (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. The model is developed to test different thermal control strategies before implementing them in the actual system. The test system....... The temperature is predicted in these three parts, where they also are measured. The heat balance of the system involves a fuel cell model to describe the heat added by the fuel cells when a current is drawn. Furthermore the model also predicts the temperatures when heating the stack with external heating...... elements for start-up, heat conduction through stack insulation, cathode air convection, and heating of the inlet gases in the manifold. Various measurements are presented to validate the model predictions of the stack temperatures....

  5. Validation of computational non-Newtonian fluid model for membrane bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Skov, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems are often considered as the wastewater treatment method of the future due to its high effluent quality. One of the main problems with such systems is a relative large energy consumption, which has led to research in this specific area. A powerful tool for optimiz......Membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems are often considered as the wastewater treatment method of the future due to its high effluent quality. One of the main problems with such systems is a relative large energy consumption, which has led to research in this specific area. A powerful tool...... for optimizing MBR-systems is computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling, giving the ability to describe the flow in the systems. A parameter which is often neglected in such models is the non-Newtonian properties of active sludge, which is of great importance for MBR systems since they operate at sludge...... are measured with a Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA). The CFD model is found capable of modelling the correct velocities in a range of setups, making CFD models a powerful tool for optimisation of MBR systems....

  6. Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane Assay: A 3D Animal Model for Study of Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xue; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ming, Huixin; Zhang, Jinyan; Huang, Guangwu; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a highly invasive and metastatic head and neck cancer. However, mechanistic study of the invasion and metastasis of NPC has been hampered by the lack of proper in vivo models. We established an in vivo chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model to study NPC tumor biology. We found 100% micro-tumor formation 3 days after inoculation with NPC cell lines (4/4) or primary tumor biopsy tissue (35/35). The transplanted NPC micro-tumors grew on CAMs with extracellular matrix interaction and induced angiogenesis. In addition, the CAM model could be used to study the growth of transplanted NPC tumors and also several important steps of metastasis, including tumor invasion by detecting the extent of basement membrane penetration, tumor angiogenesis by analyzing the area of neo-vessels, and tumor metastasis by quantifying tumor cells in distant organs. We established and described a feasible, easy-to-manipulate and reliable CAM model for in vivo study of NPC tumor biology. This model closely simulates the clinical features of NPC growth, progression and metastasis and could help elucidate the biological mechanisms of the growth pattern and invasion of NPC cells and in quantitative assessment of angiogenesis and cell intravasation.

  7. Modelling of Multi-Agent Systems: Experiences with Membrane Computing and Future Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Kefalas

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Formal modelling of Multi-Agent Systems (MAS is a challenging task due to high complexity, interaction, parallelism and continuous change of roles and organisation between agents. In this paper we record our research experience on formal modelling of MAS. We review our research throughout the last decade, by describing the problems we have encountered and the decisions we have made towards resolving them and providing solutions. Much of this work involved membrane computing and classes of P Systems, such as Tissue and Population P Systems, targeted to the modelling of MAS whose dynamic structure is a prominent characteristic. More particularly, social insects (such as colonies of ants, bees, etc., biology inspired swarms and systems with emergent behaviour are indicative examples for which we developed formal MAS models. Here, we aim to review our work and disseminate our findings to fellow researchers who might face similar challenges and, furthermore, to discuss important issues for advancing research on the application of membrane computing in MAS modelling.

  8. Loss of Dendritic Complexity Precedes Neurodegeneration in a Mouse Model with Disrupted Mitochondrial Distribution in Mature Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo López-Doménech

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Correct mitochondrial distribution is critical for satisfying local energy demands and calcium buffering requirements and supporting key cellular processes. The mitochondrially targeted proteins Miro1 and Miro2 are important components of the mitochondrial transport machinery, but their specific roles in neuronal development, maintenance, and survival remain poorly understood. Using mouse knockout strategies, we demonstrate that Miro1, as opposed to Miro2, is the primary regulator of mitochondrial transport in both axons and dendrites. Miro1 deletion leads to depletion of mitochondria from distal dendrites but not axons, accompanied by a marked re