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Sample records for model lung surfactant

  1. Model Lung Surfactant Films: Why Composition Matters

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    Selladurai, Sahana L.; Miclette Lamarche, Renaud; Schmidt, Rolf; DeWolf, Christine E.

    2016-10-18

    Lung surfactant replacement therapies, Survanta and Infasurf, and two lipid-only systems both containing saturated and unsaturated phospholipids and one containing additional palmitic acid were used to study the impact of buffered saline on the surface activity, morphology, rheology, and structure of Langmuir monolayer model membranes. Isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy show that buffered saline subphases induce a film expansion, except when the cationic protein, SP-B, is present in sufficient quantities to already screen electrostatic repulsion, thus limiting the effect of changing pH and adding counterions. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction results indicate an expansion not only of the liquid expanded phase but also an expansion of the lattice of the condensed phase. The film expansion corresponded in all cases with a significant reduction in the viscosity and elasticity of the films. The viscoelastic parameters are dominated by liquid expanded phase properties and do not appear to be dependent on the structure of the condensed phase domains in a phase separated film. The results highlight that the choice of subphase and film composition is important for meaningful interpretations of measurements using model systems.

  2. Lung surfactant protein A (SP-A) interactions with model lung surfactant lipids and an SP-B fragment.

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    Sarker, Muzaddid; Jackman, Donna; Booth, Valerie

    2011-06-07

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is the most abundant protein component of lung surfactant, a complex mixture of proteins and lipids. SP-A performs host defense activities and modulates the biophysical properties of surfactant in concerted action with surfactant protein B (SP-B). Current models of lung surfactant mechanism generally assume SP-A functions in its octadecameric form. However, one of the findings of this study is that when SP-A is bound to detergent and lipid micelles that mimic lung surfactant phospholipids, it exists predominantly as smaller oligomers, in sharp contrast to the much larger forms observed when alone in water. These investigations were carried out in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecylphosphocholine (DPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylcholine (LMPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (LMPG), and mixed LMPC + LMPG micelles, using solution and diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We have also probed SP-A's interaction with Mini-B, a biologically active synthetic fragment of SP-B, in the presence of micelles. Despite variations in Mini-B's own interactions with micelles of different compositions, SP-A is found to interact with Mini-B in all micelle systems and perhaps to undergo a further structural rearrangement upon interacting with Mini-B. The degree of SP-A-Mini-B interaction appears to be dependent on the type of lipid headgroup and is likely mediated through the micelles, rather than direct binding.

  3. Surfactant dysfunction in lung contusion with and without superimposed gastric aspiration in a rat model.

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    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Davidson, Bruce A; Knight, Paul R; Wang, Zhengdong; Helinski, Jadwiga; Chess, Patricia R; Notter, Robert H

    2008-11-01

    This study investigates surfactant dysfunction in rats with lung contusion (LC) induced by blunt chest trauma. Rats at 24 h postcontusion had a decreased percent content of large surfactant aggregates in cell-free bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and altered large-aggregate composition with decreased phosphatidylcholine (PC), increased lyso-PC, and increased protein compared with uninjured controls. The surface activity of large aggregates on a pulsating bubble surfactometer was also severely impaired at 24 h postcontusion. Decreases in large surfactant aggregate content and surface activity were improved, but still apparent, at 48 and 72 h postcontusion compared with uninjured control rats and returned to normal by 96 h postcontusion. The functional importance of surfactant abnormalities in LC injury was documented in pilot studies showing that exogenous surfactant replacement at 24 h postcontusion improved inflation/deflation lung volumes. Additional experiments investigated a clinically relevant combination of LC plus gastric aspiration (combined acid and small gastric food particles) and found reductions in large surfactant aggregates in BAL similar to those for LC. However, rats given LC + combined acid and small gastric food particles versus LC had more severe surfactant dysfunction based on decreases in surface activity and alterations in large aggregate composition. Combined data for all animal groups had strong statistical correlations between surfactant dysfunction (increased minimum surface tension, decreased large aggregates in BAL, decreased aggregate PC, and increased aggregate lyso-PC) and the severity of inflammatory lung injury (increased total protein, albumin, protein/phospholipid ratio, neutrophils, and erythrocytes in BAL plus increased whole lung myeloperoxidase activity). These results show that surfactant dysfunction is important in the pathophysiology of LC with or without concurrent gastric aspiration and provides a rationale for surfactant

  4. Paraquat poisoning: an experimental model of dose-dependent acute lung injury due to surfactant dysfunction

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    M.F.R. Silva

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the most characteristic feature of paraquat poisoning is lung damage, a prospective controlled study was performed on excised rat lungs in order to estimate the intensity of lesion after different doses. Twenty-five male, 2-3-month-old non-SPF Wistar rats, divided into 5 groups, received paraquat dichloride in a single intraperitoneal injection (0, 1, 5, 25, or 50 mg/kg body weight 24 h before the experiment. Static pressure-volume (PV curves were performed in air- and saline-filled lungs; an estimator of surface tension and tissue works was computed by integrating the area of both curves and reported as work/ml of volume displacement. Paraquat induced a dose-dependent increase of inspiratory surface tension work that reached a significant two-fold order of magnitude for 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight (P<0.05, ANOVA, sparing lung tissue. This kind of lesion was probably due to functional abnormalities of the surfactant system, as was shown by the increase in the hysteresis of the paraquat groups at the highest doses. Hence, paraquat poisoning provides a suitable model of acute lung injury with alveolar instability that can be easily used in experimental protocols of mechanical ventilation

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of phase and structural transitions in model lung surfactant mixtures

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    Duncan, Susan L.

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins that reduces and regulates the surface tension in the lungs, thereby decreasing the work of breathing. A thorough understanding of LS function is critical to the development and optimization of synthetic surfactants for the treatment of neonatal and adult respiratory distress syndrome. We have utilized coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulation to study the dynamic, hysteretic changes occurring in the structure and phase of model surfactant mixtures with varying temperature, pressure and composition. In particular, we have studied the effects of the LS components palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG), palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC), palmitic acid (PA), cholesterol, and two surface-active proteins SP-B 1--25 (the 25-residue N-terminal fragment of SP-B), and SP-C on model surfactant monolayers containing the primary lipid component dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The results indicate that POPG, POPC, SP-B1--25 and SP-C act as fluidizers and PA and cholesterol act as condensing agents, which change the phase-transition temperature, LC-LE phase distribution, and the extent of hysteresis. To explore the role of LS proteins SP-B and SP-C in storing and redelivering lipid from lipid monolayers during the compression and re-expansion occurring in lungs during breathing, we have simulated 2D-to-3D transitions at the interface. These simulations show that at near-zero surface tension the presence of a fluidizing agent, such as POPG, SP-C, or SP-B 1--25 decreases the monolayers resistance to bending allowing the monolayers to form large undulations and ultimately folds. Another folding mechanism is also observed in monolayers containing peptides, involving the lipid-mediated aggregation of the peptides into a defect, from which the fold can nucleate. The occurrence of folding depends on the hydrophobic character of the peptides; if the number of hydrophobic residues is decreased

  6. Comparison of exogenous surfactant therapy, mechanical ventilation with high end-expiratory pressure and partial liquid ventilation in a model of acute lung injury

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    A. Hartog (Anneke); G.F. Vazquez de Anda; D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik); U. Kaisers; S.J.C. Verbrugge (Serge); R. Schnabel; B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe have compared three treatment strategies, that aim to prevent repetitive alveolar collapse, for their effect on gas exchange, lung mechanics, lung injury, protein transfer into the alveoli and surfactant system, in a model of acute lung injury. In adult r

  7. Surfactant gene polymorphisms and interstitial lung diseases

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    Pantelidis Panagiotis

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, which is present in the alveolar lining fluid and is essential for normal lung function. Alterations in surfactant composition have been reported in several interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Furthermore, a mutation in the surfactant protein C gene that results in complete absence of the protein has been shown to be associated with familial ILD. The role of surfactant in lung disease is therefore drawing increasing attention following the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying its surface expression and the proof of surfactant abnormalities in ILD.

  8. Surfactant for pediatric acute lung injury.

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    Willson, Douglas F; Chess, Patricia R; Notter, Robert H

    2008-06-01

    This article reviews exogenous surfactant therapy and its use in mitigating acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in infants, children, and adults. Biophysical and animal research documenting surfactant dysfunction in ALI/ARDS is described, and the scientific rationale for treatment with exogenous surfactant is discussed. Major emphasis is placed on reviewing clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients who have ALI/ARDS. Particular advantages from surfactant therapy in direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes are described. Also discussed are additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactants in ALI/ARDS.

  9. Role of lung surfactant in respiratory disease: current knowledge in large animal medicine.

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    Christmann, U; Buechner-Maxwell, V A; Witonsky, S G; Hite, R D

    2009-01-01

    Lung surfactant is produced by type II alveolar cells as a mixture of phospholipids, surfactant proteins, and neutral lipids. Surfactant lowers alveolar surface tension and is crucial for the prevention of alveolar collapse. In addition, surfactant contributes to smaller airway patency and improves mucociliary clearance. Surfactant-specific proteins are part of the innate immune defense mechanisms of the lung. Lung surfactant alterations have been described in a number of respiratory diseases. Surfactant deficiency (quantitative deficit of surfactant) in premature animals causes neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Surfactant dysfunction (qualitative changes in surfactant) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome and asthma. Analysis of surfactant from amniotic fluid allows assessment of fetal lung maturity (FLM) in the human fetus and exogenous surfactant replacement therapy is part of the standard care in premature human infants. In contrast to human medicine, use and success of FLM testing or surfactant replacement therapy remain limited in veterinary medicine. Lung surfactant has been studied in large animal models of human disease. However, only a few reports exist on lung surfactant alterations in naturally occurring respiratory disease in large animals. This article gives a general review on the role of lung surfactant in respiratory disease followed by an overview of our current knowledge on surfactant in large animal veterinary medicine.

  10. Pulmonary surfactant and lung transplantation

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    Erasmus, Michiel Elardus

    1997-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lowers the surface tension at the air-water interface inside the alveolus. This is achieved by adsorption of surfactant phospholipids at the air-water interface, a process controlled by surfactant-associated proteins, such as SP-A. In this way, surfactant prevents collapse of th

  11. Surfactant nebulisation : lung function, surfactant distribution and pulmonary blood flow distribution in lung lavaged rabbits

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    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Surfactant nebulisation is a promising alternative to surfactant instillation in newborns with the respiratory distress syndrome. Although less surfactant is deposited in the lung, it improves gas exchange, probably due to a superior distribution. We hypothesize that a more uniform distri

  12. Surfactant nebulisation : lung function, surfactant distribution and pulmonary blood flow distribution in lung lavaged rabbits

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    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Surfactant nebulisation is a promising alternative to surfactant instillation in newborns with the respiratory distress syndrome. Although less surfactant is deposited in the lung, it improves gas exchange, probably due to a superior distribution. We hypothesize that a more uniform distri

  13. Exogenous surfactant application in a rat lung ischemia reperfusion injury model: effects on edema formation and alveolar type II cells

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    Richter Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prophylactic exogenous surfactant therapy is a promising way to attenuate the ischemia and reperfusion (I/R injury associated with lung transplantation and thereby to decrease the clinical occurrence of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, there is little information on the mode by which exogenous surfactant attenuates I/R injury of the lung. We hypothesized that exogenous surfactant may act by limiting pulmonary edema formation and by enhancing alveolar type II cell and lamellar body preservation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of exogenous surfactant therapy on the formation of pulmonary edema in different lung compartments and on the ultrastructure of the surfactant producing alveolar epithelial type II cells. Methods Rats were randomly assigned to a control, Celsior (CE or Celsior + surfactant (CE+S group (n = 5 each. In both Celsior groups, the lungs were flush-perfused with Celsior and subsequently exposed to 4 h of extracorporeal ischemia at 4°C and 50 min of reperfusion at 37°C. The CE+S group received an intratracheal bolus of a modified natural bovine surfactant at a dosage of 50 mg/kg body weight before flush perfusion. After reperfusion (Celsior groups or immediately after sacrifice (Control, the lungs were fixed by vascular perfusion and processed for light and electron microscopy. Stereology was used to quantify edematous changes as well as alterations of the alveolar epithelial type II cells. Results Surfactant treatment decreased the intraalveolar edema formation (mean (coefficient of variation: CE: 160 mm3 (0.61 vs. CE+S: 4 mm3 (0.75; p 3 (0.90 vs. CE+S: 0 mm3; p 3 (0.39 vs. CE+S: 268 mm3 (0.43; p 3(0.10 and CE+S (481 μm3(0.10 compared with controls (323 μm3(0.07; p Conclusion Intratracheal surfactant application before I/R significantly reduces the intraalveolar edema formation and development of atelectases but leads to an increased development of

  14. Aberrant lung remodeling in a mouse model of surfactant dysregulation induced by modulation of the Abca3 gene.

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    Beers, Michael F; Knudsen, Lars; Tomer, Yaniv; Maronn, Julian; Zhao, Ming; Ochs, Matthias; Mulugeta, Surafel

    2017-03-01

    The lipid transporter, ATP binding cassette class A3 (ABCA3), plays a critical role in the biogenesis of alveolar type 2 (AT2) cell lamellar bodies (LBs). A relatively large number of mutations in the ABCA3 gene have been identified in association with diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD), the most common of which is a missense mutation (valine substitution for lysine at residue 292 (ABCA3(E292V))) that leads to functional impairment of the transporter in vitro. The consequences of ABCA3(E292)(V) gene expression in vivo are unknown. To address this question, we developed mouse models expressing ABCA3(E292V) knocked-in to the endogenous mouse locus. The parental (F1) mouse line (mAbca3(E292)(V)) that retained an intronic pgk-Neo selection cassette (inserted in reverse orientation) (mAbca3(E292)(V)-rNeo) demonstrated an allele dependent extracellular surfactant phospholipid (PL) deficiency. We hypothesize that this PL deficiency leads to aberrant parenchymal remodeling contributing to the pathophysiology of the DPLD phenotype. Compared to wild type littermates, baseline studies of mice homozygous for the pgk-Neo insert (mAbca3(E292)(V)-rNeo(+/)(+)) revealed nearly 50% reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) PL content that was accompanied by quantitative reduction in AT2 LB size with a compensatory increase in LB number. The phenotypic alteration in surfactant lipid homeostasis resulted in an early macrophage predominant alveolitis which peaked at 8 weeks of age. This was followed by age-dependent development of histological DPLD characterized initially by peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration and culminating in both an emphysema-like phenotype (which included stereologically quantifiable reductions in both alveolar septal surface area and volume of septal wall tissue) plus foci of trichrome-positive collagen deposition together with substantial proliferation of hyperplastic AT2 cells. In addition to spontaneous lung remodeling, mABCA3(E292V)-rNeo mice

  15. The use of surfactant in lung transplantation.

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    Amital, Anat; Shitrit, David; Raviv, Yael; Saute, Milton; Medalion, Benjamin; Bakal, Llana; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2008-12-15

    Lung transplantation impairs surfactant activity, which may contribute to primary graft dysfunction (PGD). Prompted by studies in animals and a few reports in humans, this study sought to determine if the administration of surfactant during transplantation serves as an effective preventive measure. An open, randomized, controlled prospective design was used. Forty-two patients scheduled for single (n=38) or double (n=4) lung transplantation at a major tertiary medical center were randomly assigned to receive, or not, intraoperative surfactant treatment. In the treated group, bovine surfactant was administered at a dose of 20 mg phospholipids/kg through bronchoscope after the establishment of bronchial anastomosis. The groups were compared for oxygenation (PaO2/FiO2), chest X-ray findings, PGD grade, and outcome. Compared with the untreated group, the patients who received surfactant were characterized by better postoperative oxygenation mean PaO2/FiO2 (418.8+/-123.8 vs. 277.9+/-165 mm Hg, P=0.004), better chest radiograph score, a lower PGD grade (0.66 vs. 1.86, P=0.005), fewer cases of severe PGD (1 patient vs. 12, P<0.05), earlier extubation (by 2.2 hr; 95% CI 1.1-4.3 hr, P=0.027), shorter intensive care unit stay (by 2.3 days; 95% CI 1.47-3.74 days, P=0.001), and better vital capacity at 1 month (61% vs. 50%, P=0.022). One treated and 2 untreated patients died during the first postoperative month. Surfactant instillation during lung transplantation improves oxygenation, prevents PGD, shortens intubation time, and enhances early posttransplantation recovery. Further, larger studies are needed to assess whether surfactant should be used routinely in lung transplantation.

  16. Lung Surfactant and Its Use in Lung Diseases

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    O. A. Rosenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The review considers the present views of lung surfactant (LS functions with emphasis on its protective and barrier properties and ability to maintain local and adaptive immunity. The composition of commercial LS formulations is analyzed. Data on qualitative and quantitative LS abnormalities are presented in various diseases in neonates and adults. The results of clinical trials of different LS formulations in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults are analyzed in detail. Recent data on the results of and prospects for surfactant therapy for bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary tuberculosis are given. 

  17. Untapped therapeutic potential of surfactant proteins: is there a case for recombinant SP-D supplementation in neonatal lung disease?

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    Clark, Howard W

    2010-06-01

    Whilst pulmonary surfactant therapy has been highly successful in reducing mortality from respiratory distress syndrome of the newborn, a significant proportion of infants born at less than 28 weeks' gestation develop neonatal chronic lung disease. This has a complex pathogenesis but infection, inflammation, oxygen toxicity and ventilator-induced lung injury in the premature infant are all recognised risk factors for its development. Current surfactant therapies in clinical use do not contain all surfactant components and lack the hydrophilic surfactant proteins A and D. These proteins are known to have important roles in surfactant homeostasis and in protecting the lung against inflammation. This review examines the evidence from animal models supporting a role for surfactant protein-D in particular in reducing inflammation in the lung and speculates that supplementation of current surfactant therapies with recombinant forms of surfactant protein-D may help offset the risk of development of chronic lung disease.

  18. Newtonian to non-Newtonian flow transition in lung surfactants

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    Sadoughi, Amir; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2010-11-01

    The lining of normal lungs is covered by surfactants, because otherwise the surface tension of the aqueous layer would be too large to allow breathing. A lack of functioning surfactants can lead to respiratory distress syndrome, a potentially fatal condition in both premature infants and adults, and a major cause of death in the US and world-wide. We use a home-built Brewster angle microscope on an optically accessible deep channel viscometer to simultaneously observe the mesoscale structures of DPPC, the primary constituent of lung surfactant, on water surface and measure the interfacial velocity field. The measured interfacial velocity is compared to Navier-Stokes computations with the Boussinesq-Scriven surface model. Results show that DPPC monolayer behaves i) purely elastically at low surface pressures on water, ii) viscoelastically at modest surface pressures, exhibiting non-zero surface shear viscosity that is independent of the shear rate and flow inertia, and iii) at surface pressures approaching film collapse, DPPC loses its fluid characteristics, and a Newtonian surface model no longer captures its hydrodynamics.

  19. [Pulmonary surfactant homeostasis associated genetic abnormalities and lung diseases].

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    Jiang, Xiaojing; Sun, Xiuzhu; Du, Weihua; Hao, Haisheng; Zhao, Xueming; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Huabin; Liu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) is synthesized and secreted by alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells, which is a complex compound formed by proteins and lipids. Surfactant participates in a range of physiological processes such as reducing the surface tension, keeping the balance of alveolar fluid, maintaining normal alveolar morphology and conducting host defense. Genetic disorders of the surfactant homeostasis genes may result in lack of surfactant or cytotoxicity, and lead to multiple lung diseases in neonates, children and adults, including neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, interstitial pneumonia, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper has provided a review for the functions and processes of pulmonary surfactant metabolism, as well as the connection between disorders of surfactant homeostasis genes and lung diseases.

  20. Lung preservation in experimental ischemia/reperfusion injury and lung transplantation: a comparison of natural and synthetic surfactants.

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    Knudsen, Lars; Boxler, Laura; Mühlfeld, Christian; Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Becker, Laura; Bussinger, Christine; von Stietencron, Immanuel; Madershahian, Navid; Richter, Joachim; Wahlers, Thorsten; Wittwer, Thorsten; Ochs, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant inactivation results from ischemia/reperfusion injury and plays a major role in the pathogenesis of primary graft dysfunction after clinical lung transplantation. Thus, prophylactic administration of exogenous surfactant preparations before the onset of ischemia/reperfusion has proven to be effective in preserving pulmonary structure and function. Various natural and synthetic surfactant preparations exhibit differences regarding the biochemical composition and biophysical properties. In this study we compared the efficacy of preservation of pulmonary structure and function of the natural surfactant preparations Curosurf and Survanta to that of a synthetic surfactant containing an analog of surfactant protein C (SPC-33) in a rat model of ischemia/reperfusion injury. The oxygenation capacity and peak inspiratory pressure during the reperfusion period were recorded. By applying design-based stereology at the light- and electron-microscopic level, pathologic alterations, including alveolar edema, injury of the blood-air barrier and the intra-alveolar as well as intracellular surfactant pools, were quantified. The best oxygenation and preservation of lung structure was achieved with Curosurf. Survanta treatment was associated with the most severe injury of the blood-air barrier, and SPC-33 demonstrated signs of microatelectasis. The intra-alveolar surfactant pool after Curosurf and SPC-33 was dominated by active surfactant subtypes, whereas Survanta was associated with the highest fraction of inactive surfactant. The intracellular surfactant pool did not show any differences between the treatment groups. Taken together, Curosurf achieved the best structural and functional lung preservation, whereas Survanta was inferior to both Curosurf and SPC-33. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Liposome phospholipid substitution and lung function in surfactant deprived rats].

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    Obladen, M

    1985-01-01

    In vivo activity of an artificial surfactant was studied in surfactant depleted rats. After tenfold alveolar lavage, PaO2, tidal volume, and compliance of the respiratory system fell to one third of initial value. Substitution of large unilamellar vesicles containing 90% Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and 10% unsaturated phosphatidylglycerol largely restored oxygenation and lung mechanics in most animals. Complete normalization with weaning from the ventilator, however, was achieved neither with liposomes nor with natural surfactant concentrate.

  2. Physical principles for developing a synthetic lung surfactant

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    Jaehnig, F. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biologie, Tuebingen (Germany, F.R.)); Obladen, M. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Kinderklinik)

    1984-01-01

    The physical principles for developing a synthetic lung surfactant to treat the respiratory distress syndrome are discussed. Requirements for the lipid composition and preparation of the synthetic surfactant are detailed, leading to the conclusion that a suspension of large unilamellar vesicles consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and a small amount of unsaturated lipid is a promising choice.

  3. Pulmonary Surfactants for Acute and Chronic Lung Diseases (Part II

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    O. A. Rozenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Part 2 of the review considers the problem of surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in adults and young and old children. It gives information on the results of surfactant therapy and prevention of ARDS in patients with severe concurrent trauma, inhalation injuries, complications due to complex expanded chest surgery, or severe pneumonias, including bilateral pneumonia in the presence of A/H1N1 influenza. There are data on the use of a surfactant in obstetric care and prevention of primary graft dysfunction during lung transplantation. The results of longterm use of surfactant therapy in Russia, suggesting that death rates from ARDS may be substantially reduced (to 20% are discussed. Examples of surfactant therapy for other noncritical lung diseases, such as permanent athelectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and asthma, as well tuberculosis, are also considered.

  4. The Role of Surfactant in Lung Disease and Host Defense against Pulmonary Infections.

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    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life as it lines the alveoli to lower surface tension, thereby preventing atelectasis during breathing. Surfactant is enriched with a relatively unique phospholipid, termed dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, and four surfactant-associated proteins, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D. The hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, together with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, confer surface tension-lowering properties to the material. The more hydrophilic surfactant components, SP-A and SP-D, participate in pulmonary host defense and modify immune responses. Specifically, SP-A and SP-D bind and partake in the clearance of a variety of bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens and can dampen antigen-induced immune function of effector cells. Emerging data also show immunosuppressive actions of some surfactant-associated lipids, such as phosphatidylglycerol. Conversely, microbial pathogens in preclinical models impair surfactant synthesis and secretion, and microbial proteinases degrade surfactant-associated proteins. Deficiencies of surfactant components are classically observed in the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, where surfactant replacement therapies have been the mainstay of treatment. However, functional or compositional deficiencies of surfactant are also observed in a variety of acute and chronic lung disorders. Increased surfactant is seen in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, a disorder characterized by a functional deficiency of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor or development of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies. Genetic polymorphisms of some surfactant proteins such as SP-C are linked to interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we briefly review the composition, antimicrobial properties, and relevance of pulmonary surfactant to lung disorders and present its therapeutic implications.

  5. Characterization of Particulate Matter Transport across the Lung-Surfactant Barrier using Langmuir Monolayers

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    Eaton, Jeremy; Dennin, Michael; Levine, Alex; George, Steven

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the transport of particulate matter acros the lung using a monolayer of bovine lung surfactant tagged with NBD in conjunction with alveolar lung cells below the air-water interface. The monolaye dynamically compressed and expanded to induce phase transitions as well as buckling and folding. Polystyrene spheres ranging from 20 to 500 nm in diameter were tagged with fluorescent molecules and deposited on the monolayer. We will present results of preliminary studies of the transport of beads from the air-water surface to the lung cells through the monolayer. Characterization of the transfer will focus on differential fluorescence microscopy to distinguish uncoated beads from beads from beads coated with surfactant monolayers. The presence or absence of surfactant associated with the beads provides insight into potential transfer mechanisms and will serve as an input into models of the bead transfer. We gladly acknowledge the support of NSF grant DMR-1309402.

  6. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

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    Taku Fukuzawa

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+ and Ig-Hepta(-/- mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii surfactant secretion, and (iii a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space.

  7. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

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    Fukuzawa, Taku; Ishida, Junji; Kato, Akira; Ichinose, Taro; Ariestanti, Donna Maretta; Takahashi, Tomoya; Ito, Kunitoshi; Abe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2013-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+) and Ig-Hepta(-/-) mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i) balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii) surfactant secretion, and (iii) a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake) in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space.

  8. Maternal Baicalin Treatment Increases Fetal Lung Surfactant Phospholipids in Rats

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    Chung-Ming Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Baicalin is a flavonoid compound purified from the medicinal plant Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi and has been reported to stimulate surfactant protein (SP-A gene expression in human lung epithelial cell lines (H441. The aims of this study were to determine whether maternal baicalin treatment could increase lung surfactant production and induce lung maturation in fetal rats. This study was performed with timed pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats. One-day baicalin group mothers were injected intraperitoneally with baicalin (5 mg/kg/day on Day 18 of gestation. Two-day baicalin group mothers were injected intraperitoneally with baicalin (5 mg/kg/day on Days 17 and 18 of gestation. Control group mothers were injected with vehicle alone on Day 18 of gestation. On Day 19 of gestation, fetuses were delivered by cesarean section. Maternal treatment with 2-day baicalin significantly increased saturated phospholipid when compared with control group and total phospholipid in fetal lung tissue when compared with control and 1-day baicalin groups. Antenatal treatment with 2-day baicalin significantly increased maternal growth hormone when compared with control group. Fetal lung SP-A mRNA expression and maternal serum corticosterone levels were comparable among the three experimental groups. Maternal baicalin treatment increases pulmonary surfactant phospholipids of fetal rat lungs and the improvement was associated with increased maternal serum growth hormone. These results suggest that antenatal baicalin treatment might accelerate fetal rat lung maturation.

  9. Micropipette Technique Study of Natural and Synthetic Lung Surfactants at the Air–Water Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortiz, Elisa Parra; Kinoshita, K.; Needham, D.

    2016-01-01

    at microscopic air-water interfaces in real time and upon compression. Here, we characterized a series of animal-derived and synthetic lung surfactant formulations, including native surfactant obtained from porcine lungs (NS); the commercial Curosurf, Infasurf, and Survanta; and a synthetic Super Mini-B (SMB...... from 0.1 to 4%. Nevertheless, a direct correlation between the number of tubes and SMB contents was found, suggesting that SMB molecules are the promoters of tube nucleation in these membranes. A detailed analysis of the tube formation process was performed following previous models for the growth...

  10. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation is not superior to conventional mechanical ventilation in surfactant-treated rabbits with lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik); A. Hartog (Anneke); R. Schnabel; A. de Jaegere (Anne); B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to compare high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) with and without surfactant in the treatment of surfactant-deficient rabbits. A previously described saline lung lavage model of

  11. Porcine lung surfactant protein B gene (SFTPB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    The porcine surfactant protein B (SFTPB) is a single copy gene on chromosome 3. Three different cDNAs for the SFTPB have been isolated and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence comparison revealed six nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), four synonymous SNPs and an in-frame deletion of 69...

  12. Compatible solutes: ectoine and hydroxyectoine improve functional nanostructures in artificial lung surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Sachan, Amit Kumar; Kerth, Andreas; Lentzen, Georg; Neuhaus, Thorsten; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2011-12-01

    Ectoine and hydroxyectoine belong to the family of compatible solutes and are among the most abundant osmolytes in nature. These compatible solutes protect biomolecules from extreme conditions and maintain their native function. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of ectoine and hydroxyectoine on the domain structures of artificial lung surfactant films consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and the lung surfactant specific surfactant protein C (SP-C) in a molar ratio of 80:20:0.4. The pressure-area isotherms are found to be almost unchanged by both compatible solutes. The topology of the fluid domains shown by scanning force microscopy, which is thought to be responsible for the biophysical behavior under compression, however, is modified giving rise to the assumption that ectoine and hydroxyectoine are favorable for a proper lung surfactant function. This is further evidenced by the analysis of the insertion kinetics of lipid vesicles into the lipid-peptide monolayer, which is clearly enhanced in the presence of both compatible solutes. Thus, we could show that ectoine and hydroxyectoine enhance the function of lung surfactant in a simple model system, which might provide an additional rationale to inhalative therapy.

  13. Distribution of endotracheally instilled surfactant protein SP-C in lung-lavaged rabbits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto; de Leij, Louis; Curstedt, T; ter Haar, J G; Schoots, Coenraad; Wildevuur, Charles; Okken, Albert

    1991-01-01

    In lung-lavaged surfactant-deficient rabbits (n = 6) requiring artificial ventilation, porcine surfactant was instilled endotracheally. This resulted in improvement of lung function so that the animals could be weaned off artificial ventilation. The animals were killed 4 1/2 h after surfactant admin

  14. Lung remodeling in aging surfactant protein D deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Arkenau, Martina; Knudsen, Lars; Wedekind, Dirk; Ochs, Matthias

    2017-02-07

    Pulmonary surfactant, a mixture of lipids and proteins at the air-liquid interface of alveoli, prevents the lungs from collapsing due to surface tension. One constituent is surfactant-associated protein-D (SP-D), a protein involved in surfactant homeostasis and innate immunity. Mice deficient in SP-D (SP-D (-/-)) has been described as developing a characteristic phenotype which affects the surfactant system (including changes in the intra-cellular and intra-alveolar surfactant pool, alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages), lung architecture and its inflammatory state (development of an emphysema-like pathology, inflammatory cell infiltration). Furthermore, it has been described that these mice develop sub-pleural fibrosis and a thickening of alveolar septal walls. The aim of the present study was to systematically investigate the long term progression of this phenotype with special focus on parenchymal remodeling, whether there are progressive emphysematous changes and whether there is progressive septal wall thickening which might indicate the development of pulmonary fibrosis. By means of design-based stereology and light microscopy, lungs of wild type (wt) and SP-D (-/-) mice of four age groups (3, 6, 12 and ∼18 months) were investigated. The data do not suggest a relevant spontaneous pro-fibrotic remodeling or a destructive process in the aging SP-D (-/-) mice. We demonstrated neither a significant destructive emphysema nor significant thickening of alveolar septal walls, but the data suggest an increase in the number weighted mean alveolar volume in aging SP-D (-/-) mice without loss of alveoli or alveolar epithelial surface area per lung. This increase may reflect over-distension due to altered mechanical properties of alveoli. In the light of our findings and data from the literature, the question arises as to whether a lack of SP-D promotes structural changes in the lung which have been described as being associated with aging lungs

  15. Multilayers at the surface of solutions of exogenous lung surfactant: direct observation by neutron reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follows, D; Tiberg, F; Thomas, R K; Larsson, M

    2007-02-01

    Pharmacy-grade exogenous lung surfactant preparations of bovine and porcine origin, dispersed in physiological electrolyte solution have been studied. The organization and dynamics at the air/water interface at physiological temperature was analysed by neutron reflection. The results show that a well-defined surface phase is formed, consisting of a multilayer structure of lipid/protein bilayers alternating with aqueous layers, with a repetition period of about 70 A and correlation depths of 3 to >25 bilayers, depending on electrolyte composition and time. The experimental surfactant concentration of 0.15% (w/w) is far below that used in therapeutic application of exogenous surfactants and it is therefore likely that similar multilayer structures are also formed at the alveolar surface in the clinical situation during surfactant substitution therapy. Lung surfactant preparations in dry form swell in aqueous solution towards a limit of about 60% (w/w) of water, forming a lamellar liquid-crystalline phase above about 34 degrees C, which disperses into lamellar bodies at higher water concentrations. The lamellar spacings in the surface multilayers at the air/water interface are smaller than those in the saturated limit even though they are in contact with much greater water concentrations. The surface multilayers are laterally disordered in a way that is consistent with fragments of Lalpha-phase lamellae. The near surface layers of the multilayer structure have a significant protein content (only SP-B and SP-C are present in the preparations). The results demonstrate that a multilayer structure can be formed in exogenous surfactant even at very low concentrations and indicate that multilayers need to be incorporated into present interpretations of in vitro studies of similar lung surfactant preparations, which are largely based on monolayer models.

  16. Activity and biophysical inhibition resistance of a novel synthetic lung surfactant containing Super-Mini-B DATK peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Notter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/objectives. This study examines the surface activity, resistance to biophysical inhibition, and pulmonary efficacy of a synthetic lung surfactant containing glycerophospholipids combined with Super Mini-B (S-MB DATK, a novel and stable molecular mimic of lung surfactant protein (SP-B. The objective of the work is to test whether S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant has favorable biophysical and physiological activity for future use in treating surfactant deficiency or dysfunction in lung disease or injury.Methods. The structure of S-MB DATK peptide was analyzed by homology modeling and by FTIR spectroscopy. The in vitro surface activity and inhibition resistance of synthetic S-MB DATK surfactant was assessed in the presence and absence of albumin, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC, and free fatty acids (palmitoleic and oleic acid. Adsorption and dynamic surface tension lowering were measured with a stirred subphase dish apparatus and a pulsating bubble surfactometer (20 cycles/min, 50% area compression, 37 °C. In vivo pulmonary activity of S-MB DATK surfactant was measured in ventilated rabbits with surfactant deficiency/dysfunction induced by repeated lung lavages that resulted in arterial PO2 values <100 mmHg.Results. S-MB DATK surfactant had very high surface activity in all assessments. The preparation adsorbed rapidly to surface pressures of 46–48 mN/m at 37 °C (low equilibrium surface tensions of 22–24 mN/m, and reduced surface tension to <1 mN/m under dynamic compression on the pulsating bubble surfactometer. S-MB DATK surfactant showed a significant ability to resist inhibition by serum albumin, C16:0 lyso-PC, and free fatty acids, but surfactant inhibition was mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration. S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant quickly improved arterial oxygenation and lung compliance after intratracheal instillation to ventilated rabbits with severe surfactant deficiency.Conclusions. S-MB DATK is an active mimic

  17. Surfactant treatment before first breath for respiratory distress syndrome in preterm lambs: comparison of a peptide-containing synthetic lung surfactant with porcine-derived surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Zyl JM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Johann M van Zyl,1 Johan Smith2 1Division of Pharmacology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg, South Africa; 2Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Tygerberg Children's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg, South Africa Background: In a recent study utilizing a saline-lavaged adult rabbit model, we described a significant improvement in systemic oxygenation and pulmonary shunt after the instillation of a novel synthetic peptide-containing surfactant, Synsurf. Respiratory distress syndrome in the preterm lamb more closely resembles that of the human infant, as their blood gas, pH values, and lung mechanics deteriorate dramatically from birth despite ventilator support. Moreover, premature lambs have lungs which are mechanically unstable, with the advantage of being able to measure multiple variables over extended periods. Our objective in this study was to investigate if Synsurf leads to improved systemic oxygenation, lung mechanics, and histology in comparison to the commercially available porcine-derived lung surfactant Curosurf® when administered before first breath in a preterm lamb model. Materials and methods: A Cesarean section was performed under general anesthesia on 18 time-dated pregnant Dohne Merino ewes at 129–130 days gestation. The premature lambs were delivered and ventilated with an expiratory tidal volume of 6–8 mL/kg for the first 30 minutes and thereafter at 8–10 mL/kg. In a randomized controlled trial, the two surfactants tested were Synsurf and Curosurf®, both at a dose of 100 mg/kg phospholipids (1,2-dipalmitoyl-L-α-phosphatidylcholine; 90% in Synsurf, 40% in Curosurf®. A control group of animals was treated with normal saline. Measurements of physiological variables, blood gases, and lung mechanics were made before and after surfactant and saline replacement and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180

  18. Surfactant protein D is a candidate biomarker for subclinical tobacco smoke-induced lung damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sofie L.; Tan, Qihua; Holst, René;

    2014-01-01

    Variation in Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) is associated with lung function in tobacco smoke-induced chronic respiratory disease. We hypothesized that the same association exists in the general population and could be used to identify individuals sensitive to smoke-induced lung damage. The associat......Variation in Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) is associated with lung function in tobacco smoke-induced chronic respiratory disease. We hypothesized that the same association exists in the general population and could be used to identify individuals sensitive to smoke-induced lung damage...... or haplotypes, and expiratory lung function were assessed using twin study methodology and mixed-effects models. Significant inverse associations were evident between sSP-D and the forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity in the presence of current tobacco smoking but not in non...... with lung function measures in interaction with tobacco smoking. The obtained data suggest sSP-D as a candidate biomarker in risk assessments for subclinical tobacco smoke-induced lung damage. The data and derived conclusion warrant confirmation in a longitudinal population following chronic obstructive...

  19. Characterization of VAMP-2 in the lung: implication in lung surfactant secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Howard, Marcia D; Zhang, Honghao; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Bell, Anna; Jin, Nili; Mishra, Amarjit; Liu, Lin

    2012-09-01

    Lung surfactant is crucial for reducing the surface tension of alveolar space, thus preventing the alveoli from collapse. Lung surfactant is synthesized in alveolar epithelial type II cells and stored in lamellar bodies before being released via the fusion of lamellar bodies with the apical plasma membrane. SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptors) play an essential role in membrane fusion. We have previously demonstrated the requirement of t-SNARE (target SNARE) proteins, syntaxin 2 and SNAP-23 (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein 23), in regulated surfactant secretion. Here, we characterized the distribution of VAMPs (vesicle-associated membrane proteins) in rat lung and alveolar type II cells. VAMP-2, -3 and -8 are shown in type II cells at both mRNA and protein levels. VAMP-2 and -8 were enriched in LB (lamellar body) fraction. Immunochemistry studies indicated that VAMP-2 was co-localized with the LB marker protein, LB-180. Functionally, the cytoplasmic domain of VAMP-2, but not VAMP-8 inhibited surfactant secretion in type II cells. We suggest that VAMP-2 is the v-SNARE (vesicle SNARE) involved in regulated surfactant secretion.

  20. Two novel mutations in surfactant protein-C, lung function and obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baekvad-Hansen, Marie; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the surfactant protein-C(SFTPC) gene have been linked with interstitial lung disease. The frequency of lung disease due to SFTPC mutations in the general population is unknown. The aim of this study was to identify novel SFTPC mutations that are associated with lung function...... pulmonary disease or interstitial lung disease. No Y106X heterozygotes suffered from asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or interstitial lung disease. We identified two novel mutations in highly conserved areas of the SFTPC gene, and show that heterozygotes for the mutations have normal...... lung function and are unaffected by COPD and interstitial lung disease. A53T heterozygotes had increased asthma risk, but further research is required to conclusively determine whether this mutation is associated with asthma....

  1. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans J. Walther

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions.Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS.Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB, a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight, the clinical surfactant Infasurf®, a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS assays.Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary

  2. Essential Regulation of Lung Surfactant Homeostasis by the Orphan G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR116

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Young Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor whose function has been unclear. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies, and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 expression in ATII cells is required for maintaining normal surfactant levels. Aberrant packaging of surfactant proteins with lipids in the Gpr116 mutant mice resulted in compromised surfactant structure, function, uptake, and processing. Thus, GPR116 plays an indispensable role in lung surfactant homeostasis with important ramifications for the understanding and treatment of lung surfactant disorders.

  3. Essential Regulation of Lung Surfactant Homeostasis by the Orphan G-protein Coupled Receptor GPR116

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mi Young; Hilton, Mary Beth; Seaman, Steven; Haines, Diana C.; Nagashima, Kunio; Burks, Christina M.; Tessarollo, Lino; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Brown, H. Alex; Umstead, Todd M.; Floros, Joanna; Chroneos, Zissis C.; St. Croix, Brad

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor of previously unknown function. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 expression in ATII cells is required for maintaining normal surfactant levels. Aberrant packaging of surfactant proteins with lipids in the Gpr116 mutant mice resulted in compromised surfactant structure, function, uptake, and processing. Thus, GPR116 plays an indispensable role in lung surfactant homeostasis with important ramifications for the understanding and treatment of lung surfactant disorders. PMID:23684610

  4. Essential regulation of lung surfactant homeostasis by the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR116.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mi Young; Hilton, Mary Beth; Seaman, Steven; Haines, Diana C; Nagashima, Kunio; Burks, Christina M; Tessarollo, Lino; Ivanova, Pavlina T; Brown, H Alex; Umstead, Todd M; Floros, Joanna; Chroneos, Zissis C; St Croix, Brad

    2013-05-30

    GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor whose function has been unclear. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies, and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 expression in ATII cells is required for maintaining normal surfactant levels. Aberrant packaging of surfactant proteins with lipids in the Gpr116 mutant mice resulted in compromised surfactant structure, function, uptake, and processing. Thus, GPR116 plays an indispensable role in lung surfactant homeostasis with important ramifications for the understanding and treatment of lung surfactant disorders. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SP-A-enriched surfactant for treatment of rat lung transplants with SP-A deficiency after storage and reperfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, ME; Hofstede, GJH; Petersen, AH; Batenburg, JJ; Haagsman, HP; Oetomo, SB; Prop, J

    2002-01-01

    Background. The function of pulmonary surfactant is affected by lung transplantation, contributing to impaired lung transplant function. A decreased amount of surfactant protein-A (SP-A) after reperfusion is believed to contribute to the impaired surfactant function. Surfactant treatment has been sh

  6. Surfactant treatment before reperfusion improves the immediate function of lung transplants in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, ME; Petersen, AH; Hofstede, G; Haagsman, HP; Oetomo, SB; Prop, J

    1996-01-01

    An impaired function of alveolar surfactant can cause lung transplant dysfunction early after reperfusion. In this study it was investigated whether treatment with surfactant before reperfusion improves the immediate function of lung transplants and whether an improved transplant function was associ

  7. Lung surfactant metabolism: early in life, early in disease and target in cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Gay-Jordi, Gemma; Mucci, Adele; Lachmann, Nico; Serrano-Mollar, Anna

    2017-03-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins lining the alveolar epithelium. At the air-liquid interface, surfactant lowers surface tension, avoiding alveolar collapse and reducing the work of breathing. The essential role of lung surfactant in breathing and therefore in life, is highlighted by surfactant deficiency in premature neonates, which causes neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and results in early death after birth. In addition, defects in surfactant metabolism alter lung homeostasis and lead to disease. Special attention should be paid to two important key cells responsible for surfactant metabolism: alveolar epithelial type II cells (AE2C) and alveolar macrophages (AM). On the one hand, surfactant deficiency coming from abnormal AE2C function results in high surface tension, promoting alveolar collapse and mechanical stress in the epithelium. This epithelial injury contributes to tissue remodeling and lung fibrosis. On the other hand, impaired surfactant catabolism by AM leads to accumulation of surfactant in air spaces and the associated altered lung function in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). We review here two recent cell therapies that aim to recover the activity of AE2C or AM, respectively, therefore targeting the restoring of surfactant metabolism and lung homeostasis. Applied therapies successfully show either transplantation of healthy AE2C in fibrotic lungs, to replace injured AE2C cells and surfactant, or transplantation of bone marrow-derived macrophages to counteract accumulation of surfactant lipid and proteinaceous material in the alveolar spaces leading to PAP. These therapies introduce an alternative treatment with great potential for patients suffering from lung diseases.

  8. Lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) response and regulation during acute and chronic lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Beers, Michael F; Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N; Hansen, Soren

    2013-06-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collection that plays important roles in modulating host defense functions and maintaining phospholipid homeostasis in the lung. The aim of current study was to characterize comparatively the SP-D response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum in three murine models of lung injury, using a validated ELISA technology for estimation of SP-D levels. Mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, bleomycin, or Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) and sacrificed at different time points. In lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice, the level of SP-D in BAL increased within 6 h, peaked at 51 h (4,518 ng/ml), and returned to base level at 99 h (612 ng/ml). Serum levels of SP-D increased immediately (8.6 ng/ml), peaked at 51 h (16 ng/ml), and returned to base levels at 99 h (3.8 ng/ml). In a subacute bleomycin inflammation model, SP-D levels were 4,625 and 367 ng/ml in BAL and serum, respectively, 8 days after exposure. In a chronic Pc inflammation model, the highest level of SP-D was observed 6 weeks after inoculation, with BAL and serum levels of 1,868 and 335 ng/ml, respectively. We conclude that serum levels of SP-D increase during lung injury, with a sustained increment during chronic inflammation compared with acute inflammation. A quick upregulation of SP-D in serum in response to acute airway inflammation supports the notion that SP-D translocates from the airways into the vascular system, in favor of being synthesized systemically. The study also confirms the concept of using increased SP-D serum levels as a biomarker of especially chronic airway inflammation.

  9. The Effects of Lung Protective Ventilation or Hypercapnic Acidosis on Gas Exchange and Lung Injury in Surfactant Deficient Rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut D Hummler

    Full Text Available Permissive hypercapnia has been shown to reduce lung injury in subjects with surfactant deficiency. Experimental studies suggest that hypercapnic acidosis by itself rather than decreased tidal volume may be a key protective factor.To study the differential effects of a lung protective ventilatory strategy or hypercapnic acidosis on gas exchange, hemodynamics and lung injury in an animal model of surfactant deficiency.30 anesthetized, surfactant-depleted rabbits were mechanically ventilated (FiO2 = 0.8, PEEP = 7cmH2O and randomized into three groups: Normoventilation-Normocapnia (NN-group: tidal volume (Vt = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 40 mmHg; Normoventilation-Hypercapnia (NH-group: Vt = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg by increasing FiCO2; and a Hypoventilation-Hypercapnia (HH-group: Vt = 4.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg. Plasma lactate and interleukin (IL-8 were measured every 2 h. Animals were sacrificed after 6 h to perform bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, to measure lung wet-to-dry weight, lung tissue IL-8, and to obtain lung histology.PaO2 was significantly higher in the HH-group compared to the NN-group (p<0.05, with values of the NH-group between the HH- and NN-groups. Other markers of lung injury (wet-dry-weight, BAL-Protein, histology-score, plasma-IL-8 and lung tissue IL-8 resulted in significantly lower values for the HH-group compared to the NN-group and trends for the NH-group towards lower values compared to the NN-group. Lactate was significantly lower in both hypercapnia groups compared to the NN-group.Whereas hypercapnic acidosis may have some beneficial effects, a significant effect on lung injury and systemic inflammatory response is dependent upon a lower tidal volume rather than resultant arterial CO2 tensions and pH alone.

  10. Exogenous gene transfer of Rab(3)8 small GTPase ameliorates aberrant lung surfactant homeostasis in Ruby rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Kazuhiro; Nakase, Keisuke; Sakuma, Takashi; Nishiki, Kazuaki; Nojiri, Masafumi; Kato, Ryo; Saito, Masatoshi; Fujimoto, Yuki; Mizuno, Shiro; Toga, Hirohisa

    2017-04-24

    Rab(3)8 small GTPase regulates intracellular transport in melanocytes and alveolar type II epithelial cells. Ruby rats carrying Rab(3)8 and other gene mutations exhibit oculocutaneous albinism, bleeding diathesis, and hence, are a rat model of human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS). We previously showed that Long Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats, one strain of the Ruby rats, developed aberrant lung surfactant homeostasis with remarkably enlarged lamellar bodies in alveolar type II cells. A replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus expressing rat Rab(3)8 (Ad-Rab(3)8) was constructed. Alveolar type II cells were isolated from the LEC rats and tested for lung surfactant phosphatidylcholine secretion. The rats were also examined whether exogenous expression of Ad- Rab(3)8 could rescue the altered lung surfactant homeostasis in the lungs. Isolated type II cells infected with Ad-Rab(3)8 exhibited improved secretion patterns of [(3)H]phosphatidylcholine, i.e. increased basal hyposecretion and decreased agonist-induced hypersecretion. Endobronchial administration of Ad-Rab(3)8 improved the morphology of type II cells and lamellar bodies, reducing their sizes close to those of wild-type rats. The increased amounts of phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein B in the lamellar body fractions were decreased in the Ad-Rab(3)8 infected lungs. These results provide strong evidence that the aberrant lung surfactant homeostasis in the LEC rats is caused by Rab(3)8 deficit, and suggest that endobronchial delivery of the responsive transgene could be an effective method to ameliorate the abnormal lung phenotype in the animal model of HPS.

  11. Serum-surfactant SP-D correlates inversely to lung function in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Holmskov, Uffe; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) affects the lungs causing infections and inflammation. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an innate defense lectin primarily secreted in the lungs. We investigated the influence of the SP-D Met11Thr polymorphism on CF lung function; and serum SP-D as a marker for CF...

  12. Knockdown of flotillin-2 inhibits lung surfactant secretion by alveolar type Ⅱ cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Narendranath Reddy Chintagari; Deming Gou; Lin Liu

    2008-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Lung surfactant is stored in lamellar bodies and exocytosed following fusion of the lamellar bodies with the plasma membrane of alveolar type Ⅱ (AT2) cells [1].A number of proteins have been shown to be involved in surfactant secretion including SNAREs,NSF,α-SNAP and annexin A2 [2,3].Lipid rafts enriched in SNAREs are crucial for surfactant secretion [4].

  13. Natural history of five children with surfactant protein C mutations and interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avital, Avraham; Hevroni, Avigdor; Godfrey, Simon; Cohen, Shlomo; Maayan, Channa; Nusair, Samir; Nogee, Lawrence M; Springer, Chaim

    2014-11-01

    Interstitial lung diseases in infants and children are uncommon and may be caused by specific inborn errors of surfactant metabolism. Five children with open lung biopsy diagnosed interstitial lung disease were followed (mean of 27.2 years) and evaluated for surfactant protein gene mutations. Four of the children were originally diagnosed as desquamative interstitial pneumonitis and one as chronic interstitial pneumonitis. All had good response to chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine treatment for periods of 7-38 months. Lung function tests, incremental exercise tests, and rentgenological studies were performed in the children. Surfactant protein gene mutations were searched in all the patients and in part of their families. Three of the patients, aged now 32, 29, and 37 years, feel well and have normal lung function, while two of the patients, both females, aged 28 and 37 years, conduct normal activities of daily living, have healthy children but have clinical, physiological and rentgenological evidence of restrictive lung disease. All five patients were found to have surfactant protein C gene (SFTPC) mutations, three of them with the most common mutation (p.I73T) and the other two with new mutations of surfactant protein C gene (p.I38F and p.V39L). We conclude that detection of surfactant protein mutations should be attempted in all children presenting with interstitial lung disease. Furthermore, treatment with hydroxychloroquine should be considered in children with SFTPC mutations. Prospective evaluation of hydroxychloroquine therapy in a greater number of patients is needed.

  14. Molecular dynamics of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its metabolite interacting with lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Chavarría, Helmut I; Guizado, Teobaldo R C; Pimentel, Andre S

    2015-08-28

    The interaction of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its ultimate carcinogenic 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide with lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers was successfully performed using molecular dynamics. The DPPC/DPPG/cholesterol bilayer (64 : 64 : 2) was used as the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayer model and compared with the DPPC bilayer as a reference. Dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide were inserted in water and lipid phases in order to investigate their interactions with the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers. The radial distribution function between two P atoms in polar heads shows that the 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide affects the order between the P atoms in the DPPC/DPPG/cholesterol model more than dibenz[a,h]anthracene, which is a consequence of its preference for the polar heads and dibenz[a,h]anthracene prefers to be located in the hydrocarbon chain of the phospholipid bilayers. Dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide may form aggregates in water and lipid phases, and in the water-lipid interface. The implications for the possible effect of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide in the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers are discussed.

  15. Synthesis and surface activity of diether-linked phosphoglycerols: potential applications for exogenous lung surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notter, Robert H; Wang, Zhongyi; Wang, Zhengdong; Davy, Jason A; Schwan, Adrian L

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of three phosphoglycerols is described, one of which contains the previously unknown phosphonoglycerol headgroup. The surface tension-lowering capabilities of synthetic lung surfactant mixtures containing the PG analogs were measured on the pulsating bubble surfactometer and compared to known controls. The PG-containing mixtures exhibited superior surface tension-lowering properties indicating the significant potential of these analogs as components in synthetic exogenous lung surfactants.

  16. A double injection ADSA-CSD methodology for lung surfactant inhibition and reversal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Policova, Zdenka; Dang, Andrew; Acosta, Edgar J; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents a continuation of the development of a drop shape method for film studies, ADSA-CSD (Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis-Constrained Sessile Drop). ADSA-CSD has certain advantages over conventional methods. The development presented here allows complete exchange of the subphase of a spread or adsorbed film. This feature allows certain studies relevant to lung surfactant research that cannot be readily performed by other means. The key feature of the design is a second capillary into the bulk of the drop to facilitate addition or removal of a secondary liquid. The development will be illustrated through studies concerning lung surfactant inhibition. After forming a sessile drop of a basic lung surfactant preparation, the bulk phase can be removed and exchanged for one containing different inhibitors. Such studies mimic the leakage of plasma and blood proteins into the alveolar spaces altering the surface activity of lung surfactant in a phenomenon called surfactant inhibition. The resistance of the lung surfactant to specific inhibitors can be readily evaluated using the method. The new method is also useful for surfactant reversal studies, i.e. the ability to restore the normal surface activity of an inhibited lung surfactant film by using special additives. Results show a distinctive difference between the inhibition when an inhibitor is mixed with and when it is injected under a preformed surfactant film. None of the inhibitors studied (serum, albumin, fibrinogen, and cholesterol) were able to penetrate a preexisting film formed by the basic preparation (BLES and protasan), while all of them can alter the surface activity of such preparation when mixed with the preparation. Preliminary results show that reversal of serum inhibition can be easily achieved and evaluated using the modified methodology.

  17. Exogenous surfactant suppresses inflammation in experimental endotoxin-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Neha; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of exogenous surfactant and surfactant phospholipids on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Exogenous surfactant (porcine surfactant) and surfactant phospholipid (dipalmitoyl phospholipid DPPC, hexadecanol, tylaxopol) were instilled intratracheally with LPS in rats. Expression of surfactant apoproteins (SP-A) and the cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and -2) was studied by immunohistochemistry, and apoptosis was analyzed by in situ terminal dUTP nick end labeling TUNEL assay. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured in the isolated macrophages by fluorescence measurement with dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). LPS-induced oxidative burst and apoptosis at 72 hours were reduced by both porcine and synthetic surfactant. SP-A as well as COX-1 and -2 expressions were suppressed with synthetic surfactant treatment, whereas with porcine surfactant (P-SF) the SP-A expression was enhanced in response to LPS administration. These results indicate that exogenous surfactant inhibits LPS-induced inflammation. This anti-inflammatory activity may be an important outcome of surfactant therapy in endotoxin-induced respiratory distress.

  18. Influence of Long-Term Inhaled Glucocorticoids on the Lung Surfactant Phospholipid Levels in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Seiliev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Damage to lung surfactant, which is responsible for the lung local immunity, may contribute to the development of bronchial inflammation in patients with bronchial asthma. Different doses of glucocorticoids produce a stimulating or inhibiting effect on the synthesis of the surfactant protein (SP-A mRNA. Lung surfactant disorders may negatively influence bronchial homeostasis and aggravate the condition of patients with bronchial asthma and COPD. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of long-term inhaled corticosteroids on the phospholipid levels of the lung surfactant in rats. Methods and Results: Inhalations of prednisolone hemisuccinate (PH were given to white non-pedigree rats weighing 180-200g at a dose of 0.3mg/kg daily for 30 days. Already by the end of the first study period (10 days, lung surfactant phospholipid levels were found to decrease significantly from 1.35±0.060mg to 1.02±0.045mg (P<0.001. The decrease was further recorded at Day 20 and Day 30 of the inhalation period: down to 0.94±0.042 mg (P<0.001 and 1.04±0.047mg (P<0.01, respectively. The phospholipid content continued to decrease after termination of inhalations down to 0.80±0.036mg (P<0.001 and 0.63±0.028mg (P<0.001 at Day 40 and 50 of the experiment. By Day 60 of the experiment (30 days after termination of PH, the phospholipid content in the lung surfactant was restored to the baseline level of 1.29±0.058mg. Conclusion: The content of lung surfactant was found to decrease significantly as a result of long-term ICS treatment, which may have a negative effect for chronic lung diseases.

  19. Comparative characterization of pulmonary surfactant aggregates and alkaline phosphatase isozymes in human lung carcinoma tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Nozomi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Harada, Tsuyoshi; Igarashi, Seiji; Koyama, Iwao; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2007-05-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) isozymes are surfactant-associated proteins (SPs). Since several different AP isozymes have been detected in the pneumocytes of lung cancer patients, we attempted to identify the relationship between pulmonary surfactant aggregate subtypes and AP isozymes. Pulmonary surfactant aggregates were isolated from carcinoma and non-carcinoma tissues of patients with non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. Upon analysis, ultraheavy, heavy, and light surfactant aggregates were detected in the non-carcinoma tissues, but no ultraheavy surfactant aggregates were found in the carcinoma tissues. Surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) was detected as two bands (a 27-kDa band and a 54-kDa band) in the ultraheavy, heavy, and light surfactant aggregates found in the non-carcinoma tissues. Although both SP-A bands were detected in the heavy and light surfactant aggregates from adenocarcinoma tissues, the 54-kDa band was not detected in squamous cell carcinoma tissues. Liver AP (LAP) was detected in the heavy and light surfactant aggregates from both non-carcinoma and squamous carcinoma tissues, but not in heavy surfactant aggregates from adenocarcinoma tissues. A larger amount of bone type AP (BAP) was found in light surfactant aggregate fractions from squamous cell carcinomas than those from adenocarcinoma tissues or non-carcinoma tissues from patients with either type of cancer. LAP, BAP, and SP-A were identified immunohistochemically in type II pneumocytes from non-carcinoma tissues and adenocarcinoma cells, but no distinct SP-A staining was observed in squamous cell carcinoma tissues. The present study has thus revealed several differences in pulmonary surfactant aggregates and AP isozymes between adenocarcinoma tissue and squamous cell carcinoma tissue.

  20. Impaired recycling of surfactant-like liposomes in type II pneumocytes from injured lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, B.; Garn, H; Hochscheid, R

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Different stages of lung injury were induced by exposing rats to 10 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO2) for 3, 20, and 28 days. Type II cells were isolated from these lungs and recycling of 3H-DPPC labelled surfactant-like liposomes was studied in vitro.

  1. The SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein is selectively recognized by lung surfactant protein D and activates macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Zhong, Fei; Chow, Vincent T K;

    2007-01-01

    Da glycosylated protein. It was not secreted in the presence of tunicamycin and was detected as a 130 kDa protein in the cell lysate. The purified S-protein bound to Vero but not 293T cells and was itself recognized by lung surfactant protein D (SP-D), a collectin found in the lung alveoli. The binding required...

  2. The significance of recurrent lung opacities in neonates on surfactant treatment for respiratory distress syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odita, J.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Louisiana State Univ. Health Sciences Center, Shreveport (United States)

    2001-02-01

    Purpose. To determine the significance of recurrent opacities in chest radiographs of neonates on surfactant therapy for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) after an initial period of improvement. Materials and methods. Serial pre- and post-surfactant chest radiographs on 94 preterm infants with RDS were analyzed and the pattern of chest radiographic response was classified as (a) clear, (b) recurrent opacities, and (c) no response. Their clinical characteristics were also recorded. Results. In 34 infants the RDS changes cleared within 3 days. 31 infants developed lung opacities within 10 days after an initial period of improvement. Twenty-nine infants failed to respond to the surfactant. The corresponding mean birth weights for the three groups were 1.74, 1.19, and 0.76 kg and the mean gestation ages 32.6, 27.7, and 25.4 weeks. The incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) was highest among the slumping infants (72. % vs 50 % in no responders, P < 0.001) Conclusions. The pattern of chest radiographic response is primarily affected by gestation age and birth weight. Recurrent lung opacity after an initial positive response to surfactant therapy may be caused by such factors as edema from barotrauma and patent ductus arteriosus. Infants with intraventricular hemorrhage may demonstrate neurogenic edema. Other contributory factors include pneumonia and abnormal consumption of surfactant. Recurrent lung opacities after surfactant may be a predictor of chronic lung disease in the preterm infant. (orig.)

  3. Surfactant as salvage therapy in life threatening primary graft dysfunction in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amital, Anat; Shitrit, David; Raviv, Yael; Saute, Milton; Bakal, Ilana; Medalion, Benjamin; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2009-02-01

    Impaired surfactant activity may contribute to primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation. We assessed the role of surfactant treatment in lung transplant recipients with severe life threatening primary lung graft dysfunction. Five patients after lung transplantation: 4 after single-lung transplantation, for emphysema (n=3) or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n=1), and 1 patient after double-lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis. All had severe life threatening primary graft dysfunction that failed to respond to conventional measures. Treatment consisted of bronchoscopic instillation of mammalian surfactant, 20-90cc, at 3 (n=1) or 7 days (n=4) after transplantation. There was a significant improvement in the ratio of partial arterial oxygen tension (PaO(2)) to fractional concentration of oxygen in inspired gas (FIO(2)), from a mean of 98.8+/-21.7 to 236.8+/-52.3 mmHg (p=0.0006), within hours of treatment. All were eventually discharged home and showed a satisfactory FEV(1) (44-67% predicted) at the 6-month follow-up. All patients were still alive 6 months or more after transplantation. Surfactant treatment improves oxygenation and may be life saving in patients with primary lung graft dysfunction.

  4. Properties of mixed monolayers of clinical lung surfactant, serum albumin and hydrophilic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, I; Mircheva, K; Grozev, N; Tz, Ivanova; Panaiotov, I

    2013-01-01

    It is now established that the surface activity of the clinically used lung surfactant is reduced by serum proteins and can be restored by adding the hydrophilic polymers. The mechanisms of lung surfactant inactivation by serum proteins and restoring effect by the hydrophilic polymers remain not completely understood. In this paper the state and rheological dilatational properties of surface films formed from clinical lung surfactant Exosurf, Survanta, Curosurf and Alveofact in the presence of serum albumin (BSA) and hydrophilic polymers polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Dextran were studied. The obtained results suggest that the lung surfactant and BSA mixtures spread at air-water interface form a DPPC/BSA mixed monolayers with lower content of DPPC. The presence of hydrophilic polymers PVP, PEG and Dextran restore the DPPC content in the surface film. The effectiveness of the DPPC spreading and formation of better compacted film increases in order Exosurf, Survanta, Curosurf, Alveofact. The obtained results are in accordance with the generally admitted ideas about the mechanisms of serum protein inactivation and restoring effect of hydrophilic polymers based on the previously studies of the lung surfactant adsorption rate.

  5. Essential Regulation of Lung Surfactant Homeostasis by the Orphan G-protein Coupled Receptor GPR116

    OpenAIRE

    Mi Young Yang; Mary Beth Hilton; Steven Seaman; Diana C. Haines; Kunio Nagashima; Christina M. Burks; Lino Tessarollo; Pavlina T. Ivanova; H. Alex Brown; Todd M. Umstead; Joanna Floros; Zissis C. Chroneos; Brad St. Croix

    2013-01-01

    GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor whose function has been unclear. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies, and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 exp...

  6. Lung surfactant: Function and composition in the context of development and respiratory physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex with a unique phospholipid and protein composition. Its specific function is to reduce surface tension at the pulmonary air-liquid interface. The underlying Young-Laplace equation, applying to the surface of any geometrical structure, is the more important the smaller its radii are. It therefore applies to the alveoli and bronchioli of mature lungs, as well as to the tubules and saccules of immature lungs. Surfactant comprises 80% phosphatidylcholine (PC), of which dipalmitoyl-PC, palmitoyl-myristoyl-PC and palmitoyl-palmitoleoyl-PC together are 75%. Anionic phosphatidylglycerol and cholesterol are about 10% each, whereas surfactant proteins SP-A to -D comprise 2-5%. Maturation of the surfactant system is not essentially due to increased synthesis but to decreased turnover of specific components. Molecular differences correlate with resting respiratory rate (RR), where PC16:0/16:0 is the lower the higher RR is. PC16:0/14:0 is increased during alveolar formation, and decreases immune reactions that might impair alveolar development. In rigid bird lungs, with air-capillaries rather than alveoli, and no surface area changes during the respiratory cycle, PC16:0/16:0 is highest and PC16:0/14:0 absent. As there is no need for a surface-associated surfactant reservoir, SP-C is absent in birds as well. Airflow is lowest and particle sedimentation highest in the extrapulmonary air-sacs, rather than in the gas-exchange area. Consequently, SP-A and -D for particle opsonization are absent in bird surfactant. In essence, comparative analysis is consistent with the concept that surfactant is adapted to the physiologic needs of a given vertebrate species at a given developmental stage.

  7. Lessons from the biophysics of interfaces: Lung surfactant and tear fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rantamaki, A.; Telenius, J.; Koivuniemi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide insight into the biophysical properties and functions of tear fluid and lung surfactant - two similar fluids covering the epithelium of two distinctive organs. Both fluids form a layer-like structure that essentially comprise of an aqueous layer next to th...

  8. Surfactant therapy restores gas exchange in lung injury due to paraquat intoxication in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.L. So; E. de Buijzer; D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik); U. Kaisers; P.J.J. van Genderen (Perry); B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractParaquat is a weed killer which causes often fatal lung damage in humans and other animals. There is evidence that the pulmonary surfactant system is involved in the pathophysiology of respiratory failure after paraquat intoxication and, therefore, the possi

  9. Dynamic strength of the interaction between lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) and saccharide ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Esben; Dreyer, Jakob K; Simonsen, Adam C

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the dynamic strength of the interaction between lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) and different sugars, maltose, mannose, glucose, and galactose, we have used an atomic force microscope to monitor the interaction on a single molecule scale. The experiment is performed by me...

  10. Modeling of surfactant transport and adsorption in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, F.T.H.

    1991-04-01

    When surfactant solution is flowing in a reservoir formation, surfactants will be diluted by flow dispersion, retained in dead-end pores, adsorbed on rock surfaces, or precipitated due to ion exchange. The loss of surfactant will be detrimental to the performance of gas foam. Information of surfactant concentration profiles in reservoir formations is essential for gas foaming technique development. The major objective of this research is to investigate with mathematical models the transport and dynamic adsorption of surfactants in porous media. The mathematical models have taken into account the convection, dispersion, capacitance, and adsorption effects on concentrations of surfactants. Numerical methods and computer programs have been developed which can be used to match experimental results and to determine the characterization parameters in the models. The models can be included in foam simulation programs to calculate surfactant concentration profiles in porous media. A flow experimental method was developed to measure the effluent surfactant concentration, which will be used to determine the model parameters. Commercial foaming agent Alipal CD-128 was used in this study. Equilibrium adsorption and surfactant precipitation have been tested. Tracer solutions with a nonadsorbing solute such as dextrose and sucrose were used to determine the dispersion parameters for the experimental sandpack; thus, the adsorption of the surfactant in the test sand can be identified with an adequate model. 49 refs., 21 figs.

  11. Proteomic and Lipidomic Analysis of Nanoparticle Corona upon Contact with Lung Surfactant Reveals Differences in Protein, but Not Lipid Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raesch, Simon Sebastian; Tenzer, Stefan; Storck, Wiebke; Rurainski, Alexander; Selzer, Dominik; Ruge, Christian Arnold; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Schaefer, Ulrich Friedrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-12-22

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) constitutes the first line of host defense in the deep lung. Because of its high content of phospholipids and surfactant specific proteins, the interaction of inhaled nanoparticles (NPs) with the pulmonary surfactant layer is likely to form a corona that is different to the one formed in plasma. Here we present a detailed lipidomic and proteomic analysis of NP corona formation using native porcine surfactant as a model. We analyzed the adsorbed biomolecules in the corona of three NP with different surface properties (PEG-, PLGA-, and Lipid-NP) after incubation with native porcine surfactant. Using label-free shotgun analysis for protein and LC-MS for lipid analysis, we quantitatively determined the corona composition. Our results show a conserved lipid composition in the coronas of all investigated NPs regardless of their surface properties, with only hydrophilic PEG-NPs adsorbing fewer lipids in total. In contrast, the analyzed NP displayed a marked difference in the protein corona, consisting of up to 417 different proteins. Among the proteins showing significant differences between the NP coronas, there was a striking prevalence of molecules with a notoriously high lipid and surface binding, such as, e.g., SP-A, SP-D, DMBT1. Our data indicate that the selective adsorption of proteins mediates the relatively similar lipid pattern in the coronas of different NPs. On the basis of our lipidomic and proteomic analysis, we provide a detailed set of quantitative data on the composition of the surfactant corona formed upon NP inhalation, which is unique and markedly different to the plasma corona.

  12. The interplay of lung surfactant proteins and lipids assimilates the macrophage clearance of nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A Ruge

    Full Text Available The peripheral lungs are a potential entrance portal for nanoparticles into the human body due to their large surface area. The fact that nanoparticles can be deposited in the alveolar region of the lungs is of interest for pulmonary drug delivery strategies and is of equal importance for toxicological considerations. Therefore, a detailed understanding of nanoparticle interaction with the structures of this largest and most sensitive part of the lungs is important for both nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. Astonishingly, there is still little known about the bio-nano interactions that occur after nanoparticle deposition in the alveoli. In this study, we compared the effects of surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A and D (SP-D on the clearance of magnetite nanoparticles (mNP with either more hydrophilic (starch or hydrophobic (phosphatidylcholine surface modification by an alveolar macrophage (AM cell line (MH-S using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Both proteins enhanced the AM uptake of mNP compared with pristine nanoparticles; for the hydrophilic ST-mNP, this effect was strongest with SP-D, whereas for the hydrophobic PL-mNP it was most pronounced with SP-A. Using gel electrophoretic and dynamic light scattering methods, we were able to demonstrate that the observed cellular effects were related to protein adsorption and to protein-mediated interference with the colloidal stability. Next, we investigated the influence of various surfactant lipids on nanoparticle uptake by AM because lipids are the major surfactant component. Synthetic surfactant lipid and isolated native surfactant preparations significantly modulated the effects exerted by SP-A and SP-D, respectively, resulting in comparable levels of macrophage interaction for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanoparticles. Our findings suggest that because of the interplay of both surfactant lipids and proteins, the AM clearance of nanoparticles is essentially the same, regardless

  13. The interplay of lung surfactant proteins and lipids assimilates the macrophage clearance of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, Christian A; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Herrmann, Jennifer; Kirch, Julian; Cañadas, Olga; Echaide, Mercedes; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Casals, Cristina; Müller, Rolf; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2012-01-01

    The peripheral lungs are a potential entrance portal for nanoparticles into the human body due to their large surface area. The fact that nanoparticles can be deposited in the alveolar region of the lungs is of interest for pulmonary drug delivery strategies and is of equal importance for toxicological considerations. Therefore, a detailed understanding of nanoparticle interaction with the structures of this largest and most sensitive part of the lungs is important for both nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. Astonishingly, there is still little known about the bio-nano interactions that occur after nanoparticle deposition in the alveoli. In this study, we compared the effects of surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) on the clearance of magnetite nanoparticles (mNP) with either more hydrophilic (starch) or hydrophobic (phosphatidylcholine) surface modification by an alveolar macrophage (AM) cell line (MH-S) using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Both proteins enhanced the AM uptake of mNP compared with pristine nanoparticles; for the hydrophilic ST-mNP, this effect was strongest with SP-D, whereas for the hydrophobic PL-mNP it was most pronounced with SP-A. Using gel electrophoretic and dynamic light scattering methods, we were able to demonstrate that the observed cellular effects were related to protein adsorption and to protein-mediated interference with the colloidal stability. Next, we investigated the influence of various surfactant lipids on nanoparticle uptake by AM because lipids are the major surfactant component. Synthetic surfactant lipid and isolated native surfactant preparations significantly modulated the effects exerted by SP-A and SP-D, respectively, resulting in comparable levels of macrophage interaction for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanoparticles. Our findings suggest that because of the interplay of both surfactant lipids and proteins, the AM clearance of nanoparticles is essentially the same, regardless of different

  14. Pulmonary haptoglobin (pHp) is part of the surfactant system in the human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Mahdi; Goldmann, Torsten

    2012-11-20

    Since the existence of pHp was demonstrated, it has been shown that this molecule and its receptor CD163 are regulated by different stimuli. Furthermore, a comparably fast secretion of pHp was described as well as the immuno-stimulatory effects. The intention of this study was to elucidate the role of pHp in the human lungs further. Here we show, by means of confocal microscopy and immune-electron-microscopy, a clear co-localization of pHp with surfactant protein-B in lamellar bodies of alveolar epithelial cells type II. These results are underlined by immunohistochemical stainings in differently fixed human lung tissues, which show pHp in vesicular and released form. The images of the released form resemble the intended position of surfactant in the human alveolus. pHp is secreted by Alveolar epithelial cells type II as previously shown. Moreover, pHp is co-localized with Surfactant protein-B. We conclude that the presented data shows that pHp is a native part of the surfactant system in the human lung. http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2563584738239912.

  15. Effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide on pulmonary surfactants phospholipid synthesis in lung explants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian LI; Zi-qiang LUO; Fu-wen ZHOU; Dan-dan FENG; Cha-xiang GUAN; Chang-qing ZHANG; Xiu-hong SUN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on pulmonary surfactants (PS) phospholipid synthesis in cultured lung explants. METHODS: Lung explants were cultured with serum-free medium, [methyl-3H]choline incorporation, total phospholipid, phosphatidylcholine, activity of choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase (CCT) and CCTα mRNA level in lung explants were determined. RESULTS: (1) VIP (10-10-10-7 mol/L) for 16 h promoted [methyl-3H]choline incorporation in dose dependence and VIP (10-8 mol/L) for 2 h-16 h promoted [methylz3H]choline incorporation in time dependence. (2) VIP (10-8 mol/L) enhanced the contents of total phospholipidsand phosphatidylcholine in lung explants. (3) VIP (10-10-10-7 mol/L) elevated microsomal CCT activity of lung explants in dose dependence. (4) VIP (10-8 mol/L) increased expression of CCTα mRNA in lung explants and alveolar type Ⅱ cells (ATII). (5) [D-P-Cl-Phe(6)-Leu(17)]-VIP (10-6 mol/L), a VIP receptors antagonist, abolished the increase of [3H]choline incorporation, microsomal CCT activity and CCTα mRNA level induced by VIP (10-8 mol/L) in lung explants. CONCLUSION: VIP could enhance synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, the major component of pulmonary surfactants by enhancing microsomal CCT activity and CCTα mRNA level via VIP receptormediated pathway.

  16. Donor surfactant protein D (SP-D) polymorphisms are associated with lung transplant outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramini, B; Kim, C; Diangelo, S; Petersen, E; Lederer, D J; Shah, L; Robbins, H; Floros, J; Arcasoy, S M; Sonett, J R; D'Ovidio, F

    2013-08-01

    Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) is the major factor limiting long-term success of lung transplantation. Polymorphisms of surfactant protein D (SP-D), an important molecule within lung innate immunity, have been associated with various lung diseases. We investigated the association between donor lung SP-D polymorphisms and posttransplant CLAD and survival in 191 lung transplant recipients consecutively transplanted. Recipients were prospectively followed with routine pulmonary function tests. Donor DNA was assayed by pyrosequencing for SP-D polymorphisms of two single-nucleotide variations altering amino acids in the mature protein N-terminal domain codon 11 (Met(11) Thr), and in codon 160 (Ala(160) Thr) of the C-terminal domain. CLAD was diagnosed in 88/191 patients, and 60/191 patients have died. Recipients of allografts that expressed the homozygous Met(11) Met variant of aa11 had significantly greater freedom from CLAD development and better survival compared to those with the homozygous Thr(11) Th variant of aa11. No significant association was noted for SP-D variants of aa160. Lung allografts with the SP-D polymorphic variant Thr(11) Th of aa11 are associated with development of CLAD and reduced survival. The observed genetic differences of the donor lung, potentially with their effects on innate immunity, may influence the clinical outcomes after lung transplantation.

  17. Synthetic lung surfactants containing SP-B and SP-C peptides plus novel phospholipase-resistant lipids or glycerophospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notter, Robert H.; Gupta, Rohun; Schwan, Adrian L.; Wang, Zhengdong; Shkoor, Mohanad Gh

    2016-01-01

    Background This study examines the biophysical and preclinical pulmonary activity of synthetic lung surfactants containing novel phospholipase-resistant phosphonolipids or synthetic glycerophospholipids combined with Super Mini-B (S-MB) DATK and/or SP-Css ion-lock 1 peptides that replicate the functional biophysics of surfactant proteins (SP)-B and SP-C. Phospholipase-resistant phosphonolipids used in synthetic surfactants are DEPN-8 and PG-1, molecular analogs of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), while glycerophospholipids used are active lipid components of native surfactant (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight). The objective of the work is to test whether these novel lipid/peptide synthetic surfactants have favorable preclinical activity (biophysical, pulmonary) for therapeutic use in reversing surfactant deficiency or dysfunction in lung disease or injury. Methods Surface activity of synthetic lipid/peptide surfactants was assessed in vitro at 37 °C by measuring adsorption in a stirred subphase apparatus and dynamic surface tension lowering in pulsating and captive bubble surfactometers. Shear viscosity was measured as a function of shear rate on a Wells-Brookfield micro-viscometer. In vivo pulmonary activity was determined by measuring lung function (arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance) in ventilated rats and rabbits with surfactant deficiency/dysfunction induced by saline lavage to lower arterial PO2 to C. However, dual-peptide surfactants containing 1.5% S-MB DATK + 1.5% SP-Css ion-lock 1 combined with 9:1 DEPN-8:PG-1 or 5:3:2 DPPC:POPC:POPG had the greatest in vivo activity in improving arterial oxygenation and dynamic lung compliance in ventilated animals with ARDS. Saline dispersions of these dual-peptide synthetic surfactants were also found to have shear viscosities comparable to or below those of current animal-derived surfactant drugs, supporting their potential ease of deliverability by

  18. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and Surfactant protein-B turnover in human acute lung injury and in control patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzi Sabina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI have low concentrations of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. No information is available on their turnover. Objectives To analyze disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B turnover in patients with ARDS/ALI and in human adults with normal lungs (controls. Methods 2H2O as precursor of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine-palmitate and 113C-Leucine as precursor of surfactant protein-B were administered intravenously to 12 patients with ARDS/ALI and to 8 controls. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B were isolated from serial tracheal aspirates, and their fractional synthetic rate was derived from the 2H and 13C enrichment curves, obtained by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine, surfactant protein-B, and protein concentrations in tracheal aspirates were also measured. Results 1 Surfactant protein-B turned over at faster rate than disaturated-phosphatidylcholine both in ARDS/ALI patients and in controls. 2 In patients with ARDS/ALI the fractional synthesis rate of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine was 3.1 times higher than in controls (p Conclusions 1 Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B have a different turnover both in healthy and diseased lungs. 2 In ARDS/ALI the synthesis of these two surfactant components may be differently regulated.

  19. Analysis of pulmonary surfactant in rat lungs after inhalation of nanomaterials: Fullerenes, nickel oxide and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoya, Chikara; Lee, Byeong-Woo; Ogami, Akira; Oyabu, Takako; Nishi, Ken-ichiro; Yamamoto, Makoto; Todoroki, Motoi; Morimoto, Yasuo; Tanaka, Isamu; Myojo, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The health risks of inhalation exposure to engineered nanomaterials in the workplace are a major concern in recent years, and hazard assessments of these materials are being conducted. The pulmonary surfactant of lung alveoli is the first biological entity to have contact with airborne nanomaterials in inhaled air. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the pulmonary surfactant components of rat lungs after a 4-week inhalation exposure to three different nanomaterials: fullerenes, nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), with similar levels of average aerosol concentration (0.13-0.37 mg/m(3)). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of the rat lungs stored after previous inhalation studies was analyzed, focusing on total protein and the surfactant components, such as phospholipids and surfactant-specific SP-D (surfactant protein D) and the BALF surface tension, which is affected by SP-B and SP-C. Compared with a control group, significant changes in the BALF surface tension and the concentrations of phospholipids, total protein and SP-D were observed in rats exposed to NiO nanoparticles, but not in those exposed to fullerenes. Surface tension and the levels of surfactant phospholipids and proteins were also significantly different in rats exposed to MWCNTs. The concentrations of phospholipids, total protein and SP-D and BALF surface tension were correlated significantly with the polymorphonuclear neutrophil counts in the BALF. These results suggest that pulmonary surfactant components can be used as measures of lung inflammation.

  20. Predictive model of cationic surfactant binding to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Koopal, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    The humic substances (HS) have a high reactivity with other components in the natural environment. An important factor for the reactivity of HS is their negative charge. Cationic surfactants bind strongly to HS by electrostatic and specific interaction. Therefore, a surfactant binding model is devel

  1. Constrained sessile drop as a new configuration to measure low surface tension in lung surfactant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Laura M Y; Lu, James J; Chan, Yawen W; Ng, Amy; Zhang, Ling; Hoorfar, Mina; Policova, Zdenka; Grundke, Karina; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2004-08-01

    Existing methodology for surface tension measurements based on drop shapes suffers from the shortcoming that it is not capable to function at very low surface tension if the liquid dispersion is opaque, such as therapeutic lung surfactants at clinically relevant concentrations. The novel configuration proposed here removes the two big restrictions, i.e., the film leakage problem that is encountered with such methods as the pulsating bubble surfactometer as well as the pendant drop arrangement, and the problem of the opaqueness of the liquid, as in the original captive bubble arrangement. A sharp knife edge is the key design feature in the constrained sessile drop that avoids film leakage at low surface tension. The use of the constrained sessile drop configuration in conjunction with axisymmetric drop shape analysis to measure surface tension allows complete automation of the setup. Dynamic studies with lung surfactant can be performed readily by changing the volume of a sessile drop, and thus the surface area, by means of a motor-driven syringe. To illustrate the validity of using this configuration, experiments were performed using an exogenous lung surfactant preparation, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) at 5.0 mg/ml. A comparison of results obtained for BLES at low concentration between the constrained sessile drop and captive bubble arrangement shows excellent agreement between the two approaches. When the surface area of the BLES film (0.5 mg/ml) was compressed by about the same amount in both systems, the minimum surface tensions attained were identical within the 95% confidence limits.

  2. Biophysical mimicry of lung surfactant protein B by random nylon-3 copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohm, Michelle T; Mowery, Brendan P; Czyzewski, Ann M; Stahl, Shannon S; Gellman, Samuel H; Barron, Annelise E

    2010-06-16

    Non-natural oligomers have recently shown promise as functional analogues of lung surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C), two helical and amphiphilic proteins that are critical for normal respiration. The generation of non-natural mimics of SP-B and SP-C has previously been restricted to step-by-step, sequence-specific synthesis, which results in discrete oligomers that are intended to manifest specific structural attributes. Here we present an alternative approach to SP-B mimicry that is based on sequence-random copolymers containing cationic and lipophilic subunits. These materials, members of the nylon-3 family, are prepared by ring-opening polymerization of beta-lactams. The best of the nylon-3 polymers display promising in vitro surfactant activities in a mixed lipid film. Pulsating bubble surfactometry data indicate that films containing the most surface-active polymers attain adsorptive and dynamic-cycling properties that surpass those of discrete peptides intended to mimic SP-B. Attachment of an N-terminal octadecanoyl unit to the nylon-3 copolymers, inspired by the post-translational modifications found in SP-C, affords further improvements by reducing the percent surface area compression to reach low minimum surface tension. Cytotoxic effects of the copolymers are diminished relative to that of an SP-B-derived peptide and a peptoid-based mimic. The current study provides evidence that sequence-random copolymers can mimic the in vitro surface-active behavior of lung surfactant proteins in a mixed lipid film. These findings raise the possibility that random copolymers might be useful for developing a lung surfactant replacement, which is an attractive prospect given that such polymers are easier to prepare than are sequence-specific oligomers.

  3. Surfactant protein-A suppresses eosinophil-mediated killing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in allergic lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie G Ledford

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein-A (SP-A has well-established functions in reducing bacterial and viral infections but its role in chronic lung diseases such as asthma is unclear. Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp frequently colonizes the airways of chronic asthmatics and is thought to contribute to exacerbations of asthma. Our lab has previously reported that during Mp infection of non-allergic airways, SP-A aides in maintaining airway homeostasis by inhibiting an overzealous TNF-alpha mediated response and, in allergic mice, SP-A regulates eosinophilic infiltration and inflammation of the airway. In the current study, we used an in vivo model with wild type (WT and SP-A(-/- allergic mice challenged with the model antigen ovalbumin (Ova that were concurrently infected with Mp (Ova+Mp to test the hypothesis that SP-A ameliorates Mp-induced stimulation of eosinophils. Thus, SP-A could protect allergic airways from injury due to release of eosinophil inflammatory products. SP-A deficient mice exhibit significant increases in inflammatory cells, mucus production and lung damage during concurrent allergic airway disease and infection (Ova+Mp as compared to the WT mice of the same treatment group. In contrast, SP-A deficient mice have significantly decreased Mp burden compared to WT mice. The eosinophil specific factor, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO, which has been implicated in pathogen killing and also in epithelial dysfunction due to oxidative damage of resident lung proteins, is enhanced in samples from allergic/infected SP-A(-/- mice as compared to WT mice. In vitro experiments using purified eosinophils and human SP-A suggest that SP-A limits the release of EPO from Mp-stimulated eosinophils thereby reducing their killing capacity. These findings are the first to demonstrate that although SP-A interferes with eosinophil-mediated biologic clearance of Mp by mediating the interaction of Mp with eosinophils, SP-A simultaneously benefits the airway by limiting inflammation

  4. Fluidization of a dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine monolayer by fluorocarbon gases: potential use in lung surfactant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Frédéric; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Vandamme, Thierry F; Goldmann, Michel; Fontaine, Philippe

    2006-05-01

    Fluorocarbon gases (gFCs) were found to inhibit the liquid-expanded (LE)/liquid-condensed (LC) phase transition of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) Langmuir monolayers. The formation of domains of an LC phase, which typically occurs in the LE/LC coexistence region upon compression of DPPC, is prevented when the atmosphere above the DPPC monolayer is saturated with a gFC. When contacted with gFC, the DPPC monolayer remains in the LE phase for surface pressures lower than 38 mN m(-1), as assessed by compression isotherms and fluorescence microscopy (FM). Moreover, gFCs can induce the dissolution of preexisting LC phase domains and facilitate the respreading of the DPPC molecules on the water surface, as shown by FM and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. gFCs have thus a highly effective fluidizing effect on the DPPC monolayer. This gFC-induced fluidizing effect was compared with the fluidizing effect brought about by a mixture of unsaturated lipids and proteins, namely the two commercially available lung surfactant substitutes, Curosurf and Survanta, which are derived from porcine and bovine lung extracts, respectively. The candidate FCs were chosen among those already investigated for biomedical applications, and in particular for intravascular oxygen transport, i.e., perfluorooctyl bromide, perfluorooctylethane, bis(perfluorobutyl)ethene, perfluorodecalin, and perfluorooctane. The fluidizing effect is most effective with the linear FCs. This study suggests that FCs, whose biocompatibility is well documented, may be useful in lung surfactant substitute compositions.

  5. Pilot study exploring lung allograft surfactant protein A (SP-A) expression in association with lung transplant outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ovidio, F; Kaneda, H; Chaparro, C; Mura, M; Lederer, D; Di Angelo, S; Takahashi, H; Gutierrez, C; Hutcheon, M; Singer, L G; Waddell, T K; Floros, J; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2013-10-01

    Primary graft failure and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) limit lung transplant long-term outcomes. Various lung diseases have been correlated with surfactant protein (SP) expression and polymorphisms. We sought to investigate the role of SP expression in lung allografts prior to implantation, in relation to posttransplant outcomes. The expression of SP-(A, B, C, D) mRNA was assayed in 42 allografts. Posttransplant assessments include pulmonary function tests, bronchoscopy, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and biopsies to determine allograft rejection. BALF was assayed for SP-A, SP-D in addition to cytokines IL-8, IL-12 and IL-2. The diagnosis of CLAD was evaluated 6 months after transplantation. Lung allografts with low SP-A mRNA expression prior to implantation reduced survival (Log-rank p < 0.0001). No association was noted for the other SPs. Allografts with low SP-A mRNA had greater IL-2 (p = 0.03) and IL-12 (p < 0.0001) in the BALF and a greater incidence of rejection episodes (p = 0.003). Levels of SP-A mRNA expression were associated with the SP-A2 polymorphisms (p = 0.015). Specifically, genotype 1A1A(0) was associated with lower SP-A mRNA expression (p < 0.05). Lung allografts with low levels of SP-A mRNA expression are associated with reduced survival. Lung allograft SP-A mRNA expression appears to be associated with SP-A gene polymorphisms.

  6. Pulmonary toxicity of trichloroethylene: induction of changes in surfactant phospholipids and phospholipase A2 activity in the mouse lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J E; Forkert, P G; Oulton, M; Rasmusson, M G; Temple, S; Fraser, M O; Whitefield, S

    1988-08-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common organic solvent in use as a dry cleaning agent as well as an inhalant anesthetic. Nevertheless the effects of this material on the pulmonary surfactant which prevents alveolar collapse at maximal expiration is not known. Therefore, we have examined the effect of TCE on the intra- and extracellular surfactant pools and the activity of phospholipase A2, an enzyme which controls the remodeling of phosphatidylcholine to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, the primary constituent of the pulmonary surfactant. Male CD-1 mice were treated ip with 2500 or 3000 mg/kg TCE. Twenty-four hours later mice were anesthetized and the lungs lavaged. Mice were then killed, the lungs perfused and excised, and subcellular fractions including lamellar bodies prepared. Some lungs were prepared for ultrastructural examination. Phospholipase A2 was assayed in all subcellular fractions. Phospholipid was assayed in the lavage (extracellular surfactant) and the lamellar bodies (intracellular surfactant). TCE (2500 mg/kg) caused selective exfoliation of Clara cells. However, only the dose of 3000 mg/kg TCE produced a significant decrease in the intracellular surfactant phospholipid. Minimal changes occurred in the phospholipid profiles. Phospholipase A2 specific activity was significantly decreased at both dosages within the lung microsomal fraction. In addition after treatment with 3000 mg/kg TCE the enzyme activity in the lamellar body fraction was significantly increased. These data suggest that inhalation of TCE may damage the enzymes which are responsible for synthesizing the pulmonary surfactant resulting in lower amounts of surfactant being stored and available for secretion into the alveolus.

  7. Lung deposition and toxicological responses evoked by multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in a synthetic lung surfactant in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzani, Carole; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Vonesch, Jean-Luc; Lebeau, Luc; Pons, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we elaborated a synthetic lung surfactant composed of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), phosphatidylglycerol, cholesterol and bovine serum albumin (BSA), as a vehicle to study the lung toxicity of pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). MWCNT were dispersed in surfactant, saline or saline containing DPPC, BSA, Pluronic(®) F68 or sodium dodecyl sulfate, for comparison. Dispersions were characterized visually, and by light microscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). Deposition of surfactant-dispersed MWCNT in the lung of BALB/c mice upon single or repeated administrations was analyzed by histology and TEM. Inflammation and airway remodeling were assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) or lung tissue of mice by counting cells and quantifying cytokines, tumor growth factor (TGF)-β1 and collagen, and by histology. We found that the elaborated surfactant is more effective in dispersing MWCNT when compared to the other agents, while being biocompatible. Surfactant-dispersed MWCNT distributed all throughout the mouse airways upon single and repeated administrations and were observed in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells, and in infiltrated neutrophils. Mice that received a single administration of MWCNT showed neutrophil infiltrate and greater concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) and interleukin (IL)-17 in BALF when compared to controls. After repeated MWCNT administrations, increases in macrophage number, KC and TGF-β1 levels in BALF, and collagen deposition and mucus hyperplasia in lung tissue were observed. Altogether, the elaborated lung surfactant could be a valuable tool to further study the toxicological impact of pristine MWCNT in laboratory animals.

  8. Synthetic lung surfactants containing SP-B and SP-C peptides plus novel phospholipase-resistant lipids or glycerophospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Notter

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background This study examines the biophysical and preclinical pulmonary activity of synthetic lung surfactants containing novel phospholipase-resistant phosphonolipids or synthetic glycerophospholipids combined with Super Mini-B (S-MB DATK and/or SP-Css ion-lock 1 peptides that replicate the functional biophysics of surfactant proteins (SP-B and SP-C. Phospholipase-resistant phosphonolipids used in synthetic surfactants are DEPN-8 and PG-1, molecular analogs of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC and palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylglycerol (POPG, while glycerophospholipids used are active lipid components of native surfactant (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight. The objective of the work is to test whether these novel lipid/peptide synthetic surfactants have favorable preclinical activity (biophysical, pulmonary for therapeutic use in reversing surfactant deficiency or dysfunction in lung disease or injury. Methods Surface activity of synthetic lipid/peptide surfactants was assessed in vitro at 37 °C by measuring adsorption in a stirred subphase apparatus and dynamic surface tension lowering in pulsating and captive bubble surfactometers. Shear viscosity was measured as a function of shear rate on a Wells-Brookfield micro-viscometer. In vivo pulmonary activity was determined by measuring lung function (arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance in ventilated rats and rabbits with surfactant deficiency/dysfunction induced by saline lavage to lower arterial PO2 to <100 mmHg, consistent with clinical acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Results Synthetic surfactants containing 5:3:2 DPPC:POPC:POPG or 9:1 DEPN-8:PG-1 combined with 3% (by wt of S-MB DATK, 3% SP-Css ion-lock 1, or 1.5% each of both peptides all adsorbed rapidly to low equilibrium surface tensions and also reduced surface tension to ≤1 mN/m under dynamic compression at 37 °C. However, dual-peptide surfactants containing 1.5% S-MB DATK + 1.5% SP-Css ion-lock 1 combined with

  9. Correlations of Mechanical Stability, Morphology, Pulmonary Surfactant, and Phospholipid Content in the Developing Lamb Lung*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, George W.; Chernick, Victor; Hodson, W. Alan; Normand, Colin; Fenner, Axel; Avery, Mary Ellen

    1967-01-01

    Pressure-volume characteristics and surface tension measurements of the lamb of 120 to 130 days gestational age were typical of the mature lung in the upper lobes and the immature lung in the lower lobes. By term both upper and lower lobes had findings characteristic of the mature animal. Phospholipid concentration per milligram DNA and per cent saturated fatty acids on pulmonary phosphatidyl choline were relatively constant from 60 to 120 days gestational age; thereafter there was a significant increase in both measurements. These changes usually coincided with an increase in osmiophilic inclusion bodies in the large alveolar cell. A concentration of disaturated phosphatidyl choline per milligram DNA in excess of 0.170 mg per mg was associated with a minimal surface tension below 13 dynes per cm (p < 0.001). Newborn animal lungs contained over 3 times this critical concentration, whereas adult lungs contained 1.5 times this value. The excess disaturated phosphatidyl choline per milligram DNA may represent a reservoir of pulmonary surfactant. Images PMID:6025487

  10. Effects of continuous tracheal gas insufflation during pressure limited ventilation on pulmonary surfactant in rabbits with acute lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Guang-fa; ZHANG Wei; ZONG Hua; LIANG Ying

    2006-01-01

    .44±0.07) as compared with CMV.Conclusions In this animal model of ALI, TGI decreased ventilatory requirements (PIP, VT and VD/VT),resulted in more favourable alveolar pulmonary surfactant composition and function and less severity of lung injury than CMV. TGI in combination with pressure limited ventilation may be a lung protective strategy for ALI.

  11. Mathematical Modelling of Surfactant Self-assembly at Interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Morgan, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. We present a mathematical model to describe the distribution of surfactant pairs in a multilayer structure beneath an adsorbed monolayer. A mesoscopic model comprising a set of ordinary differential equations that couple the rearrangement of surfactant within the multilayer to the surface adsorption kinetics is first derived. This model is then extended to the macroscopic scale by taking the continuum limit that exploits the typically large number of surfactant layers, which results in a novel third-order partial differential equation. The model is generalized to allow for the presence of two adsorbing boundaries, which results in an implicit free-boundary problem. The system predicts physically observed features in multilayer systems such as the initial formation of smaller lamellar structures and the typical number of layers that form in equilibrium.

  12. Effect of Minimally Invasive Surfactant Therapy on Lung Volume and Ventilation in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burg, Pauline S; de Jongh, Frans H; Miedema, Martijn; Frerichs, Inez; van Kaam, Anton H

    2016-03-01

    To assess the changes in (regional) lung volume and gas exchange during minimally invasive surfactant therapy (MIST) in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. In this prospective observational study, infants requiring a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) ≥ 0.30 during nasal continuous positive airway pressure of 6 cmH2O were eligible for MIST. Surfactant (160-240 mg/kg) was administered in supine position in 1-3 minutes via an umbilical catheter placed 2 cm below the vocal cords. Changes in end-expiratory lung volume (EELV), tidal volume, and its distribution were recorded continuously with electrical impedance tomography before and up to 60 minutes after MIST. Changes in transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2) and partial carbon dioxide pressure, FiO2, respiratory rate, and minute ventilation were recorded. A total of 16 preterm infants were included. One patient did not finish study protocol because of severe apnea 10 minutes after MIST. In the remaining infants (gestational age 29.8 ± 2.8 weeks, body weight 1545 ± 481 g) EELV showed a rapid and sustained increase, starting in the dependent lung regions, followed by the nondependent regions approximately 5 minutes later. Oxygenation, expressed as the SpO2/FiO2 ratio, increased from 233 (IQR 206-257) to 418 (IQR 356-446) after 60 minutes (P transcutaneous partial carbon dioxide pressure was comparable with pre-MIST values. Ventilation distribution remained unchanged. MIST results in a rapid and homogeneous increase in EELV, which is associated with an improvement in oxygenation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Endogenous lung surfactant inspired pH responsive nanovesicle aerosols: Pulmonary compatible and site-specific drug delivery in lung metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nitin; Shirsath, Nitesh; Singh, Ankur; Joshi, Kalpana S.; Banerjee, Rinti

    2014-11-01

    Concerns related to pulmonary toxicity and non-specificity of nanoparticles have limited their clinical applications for aerosol delivery of chemotherapeutics in lung cancer. We hypothesized that pulmonary surfactant mimetic nanoparticles that offer pH responsive release specifically in tumor may be a possible solution to overcome these issues. We therefore developed lung surfactant mimetic and pH responsive lipid nanovesicles for aerosol delivery of paclitaxel in metastatic lung cancer. 100-200 nm sized nanovesicles showed improved fusogenicity and cytosolic drug release, specifically with cancer cells, thereby resulting in improved cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in B16F10 murine melanoma cells and cytocompatibility with normal lung fibroblasts (MRC 5). The nanovesicles showed airway patency similar to that of endogenous pulmonary surfactant and did not elicit inflammatory response in alveolar macrophages. Their aerosol administration while significantly improving the biodistribution of paclitaxel in comparison to Taxol (i.v.), also showed significantly higher metastastes inhibition (~75%) in comparison to that of i.v. Taxol and i.v. Abraxane. No signs of interstitial pulmonary fiborisis, chronic inflammation and any other pulmonary toxicity were observed with nanovesicle formulation. Overall, these nanovesicles may be a potential platform to efficiently deliver hydrophobic drugs as aerosol in metastatic lung cancer and other lung diseases, without causing pulmonary toxicity.

  14. Prediction of acute inhalation toxicity using in vitro lung surfactant inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørli, Jorid Birkelund; Huang, Yishi; Da Silva, Emilie

    2017-01-01

    numbers and amounts and exhibit great variety. Therefore, an alternative method to screen for acute inhalation toxicity is needed. The aim of our study was to determine if inhibition of lung surfactant by impregnation products in vitro could accurately predict toxicity in vivo in mice. We tested 21...... the chemical composition of the products and induction of toxicity. The currently accepted method for determination of acute inhalation toxicity is based on experiments on animals; it is time-consuming, expensive and causes stress for the animals. Impregnation products are present on the market in large...... impregnation products using the constant flow through set-up of the constrained drop surfactometer to determine if they inhibited LS function or not. The same products were tested in a mouse inhalation bioassay to determine their toxicity in vivo. The sensitivity was 100%, i.e. the in vitro method predicted...

  15. Cloning of gp-340, a putative opsonin receptor for lung surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, U; Mollenhauer, J; Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an oligomeric C type lectin that promotes phagocytosis by binding to microbial surface carbohydrates. A 340-kDa glycoprotein (gp-340) has been shown to bind SP-D in the presence of calcium but does so independently of carbohydrate recognition. This protein exists both...... transcription-PCR analysis showed that the main sites of synthesis of gp-340 are lung, trachea, salivary gland, small intestine, and stomach. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong staining for gp-340 in alveolar and other tissue macrophages. Immunostaining of the macrophage membrane was either uniform or focal...... intestine and in the ducts of salivary glands. The distribution of gp-340 in macrophages is compatible with a role as an opsonin receptor for SP-D....

  16. Environmental Pollutant Ozone Causes Damage to Lung Surfactant Protein B (SP-B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is an essential protein found in the surfactant fluid at the air–water interface of the lung. Exposure to the air pollutant ozone could potentially damage SP-B and lead to respiratory distress. We have studied two peptides, one consisting of the N-terminus of SP-B [SP-B(1–25)] and the other a construct of the N- and C-termini of SP-B [SP-B(1–25,63–78)], called SMB. Exposure to dilute levels of ozone (∼2 ppm) of monolayers of each peptide at the air–water interface leads to a rapid reaction, which is evident from an increase in the surface tension. Fluorescence experiments revealed that this increase in surface tension is accompanied by a loss of fluorescence from the tryptophan residue at the interface. Neutron and X-ray reflectivity experiments show that, in contrast to suggestions in the literature, the peptides are not solubilized upon oxidation but rather remain at the interface with little change in their hydration. Analysis of the product material reveals that no cleavage of the peptides occurs, but a more hydrophobic product is slowly formed together with an increased level of oligomerization. We attributed this to partial unfolding of the peptides. Experiments conducted in the presence of phospholipids reveal that the presence of the lipids does not prevent oxidation of the peptides. Our results strongly suggest that exposure to low levels of ozone gas will damage SP-B, leading to a change in its structure. The implication is that the oxidized protein will be impaired in its ability to interact at the air–water interface with negatively charged phosphoglycerol lipids, thus compromising what is thought to be its main biological function. PMID:26270023

  17. Expression profiles of hydrophobic surfactant proteins in children with diffuse chronic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guttentag Susan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormalities of the intracellular metabolism of the hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C and their precursors may be causally linked to chronic childhood diffuse lung diseases. The profile of these proteins in the alveolar space is unknown in such subjects. Methods We analyzed bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by Western blotting for SP-B, SP-C and their proforms in children with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP, n = 15, children with no SP-B (n = 6, children with chronic respiratory distress of unknown cause (cRD, n = 7, in comparison to children without lung disease (n = 15 or chronic obstructive bronchitis (n = 19. Results Pro-SP-B of 25–26 kD was commonly abundant in all groups of subjects, suggesting that their presence is not of diagnostic value for processing defects. In contrast, pro-SP-B peptides cleaved off during intracellular processing of SP-B and smaller than 19–21 kD, were exclusively found in PAP and cRD. In 4 of 6 children with no SP-B, mutations of SFTPB or SPTPC genes were found. Pro-SP-C forms were identified at very low frequency. Their presence was clearly, but not exclusively associated with mutations of the SFTPB and SPTPC genes, impeding their usage as candidates for diagnostic screening. Conclusion Immuno-analysis of the hydrophobic surfactant proteins and their precursor forms in bronchoalveolar lavage is minimally invasive and can give valuable clues for the involvement of processing abnormalities in pediatric pulmonary disorders.

  18. Alterations of alveolar type II cells and intraalveolar surfactant after bronchoalveolar lavage and perfluorocarbon ventilation. An electron microscopical and stereological study in the rat lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhardt Wolfram

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeated bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL has been used in animals to induce surfactant depletion and to study therapeutical interventions of subsequent respiratory insufficiency. Intratracheal administration of surface active agents such as perfluorocarbons (PFC can prevent the alveolar collapse in surfactant depleted lungs. However, it is not known how BAL or subsequent PFC administration affect the intracellular and intraalveolar surfactant pool. Methods Male wistar rats were surfactant depleted by BAL and treated for 1 hour by conventional mechanical ventilation (Lavaged-Gas, n = 5 or partial liquid ventilation with PF 5080 (Lavaged-PF5080, n = 5. For control, 10 healthy animals with gas (Healthy-Gas, n = 5 or PF5080 filled lungs (Healthy-PF5080, n = 5 were studied. A design-based stereological approach was used for quantification of lung parenchyma and the intracellular and intraalveolar surfactant pool at the light and electron microscopic level. Results Compared to Healthy-lungs, Lavaged-animals had more type II cells with lamellar bodies in the process of secretion and freshly secreted lamellar body-like surfactant forms in the alveoli. The fraction of alveolar epithelial surface area covered with surfactant and total intraalveolar surfactant content were significantly smaller in Lavaged-animals. Compared with Gas-filled lungs, both PF5080-groups had a significantly higher total lung volume, but no other differences. Conclusion After BAL-induced alveolar surfactant depletion the amount of intracellularly stored surfactant is about half as high as in healthy animals. In lavaged animals short time liquid ventilation with PF5080 did not alter intra- or extracellular surfactant content or subtype composition.

  19. Sustained inflation at birth did not alter lung injury from mechanical ventilation in surfactant-treated fetal lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah H Hillman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sustained inflations (SI are used with the initiation of ventilation at birth to rapidly recruit functional residual capacity and may decrease lung injury and the need for mechanical ventilation in preterm infants. However, a 20 second SI in surfactant-deficient preterm lambs caused an acute phase injury response without decreasing lung injury from subsequent mechanical ventilation. HYPOTHESIS: A 20 second SI at birth will decrease lung injury from mechanical ventilation in surfactant-treated preterm fetal lambs. METHODS: The head and chest of fetal sheep at 126±1 day GA were exteriorized, with tracheostomy and removal of fetal lung fluid prior to treatment with surfactant (300 mg in 15 ml saline. Fetal lambs were randomized to one of four 15 minute interventions: 1 PEEP 8 cmH2O; 2 20 sec SI at 40 cmH2O, then PEEP 8 cmH2O; 3 mechanical ventilation with 7 ml/kg tidal volume; or 4 20 sec SI then mechanical ventilation at 7 ml/kg. Fetal lambs remained on placental support for the intervention and for 30 min after the intervention. RESULTS: SI recruited a mean volume of 6.8±0.8 mL/kg. SI did not alter respiratory physiology during mechanical ventilation. Heat shock protein (HSP 70, HSP60, and total protein in lung fluid similarly increased in both ventilation groups. Modest pro-inflammatory cytokine and acute phase responses, with or without SI, were similar with ventilation. SI alone did not increase markers of injury. CONCLUSION: In surfactant treated fetal lambs, a 20 sec SI did not alter ventilation physiology or markers of lung injury from mechanical ventilation.

  20. Pulmonary surfactant augments cytotoxicity of silica nanoparticles: Studies on an in vitro air–blood barrier model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Y. Kasper

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The air–blood barrier is a very thin membrane of about 2.2 µm thickness and therefore represents an ideal portal of entry for nanoparticles to be used therapeutically in a regenerative medicine strategy. Until now, numerous studies using cellular airway models have been conducted in vitro in order to investigate the potential hazard of NPs. However, in most in vitro studies a crucial alveolar component has been neglected. Before aspirated NPs encounter the cellular air–blood barrier, they impinge on the alveolar surfactant layer (10–20 nm in thickness that lines the entire alveolar surface. Thus, a prior interaction of NPs with pulmonary surfactant components will occur. In the present study we explored the impact of pulmonary surfactant on the cytotoxic potential of amorphous silica nanoparticles (aSNPs using in vitro mono- and complex coculture models of the air–blood barrier. Furthermore, different surface functionalisations (plain-unmodified, amino, carboxylate of the aSNPs were compared in order to study the impact of chemical surface properties on aSNP cytotoxicity in combination with lung surfactant. The alveolar epithelial cell line A549 was used in mono- and in coculture with the microvascular cell line ISO-HAS-1 in the form of different cytotoxicity assays (viability, membrane integrity, inflammatory responses such as IL-8 release. At a distinct concentration (100 µg/mL aSNP–plain displayed the highest cytotoxicity and IL-8 release in monocultures of A549. aSNP–NH2 caused a slight toxic effect, whereas aSNP–COOH did not exhibit any cytotoxicity. In combination with lung surfactant, aSNP–plain revealed an increased cytotoxicity in monocultures of A549, aSNP–NH2 caused a slightly augmented toxic effect, whereas aSNP–COOH did not show any toxic alterations. A549 in coculture did not show any decreased toxicity (membrane integrity for aSNP–plain in combination with lung surfactant. However, a significant augmented

  1. AMOTL2 interaction with TAZ causes the inhibition of surfactant proteins expression in lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucci, Valeria; Di Palma, Tina; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Scaloni, Andrea; Zannini, Mariastella

    2013-10-25

    TAZ (Transcriptional co-Activator with PDZ-binding motif), is a biologically potent transcriptional coactivator and functions by binding to the PPXY motif present in several transcription factors. Notably, TAZ behaves as a transducer linking cytoplasmic signaling events to transcriptional regulation in the nucleus. Several different factors regulate TAZ expression and/or function. In particular, a major regulation of TAZ activity occurs through the Hippo pathway by a phosphorylation-mediated mechanism that causes its cytoplasmic sequestration or degradation. Here we demonstrate that AMOTL2 robustly co-immunoprecipitates with TAZ, and their interaction is dependent on the WW domain of TAZ and the PPXY motif in the N-terminus of AMOTL2. Furthermore, we show that AMOTL2 colocalizes with TAZ in the cytoplasm of H441 human lung cells and regulates TAZ cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation through direct protein-protein interaction. Interestingly, the overexpression of AMOTL2 inhibits the functional cooperation between the transcription factor TTF-1 and TAZ on the Surfactant C gene promoter, as well as the expression of other known target genes of these regulatory factors. Taken together, our results suggest an inhibitory role of AMOTL2 on TAZ ability to co-activate transcription and describe a different mechanism, Hippo pathway-independent, that modulates the activity of TAZ in lung cells through the interaction with Angiomotin-like 2 (AMOTL2). © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Surfactant before the first inflation at birth improves spatial distribution of ventilation and reduces lung injury in preterm lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingay, David G; Wallace, Megan J; Bhatia, Risha; Schmölzer, Georg M; Zahra, Valerie A; Dolan, Melinda J; Hooper, Stuart B; Davis, Peter G

    2014-02-01

    The interrelationship between the role of surfactant and a sustained inflation (SI) to aid ex utero transition of the preterm lung is unknown. We compared the effect of surfactant administered before and after an initial SI on gas exchange, lung mechanics, spatial distribution of ventilation, and lung injury in preterm lambs. Gestational-age lambs (127 days; 9 per group) received 100 mg/kg of a surfactant (Curosurf) either prior (Surf+SI) or 10 min after birth (SI+Surf). At birth, a 20-s, 35 cmH2O SI was applied, followed by 70 min of positive pressure ventilation. Oxygenation, carbon dioxide removal, respiratory system compliance, end-expiratory thoracic volume (via respiratory inductive plethysmography), and distribution of end-expiratory volume and ventilation (via electrical impedance tomography) were measured throughout. Early markers of lung injury were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR. During the first 15 min, oxygenation, carbon dioxide removal, and compliance were better in the Surf+SI group (all P ventilation was more uniform in the Surf+SI group throughout; 50.1 ± 10.9% of total ventilation in the left hemithorax at 70 min vs. 42.6 ± 11.1% in the SI+Surf group. Surf+SI resulted in lower mRNA levels of CYR61 and EGR1 compared with SI+Surf (P mechanical and injury response to a sustained inflation and ventilation by changing surface tension of the air/fluid interface.

  3. Secretagogues of lung surfactant increase annexin A7 localization with ABCA3 in alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerelsaikhan, Tudevdagva; Chen, Xiao-Liang; Chander, Avinash

    2011-12-01

    Membrane fusion between the lamellar bodies and plasma membrane is an obligatory event in the secretion of lung surfactant. Previous studies have postulated a role for annexin A7 (A7) in membrane fusion during exocytosis in some cells including alveolar type II cells. However, the intracellular trafficking of A7 during such fusion is not described. In this study, we investigated association of endogenous A7 with lamellar bodies in alveolar type II cells following treatment with several secretagogues of lung surfactant. Biochemical studies with specific antibodies showed increased membrane-association of cell A7 in type II cells stimulated with agents that increase secretion through different signaling mechanisms. Immuno-fluorescence studies showed increased co-localization of A7 with ABCA3, the lamellar body marker protein. Because these agents increase surfactant secretion through activation of PKC and PKA, we also investigated the effects of PKC and PKA inhibitors, bisindolylmaleimideI (BisI) and H89, respectively, on A7 partitioning. Western blot analysis showed that these inhibitors prevented secretagogue-mediated A7 increase in the membrane fractions. These inhibitors also blocked increased co-localization of A7 with ABCA3 in secretagogue-treated cells, as revealed by immuno-fluorescence studies. In vitro studies with recombinant A7 showed phosphorylation with PKC and PKA. The cell A7 was also phosphorylated in cells treated with surfactant secretagogues. Thus, our studies demonstrate that annexin A7 relocates to lamellar bodies in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We suggest that activation of protein kinase promotes phosphorylation and membrane-association of A7 presumably to facilitate membrane fusion during lung surfactant secretion.

  4. Computational multiscale toxicodynamic modeling of silver and carbon nanoparticle effects on mouse lung function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwaipayan Mukherjee

    Full Text Available A computational, multiscale toxicodynamic model has been developed to quantify and predict pulmonary effects due to uptake of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs in mice. The model consists of a collection of coupled toxicodynamic modules, that were independently developed and tested using information obtained from the literature. The modules were developed to describe the dynamics of tissue with explicit focus on the cells and the surfactant chemicals that regulate the process of breathing, as well as the response of the pulmonary system to xenobiotics. Alveolar type I and type II cells, and alveolar macrophages were included in the model, along with surfactant phospholipids and surfactant proteins, to account for processes occurring at multiple biological scales, coupling cellular and surfactant dynamics affected by nanoparticle exposure, and linking the effects to tissue-level lung function changes. Nanoparticle properties such as size, surface chemistry, and zeta potential were explicitly considered in modeling the interactions of these particles with biological media. The model predictions were compared with in vivo lung function response measurements in mice and analysis of mice lung lavage fluid following exposures to silver and carbon nanoparticles. The predictions were found to follow the trends of observed changes in mouse surfactant composition over 7 days post dosing, and are in good agreement with the observed changes in mouse lung function over the same period of time.

  5. Gradient dynamics models for liquid films with soluble surfactant

    CERN Document Server

    Thiele, Uwe; Pismen, Len M

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose equations of motion for the dynamics of liquid films of surfactant suspensions that consist of a general gradient dynamics framework based on an underlying energy functional. This extends the gradient dynamics approach to dissipative non-equilibrium thin film systems with several variables, and casts their dynamic equations into a form that reproduces Onsager's reciprocity relations. We first discuss the general form of gradient dynamics models for an arbitrary number of fields and discuss simple well-known examples with one or two fields. Next, we develop the gradient dynamics (three field) model for a thin liquid film covered by soluble surfactant and discuss how it automatically results in consistent convective (driven by pressure gradients, Marangoni forces and Korteweg stresses), diffusive, adsorption/desorption, and evaporation fluxes. We then show that in the dilute limit, the model reduces to the well-known hydrodynamic form that includes Marangoni fluxes due to a linear equat...

  6. Surfactant disaturated-phosphatidylcholine kinetics in acute respiratory distress syndrome by stable isotopes and a two compartment model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cogo Paola E

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, it is well known that only part of the lungs is aerated and surfactant function is impaired, but the extent of lung damage and changes in surfactant turnover remain unclear. The objective of the study was to evaluate surfactant disaturated-phosphatidylcholine turnover in patients with ARDS using stable isotopes. Methods We studied 12 patients with ARDS and 7 subjects with normal lungs. After the tracheal instillation of a trace dose of 13C-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, we measured the 13C enrichment over time of palmitate residues of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine isolated from tracheal aspirates. Data were interpreted using a model with two compartments, alveoli and lung tissue, and kinetic parameters were derived assuming that, in controls, alveolar macrophages may degrade between 5 and 50% of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine, the rest being lost from tissue. In ARDS we assumed that 5–100% of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine is degraded in the alveolar space, due to release of hydrolytic enzymes. Some of the kinetic parameters were uniquely determined, while others were identified as lower and upper bounds. Results In ARDS, the alveolar pool of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine was significantly lower than in controls (0.16 ± 0.04 vs. 1.31 ± 0.40 mg/kg, p de novo synthesis of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine were also significantly lower, while mean resident time in lung tissue was significantly higher in ARDS than in controls. Recycling was 16.2 ± 3.5 in ARDS and 31.9 ± 7.3 in controls (p = 0.08. Conclusion In ARDS the alveolar pool of surfactant is reduced and disaturated-phosphatidylcholine turnover is altered.

  7. Modeling transport effects of perfluorinated and hydrocarbon surfactants in groundwater by using micellar liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Rashad N. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1322 (United States); McGuffin, Victoria L. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1322 (United States)], E-mail: jgshabus@aol.com

    2007-11-05

    The effects of hydrocarbon and perfluorinated surfactants, above their critical micelle concentration (CMC), on the transport of neutral environmental pollutants are compared. Reversed-phase micellar liquid chromatography is used to model the groundwater system. The octadecylsilica stationary phase serves to simulate soil particles containing organic matter, whereas the aqueous surfactant mobile phases serve to simulate groundwater containing a surfactant at varying concentrations. Sodium dodecyl sulfate and lithium perfluorooctane sulfonate are used as representatives of the hydrocarbon and perfluorinated surfactants, respectively. Benzene, mono- and perhalogenated benzenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are used as models for environmental pollutants. Transport effects were elucidated from the retention factor, k, and the equilibrium constant per micelle, K{sub eq}, of the model pollutants in the individual surfactants. Based on k values, the transport of the model pollutants increased in both surfactant solutions in comparison to pure water. As the concentration of the surfactants increased, the transport of the pollutants increased as well. Notably, the K{sub eq} values of the pollutants in the perfluorinated surfactant were at least an order of magnitude less than those in the hydrocarbon surfactant. Overall, these results suggest that the presence of a perfluorinated surfactant, above its CMC, increases the transport of pollutants in a groundwater system. However, the perfluorinated surfactant exhibits a lesser transport effect than the hydrocarbon surfactant.

  8. Comparison of DPPC and DPPG environments in pulmonary surfactant models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Michael R; Temple, Sara; Stewart, June; Keough, Kevin M W

    2007-07-01

    Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance was used to monitor lipid acyl-chain orientational order in suspensions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) containing Ca(2+) and the lung surfactant proteins SP-A and SP-B separately and together. To distinguish between protein-lipid interactions involving the PC and PG lipid headgroups and to examine whether such interactions might influence spatial distribution of lipids within the bilayer, acyl chains on either the DPPC or the DPPG component of the mixture were deuterated. The lipid components of the resulting mixtures were thus either DPPC-d(62)/DPPG (7:3) or DPPC/DPPG-d(62) (7:3), respectively. SP-A had little effect on DPPC-d(62) chain order but did narrow the temperature range over which DPPG-d(62) ordered at the liquid-crystal-to-gel transition. No segregation of lipid components was seen for temperatures above or below the transition. Near the transition, though, there was evidence that SP-A promoted preferential depletion of DPPG from liquid crystalline domains in the temperature range over which gel and liquid crystal domains coexist. SP-B lowered average chain order of both lipids both above and below the main transition. The perturbations of chain order by SP-A and SP-B together were smaller than by SP-B alone. This reduction in perturbation of the lipids by the additional presence of SP-A likely indicated a strong interaction between SP-A and SP-B. The competitive lipid-lipid, lipid-protein, and protein-protein interactions suggested by these observations presumably facilitate the reorganization of surfactant material inherent in the transformation from lamellar bodies to a functional surfactant layer.

  9. Dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes by a natural lung surfactant for pulmonary in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercer Robert R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulating evidence indicate that the degree of dispersion of nanoparticles has a strong influence on their biological activities. The aims of this study were to develop a simple and rapid method of nanoparticle dispersion using a natural lung surfactant and to evaluate the effect of dispersion status of SWCNT on cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity in vitro and in vivo. Results The natural lung surfactant Survanta® was used to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT in a biological medium. At physiologically relevant concentrations, Survanta® produced well dispersed SWCNT without causing a cytotoxic or fibrogenic effect. In vitro studies show that Survanta®-dispersed SWCNT (SD-SWCNT stimulated proliferation of lung epithelial cells at low doses (0.04-0.12 μg/ml or 0.02-0.06 μg/cm2 exposed surface area but had a suppressive effect at high doses. Non-dispersed SWCNT (ND-SWCNT did not exhibit these effects, suggesting the importance of dispersion status of SWCNT on bioactivities. Studies using cultured human lung fibroblasts show that SD-SWCNT stimulated collagen production of the cells. This result is supported by a similar observation using Acetone/sonication dispersed SWCNT (AD-SWCNT, suggesting that Survanta® did not mask the bioactivity of SWCNT. Likewise, in vivo studies show that both SD-SWCNT and AD-SWCNT induced lung fibrosis in mice, whereas the dispersing agent Survanta® alone or Survanta®-dispersed control ultrafine carbon black had no effect. Conclusions The results indicate that Survanta® was effective in dispersing SWCNT in biological media without causing cytotoxic effects at the test concentrations used in this study. SD-SWCNT stimulated collagen production of lung fibroblasts in vitro and induced lung fibrosis in vivo. Similar results were observed with AD-SWCNT, supporting the conclusion that Survanta® did not mask the bioactivities of SWCNT and thus can be used as an effective dispersing agent

  10. Effects of simulated microgravity on surfactant and water balance of lung in animals with different resistance to stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryndina, Irina; Vasilieva, Natalia

    Weightlessness is accompanied by redistribution of blood flow in lung, changes of lung volumes and gas exchange (Prisk et al., 2002; Grigoriev, Baranov, 2003). On the other hand, it is known that microgravity is considered as a kind of moderate stress (Grigoriev et al., 2004). Stress response may differ in animals resistant or vulnerable to stress (Sudakov, 2007). To study the effects of simulated microgravity upon lung, we used 20 male albino rats tested for behavior in the "open field" and than divided into active (stress resistant - SR ) and passive (stress vulnerable - CV) groups. Two mouse lines were used with similar goal - C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice (n=16). According to data obtained earlier, BALB/c mice referred as more stress vulnerable, in contrast to C57BL/6 mice, which are considered to be relatively stress resistant (Flint et al., 2007). We have previously shown that changes in lung surfactant system after psychosocial stress or long-term immobilization are less pronounced in stress resistant rats (Vasilieva, Bryndina, 2012). The aim of this work is to study the properties and biochemical composition of pulmonary surfactant and lung water balance in rats and mice with different stress resistance in antiorthostatic suspension (AOS) of short and long duration. Simulated microgravity was reproduced according to procedure of Ilyin-Novikov in modification of Morey-Holton. The duration of exposure was 10 days for rats and 30 days for mice. The properties of pulmonary surfactant were assessed by the evaluation of surface activity (surface tension - ST), the content of total phospholipids (PL) and their fractions. Simultaneously we calculated the gravimetric water balance indices: lung coefficient, "dry residue" and wet-to-dry ratio. Total and extravascular lung fluid and pulmonary blood supply were estimated as well. The experiments demonstrated that there was a decrease of surface tension of surfactant films after 10-day AOS in both groups of rats (to a greater

  11. Delivery and performance of surfactant replacement therapies to treat pulmonary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendy, Nashwa; Kaviratna, Anubhav; Berkland, Cory; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2013-08-01

    Lung surfactant is crucial for optimal pulmonary function throughout life. An absence or deficiency of surfactant can affect the surfactant pool leading to respiratory distress. Even if the coupling between surfactant dysfunction and the underlying disease is not always well understood, using exogenous surfactants as replacement is usually a standard therapeutic option in respiratory distress. Exogenous surfactants have been extensively studied in animal models and clinical trials. The present article provides an update on the evolution of surfactant therapy, types of surfactant treatment, and development of newer-generation surfactants. The differences in the performance between various surfactants are highlighted and advanced research that has been conducted so far in developing the optimal delivery of surfactant is discussed.

  12. Correlation of mineral dust-induced changes in the composition of a fraction enriched in lung surfactant with pulmonary histologic lesions in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schengrund, C.-L.; Griffith, J.W.; Wilson, R.P.; Xiaoli Chi [Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    1996-07-01

    In previous work the composition of surfactant isolated from cell-free bronchoalveolar lavage (CF-BAL) from the right lungs of monkeys instilled with 500 mg of either generic bituminous, anthracite, quartz, or titanium dioxide dust was compared with that of surfactant isolated from CF-BAL from control left lungs. Exposure to quartz, anthracite, or titanium dioxide induced a significant increase in the amount of protein recovered, which was evident throughout most of the time period (1 year) studied. Exposure to quartz also induced a significant decrease in the total amount of lipid-associated phosphorus. To determine whether dust-induced changes in surfactant composition paralleled changes in lung morphology, consecutive studies were carried out in rats. Rats were instilled with 50 mg of either quartz or anthracite dust/kilogram body weight. One milligram of bituminous dust was intilled with every 5 mg of quartz dust as a marker to indicate dust location. Histologic evaluation of quartz dust-exposed lungs showed alveolitis, including microgranulomas, which were associated with clusters of dust-containing macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells which were localized within alveoli and interstitium surrounding small bronchioles. The anthracite dust-exposed lungs contained similar cell types localized around small bronchioles, which did not form microgranulomas. Surfactant protein A was found within alveolar type II cells and macrophages of both rat and primate lungs, but not within macrophages markedly distended with dust particles. The number of alveolar type II cells appeared to increase in response to the length of time of exposure to dust, as did the total amount of protein recovered in the surfactant-enriched fractions prepared from CF-BAL from dust-instilled lungs relative to that in surfactant-enriched fractions isolated from CF-BAL from control lungs. 26 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. CHARMM36 united atom chain model for lipids and surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sarah; Tran, Alan; Allsopp, Matthew; Lim, Joseph B; Hénin, Jérôme; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2014-01-16

    Molecular simulations of lipids and surfactants require accurate parameters to reproduce and predict experimental properties. Previously, a united atom (UA) chain model was developed for the CHARMM27/27r lipids (Hénin, J., et al. J. Phys. Chem. B. 2008, 112, 7008-7015) but suffers from the flaw that bilayer simulations using the model require an imposed surface area ensemble, which limits its use to pure bilayer systems. A UA-chain model has been developed based on the CHARMM36 (C36) all-atom lipid parameters, termed C36-UA, and agreed well with bulk, lipid membrane, and micelle formation of a surfactant. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of alkanes (heptane and pentadecane) were used to test the validity of C36-UA on density, heat of vaporization, and liquid self-diffusion constants. Then, simulations using C36-UA resulted in accurate properties (surface area per lipid, X-ray and neutron form factors, and chain order parameters) of various saturated- and unsaturated-chain bilayers. When mixed with the all-atom cholesterol model and tested with a series of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/cholesterol mixtures, the C36-UA model performed well. Simulations of self-assembly of a surfactant (dodecylphosphocholine, DPC) using C36-UA suggest an aggregation number of 53 ± 11 DPC molecules at 0.45 M of DPC, which agrees well with experimental estimates. Therefore, the C36-UA force field offers a useful alternative to the all-atom C36 lipid force field by requiring less computational cost while still maintaining the same level of accuracy, which may prove useful for large systems with proteins.

  14. Human salivary agglutinin binds to lung surfactant protein-D and is identical with scavenger receptor protein gp-340

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ligtenberg, T J; Bikker, F J; Groenink, J

    2001-01-01

    bound in a similar way to Streptococcus mutans and surfactant protein-D. Histochemically, the distribution of gp-340 in the submandibular salivary glands was identical with the agglutinin distribution, as shown in a previous paper [Takano, Bogert, Malamud, Lally and Hand (1991) Anat. Rec. 230, 307......Salivary agglutinin is a 300-400 kDa salivary glycoprotein that binds to antigen B polypeptides of oral streptococci, thereby playing a role in their colonization and the development of caries. A mass spectrum was recorded of a trypsin digest of agglutinin. A dominant peak of 1460 Da was sequenced...... of gp-340. gp-340 is a 340 kDa glycoprotein isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid that binds specifically to lung surfactant protein-D. DMBT1 is a candidate tumour suppressor gene. A search in the human genome revealed only one copy of this gene. The molecular mass, as judged from SDS...

  15. Bilayer characteristics of a diether phosphonolipid analog of the major lung surfactant glycerophospholipid dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skita, V; Chester, D W; Oliver, C J; Turcotte, J G; Notter, R H

    1995-05-01

    Thermal and lyotropic phase behavior was studied by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry for a diether phosphonolipid analog (DEPN-8) of the major lung surfactant glycerophospholipid dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC). DEPN-8 differs in an ether, rather than an ester, bond at the acyl chain-backbone linkage and a headgroup phosphonate (isosteric methylene substitution) versus phosphate constituent. Analysis of lamellar diffraction maxima demonstrated that at high relative humidity (98%) and temperatures below the liquid crystal phase transition (approximately 45 degrees C), DEPN-8 formed interdigitated bilayers with a characteristic periodicity of 41.9-46.5 A. At low humidity the gel phase DEPN-8 bilayers were characteristic of a normal L beta phase with a periodicity equivalent to DPPC (57-59 A). Above the liquid crystal thermal phase transition, bilayer spacing for both DEPN-8 and DPPC was 51-52 A, characteristic of the L alpha phase. Complete assessments of both lamellar and in-plane X-ray scattering used to construct electron density profiles and structure-factor plots for DEPN-8 defined more fully the interdigitated bilayer state at high humidity and low temperature. Compared to DPPC, it is energetically favorable for DEPN-8 to form interdigitated bilayers under conditions of excess water and low temperature. The flexible character of the ether bonds in DEPN-8 allows increased hydrophobic interactions between acyl chains, without generating a steric penalty from the increased packing density of the molecules. Additionally, the ether bond and the phosphonate moiety may allow for more energetically favorable interactions between the choline portion of the headgroup and water. The DEPN-8 ether linkage may also contribute to the improved adsorption and film respreading found previously for this phosphonolipid compared to DPPC.

  16. Surfactant Phosphatidylcholine Metabolism in Severe Neonatal Lung Disease: Studied with Stable Isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.M.T. Janssen (Daphne)

    2003-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Avery and Mead showed in 1959 that pulmonary surfactant deficiency is a major factor in the pathophysiology of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). In 1980 Fujiwara et al. administered exogenous surfactant for the first time successfully to preterm infants with RDS

  17. Surfactant Phosphatidylcholine Metabolism in Severe Neonatal Lung Disease: Studied with Stable Isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.M.T. Janssen (Daphne)

    2003-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Avery and Mead showed in 1959 that pulmonary surfactant deficiency is a major factor in the pathophysiology of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). In 1980 Fujiwara et al. administered exogenous surfactant for the first time successfully to preterm infants with RDS (2).

  18. Palmitoylation as a key factor to modulate SP-C-lipid interactions in lung surfactant membrane multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, Nuria; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Garcia-Alvarez, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) has been regarded as the most specific protein linked to development of mammalian lungs, and great efforts have been done to understand its structure-function relationships. Previous evidence has outlined the importance of SP-C palmitoylation to sustain the proper dynamics of lung surfactant, but the mechanism by which this posttranslational modification aids SP-C to stabilize the interfacial surfactant film along the compression-expansion breathing cycles, is still unrevealed. In this work we have compared the structure, orientation and lipid-protein interactions of a native palmitoylated SP-C with those of a non-palmitoylated recombinant SP-C (rSP-C) form in air-exposed multilayer membrane environments, by means of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Palmitoylation does not affect the secondary structure of the protein, which exhibits a full α-helical conformation in partly dehydrated phospholipid multilayer films. However, differences between the Amide I band of the IR spectrum of palmitoylated and non-palmitoylated proteins suggest subtle differences affecting the environment of their helical component. These differences are accompanied by differential effects on the IR bands from phospholipid phosphates, indicating that palmitoylation modulates lipid-protein interactions at the headgroup region of phospholipid layers. On the other hand, the relative dichroic absorption of polarized IR has allowed calculating that the palmitoylated protein adopts a more tilted transmembrane orientation than the non-palmitoylated SP-C, likely contributing to more compact, dehydrated and possibly stable multilayer lipid-protein films. As a whole, the behavior of multilayer films containing palmitoylated SP-C may reflect favorable structural properties for surfactant reservoirs at the air-liquid respiratory interface.

  19. Innovation in surfactant therapy I: surfactant lavage and surfactant administration by fluid bolus using minimally invasive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargaville, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in the field of exogenous surfactant therapy continues more than two decades after the drug became commercially available. One such innovation, lung lavage using dilute surfactant, has been investigated in both laboratory and clinical settings as a treatment for meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Studies in animal models of MAS have affirmed that dilute surfactant lavage can remove meconium from the lung, with resultant improvement in lung function. In human infants both non-randomised studies and two randomised controlled trials have demonstrated a potential benefit of dilute surfactant lavage over standard care. The largest clinical trial, performed by our research group in infants with severe MAS, found that lung lavage using two 15-ml/kg aliquots of dilute surfactant did not reduce the duration of respiratory support, but did appear to reduce the composite outcome of death or need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A further trial of lavage therapy is planned to more precisely define the effect on survival. Innovative approaches to surfactant therapy have also extended to the preterm infant, for whom the more widespread use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has meant delaying or avoiding administration of surfactant. In an effort to circumvent this problem, less invasive techniques of bolus surfactant therapy have been trialled, including instillation directly into the pharynx, via laryngeal mask and via brief tracheal catheterisation. In a recent clinical trial, instillation of surfactant into the trachea using a flexible feeding tube was found to reduce the need for subsequent intubation. We have developed an alternative method of brief tracheal catheterisation in which surfactant is delivered via a semi-rigid vascular catheter inserted through the vocal cords under direct vision. In studies to date, this technique has been relatively easy to perform, and resulted in rapid improvement in lung function and reduced need for

  20. In vitro surfactant and perfluorocarbon aerosol deposition in a neonatal physical model of the upper conducting airways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estibalitz Goikoetxea

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aerosol delivery holds potential to release surfactant or perfluorocarbon (PFC to the lungs of neonates with respiratory distress syndrome with minimal airway manipulation. Nevertheless, lung deposition in neonates tends to be very low due to extremely low lung volumes, narrow airways and high respiratory rates. In the present study, the feasibility of enhancing lung deposition by intracorporeal delivery of aerosols was investigated using a physical model of neonatal conducting airways. METHODS: The main characteristics of the surfactant and PFC aerosols produced by a nebulization system, including the distal air pressure and air flow rate, liquid flow rate and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD, were measured at different driving pressures (4-7 bar. Then, a three-dimensional model of the upper conducting airways of a neonate was manufactured by rapid prototyping and a deposition study was conducted. RESULTS: The nebulization system produced relatively large amounts of aerosol ranging between 0.3±0.0 ml/min for surfactant at a driving pressure of 4 bar, and 2.0±0.1 ml/min for distilled water (H2Od at 6 bar, with MMADs between 2.61±0.1 µm for PFD at 7 bar and 10.18±0.4 µm for FC-75 at 6 bar. The deposition study showed that for surfactant and H2Od aerosols, the highest percentage of the aerosolized mass (∼65% was collected beyond the third generation of branching in the airway model. The use of this delivery system in combination with continuous positive airway pressure set at 5 cmH2O only increased total airway pressure by 1.59 cmH2O at the highest driving pressure (7 bar. CONCLUSION: This aerosol generating system has the potential to deliver relatively large amounts of surfactant and PFC beyond the third generation of branching in a neonatal airway model with minimal alteration of pre-set respiratory support.

  1. Efficiency of Combined Use of a Surfactant and the «Lung Opening» Maneuver in the Treatment of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vlasenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses whether the «lung opening» maneuver in combination with the endobronchial administration of a pulmonary surfactant can be used in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS of various genesis. The authors outline data of their studies of the separate use of both methods and present the results of successful treatment in a patient with severe concomitant injury and posttraumatic ARDS in the combined use of the «lung opening» maneuver and Surfactant-BL. With intensive care, the combined use of these methods is a more effective way of improving gas exchange as compared with their use alone. Key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, surfactant-BL, «lung opening» maneuver, combined use of both methods.

  2. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing lung cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  3. Pulmonary surfactant protein A inhibits the lipid peroxidation stimulated by linoleic acid hydroperoxide of rat lung mitochondria and microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasa, Ana M; Guajardo, Margarita H; de Armas Sanabria, Elizabeth; Catalá, Angel

    2005-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species play an important role in several acute lung injuries. The lung tissue contains polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that are substrates of lipid peroxidation that may lead to loss of the functional integrity of the cell membranes. In this study, we compare the in vitro protective effect of pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A), purified from porcine surfactant, against ascorbate-Fe(2+) lipid peroxidation stimulated by linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LHP) of the mitochondria and microsomes isolated from rat lung; deprived organelles of ascorbate and LHP were utilized as control. The process was measured simultaneously by chemiluminescence as well as by PUFA degradation of the total lipids isolated from these organelles. The addition of LHP to rat lung mitochondria or microsomes produces a marked increase in light emission; the highest value of activation was produced in microsomes (total chemiluminescence: 20.015+/-1.735 x 10(5) cpm). The inhibition of lipid peroxidation (decrease of chemiluminescence) was observed with the addition of increasing amounts (2.5 to 5.0 microg) of SP-A in rat lung mitochondria and 2.5 to 7.5 microg of SP-A in rat lung microsomes. The inhibitory effect reaches the highest values in the mitochondria, thus, 5.0 microg of SP-A produces a 100% inhibition in this membranes whereas 7.5 microg of SP-A produces a 51.25+/-3.48% inhibition in microsomes. The major difference in the fatty acid composition of total lipids isolated from native and peroxidized membranes was found in the arachidonic acid content; this decreased from 9.68+/-1.60% in the native group to 5.72+/-1.64% in peroxidized mitochondria and from 7.39+/-1.14% to 3.21+/-0.77% in microsomes. These changes were less pronounced in SP-A treated membranes; as an example, in the presence of 5.0 microg of SP-A, we observed a total protection of 20:4 n-6 (9.41+/-3.29%) in mitochondria, whereas 7.5 microg of SP-A produced a 65% protection in microsomes (5

  4. Mechanisms and Treatment of Lung Lesions and Associated Surfactant Damage in Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-09-18

    expect that during inspira- tion the alveoli unfold and excess transudation of fluid exudes from the damaged portions of previously plicated type I...conditions, is the lack of appropriate methods to separate the surfactant from blood components transudated into the air spaces. A rapid and simple...inactivation of surfactant following transudation of blood constituents into the air space. In addition, the structural and func- tional integrity of the

  5. The role of exogenous surfactant in the treatment of ARDS%外源性肺表面活性物质在ARDS中的治疗作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆月明

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that alterations of pulmonary surfactant system contribute to the lung dysfunction associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). There have been many animal experiments and clinical investigations evaluating exogenous surfactant in ARDS models or patients. Exogenous surfactant administration has proven inconsistent as a therapeutic modality for patients with ARDS. Various factors that may influence a host response to exogenous surfactant, these factots include: the nature and severity of the underlying injury,the surfactant preparation utilized, the amount, frequency, and method of surfactant administration, the mode of ventilation used during and after surfactant delivery, and the timing or surfactant administration over the course of the illness

  6. Phase equilibria in model surfactants forming Langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, E; Santana, A; Cruz, A; López, G E

    2007-12-14

    The study of Langmuir monolayers has generated the attention of researchers because of their unique properties and their not well understood phase equilibrium. These monolayers exhibit interesting phase diagrams where the unusual liquid-liquid equilibrium can be observed for a single component monolayer. Monte Carlo computer simulations in the virtual Gibbs ensemble were used to obtain the phase diagram of Langmuir monolayers. The liquid-vapor and liquid-liquid phase equilibria were considered by constructing the Cailletet-Mathias phase diagrams. By using the Ising model and the rectilinear approximations the identification of the critical properties for both equilibria was determined. These critical parameters were calculated as a function of the strength of the interaction between the surfactant molecules and the aqueous subphase. As a result, we have identified the coexistence between a liquid expanded state (LES)-vapor and the liquid condensed state-LES, in agreement with experimental and theoretical evidence in the literature. We obtained a clear separation of phases and a strong dependence on the strength of the solvent used. Namely, as the interaction between the solvent and the head of the surfactant increases, the critical properties also increase. Equilibrium states were characterized by computing thermodynamic quantities as a function of temperature and solvent strength.

  7. A conservative interface-interaction model with insoluble surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schranner, Felix S.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we extend the conservative interface-interaction method of Hu et al. (2006) [34], adapted for weakly-compressible flows by Luo et al. (2015) [37], to include the effects of viscous, capillary, and Marangoni stresses consistently as momentum-exchange terms at the sharp interface. The interface-interaction method is coupled with insoluble surfactant transport which employs the underlying sharp-interface representation. Unlike previous methods, we thus achieve discrete global conservation in terms of interface interactions and a consistently sharp interface representation. The interface is reconstructed locally, and a sub-cell correction of the interface curvature improves the evaluation of capillary stresses and surfactant diffusion in particular for marginal mesh resolutions. For a range of numerical test cases we demonstrate accuracy and robustness of the method. In particular, we show that the method is at least as accurate as previous diffuse-interface models while exhibiting throughout the considered test cases improved computational efficiency. We believe that the method is attractive for high-resolution level-set interface-tracking simulations as it straightforwardly incorporates the effects of variable surface tension into the underlying conservative interface-interaction approach.

  8. A specific phospholipase C activity regulates phosphatidylinositol levels in lung surfactant of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyridakis, Spyros; Leondaritis, George; Nakos, George; Lekka, Marilena E; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2010-03-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a lipid-rich material lining the inside of the lungs. It reduces surface tension at the liquid/air interface and thus, it confers protection of the alveoli from collapsing. The surface-active component of LS is dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, while anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and primarily phosphatidylglycerol are involved in the stabilization of the LS monolayer. The exact role of PtdIns in this system is not well-understood; however, PtdIns levels change dramatically during the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) evolution. In this report we present evidence of a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activity in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, which may regulate PtdIns levels. Characterization of this extracellular activity showed specificity for PtdIns and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, sharing the typical substrate concentration-, pH-, and calcium-dependencies with mammalian PI-PLCs. Fractionation of BAL fluid showed that PI-PLC did not co-fractionate with large surfactant aggregates, but it was found mainly in the soluble fraction. Importantly, analysis of BAL samples from control subjects and from patients with ARDS showed that the PI-PLC specific activity was decreased by 4-fold in ARDS samples concurrently with the increase in BAL PtdIns levels. Thus, we have identified for the first time an extracellular PI-PLC enzyme activity that may be acutely involved in the regulation of PtdIns levels in LS.

  9. Micropipette Technique Study of Natural and Synthetic Lung Surfactants at the Air-Water Interface: Presence of a SP-B Analog Peptide Promotes Membrane Aggregation, Formation of Tightly Stacked Lamellae, and Growth of Myelin Figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Elisa; Kinoshita, Koji; Needham, David

    2016-10-03

    The present study is a microscopic interfacial characterization of a series of lung surfactant materials performed with the micropipette technique. The advantages of this technique include the measurement of equilibrium and dynamic surface tensions while acquiring structural and dynamic information at microscopic air-water interfaces in real time and upon compression. Here, we characterized a series of animal-derived and synthetic lung surfactant formulations, including native surfactant obtained from porcine lungs (NS); the commercial Curosurf, Infasurf, and Survanta; and a synthetic Super Mini-B (SMB)-containing formulation. It was observed that the presence of the natural hydrophobic proteins and, more strikingly, the peptide SMB, promoted vesicle condensation as thick membrane stacks beneath the interface. Only in the presence of SMB, these stacks underwent spontaneous structural transformations, consisting of the nucleation and growth of microtubes and in some cases their subsequent coiling into helices. The dimensions of these tubes (2-15 μm diameter) and their linear (2-3 μm/s) and volumetric growth rates (20-30 μm(3)/s) were quantified, and no specific effects were found on them for increasing SMB concentrations from 0.1 to 4%. Nevertheless, a direct correlation between the number of tubes and SMB contents was found, suggesting that SMB molecules are the promoters of tube nucleation in these membranes. A detailed analysis of the tube formation process was performed following previous models for the growth of myelin figures, proposing a combined mechanism between dehydration-rehydration of the lipid bilayers and induction of mechanical defects by SMB that would act as nucleation sites for the tubes. The formation of tubes was also observed in Infasurf, and in NS only after subsequent expansion and compression but neither in the other clinical surfactants nor in protein-free preparations. Finally, the connection between this data and the observations from

  10. Computational modeling of unsteady surfactant-laden liquid plug propagation in neonatal airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgac, Ufuk; Muradoglu, Metin

    2013-07-01

    Surfactant-free and surfactant-laden liquid plug propagation in neonatal airways in various generations representing the upper and lower airways are investigated computationally using a finite-difference/front-tracking method. Emphasis is placed on the unsteady surfactant-laden plug propagation as a model for Surfactant Replacement Therapy (SRT) and airway reopening. The numerical method is designed to solve the evolution equations of the interfacial and bulk surfactant concentrations coupled with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Available experimental data for surfactant Survanta are used to relate surface tension coefficient to surfactant concentration at the interface. It is found that, for the surfactant-free case, the trailing film thickness is in good agreement with Taylor's law for plugs with plug length greater than the airway width. Mechanical stresses that could be injurious to epithelial cells such as pressure and shear stress and their gradients are maximized on the front and rear menisci with increasing magnitudes in the lower generations. These mechanical stresses, especially pressure and pressure gradient, are diminished with the introduction of surfactants. Surfactant is absorbed onto the trailing film and thickens it, eventually leading to either plug rupture or, if totally consumed prior to rupture, to steadily propagating plug. In the upper airways, initially small plugs rupture rapidly and plugs with comparable initial plug length with the airway width persist and propagate steadily. For a more effective SRT treatment, we recommend utilization of plugs with initial plug length greater than the airway width. Increasing surfactant strength or increasing the initially instilled surfactant concentration is found to be ineffective.

  11. Polymers and surfactants in solution and at interfaces : a model study on detergency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torn, L.H.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis deals with detergency-related adsorption phenomena of (mixtures of) polymers and surfactants. Both types of molecules play an important role in the removal and subsequent stabilization of soil from a substrate. Starting with a model detergency system consisting of polymers, surfactants,

  12. A liquid CO2-compatible hydrocarbon surfactant: experiment and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, S.; Kleijn, J.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Surfactants soluble in liquid CO2 are rare and knowledge on interfacial and self-assembly behaviour is fragmented. We found that polyoxyethylene (5) isooctylphenyl ether is interfacially active at the water–liquid CO2 interface. Water–liquid CO2 interfacial tension was measured at various surfactant

  13. Two-phase flow with surfactants: Diffuse interface models and their analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Abels, Helmut; Lam, Kei Fong; Weber, Josef

    2016-01-01

    New diffuse interface and sharp interface models for soluble and insoluble surfactants fulfilling energy inequalities are introduced. We discuss their relation with the help of asymptotic analysis and present an existence result for a particular diffuse interface model.

  14. Influence of Natural Lung Surfactant Inhalations on Clinical Symptoms and Pulmonary Function Parameters in Patients with Bronchial Asthma. Communication 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Stepanova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Damage to lung surfactant (LS enabling the lung local immunity may contribute to the development of bronchial inflammation in patients with bronchial asthma. Methods and Results: A 40-day course of 16 LS (Surfactant-BL inhalations at the dose of 25mg was added to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS and short/long-acting bronchodilators or combined inhalers in 14 patients with bronchial asthma. After 7 inhalations, patients demonstrated a significant decrease in shortness of breath and bronchospasm attacks, double reduction of ICS dose (p=0.01, and improvement of pulmonary function. Forced vital capacity (FVC increases during treatment in a linear fashion (y=62.9+5.60•x; p<0.05, reaching the normal level (80% after 9 inhalations (Day 15. Forced expiratory volume (FEV1 increases in a linear fashion (y=50.7+4.15•x; p<0.05 without reaching the normal level (80% after 16 inhalations (Day 41. The FEV1/FVC ratio does not change significantly in the time period between Day 1 to Day 15. By Day 41 the value decreases significantly to 67.4±4.66% (p<0.05. The peak expiratory flow (PEF parameter increases in a linear fashion (y=53.9+5.00•x; p<0.01 from 57.7±6.33% to 76.2±9.33% of the predicted value. Conclusion: LS inhalations improve the condition of patients with BA, allow ICS dose reduction by 2 times, and improve pulmonary function parameters.

  15. Measurement of cytotoxicity and irritancy potential of sugar-based surfactants on skin-related 3D models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Biao; Miao, Yong; Vigneron, Pascale; Chagnault, Vincent; Grand, Eric; Wadouachi, Anne; Postel, Denis; Pezron, Isabelle; Egles, Christophe; Vayssade, Muriel

    2017-04-01

    Sugar-based surfactants present surface-active properties and relatively low cytotoxicity. They are often considered as safe alternatives to currently used surfactants in cosmetic industries. In this study, four sugar-based surfactants, each with an eight carbon alkyl chain bound to a glucose or a maltose headgroup through an amide linkage, were synthesized and compared to two standard surfactants. The cytotoxic and irritant effects of surfactants were evaluated using two biologically relevant models: 3D dermal model (mouse fibroblasts embedded in collagen gel) and reconstituted human epidermis (RHE, multi-layered human keratinocytes). Results show that three synthesized surfactants possess lower cytotoxicity compared to standard surfactants as demonstrated in the 3D dermal model. Moreover, the IC50s of surfactants against the 3D dermal model are higher than IC50s obtained with the 2D dermal model (monolayer mouse fibroblasts). Both synthesized and standard surfactants show no irritant effects after 48h of topical application on RHE. Throughout the study, we demonstrate the difficulty to link the physico-chemical properties of surfactants and their cytotoxicity in complex models. More importantly, our data suggest that, prior to in vivo tests, a complete understanding of surfactant cytotoxicity or irritancy potential requires a combination of cellular and tissue models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A poroelastic model of the lung

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Lorenz; Burrowes, Kelly; Grau, Vicente; Tavener, Simon; Bordas, Rafel

    2014-01-01

    This work is motivated by the modelling of ventilation and deformation in the lung for understanding the biomechanics of respiratory diseases. The main contribution is the derivation and implementation of a lung model that tightly couples a poroelastic model of lung parenchyma to an airway fluid network. The poroelastic model approximates the porous structure of lung parenchyma using a continuum model that allows us to naturally model changes in physiology by spatially varying material parameters, whilst conserving mass and momentum within the tissue. The proposed model will also take advantage of realistic deformation boundary conditions obtained from image registration, to drive the simulation. A finite element method is presented to discretize the equations in a monolithic way to ensure convergence of the nonlinear problem. To demonstrate the coupling between the poroelastic medium and the network flow model numerical simulations on a realistic lung geometry are presented. These numerical simulations are a...

  17. Regional pulmonary inflammation in an endotoxemic ovine acute lung injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Bustamante, A; Easley, R B; Fuld, M; Mulreany, D; Chon, D; Lewis, J F; Simon, B A

    2012-08-15

    The regional distribution of inflammation during acute lung injury (ALI) is not well known. In an ovine ALI model we studied regional alveolar inflammation, surfactant composition, and CT-derived regional specific volume change (sVol) and specific compliance (sC). 18 ventilated adult sheep received IV lipopolysaccharide (LPS) until severe ALI was achieved. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from apical and basal lung regions were obtained at baseline and injury time points, for analysis of cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β), BAL protein and surfactant composition. Whole lung CT images were obtained in 4 additional sheep. BAL protein and IL-1β were significantly higher in injured apical vs. basal regions. No significant regional surfactant composition changes were observed. Baseline sVol and sC were lower in apex vs. base; ALI enhanced this cranio-caudal difference, reaching statistical significance only for sC. This study suggests that apical lung regions show greater inflammation than basal ones during IV LPS-induced ALI which may relate to differences in regional mechanical events.

  18. Circulating surfactant protein D as a potential lung-specific biomarker of health outcomes in COPD: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man SF Paul

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a paucity of surrogate lung-specific biological markers that can be used to track disease progression and predict clinical outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The principal aim of this pilot study was to determine whether circulating surfactant protein D (SPD or Clara Cell protein-16 (CC16 levels are associated with lung function or health status in patients with severe COPD. Methods We studied 23 patients with advanced COPD. Lung function measurements, Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ scores, and serum levels of SPD, CC16, and C-reactive protein (CRP were determined at baseline and at 3 months. Results At baseline, FEV1 was inversely associated with serum SPD levels (P = 0.045 but not with CC16 (P = 0.675 or CRP levels (P = 0.549. Over a 3 month period, changes in SPD levels correlated significantly with changes in CRQ scores (adjusted P = 0.008 such that patients who had the largest declines in serum SPD levels experienced the largest gains in health status. The association was particularly notable between circulating SPD level and the dyspnea domain of the CRQ score (P = 0.018. Changes in CC16 or CRP levels did not correlate with changes in CRQ scores. Conclusion Changes in serum SPD levels tracked well with changes in health status over a 3 month period in patients with severe COPD. These data suggest that circulating SPD levels may be useful biomarkers to track health outcomes of COPD patients.

  19. Weak solutions to a thin film model with capillary effects and insoluble surfactant

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, Joachim; Laurencot, Philippe; Walker, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The paper focuses on a model describing the spreading of an insoluble surfactant on a thin viscous film with capillary effects taken into account. The governing equation for the film height is degenerate parabolic of fourth order and coupled to a second order parabolic equation for the surfactant concentration. It is shown that nonnegative weak solutions exist under natural assumptions on the surface tension coefficient.

  20. Hypoxia in models of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Edward E; Vilalta, Marta; Cecic, Ivana K

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To efficiently translate experimental methods from bench to bedside, it is imperative that laboratory models of cancer mimic human disease as closely as possible. In this study, we sought to compare patterns of hypoxia in several standard and emerging mouse models of lung cancer...... to establish the appropriateness of each for evaluating the role of oxygen in lung cancer progression and therapeutic response. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Subcutaneous and orthotopic human A549 lung carcinomas growing in nude mice as well as spontaneous K-ras or Myc-induced lung tumors grown in situ......H2AX foci in vitro and in vivo. Finally, our findings were compared with oxygen electrode measurements of human lung cancers. RESULTS: Minimal fluoroazomycin arabinoside and pimonidazole accumulation was seen in tumors growing within the lungs, whereas subcutaneous tumors showed substantial trapping...

  1. Developmental regulation of chicken surfactant protein A and its localization in lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Weidong; Cuperus, Tryntsje; van Dijk, Albert;

    2016-01-01

    in the lung lining fluid covering the parabronchial epithelia. Specific cSP-A producing epithelial cells, resembling mammalian type II cells, were identified in the parabronchi. Gene expression of cSP-A markedly increased from embryonic day 14 onwards until the time of hatch, comparable to the SP-A homologue...

  2. The Effects of Periodic Wall Stretch on Surfactant and Liquid Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph; Halpern, David; Grotberg, James

    1999-11-01

    The cycle-mean transport of soluble surfactant and airway surface liquid is examined using a mathematical model of Marangoni flows which accounts for airway branching and for time-periodic radial and axial airway stretch. The transport of surfactant and liquid is fundamental to surfactant replacement therapy as well as liquid and surfactant clearance from healthy lungs. The majority of surfactant and liquid transport occurs in the cycle-mean spreading which follows the very brief initial transient spreading phase. We consider either delivery of surfactants into the lung, by setting the proximal boundary condition to a higher concentration compared to the distal boundary condition, or removal from the lung by switching these end conditions. Starting with a steady-state, non-cycled, non-uniform, surfactant distribution we find that transport of surfactant into the lung is enhanced for larger strain amplitudes and frequency, though frequency is less important. For surfactant clearance from the lung we find, as in the case of delivery, that larger strain amplitude enhances transport. But, cycling frequency has the opposite effect with larger frequencies leading to reduced transport. Liquid clearance is enhanced by larger strain amplitudes and slower frequencies. This work supported by NIH grant HL-41126 and NSF grant CTS-9412523.

  3. PCA-based lung motion model

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ruijiang; Jia, Xun; Zhao, Tianyu; Lamb, James; Yang, Deshan; Low, Daniel A; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Organ motion induced by respiration may cause clinically significant targeting errors and greatly degrade the effectiveness of conformal radiotherapy. It is therefore crucial to be able to model respiratory motion accurately. A recently proposed lung motion model based on principal component analysis (PCA) has been shown to be promising on a few patients. However, there is still a need to understand the underlying reason why it works. In this paper, we present a much deeper and detailed analysis of the PCA-based lung motion model. We provide the theoretical justification of the effectiveness of PCA in modeling lung motion. We also prove that under certain conditions, the PCA motion model is equivalent to 5D motion model, which is based on physiology and anatomy of the lung. The modeling power of PCA model was tested on clinical data and the average 3D error was found to be below 1 mm.

  4. Effect of surfactant and partial liquid ventilation treatment on gas exchange and lung mechanics in immature lambs: influence of gestational age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rey-Santano

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Surfactant (SF and partial liquid ventilation (PLV improve gas exchange and lung mechanics in neonatal RDS. However, variations in the effects of SF and PLV with degree of lung immaturity have not been thoroughly explored. SETTING: Experimental Neonatal Respiratory Physiology Research Unit, Cruces University Hospital. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized study using sealed envelopes. SUBJECTS: 36 preterm lambs were exposed (at 125 or 133-days of gestational age by laparotomy and intubated. Catheters were placed in the jugular vein and carotid artery. INTERVENTIONS: All the lambs were assigned to one of three subgroups given: 20 mL/Kg perfluorocarbon and managed with partial liquid ventilation (PLV, surfactant (Curosurf®, 200 mg/kg or (3 no pulmonary treatment (Controls for 3 h. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Cardiovascular parameters, blood gases and pulmonary mechanics were measured. In 125-day gestation lambs, SF treatment partially improved gas exchange and lung mechanics, while PLV produced significant rapid improvements in these parameters. In 133-day lambs, treatments with SF or PLV achieved similarly good responses. Neither surfactant nor PLV significantly affected the cardiovascular parameters. CONCLUSION: SF therapy response was more effective in the older gestational age group whereas the effectiveness of PLV therapy was not gestational age dependent.

  5. Computational modeling of a forward lunge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Tine Alkjær; Wieland, Maja Rose; Andersen, Michael Skipper

    2012-01-01

    during forward lunging. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to establish a musculoskeletal model of the forward lunge to computationally investigate the complete mechanical force equilibrium of the tibia during the movement to examine the loading pattern of the cruciate ligaments. A healthy female...... was selected out of a group of healthy subjects, who all performed a forward lunge on a force platform, targeting a knee flexion angle of 90˚. Skin-markers were placed on anatomical landmarks on the subject and the movement was recorded by five video cameras. The three-dimensional kinematic data describing...... the forward lunge movement were extracted and used to develop a biomechanical model of the lunge movement. The model comprised two legs including femur, crus, rigid foot segments and the pelvis. Each leg had 35 independent muscle units, which were recruited according to a minimum fatigue criterion...

  6. Model study of enhanced oil recovery by flooding with aqueous surfactant solution and comparison with theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Paul D I; Savory, Luke D; Woods, Freya; Clarke, Andrew; Howe, Andrew M

    2015-03-17

    With the aim of elucidating the details of enhanced oil recovery by surfactant solution flooding, we have determined the detailed behavior of model systems consisting of a packed column of calcium carbonate particles as the porous rock, n-decane as the trapped oil, and aqueous solutions of the anionic surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT). The AOT concentration was varied from zero to above the critical aggregation concentration (cac). The salt content of the aqueous solutions was varied to give systems of widely different, post-cac oil-water interfacial tensions. The systems were characterized in detail by measuring the permeability behavior of the packed columns, the adsorption isotherms of AOT from the water to the oil-water interface and to the water-calcium carbonate interface, and oil-water-calcium carbonate contact angles. Measurements of the percent oil recovery by pumping surfactant solutions into calcium carbonate-packed columns initially filled with oil were analyzed in terms of the characterization results. We show that the measured contact angles as a function of AOT concentration are in reasonable agreement with those calculated from values of the surface energy of the calcium carbonate-air surface plus the measured adsorption isotherms. Surfactant adsorption onto the calcium carbonate-water interface causes depletion of its aqueous-phase concentration, and we derive equations which enable the concentration of nonadsorbed surfactant within the packed column to be estimated from measured parameters. The percent oil recovery as a function of the surfactant concentration is determined solely by the oil-water-calcium carbonate contact angle for nonadsorbed surfactant concentrations less than the cac. For surfactant concentrations greater than the cac, additional oil removal occurs by a combination of solubilization and emulsification plus oil mobilization due to the low oil-water interfacial tension and a pumping pressure increase.

  7. Interfacial mechanisms for stability of surfactant-laden films

    CERN Document Server

    Bhamla, M Saad; Alvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; Tajuelo, Javier; Fuller, Gerald G

    2016-01-01

    Thin liquid films are central to everyday life. They are ubiquitous in modern technology (pharmaceuticals, coatings), consumer products (foams, emulsions) and also serve vital biological functions (tear film of the eye, pulmonary surfactants in the lung). A common feature in all these examples is the presence of surface-active molecules at the air-liquid interface. Though they form only molecularly-thin layers, these surfactants produce complex surface stresses on the free surface, which have important consequences for the dynamics and stability of the underlying thin liquid film. Here we conduct simple thinning experiments to explore the fundamental mechanisms that allow the surfactant molecules to slow the gravity-driven drainage of the underlying film. We present a simple model that works for both soluble and insoluble surfactant systems. We show that surfactants with finite surface rheology influence bulk flow through viscoelastic interfacial stresses, while surfactants with inviscid surfaces achieve stab...

  8. Effect of pulmonary surfactant on the expression of TGF-β1 in fetus lung injury in rabbit model with intrauterine infection%肺表面活性物质对肺损伤胎兔肺组织转化生长因子β1表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴静; 刘冬云; 刘敬; 封志纯

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of Intra-amniotic administration of pulmonary surfactant on the expression of TGF-β1 in fetus lung injury in rabbit model with intrauterine infection. Methods: Nineteen Japanese albino pregnant rabbits were divided into 3 groups%目的:探讨羊膜腔内注射肺表面活性物质(PS)对宫内感染致肺损伤胎兔的肺组织转化生长因子β1( TGF-β1)表达的影响.方法:选取健康成年育龄日本大耳白兔19只,成功受孕后随机分为对照组、细菌组、细菌+ PS组,建立宫内感染模型.对照组和细菌组按胎龄又分为21、22、23、24、26 d5个亚组,细菌+ PS组分为24、26 d2个亚组.细菌组宫内注射E.coli菌株,细菌+PS组宫内注射E.coli菌株的同时羊膜腔内注射PS200 mg/kg,对照组宫内注射生理盐水.模型建成后分别在各时相点取胎兔肺组织,免疫组织化学法检测肺组织内TGF-β1表达;RT-PCR检测TGF-β1mRNA表达;Western blotting法检测TGF-β1蛋白表达.结果:对照组TGF-β1蛋白在支气管上皮或血管内皮细胞及其周围的结缔组织有阳性表达,细菌组、细菌+ PS组TGF-β1阳性蛋白表达量增加,与对照组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).TGF-β1mRNA、蛋白表达在细菌感染后明显上调,3组比较,差异有显著统计学意义(F=631.109、183.980,P=0.000).结论:宫内感染后胎肺TGF-β1高表达是肺损伤的高危因素.羊膜腔内注射PS可使TGF-β1表达下降,对减轻肺损伤、促进肺发育具有积极作用.

  9. Comparison of lung preservation solutions in human lungs using an ex vivo lung perfusion experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel L. Medeiros

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Experimental studies on lung preservation have always been performed using animal models. We present ex vivo lung perfusion as a new model for the study of lung preservation. Using human lungs instead of animal models may bring the results of experimental studies closer to what could be expected in clinical practice. METHOD: Brain-dead donors whose lungs had been declined by transplantation teams were used. The cases were randomized into two groups. In Group 1, Perfadex®was used for pulmonary preservation, and in Group 2, LPDnac, a solution manufactured in Brazil, was used. An ex vivo lung perfusion system was used, and the lungs were ventilated and perfused after 10 hours of cold ischemia. The extent of ischemic-reperfusion injury was measured using functional and histological parameters. RESULTS: After reperfusion, the mean oxygenation capacity was 405.3 mmHg in Group 1 and 406.0 mmHg in Group 2 (p = 0.98. The mean pulmonary vascular resistance values were 697.6 and 378.3 dyn·s·cm-5, respectively (p =0.035. The mean pulmonary compliance was 46.8 cm H20 in Group 1 and 49.3 ml/cm H20 in Group 2 (p =0.816. The mean wet/dry weight ratios were 2.06 and 2.02, respectively (p=0.87. The mean Lung Injury Scores for the biopsy performed after reperfusion were 4.37 and 4.37 in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (p = 1.0, and the apoptotic cell counts were 118.75/mm² and 137.50/mm², respectively (p=0.71. CONCLUSION: The locally produced preservation solution proved to be as good as Perfadex®. The clinical use of LPDnac may reduce costs in our centers. Therefore, it is important to develop new models to study lung preservation.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of airflow inside lungs using heterogenous anisotropic lung tissue elastic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun; Li, Ziang; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to model the airflow inside lungs during breathing and its fluid-structure interaction with the lung tissues and the lung tumor using subject-specific elastic properties. The fluid-structure interaction technique simultaneously simulates flow within the airway and anisotropic deformation of the lung lobes. The three-dimensional (3D) lung geometry is reconstructed from the end-expiration 3D CT scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The lung is modeled as a poro-elastic medium with anisotropic elastic property (non-linear Young's modulus) obtained from inverse lung elastography of 4D CT scans for the same patients. The predicted results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation along with the airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effect is also presented of anisotropic elasticity on both the spatio-temporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis.

  11. X-ray diffraction and reflectivity validation of the depletion attraction in the competitive adsorption of lung surfactant and albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Patrick C; Wu, Guohui; Miller, Chad E; Chi, Eva Y; Frey, Shelli L; Lee, Ka Yee C; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Kjaer, Kristian; Zasadzinski, Joseph A

    2009-08-05

    Lung surfactant (LS) and albumin compete for the air-water interface when both are present in solution. Equilibrium favors LS because it has a lower equilibrium surface pressure, but the smaller albumin is kinetically favored by faster diffusion. Albumin at the interface creates an energy barrier to subsequent LS adsorption that can be overcome by the depletion attraction induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) in solution. A combination of grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), x-ray reflectivity (XR), and pressure-area isotherms provides molecular-resolution information on the location and configuration of LS, albumin, and polymer. XR shows an average electron density similar to that of albumin at low surface pressures, whereas GIXD shows a heterogeneous interface with coexisting LS and albumin domains at higher surface pressures. Albumin induces a slightly larger lattice spacing and greater molecular tilt, similar in effect to a small decrease in the surface pressure. XR shows that adding PEG to the LS-albumin subphase restores the characteristic LS electron density profile at the interface, and confirms that PEG is depleted near the interface. GIXD shows the same LS Bragg peaks and Bragg rods as on a pristine interface, but with a more compact lattice corresponding to a small increase in the surface pressure. These results confirm that albumin adsorption creates a physical barrier that inhibits LS adsorption, and that PEG in the subphase generates a depletion attraction between the LS aggregates and the interface that enhances LS adsorption without substantially altering the structure or properties of the LS monolayer.

  12. Influence of water concentrations on the phase transformation of a model surfactant/co-surfactant/water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunkad, Raju; Srivastava, Arpita; Debnath, Ananya

    2017-02-01

    The influence of water concentrations on phase transformations of a surfactant/co-surfactant/water system is investigated by using all atom molecular dynamics simulations. At higher water concentrations, where surfactant (behenyl trimethyl ammonium chloride, BTMAC) to co-surfactant (stearyl alcohol, SA) ratio is fixed, BTMAC and SA self-assemble into spherical micelles, which transform into strongly interdigitated one dimensional rippled lamellar phases upon decreasing water concentrations. Fragmentation or fusions of spherical micelles of different sizes are evident from the radial distribution functions at different temperatures. However, at lower water concentrations rippled lamellar phase transforms into an LβI phase upon heating. Our simulations reveal that the concentrations of water can influence available space around the head groups which couple with critical thickness to accommodate the packing fraction required for respective phases. This directs towards obtaining a controlling factor to design desired phases important for industrial and medical applications in the future.

  13. Surfactant nebulization versus instillation during high frequency ventilation in surfactant-deficient rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1998-01-01

    Surfactant nebulization improves lung function at low alveolar doses of surfactant. However, efficiency of nebulization is low, and lung deposition seems to depend on lung aeration. High frequency ventilation (HFV) has been shown to improve lung aeration. We hypothesize that the combination of HFV a

  14. Analysis of regional compliance in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplik, Michael; Biener, Ingeborg; Dembinski, Rolf; Pelosi, Paolo; Soodt, Thomas; Schroeder, Wolfgang; Leonhardt, Steffen; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf; Bickenbach, Johannes

    2012-10-15

    Lung protective ventilation in acute lung injury (ALI) focuses on using low tidal volumes and adequate levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Identifying optimal pressure is difficult because pressure-volume (PV) relations differ regionally. Precise analysis demands local measurements of pressures and related alveolar morphologies. In a porcine model of surfactant depletion (n=24), we combined measuring static pressures with endoscopic microscopy and electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to examine regional PV loops and morphologic heterogeneities between healthy (control group; CON) and ALI lungs ventilated with low (LVT) or high tidal volumes (HVT). Quantification included indices for microscopy (Volume Air Index (VAI), Heterogeneity and Circularity Index), EIT analysis and calculation of regional compliances due to generated PV loops. We found that: (1) VAI decreased in lower lobe after ALI, (2) electrical impedance decreased in dorsal regions and (3) PV loops differed regionally. Further studies should prove the potentials of these techniques on individual respiratory settings and clinical outcome.

  15. Physiological, Biochemical, and Biophysical Characterization of the Lung-Lavaged Spontaneously-Breathing Rabbit as a Model for Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Francesca; Catozzi, Chiara; Murgia, Xabier; Rosa, Brenda; Amidani, Davide; Lorenzini, Luca; Bianco, Federico; Rivetti, Claudio; Catinella, Silvia; Villetti, Gino; Civelli, Maurizio; Pioselli, Barbara; Dani, Carlo; Salomone, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is a widely accepted technique of non-invasive respiratory support in spontaneously-breathing premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Surfactant administration techniques compatible with nCPAP ventilation strategy are actively investigated. Our aim is to set up and validate a respiratory distress animal model that can be managed on nCPAP suitable for surfactant administration techniques studies. Surfactant depletion was induced by bronchoalveolar lavages (BALs) on 18 adult rabbits. Full depletion was assessed by surfactant component analysis on the BALs samples. Animals were randomized into two groups: Control group (nCPAP only) and InSurE group, consisting of a bolus of surfactant (Poractant alfa, 200 mg/kg) followed by nCPAP. Arterial blood gases were monitored until animal sacrifice, 3 hours post treatment. Lung mechanics were evaluated just before and after BALs, at the time of treatment, and at the end of the procedure. Surfactant phospholipids and protein analysis as well as surface tension measurements on sequential BALs confirmed the efficacy of the surfactant depletion procedure. The InSurE group showed a significant improvement of blood oxygenation and lung mechanics. On the contrary, no signs of recovery were appreciated in animals treated with just nCPAP. The surfactant-depleted adult rabbit RDS model proved to be a valuable and efficient preclinical tool for mimicking the clinical scenario of preterm infants affected by mild/moderate RDS who spontaneously breathe and do not require mechanical ventilation. This population is of particular interest as potential target for the non-invasive administration of surfactant. PMID:28060859

  16. Values of surfactant protein-A and surfactant protein-D in Interstitial lung disease%血清肺表面活性蛋白A、D在间质性肺疾病中的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓立; 吕长俊; 王晓芝

    2008-01-01

    The pathological diagnosis of interstitial lung disease (ILD) by surgical lung biopsy is important for clinical decision. There is a need, however, to use serum markers which is non-invasive for differentiating ILD. Surfactant protein(SP)-A, SP-D are useful markers for the diagnosis and evaluation of activity of ILD. More studies have appeared on the proteins' usefulness in recent years and they are reviewed as follows.%开胸肺活检取得病理诊断是对间质性肺疾病(interstitial lung disease,ILD)的诊断起决定作用的.然而,需要一种非侵入性的血清标志物来区别ILD,尤其是对于最常见、预后最差的寻常型间质性肺炎.肺表面活性蛋白A、D在ILD鉴别诊断及评定疾病活动性上有提示意义.近年来这类蛋白的研究进展显著,现对ILD的价值作一综述.

  17. The effect of surfactant and solid phase concentration on drug aggregates in model aerosol propellent suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, C; Washington, C; Purewal, T S

    1996-04-01

    The effect of increasing solid phase concentration on the morphology and flocculation rate of model aerosol suspensions has been investigated. Suspensions of micronized salbutamol sulphate and lactose in trichlorotrifluoroethane (P113) were studied under conditions of increasing shear stress. By use of image analysis techniques, measurement of aggregate size, fractal dimension and rate of aggregation was performed. The effect of the surfactant sorbitan monooleate on morphology and flocculation rate was also studied. Increased solid phase concentration caused an increase in the rate of aggregation and average aggregate size at a given value of shear stress. Surfactant addition retarded the aggregation rate, and caused a shift from a diffusion-limited cluster aggregation to a reaction-limited cluster aggregation mechanism. The aggregate profiles showed a corresponding change from rugged and crenellated without surfactant, to increasingly smooth and Euclidian with increasing surfactant concentration. The morphological changes were characterized by a decrease in the average boundary fractal dimension which also correlated well with the corresponding reduction in aggregation rate.

  18. Surfactants and the Mechanics of Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Alveoli are small sacs found at the end of terminal bronchioles in human lungs with a mean diameter of 200 μm. A thin layer of fluid (hypophase) coats the inner face of an alveolus and is in contact with the air in the lungs. The thickness of this layer varies among alveoli, but is in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 μm for many portions of the alveolar network. The interfacial tension σ at the air-hypophase interface tends to favor collapse of the alveolus, and resists its expansion during inhalation. Type II alveolar cells synthesize and secrete a mixture of phospholipids and proteins called pulmonary surfactant. These surfactant molecules adsorb to the interface causing σ of water at body temperature is 70 mN/m and falls to an equilibrium value of 25 mN/m when surfactants are present. Also, in a dynamic sense, it is known that σ is reduced to near 0 during exhalation when the surfactant film compresses. In this work, the authors develop a mechanical and transport model of the alveolus to study the effect of surfactants on various aspects of respiration. The model is composed of three principal parts: (i) air movement into and out of the alveolus; (ii) a balance of linear momentum across the two-layered membrane of the alveolus (hypophase and elastic wall); and (iii) a pulmonary surfactant transport problem in the hypophase. The goal is to evaluate the influence of pulmonary surfactant on respiratory mechanics.

  19. Chain architecture and micellization: A mean-field coarse-grained model for poly(ethylene oxide) alkyl ether surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García Daza, Fabián A.; Mackie, Allan D., E-mail: allan.mackie@urv.cat [Department d’Enginyeria Química, ETSEQ, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Avinguda dels Països Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Colville, Alexander J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115-5000 (United States)

    2015-03-21

    Microscopic modeling of surfactant systems is expected to be an important tool to describe, understand, and take full advantage of the micellization process for different molecular architectures. Here, we implement a single chain mean field theory to study the relevant equilibrium properties such as the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and aggregation number for three sets of surfactants with different geometries maintaining constant the number of hydrophobic and hydrophilic monomers. The results demonstrate the direct effect of the block organization for the surfactants under study by means of an analysis of the excess energy and entropy which can be accurately determined from the mean-field scheme. Our analysis reveals that the CMC values are sensitive to branching in the hydrophilic head part of the surfactant and can be observed in the entropy-enthalpy balance, while aggregation numbers are also affected by splitting the hydrophobic tail of the surfactant and are manifested by slight changes in the packing entropy.

  20. Modeling of the Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of Nonionic Surfactants with an Extended Group-Contribution Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    A group-contribution (GC) property prediction model for estimating the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of nonionic surfactants in water at 25 °C is presented. The model is based on the Marrero and Gani GC method. A systematic analysis of the model performance against experimental data......; and carbohydrate derivate ethers, esters, and thiols. The model developed consists of linear group contributions, and the critical micelle concentration is estimated using the molecular structure of the nonionic surfactant alone. Compared to other models used for the prediction of the critical micelle...... is carried out using data for a wide range of nonionic surfactants covering a wide range of molecular structures. As a result of this procedure, new third order groups based on the characteristic structures of nonionic surfactants are defined and are included in the Marrero and Gani GC model. In this way...

  1. A Molecular Thermodynamic Model for Interfacial Tension in Surfactant-Oil-Water System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An interfacial equation of state based on perturbation theory for surfactant-oil-water system has been developed. By combining the interfacial equation of state with Boudh-Hir and Mansoori's model, a molecular ther- modynamic model has been proposed. The interfacial tension of surfactant-oil-water systems can be calculated from the surface tensions of pure oil and water by this model. The inteffacial tension data for sodium dodecyl sulphate- heptane-water system, polyoxyethylene n-octylphenol-heptane-water system and hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide-heptane-water system have been correlated. By using the adjustable parameters obtained, the interfacial tensions of these systems at other temperatures have been predicted. Both the correlated and the predicted values are satisfactory.

  2. Hypo-Elastic Model for Lung Parenchyma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-03-01

    A simple elastic isotropic constitutive model for the spongy tissue in lung is derived from the theory of hypoelasticity. The model is shown to exhibit a pressure dependent behavior that has been interpreted by some as indicating extensional anisotropy. In contrast, we show that this behavior arises natural from an analysis of isotropic hypoelastic invariants, and is a likely result of non-linearity, not anisotropy. The response of the model is determined analytically for several boundary value problems used for material characterization. These responses give insight into both the material behavior as well as admissible bounds on parameters. The model is characterized against published experimental data for dog lung. Future work includes non-elastic model behavior.

  3. Obstructive lung disease models: what is valid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinands, Jill M; Mannino, David M

    2008-12-01

    Use of disease simulation models has led to scrutiny of model methods and demand for evidence that models credibly simulate health outcomes. We sought to describe recent obstructive lung disease simulation models and their validation. Medline and EMBASE were used to identify obstructive lung disease simulation models published from January 2000 to June 2006. Publications were reviewed to assess model attributes and four types of validation: first-order (verification/debugging), second-order (comparison with studies used in model development), third-order (comparison with studies not used in model development), and predictive validity. Six asthma and seven chronic obstructive pulmonary disease models were identified. Seven (54%) models included second-order validation, typically by comparing observed outcomes to simulations of source study cohorts. Seven (54%) models included third-order validation, in which modeled outcomes were usually compared qualitatively for agreement with studies independent of the model. Validation endpoints included disease prevalence, exacerbation, and all-cause mortality. Validation was typically described as acceptable, despite near-universal absence of criteria for judging adequacy of validation. Although over half of recent obstructive lung disease simulation models report validation, inconsistencies in validation methods and lack of detailed reporting make assessing adequacy of validation difficult. For simulation modeling to be accepted as a tool for evaluating clinical and public health programs, models must be validated to credibly simulate health outcomes of interest. Defining the required level of validation and providing guidance for quantitative assessment and reporting of validation are important future steps in promoting simulation models as practical decision tools.

  4. Surfactant inhibition in acute respiratory failure : consequences for exogenous surfactant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P. Eijking (Eric)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is characterized by immaturity of the lung, resulting in relative or absolute absence of pulmonary surfactant. Worldwide, neonates suffering from RDS have been treated successfully with exogenous surfactant preparations. Currently, exogeno

  5. Human models of acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair G. Proudfoot

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a syndrome that is characterised by acute inflammation and tissue injury that affects normal gas exchange in the lungs. Hallmarks of ALI include dysfunction of the alveolar-capillary membrane resulting in increased vascular permeability, an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung and a local pro-coagulant state. Patients with ALI present with severe hypoxaemia and radiological evidence of bilateral pulmonary oedema. The syndrome has a mortality rate of approximately 35% and usually requires invasive mechanical ventilation. ALI can follow direct pulmonary insults, such as pneumonia, or occur indirectly as a result of blood-borne insults, commonly severe bacterial sepsis. Although animal models of ALI have been developed, none of them fully recapitulate the human disease. The differences between the human syndrome and the phenotype observed in animal models might, in part, explain why interventions that are successful in models have failed to translate into novel therapies. Improved animal models and the development of human in vivo and ex vivo models are therefore required. In this article, we consider the clinical features of ALI, discuss the limitations of current animal models and highlight how emerging human models of ALI might help to answer outstanding questions about this syndrome.

  6. In vitro models of lung toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, G L; Placke, M E

    1987-12-01

    In vitro assays that emphasize cellular components critical to the host defense system have been developed to evaluate pulmonary toxicity and define deleterious changes in parenchymal cell populations. Assays that employ pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) have demonstrated good correlation between macrophage toxicity and pulmonary fibrogenicity for many inorganic compounds. The PAM assays provide simple and inexpensive screens of potential respiratory tract toxicity. Many investigators screen chemicals for their ability to alter the mucosal epithelial cell conducting airways by performing tracheal organ cultures. The tracheal assays have also provided useful screens for Vitamin A analogues required for epithelial cell differentiation. Most recently, in vitro respiratory tract models have been extended to include whole-lung explants, an approach that allows for development of fibrosis and epithelial cell toxicity after in vitro exposure to inorganic and organic fibrogens. The whole-lung explant system appears to duplicate the in vivo response to a variety of lung toxins, including bleomycin, silica, and crocidolite asbestos. Together, these assays provide a description of potential toxicity to key components of the lung, emphasizing the pulmonary macrophage, conducting airways, and alveolar septae. It is expected that continued research in these models will enhance their predictive abilities and utility in risk assessment.

  7. Jamming dynamics of stretch-induced surfactant release by alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arnab; Arold, Stephen P; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Suki, Béla

    2012-03-01

    Secretion of pulmonary surfactant by alveolar epithelial type II cells is vital for the reduction of interfacial surface tension, thus preventing lung collapse. To study secretion dynamics, rat alveolar epithelial type II cells were cultured on elastic membranes and cyclically stretched. The amounts of phosphatidylcholine, the primary lipid component of surfactant, inside and outside the cells, were measured using radiolabeled choline. During and immediately after stretch, cells secreted less surfactant than unstretched cells; however, stretched cells secreted significantly more surfactant than unstretched cells after an extended lag period. We developed a model based on the hypothesis that stretching leads to jamming of surfactant traffic escaping the cell, similar to vehicular traffic jams. In the model, stretch increases surfactant transport from the interior to the exterior of the cell. This transport is mediated by a surface layer with a finite capacity due to the limited number of fusion pores through which secretion occurs. When the amount of surfactant in the surface layer approaches this capacity, interference among lamellar bodies carrying surfactant reduces the rate of secretion, effectively creating a jam. When the stretch stops, the jam takes an extended time to clear, and subsequently the amount of secreted surfactant increases. We solved the model analytically and show that its dynamics are consistent with experimental observations, implying that surfactant secretion is a fundamentally nonlinear process with memory representing collective behavior at the level of single cells. Our results thus highlight the importance of a jamming dynamics in stretch-induced cellular secretory processes.

  8. Translational models of lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Paul F; Abbott-Banner, Katharine; Adcock, Ian M; Knowles, Richard G

    2015-02-01

    The 2nd Cross Company Respiratory Symposium (CCRS), held in Horsham, U.K. in 2012, brought together representatives from across the pharmaceutical industry with expert academics, in the common interest of improving the design and translational predictiveness of in vivo models of respiratory disease. Organized by the respiratory representatives of the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Federations (EFPIA) group of companies involved in the EU-funded project (U-BIOPRED), the aim of the symposium was to identify state-of-the-art improvements in the utility and design of models of respiratory disease, with a view to improving their translational potential and reducing wasteful animal usage. The respiratory research and development community is responding to the challenge of improving translation in several ways: greater collaboration and open sharing of data, careful selection of the species, complexity and chronicity of the models, improved practices in preclinical research, continued refinement in models of respiratory diseases and their sub-types, greater understanding of the biology underlying human respiratory diseases and their sub-types, and finally greater use of human (and especially disease-relevant) cells, tissues and explants. The present review highlights these initiatives, combining lessons from the symposium and papers published in Clinical Science arising from the symposium, with critiques of the models currently used in the settings of asthma, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and COPD. The ultimate hope is that this will contribute to a more rational, efficient and sustainable development of a range of new treatments for respiratory diseases that continue to cause substantial morbidity and mortality across the world.

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) reduces mortality and improves lung function in a model of experimental obstructive lung disease in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viby, Niels-Erik; Isidor, Marie S; Buggeskov, Katrine B; Poulsen, Steen S; Hansen, Jacob B; Kissow, Hannelouise

    2013-12-01

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an important insulin secretagogue and GLP-1 analogs are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 displays antiinflammatory and surfactant-releasing effects. Thus, we hypothesize that treatment with GLP-1 analogs will improve pulmonary function in a mouse model of obstructive lung disease. Female mice were sensitized with injected ovalbumin and treated with GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists. Exacerbation was induced with inhalations of ovalbumin and lipopolysaccharide. Lung function was evaluated with a measurement of enhanced pause in a whole-body plethysmograph. mRNA levels of GLP-1R, surfactants (SFTPs), and a number of inflammatory markers were measured. GLP-1R was highly expressed in lung tissue. Mice treated with GLP-1R agonists had a noticeably better clinical appearance than the control group. Enhanced pause increased dramatically at day 17 in all control mice, but the increase was significantly less in the groups of GLP-1R agonist-treated mice (P agonist-treated mice (P agonist treatment. These results show that GLP-1R agonists have potential therapeutic potential in the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, by decreasing the severity of acute exacerbations. The mechanism of action does not seem to be the modulation of inflammation and SFTP expression.

  10. Visualization of TCE recovery mechanisms using surfactant-polymer solutions in a two-dimensional heterogeneous sand model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Thomas; Martel, Richard; Conrad, Stephen H; Lefebvre, René; Gabriel, Uta

    2006-06-30

    This research focused on the optimization of TCE dissolution in a physical two-dimensional model providing a realistic representation of a heterogeneous granular aquifer. TCE was infiltrated in the sand pack where it resided both in pools and in zones of residual saturation. Surfactant was initially injected at low concentration to minimize TCE remobilization at first contact but was incrementally increased later during the experiment. Xanthan gum was added to the injected surfactant solution to optimize the sweep efficiency through the heterogeneous medium. Photographs and digital image analysis illustrated the interactions between TCE and the injected fluids. During the polymer flood, the effects of heterogeneities inside the sand pack were greatly reduced by the increased fluid viscosity and the shear-thinning effects of the polymer. The polymer also improved the contact between the TCE ganglia and the surfactant-polymer solution, thereby promoting dissolution. Surfactants interacted with the polymer reducing the overall viscosity of the solution. At first contact with a 0.5%(mass) surfactant solution, the TCE pools drained and some remobilization occurred. However, no TCE bank was formed and TCE did not penetrate into any previously uncontaminated areas. As a result, TCE surface area was increased. Subsequent surfactant floods at higher surfactant concentrations did not trigger more remobilization. TCE was mainly dissolved by the solution with the highest surfactant concentration. Plugging from bacterial growth or microgel formation associated to the polymer at the inflow screen prevented the full completion of the experiment. However, more than 90% of TCE was recovered with the circulation of less than 6 pore volumes of surfactant-polymer solution.

  11. Effects of nonionic surfactant lauryl alcohol ethoxylated on stratum corneum alternative model biomembranes evaluated by biophysical techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Baby, André R.; Lacerda, Áurea C. L.; Prestes, Paula S.; Velasco, María Valéria R.; Kawano, Yoshio; Kaneko,Telma Mary

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the nonionic surfactant lauryl alcohol ethoxylate with 12 moles ethylene oxide (LAE-12OE) was evaluated on the Stratum corneum model biomembrane (SCMM) of shed snake skin (Bothrops jararaca and Spilotes pullatus) through the biophysical techniques Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) and Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS-FTIR). The surfactant was used in aqueous solutions above and below the critical micelle concentration (cmc), 50.0 and 0....

  12. [The phenol turbidity test for measurement of pulmonary surfactants in amniotic fluid--rapid test for fetal lung maturity (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, H; Shimada, N; Kuramoto, R; Mochizuki, Y; Nishizima, M; Arai, M; Osanai, K; Ishihara, K; Goso, K; Hotta, K

    1981-05-01

    A simple and sensitive procedure for the quantitative estimation of pulmonary surfactants in the amniotic fluid is described. The method is based on the formation of turbidity from the amniotic fluid surfactants with phenol. Amniotic fluid drawn through an intrauterine catheter was centrifuged at 2000 rpm for 5 min. One ml of 5% aqueous phenol solution was added to 1.0 ml of the diluted supernatant. Control solution was prepared by addition of 1.0 ml of distilled water to the supernatant, instead of phenol solution. The turbidity was measured spectrophotometrically against control at 340 nm 5 to 10 min after agitation on a Vortex mixer for 5 sec. The turbidity obtained from amniotic fluid with phenol was proportional to the increase in total phospholipids in the fluid measured enzymatically. Moreover, only lecithin in the phospholipids was related to the turbidity formation. Sphyngomyelin, lysolecithin, phosphatidylethanolamin did not produce any turbidity with phenol. The spectrophotometric reading of 87 cases (31-41 weeks) was ranged at 0.18-3.52. Four cases with lower value (0.40) showed neonatal respiratory problem. The phenol turbidity test is more useful for the detection of fetal lung maturity comparing with the generally used shake test.

  13. Effects of surfactants and thermodynamic activity of model active ingredient on transport over plant leaf cuticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerström, Anton; Kocherbitov, Vitaly; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Westbye, Peter; Bergström, Karin; Engblom, Johan

    2013-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of molecular transport across the cuticle of Clivia leaves. In vitro diffusion methodology was used to investigate the transport of a systemic fungicide, tebuconazole, over a model silicone membrane, enzymatically isolated cuticle membranes, and dermatomed leaves. It was shown that dermatomed leaves may replace enzymatically isolated cuticles. Furthermore, the effects of two surfactants, C(10)EO(7) and C(8)G(1.6), on the fungicide transport were investigated. Tebuconazole cuticle permeation was described using Fick's first law of diffusion, expressed by the thermodynamic activity of the solute in the membrane. A new method for calculation of diffusion coefficients in the membrane is proposed. To access the thermodynamic activity of the fungicide in the membranes, sorption isotherms of tebuconazole in the membrane materials studied were recorded. The thermodynamic activity of the fungicide in aqueous solutions was calculated from solubility data. For that purpose, the effect of surfactants on tebuconazole solubility was studied. The results show that addition of surfactants allows for higher concentrations of tebuconazole available for penetration. Nonetheless, at a fixed fungicide thermodynamic activity, all formulations produced the same flux over the silicone membrane independently on the fungicide concentration. This shows that the driving force across non-responding membranes is the gradient of thermodynamic activity, rather than the gradient of the fungicide concentration. In case of leaves, surfactants induced the same quantitative increase in both flux and diffusion coefficient of solute in the cuticle, while the cuticle-water partition coefficient was unaffected.

  14. Postdeposition dispersion of aerosol medications using surfactant carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkowski, Amy L; Garoff, Stephen; Tilton, Robert D; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2008-12-01

    Inhaled aerosol drugs provide a means of directly treating the lungs; however, aerosol deposition and drug distribution can be nonuniform, especially in obstructive lung disease. We hypothesize that surfactant-based aerosol carriers will disperse medications over airway surfaces after deposition through surface tension driven flows, increasing dose uniformity and improving drug distribution into underventilated regions. We considered saline and surfactant aerosol delivery via cannula onto several model airway surfaces including porcine gastric mucus (PGM) and both cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEs). Fluorescent dye and microspheres (d = 100 nm, 1 mum) were used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess postdeposition dispersion. Aerosol volume median diameters were in the 1-4 mum range. The tested surfactants included sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), tyloxapol, and calfactant. All surfactants tested on PGM (tyloxapol, calfactant, SDS, and CTAB) significantly increased dispersion area versus saline with all markers (2-20-fold increases; all p surfactants tested on CF HBEs (tyloxapol and calfactant) significantly increased dispersion area versus saline with all markers (1.6-4.1-fold increases; all p Surfactant carriers enhanced dispersion after aerosol deposition onto model airway surfaces, and may improve the efficacy of inhaled preparations such as inhaled antibiotics for cystic fibrosis.

  15. Changes of respiratory system mechanics in ventilated lungs of preterm infants with two different schedules of surfactant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, J P; Merth, I T; van Bel, F; Egberts, J; Brand, R; Quanjer, P H

    1994-05-01

    We investigated the time course of changes in the static respiratory system compliance and resistance in relationship to surfactant administration by means of single-breath and multiple-occlusion techniques. The study comprised 12 infants receiving a high-dose schedule (200 mg/kg, maximum 600 mg/kg) and 13 infants receiving a low-dose schedule (100 mg/kg, maximum 300 mg/kg) of porcine surfactant. Eight healthy preterm infants served as a comparison group. Respiratory mechanics were studied before and at 1.5, 8, and 72 h after surfactant administration. Results were related to changes in gas transfer, including an estimate of venous admixture. Static compliance improved after surfactant instillation, and changes were similar in the two treatment groups during the first eight h (0.8 In.(hour + 1) mL.kPa-1). The compliance values remained below the values of the healthy comparison group during the whole study period, but resistance remained at the same level. There was a considerable delay in changes of respiratory mechanics in relationship to the rapid fall of the venous admixture, from 27 to 19%, and the rapid increase of the transcutaneous oxygen pressure/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio from 13 to 27 kPa within the hour. There were no clues that short-term changes in compliance were masked by breathing at a higher and flatter portion of the pressure-volume curve. Both treatment schedules resulted in a similar improvement of compliance within 72 h and the two groups benefited similarly in terms of venous admixture.

  16. THE EFFECT OF EXOGENOUS SURFACTANT ON THE EUSTACHIAN TUBE FUNCTION IN THE GERBIL MODEL OF SECRETORY OTITIS MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑国玺; 朱宏亮; 康全清; 韦俊荣; 张晓彤

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of exogenous surfactant on Eustachian tube opening function. Methods This reasarch measures for the Eustachian tube opening pressure by injection of surface active substance into middle ear space, studying the effect of surfactant on Eustachian tube opening function. Results It has been showed that the injection of killed streptococcus pneumoneac bacteria by the transtympanic route, successfully developed a secretory otitis media model. Eustachian tube opening pressure in ears with SOM was significantly greater than those without effusion (P<0.01). Irrigation the middle ear space with surfactant resulted in a dramatic decrease in eustachian tube passive opening pressure in both normal and patients (P<0.01). Conclusion The results indicate that flushing with exogenous surfactant by the transtympanic rote reduce of eustachian tube surface tension, and it benefits the Eustachian tube opening.

  17. Development of a Guinea Pig Lung Deposition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Development of a Guinea Pig Lung Deposition Model Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. January...4 Figure 2. Particle deposition in the lung of the guinea pig via endotracheal breathing...Particle deposition in the lungs of guinea pigs via nasal breathing. ......................................... 12 v PREFACE The research work

  18. The mathematical model of a LUNG simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Šolc

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the design, modelling, implementation and testing of a specific LUNG simulator,. The described research was performed as a part of the project AlveoPic – Advanced Lung Research for Veterinary Medicine of Particles for Inhalation. The simulator was designed to establish a combined study programme comprising Biomedical Engineering Sciences (FEEC BUT and Healthcare and Rehabilitation Technology (FH Technikum Wien. The simulator is supposed to be an advanced laboratory equipment which should enhance the standard of the existing research activities within the above-mentioned study programs to the required level. Thus, the proposed paper introduces significant technical equipment for the laboratory education of students at both FH Technikum Wien and the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Communication, Brno University of Technology. The apparatuses described here will be also used to support cooperative research activities. In the given context, the authors specify certain technical solutions and parameters related to artificial lungs, present the electrical equipment of the system, and point out the results of the PC-based measurement and control.

  19. Conformational and phase transitions in DNA--photosensitive surfactant solutions: Experiment and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasyanenko, N; Lysyakova, L; Ramazanov, R; Nesterenko, A; Yaroshevich, I; Titov, E; Alexeev, G; Lezov, A; Unksov, I

    2015-02-01

    DNA binding to trans- and cis-isomers of azobenzene containing cationic surfactant in 5 mM NaCl solution was investigated by the methods of dynamic light scattering (DLS), low-gradient viscometry (LGV), atomic force microscopy (AFM), circular dichroism (CD), gel electrophoresis (GE), flow birefringence (FB), UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Light-responsive conformational transitions of DNA in complex with photosensitive surfactant, changes in DNA optical anisotropy and persistent length, phase transition of DNA into nanoparticles induced by high surfactant concentration, as well as transformation of surfactant conformation under its binding to macromolecule were studied. Computer simulations of micelles formation for cis- and trans-isomers of azobenzene containing surfactant, as well as DNA-surfactant interaction, were carried out. Phase diagram for DNA-surfactant solutions was designed. The possibility to reverse the DNA packaging induced by surfactant binding with the dilution and light irradiation was shown.

  20. Surfactant-Amino Acid and Surfactant-Surfactant Interactions in Aqueous Medium: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nisar Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    An overview of surfactant-amino acid interactions mainly in aqueous medium has been discussed. Main emphasis has been on the solution thermodynamics and solute-solvent interactions. Almost all available data on the topic has been presented in a lucid and simple way. Conventional surfactants have been discussed as amphiphiles forming micelles and amino acids as additives and their effect on the various physicochemical properties of these conventional surfactants. Surfactant-surfactant interactions in aqueous medium, various mixed surfactant models, are also highlighted to assess their interactions in aqueous medium. Finally, their applied part has been taken into consideration to interpret their possible uses.

  1. Impact of model perfume molecules on the self-assembly of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl 6-benzene sulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Robert; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Jones, Craig; Grillo, Isabelle

    2013-03-12

    The impact of two model perfumes with differing degrees of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, linalool (LL) and phenylethanol (PE), on the solution structure of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl 6-benzene sulfonate, LAS-6, has been studied by small angle neutron scattering, SANS. For both types of perfume molecules, complex phase behavior is observed. The phase behavior depends upon the concentration, surfactant/perfume composition, and type of perfume. The more hydrophilic perfume PE promotes the formation of more highly curved structures. At relatively low surfactant concentrations, small globular micelles, L1, are formed. These become perfume droplets, L(sm), stabilized by the surfactant at much higher perfume solution compositions. At higher surfactant concentrations, the tendency of LAS-6 to form more planar structures is evident. The more hydrophobic linalool promotes the formation of more planar structures. Combined with the greater tendency of LAS-6 to form planar structures, this results in the planar structures dominating the phase behavior for the LAS-6/linalool mixtures. For the LAS-6/linalool mixture, the self-assembly is in the form of micelles only at the lowest surfactant and perfume concentrations. Over most of the concentration-composition space explored, the structures are predominantly lamellar, L(α), or vesicle, L(v), or in the form of a lamellar/micellar coexistence. At low and intermediate amounts of LL, a significantly different structure is observed, and the aggregates are in the form of small, relatively monodisperse vesicles (i.e., nanovesicles), L(sv).

  2. Persurf, a new method to improve surfactant delivery: a study in surfactant depleted rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Burkhardt

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Exogenous surfactant is not very effective in adults with ARDS, since surfactant does not reach atelectatic alveoli. Perfluorocarbons (PFC can recruit atelectatic areas but do not replace impaired endogenous surfactant. A surfactant-PFC-mixture could combine benefits of both therapies. The aim of the proof-of-principal-study was to produce a PFC-in-surfactant emulsion (Persurf and to test in surfactant depleted Wistar rats whether Persurf achieves I. a more homogenous pulmonary distribution and II. a more homogenous recruitment of alveoli when compared with surfactant or PFC alone. METHODS: Three different PFC were mixed with surfactant and phospholipid concentration in the emulsion was measured. After surfactant depletion, animals either received 30 ml/kg of PF5080, 100 mg/kg of stained (green dye Curosurf™ or 30 ml/kg of Persurf. Lungs were fixated after 1 hour of ventilation and alveolar aeration and surfactant distribution was estimated by a stereological approach. RESULTS: Persurf contained 3 mg/ml phospholipids and was stable for more than 48 hours. Persurf-administration improved oxygenation. Histological evaluation revealed a more homogenous surfactant distribution and alveolar inflation when compared with surfactant treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: In surfactant depleted rats administration of PFC-in-surfactant emulsion leads to a more homogenous distribution and aeration of the lung than surfactant alone.

  3. Identification and examination of a novel 9-bp insert/deletion polymorphism on porcine SFTPA1 exon 2 associated with acute lung injury using an oleic acid-acute lung injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuebo; Zhang, Longchao; Wang, Ligang; Qiao, Lijuan; Liang, Jing; Yan, Hua; Zhao, Kebin; Liu, Xin; Wang, Lixian

    2015-06-01

    The pulmonary surfactant-associated protein (SFTPA1, SP-A) gene has been studied as a candidate gene for lung disease resistance in humans and livestock. The objective of the present study was to identify polymorphisms of the porcine SFTPA1 gene coding region and its association with acute lung injury (ALI). Through DNA sequencing and the PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism method, a novel 9-bp nucleotide insertion (+) or deletion (-) was detected on exon 2 of SFTPA1, which causes a change in three amino acids, namely, alanine (Ala), glycine (Gly) and proline (Pro). Individuals of three genotypes (-/-, +/- and +/+) were divided into equal groups from 60 Rongchang pigs that were genotyped. These pigs were selected for participation in the oleic acid (OA)-ALI model by 1-h and 3-h injections of OA, and there were equal numbers of pigs in the control and injection groups. The lung water content, a marker for acute lung injury, was measured in this study; there is a significant correlation between high lung water content and the presence of the 9-bp indel polymorphism (P polymorphism causing altered expression of the gene. The individuals with the -/- genotype showed lower lung water content than the +/+ genotype pigs, which suggests that polymorphism could be a potential marker for lung disease-resistant pig breeding and that pig can be a potential animal model for human lung disease resistance in future studies.

  4. Effect of Surfactants on the Deformation and Detachment of Oil Droplets in a Model Laminar Flow Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fréville V.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sugar-based surfactants are increasingly present in the development of eco-friendly detergents due to current regulations and consumer demand. In order to assess the degreasing performance of these new surfactants, the behavior of model oil droplets subjected to the action of a flow of surfactant solutions of different concentrations was studied in a laminar flow cell and related to the physico-chemical properties measured at the liquid/liquid (interfacial tension and solid/liquid/liquid interfaces (contact angle. With the surfactant solutions and the model oils employed in this study, three main behaviors were observed when a critical flow rate was reached: elongation, fragmentation or spontaneous detachment of the droplet. The analysis of the results leads to a correlation between the droplet behavior and the balance of the forces applied on the droplet in its initial position, in particular the gravity force Fg, which tends to move the oil droplet upwards (given the density difference, and the capillary force Fc, which tends to keep the droplet spherical. A state diagram could be established, based on the dimensionless Bond number (Fg/Fc and cosθ, θ being the initial contact angle of the drop on the surface before the establishment of the flow. One can thus predict the droplet behavior as a function of the system initial characteristics. The results allowed the comparison of degreasing performance of the different surfactants used and illustrated the potential of AlkylPolyPentosides (APP for detergent formulations.

  5. Improvement of lung mechanics by exogenous surfactant: effect of prior application of high positive end-expiratory pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hartog (Anneke); D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik); J.J. Haitsma (Jack); B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe use of a ventilation strategy with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) that is intended to recruit collapsed alveoli and to prevent recurrent collapse can reduce alveolar protein influx in experimental acute lung injury (ALI). This could affect

  6. Surfactant phospholipids and proteins in lung defence%肺防御系统中的表面磷脂酶和蛋白

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haagsman HP; Herias V; van Eijk M

    2003-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant comprises two hydrophobic proteins SP-B and SP-C, which are important forthe adsorption and spreading of the surfactant film at the air-liquid interface. Besides the hydrophobic proteins two other surfactant proteins have been described: SP-A and SP-D. These proteins are members of a family

  7. Cloud point phenomena for POE-type nonionic surfactants in a model room temperature ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tohru; Misono, Takeshi

    2008-10-15

    The cloud point phenomenon has been investigated for the solutions of polyoxyethylene (POE)-type nonionic surfactants (C(12)E(5), C(12)E(6), C(12)E(7), C(10)E(6), and C(14)E(6)) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (bmimBF(4)), a typical room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). The cloud point, T(c), increases with the elongation of the POE chain, while decreases with the increase in the hydrocarbon chain length. This demonstrates that the solvophilicity/solvophobicity of the surfactants in RTIL comes from POE chain/hydrocarbon chain. When compared with an aqueous system, the chain length dependence of T(c) is larger for the RTIL system regarding both POE and hydrocarbon chains; in particular, hydrocarbon chain length affects T(c) much more strongly in the RTIL system than in equivalent aqueous systems. In a similar fashion to the much-studied aqueous systems, the micellar growth is also observed in this RTIL solvent as the temperature approaches T(c). The cloud point curves have been analyzed using a Flory-Huggins-type model based on phase separation in polymer solutions.

  8. Salivary agglutinin and lung scavenger receptor cysteine-rich glycoprotein 340 have broad anti-influenza activities and interactions with surfactant protein D that vary according to donor source and sialylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Ligtenberg, Antoon; White, Mitchell R.;

    2006-01-01

    from this donor as compared with salivary gp-340 from another donor or several preparations of lung gp-340. Hence, the specificity of sialic acid linkages on gp-340 is an important determinant of anti-IAV activity. Gp-340 binds to SP-D (surfactant protein D), and we previously showed that lung gp-340...... has co-operative interactions with SP-D in viral neutralization and aggregation assays. We now report that salivary gp-340 can, in some cases, strongly antagonize certain antiviral activities of SP-D. This effect was associated with greater binding of salivary gp-340 to the carbohydrate recognition...

  9. Salivary agglutinin and lung scavenger receptor cysteine-rich glycoprotein 340 have broad anti-influenza activities and interactions with surfactant protein D that vary according to donor source and sialylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Ligtenberg, Antoon; White, Mitchell R.

    2006-01-01

    and salivary gp-340 are identical in protein sequence, salivary gp-340 from one donor had significantly greater antiviral activity against avian-like IAV strains which preferentially bind sialic acids in alpha(2,3) linkage. A greater density of alpha(2,3)-linked sialic acids was present on the salivary gp-340...... from this donor as compared with salivary gp-340 from another donor or several preparations of lung gp-340. Hence, the specificity of sialic acid linkages on gp-340 is an important determinant of anti-IAV activity. Gp-340 binds to SP-D (surfactant protein D), and we previously showed that lung gp-340......We previously found that scavenger receptor cysteine-rich gp-340 (glycoprotein-340), isolated from lung or saliva, directly inhibits human IAVs (influenza A viruses). We now show that salivary gp-340 has broad antiviral activity against human, equine and porcine IAV strains. Although lung...

  10. On a PCA-based lung motion model

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Jia, Xun; Zhao, Tianyu; Liu, Weifeng; Wuenschel, Sara; Lamb, James; Yang, Deshan; Low, Daniel A.; Jiang, Steve. B.

    2011-01-01

    Respiration-induced organ motion is one of the major uncertainties in lung cancer radiotherapy and is crucial to be able to accurately model the lung motion. Most work so far has focused on the study of the motion of a single point (usually the tumor center of mass), and much less work has been done to model the motion of the entire lung. Inspired by the work of Zhang et al (2007 Med. Phys. 34 4772–81), we believe that the spatiotemporal relationship of the entire lung motion can be acc...

  11. Analysis of the interaction of surfactants oleic acid and oleylamine with iron oxide nanoparticles through molecular mechanics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard Anthony; Shumbula, Poslet Morgan; van der Walt, Hendriëtte

    2015-04-07

    The interface interactions between surfactants oleic acid and oleylamine and magnetic nanoparticles are studied via molecular mechanics and dynamics. Mixtures of these two surfactants are widely advocated in the chemical synthesis of nanoparticles. However, the exact dynamic mechanism remains unclear. Here we report, for the first time, a comprehensive qualitative model showing the importance of acid-base complex formation between oleic acid and oleylamine as well as the presence of free protons in the engineering of nanoparticles of specific shapes and sizes. We show why critical parameters such as surfactant concentration may modify iron oxide nanoparticle shape and size and how this can be understood in the light of acid-base complex pair formation. We report on the influence these parameters have on both the in situ nanoparticle surface charge and zeta potential. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FTIR, and pH studies are used to confirm the validity of the calculated binding energies and number of acid-base pairs.

  12. Late gestational lung hypoplasia in a mouse model of the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tint G Stephen

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis is important for mammalian embryonic development. Neonatal mice lacking functional dehydrocholesterol Δ7-reductase (Dhcr7, a model for the human disease of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, die within 24 hours of birth. Although they have a number of biochemical and structural abnormalities, one cause of death is from apparent respiratory failure due to developmental pulmonary abnormalities. Results In this study, we characterized further the role of cholesterol deficiency in lung development of these mice. Significant growth retardation, beginning at E14.5~E16.5, was observed in Dhcr7-/- embryos. Normal lobation but smaller lungs with a significant decrease in lung-to-body weight ratio was noted in Dhcr7-/- embryos, compared to controls. Lung branching morphogenesis was comparable between Dhcr7-/- and controls at early stages, but delayed saccular development was visible in all Dhcr7-/- embryos from E17.5 onwards. Impaired pre-alveolar development of varying severity, inhibited cell proliferation, delayed differentiation of type I alveolar epithelial cells (AECs and delayed vascular development were all evident in knockout lungs. Differentiation of type II AECs was apparently normal as judged by surfactant protein (SP mRNAs and SP-C immunostaining. A significant amount of cholesterol was detectable in knockout lungs, implicating some maternal transfer of cholesterol. No significant differences of the spatial-temporal localization of sonic hedgehog (Shh or its downstream targets by immunohistochemistry were detected between knockout and wild-type lungs and Shh autoprocessing occurred normally in tissues from Dhcr7-/- embryos. Conclusion Our data indicated that cholesterol deficiency caused by Dhcr7 null was associated with a distinct lung saccular hypoplasia, characterized by failure to terminally differentiate alveolar sacs, a delayed differentiation of type I AECs and an immature

  13. Establishing of the Transplanted Animal Models for Human Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingli Zhang; Jinchang Wu

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide.Even with the applications of excision,radiotherapy,chemotherapy,and gene therapy,the 5 year survival rate is only 15% in the USA.Clinically relevant laboratory animal models of the disease could greatly facilitate understanding of the pathogenesis of lung cancer,its progression,invasion and metastasis.Transplanted lung cancer models are of special interest and are widely used today.Such models are essential tools in accelerating development of new therapies for lung cancer.In this communication we will present a brief overview of the hosts,sites and pathways used to establish transplanted animal lung tumor models.

  14. Self-consistent field modeling of non-ionic surfactants at the silica-water interface: Incorporating molecular detail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmus, B.R.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    We have constructed a model to predict the properties of non-ionic (alkyl-ethylene oxide) (C(n)E(m)) surfactants, both in aqueous solutions and near a silica surface, based upon the self-consistent field theory using the Scheutjens-Fleer discretisation scheme. The system has the pH and the ionic

  15. Biophysicochemical Interaction of a Clinical Pulmonary Surfactant with Nanoalumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousseau, F; Le Borgne, R; Seyrek, E; Berret, J-F

    2015-07-01

    We report on the interaction of pulmonary surfactant composed of phospholipids and proteins with nanometric alumina (Al2O3) in the context of lung exposure and nanotoxicity. We study the bulk properties of phospholipid/nanoparticle dispersions and determine the nature of their interactions. The clinical surfactant Curosurf, both native and extruded, and a protein-free surfactant are investigated. The phase behavior of mixed surfactant/particle dispersions was determined by optical and electron microscopy, light scattering, and zeta potential measurements. It exhibits broad similarities with that of strongly interacting nanosystems such as polymers, proteins or particles, and supports the hypothesis of electrostatic complexation. At a critical stoichiometry, micron-sized aggregates arising from the association between oppositely charged vesicles and nanoparticles are formed. Contrary to the models of lipoprotein corona or of particle wrapping, our work shows that vesicles maintain their structural integrity and trap the particles at their surfaces. The agglomeration of particles in surfactant phase is a phenomenon of importance that could change the interactions of the particles with lung cells.

  16. Effect of Bile Acid on Fetal Lung in Rat Model of Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the correlation between maternal bile acid (BA level and fetal pulmonary surfactant in rats and study the effects of BA on fetal lung in rat model of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Methods. Forty pregnant rats were treated with (A 5.5 mg/kg BA, (B 1.4 mg/kg BA, and (C 1 ml physiological saline. Levels of total bile acid (TBA, ALT, AST, TBIL, DBIL, and SP-A were determined and the lungs of fetal rats were analyzed for pathological changes. Results. Groups A and B intervened with BA showed significant higher level of TBA in both maternal and fetal serum, more mortality rate of fetal rats, more concentration of SP-A in fetal serum, and wider alveolus mesenchyme of fetal rats than the control Group C. Higher level of BA associated with increased fetal risk and lower numerical density of mitochondria in type II alveolar epithelial cells. The levels of TBA in maternal serum were found to have significant positive correlation with those in fetal serum and SP-A level but negatively with the area of alveolus and the numerical density of lamellar body. Conclusions. The TBA level in maternal serum showed significant association with lung pathological changes in fetal rats.

  17. Theoretical modeling of cationic surfactant aggregation at the silica/aqueous solution interface: Effects of pH and ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drach, M.; Andrzejewska, A.; Narkiewicz-Michalek, J.; Rudzinski, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2002-01-01

    A theory of ionic surfactant aggregation on oppositely charged surfaces is presented. In the proposed model the adsorbed phase is considered as a mixture of singly dispersed surfactant molecules, monolayered and bilayered aggregates of various sizes and the ions of simple electrolyte added to the aq

  18. Thin Film Equations with Soluble Surfactant and Gravity: Modeling and Stability of Steady States

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, Joachim; Laurençot, Philippe; Walker, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    A thin film on a horizontal solid substrate and coated with a soluble surfactant is considered. The governing degenerate parabolic equations for the film height and the surfactant concentrations on the surface and in the bulk are derived using a lubrication approximation when gravity is taken into account. It is shown that the steady states are asymptotically stable.

  19. Use of Mathematical Models in the Design and Performance Evaluation of a Surfactant Flushing Demonstration at the Bachman Road Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriola, L. M.; Drummond, C. D.; Lemke, L. D.; Rathfelder, K. M.; Pennell, K. D.

    2001-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the design and performance evaluation of a surfactant enhanced remediation pilot demonstration conducted in the summer of 2000 at a former dry cleaning facility in Oscoda, Michigan, USA. The unconfined contaminated formation is composed of relatively homogeneous glacial outwash sands, underlain by a thick clay layer. Core samples have revealed the presence of a reasonably persistent coarse sand and gravel layer at a depth of 11-16 feet and a sand/silt/clay transition zone at the base of the aquifer. A narrow tetrachloroethylene (PCE) plume emanates from the suspected source area, beneath the former dry cleaning building, and discharges into Lake Huron, approximately 700 feet down gradient. There is little evidence of microbial plume attenuation at the site. Aqueous samples from multilevel piezometers installed beneath the building have confirmed the presence of residual PCE within the coarse sand and gravel layer and have detected consistently high PCE concentrations at the base of the aquifer. The actual distribution and volume of entrapped PCE, however, is unknown. A surfactant injection and recovery scheme was designed and implemented to effectively flush the identified source area beneath the building. In this scheme, a line of water injection wells was installed behind the surfactant injection points to control surfactant delivery and maximize solubilized plume capture. Prior to surfactant injection, conservative and partitioning tracer tests were also conducted to confirm sweep and estimate source zone mass. Mass recovery calculations indicate that more than 94% of the injected surfactant and approximately 19 liters of PCE were recovered during the test. This volume of DNAPL is consistent with estimated low saturations within the swept zone. Single and multiphase transport models were employed to aid in remedial design and predict system performance. For the model simulations, input parameters were determined from

  20. Finite element modeling of blast lung injury in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Melissa M; Dang, Xinglai; Adkins, Mark; Powell, Brian; Chan, Philemon

    2015-04-01

    A detailed 3D finite element model (FEM) of the sheep thorax was developed to predict heterogeneous and volumetric lung injury due to blast. A shared node mesh of the sheep thorax was constructed from a computed tomography (CT) scan of a sheep cadaver, and while most material properties were taken from literature, an elastic-plastic material model was used for the ribs based on three-point bending experiments performed on sheep rib specimens. Anesthetized sheep were blasted in an enclosure, and blast overpressure data were collected using the blast test device (BTD), while surface lung injury was quantified during necropsy. Matching blasts were simulated using the sheep thorax FEM. Surface lung injury in the FEM was matched to pathology reports by setting a threshold value of the scalar output termed the strain product (maximum value of the dot product of strain and strain-rate vectors over all simulation time) in the surface elements. Volumetric lung injury was quantified by applying the threshold value to all elements in the model lungs, and a correlation was found between predicted volumetric injury and measured postblast lung weights. All predictions are made for the left and right lungs separately. This work represents a significant step toward the prediction of localized and heterogeneous blast lung injury, as well as volumetric injury, which was not recorded during field testing for sheep.

  1. Theory of phase equilibria for model mixtures of n-alkanes, perfluoroalkanes and perfluoroalkylalkane diblock surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Ramos, María Carolina; Blas, Felipe J.

    2007-05-01

    An extension of the SAFT-VR equation of state, the so-called hetero-SAFT approach [Y. Peng, H. Zhao, and C. McCabe, Molec. Phys. 104, 571 (2006)], is used to examine the phase equilibria exhibited by a number of model binary mixtures of n-alkanes, perfluoroalkanes and perfluoroalkylalkane diblock surfactants. Despite the increasing recent interest in semifluorinated alkanes (or perfluoroalkylalkane diblock molecules), the phase behaviour of mixtures involving these molecules with n-alkanes or perfluoroalkanes is practically unknown from the experimental point of view. In this work, we use simple molecular models for n-alkanes, perfluoroalkanes and perfluoroalkylalkane diblock molecules to predict, from a molecular perspective, the phase behaviour of selected model mixtures of perfluoroalkylalkanes with n-alkanes and perfluoroalkanes. In particular, we focus our interest on the understanding of the microscopic conditions that control the liquid-liquid separation and the stabilization of these mixtures. n-Alkanes and perfluoroalkanes are modelled as tangentially bonded monomer segments with molecular parameters taken from the literature. The perfluoroalkylalkane diblock molecules are modelled as heterosegmented diblock chains, with parameters for the alkyl and perfluoroalkyl segments developed in earlier work. This simple approach, which was proposed in previous work [P. Morgado, H. Zhao, F. J. Blas, C. McCabe, L. P. N. Rebelo, and E. J. M. Filipe, J. Phys. Chem. B, 111, 2856], is now extended to describe model n-alkane (or perfluoroalkane) + perfluroalkylalkane binary mixtures. We have obtained the phase behaviour of different mixtures and studied the effect of the molecular weight of n-alkanes and perfluoroalkanes on the type of phase behaviour observed in these mixtures. We have also analysed the effect of the number of alkyl and perfluoroalkyl chemical groups in the surfactant molecule on the phase behaviour. In addition to the usual vapour-liquid phase

  2. Effect of frequency and amplitude of vibration and role of a surfactant on void formation in models poured from polyvinyl siloxane impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kulashekar Reddy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : To determine whether the frequency and amplitude of vibration and the use of surfactant has any effect on the formation of voids on the cast surface, poured from a polyvinyl siloxane impression material, using a mechanical model vibrator. Materials and Methods : A total of 100 impressions of a master die were made using Reprosil, Type 1, Medium Viscosity, Regular body, and Dentsply Caulk. The test group was subdivided into a surfactant and non-surfactant group, 50 impressions each. The impressions were poured in a dental stone with a mechanical model vibrator that was set at a vibration frequency of 3000 cycles / minute (low and 6000 cycles / minute (high with the help of a knob. The resultant casts were examined with a Stereomicroscope (LABOMED CZM4 under x10 magnifications. Results : For the low and high frequencies, when surfactant and non-surfactant groups were compared, for all the amplitudes and for both the material groups, the surfactant groups resulted in fewer void formations and showed very high statistical significance (P-value = 0.001. Conclusions : The lowest mean voids were obtained for high frequency surfactant groups. Reprosil: High frequency amplitude 2 being the most prominent, produced the least mean voids (mean = 23.2000, P = 0.001, very highly significant. In comparison, the surfactant groups produced the least voids for both frequencies.

  3. Lamb Model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus–Associated Lung Disease: Insights to Pathogenesis and Novel Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a risk factor for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and hospitalization. The pathogenesis underlying this is not fully understood, and in vivo studies are needed to better clarify essential cellular features and molecular mechanisms. Such studies include analysis of lung tissue from affected human infants and various animal models. The preterm and newborn lamb lung has developmental, structural, cellular, physiologic, and immunologic features similar to that of human infants. Also, the lamb lung is susceptible to various strains of RSV that infect infants and cause similar bronchiolar lesions. Studies in lambs suggest that viral replication in airways (especially bronchioles) is extensive by 4 days after infection, along with bronchiolitis characterized by degeneration and necrosis of epithelial cells, syncytial cell formation, neutrophil infiltration, epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and innate and adaptive immune responses. RSV bronchiolitis greatly affects airflow and gaseous exchange. RSV disease severity is increased in preterm lambs compared with full-term lambs; similar to human infants. The lamb is conducive to experimental assessment of novel, mechanistic therapeutic interventions such as delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor and enhancement of airway epithelial oxidative responses, Club (Clara) cell protein 10, and synthesized compounds such as nanobodies. In contrast, exposure of the fetal ovine lung in vivo to ethanol, a risk factor for preterm birth, reduces pulmonary alveolar development and surfactant protein A expression. Because the formalin-inactivated RSV vaccination enhances some inflammatory responses to RSV infection in lambs, this model has the potential to assess mechanisms of formalin-inactivated RSV enhanced disease as well as newly developed vaccines. PMID:24936027

  4. CRP-ductin, the mouse homologue of gp-340/deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1), binds gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and interacts with lung surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Tornøe, Ida; Nielsen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    CRP-ductin is a protein expressed mainly by mucosal epithelial cells in the mouse. Sequence homologies indicate that CRP-ductin is the mouse homologue of human gp-340, a glycoprotein that agglutinates microorganisms and binds the lung mucosal collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D). Here we report......-ductin and SP-D expression by reverse transcription-PCR. The pancreas was the main site of synthesis of CRP-ductin, but transcripts were also readily amplified from salivary gland, the gastrointestinal tract, liver, testis, uterus and lung. Lung was the main site of synthesis of SP-D, but transcripts were also...... amplified from uterus, salivary gland, thymus, thyroid gland, pancreas and testis. We conclude that CRP-ductin is the mouse homologue of human gp-340 and that its capacity to bind SP-D as well as gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria suggests a role in mucosal immune defense....

  5. A lung segmental model of chronic Pseudomonas infection in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collie, David; Govan, John; Wright, Steven; Thornton, Elisabeth; Tennant, Peter; Smith, Sionagh; Doherty, Catherine; McLachlan, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major contributor to morbidity, mortality and premature death in cystic fibrosis. A new paradigm for managing such infections is needed, as are relevant and translatable animal models to identify and test concepts. We sought to improve on limitations associated with existing models of infection in small animals through developing a lung segmental model of chronic Pseudomonas infection in sheep. Using local lung instillation of P. aeruginosa suspended in agar beads we were able to demonstrate that such infection led to the development of a suppurative, necrotising and pyogranulomatous pneumonia centred on the instilled beads. No overt evidence of organ or systemic compromise was apparent in any animal during the course of infection. Infection persisted in the lungs of individual animals for as long as 66 days after initial instillation. Quantitative microbiology applied to bronchoalveolar lavage fluid derived from infected segments proved an insensitive index of the presence of significant infection in lung tissue (>10(4) cfu/g). The agar bead model of chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection in sheep is a relevant platform to investigate both the pathobiology of such infections as well as novel approaches to their diagnosis and therapy. Particular ethical benefits relate to the model in terms of refining existing approaches by compromising a smaller proportion of the lung with infection and facilitating longitudinal assessment by bronchoscopy, and also potentially reducing animal numbers through facilitating within-animal comparisons of differential therapeutic approaches.

  6. Can Serum Surfactant Protein D or CC-Chemokine Ligand 18 Predict Outcome of Interstitial Lung Disease in Patients with Early Systemic Sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhaj, Mona; Charles, Julio; Pedroza, Claudia; Liu, Xiaochun; Zhou, Xiaodong; Estrada-Y-Martin, Rosa M.; Gonzalez, Emilio B.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Draeger, Hilda T.; Kim, Sarah; Arnett, Frank C.; Mayes, Maureen D.; Assassi, Shervin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the predictive significance of 2 pneumoproteins, surfactant protein D (SP-D) and CC-chemokine ligand 18 (CCL18), for the course of systemic sclerosis (SSc)-related interstitial lung disease. Methods The pneumoproteins were determined in the baseline plasma samples of 266 patients with early SSc enrolled in the GENISOS observational cohort. They also were measured in 83 followup patient samples. Pulmonary function tests were obtained annually. The primary outcome was decline in forced vital capacity (FVC percentage predicted) over time. The predictive significance for longterm change in FVC was investigated by a joint analysis of longitudinal measurements (sequentially obtained FVC percentage predicted) and survival data. Results SP-D and CCL18 levels were both higher in patients with SSc than in matched controls (p < 0.001 and p = 0.015, respectively). Baseline SP-D levels correlated with lower concomitantly obtained FVC (r = −0.27, p < 0.001), but did not predict the short-term decline in FVC at 1 year followup visit or its longterm decline rate. CCL18 showed a significant correlation with steeper short-term decline in FVC (p = 0.049), but was not a predictor of its longterm decline rate. Similarly, a composite score of SP-D and CCL18 was a significant predictor of short-term decline in FVC but did not predict its longterm decline rate. Further, the longitudinal change in these 2 pneumoproteins did not correlate with the concomitant percentage change in FVC. Conclusion SP-D correlated with concomitantly obtained FVC, while CCL18 was a predictor of short-term decline in FVC. However, neither SP-D nor CCL18 was a longterm predictor of FVC course in patients with early SSc. PMID:23588945

  7. On a PCA-based lung motion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ruijiang; Lewis, John H; Jia Xun; Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology and Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies, University of California San Diego, 3855 Health Sciences Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037-0843 (United States); Zhao Tianyu; Wuenschel, Sara; Lamb, James; Yang Deshan; Low, Daniel A [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, 4921 Parkview Pl, St. Louis, MO 63110-1093 (United States); Liu Weifeng, E-mail: sbjiang@ucsd.edu [Amazon.com Inc., 701 5th Ave. Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2011-09-21

    Respiration-induced organ motion is one of the major uncertainties in lung cancer radiotherapy and is crucial to be able to accurately model the lung motion. Most work so far has focused on the study of the motion of a single point (usually the tumor center of mass), and much less work has been done to model the motion of the entire lung. Inspired by the work of Zhang et al (2007 Med. Phys. 34 4772-81), we believe that the spatiotemporal relationship of the entire lung motion can be accurately modeled based on principle component analysis (PCA) and then a sparse subset of the entire lung, such as an implanted marker, can be used to drive the motion of the entire lung (including the tumor). The goal of this work is twofold. First, we aim to understand the underlying reason why PCA is effective for modeling lung motion and find the optimal number of PCA coefficients for accurate lung motion modeling. We attempt to address the above important problems both in a theoretical framework and in the context of real clinical data. Second, we propose a new method to derive the entire lung motion using a single internal marker based on the PCA model. The main results of this work are as follows. We derived an important property which reveals the implicit regularization imposed by the PCA model. We then studied the model using two mathematical respiratory phantoms and 11 clinical 4DCT scans for eight lung cancer patients. For the mathematical phantoms with cosine and an even power (2n) of cosine motion, we proved that 2 and 2n PCA coefficients and eigenvectors will completely represent the lung motion, respectively. Moreover, for the cosine phantom, we derived the equivalence conditions for the PCA motion model and the physiological 5D lung motion model (Low et al 2005 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 63 921-9). For the clinical 4DCT data, we demonstrated the modeling power and generalization performance of the PCA model. The average 3D modeling error using PCA was within 1

  8. A comparison of biologically variable ventilation to recruitment manoeuvres in a porcine model of acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rector Edward S

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biologically variable ventilation (return of physiological variability in rate and tidal volume using a computer-controller was compared to control mode ventilation with and without a recruitment manoeuvre – 40 cm H2O for 40 sec performed hourly; in a porcine oleic acid acute lung injury model. Methods We compared gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, and measured bronchoalveolar fluid for inflammatory cytokines, cell counts and surfactant function. Lung injury was scored by light microscopy. Pigs received mechanical ventilation (FIO2 = 0.3; PEEP 5 cm H2O in control mode until PaO2 decreased to 60 mm Hg with oleic acid infusion (PaO2/FIO2 2O was added after injury. Animals were randomized to one of the 3 modes of ventilation and followed for 5 hr after injury. Results PaO2 and respiratory system compliance was significantly greater with biologically variable ventilation compared to the other 2 groups. Mean and mean peak airway pressures were also lower. There were no differences in cell counts in bronchoalveolar fluid by flow cytometry, or interleukin-8 and -10 levels between groups. Lung injury scoring revealed no difference between groups in the regions examined. No differences in surfactant function were seen between groups by capillary surfactometry. Conclusions In this porcine model of acute lung injury, various indices to measure injury or inflammation did not differ between the 3 approaches to ventilation. However, when using a low tidal volume strategy with moderate levels of PEEP, sustained improvements in arterial oxygen tension and respiratory system compliance were only seen with BVV when compared to CMV or CMV with a recruitment manoeuvre.

  9. Modeling Airflow Using Subject-Specific 4DCT-Based Deformable Volumetric Lung Models

    OpenAIRE

    Olusegun J. Ilegbusi; Zhiliang Li; Behnaz Seyfi; Yugang Min; Sanford Meeks; Patrick Kupelian; Santhanam, Anand P.

    2012-01-01

    Lung radiotherapy is greatly benefitted when the tumor motion caused by breathing can be modeled. The aim of this paper is to present the importance of using anisotropic and subject-specific tissue elasticity for simulating the airflow inside the lungs. A computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) based approach is presented to simulate airflow inside a subject-specific deformable lung for modeling lung tumor motion and the motion of the surrounding tissues during radiotherapy. A flow-structure inter...

  10. Rabbit model of radiation-induced lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Zong Du; Hua Ren; Jian-Fei Song; Li-Fei Zhang; Feng Lin; Hai-Yong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the feasibility of establishing an animal model of chronic radiation-induced lung injury.Methods:Twenty-eightNewZealand white rabbits were randomly divided into3 groups(the right lung irradiation group, the whole lung irradiation group and the control group).Animal model of radiation-induced lung injury was established by high-does radiotherapy in the irradiation groups, then all rabbits underwentCT and pathological examinations at1,2,4,8,12,16 weeks, respectively after radiation.Results:Within4 weeks of irradiation, some rabbits in the right lung irradiation group and whole lung irradiation group died. CT and pathological examinations all showed acute radiation pneumonitis.At8-12 weeks after irradiation,CT scanning showed ground glass samples signs, patchy shadows and fibrotic stripes. Pathological examination showed the fibrosis pulmonary alveolar wall thickened obviously. Conclusions:The clinical animal model of chronic radiation-induced lung injury which corresponds to practical conditions in clinic can be successfully established.

  11. Design-based stereological analysis of the lung parenchymal architecture and alveolar type II cells in surfactant protein A and D double deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, A; Allen, L; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2005-01-01

    overlapping as well as distinct functions. The present study provides a design-based stereological analysis of adult mice deficient in both SP-A and SP-D (A(-)D(-)) with special emphasis on parameters characterizing alveolar architecture and surfactant-producing type II cells. Compared to wild-type, A......, but the mean volume of a single lamellar body remains constant. These results demonstrate that chronic deficiency of SP-A and SP-D in mice leads to parenchymal remodeling, type II cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and disturbed intracellular surfactant metabolism. The design-based stereological approach......Alveolar epithelial type II cells synthesize and secrete surfactant. The surfactant-associated proteins A and D (SP-A and SP-D), members of the collectin protein family, participate in pulmonary immune defense, modulation of inflammation, and surfactant metabolism. Both proteins are known to have...

  12. Chapter 7: Description of miscan-lung, the erasmus mc lung cancer microsimulation model for evaluating cancer control interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.W. Schultz (Frank); R. Boer (Rob); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe MISCAN-lung model was designed to simulate population trends in lung cancer (LC) for comprehensive surveillance of the disease, to relate past exposure to risk factors to (observed) LC incidence and mortality, and to estimate the impact of cancer-control interventions. MISCAN-lung

  13. CFD analysis and flow model reduction for surfactant production in helix reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikačević N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow pattern analysis in a spiral Helix reactor is conducted, for the application in the commercial surfactant production. Step change response curves (SCR were obtained from numerical tracer experiments by three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations. Non-reactive flow is simulated, though viscosity is treated as variable in the direction of flow, as it increases during the reaction. The design and operating parameters (reactor diameter, number of coils and inlet velocity are varied in CFD simulations, in order to examine the effects on the flow pattern. Given that 3D simulations are not practical for fast computations needed for optimization, scale-up and control, CFD flow model is reduced to one-dimensional axial dispersion (AD model with spatially variable dispersion coefficient. Dimensionless dispersion coefficient (Pe is estimated under different conditions and results are analyzed. Finally, correlation which relates Pe number with Reynolds number and number of coils from the reactor entrance is proposed for the particular reactor application and conditions.

  14. On the predictions and limitations of the Becker–Döring model for reaction kinetics in micellar surfactant solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Griffiths, I.M.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the breakdown of a system of micellar aggregates in a surfactant solution following an order-one dilution. We derive a mathematical model based on the Becker-Döring system of equations, using realistic expressions for the reaction constants fit to results from Molecular Dynamics simulations. We exploit the largeness of typical aggregation numbers to derive a continuum model, substituting a large system of ordinary differential equations for a partial differential equation in two independent variables: time and aggregate size. Numerical solutions demonstrate that re-equilibration occurs in two distinct stages over well-separated timescales, in agreement with experiment and with previous theories. We conclude by exposing a limitation in the Becker-Döring theory for re-equilibration of surfactant solutions. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Hypoxia in Models of Lung Cancer: Implications for Targeted Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Edward E.; Vilalta, Marta; Cecic, Ivana K.; Erler, Janine T.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Felsher, Dean; Sayles, Leanne; Sweet-Cordero, Alejandro; –Thu Le, Quynh; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In order to efficiently translate experimental methods from bench to bedside, it is imperative that laboratory models of cancer mimic human disease as closely as possible. In this study we sought to compare patterns of hypoxia in several standard and emerging mouse models of lung cancer in order to establish the appropriateness of each for evaluating the role of oxygen in lung cancer progression and therapeutic response. Experimental Design Subcutaneous and orthotopic human A549 lung carcinomas growing in nude mice as well as spontaneous K-ras or Myc-induced lung tumors grown in situ or subcutaneously were studied using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and fluoroazomycin arabinoside (FAZA) positron emission tomography (PET), and post-mortem by immunohistochemical observation of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. The response of these models to the hypoxia-activated cytotoxin PR-104 was also quantified by formation of γH2AX foci in vitro and in vivo. Finally, our findings were compared with oxygen electrode measurements of human lung cancers. Results Minimal FAZA and pimonidazole accumulation was seen in tumors growing within the lungs, while subcutaneous tumors showed substantial trapping of both hypoxia probes. These observations correlated with the response of these tumors to PR-104, and with the reduced incidence of hypoxia in human lung cancers relative to other solid tumor types. Conclusions These findings suggest that in situ models of lung cancer in mice may be more reflective of the human disease, and encourage judicious selection of preclinical tumor models for the study of hypoxia imaging and anti-hypoxic cell therapies. PMID:20858837

  16. Kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF): Reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants and surfactant molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Pascale; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    Oxidants cause damage to biosurfaces such as the lung epithelium unless they are effectively scavenged. The respiratory tract is covered in a thin layer of fluid which extends from the nasal cavity to the alveoli and contain species that scavenge ozone and other incoming oxidants. The kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF) has been developed in order to investigate the reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants (ascorbate, uric acid, glutathione and α-tocopherol) and surfactant lipids and proteins within the epithelial lining fluid (ELF). The model incorporates different processes: gas phase diffusion, adsorption and desorption from the surface, bulk phase diffusion and known reactions at the surface and in the bulk. The ELF is split into many layers: a sorption layer, a surfactant layer, a near surface bulk layer and several bulk layers. Initial results using KM-ELF indicate that at ELF thicknesses of 80 nm and 1 × 10-4cm the ELF would become rapidly saturated with ozone with saturation occurring in less than a second. However, at an ELF thickness of 1 × 10-3cm concentration gradients were observed throughout the ELF and the presence of antioxidants reduced the O3 reaching the lung cells and tissues by 40% after 1 hour of exposure. In contrast, the antioxidants were efficient scavengers of OH radicals, although the large rate constants of OH reacting with the antioxidants resulted in the antioxidants decaying away rapidly. The chemical half-lives of the antioxidants and surface species were also calculated using KM-ELF as a function of O3 and OH concentration and ELF thickness. Finally, the pH dependence of the products of reactions between antioxidants and O3 were investigated. The KM-ELF model predicted that a harmful ascorbate ozonide product would increase from 1.4 × 1011cm-3at pH 7.4 to 1.1 × 1014 cm-3 at pH 4after 1 hour although a uric acid ozonide product would decrease from 2.0 × 1015cm-3to 5.9 × 1012cm-3.

  17. Characterization of azoxymethane-induced colon tumor metastasis to lung in a mouse model relevant to human sporadic colorectal cancer and evaluation of grape seed extract efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Molly M; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2014-08-01

    The second leading cause of cancer-related deaths (both genders combined) in the United States is colorectal cancer (CRC). This emphasizes the need to develop both effective therapies for CRC patients and pre-clinical models mimicking human disease that carry translational potential in drug-development. Notably, at present there are no in situ models of CRC metastasis to lung. In our azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis study in A/J mice assessing grape seed extract (GSE) efficacy, during necropsy we also found multiple lung nodules suggestive of colon tumor metastasis to lung that were significantly inhibited in GSE fed group. Both histopathological and molecular studies were performed to characterize and establish the origin of these lesions in lung. Histologically these nodules were determined as adenocarcinoma of mucin origin. Molecular analyses by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and RT-PCR revealed strong protein and transcript levels of colon specific markers CDX2 and CK20 in these lung nodules compared to uninvolved control lung tissue. Vis-à-vis, these nodules also showed minimally expressed lung specific biomarkers, specifically surfactant D and TTF-1, in IHC analysis. Additionally, 0.25% GSE supplementation in diet (w/w) decreased the incidence of these lung nodules by 53% and their total number by 66%. Together, the characterization of this unique in situ mouse model of CRC metastasis to lung provides translational opportunities in developing effective therapies to clinically manage and treat CRC at the advanced stage. Moreover, GSE efficacy in inhibiting CRC metastasis to lung in this model further supports its translational potential in controlling CRC growth, progression and metastasis in patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Switchable Surfactants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yingxin Liu; Philip G. Jessop; Michael Cunningham; Charles A. Eckert; Charles L. Liotta

    2006-01-01

    .... We report that long-chain alkyl amidine compounds can be reversibly transformed into charged surfactants by exposure to an atmosphere of carbon dioxide, thereby stabilizing water/alkane emulsions...

  19. Effective short-range Coulomb correction to model the aggregation behavior of ionic surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Mármol, J. Javier; Solans, Conxita; Patti, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    We present a short-range correction to the Coulomb potential to investigate the aggregation of amphiphilic molecules in aqueous solutions. The proposed modification allows to quantitatively reproduce the distribution of counterions above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) or, equivalently, the degree of ionization, α, of the micellar clusters. In particular, our theoretical framework has been applied to unveil the behavior of the cationic surfactant C24H49N2O2+ CH3SO4-, which offers a wide range of applications in the thriving and growing personal care market. A reliable and unambiguous estimation of α is essential to correctly understand many crucial features of the micellar solutions, such as their viscoelastic behavior and transport properties, in order to provide sound formulations for the above mentioned personal care solutions. We have validated our theory by performing extensive lattice Monte Carlo simulations, which show an excellent agreement with experimental observations. More specifically, our coarse-grained model is able to reproduce and predict the complex morphology of the micelles observed at equilibrium. Additionally, our simulation results disclose the existence of a transition from a monodisperse to a bidisperse size distribution of aggregates, unveiling the intriguing existence of a second CMC.

  20. ICOS-expressing lymphocytes promote resolution of CD8-mediated lung injury in a mouse model of lung rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wu

    Full Text Available Acute rejection, a common complication of lung transplantation, may promote obliterative bronchiolitis leading to graft failure in lung transplant recipients. During acute rejection episodes, CD8(+ T cells can contribute to lung epithelial injury but the mechanisms promoting and controlling CD8-mediated injury in the lung are not well understood. To study the mechanisms regulating CD8(+ T cell-mediated lung rejection, we used a transgenic model in which adoptively transferred ovalbumin (OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL induce lung injury in mice expressing an ovalbumin transgene in the small airway epithelium of the lungs (CC10-OVA mice. The lung pathology is similar to findings in humans with acute lung transplant. In the presence of an intact immune response the inflammation resolves by day 30. Using CC10-OVA.RAG(-/- mice, we found that CD4(+ T cells and ICOS(+/+ T cells were required for protection against lethal lung injury, while neutrophil depletion was not protective. In addition, CD4(+Foxp3 (+ ICOS(+ T cells were enriched in the lungs of animals surviving lung injury and ICOS(+/+ Tregs promoted survival in animals that received ICOS(-/- T cells. Direct comparison of ICOS(-/- Tregs to ICOS(+/+ Tregs found defects in vitro but no differences in the ability of ICOS(-/- Tregs to protect from lethal lung injury. These data suggest that ICOS affects Treg development but is not necessarily required for Treg effector function.

  1. In vivo microscopy in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickenbach, Johannes; Czaplik, Michael; Dembinski, Rolf; Pelosi, Paolo; Schroeder, Wolfgang; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf

    2010-07-31

    Regional inhomogeneity and alveolar mechanics in a porcine model of acute lung injury (ALI) was evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM was performed through thoracic windows of the upper and lower lobes. Image quantification was conducted by use of a volume air index (VAI). Twelve anesthetized, mechanically ventilated pigs were randomized to non-injury (control group, n = 6) or ALI induced by surfactant depletion (ALI group, n = 6). CLSM was performed at baseline, after 1 h at 5 mbar and after 2 h at 15 mbar positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Haemodynamics, respiratory mechanics and calculation of pulmonary ventilation-perfusion distribution by MIGET were determined. At baseline, VAI was not different. In the upper lobes, VAI significantly decreased in ALI compared to control group, with no changes after PEEP application. In the lower lobes, VAI significantly decreased in ALI compared to control group. Incremental PEEP significantly increased VAI in ALI, but not in control group. Haemodynamics were significantly compromised in the ALI group. A significant deterioration in oxygenation and ventilation-perfusion distribution could be seen being restored after PEEP adjustment. The VAI may help to assess regional inhomogeneity of the acutely injured lung.

  2. Certain surfactants significantly enhance the activity of antibiotics in the mouse model of MTB and drug resistant MTB infection and effectively remove the bacteria from a pulmonary cavity in human ex-vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risin, Semyon A; Hunter, Robert L; Kobak, Mikhail; Ariel, Boris; Vishnevsky, Boris; Erokhin, Vladislav; Demikhova, Olga; Bocharova, Irina; Stoops, James K

    2014-01-01

    Surfactants have the potential to overcome natural resistance of MTB to antibiotics which is mediated by barriers that impede the penetration of drugs to their targets. A major component of this barrier is trehalose dimycolate (TDM) which surrounds the bacteria with a thick lipid shield. In this study dodecyl maltoside (DDM) was evaluated for this purpose. This surfactant is an excellent cellular permeabilizing agent with associated low toxicity. The administration of the surfactant as an aerosol into the lungs of the infected mice achieved a 5-10 times enhancement of the isoniazid (INH) treatment gauged by the reduction of the colony forming units. This study also established proof of principle that surfactants alone applied as an aerosol can reduce the bacteria count in lungs infected with MTB. The potential of the surfactant in the therapy of human cavitary TB was also investigated using a surgically removed lung from a patient with extreme drug resistant MTB (XDR-TB). A cavity in this lung was flushed with DDM solution ex-vivo. The procedure readily removed the bacteria, excessive amounts of TDM and necrotic tissue from the cavity. These studies demonstrate that DDM can disrupt the layers of TDM and free embedded MTB and, consequently, surfactants have promise as a proficient modality for the treatment of pulmonary MTB.

  3. Surfactant nebulisation prevents the adverse effects of surfactant therapy on blood pressure and cerebral blood flow in rabbits with severe respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, PH; Heikamp, A; Oetomo, SB

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Surfactant replacement therapy for the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome has shown beneficial effects on lung function and survival. Recently, rapid fluctuations of haemodynamics and cerebral perfusion following surfactant instillation have beer, described and an association with the

  4. Dynamics of Structural Parameters and Accumulation of Collagen Fibrils in Rat Lung after Inhalations of Surfactant-BL at Various Terms of Bleomycin-Induced Alveolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchkov, V A; Dubrovskaya, V F; Valkovich, A A; Klestova, O V; Serzhanina, V A; Zhuikov, A G; Seiliev, A A; Rosenberg, O A

    2016-08-01

    Rats were subjected to surfactant-BL inhalations at the early and late phases of bleomycininduced alveolitis. In both regimens, the drug reduced the severity of inflammation. In the acute phase of alveolitis, the therapeutic effect of inhalation was accompanied by activation of the synthesis of fine lose collagen fibrils. In the late phase of alveolitis, inhalation of surfactant-BL thickened the fibrils and diminished their population in alveolar walls.

  5. Development of a metastatic fluorescent Lewis Lung carcinoma mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Lene; Fregil, Marianne; Høgdall, Estrid;

    2013-01-01

    models. To examine the mechanisms involved in tumor metastasis, we first generated a stably transfected Lewis Lung carcinoma cell line expressing a far-red fluorescent protein, called Katushka. After in vivo growth in syngeneic mice, two fluorescent Lewis Lung cancer subpopulations were isolated from...... primary tumors and lung metastases. The metastasis-derived cells exhibited a significant improvement in in vitro invasive activity compared to the primary tumor-derived cells, using a quantitative invasion chamber assay. Moreover, expression levels of 84 tumor metastasis-related mRNAs, 88 cancer......-related microRNAs as well as Dicer and Drosha were determined using RT-qPCR. Compared to the primary Lewis Lung carcinoma subculture, the metastasis-derived cells exhibited statistically significantly increased mRNA levels for several matrix metalloproteinases as well as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF...

  6. Biophysicochemical interaction of a clinical pulmonary surfactant with nano-alumina

    CERN Document Server

    Mousseau, F; Seyrek, E; Berret, J -F

    2015-01-01

    We report on the interaction of pulmonary surfactant composed of phospholipids and proteins with nanometric alumina (Al2O3) in the context of lung exposure and nanotoxicity. We study the bulk properties of phospholipid/nanoparticle dispersions and determine the nature of their interactions. The clinical surfactant Curosurf, both native and extruded, and a protein-free surfactant are investigated. The phase behavior of mixed surfactant/particle dispersions was determined by optical and electron microscopy, light scattering and zeta potential measurements. It exhibits broad similarities with that of strongly interacting nanosystems such as polymers, proteins or particles, and supports the hypothesis of electrostatic complexation. At a critical stoichiometry, micron sized aggregates arising from the association between oppositely charged vesicles and nanoparticles are formed. Contrary to the models of lipoprotein corona or of particle wrapping, our work shows that vesicles maintain their structural integrity and...

  7. A lung segmental model of chronic Pseudomonas infection in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Collie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major contributor to morbidity, mortality and premature death in cystic fibrosis. A new paradigm for managing such infections is needed, as are relevant and translatable animal models to identify and test concepts. We sought to improve on limitations associated with existing models of infection in small animals through developing a lung segmental model of chronic Pseudomonas infection in sheep. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using local lung instillation of P. aeruginosa suspended in agar beads we were able to demonstrate that such infection led to the development of a suppurative, necrotising and pyogranulomatous pneumonia centred on the instilled beads. No overt evidence of organ or systemic compromise was apparent in any animal during the course of infection. Infection persisted in the lungs of individual animals for as long as 66 days after initial instillation. Quantitative microbiology applied to bronchoalveolar lavage fluid derived from infected segments proved an insensitive index of the presence of significant infection in lung tissue (>10(4 cfu/g. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The agar bead model of chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection in sheep is a relevant platform to investigate both the pathobiology of such infections as well as novel approaches to their diagnosis and therapy. Particular ethical benefits relate to the model in terms of refining existing approaches by compromising a smaller proportion of the lung with infection and facilitating longitudinal assessment by bronchoscopy, and also potentially reducing animal numbers through facilitating within-animal comparisons of differential therapeutic approaches.

  8. Predicting for thermodynamic instabilities in water/oil/surfactant microemulsions: A mesoscopic modelling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvail, Magali, E-mail: magali.duvail@icsm.fr; Zemb, Thomas; Dufrêche, Jean-François [Institut de Chimie Séparative de Marcoule (ICSM), UMR 5257, CEA-CNRS-Université Montpellier 2-ENSCM, Site de Marcoule, Bâtiment 426, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Arleth, Lise [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark)

    2014-04-28

    The thermodynamics and structural properties of flexible and rigid nonionic water/oil/surfactant microemulsions have been investigated using a two level-cut Gaussian random field method based on the Helfrich formalism. Ternary stability diagrams and scattering spectra have been calculated for different surfactant rigidities and spontaneous curvatures. A more important contribution of the Gaussian elastic constants compared to the bending one is observed on the ternary stability diagrams. Furthermore, influence of the spontaneous curvature of the surfactant points out a displacement of the instability domains which corresponds to the difference between the spontaneous and effective curvatures. We enlighten that a continuous transition from a connected water in oil droplets to a frustrated locally lamellar (oil in water in oil droplets) microstructure is found to occur when increasing the temperature for an oil-rich microemulsion. This continuous transition translated in a shift in the scattering functions, points out that the phase inversion phenomenon occurs by a coalescence of the water droplets.

  9. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  10. Kinetic model for the pathogenesis of radiation lung damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, C.H. (Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (UK). Surrey Branch)

    1982-09-01

    The development of radiation-induced lung damage can be explained by a kinetic model, based on the assumption that this damage becomes manifest only when a critical proportion (K) of essential cells have ceased to function, and that the rate of loss of these cells following irradiation is linear and dose-dependent. The kinetic model relates the surviving fraction to the time to manifestation of radiation-induced lung damage and to constants, K and the cell cycle time, T. Predictions made from the model about the nature of the response to irradiation are, for the most part, fulfilled. The model can also be used to interpret the response to combined treatment with irradiation and cytotoxic drugs, including the much earlier manifestation of lung damage sometimes seen with such treatment.

  11. Monte-Carlo-Model for the aerosol bolus dispersion in the human lung. Part 2. Model predictions for the diseased lung; Monte-Carlo-Modell der Aerosolbolusdispersion in der menschlichen Lunge. Teil 2. Modellvorhersagen fuer die kranke Lunge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, R.; Pawlak, E.; Hofmann, W. [Salzburg Univ. (Austria). Abt. fuer Physik und Biophysik

    2007-07-01

    After a mathematical extension of the existing model for the theoretical description of the aerosol bolus dispersion, the behavior of particle pulses in diseased lung structures was simulated. The geometry used for healthy lungs was modified in two aspects: First, a modelling of possible airway obstructions, which usually occur in patients with chronic bronchitis, chronic asthma or cystic fibrosis, was carried out and, second, a theoretical approximation of the emphysema, being observed in lungs of smokers, but also as an accompanying phenomenon in obstructive diseases, was established. According to the modified model, in lungs with airway obstructions the exhaled bolus exhibited a decreased dispersion with respect to healthy subjects, whereas in emphysematous lungs the respective half-width of the peak was increased. Standard deviation and skewness of the bolus were similarly influenced by the modified lung architecture. A combination of airway obstruction and emphysema caused an extensive compensation of individual dispersion effects, complicating a secure distinction from the healthy lung. According to the model, a special diagnostic value may be assigned to the bolus deposition, showing significant deviations from the normal case for all simulated diseases. (orig.)

  12. Regional differences in prediction models of lung function in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäper Christoph

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the influencing potential of specific characteristics on lung function in different populations. The aim of this analysis was to determine whether lung function determinants differ between subpopulations within Germany and whether prediction equations developed for one subpopulation are also adequate for another subpopulation. Methods Within three studies (KORA C, SHIP-I, ECRHS-I in different areas of Germany 4059 adults performed lung function tests. The available data consisted of forced expiratory volume in one second, forced vital capacity and peak expiratory flow rate. For each study multivariate regression models were developed to predict lung function and Bland-Altman plots were established to evaluate the agreement between predicted and measured values. Results The final regression equations for FEV1 and FVC showed adjusted r-square values between 0.65 and 0.75, and for PEF they were between 0.46 and 0.61. In all studies gender, age, height and pack-years were significant determinants, each with a similar effect size. Regarding other predictors there were some, although not statistically significant, differences between the studies. Bland-Altman plots indicated that the regression models for each individual study adequately predict medium (i.e. normal but not extremely high or low lung function values in the whole study population. Conclusions Simple models with gender, age and height explain a substantial part of lung function variance whereas further determinants add less than 5% to the total explained r-squared, at least for FEV1 and FVC. Thus, for different adult subpopulations of Germany one simple model for each lung function measures is still sufficient.

  13. Different effects of surfactant proteins B and C - implications for development of synthetic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curstedt, Tore; Johansson, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with synthetic surfactants containing a surfactant protein C analogue in a simple phospholipid mixture gives similar tidal volumes as treatment with poractant alfa (Curosurf(R)) but ventilation with a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is needed for this synthetic surfactant to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. The effect on lung gas volumes seems to depend on the structure of the peptide since treatment with a synthetic surfactant containing the 21-residue peptide (LysLeu(4))(4)Lys (KL(4)) gives low lung gas volumes in experiments also performed with PEEP. Surfactant preparations containing both surfactant proteins B and C or their analogues prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration even if ventilated without PEEP. Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with different natural surfactants indicates that both the lipid composition and the proteins are important in order to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. Synthetic surfactants containing two peptides may be able to replace natural surfactants within the near future but more trials need to be performed before any conclusion can be drawn about the ideal composition of this new generation of synthetic surfactants.

  14. Overview of KRAS-Driven Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Clare; Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    KRAS, the most frequently mutated oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer, has been utilized extensively to model human lung adenocarcinomas. The results from such studies have enhanced considerably an understanding of the relationship between KRAS and the development of lung cancer. Detailed in this overview are the features of various KRAS-driven genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of non-small cell lung cancer, their utilization, and the potential of these models for the study of lung cancer biology.

  15. CFD analysis and flow model reduction for surfactant production in helix reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikačević, N.M.; Thielen, L.; Twerda, A.; Hof, P.M.J. van den

    2014-01-01

    Flow pattern analysis in a spiral Helix reactor is conducted, for the application in the commercial surfactant production. Step change response curves (SCR) were obtained from numerical tracer experiments by three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Non-reactive flow is simul

  16. An ex vivo model to induce early fibrosis-like changes in human precision-cut lung slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsafadi, Hani N; Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia A; Lehmann, Mareike; Lindner, Michael; Peschel, Britta; Königshoff, Melanie; Wagner, Darcy E

    2017-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating chronic interstitial lung disease (ILD) characterized by lung tissue scarring and high morbidity. Lung epithelial injury, myofibroblast activation, and deranged repair are believed to be key processes involved in disease onset and progression, but the exact molecular mechanisms behind IPF remain unclear. Several drugs have been shown to slow disease progression, but treatments that halt or reverse IPF progression have not been identified. Ex vivo models of human lung have been proposed for drug discovery, one of which is precision-cut lung slices (PCLS). Although PCLS production from IPF explants is possible, IPF explants are rare and typically represent end-stage disease. Here we present a novel model of early fibrosis-like changes in human PCLS derived from patients without ILD/IPF using a combination of profibrotic growth factors and signaling molecules (transforming growth factor-β, tumor necrosis factor-α, platelet-derived growth factor-AB, and lysophosphatidic acid). Fibrotic-like changes of PCLS were qualitatively analyzed by histology and immunofluorescence and quantitatively by water-soluble tetrazolium-1, RT-qPCR, Western blot analysis, and ELISA. PCLS remained viable after 5 days of treatment, and fibrotic gene expression (FN1, SERPINE1, COL1A1, CTGF, MMP7, and ACTA2) increased as early as 24 h of treatment, with increases in protein levels at 48 h and increased deposition of extracellular matrix. Alveolar epithelium reprogramming was evident by decreases in surfactant protein C and loss of HOPX In summary, using human-derived PCLS, we established a novel ex vivo model that displays characteristics of early fibrosis and could be used to evaluate novel therapies and study early-stage IPF pathomechanisms. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Animal models in carotenoids research and lung cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jina; Kim, Yuri

    2011-10-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have consistently demonstrated that individuals who eat more fruits and vegetables (which are rich in carotenoids) and who have higher serum β-carotene levels have a lower risk of cancer, especially lung cancer. However, two human intervention trials conducted in Finland and in the United States have reported contrasting results with high doses of β-carotene supplementation increasing the risk of lung cancer among smokers. The failure of these trials to demonstrate actual efficacy has resulted in the initiation of animal studies to reproduce the findings of these two studies and to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the harmful or protective effects of carotenoids in lung carcinogenesis. Although these studies have been limited by a lack of animal models that appropriately represent human lung cancer induced by cigarette smoke, ferrets and A/J mice are currently the most widely used models for these types of studies. There are several proposed mechanisms for the protective effects of carotenoids on cigarette smoke-induced lung carcinogenesis, and these include antioxidant/prooxidant effects, modulation of retinoic acid signaling pathway and metabolism, induction of cytochrome P450, and molecular signaling involved in cell proliferation and/or apoptosis. The technical challenges associated with animal models include strain-specific and diet-specific effects, differences in the absorption and distribution of carotenoids, and differences in the interactions of carotenoids with other antioxidants. Despite the problems associated with extrapolating from animal models to humans, the understanding and development of various animal models may provide useful information regarding the protective effects of carotenoids against lung carcinogenesis.

  18. Surfactant softening of plant leaf cuticle model wax--a Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerström, Anton; Kocherbitov, Vitaly; Westbye, Peter; Bergström, Karin; Arnebrant, Thomas; Engblom, Johan

    2014-07-15

    The aim was to quantify the softening effect that two surfactants (C10EO7 and C8G1.6) have on a plant leaf cuticle model wax. Effects on the thermotropic phase behavior and fluidity of the wax (C22H45OH/C32H66/H2O) were determined. The model wax is crystalline at ambient conditions, yet it is clearly softened by the surfactants. Both surfactants decreased the transition temperatures in the wax and the G″/G' ratio of the wax film increased in irreversible steps following surfactant exposure. C10EO7 has a stronger fluidizing effect than C8G1.6 due to stronger interaction with the hydrophobic waxes. Intracuticular waxes (IW) comprise both crystalline and amorphous domains and it has previously been proposed that the fluidizing effects of surfactants are due to interactions with the amorphous parts. New data suggests that this may be a simplification. Surfactants may also absorb in crevices between crystalline domains. This causes an irreversible effect and a softer cuticle wax.

  19. Induction of virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus by pulmonary surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Yasukawa, Jyunichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-04-01

    We performed a genomewide analysis using a next-generation sequencer to investigate the effect of pulmonary surfactant on gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus, a clinically important opportunistic pathogen. RNA sequence (RNA-seq) analysis of bacterial transcripts at late log phase revealed 142 genes that were upregulated >2-fold following the addition of pulmonary surfactant to the culture medium. Among these genes, we confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis that mRNA amounts for genes encoding ESAT-6 secretion system C (EssC), an unknown hypothetical protein (NWMN_0246; also called pulmonary surfactant-inducible factor A [PsiA] in this study), and hemolysin gamma subunit B (HlgB) were increased 3- to 10-fold by the surfactant treatment. Among the major constituents of pulmonary surfactant, i.e., phospholipids and palmitate, only palmitate, which is the most abundant fatty acid in the pulmonary surfactant and a known antibacterial substance, stimulated the expression of these three genes. Moreover, these genes were also induced by supplementing the culture with detergents. The induction of gene expression by surfactant or palmitate was not observed in a disruption mutant of the sigB gene, which encodes an alternative sigma factor involved in bacterial stress responses. Furthermore, each disruption mutant of the essC, psiA, and hlgB genes showed attenuation of both survival in the lung and host-killing ability in a murine pneumonia model. These findings suggest that S. aureus resists membrane stress caused by free fatty acids present in the pulmonary surfactant through the regulation of virulence gene expression, which contributes to its pathogenesis within the lungs of the host animal.

  20. Design-based stereological analysis of the lung parenchymal architecture and alveolar type II cells in surfactant protein A and D double deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, A; Allen, L; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2005-01-01

    overlapping as well as distinct functions. The present study provides a design-based stereological analysis of adult mice deficient in both SP-A and SP-D (A(-)D(-)) with special emphasis on parameters characterizing alveolar architecture and surfactant-producing type II cells. Compared to wild-type, A......, but the mean volume of a single lamellar body remains constant. These results demonstrate that chronic deficiency of SP-A and SP-D in mice leads to parenchymal remodeling, type II cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and disturbed intracellular surfactant metabolism. The design-based stereological approach...

  1. Development of a three-dimensional model of lung cancer using cultured transformed lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertrees, Roger A; McCarthy, Maureen; Solley, Travis; Popov, Vselovod L; Roaten, John; Pauley, Matthew; Wen, Xiaodong; Goodwin, Thomas J

    2009-02-01

    Despite great strides in understanding cancer biology, the role cellular differentiation and three-dimensional (3-D) structural organization play in metastasis and malignancy remains unclear. Development of 3-D cultures may ultimately provide a model facilitating discovery and interpretation of more relevant information for the expression and role of antibodies in lung cellular pathobiology. The purpose was to develop traditional monolayer (ML) and 3-D cultures of a known transformed metastatic lung cell line and then determine similarities and differences between cultures in terms of differentiation, molecular marker expression and metastasis. A transformed lung cell line (BZR-T33) was initially transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in ML culture. Nude mice were inoculated with BZR-T33 and observed for metastasis. BZR-T33 was grown as ML and 3-D cultures under identical conditions. Immunohistochemical comparison for degree of antibody expression between cultures and control tissue were studied. Electron microscopy (EM) for identification of ultra structures was done and compared between cultures. A 3-D co-culture containing GFP-transformed cells over an immortalized lung-cell line was developed. The GFP-transfected cell line formed tumors and metastasized in mice. EM identified significant mitochondrial and granular endoplasmic reticular pathology in ML not seen in 3-D. Degree of differentiation shows ultra structures and antibody expressions were more representative of control tissue in 3-D than ML. The co-culture experiment in 3-D demonstrates the ability of transformed cells to penetrate the sub-layer of immortalized cells. Development of 3-D cultures will provide a new and powerful tool to study lung biology and pathobiology.

  2. Orphan G Protein–Coupled Receptor GPR116 Regulates Pulmonary Surfactant Pool Size

    OpenAIRE

    Bridges, James P.; Ludwig, Marie-Gabrielle; Mueller, Matthias; Kinzel, Bernd; Sato, Atsuyasu; Xu, Yan; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Ikegami, Machiko

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant levels within the alveoli are tightly regulated to maintain lung volumes and promote efficient gas exchange across the air/blood barrier. Quantitative and qualitative abnormalities in surfactant are associated with severe lung diseases in children and adults. Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control surfactant metabolism have been studied intensively, the critical molecular pathways that sense and regulate endogenous surfactant levels within the alveolu...

  3. Sizing up surfactant synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2014-08-01

    Phosphatidylcholine is generated through de novo synthesis and remodeling involving a lysophospholipid. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, research from the Shimizu lab (Harayama et al., 2014) demonstrates the highly selective enzymatic behavior of lysophospholipid acyltransferases. The authors present an enzymatic model for phosphatidylcholine molecular species diversification that impacts surfactant formation.

  4. Modeling and simulation of surfactant-polymer flooding using a new hybrid method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daripa, Prabir; Dutta, Sourav

    2017-04-01

    Chemical enhanced oil recovery by surfactant-polymer (SP) flooding has been studied in two space dimensions. A new global pressure for incompressible, immiscible, multicomponent two-phase porous media flow has been derived in the context of SP flooding. This has been used to formulate a system of flow equations that incorporates the effect of capillary pressure and also the effect of polymer and surfactant on viscosity, interfacial tension and relative permeabilities of the two phases. The coupled system of equations for pressure, water saturation, polymer concentration and surfactant concentration has been solved using a new hybrid method in which the elliptic global pressure equation is solved using a discontinuous finite element method and the transport equations for water saturation and concentrations of the components are solved by a Modified Method Of Characteristics (MMOC) in the multicomponent setting. Numerical simulations have been performed to validate the method, both qualitatively and quantitatively, and to evaluate the relative performance of the various flooding schemes for several different heterogeneous reservoirs.

  5. Suppression of lung inflammation in an LPS-induced acute lung injury model by the fruit hull of Gleditsia sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyun Ha; Kwun, Min Jung; Han, Chang Woo; Ha, Ki-Tae; Choi, Jun-Yong; Joo, Myungsoo

    2014-10-15

    The fruit hull of Gleditsia sinensis (FGS) used in traditional Asian medicine was reported to have a preventive effect on lung inflammation in an acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. Here, we explored FGS as a possible therapeutics against inflammatory lung diseases including ALI, and examined an underlying mechanism for the effect of FGS. The decoction of FGS in water was prepared and fingerprinted. Mice received an intra-tracheal (i.t.) FGS 2 h after an intra-peritoneal (i.p.) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The effect of FGS on lung inflammation was determined by chest imaging of NF-κB reporter mice, counting inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, analyzing lung histology, and performing semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of lung tissue. Impact of Nrf2 on FGS effect was assessed by comparing Nrf2 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice that were treated similarly. Bioluminescence from the chest of the reporter mice was progressively increased to a peak at 16 h after an i.p. LPS treatment. FGS treatment 2 h after LPS reduced the bioluminescence and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes in the lung. While suppressing the infiltration of inflammatory cells to the lungs of WT mice, FGS post-treatment failed to reduce lung inflammation in Nrf2 KO mice. FGS activated Nrf2 and induced Nrf2-dependent gene expression in mouse lung. FGS post-treatment suppressed lung inflammation in an LPS-induced ALI mouse model, which was mediated at least in part by Nrf2. Our results suggest a therapeutic potential of FGS on inflammatory lung diseases.

  6. Solubility of block copolymer surfactants in compressed CO{sub 2} using a lattice fluid hydrogen-bonding model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takishima, Shigeki; O`Neill, M.L.; Johnston, K.P. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-07-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is an environmentally benign alternative to organic solvents in chemical processing. The solubilities of the homopolymers poly(ethylene glycol), poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (PEGDME), and poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) in CO{sub 2} were correlated with a lattice fluid hydrogen-bonding (LFHB) model, which was then used to predict solubilities of Pluronic L (PEG-PPG-PEG) and Pluronic R (PPG-PEG-PPG) triblock copolymers. Simple averaging rules were developed to evaluate the physical properties of the copolymers without introducing any adjustable parameters. For a given average molecular weight, the predictions of the model were quite reasonable and in some cases perhaps more accurate than the data, due to the large polydispersity of the samples. The model predicts the effects of total molecular weight, PEG/PPG ratio, terminal functional groups, temperature, and density on solubility. The much higher solubility of PPG versus PEG is due primarily to steric hindrance from the methyl branch, which weakens segment-segment interactions, and to a lesser extent to the stronger hydrogen bond donor strength of a primary (in the case of PEG) versus a secondary (in the case of PPG) alcohol terminal group. Consequently, the predicted solubilities of Pluronic L surfactants, which have stronger hydrogen bond donors on the terminal groups, are not much smaller than those of Pluronic R surfactants for given molecular weights of the blocks.

  7. A human lung xenograft mouse model of Nipah virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Valbuena

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nipah virus (NiV is a member of the genus Henipavirus (family Paramyxoviridae that causes severe and often lethal respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans with high mortality rates (up to 92%. NiV can cause Acute Lung Injury (ALI in humans, and human-to-human transmission has been observed in recent outbreaks of NiV. While the exact route of transmission to humans is not known, we have previously shown that NiV can efficiently infect human respiratory epithelial cells. The molecular mechanisms of NiV-associated ALI in the human respiratory tract are unknown. Thus, there is an urgent need for models of henipavirus infection of the human respiratory tract to study the pathogenesis and understand the host responses. Here, we describe a novel human lung xenograft model in mice to study the pathogenesis of NiV. Following transplantation, human fetal lung xenografts rapidly graft and develop mature structures of adult lungs including cartilage, vascular vessels, ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium, and primitive "air" spaces filled with mucus and lined by cuboidal to flat epithelium. Following infection, NiV grows to high titers (10(7 TCID50/gram lung tissue as early as 3 days post infection (pi. NiV targets both the endothelium as well as respiratory epithelium in the human lung tissues, and results in syncytia formation. NiV infection in the human lung results in the production of several cytokines and chemokines including IL-6, IP-10, eotaxin, G-CSF and GM-CSF on days 5 and 7 pi. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that NiV can replicate to high titers in a novel in vivo model of the human respiratory tract, resulting in a robust inflammatory response, which is known to be associated with ALI. This model will facilitate progress in the fundamental understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis and virus-host interactions; it will also provide biologically relevant models for other respiratory viruses.

  8. Minimally Invasive Surfactant Therapy and Noninvasive Respiratory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kribs, Angela

    2016-12-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) caused by surfactant deficiency is major cause for neonatal mortality and short- and long-term morbidity of preterm infants. Continuous positive airway pressure and other modes of noninvasive respiratory support and intubation and positive pressure ventilation with surfactant therapy are efficient therapies for RDS. Because continuous positive airway pressure can fail in severe surfactant deficiency, and because traditional surfactant therapy requires intubation and positive pressure ventilation, this entails a risk of lung injury. Several strategies to combine noninvasive respiratory therapy with minimally invasive surfactant therapy have been described. Available data suggest that those strategies may improve outcome of premature infants with RDS.

  9. Computational modeling of the obstructive lung diseases asthma and COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrowes, Kelly Suzanne; Doel, Tom; Brightling, Chris

    2014-11-28

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized by airway obstruction and airflow imitation and pose a huge burden to society. These obstructive lung diseases impact the lung physiology across multiple biological scales. Environmental stimuli are introduced via inhalation at the organ scale, and consequently impact upon the tissue, cellular and sub-cellular scale by triggering signaling pathways. These changes are propagated upwards to the organ level again and vice versa. In order to understand the pathophysiology behind these diseases we need to integrate and understand changes occurring across these scales and this is the driving force for multiscale computational modeling. There is an urgent need for improved diagnosis and assessment of obstructive lung diseases. Standard clinical measures are based on global function tests which ignore the highly heterogeneous regional changes that are characteristic of obstructive lung disease pathophysiology. Advances in scanning technology such as hyperpolarized gas MRI has led to new regional measurements of ventilation, perfusion and gas diffusion in the lungs, while new image processing techniques allow these measures to be combined with information from structural imaging such as Computed Tomography (CT). However, it is not yet known how to derive clinical measures for obstructive diseases from this wealth of new data. Computational modeling offers a powerful approach for investigating this relationship between imaging measurements and disease severity, and understanding the effects of different disease subtypes, which is key to developing improved diagnostic methods. Gaining an understanding of a system as complex as the respiratory system is difficult if not impossible via experimental methods alone. Computational models offer a complementary method to unravel the structure-function relationships occurring within a multiscale, multiphysics system such as this. Here we review the currentstate

  10. Sex and smoking sensitive model of radon induced lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukovsky, M.; Yarmoshenko, I. [Institute of Industrial Ecology of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    Radon and radon progeny inhalation exposure are recognized to cause lung cancer. Only strong evidence of radon exposure health effects was results of epidemiological studies among underground miners. Any single epidemiological study among population failed to find reliable lung cancer risk due to indoor radon exposure. Indoor radon induced lung cancer risk models were developed exclusively basing on extrapolation of miners data. Meta analyses of indoor radon and lung cancer case control studies allowed only little improvements in approaches to radon induced lung cancer risk projections. Valuable data on characteristics of indoor radon health effects could be obtained after systematic analysis of pooled data from single residential radon studies. Two such analyses are recently published. Available new and previous data of epidemiological studies of workers and general population exposed to radon and other sources of ionizing radiation allow filling gaps in knowledge of lung cancer association with indoor radon exposure. The model of lung cancer induced by indoor radon exposure is suggested. The key point of this model is the assumption that excess relative risk depends on both sex and smoking habits of individual. This assumption based on data on occupational exposure by radon and plutonium and also on the data on external radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the data on external exposure in Mayak nuclear facility. For non-corrected data of pooled European and North American studies the increased sensitivity of females to radon exposure is observed. The mean value of ks for non-corrected data obtained from independent source is in very good agreement with the L.S.S. study and Mayak plutonium workers data. Analysis of corrected data of pooled studies showed little influence of sex on E.R.R. value. The most probable cause of such effect is the change of men/women and smokers/nonsmokers ratios in corrected data sets in North American study. More correct

  11. Water Repellent Soils: The use of electrical resistivity tomography in a small scale catchment model to evaluate the effectiveness of surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Mary-Anne; Mathes, Falko; McGrath, Gavan; Leopold, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Soil water repellence effects large areas of land in Western Australia causing large forfeits in agricultural profit. Surfactants are a potential management tool, however, in field trials they have had varied success and their impact on water movement is poorly understood. This study employs a novel approach to determine the effectiveness of surfactants at modifying infiltration into water repellent soils. Using a physical catchment model (0.6 m × 0.6 m) with soils arranged in a ridge and furrow topography, irrigation and runoff were quantified. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used to measure changes in soil moisture patterns in two dimensions. Two sandy soils with contrasting severity of water repellence, as measured by the Molarity of Ethanol Droplet (MED) test, were assessed. The impact of two surfactants, at an equivalent rate of 1 L ha-1, and an untreated control were monitored over 5 wetting events. With surfactant application the very severely water repellent soil (MED 4.2 M) showed an increase in infiltration of up to 31%, which was concentrated under the area of surfactant application in the furrow. Volumetric water contents beneath the furrow increased up to 40% below 20 mm depth. Water infiltration into the untreated soil with low water repellence (MED 1.0 M) was 98%, and this did not significantly change with surfactant application. This physical catchment model, combined with hydrological and geophysical monitoring provides a useful tool to assess the effectiveness of surfactants in increasing water infiltration and subsurface soil moisture in water repellent soils. The work is part of the Australian CRC for Polymer project.

  12. A comparative study of aerosol deposition in different lung models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C P; Diu, C K

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical calculations are made on total and regional deposition of inhaled particles in the human respiratory system based upon various current lung models. It is found that although total deposition does not vary appreciably from model to model, considerably large differences are present in regional deposition. Deposition profiles along the airways from different models also show very different patterns. These differences can be explained in terms of airway dimensions and the number of structures in different models. Extension to explain intersubject variability is also made.

  13. Surfactant-soil interactions during surfactant-amended remediation of contaminated soils by hydrophobic organic compounds: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laha, Shonali; Tansel, Berrin; Ussawarujikulchai, Achara

    2009-01-01

    Surfactants are amphiphilic molecules that reduce aqueous surface tension and increase the solubility of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). Surfactant-amended remediation of HOC-contaminated soils and aquifers has received significant attention as an effective treatment strategy - similar in concept to using soaps and detergents as washing agents to remove grease from soiled fabrics. The proposed mechanisms involved in surfactant-amended remediation include: lowering of interfacial tension, surfactant solubilization of HOCs, and the phase transfer of HOC from soil-sorbed to pseudo-aqueous phase. However, as with any proposed chemical countermeasures, there is a concern regarding the fate of the added surfactant. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding nonionic micelle-forming surfactant sorption onto soil, and serves as an introduction to research on that topic. Surfactant sorption onto soil appears to increase with increasing surfactant concentration until the onset of micellization. Sorbed-phase surfactant may account for the majority of added surfactant in surfactant-amended remediation applications, and this may result in increased HOC partitioning onto soil until HOC solubilization by micellar phase surfactant successfully competes with increased HOC sorption on surfactant-modified soil. This review provides discussion of equilibrium partitioning theory to account for the distribution of HOCs between soil, aqueous phase, sorbed surfactant, and micellar surfactant phases, as well as recently developed models for surfactant sorption onto soil. HOC partitioning is characterized by apparent soil-water distribution coefficients in the presence of surfactant.

  14. Surfactant apoprotein in nonmalignant pulmonary disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lungs exhibiting a variety of nonmalignant disorders were studied by immunoperoxidase staining using antibodies specific for surfactant apoprotein, IgG, IgM, IgA, albumin, fibrinogen, and lysozyme. Normal Type II pneumocytes showed staining for surfactant apoprotein in the perinuclear region only. The extent and intensity of staining for apoprotein was markedly increased in reactive Type II pneumocytes. This increase appeared to be a nonspecific reaction to l...

  15. Theoretical model to investigate the alkyl chain and anion dependent interactions of gemini surfactant with bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishvakarma, Vijay K; Kumari, Kamlesh; Patel, Rajan; Dixit, V S; Singh, Prashant; Mehrotra, Gopal K; Chandra, Ramesh; Chakrawarty, Anand Kumar

    2015-05-15

    Surfactants are used to prevent the irreversible aggregation of partially refolded proteins and they also assist in protein refolding. We have reported the design and screening of gemini surfactant to stabilize bovine serum albumin (BSA) with the help of computational tool (iGEMDOCK). A series of gemini surfactant has been designed based on bis-N-alkyl nicotinate dianion via varying the alkyl group and anion. On changing the alkyl group and anion of the surfactant, the value of Log P changes means polarity of surfactant can be tuned. Further, the virtual screening of the gemini surfactant has been carried out based on generic evolutionary method. Herein, thermodynamic data was studied to determine the potential of gemini surfactant as BSA stabilizer. Computational tools help to find out the efficient gemini surfactant to stabilize the BSA rather than to use the surfactant randomly and directionless for the stabilization. It can be confirmed through the experimental techniques. Previously, researcher synthesized one of the designed and used gemini surfactant to stabilize the BSA and their interactions were confirmed through various techniques and computational docking. But herein, the authors find the most competent gemini surfactant to stabilize BSA using computational tools on the basis of energy score. Different from the single chain surfactant, the gemini surfactants exhibit much stronger electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with the protein and are thus effective at much lower concentrations. Based on the present study, it is expected that gemini surfactants may prove useful in the protein stabilization operations and may thus be effectively employed to circumvent the problem of misfolding and aggregation.

  16. Experimental Study of Aerosol Deposition in a Realistic Lung Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František LÍZAL

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The inhalation route for administration of medicaments is becoming more and more popular in recent years. The reason is non-invasiveness of the method and instantaneous absorption of drugs to the blood circulation. It is necessary to deliver exact amount of drug to the specific segment because of occurrence of diverse diseases in different segments of lungs. The aim of our work is to contribute to better understanding of transport and deposition of aerosolized drugs in lungs and hence to more effective treatment of respiratory diseases due to the targeted drug delivery. We provided measurements of aerosol deposition in segmented realistic model of lungs without a mouth cavity. Monodisperse particles marked with fluorescein were supplied to the model. The model was then disassembled to segments and each segment was rinsed with isopropanol, whereby fluorescent samples were created. Each sample was analysed by fluorometer and an amount of aerosol deposited in the segment was calculated. Experiences obtained by this study were used for creation of a new model with the mouth cavity. This model will be used for future studies with porous and fiber aerosols.

  17. Physician Assistant Model for Lung Procurements: A Paradigm Worth Considering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Joseph; D’Ovidio, Frank; Bacchetta, Matthew; LaVelle, Matthew; Singh, Gopal; Sonett, Joshua R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Thoracic procurements have traditionally been performed by surgical fellows or attending cardiothoracic surgeons. Donor lung procurement protocols are well established and fairly standardized; however, specific procurement training and judgment are essential to optimizing donor utilization. Although the predicted future deficits of cardiothoracic surgeons are based on a variety of analytical models and scenarios, it appears evident that there will not be a sufficient number of trained cardiothoracic surgeons over the next two decades. Over the past five years in our institution, lung procurements have been performed by a specifically trained physician assistant; as the lead donor surgeon. This model may serve as a cost effective, reproducible and safe alternative to using surgical fellows and attending surgeons, assuring continuity, ongoing technical expertise, and teaching, while addressing future workforce issues as related to transplant. Methods This is a single institution review of 287 consecutive lung procurements performed by either a physician assistant or fellow over five years. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Columbia University, which waived the need for informed consent (IRB#AAAL7107). Results From 2008 to 2012, fellows served as senior surgeon in 90 cases (31.4%) vs. 197 cases (68.6%) by the physician assistant, including 12 Donations after Cardiac Death and 6 re-operative donors. Injury rate was significantly lower for the physician assistant compared to the resident cohort (1/197 (0.5%) vs. 22/90 (24%) respectively. (Rates for pulmonary graft dysfunction grade 2&3 were found to be significantly lower in cases where the physician assistant served as senior surgeon (combined rates of 32.2% (29/90) vs. 9.6% (19/197) in physician assistant group) (p<0.01). Conclusions Use of experienced physician assistants in donor lung procurements is a safe and viable alternative offering continuity of technical expertise and

  18. A moving boundary problem and orthogonal collocation in solving a dynamic liquid surfactant membrane model including osmosis and breakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.C. Biscaia Junior

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic kinetic-diffusive model for the extraction of metallic ions from aqueous liquors using liquid surfactant membranes is proposed. The model incorporates undesirable intrinsic phenomena such as swelling and breakage of the emulsion globules that have to be controlled during process operation. These phenomena change the spatial location of the chemical reaction during the course of extraction, resulting in a transient moving boundary problem. The orthogonal collocation method was used to transform the partial differential equations into an ordinary differential equation set that was solved by an implicit numerical routine. The model was found to be numerically stable and reliable in predicting the behaviour of zinc extraction with acidic extractant for long residence times.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of ZnO Nanoparticle Dispersion in Solution: Modeling of Surfactant Association, Electrostatic Shielding and Counter Ion Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Duchstein

    Full Text Available Molecular models of 5 nm sized ZnO/Zn(OH2 core-shell nanoparticles in ethanolic solution were derived as scale-up models (based on an earlier model created from ion-by-ion aggregation and self-organization and subjected to mechanistic analyses of surface stabilization by block-copolymers. The latter comprise a poly-methacrylate chain accounting for strong surfactant association to the nanoparticle by hydrogen bonding and salt-bridges. While dangling poly-ethylene oxide chains provide only a limited degree of sterical hindering to nanoparticle agglomeration, the key mechanism of surface stabilization is electrostatic shielding arising from the acrylates and a halo of Na+ counter ions associated to the nanoparticle. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal different solvent shells and distance-dependent mobility of ions and solvent molecules. From this, we provide a molecular rationale of effective particle size, net charge and polarizability of the nanoparticles in solution.

  20. A DSC investigation on the influence of gemini surfactant stereochemistry on the organization of lipoplexes and on their interaction with model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleandri, S; Bonicelli, M G; Giansanti, L; Giuliani, C; Ierino, M; Mancini, G; Martino, A; Scipioni, A

    2012-12-01

    Previous investigations showed that the extent of DNA condensation and the efficiency in the transfection of liposomes formulated with 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine and cationic stereomeric gemini surfactants depend heavily on the stereochemistry of the gemini. The influence of the stereochemistry on the interaction of lipoplexes with zwitterionic and anionic cell membrane models was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry to rationalize their different biological behavior. Further, the thermotropic behavior of the corresponding liposomes and of the spontaneous self-assemblies of gemini surfactants in the presence and in the absence of DNA was evaluated to correlate the physicochemical properties of lipoplexes and the stereochemistry of the cationic component. The obtained results show that the stereochemistry of the gemini surfactant controls lipoplexes organization and their mode and kinetic of interaction with different cell membrane models.

  1. A novel SCID mouse model for studying spontaneous metastasis of human lung cancer to human tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, S; Kyoizumi, S; Seyama, T; Yamakido, M; Akiyama, M

    1995-05-01

    We established a novel severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model for the study of human lung cancer metastasis to human lung. Implantation of both human fetal and adult lung tissue into mammary fat pads of SCID mice showed a 100% rate of engraftment, but only fetal lung implants revealed normal morphology of human lung tissue. Using these chimeric mice, we analyzed human lung cancer metastasis to both mouse and human lungs by subcutaneous inoculation of human squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma cell lines into the mice. In 60 to 70% of SCID mice injected with human-lung squamous-cell carcinoma, RERF-LC-AI, cancer cells were found to have metastasized to both mouse lungs and human fetal lung implants but not to human adult lung implants 80 days after cancer inoculation. Furthermore, human-lung adenocarcinoma cells, RERF-LC-KJ, metastasized to the human lung implants within 90 days in about 40% of SCID mice, whereas there were no metastases to the lungs of the mice. These results demonstrate the potential of this model for the in vivo study of human lung cancer metastasis.

  2. "SP-G", a putative new surfactant protein--tissue localization and 3D structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Rausch

    Full Text Available Surfactant proteins (SP are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class.

  3. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles regulate translocation across pulmonary surfactant monolayer and formation of lipoprotein corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guoqing; Jiao, Bao; Shi, Xinghua; Valle, Russell P; Fan, Qihui; Zuo, Yi Y

    2013-12-23

    Interaction with the pulmonary surfactant film, being the first line of host defense, represents the initial bio-nano interaction in the lungs. Such interaction determines the fate of the inhaled nanoparticles and their potential therapeutic or toxicological effect. Despite considerable progress in optimizing physicochemical properties of nanoparticles for improved delivery and targeting, the mechanisms by which inhaled nanoparticles interact with the pulmonary surfactant film are still largely unknown. Here, using combined in vitro and in silico methods, we show how hydrophobicity and surface charge of nanoparticles differentially regulate the translocation and interaction with the pulmonary surfactant film. While hydrophilic nanoparticles generally translocate quickly across the pulmonary surfactant film, a significant portion of hydrophobic nanoparticles are trapped by the surfactant film and encapsulated in lipid protrusions upon film compression. Our results support a novel model of pulmonary surfactant lipoprotein corona associated with inhaled nanoparticles of different physicochemical properties. Our data suggest that the study of pulmonary nanotoxicology and nanoparticle-based pulmonary drug delivery should consider this lipoprotein corona.

  4. Computational and bioengineered lungs as alternatives to whole animal, isolated organ, and cell-based lung models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Brijeshkumar; Gauvin, Robert; Absar, Shahriar; Gupta, Vivek; Gupta, Nilesh; Nahar, Kamrun; Khademhosseini, Ali; Ahsan, Fakhrul

    2012-11-01

    Development of lung models for testing a drug substance or delivery system has been an intensive area of research. However, a model that mimics physiological and anatomical features of human lungs is yet to be established. Although in vitro lung models, developed and fine-tuned over the past few decades, were instrumental for the development of many commercially available drugs, they are suboptimal in reproducing the physiological microenvironment and complex anatomy of human lungs. Similarly, intersubject variability and high costs have been major limitations of using animals in the development and discovery of drugs used in the treatment of respiratory disorders. To address the complexity and limitations associated with in vivo and in vitro models, attempts have been made to develop in silico and tissue-engineered lung models that allow incorporation of various mechanical and biological factors that are otherwise difficult to reproduce in conventional cell or organ-based systems. The in silico models utilize the information obtained from in vitro and in vivo models and apply computational algorithms to incorporate multiple physiological parameters that can affect drug deposition, distribution, and disposition upon administration via the lungs. Bioengineered lungs, on the other hand, exhibit significant promise due to recent advances in stem or progenitor cell technologies. However, bioengineered approaches have met with limited success in terms of development of various components of the human respiratory system. In this review, we summarize the approaches used and advancements made toward the development of in silico and tissue-engineered lung models and discuss potential challenges associated with the development and efficacy of these models.

  5. Surfactant enhanced volumetric sweep efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwell, J.H.; Scamehorn, J.F.

    1989-10-01

    Surfactant-enhanced waterflooding is a novel EOR method aimed to improve the volumetric sweep efficiencies in reservoirs. The technique depends upon the ability to induce phase changes in surfactant solutions by mixing with surfactants of opposite charge or with salts of appropriate type. One surfactant or salt solution is injected into the reservoir. It is followed later by injection of another surfactant or salt solution. The sequence of injections is arranged so that the two solutions do not mix until they are into the permeable regions well away from the well bore. When they mix at this point, by design they form a precipitate or gel-like coacervate phase, plugging this permeable region, forcing flow through less permeable regions of the reservoir, improving sweep efficiency. The selectivity of the plugging process is demonstrated by achieving permeability reductions in the high permeable regions of Berea sandstone cores. Strategies were set to obtain a better control over the plug placement and the stability of plugs. A numerical simulator has been developed to investigate the potential increases in oil production of model systems. Furthermore, the hardness tolerance of anionic surfactant solutions is shown to be enhanced by addition of monovalent electrolyte or nonionic surfactants. 34 refs., 32 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Analytical modelling of regional radiotherapy dose response of lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangkyu; Stroian, Gabriela; Kopek, Neil; AlBahhar, Mahmood; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of the dose-response of radiation-induced lung disease (RILD) is necessary for optimization of radiotherapy (RT) treatment plans involving thoracic cavity irradiation. This study models the time-dependent relationship between local radiation dose and post-treatment lung tissue damage measured by computed tomography (CT) imaging. Fifty-eight follow-up diagnostic CT scans from 21 non-small-cell lung cancer patients were examined. The extent of RILD was segmented on the follow-up CT images based on the increase of physical density relative to the pre-treatment CT image. The segmented RILD was locally correlated with dose distribution calculated by analytical anisotropic algorithm and the Monte Carlo method to generate the corresponding dose-response curves. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model was fit to the dose-response curves at six post-RT time periods, and temporal change in the LKB parameters was recorded. In this study, we observed significant correlation between the probability of lung tissue damage and the local dose for 96% of the follow-up studies. Dose-injury correlation at the first three months after RT was significantly different from later follow-up periods in terms of steepness and threshold dose as estimated from the LKB model. Dependence of dose response on superior-inferior tumour position was also observed. The time-dependent analytical modelling of RILD might provide better understanding of the long-term behaviour of the disease and could potentially be applied to improve inverse treatment planning optimization.

  7. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F.; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  8. Bayesian analysis of a disability model for lung cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armero, C; Cabras, S; Castellanos, M E; Perra, S; Quirós, A; Oruezábal, M J; Sánchez-Rubio, J

    2016-02-01

    Bayesian reasoning, survival analysis and multi-state models are used to assess survival times for Stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer patients and the evolution of the disease over time. Bayesian estimation is done using minimum informative priors for the Weibull regression survival model, leading to an automatic inferential procedure. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods have been used for approximating posterior distributions and the Bayesian information criterion has been considered for covariate selection. In particular, the posterior distribution of the transition probabilities, resulting from the multi-state model, constitutes a very interesting tool which could be useful to help oncologists and patients make efficient and effective decisions.

  9. The Role of Surfactant in Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The key feature of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the insufficient production of surfactant in the lungs of preterm infants. As a result, researchers have looked into the possibility of surfactant replacement therapy as a means of preventing and treating RDS. We sought to identify the role of surfactant in the prevention and management of RDS, comparing the various types, doses, and modes of administration, and the recent development. A PubMed search was carried out up to March 2012 u...

  10. A Computational Model of Cellular Engraftment on Lung Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Pothen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The possibility that stem cells might be used to regenerate tissue is now being investigated for a variety of organs, but these investigations are still essentially exploratory and have few predictive tools available to guide experimentation. We propose, in this study, that the field of lung tissue regeneration might be better served by predictive tools that treat stem cells as agents that obey certain rules of behavior governed by both their phenotype and their environment. Sufficient knowledge of these rules of behavior would then, in principle, allow lung tissue development to be simulated computationally. Toward this end, we developed a simple agent-based computational model to simulate geographic patterns of cells seeded onto a lung scaffold. Comparison of the simulated patterns to those observed experimentally supports the hypothesis that mesenchymal stem cells proliferate preferentially toward the scaffold boundary, whereas alveolar epithelial cells do not. This demonstrates that a computational model of this type has the potential to assist in the discovery of rules of cellular behavior

  11. Vortical Structures in CT-based Breathing Lung Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiwoong; Lee, Changhyun; Hoffman, Eric; Lin, Ching-Long

    2016-11-01

    The 1D-3D coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) lung model is applied to study vortical structures in the human airways during normal breathing cycles. During inhalation, small vortical structures form around the turbulent laryngeal jet and Taylor-Gőrtler-like vortices form near the curved walls in the supraglottal region and at airway bifurcations. On exhalation elongated vortical tubes are formed in the left main bronchus, whereas a relatively slower stream is observed in the right main bronchus. These structures result in helical motions in the trachea, producing long lasting high wall shear stress on the wall. The current study elucidates that the correct employment of image-based airway deformation and lung deflation information is crucial for capturing the physiologically consistent regional airflow structures. The pathophysiological implications of these structures in destruction of tracheal wall will be discussed.

  12. Modeling of mass transfer characteristics of bubble column reactor with surfactant present

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵伟荣; 史惠祥; 汪大翚

    2004-01-01

    Danckwert's method was used to determine the specific interfacial area, a, and the individual mass transfer coefficient, kL, during absorption of CO2 in a bubble column with an anionic surfactant in the carbonate-bicarbonate buffer solution and NaAsO2 as catalyst, the presence of which decreases the specific interfacial area and the individual mass transfer coefficient. The specific interfacial area and the individual mass transfer coefficient increase with increasing superficial gas velocity. The specific interfacial area decreases whereas the individual mass transfer coefficient increases with increasing temperature. The results of experiments were used to determine the dependence of a, kL, and kLa on the surface tension, the temperature of the absorption phase, and the superficial velocity of the gas. The calculated results from the correlation were found to be within 10% deviation from the actual experimental results.

  13. Modeling of mass transfer characteristics of bubble column reactor with surfactant present

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵伟荣; 史惠祥; 汪大翚

    2004-01-01

    Danckwert's method was used to determine the specific interfacial area, a, and the individual mass transfer coefficient, κL, during absorption of CO2 in a bubble column with an anionic surfactant in the carbonate-bicarbonate buffer solution and NaAsO2 as catalyst, the presence of which decreases the specific interracial area and the individual mass transfer coefficient. The specific interfacial area and the individual mass transfer coefficient increase with increasing superficial gas velocity. The specific interfacial area decreases whereas the individual mass transfer coefficient increases with increasing temperature. The results of experiments were used to determine the dependence of a, κL, and κLa on the surface tension, the temperature of the absorption phase, and the superficial velocity of the gas. The calculated results from the correlation were found to be within 10% deviation from the actual experimental results.

  14. Effects of Glycyrrhizin in a Mouse Model of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Ping Deng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently, there is a global attempt to identify potential anti-cancer agents with low toxicity. Previous studies have found that glycyrrhizin exerts anti-cancer action with low toxicity through suppressing thromboxane A2 (TxA2 in lung cancer cell lines. However, these effects have not yet been determined in animal models of lung cancer. Methods: Human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts were established in nude mice by the introduction of A549 cells with stable transfection of the TxA2 receptor (TPα. The animal model was confirmed by the hematoxylin and eosin (H&E method. Tumor-bearing mice were then administered graded concentrations of glycyrrhizin, cisplatin or both. After the treatments, body weights of all animals were recorded, and immunohistochemistry staining of lung tissues and serum biochemistry detection of aspartate amino transferase (AST, alanine amino transferase (ALT, urea and creatinine were carried out. Results: Treatment with glycyrrhizin alone or the combination of cisplatin and glycyrrhizin profoundly reduced expression of thromboxane synthase (TxAS as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, recovered the body weight, and rescued damage of liver and kidney in tumor-bearing mice. Although it inhibited PCNA expression, cisplatin could not significantly suppress TxAS expression. Because of a positive feedback loop between TPα and TxAS, the effects of glycyrrhizin are possibly attributable to the suppression of the TxA2 pathway. Conclusions: This study provides in vivo evidence to support glycyrrhizin as a potential candidate for developing new regimens to overcome tumor progression and the resistance and toxicity of cisplatin.

  15. In vitro analysis of the effect of alkyl-chain length of anionic surfactants on the skin by using a reconstructed human epidermal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Fumiko; Watanabe, Shin-Ichi; Harada, Fusae; Miyake, Miyuki; Yoshida, Masaki; Okano, Tomomichi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of the alkyl-chain length of anionic surfactants on the skin using an in vitro model. The evaluated anionic surfactants were sodium alkyl sulfate (AS) and sodium fatty acid methyl ester sulfonate (MES), which had different alkyl-chain lengths (C8-C14). Skin tissue damage and permeability were examined using a reconstructed human epidermal model, LabCyte EPI-MODEL24. Skin tissue damage was examined by measuring cytotoxicity with an MTT assay. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) were used to detect surfactants that permeated into the assay medium through an epidermal model. To assess the permeation mechanism and cell damage caused by the surfactants through the epidermis, we evaluated the structural changes of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA), used as a simple model protein, and the fluidity of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphpcholine (DPPC) liposome, which serves as one of the most abundant phospholipid models of living cell membranes in the epidermis. The effects of the surfactants on the proteins were measured using Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, while the effects on membrane fluidity were investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. ET50 (the 50% median effective time) increased as follows: C10 C12 > C14, for both AS and MES. For both AS and MES, the order parameter, which is the criteria for the microscopic viscosity of lipid bilayers, increased as follows: C10 C12 > C14. It was determined that the difference in skin tissue damage in the LabCyte EPI-MODEL24 with C10 to C14 AS and MES was caused by the difference in permeation and cell membrane fluidity through the lipid bilayer path in the epidermis.

  16. A simple model for predicting lung cancer occurrence in a lung cancer screening program: The Pittsburgh Predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David O; Weissfeld, Joel

    2015-07-01

    A user-friendly method for assessing lung cancer risk may help standardize selection of current and former smokers for screening. We evaluated a simple 4-factor model, the Pittsburgh Predictor, against two well-known, but more complicated models for predicting lung cancer risk. Trained against outcomes observed in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), the Pittsburgh Predictor used four risk factors, duration of smoking, smoking status, smoking intensity, and age, to predict 6-year lung cancer incidence. After calibrating the Bach and PLCOM2012 models to outcomes observed in the low-dose computed tomography arm of the NLST, we compared model calibration, discrimination, and clinical usefulness (net benefit) in the NLST and Pittsburgh Lung Screening Study (PLuSS) populations. The Pittsburgh Predictor, Bach, and PLCOM2012 represented risk equally well, except for the tendency of PLCOM2012 to overestimate risk in subjects at highest risk. Relative to the Pittsburgh Predictor, Bach and PLCOM2012 increased the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve by 0.007-0.009 and 0.012-0.021 units, respectively, depending on study population. Across a clinically relevant span of 6-year lung cancer risk thresholds (0.01-0.05), Bach and PLCOM2012 increased net benefit by less than 0.1% in NLST and 0.3% in PLuSS. In exchange for a small reduction in prediction accuracy, a simpler lung cancer risk prediction model may facilitate standardized procedures for advising and selecting patients with respect to lung cancer screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantification of Lung Metastases from In Vivo Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joan; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-01

    Cancer research has made significant progress in terms of understanding and targeting primary tumors; however, the challenge remains for the successful treatment of metastatic cancers. This highlights the importance to use in vivo models to study the metastatic process, as well as for preclinical testing of compounds that could inhibit metastasis. As a result, proper quantification of metastases from in vivo models is of the utmost significance. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for collecting and handling lung tissues from mice, and guidance for subsequent analysis of metastases, as well as interpretation of data.

  18. Quantification of Lung Metastases from In Vivo Mouse Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Joan; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-01

    Cancer research has made significant progress in terms of understanding and targeting primary tumors; however, the challenge remains for the successful treatment of metastatic cancers. This highlights the importance to use in vivo models to study the metastatic process, as well as for preclinical...... testing of compounds that could inhibit metastasis. As a result, proper quantification of metastases from in vivo models is of the utmost significance. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for collecting and handling lung tissues from mice, and guidance for subsequent analysis of metastases, as well...

  19. Chapter 7: Description of MISCAN-lung, the Erasmus MC Lung Cancer microsimulation model for evaluating cancer control interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, F W; Boer, R; de Koning, H J

    2012-07-01

    The MISCAN-lung model was designed to simulate population trends in lung cancer (LC) for comprehensive surveillance of the disease, to relate past exposure to risk factors to (observed) LC incidence and mortality, and to estimate the impact of cancer-control interventions. MISCAN-lung employs the technique of stochastic microsimulation of life histories affected by risk factors. It includes the two-stage clonal expansion model for carcinogenesis and a detailed LC progression model; the latter is specifically intended for the evaluation of screenings. This article elucidates further the principles of MISCAN-lung and describes its application to a comparative study within the CISNET Lung Working Group on the impact of tobacco control on U.S. LC mortality. MISCAN-lung yields an estimate of the number of LC deaths avoided during 1975-2000. The potential number of avoidable LC deaths, had everybody quit smoking in 1965, is 2.2 million; 750,000 deaths (30%) were avoided in the United States due to actual tobacco control interventions. The model fits in the actual tobacco-control scenario, providing credibility to the estimates of other scenarios, although considering survey-reported smoking trends alone has limitations.

  20. Pulmonary surfactant adsorption is increased by hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taeusch, H William; Dybbro, Eric; Lu, Karen W

    2008-04-01

    In acute lung injuries, inactivating agents may interfere with transfer (adsorption) of pulmonary surfactants to the interface between air and the aqueous layer that coats the interior of alveoli. Some ionic and nonionic polymers reduce surfactant inactivation in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested directly whether an ionic polymer, hyaluronan, or a nonionic polymer, polyethylene glycol, enhanced adsorption of a surfactant used clinically. We used three different methods of measuring adsorption in vitro: a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer; a King/Clements device; and a spreading trough. In addition we measured the effects of both polymers on surfactant turbidity, using this assay as a nonspecific index of aggregation. We found that both hyaluronan and polyethylene glycol significantly increased the rate and degree of surfactant material adsorbed to the surface in all three assays. Hyaluronan was effective in lower concentrations (20-fold) than polyethylene glycol and, unlike polyethylene glycol, hyaluronan did not increase apparent aggregation of surfactant. Surfactant adsorption in the presence of serum was also enhanced by both polymers regardless of whether hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol was included with serum in the subphase or added to the surfactant applied to the surface. Therefore, endogenous polymers in the alveolar subphase, or exogenous polymers added to surfactant used as therapy, may both be important for reducing inactivation of surfactant that occurs with various lung injuries.

  1. Molecular recognition of genomic DNA in a condensate with a model surfactant for potential gene-delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priya; Choudhury, Susobhan; Chandra, Goutam Kumar; Lemmens, Peter; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The functionality of a gene carrying nucleic acid in an artificial gene-delivery system is important for the overall efficiency of the vehicle in vivo. Here, we have studied a well-known artificial gene-delivery system, which is a condensate of calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with a model cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) to investigate the molecular recognition of the genomic DNA in the condensate. While dynamic light scattering (DLS) and circular dichroism (CD) reveal structural aspects of the condensate and the constituting DNA respectively, picosecond resolved polarization gated spectroscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) reveal molecular recognition of the genomic DNA in the condensate. We have considered ethidium bromide (EB) and crystal violet (CV), which are well known DNA-binding agents through intercalative (specific) and electrostatic (non-specific) interactions, respectively, as model ligands for the molecular recognition studies. A fluorescent cationic surfactant, Nonyl Acridine Orange (NAO) is considered to be a mimic of CTAB in the condensate. The polarization gated fluorescence of NAO at various temperatures has been used to investigate the local microviscosity of the condensate. The excellent spectral overlap of NAO emission and the absorption spectra of both EB and CV allow us to investigate FRET-distances of the ligands with respect to NAO in the condensate at various temperatures and thermal stability of ligand-binding of the genomic DNA. The thermodynamic properties of the molecular recognition have also been explored using Van't Hoff equation. We have also extended our studies to molecular recognition of the genomic DNA in the condensate as dried thin films. This has important implications for its application in bioelectronics.

  2. DISTRIBUTION OF A 2ND DOSE OF EXOGENOUS SURFACTANT IN RABBITS WITH SEVERE RESPIRATORY-FAILURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PLOTZ, FB; STEVENS, H; HEIKAMP, A; OETOMO, SB

    1995-01-01

    Newborn infants with respiratory distress who fail to respond to surfactant treatment receive a second dose of surfactant. The effect of this strategy on the distribution of surfactant to the lung is unknown. We therefore investigated the distribution of the first (100 mg/kg body weight) and second

  3. Experimental model of isolated lung perfusion in rats: first Brazilian experience using the IL-2 isolated perfused rat or guinea pig lung system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pêgo-Fernandes, P M; Werebe, E; Cardoso, P F G; Pazetti, R; de Oliveira, K A; Soares, P R O; Jatene, F B

    2010-03-01

    Lung transplantation has become the mainstay therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease refractory to medical management. However, the number of patients listed for lung transplantation largely exceeds available donors. The study of lung preservation requires accurate, cost-effective small animal models. We have described a model of ex vivo rat lung perfusion using a commercially available system. Male Wistar rats weighing 250 g-300 g were anesthetized with intraperitoneal sodium thiopental (50 mg/kg body weight). The surgical technique included heart-lung block extraction, assembly, and preparation for perfusion and data collection. We used an IL-2 Isolated Perfused Rat or Guinea Pig Lung System (Harvard Apparatus, Holliston, Mass, United States; Hugo Sachs Elektronik, Alemanha). Preliminary results included hemodynamic and pulmonary mechanics data gathered in the experiments. The isolated rat lung perfusion system is a reliable method to assess lung preservation. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Florida Red Tides, Manatee Brevetoxicosis, and Lung Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Colbert, Debborah E.; Dalpra, Dana; Newton, Elizabeth A. C.; Gaspard, Joseph; Littlefield, Brandi; Manire, Charles

    2010-01-01

    In 1996, 149 Florida manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris, died along the southwest coast of Florida. Necropsy pathology results of these animals indicated that brevetoxin from the Florida red tide, Karenia brevis, caused their death. A red tide bloom had been previously documented in the area where these animals stranded. The necropsy data suggested the mortality occurred from chronic inhalation and/or ingestion. Inhalation theories include high doses of brevetoxin deposited/stored in the manatee lung or significant manatee sensitivity to the brevetoxin. Laboratory models of the manatee lungs can be constructed from casts of necropsied animals for further studies; however, it is necessary to define the breathing pattern in the manatee, specifically the volumes and flow rates per breath to estimate toxin deposition in the lung. To obtain this information, two captive-born Florida manatees, previously trained for husbandry and research behaviors, were trained to breathe into a plastic mask placed over their nares. The mask was connected to a spirometer that measured volumes and flows in situ. Results reveal high volumes, short inspiratory and expiratory times and high flow rates, all consistent with observed breathing patterns. PMID:26448968

  5. Preparation and tumor cell model based biobehavioral evaluation of the nanocarrier system using partially reduced graphene oxide functionalized by surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2015-07-01

    lysosomes in 2 hours through endocytosis, then the drug is released in the cytoplasm in 8 hours, and ultimately EPI is delivered into cell nucleus to exhibit medicinal effects in 1 day.Conclusion: The comprehensive exploration of the biological uptake mechanism of functional graphene-mediated tumor cell targeting model provides a typical protocol for evaluation of drug delivery system and will benefit the discovery of new surfactant-modified nanocarriers in nanomedicine. Keywords: biocompatibility, cytotoxicity, drug delivery, controlled release, fluorescence colocalization, epirubicin

  6. Role of TNF-α in lung tight junction alteration in mouse model of acute lung inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuzzocrea Salvatore

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study, we used tumor necrosis factor-R1 knock out mice (TNF-αR1KO to understand the roles of TNF-α on epithelial function in models of carrageenan-induced acute lung inflammation. In order to elucidate whether the observed anti-inflammatory status is related to the inhibition of TNF-α, we also investigated the effect of etanercept, a TNF-α soluble receptor construct, on lung TJ function. Pharmacological and genetic TNF-α inhibition significantly reduced the degree of (1 TNF-α production in pleural exudates and in the lung tissues, (2 the inflammatory cell infiltration in the pleural cavity as well as in the lung tissues (evaluated by MPO activity, (3 the alteration of ZO-1, Claudin-2, Claudin-4, Claudin-5 and β-catenin (immunohistochemistry and (4 apoptosis (TUNEL staining, Bax, Bcl-2 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that inhibition of TNF-α reduces the tight junction permeability in the lung tissues associated with acute lung inflammation, suggesting a possible role of TNF-α on lung barrier dysfunction.

  7. Effects of various pulmonary surfactants on proinflammatory cytokines in rabitts with lung injury induced by chest impact%不同肺表面活性物质对兔胸部撞击肺损伤中促炎性细胞因子的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立; 张裕祥; 杜萍; 康迪

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of various pulmonary surfactant( PS) on the inflammatory cytokines in rabitts with lung injury induced by chest impact.Methods Fifty-two New Zealand white rabbits were selected in the study,and the model of acute lung injury was established by vertical impact on the right chest of the rabbit.The 52 rabbits were randomly divided into control group (n=17),sheep PS group(n=17) and cattle PS group(n=18),were given bronchoalveolar lavage with normal saline,PS of sheep′lung and PS of cattle′lung, respectively, and then the animals were killed to collect the lung tissues.Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect the contents of tumor nuclear factor(TNF)-α,interleukin(IL)-1 and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung homogenate.Results Sheep PS and cattle PS groups presented significantly lower contents of TNF-α,IL-1 and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung homogenate compared with control group(P0.05).Conclusion The PS of sheep′lung and cattle′s lung can significantly reduce the content of inflammatory cytokines in rabbits with acute lung injury,which might own certain inhibitory effects on proinflammatory cytokines.%目的 观察不同肺表面活性物质( PS)对兔胸部撞击肺损伤后促炎性细胞因子的影响. 方法 选取新西兰大白兔52只,撞击物以自由落体的方式垂直撞击其右侧胸部建立急性肺损伤模型,随机分为对照组17只、羊PS组17只和牛PS组18 只,分别以生理盐水、羊、牛肺表面活性物质行支气管肺泡灌洗,然后处死动物取肺组织;采用酶联免疫吸附(ELISA)法检测肺泡灌洗液和肺组织匀浆中肿瘤坏死因子-α(TNF-α)、白介素-1(IL-1)、白介素-6(IL-6)含量. 结果 羊PS组及牛PS组的肺泡灌洗液和肺组织匀浆中的 TNF-α、IL-1、IL-6 含量均低于对照组(P 0.05). 结论 羊、牛肺表面活性物质均能有效减少兔急性肺损伤促炎性细胞因子的含量,对急性

  8. 蜕皮甾酮对急性肺损伤大鼠肺组织中Toll样受体4及肺表面活性蛋白A表达的影响%Effect of ecdysterone on the expression of toll-like receptor 4 and surfactant protein A in lung tissue of rats with acute lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李军; 吴旭; 张军花; 吴霞; 高冬蕴; 沈涛; 谷城威

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect of ecdysterone (EDS) on surfactant protein A (SP-A) and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression in rats with acute lung injury (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) , and investigate its mechanism. Methods: Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal control group, LPS group, low (20 mg/kg) , middle (30 mg/kg) , and high (40 mg/kg) dosage of EDS treatment groups (n=8). The rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg LPS to replicate the ALI model, except the rats in normal control group. After 1 hour, EDS treatment groups received different dosage of EDS by intraperitoneal injection, and rats in other groups received the same volume of normal saline instead. After 24 hours, lung pathological changes were observed with optical microscope; SP-A and TLR4 levels in the supernatant of lung homogenates were determined by Western blot; tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in the supernatant of lung homogenates were determined by ELISA; the expression of TNF-α mRNA in the lung tissues were assayed by reverse transcription-pol-ymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results:The pathological changes showed that edema and hemorrhage appeared in alveolar interstitial tissue, and inflammatory cells were observed in LPS group, which were alleviated by different dosage of EDS, and the effects were more obvious with higher dosages. The content of SP-A in supernatant of lung homogenate was significantly decreased, while the levels of TLR4 ,TNF-α and TNF-α mRNA of lung tissues were significantly increased in LPS group compared with those of the normal control group (P<0. 05). Compared with LPS group, the content of SP-A was significantly increased while the levels of TLR4 , TNF-α and TNF-α mRNA were significantly lowed in groups of different dosage of EDS (P<0. 05) , and the effect in high dosage of EDS group was more significant than that in the medium and low dosage of EDS groups (P<0. 05). Conclusions: EDS could protect

  9. History of surfactant up to 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Remarkable insight into disturbed lung mechanics of preterm infants was gained in the 18th and 19th century by the founders of obstetrics and neonatology who not only observed respiratory failure but also designed devices to treat it. Surfactant research followed a splendid and largely logical growth curve. Pathological changes in the immature lung were characterized in Germany by Virchow in 1854 and by Hochheim in 1903. The Swiss physiologist von Neergard fully understood surfactant function in 1929, but his paper was ignored for 25 years. The physical properties of surfactant were recognized in the early 1950s from research on warfare chemicals by Pattle in Britain and by Radford and Clements in the United States. The causal relationship of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and surfactant deficiency was established in the USA by Avery and Mead in 1959. The Australian obstetrician Liggins induced lung maturity with glucocorticoids in 1972, but his discovery was not fully believed for another 20 years. A century of basic research was rewarded when Fujiwara introduced surfactant substitution in Japan in 1980 for treatment and prevention of RDS.

  10. Surfactant apoprotein in nonmalignant pulmonary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lungs exhibiting a variety of nonmalignant disorders were studied by immunoperoxidase staining using antibodies specific for surfactant apoprotein, IgG, IgM, IgA, albumin, fibrinogen, and lysozyme. Normal Type II pneumocytes showed staining for surfactant apoprotein in the perinuclear region only. The extent and intensity of staining for apoprotein was markedly increased in reactive Type II pneumocytes. This increase appeared to be a nonspecific reaction to lung injury. The intra-alveolar material in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis stained intensely for surfactant apoprotein, indicating that the accumulated proteinaceous material contained pulmonary surfactant. Type II pneumocytes in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis exhibited hyperplasia as well as hypertrophy. The few macrophages in lung affected by pulmonary alveolar proteinosis stained intensely for lysozyme. The excessive intraalveolar accumulation of proteinaceous material in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis may be the result of both an over-production as well as a deficient removal of pulmonary surfactant. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 p[57]-a PMID:7004201

  11. A systems approach to mapping transcriptional networks controlling surfactant homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Vrushank

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary surfactant is required for lung function at birth and throughout life. Lung lipid and surfactant homeostasis requires regulation among multi-tiered processes, coordinating the synthesis of surfactant proteins and lipids, their assembly, trafficking, and storage in type II cells of the lung. The mechanisms regulating these interrelated processes are largely unknown. Results We integrated mRNA microarray data with array independent knowledge using Gene Ontology (GO similarity analysis, promoter motif searching, protein interaction and literature mining to elucidate genetic networks regulating lipid related biological processes in lung. A Transcription factor (TF - target gene (TG similarity matrix was generated by integrating data from different analytic methods. A scoring function was built to rank the likely TF-TG pairs. Using this strategy, we identified and verified critical components of a transcriptional network directing lipogenesis, lipid trafficking and surfactant homeostasis in the mouse lung. Conclusions Within the transcriptional network, SREBP, CEBPA, FOXA2, ETSF, GATA6 and IRF1 were identified as regulatory hubs displaying high connectivity. SREBP, FOXA2 and CEBPA together form a common core regulatory module that controls surfactant lipid homeostasis. The core module cooperates with other factors to regulate lipid metabolism and transport, cell growth and development, cell death and cell mediated immune response. Coordinated interactions of the TFs influence surfactant homeostasis and regulate lung function at birth.

  12. Liquid-liquid extraction for surfactant-contaminant separation and surfactant reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, M.A. [Surbec Environmental, Norman, OK (United States); Sabatini, D.A.; Harwell, J.H. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction was investigated for use with surfactant enhanced subsurface remediation. A surfactant liquid-liquid extraction model (SLLEM) was developed for batch equilibrium conditions based on contaminant partitioning between micellar, water, and solvent phases. The accuracy of this fundamental model was corroborated with experimental results (using naphthalene and phenanthrene as contaminants and squalane as the extracting solvent). The SLLEM model was then expanded to nonequilibrium conditions. The effectiveness of this nonequilibrium model was corroborated with experimental results from continuous flow hollow fiber membrane systems. The validated models were used to conduct a sensitivity analysis evaluating the effects of surfactants on the removal of the contaminants in liquid-liquid extraction systems. In addition, liquid-liquid extraction is compared to air stripping for surfactant-contaminant separation. Finally, conclusions are drawn as to the impact of surfactants on liquid-liquid extraction processes, and the significance of these impacts on the optimization of surfactant-enhanced subsurface remediation.

  13. Silicone antifoam performance enhancement by nonionic surfactants in potato medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiano, Steven P; Fey, Kenneth C

    2003-01-01

    The ability of a silicone antifoam to retard foaming in a liquor prepared from potatoes is enhanced by the addition of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants. The enhancement is non-linear for surfactant concentration, with all 12 surfactants tested possessing a concentration at which foam heights strongly diminish, referred to as the surfactant critical antifoaming concentration (SCAFC). SCAFCs vary between surfactants, with lower values indicating better mass efficiency of antifoaming enhancement. SCAFCs decrease with degree of ethoxylation and decrease with the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance for ethoxylated nonionic surfactants. Surfactant addition produces a mixed water-surface layer containing surfactant and surface-active components in the potato medium. Surface tension reduction does not correlate well with antifoam performance enhancement. A model is proposed where surfactant adsorption promotes desorption of surface-active potato medium components from the water surface. At the SCAFC, desorption is not complete, yet the rate of bubble rupture is sufficiently enhanced to provide excellent foam control.

  14. Modeling Granulomas in Response to Infection in the Lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenrui Hao

    Full Text Available Alveolar macrophages play a large role in the innate immune response of the lung. However, when these highly immune-regulatory cells are unable to eradicate pathogens, the adaptive immune system, which includes activated macrophages and lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is called upon to control the pathogens. This collection of immune cells surrounds, isolates and quarantines the pathogen, forming a small tissue structure called a granuloma for intracellular pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. In the present work we develop a mathematical model of the dynamics of a granuloma by a system of partial differential equations. The 'strength' of the adaptive immune response to infection in the lung is represented by a parameter α, the flux rate by which T cells and M1 macrophages that immigrated from the lymph nodes enter into the granuloma through its boundary. The parameter α is negatively correlated with the 'switching time', namely, the time it takes for the number of M1 type macrophages to surpass the number of infected, M2 type alveolar macrophages. Simulations of the model show that as α increases the radius of the granuloma and bacterial load in the granuloma both decrease. The model is used to determine the efficacy of potential host-directed therapies in terms of the parameter α, suggesting that, with fixed dosing level, an infected individual with a stronger immune response will receive greater benefits in terms of reducing the bacterial load.

  15. Mucus Distribution Model in a Lung with Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zarei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians with a reported incidence of 1 in every 3200 live births. Most strikingly, CF is associated with early mortality. Host in flammatory responses result in airway mucus plugging, airway wall edema, and eventual destruction of airway wall support structure. Despite aggressive treatment, the median age of survival is approximately 38 years. This work is the first attempt to parameterize the distributions of mucus in a CF lung as a function of time. By default, the model makes arbitrary choices at each stage of the construction process, whereby the simplest choice is made. The model is sophisticated enough to fit the average CF patients' spirometric data over time and to identify several interesting parameters: probability of colonization, mucus volume growth rate, and scarring rate. Extensions of the model appropriate for describing the dynamics of single patient MRI data are also discussed.

  16. Lung Cancer Pathological Image Analysis Using a Hidden Potts Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianyun Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many biological data are acquired via images. In this article, we study the pathological images scanned from 205 patients with lung cancer with the goal to find out the relationship between the survival time and the spatial distribution of different types of cells, including lymphocyte, stroma, and tumor cells. Toward this goal, we model the spatial distribution of different types of cells using a modified Potts model for which the parameters represent interactions between different types of cells and estimate the parameters of the Potts model using the double Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. The double Metropolis-Hastings algorithm allows us to simulate samples approximately from a distribution with an intractable normalizing constant. Our numerical results indicate that the spatial interaction between the lymphocyte and tumor cells is significantly associated with the patient’s survival time, and it can be used together with the cell count information to predict the survival of the patients.

  17. Lung Cancer Pathological Image Analysis Using a Hidden Potts Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianyun; Yi, Faliu; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Guanghua; Liang, Faming

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, many biological data are acquired via images. In this article, we study the pathological images scanned from 205 patients with lung cancer with the goal to find out the relationship between the survival time and the spatial distribution of different types of cells, including lymphocyte, stroma, and tumor cells. Toward this goal, we model the spatial distribution of different types of cells using a modified Potts model for which the parameters represent interactions between different types of cells and estimate the parameters of the Potts model using the double Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. The double Metropolis-Hastings algorithm allows us to simulate samples approximately from a distribution with an intractable normalizing constant. Our numerical results indicate that the spatial interaction between the lymphocyte and tumor cells is significantly associated with the patient's survival time, and it can be used together with the cell count information to predict the survival of the patients.

  18. Stability of an amphipathic helix-hairpin surfactant peptide in liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Alan J; Gupta, Monik; Gordon, Larry M; Fujii, Gary; Walther, Frans J

    2016-12-01

    Surfactant protein B (SP-B; 79 residues) is a member of the saposin superfamily and plays a pivotal role in lung function. The N- and C-terminal regions of SP-B, cross-linked by two disulfides, were theoretically predicted to fold as charged amphipathic helices, suggesting participation in surfactant activities. Previous studies with oxidized Super Mini-B (SMB), a construct based on the N- and C-regions of SP-B (i.e., residues 1-25 and 63-78) joined with a designer turn (-PKGG-) and two disulfides, indicated that freshly prepared SMB in lipids folded as a surface active, α-helix-hairpin. Because other peptides modeled on α-helical SP domains lost helicity and surfactant activity on storage, experiments were here performed on oxidized SMB in surfactant liposomes stored at ~2-8°C for ≤5.5years. Captive bubble surfactometry confirmed low minimum surface tensions for fresh and stored SMB preparations. FTIR spectroscopy of fresh and stored SMB formulations showed secondary structures compatible with the peptide folding as α-helix-hairpin. A homology (I-TASSER) model of oxidized SMB demonstrated a globular protein, exhibiting a core of hydrophobic residues and a surface of polar residues. Since mass spectroscopy indicated that the disulfides were maintained on storage, the stability of SMB may be partly due to the disulfides bringing the N- and C-α-helices closer. Mass spectroscopy of stored SMB preparations showed some methionine oxidation, and also partial deacylation of surfactant phospholipids to form lyso-derivatives. However, the stable conformation and activity of stored SMB surfactant suggest that the active helix-hairpin resists these chemical changes which otherwise may lead to surfactant inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Bayesian network approach for modeling local failure in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung Hun; Craft, Jeffrey; Al-Lozi, Rawan; Vaidya, Manushka; Meng, Yifan; Deasy, Joseph O; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Naqa, Issam El

    2011-01-01

    Locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients suffer from a high local failure rate following radiotherapy. Despite many efforts to develop new dose-volume models for early detection of tumor local failure, there was no reported significant improvement in their application prospectively. Based on recent studies of biomarker proteins’ role in hypoxia and inflammation in predicting tumor response to radiotherapy, we hypothesize that combining physical and biological factors with a suitable framework could improve the overall prediction. To test this hypothesis, we propose a graphical Bayesian network framework for predicting local failure in lung cancer. The proposed approach was tested using two different datasets of locally advanced NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. The first dataset was collected retrospectively, which is comprised of clinical and dosimetric variables only. The second dataset was collected prospectively in which in addition to clinical and dosimetric information, blood was drawn from the patients at various time points to extract candidate biomarkers as well. Our preliminary results show that the proposed method can be used as an efficient method to develop predictive models of local failure in these patients and to interpret relationships among the different variables in the models. We also demonstrate the potential use of heterogenous physical and biological variables to improve the model prediction. With the first dataset, we achieved better performance compared with competing Bayesian-based classifiers. With the second dataset, the combined model had a slightly higher performance compared to individual physical and biological models, with the biological variables making the largest contribution. Our preliminary results highlight the potential of the proposed integrated approach for predicting post-radiotherapy local failure in NSCLC patients. PMID:21335651

  20. Human decidua-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into functional alveolar type II-like cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrada, Alejandro; de la Torre, Paz; Grande, Jesús; Haller, Thomas; Flores, Ana I; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Lung alveolar type II (ATII) cells are specialized in the synthesis and secretion of pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex that reduces surface tension to minimize the work of breathing. Surfactant synthesis, assembly and secretion are closely regulated and its impairment is associated with severe respiratory disorders. At present, well-established ATII cell culture models are not available. In this work, Decidua-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (DMSCs) have been differentiated into Alveolar Type II- Like Cells (ATII-LCs), which display membranous cytoplasmic organelles resembling lamellar bodies, the organelles involved in surfactant storage and secretion by native ATII cells, and accumulate disaturated phospholipid species, a surfactant hallmark. Expression of characteristic ATII cells markers was demonstrated in ATII-LCs at gene and protein level. Mimicking the response of ATII cells to secretagogues, ATII-LCs were able to exocytose lipid-rich assemblies, which displayed highly surface active capabilities, including faster interfacial adsorption kinetics than standard native surfactant, even in the presence of inhibitory agents. ATII-LCs could constitute a highly useful ex vivo model for the study of surfactant biogenesis and the mechanisms involved in protein processing and lipid trafficking, as well as the packing and storage of surfactant complexes.

  1. Human decidua-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into functional alveolar type II-like cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Cerrada

    Full Text Available Lung alveolar type II (ATII cells are specialized in the synthesis and secretion of pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex that reduces surface tension to minimize the work of breathing. Surfactant synthesis, assembly and secretion are closely regulated and its impairment is associated with severe respiratory disorders. At present, well-established ATII cell culture models are not available. In this work, Decidua-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (DMSCs have been differentiated into Alveolar Type II- Like Cells (ATII-LCs, which display membranous cytoplasmic organelles resembling lamellar bodies, the organelles involved in surfactant storage and secretion by native ATII cells, and accumulate disaturated phospholipid species, a surfactant hallmark. Expression of characteristic ATII cells markers was demonstrated in ATII-LCs at gene and protein level. Mimicking the response of ATII cells to secretagogues, ATII-LCs were able to exocytose lipid-rich assemblies, which displayed highly surface active capabilities, including faster interfacial adsorption kinetics than standard native surfactant, even in the presence of inhibitory agents. ATII-LCs could constitute a highly useful ex vivo model for the study of surfactant biogenesis and the mechanisms involved in protein processing and lipid trafficking, as well as the packing and storage of surfactant complexes.

  2. Regional lung perfusion estimated by electrical impedance tomography in a piglet model of lung collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, João Batista; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Bohm, Stephan H; Tusman, Gerardo; Melo, Alexandre; Maripuu, Enn; Sandström, Mattias; Park, Marcelo; Costa, Eduardo L V; Hedenstierna, Göran; Amato, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of the regional match between alveolar ventilation and perfusion in critically ill patients requires simultaneous measurements of both parameters. Ideally, assessment of lung perfusion should be performed in real-time with an imaging technology that provides, through fast acquisition of sequential images, information about the regional dynamics or regional kinetics of an appropriate tracer. We present a novel electrical impedance tomography (EIT)-based method that quantitatively estimates regional lung perfusion based on first-pass kinetics of a bolus of hypertonic saline contrast. Pulmonary blood flow was measured in six piglets during control and unilateral or bilateral lung collapse conditions. The first-pass kinetics method showed good agreement with the estimates obtained by single-photon-emission computerized tomography (SPECT). The mean difference (SPECT minus EIT) between fractional blood flow to lung areas suffering atelectasis was -0.6%, with a SD of 2.9%. This method outperformed the estimates of lung perfusion based on impedance pulsatility. In conclusion, we describe a novel method based on EIT for estimating regional lung perfusion at the bedside. In both healthy and injured lung conditions, the distribution of pulmonary blood flow as assessed by EIT agreed well with the one obtained by SPECT. The method proposed in this study has the potential to contribute to a better understanding of the behavior of regional perfusion under different lung and therapeutic conditions.

  3. A new rabbit model for study of lung preservation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Qing-lin; ZHANG Xin-zhong; HAN Pei-li; SHI Rui-feng; CUI Yu; Zhang Jie

    2007-01-01

    @@ In 1983,Cooper successfully performed the first case of right lung transplantation for a patient with end stage pulmonary fibrosis and long survival was achieved, which confirmed that lung transplantation is feasible clinically.

  4. Electroporation-mediated delivery of genes in rodent models of lung contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Aranda, David; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2014-01-01

    Several of the biological processes involved in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome after lung contusion are regulated at a genetic and epigenetic level. Thus, strategies to manipulate gene expression in this context are highly desirable not only to elucidate the mechanisms involved but also to look for potential therapies. In the present chapter, we describe mouse and rat models of inducing blunt thoracic injury followed by electroporation-mediated gene delivery to the lung. Electroporation is a highly efficient and easily reproducible technique that allows circumvention of several of lung gene delivery challenges and safety issues present with other forms of lung gene therapy.

  5. Removal of oxide nanoparticles in a model wastewater treatment plant: influence of agglomeration and surfactants on clearing efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, Ludwig K; Bereiter, Robert; Müller, Elisabeth; Krebs, Rolf; Galli, René; Stark, Wendelin J

    2008-08-01

    The rapidly increasing production of engineered nanoparticles has created a demand for particle removal from industrial and communal wastewater streams. Efficient removal is particularly important in view of increasing long-term persistence and evidence for considerable ecotoxicity of specific nanoparticles. The present work investigates the use of a model wastewater treatment plant for removal of oxide nanoparticles. While a majority of the nanoparticles could be captured through adhesion to clearing sludge, a significant fraction of the engineered nanoparticles escaped the wastewater plant's clearing system, and up to 6 wt % of the model compound cerium oxide was found in the exit stream of the model plant. Our study demonstrates a significant influence of surface charge and the addition of dispersion stabilizing surfactants as routinely used in the preparation of nanoparticle derived products. A detailed investigation on the agglomeration of oxide nanoparticles in wastewater streams revealed a high stabilization of the particles against clearance (adsorption on the bacteria from the sludge). This unexpected finding suggests a need to investigate nanoparticle clearance in more detail and demonstrates the complex interactions between dissolved species and the nanoparticles within the continuously changing environment of the clearing sludge.

  6. Anion Exchange on Cationic Surfactant Micelles, and a Speciation Model for Estimating Anion Removal on Micelles during Ultrafiltration of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Jafvert, Chad T

    2017-07-05

    Surfactant micelles combined with ultrafiltration can partially, or sometimes nearly completely, separate various ionic and nonionic pollutants from water. To this end, the selectivity of aqueous micelles composed of either cetyltrimethylammonium (CTA(+)) bromide or cetylpyridinium (CP(+)) chloride toward many environmentally relevant anions (IO3(-), F(-), Cl(-), HCO3(-), NO2(-), Br(-), NO3(-), H2PO4(-), HPO4(2-), SO4(2-), and CrO4(2-)) was investigated. Selectivity coefficients of CTA(+) micelles (with respect to Br(-)) and CP(+) micelle (with respect to Cl(-)) for these anions were evaluated using a simple thermodynamic ion exchange model. The sequence of anion affinity for the CTA(+) micelles and for the CP(+) micelles were the same, with decreasing affinity occurring in the order of: CrO4(2-) > SO4(2-) > HPO4(2-) > NO3(-) > Br(-) > NO2(-) > Cl(-) > HCO3(-) > H2PO4(-) ≈ F(-). From the associated component mass balance and ion exchange (i.e., mass action) equations, an overall speciation model was developed to predict the distribution of all anions between the aqueous and micellar pseudophase for complex ionic mixtures. Experimental results of both artificial and real surface waters were in good agreement to model predictions. Further, the results indicated that micelles combined with ultrafiltration may be a potential technology for nutrient and other pollutant removal from natural or effluent waters.

  7. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  8. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  9. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  10. Musculoskeletal Modeling of a Forward Lunge Movement:Implications for ACL Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Wieland, MR; Andersen, MS

    2010-01-01

    Context: The forward lunge is widely used among athletes for training and rehabilitation purposes. The forward lunge movement has also been suggested as a model to study functional adaptation to ACL rupture. Previous investigations indicate that the absence of the ACL influences the movement patt...... by the ACL. The forward lunge explored the muscle and reaction forces, which can be used for further examination of ACL injury mechanisms and prevention strategies by applying parameter and optimization studies to the model....

  11. Establishment and Quantitative Imaging of a 3D Lung Organotypic Model of Mammary Tumor Outgrowth

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Michelle D.; Fingleton, Barbara; Lynch, Conor C.; Wells, Sam; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Piston, David W.; Matrisian, Lynn M.

    2008-01-01

    The lung is the second most common site of metastatic spread in breast cancer and experimental evidence has been provided in many systems for the importance of an organ-specific microenvironment in the development of metastasis. To better understand the interaction between tumor and host cells in this important secondary site, we have developed a 3D in vitro organotypic model of breast tumor metastatic growth in the lung. In our model, cells isolated from mouse lungs are placed in a collagen ...

  12. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Fecher, David; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Buck, Andreas; BUNDSCHUH, RALPH; Nietzer, Sarah; Dandekar, Gudrun; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Lückerath, Katharina; Steinke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and –testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. ...

  13. Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus proviral clone JSRV(JS7), derived from the JS7 lung tumor cell line, induces ovine pulmonary carcinoma and is integrated into the surfactant protein A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMartini, J C; Bishop, J V; Allen, T E; Jassim, F A; Sharp, J M; de las Heras, M; Voelker, D R; Carlson, J O

    2001-05-01

    Ovine pulmonary carcinoma (OPC) is a contagious neoplasm of alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) or Clara cells caused by a type D/B chimeric retrovirus, jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV). Here we report the isolation, sequencing, pathogenicity, and integration site of a JSRV provirus isolated from a sheep lung tumor cell line (JS7). The sequence of the virus was 93 to 99% identical to other JSRV isolates and contained all of the expected open reading frames. To produce virions and test its infectivity, the JS7 provirus (JSRV(JS7)) was cloned into a plasmid containing a cytomegalovirus promoter and transfected into 293T cells. After intratracheal inoculation with virions from concentrated supernatant fluid, JSRV-associated OPC lesions were found in one of four lambs, confirming that JSRV(JS7) is pathogenic. In JS7-cell DNA, the viral genome was inserted in the protein-coding region for the surfactant protein A (SP-A) gene, which is highly expressed in ATII cells, in an orientation opposite to the direction of transcription of the SP-A gene. No significant transcription was detected from either the viral or the SP-A gene promoter in the JS7 cell line at passage level 170. The oncogenic significance of the JSRV proviral insertion involving the SP-A locus in the JS7 tumor cell line is unknown.

  14. Clearance of refractory ceramic fibers (RCF) from the rat lung: development of a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C P; Zhang, L; Oberdörster, G; Mast, R W; Glass, L R; Utell, M J

    1994-05-01

    Chronic exposure and postexposure experiments have been recently performed in rats to evaluate the biological responses of inhaled refractory ceramic fibers (RCF) at different concentration levels. The lung burden data in the accessory lobe of the rat lung were collected during and after different exposure and postexposure periods. The size distribution of retained fibers in the lung at different time points was also measured. We used these data to develop a mathematical model of fiber clearance from the rat lung. It was found that the clearance rate did not depend significantly upon fiber size but there was a clear dependence on lung burden. As lung burden increased, the clearance rate was found to decrease. An empirical equation was derived for the clearance rate as a function of lung burden. At low burdens, rats had a retention half-time of about 126 days for RCF compared to a typical half-time of about 60 days for insoluble nonfibrous particles.

  15. Surfactant protein D, Club cell protein 16, Pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine, C-reactive protein, and Fibrinogen biomarker variation in chronic obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sofie Lock; Vestbo, J.; Sorensen, G. L.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multifaceted condition that cannot be fully described by the severity of airway obstruction. The limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted researchers to investigate a multitude of surrogate biomarkers of disease for the assessm......Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multifaceted condition that cannot be fully described by the severity of airway obstruction. The limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted researchers to investigate a multitude of surrogate biomarkers of disease...... for the assessment of patients, prediction of risk, and guidance of treatment. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary of observations for a selection of recently investigated pulmonary inflammatory biomarkers (Surfactant protein D (SP-D), Club cell protein 16 (CC-16), and Pulmonary...... and activation-regulated chemokine (PARC/CCL-18)) and systemic inflammatory biomarkers (C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen) with COPD. The relevance of these biomarkers for COPD is discussed in terms of their biological plausibility, their independent association to disease and hard clinical outcomes...

  16. Microfibril-associated Protein 4 Binds to Surfactant Protein A (SP-A) and Colocalizes with SP-A in the Extracellular Matrix of the Lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlosser, Anders; Thomsen, Theresa H.; Shipley, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an oligomeric collectin that recognizes lipid and carbohydrate moieties present on broad range of micro-organisms, and mediates microbial lysis and clearance. SP-A also modulates multiple immune-related functions including cytokine production and chemotaxis...... for phagocytes. Here we describe the molecular interaction between the extracellular matrix protein microfibril-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) and SP-A. MFAP4 is a collagen-binding molecule containing a C-terminal fibrinogen-like domain and a N-terminal located integrin-binding motif. We produced recombinant MFAP4...... with a molecular mass of 36 and 66 kDa in the reduced and unreduced states respectively. Gel filtration chromatography and chemical crosslinking showed that MFAP4 forms oligomers of four dimers. We demonstrated calcium-dependent binding between MFAP4 and human SP-A1 and SP-A2. No binding was seen to recombinant SP-A...

  17. Rat models of asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James G; Tamaoka, Meiyo

    2006-01-01

    The rat has been extensively used to model asthma and somewhat less extensively to model chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The features of asthma that have been successfully modeled include allergen-induced airway constriction, eosinophilic inflammation and allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. T-cell involvement has been directly demonstrated using adoptive transfer techniques. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are activated in response to allergen challenge in the sensitized rat and express Thelper2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13). Repeated allergen exposure causes airway remodeling. Dry gas hyperpnea challenge also evokes increases in lung resistance, allowing exercise-induced asthma to be modeled. COPD is modeled using elastase-induced parenchymal injury to mimic emphysema. Cigarette smoke-induced airspace enlargement occurs but requires months of cigarette exposure. Inflammation and fibrosis of peripheral airways is an important aspect of COPD that is less well modeled. Novel approaches to the treatment of COPD have been reported including treatments aimed at parenchymal regeneration.

  18. Anatomy and bronchoscopy of the porcine lung. A model for translational respiratory medicine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Judge, Eoin P

    2014-09-01

    The porcine model has contributed significantly to biomedical research over many decades. The similar size and anatomy of pig and human organs make this model particularly beneficial for translational research in areas such as medical device development, therapeutics and xenotransplantation. In recent years, a major limitation with the porcine model was overcome with the successful generation of gene-targeted pigs and the publication of the pig genome. As a result, the role of this model is likely to become even more important. For the respiratory medicine field, the similarities between pig and human lungs give the porcine model particular potential for advancing translational medicine. An increasing number of lung conditions are being studied and modeled in the pig. Genetically modified porcine models of cystic fibrosis have been generated that, unlike mouse models, develop lung disease similar to human cystic fibrosis. However, the scientific literature relating specifically to porcine lung anatomy and airway histology is limited and is largely restricted to veterinary literature and textbooks. Furthermore, methods for in vivo lung procedures in the pig are rarely described. The aims of this review are to collate the disparate literature on porcine lung anatomy, histology, and microbiology; to provide a comparison with the human lung; and to describe appropriate bronchoscopy procedures for the pig lungs to aid clinical researchers working in the area of translational respiratory medicine using the porcine model.

  19. Characterizing the lung tissue mechanical properties using a micromechanical model of alveolar sac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Elham; Seify, Behzad; Moghadas, Hadi; Sabsalinejad, Masoomeh; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2017-03-01

    According to statistics, lung disease is among the leading causes of death worldwide. As such, many research groups are developing powerful tools for understanding, diagnosis and treatment of various lung diseases. Recently, biomechanical modeling has emerged as an effective tool for better understanding of human physiology, disease diagnosis and computer assisted medical intervention. Mechanical properties of lung tissue are important requirements for methods developed for lung disease diagnosis and medical intervention. As such, the main objective of this study is to develop an effective tool for estimating the mechanical properties of normal and pathological lung parenchyma tissue based on its microstructure. For this purpose, a micromechanical model of the lung tissue was developed using finite element (FE) method, and the model was demonstrated to have application in estimating the mechanical properties of lung alveolar wall. The proposed model was developed by assembling truncated octahedron tissue units resembling the alveoli. A compression test was simulated using finite element method on the created geometry and the hyper-elastic parameters of the alveoli wall were calculated using reported alveolar wall stress-strain data and an inverse optimization framework. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed model can be potentially used to reconstruct microstructural images of lung tissue using macro-scale tissue response for normal and different pathological conditions. Such images can be used for effective diagnosis of lung diseases such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

  20. Computer-controlled mechanical lung model for application in pulmonary function studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F.M. Verbraak (Anton); J.E.W. Beneken; J.M. Bogaard (Jan); A. Versprille (Adrian)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractA computer controlled mechanical lung model has been developed for testing lung function equipment, validation of computer programs and simulation of impaired pulmonary mechanics. The construction, function and some applications are described. The physical model is constructed from two

  1. Musculoskeletal Modeling of a Forward Lunge Movement:Implications for ACL Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Wieland, MR; Andersen, MS

    2010-01-01

    5 20 years). Interventions: Three-dimensional coordinates of skin-mounted markers were obtained via five video cameras. The subject performed a forward lunge on a force plate, targeting a knee flexion angle of 906. A model of the lunge movement was developed using the AnyBody Modeling System...

  2. Experimental and computational studies of water drops falling through model oil with surfactant and subjected to an electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Ervik, Åsmund; Munkejord, Svend Tollak; Müller, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The behaviour of a single sub-millimetre-size water drop falling through a viscous oil while subjected to an electric field is of fundamental importance to industrial applications such as crude oil electrocoalescers. Detailed studies, both experimental and computational, have been performed previously, but an often challenging issue has been the characterization of the fluids. As numerous authors have noted, it is very difficult to have a perfectly clean water-oil system even for very pure model oils, and the presence of trace chemicals may significantly alter the interface behaviour. In this work, we consider a well- characterized water-oil system where controlled amounts of a surface active agent (Span 80) have been added to the oil. This addition dominates any trace contaminants in the oil, such that the interface behaviour can also be well-characterized. We present the results of experiments and corresponding two-phase- flow simulations of a falling water drop covered in surfactant and subjected to a mono...

  3. The Effect of Phospholipids (Surfactant) on Adhesion and Biomechanical Properties of Tendon: A Rat Achilles Tendon Repair Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabak, T Kursat; Sertkaya, Omer; Acar, Nuray; Donmez, B Ozgur; Ustunel, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion of the tendon is a major challenge for the orthopedic surgeon during tendon repair. Manipulation of biological environment is one of the concepts to prevent adhesion. Lots of biochemicals have been studied for this purpose. We aimed to determine the effect of phospholipids on adhesion and biomechanical properties of tendon in an animal tendon repair model. Seventy-two Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. Achilles tendons of rats were cut and repaired. Phospholipids were applied at two different dosages. Tendon adhesion was determined histopathologically and biomechanical test was performed. At macroscopic evaluation of adhesion, there are statistically significant differences between multiple-dose phospholipid injection group and Control group and also hyaluronic acid group and Control group (p 0.008). Ultimate strength was highest at hyaluronic acid injection group and lowest at multiple-dose phospholipid injection group. Single-dose phospholipids (surfactant) application may have a beneficial effect on the tendon adhesion. Although multiple applications of phospholipids seem the most effective regime to reduce the tendon adhesion among groups, it deteriorated the biomechanical properties of tendon.

  4. Tobacco carcinogen NNK-induced lung cancer animal models and associated carcinogenic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Guang-Zhe; Xu, Tian-Rui; Chen, Ceshi

    2015-07-01

    Tobacco usage is a major risk factor in the development, progression, and outcomes for lung cancer. Of the carcinogens associated with lung cancer, tobacco-specific nitrosamines 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is among the most potent ones. The oncogenic mechanisms of NNK are not entirely understood, hindering the development of effective strategies for preventing and treating smoking-associated lung cancers. Here, we introduce the NNK-induced lung cancer animal models in different species and its potential mechanisms. Finally, we summarize several chemopreventive agents developed from these animal models.

  5. A novel model of rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease in SKG mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Rebecca C; Powers, Jennifer L; Redente, Elizabeth F; Sergew, Amen; Martin, Richard J; Gizinski, Alison; Holers, V Michael; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Riches, David W H

    2012-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD) is associated with increased mortality in up to 10% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Lung exposure to cigarette smoke has been implicated in disease development. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying the development of RA-ILD, in part due to the lack of an appropriate mouse model. The objectives of this study were (i) to test the suitability of SKG mice as a model of cellular and fibrotic interstitial pneumonia in the setting of autoimmune arthritis, and (ii) to determine the role of lung injury in the development of arthritis in SKG mice. Lung tissues were evaluated in arthritic SKG mice by quantifying cell accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage, static compliance, collagen levels, and infiltrating cell phenotypes by flow cytometry and histology. Lung injury was induced by exposure to cigarette smoke or bleomycin. Arthritic SKG mice developed a patchy cellular and fibrotic interstitial pneumonia associated with reduced static compliance, increased collagen levels, and accumulation of inflammatory cells. Infiltrating cells comprised CD4+ T cells, B cells, macrophages, and neutrophils. Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke or initiation of lung injury with bleomycin did not cause arthritis. The pattern of lung disease suggests that arthritic SKG mice represent an authentic model of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia in RA-ILD patients. The lack of arthritis development after cigarette smoke or lung injury suggests that a model where breaches in immunologic tolerance are induced by lung inflammation and injury alone may be overly simplistic.

  6. A novel mechanical lung model of pulmonary diseases to assist with teaching and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Geoffrey M

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A design concept of low-cost, simple, fully mechanical model of a mechanically ventilated, passively breathing lung is developed. An example model is built to simulate a patient under mechanical ventilation with accurate volumes and compliances, while connected directly to a ventilator. Methods The lung is modelled with multiple units, represented by rubber bellows, with adjustable weights placed on bellows to simulate compartments of different superimposed pressure and compliance, as well as different levels of lung disease, such as Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. The model was directly connected to a ventilator and the resulting pressure volume curves recorded. Results The model effectively captures the fundamental lung dynamics for a variety of conditions, and showed the effects of different ventilator settings. It was particularly effective at showing the impact of Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP therapy on lung recruitment to improve oxygenation, a particulary difficult dynamic to capture. Conclusion Application of PEEP therapy is difficult to teach and demonstrate clearly. Therefore, the model provide opportunity to train, teach, and aid further understanding of lung mechanics and the treatment of lung diseases in critical care, such as ARDS and asthma. Finally, the model's pure mechanical nature and accurate lung volumes mean that all results are both clearly visible and thus intuitively simple to grasp.

  7. Molecular-thermodynamic theory of micellization of multicomponent surfactant mixtures: 2. pH-sensitive surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsipe, Arthur; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2007-05-22

    In article 1 of this series, we developed a molecular-thermodynamic (MT) theory to model the micellization of mixtures containing an arbitrary number of conventional (pH-insensitive) surfactants. In this article, we extend the MT theory to model mixtures containing a pH-sensitive surfactant. The MT theory was validated by examining mixtures containing both a pH-sensitive surfactant and a conventional surfactant, which effectively behave like ternary surfactant mixtures. We first compared the predicted micellar titration data to experimental micellar titration data that we obtained for varying compositions of mixed micelles containing the pH-sensitive surfactant dodecyldimethylamine oxide (C12DAO) mixed with either a cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, C12TAB), a nonionic surfactant (dodecyl octa(ethylene oxide), C12E8), or an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) surfactant. The MT theory accurately modeled the titration behavior of C12DAO mixed with C12E8. However, C12DAO was observed to interact more favorably with SDS and with C12TAB than was predicted by the MT theory. We also compared predictions to data from the literature for mixtures of C12DAO and SDS. Although the pH values of solutions with no added acid were modeled with only qualitative accuracy, the MT theory resulted in quantitatively accurate predictions of solution pH for mixtures containing added acid. In addition, the predicted degree of counterion binding yielded a lower bound to the experimentally measured value. Finally, we predicted the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of solutions of two pH-sensitive surfactants, tetradecyldimethylamine oxide (C14DAO) and hexadecyldimethyl betaine (C16Bet), at varying solution pH and surfactant composition. However, at the pH values considered, the pH sensitivity of C16Bet could be neglected, and it was equivalently modeled as a zwitterionic surfactant. The cmc's predicted using the MT theory agreed well with the experimental

  8. A 4DCT imaging-based breathing lung model with relative hysteresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Choi, Sanghun [IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Hoffman, Eric A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Lin, Ching-Long, E-mail: ching-long-lin@uiowa.edu [IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, 3131 Seamans Center, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    To reproduce realistic airway motion and airflow, the authors developed a deforming lung computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model based on four-dimensional (4D, space and time) dynamic computed tomography (CT) images. A total of 13 time points within controlled tidal volume respiration were used to account for realistic and irregular lung motion in human volunteers. Because of the irregular motion of 4DCT-based airways, we identified an optimal interpolation method for airway surface deformation during respiration, and implemented a computational solid mechanics-based moving mesh algorithm to produce smooth deforming airway mesh. In addition, we developed physiologically realistic airflow boundary conditions for both models based on multiple images and a single image. Furthermore, we examined simplified models based on one or two dynamic or static images. By comparing these simplified models with the model based on 13 dynamic images, we investigated the effects of relative hysteresis of lung structure with respect to lung volume, lung deformation, and imaging methods, i.e., dynamic vs. static scans, on CFD-predicted pressure drop. The effect of imaging method on pressure drop was 24 percentage points due to the differences in airflow distribution and airway geometry. - Highlights: • We developed a breathing human lung CFD model based on 4D-dynamic CT images. • The 4DCT-based breathing lung model is able to capture lung relative hysteresis. • A new boundary condition for lung model based on one static CT image was proposed. • The difference between lung models based on 4D and static CT images was quantified.

  9. Lung cancer and passive smoking: predicted effects from a mathematical model for cigarette smoking and lung cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Darby, S C; Pike, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of active smokers have shown that the duration of smoking has a much greater effect on lung cancer risk than the amount smoked. This observation suggests that passive smoking might be much more harmful than would be predicted from measures of the level of exposure alone, as it is often of very long duration frequently beginning in early childhood. In this paper we have investigated this using a multistage model with five stages. The model is shown to provide an excelle...

  10. A simple, closed-form, mathematical model for gas exchange in microchannel artificial lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potkay, Joseph A

    2013-06-01

    Microfabrication techniques are attractive for constructing artificial lungs due to the ability to create features similar in size to those in the natural lung. However, a simple and intuitive mathematical model capable of accurately predicting the gas exchange performance of microchannel artificial lungs does not currently exist. Such a model is critical to understanding and optimizing these devices. Here, we describe a simple, closed-form mathematical model for gas exchange in microchannel artificial lungs and qualify it through application to experimental data from several research groups. We utilize lumped parameters and several assumptions to obtain a closed-form set of equations that describe gas exchange. This work is intended to augment computational models by providing a more intuitive, albeit potentially less accurate, understanding of the operation and trade-offs inherent in microchannel artificial lung devices.

  11. Modeling the lung: Design and development of tissue engineered macro- and micro-physiologic lung models for research use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Joan E; Niles, Jean A; Vega, Stephanie P; Argueta, Lissenya B; Eastaway, Adriene; Cortiella, Joaquin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract specific cell populations, or tissue engineered in vitro grown human lung, have the potential to be used as research tools to mimic physiology, toxicology, pathology, as well as infectious diseases responses of cells or tissues. Studies related to respiratory tract pathogenesis or drug toxicity testing in the past made use of basic systems where single cell populations were exposed to test agents followed by evaluations of simple cellular responses. Although these simple single-cell-type systems provided good basic information related to cellular responses, much more can be learned from cells grown in fabricated microenvironments which mimic in vivo conditions in specialized microfabricated chambers or by human tissue engineered three-dimensional (3D) models which allow for more natural interactions between cells. Recent advances in microengineering technology, microfluidics, and tissue engineering have provided a new approach to the development of 2D and 3D cell culture models which enable production of more robust human in vitro respiratory tract models. Complex models containing multiple cell phenotypes also provide a more reasonable approximation of what occurs in vivo without the confounding elements in the dynamic in vivo environment. The goal of engineering good 3D human models is the formation of physiologically functional respiratory tissue surrogates which can be used as pathogenesis models or in the case of 2D screening systems for drug therapy evaluation as well as human toxicity testing. We hope that this manuscript will serve as a guide for development of future respiratory tract model systems as well as a review of conventional models. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  12. Improvement of pulmonary surfactant activity by introducing D-amino acids into highly hydrophobic amphiphilic α-peptide Hel 13-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Yukitake, Ko; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Lee, Sooyoung; Shibata, Osamu; Lee, Sannamu

    2014-08-01

    The high costs of artificial pulmonary surfactants, ranging in hundreds per kilogram of body weight, used for treating the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) premature babies have limited their applications. We have extensively studied soy lecithins and higher alcohols as lipid alternatives to expensive phospholipids such as DPPC and PG. As a substitute for the proteins, we have synthesized the peptide Hel 13-5D3 by introducing D-amino acids into a highly lipid-soluble, basic amphiphilic peptide, Hel 13-5, composed of 18 amino acid residues. Analysis of the surfactant activities of lipid-amphiphilic artificial peptide mixtures using lung-irrigated rat models revealed that a mixture (Murosurf SLPD3) of dehydrogenated soy lecithin, fractionated soy lecithin, palmitic acid (PA), and peptide Hel 13-5D3 (40:40:17.5:2.5, by weight) superior pulmonary surfactant activity than a commercially available pulmonary surfactant (beractant, Surfacten®). Experiments using ovalbumin-sensitized model animals revealed that the lipid-amphiphilic artificial peptide mixtures provided significant control over an increase in the pulmonary resistance induced by premature allergy reaction and reduced the number of acidocytes and neutrophils in lung-irrigated solution. The newly developed low-cost pulmonary surfactant system may be used for treatment of a wide variety of respiratory diseases.

  13. Study of adjuvant effect of model surfactants from the groups of alkyl sulfates, alkylbenzene sulfonates, alcohol ethoxylates and soaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, S K; Sobhani, S; Poulsen, O M

    2000-01-01

    The sodium salts of representatives of anionic surfactants, dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and coconut oil fatty acids, and a nonionic surfactant, dodecyl alcohol ethoxylate, were studied for adjuvant effect on the production of specific IgE antibodies in mice...... showed a statistically significant increase in OVA specific IgE levels. After two boosters, a statistically significant suppression in OVA-specific IgE production occurred with SDS (1000 mg/l), SDBS (1000 and 100 mg/l), coconut soap (1000 mg/l) and the alcohol ethoxylate (10 mg/l). This study suggests...

  14. A rat model for isolated bilateral lung contusion from blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Davidson, Bruce A; Helinski, Jadwiga D; Marschke, Cristi J; Manderscheid, Patricia; Woytash, James A; Notter, Robert H; Knight, Paul R

    2005-11-01

    Lung contusion affects 17%-25% of adult blunt trauma patients, and is the leading cause of death from blunt thoracic injury. A small animal model for isolated bilateral lung contusion has not been developed. We induced lung contusion in anesthetized rats by dropping a 0.3-kg weight onto a precordial protective shield to direct the impact force away from the heart and toward the lungs. Lung injury was characterized as a function of chest impact energy (1.8-2.7 J) by measurements of arterial oxygenation, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) albumin and cytology, pressure-volume mechanics, and histopathology. Histology confirmed bilateral lung contusion without substantial cardiac muscle trauma. Rats receiving 2.7 J of chest impact energy had 33% mortality that exceeded prospectively defined limits for sublethal injury. Hypoxemia in rats with maximal sublethal injury (2.45 J) met criteria for acute lung injury at lung volumes at 48 h. We concluded that an impact energy of 2.45 J induces isolated, bilateral lung contusion and provides a useful model for future mechanistic pathophysiological assessments.

  15. Modeling the nuclear magnetic resonance behavior of lung: from electrical engineering to critical care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutillo, A G; Ailion, D C

    1999-01-01

    The present article reviews the basic principles of a new approach to the characterization of pulmonary disease. This approach is based on the unique nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of the lung and combines experimental measurements (using specially developed NMR techniques) with theoretical simulations. The NMR signal from inflated lungs decays very rapidly compared with the signal from completely collapsed (airless) lungs. This phenomenon is due to the presence of internal magnetic field inhomogeneity produced by the alveolar air-tissue interface (because air and water have different magnetic susceptibilities). The air-tissue interface effects can be detected and quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques using temporally symmetric and asymmetric spin-echo sequences. Theoretical models developed to explain the internal (tissue-induced) magnetic field inhomogeneity in aerated lungs predict the NMR lung behavior as a function of various technical and physiological factors (e.g., the level of lung inflation) and simulate the effects of various lung disorders (in particular, pulmonary edema) on this behavior. Good agreement has been observed between the predictions obtained from the mathematical models and the results of experimental NMR measurements in normal and diseased lungs. Our theoretical and experimental data have important pathophysiological and clinical implications, especially with respect to the characterization of acute lung disease (e.g., pulmonary edema) and the management of critically ill patients.

  16. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Youbing, E-mail: youbing-yin@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Choi, Jiwoong, E-mail: jiwoong-choi@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Hoffman, Eric A., E-mail: eric-hoffman@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Tawhai, Merryn H., E-mail: m.tawhai@auckland.ac.nz [Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Lin, Ching-Long, E-mail: ching-long-lin@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C{sub 1} continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung.

  17. Two mathematical models for predicting dispersion of particles in the human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganser, G H; Christie, I; McCawley, M A

    2007-02-01

    The dispersion of particles in the human lung is modeled as a series of virtual mixing tanks. Using the experimental results of Scherer et al. (1975, J. Appl. Physiol., 38(4), pp. 719-723) for a five-generation glass lung model, it is shown that each generation of the glass lung behaves like an independent virtual mixing tank. The corresponding resident time distribution is shown to have a variance approximately equal to the square of the average time a particle spends in the generation. By assuming that each generation of the human lung behaves as an independent virtual mixing tank, the realistic lung data provided by Weibel (1963, Morphometry of the Human Lung, Spinger-Verlag, New York) are used to validate this assumption in two ways. First, the half-width of the exhaled particle concentration profile is obtained. Second, a system of differential equations, with the concentration of particles in each mixing tank as its solution, is derived and solved numerically. This gives the exhaled concentration profile. Both techniques yield similar results to each other, and both give excellent agreement with the experimental data. The virtual mixing tank approach allows the complex mixing that occurs in the branching pathways of the lung to be more simply modeled. The model, thereby derived, is simple to change and could lead to enhancements in the understanding of the underlying processes contributing to the ventilation of the lung in health and disease.

  18. Novel Experimental-Modeling Approach for Characterizing Perfluorinated Surfactants in Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtier-Murias, Denis; Michel, Eric; Rodts, Stéphane; Lafolie, François

    2017-02-16

    Soil contamination is still poorly understood and modeled in part because of the difficulties of looking inside the "black box" constituted by soils. Here, we investigated the application of a recently developed (1)H NMR technique to (19)F NMR relaxometry experiments and utilized the results as inputs for an existing model. This novel approach yields (19)F T2 NMR relaxation values of any fluorinated contaminant, which are among the most dangerous contaminants, allowing us to noninvasively and directly monitor their fate in soils. Using this protocol, we quantified the amount of a fluorinated xenobiotic (heptafluorobutyric acid, HFBA) in three different environments in soil aggregate packings and monitored contaminant exchange dynamics between these compartments. A model computing HFBA partition dynamics between different soil compartments showed that these three environments corresponded to HFBA in solution (i) between and (ii) inside the soil aggregates and (iii) to HFBA adsorbed to (or strongly interacting with) the soil constituents. In addition to providing a straightforward way of determining the sorption kinetics of any fluorinated contaminant, this work also highlights the strengths of a combined experimental-modeling approach to unambiguously understand experimental data and more generally to study contaminant fate in soils.

  19. Regulation of p53-mediated changes in the uPA-fibrinolytic system and in lung injury by loss of surfactant protein-C expression in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthusseri, Bijesh; Marudamuthu, Amarnath S; Tiwari, Nivedita; Fu, Jian; Idell, Steven; Shetty, Sreerama

    2017-04-06

    Pulmonary surfactant protein-C (SP-C) expression by type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) is markedly reduced in diverse types of lung injuries and is often associated with AEC apoptosis. It is unclear whether loss of SP-C contributes to the increased p53 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system cross talk and apoptosis of AECs. We therefore inhibited SP-C expression in human and murine AECs using lentivirus vector expressing shRNA and tested p53 and downstream changes in uPA-fibrinolytic system. Inhibition of SP-C expression in AECs induced p53 and activated caspase-3, indicating AEC apoptosis. We also found that bleomycin or cigarette smoke exposure failed to inhibit SP-C expression or apoptosis in AECs in p53- and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1)-deficient mice. Depletion of SP-C expression by lentiviral SP-C shRNA in PAI-1-deficient mice failed to induce p53 or apoptosis in AECs, while it increased both AEC p53 and apoptosis in wild type or uPA-deficient mice. SP-C inhibition in AECs also increased in CXCL1 and CXCL2, and their receptor CXCR2 as well as ICAM-1 expression, indicative of a pro-inflammatory response. Overexpression of p53-binding 3'UTR sequences in AECs inhibited PAI-1 induction while maintaining uPA and uPAR protein and mRNA expression. Further, caveolin-1 expression and phosphorylation were increased in AECs indicating an intricate link between caveolin-1 and Src kinase-mediated cell signalling and AEC apoptosis due to loss of SP-C expression through p53 and uPA system-mediated cross-talk. The role of uPA, PAI-1 and p53 in the regulation of AEC apoptosis after injury was also determined in knock out mice.

  20. Statistical modeling of 4D respiratory lung motion using diffeomorphic image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, René; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2011-02-01

    Modeling of respiratory motion has become increasingly important in various applications of medical imaging (e.g., radiation therapy of lung cancer). Current modeling approaches are usually confined to intra-patient registration of 3D image data representing the individual patient's anatomy at different breathing phases. We propose an approach to generate a mean motion model of the lung based on thoracic 4D computed tomography (CT) data of different patients to extend the motion modeling capabilities. Our modeling process consists of three steps: an intra-subject registration to generate subject-specific motion models, the generation of an average shape and intensity atlas of the lung as anatomical reference frame, and the registration of the subject-specific motion models to the atlas in order to build a statistical 4D mean motion model (4D-MMM). Furthermore, we present methods to adapt the 4D mean motion model to a patient-specific lung geometry. In all steps, a symmetric diffeomorphic nonlinear intensity-based registration method was employed. The Log-Euclidean framework was used to compute statistics on the diffeomorphic transformations. The presented methods are then used to build a mean motion model of respiratory lung motion using thoracic 4D CT data sets of 17 patients. We evaluate the model by applying it for estimating respiratory motion of ten lung cancer patients. The prediction is evaluated with respect to landmark and tumor motion, and the quantitative analysis results in a mean target registration error (TRE) of 3.3 ±1.6 mm if lung dynamics are not impaired by large lung tumors or other lung disorders (e.g., emphysema). With regard to lung tumor motion, we show that prediction accuracy is independent of tumor size and tumor motion amplitude in the considered data set. However, tumors adhering to non-lung structures degrade local lung dynamics significantly and the model-based prediction accuracy is lower in these cases. The statistical respiratory

  1. Fluorescence emission of pyrene in surfactant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro, Lucas; Novo, Mercedes; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2015-01-01

    The systematic description of the complex photophysical behaviour of pyrene in surfactant solutions in combination with a quantitative model for the surfactant concentrations reproduces with high accuracy the steady-state and the time resolved fluorescence intensity of pyrene in surfactant solutions near the cmc, both in the monomer and in the excimer emission bands. We present concise model equations that can be used for the analysis of the pyrene fluorescence intensity in order to estimate fundamental parameters of the pyrene-surfactant system, such as the binding equilibrium constant K of pyrene to a given surfactant micelle, the rate constant of excimer formation in micelles, and the equilibrium constant of pyrene-surfactant quenching. The values of the binding equilibrium constant K(TX100)=3300·10³ M⁻¹ and K(SDS)=190·10³ M⁻¹ for Triton X-100 (TX100) and SDS micelles, respectively, show that the partition of pyrene between bulk water and micelles cannot be ignored, even at relatively high surfactant concentrations above the cmc. We apply the model to the determination of the cmc from the pyrene fluorescence intensity, especially from the intensity ratio at two vibronic bands in the monomer emission or from the ratio of excimer to monomer emission intensity. We relate the finite width of the transition region below and above the cmc with the observed changes in the pyrene fluorescence in this region.

  2. Sphere-to-Rod Transitions of Nonionic Surfactant Micelles in Aqueous Solution Modeled by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velinova, Maria; Sengupta, Durba; Tadjer, Alia V.; Marrink, Siewert-Jan

    2011-01-01

    Control of the size and agglomeration of micellar systems is important for pharmaceutical applications such as drug delivery. Although shape-related transitions in surfactant solutions are studied experimentally, their molecular mechanisms are still not well understood. In this study, we use coarse-

  3. A Mathematical Model for MicroRNA in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hye-Won; Crawford, Melissa; Fabbri, Muller; Nuovo, Gerard; Garofalo, Michela; Nana-Sinkam, S Patrick; Friedman, Avner

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Lack of early detection and limited options for targeted therapies are both contributing factors to the dismal statistics observed in lung cancer. Thus, advances in both of these areas are likely to lead to improved outcomes. MicroRNAs (miRs or miRNAs) represent a class of non-coding RNAs that have the capacity for gene regulation and may serve as both diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in lung cancer. Abnormal expression ...

  4. Exploring the uncertainties of early detection results: model-based interpretation of mayo lung project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berman Barbara

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mayo Lung Project (MLP, a randomized controlled clinical trial of lung cancer screening conducted between 1971 and 1986 among male smokers aged 45 or above, demonstrated an increase in lung cancer survival since the time of diagnosis, but no reduction in lung cancer mortality. Whether this result necessarily indicates a lack of mortality benefit for screening remains controversial. A number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain the observed outcome, including over-diagnosis, screening sensitivity, and population heterogeneity (initial difference in lung cancer risks between the two trial arms. This study is intended to provide model-based testing for some of these important arguments. Method Using a micro-simulation model, the MISCAN-lung model, we explore the possible influence of screening sensitivity, systematic error, over-diagnosis and population heterogeneity. Results Calibrating screening sensitivity, systematic error, or over-diagnosis does not noticeably improve the fit of the model, whereas calibrating population heterogeneity helps the model predict lung cancer incidence better. Conclusions Our conclusion is that the hypothesized imperfection in screening sensitivity, systematic error, and over-diagnosis do not in themselves explain the observed trial results. Model fit improvement achieved by accounting for population heterogeneity suggests a higher risk of cancer incidence in the intervention group as compared with the control group.

  5. Artificial Neural Network Model for Alkali-Surfactant-Polymer Flooding in Viscous Oil Reservoirs: Generation and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Le Van

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical flooding has been widely utilized to recover a large portion of the oil remaining in light and viscous oil reservoirs after the primary and secondary production processes. As core-flood tests and reservoir simulations take time to accurately estimate the recovery performances as well as analyzing the feasibility of an injection project, it is necessary to find a powerful tool to quickly predict the results with a level of acceptable accuracy. An approach involving the use of an artificial neural network to generate a representative model for estimating the alkali-surfactant-polymer flooding performance and evaluating the economic feasibility of viscous oil reservoirs from simulation is proposed in this study. A typical chemical flooding project was referenced for this numerical study. A number of simulations have been made for training on the basis of a base case from the design of 13 parameters. After training, the network scheme generated from a ratio data set of 50%-20%-30% corresponding to the number of samples used for training-validation-testing was selected for estimation with the total coefficient of determination of 0.986 and a root mean square error of 1.63%. In terms of model application, the chemical concentration and injection strategy were optimized to maximize the net present value (NPV of the project at a specific oil price from the just created ANN model. To evaluate the feasibility of the project comprehensively in terms of market variations, a range of oil prices from 30 $/bbl to 60 $/bbl referenced from a real market situation was considered in conjunction with its probability following a statistical distribution on the NPV computation. Feasibility analysis of the optimal chemical injection scheme revealed a variation of profit from 0.42 $MM to 1.0 $MM, corresponding to the changes in oil price. In particular, at the highest possible oil prices, the project can earn approximately 0.61 $MM to 0.87 $MM for a quarter

  6. Use of a multistage model to predict time trends in smoking induced lung cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, J B

    1992-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aims were to use a mathematical model to predict the time course of smoking induced lung cancer, and to investigate to what extent the most recent increases in lung cancer mortality are due to cigarette smoking. DESIGN--A mathematical model was developed and solved by simulation to construct detailed smoking histories of the US white male population given available prevalence data by age and cohort. A multistage carcinogenesis model was used to predict the time course of ...

  7. Composition, structure and mechanical properties define performance of pulmonary surfactant membranes and films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Elisa; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory surface in the mammalian lung is stabilized by pulmonary surfactant, a membrane-based system composed of multiple lipids and specific proteins, the primary function of which is to minimize the surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface, optimizing the mechanics of breathing and avoiding alveolar collapse, especially at the end of expiration. The goal of the present review is to summarize current knowledge regarding the structure, lipid-protein interactions and mechanical features of surfactant membranes and films and how these properties correlate with surfactant biological function inside the lungs. Surfactant mechanical properties can be severely compromised by different agents, which lead to surfactant inhibition and ultimately contributes to the development of pulmonary disorders and pathologies in newborns, children and adults. A detailed comprehension of the unique mechanical and rheological properties of surfactant layers is crucial for the diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases, either by analyzing the contribution of surfactant impairment to the pathophysiology or by improving the formulations in surfactant replacement therapies. Finally, a short review is also included on the most relevant experimental techniques currently employed to evaluate lung surfactant mechanics, rheology, and inhibition and reactivation processes.

  8. Maintained inspiratory activity during proportional assist ventilation in surfactant-depleted cats early after surfactant instillation: phrenic nerve and pulmonary stretch receptor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaller Peter

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inspiratory activity is a prerequisite for successful application of patient triggered ventilation such as proportional assist ventilation (PAV. It has recently been reported that surfactant instillation increases the activity of slowly adapting pulmonary stretch receptors (PSRs followed by a shorter inspiratory time (Sindelar et al, J Appl Physiol, 2005 [Epub ahead of print]. Changes in lung mechanics, as observed in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome and after surfactant treatment, might therefore influence the inspiratory activity when applying PAV early after surfactant treatment. Objective To investigate the regulation of breathing and ventilatory response in surfactant-depleted young cats during PAV and during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP early after surfactant instillation in relation to phrenic nerve activity (PNA and the activity of PSRs. Methods Seven anesthetized, endotracheally intubated young cats were exposed to periods of CPAP and PAV with the same end-expiratory pressure (0.2–0.5 kPa before and after lung lavage and after surfactant instillation. PAV was set to compensate for 75% of the lung elastic recoil. Results Tidal volume and respiratory rate were higher with lower PaCO2 and higher PaO2 during PAV than during CPAP both before and after surfactant instillation (p Conclusion PSR activity and the control of breathing are maintained during PAV in surfactant-depleted cats early after surfactant instillation, with a higher ventilatory response and a lower breathing effort than during CPAP.

  9. Towards a biomechanical model of the human lung

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez Marquez, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy of the lung is challenging due to the motion induced by respiration. Plans of radiotherapy treatments are developed based on static computed tomography (CT) images, while treatment is performed in moving organs. This leads to a lack of precise knowledge of the actual position of the tumor and internal organs during treatment makes the calculation of actual dose absorbed by the lungs and surrounding tissues unknown. In the Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies (CART), the ...

  10. Towards a biomechanical model of the human lung

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez Marquez, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy of the lung is challenging due to the motion induced by respiration. Plans of radiotherapy treatments are developed based on static computed tomography (CT) images, while treatment is performed in moving organs. This leads to a lack of precise knowledge of the actual position of the tumor and internal organs during treatment makes the calculation of actual dose absorbed by the lungs and surrounding tissues unknown. In the Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies (CART), the ...

  11. Surfactants in tribology

    CERN Document Server

    Biresaw, Girma

    2014-01-01

    Surface science and tribology play very critical roles in many industries. Manufacture and use of almost all consumer and industrial products rely on the application of advanced surface and tribological knowledge. The fourth in a series, Surfactants in Tribology, Volume 4 provides an update on research and development activities connecting surfactants and tribological phenomena. Written by renowned subject matter experts, the book demonstrates how improved design of surfactants can be harnessed to control tribological phenomena. Profusely illustrated and copiously referenced, the chapters also

  12. Modelling Adsorption of Foam-Forming Surfactants Modélisation de l'adsorption des produits tensio-actifs moussants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannhardt K.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in the use of foam-forming surfactants for mobility control in gas flooding enhanced oil recovery processes. The success of any such process is strongly affected by the rate of propagation of the surfactant through the reservoir. A sound understanding of surfactant adsorption on rock surfaces at reservoir conditions is therefore essential. This paper describes a model for the evaluation of adsorption during flow of surfactant solutions through porous media. The adsorption term in the flow equation is expressed in terms of the surface excess which proves to be more generally applicable than, for example, the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Adsorption isotherms of three types of commercially available foam-forming surfactants are determined from core flooding data at different temperatures and brine salinities. L'utilisation de produits tensio-actifs moussants pour le contrôle de mobilité dans les procédés de récupération assistée du pétrole par injection de gaz suscite actuellement un grand intérêt. Mais le succès d'un tel procédé dépend largement de la vitesse de propagation du tensioactif dans le réservoir. Il est donc indispensable d'avoir une bonne connaissance de l'adsorption du tensio-actif sur les surfaces de la roche, dans les conditions de réservoir. Cet article décrit un modèle qui permet d'évaluer l'adsorption pendant l'écoulement de solutions tensio-actives en milieu poreux. Le terme qui représente l'adsorption dans l'équation de l'écoulement est exprimé en fonction de l'excédent de surface, concept qui s'est révélé d'une application plus générale que, par exemple, l'isotherme d'adsorption de Langmuir. Les isothermes d'adsorption de trois types de tensio-actifs moussants disponibles sur le marché sont déterminées à partir de données obtenues lors d'essais de déplacement dans des carottes, à différentes températures et avec des saumures de différentes salinités.

  13. Is tail vein injection a relevant breast cancer lung metastasis model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Omar M.; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramachandran, Suburamaniam; Dumur, Catherine I.; Schaum, Julia C.; Yamada, Akimitsu; Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Background Two most commonly used animal models for studying breast cancer lung metastasis are: lung metastasis after orthotopic implantation of cells into the mammary gland, and lung implantations produced after tail vein (TV) injection of cells. Tail vein injection can produce lung lesions faster, but little has been studied regarding the differences between these tumors, thus, we examined their morphology and gene expression profiles. Methods Syngeneic murine mammary adenocarcinoma, 4T1-luc2 cells, were implanted either subcutaneously (Sq), orthotopically (OS), or injected via TV in Balb/c mice. Genome-wide microarray analyses of cultured 4T1 cells, Sq tumor, OS tumor, lung metastases after OS (LMet), and lung tumors after TV (TVt) were performed 10 days after implantation. Results Bioluminescence analysis demonstrated different morphology of metastases between LMet and TVt, confirmed by histology. Gene expression profile of cells were significantly different from tumors, OS, Sq, TVt or LMet (10,350 probe sets; FDR≤1%; P1.5-fold-change; P<0.01), with no significant difference between TVt and LMet. Conclusions There were significant differences between the gene profiles of cells in culture and OS versus LMet, but there were no differences between LMet versus TVt. Therefore, the lung tumor generated by TVt can be considered genetically similar to those produced after OS, and thus TVt is a relevant model for breast cancer lung metastasis. PMID:23991292

  14. Establishing the Impact of Model Surfactants on Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activation of Sea Spray Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestieri, S.; Cappa, C. D.; Ruehl, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Aerosol impacts on cloud properties, also known as indirect effects, remain a major source of uncertainty in modeling global radiative forcing. To reduce this uncertainty necessitates better understanding of how aerosol chemical composition impacts the cloud-forming ability of aerosols. It is well established that both size and hygroscopicity impact the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aerosols. Previous studies demonstrate that the presence of surface-active organic material in aerosols can also reduce the surface tension of activating droplets, thereby enhancing CCN activity. We quantified surface tension of microscopic droplets using a continuous-flow stream-wise thermal gradient chamber at humidities close to activation for multi-component lab-generated sea spray aerosol (SSA) proxies. The SSA proxies used were atomized NaCl or synthetic sea salt coated with one to many various fatty acids found in nascent SSA particles. Observed surface tension values near the point of activation as a function of chemical composition for various SSA proxies will be presented.

  15. POLYMERIC SURFACTANT STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.M. Saville; J.W. White

    2001-01-01

    Polymeric surfactants are amongst the most widespread of all polymers. In nature, proteins and polysaccharides cause self organization as a result of this surfactancy; in industry, polymeric surfactants play key roles in the food, explosives and surface coatings sectors. The generation of useful nano- and micro-structures in films and emulsions as a result of polymer amphiphilicity and the application of mechanical stress is discussed. The use of X-ray and neutron small angle scattering and reflectivity to measure these structures and their dynamic properties will be described. New results on linear and dendritic polymer surfactants are presented.

  16. Dendrimer-surfactant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yiyun; Zhao, Libo; Li, Tianfu

    2014-04-28

    In this article, we reviewed the interactions between dendrimers and surfactants with particular focus on the interaction mechanisms and physicochemical properties of the yielding dendrimer-surfactant aggregates. In order to provide insight into the behavior of dendrimers in biological systems, the interactions of dendrimers with bio-surfactants such as phospholipids in bulk solutions, in solid-supported bilayers and at the interface of phases or solid-states were discussed. Applications of the dendrimer-surfactant aggregates as templates to guide the synthesis of nanoparticles and in drug or gene delivery were also mentioned.

  17. Evaluation and management of inherited disorders of surfactant metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aaron Hamvas

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the pathophysiology, evaluation, management, and outcomes of children with inherited disorders of surfactant metabolism due to mutations in the genes encoding surfactant proteins-B or -C(SFTPB, SFTPC), ATP binding cassette member A3 (ABCA3), and thyroid transcription factor (NKX2.1).Data sources Review of the literature, previous work from the author's and collaborators' laboratories, St. Louis Children's Hospital Lung Transplant Database.Study selection Key articles in the field, author's work.Results Inherited disorders of surfactant metabolism present as acute, severe respiratory dysfunction in the neonatal period (SFTPB, ABCA3, NKX2.1) or as chronic respiratory insufficiency in later infancy and childhood which is of variable onset, severity, and course (SFTPC, ABCA3, NKX2.1). Diagnosis is established with sequencing the relevant genes; lung biopsy with electron microscopy is a useful adjunct. For surfactant protein-B and ABCA3 deficiency presenting with acute neonatal disease, treatment options are limited to lung transplantation or compassionate care. For the more chronic presentations of surfactant protein-C, ABCA3, and NKX2.1 associated disease, the natural history is variable and therefore individualized, supportive care is appropriate,Conclusions Inherited disorders of surfactant metabolism are rare, but informative diseases that provide unique opportunities for understanding mechanisms of respiratory disease in newborns and children.

  18. Barrier or carrier? Pulmonary surfactant and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Alberto; Cruz, Antonio; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    To consider the lung as a target for drug delivery and to optimise strategies directed at the pulmonary route, it is essential to consider the role of pulmonary surfactant, a thin lipid-protein film lining the respiratory surface of mammalian lungs. Membrane-based surfactant multilayers are essential for reducing the surface tension at the respiratory air-liquid interface to minimise the work of breathing. Different components of surfactant are also responsible for facilitating the removal of potentially pathological entities such as microorganisms, allergens or environmental pollutants and particles. Upon inhalation, drugs or nanoparticles first contact the surfactant layer, and these interactions critically affect their lifetime and fate in the airways. This review summarises the current knowledge on the possible role and effects of the pulmonary surfactant system in drug delivery strategies. It also summarises the evidence that suggests that pulmonary surfactant is far from being an insuperable barrier and could be used as an efficient shuttle for delivering hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds deep into the lung and the organism.

  19. Numerical modeling of Po-218 deposition in a physiologically realistic lung bifurcation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mously-Soroujy, Khalid Ahmad

    Experimental data for lung bifurcations reveals complex geometries and distinct asymmetrical characteristic, which affects the localized distribution of particles deposited in the lung. This study is based on recently published numerical results for a symmetric physiological realistic bifurcation geometry Heistracher and Hofmann (1995) which has been extended here to the case of a asymmetric geometry. The asymmetric PRB model was used to study the flow field and the deposition of ultrafine particles for inspiratory and expiratory conditions. In the present study, we investigated the effect of different flow rates, representing human activity and deposition of different ultrafine particles representing radon daughter (Po-218), in the PRB model. Numerical results were compared with the limited available experimental and numerical data. The fluid dynamic computer program FIDAP was used for this purpose.

  20. Surfactant Sector Needs Urgent Readjustment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Hongzhou

    2007-01-01

    @@ Surfactant industrial system has been basically established After 50 years' development, China has already established a surfactant industrial system with a relatively complete product portfolio and can produce 4714 varieties of surfactants in cationic,anionic, nonionic and amphoteric categories.

  1. Pulmonary surfactant expression analysis--role of cell-cell interactions and 3-D tissue-like architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandkumar, Maya A; Ashna, U; Thomas, Lynda V; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-03-01

    Surfactant production is important in maintaining alveolar function both in vivo and in vitro, but surfactant expression is the primary property lost by alveolar Type II Pneumocytes in culture and its maintenance is a functional requirement. To develop a functional tissue-like model, the in vivo cell-cell interactions and three dimensional architecture has to be reproduced. To this end, 3D button-shaped synthetic gelatin vinyl acetate (GeVAc) co-polymer scaffold was seeded with different types of lung cells. Functionality of the construct was studied under both static and dynamic conditions. The construct was characterized by Environmental Scanning Electron and fluorescent microscopy, and functionality of the system was analyzed by studying mRNA modulations of all four surfactant genes A, B, C, and D by real time-PCR and varying culture conditions. The scaffold supports alveolar cell adhesion and maintenance of cuboidal morphology, and the alveolar-specific property of surfactant synthesis, which would otherwise be rapidly lost in culture. This is a novel 3D system that expresses all 4 surfactants for a culture duration of 3 weeks.

  2. Effect of surfactants, gastric emptying, and dosage form on supersaturation of dipyridamole in an in vitro model simulating the stomach and duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, A; Fadda, H M

    2014-08-04

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of gastric emptying patterns, surfactants, and dosage form on the supersaturation of a poorly soluble weakly basic drug, dipyridamole, using an in vitro model mimicking the dynamic environment of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and, furthermore, to evaluate the usefulness of this model in establishing correlations to in vivo bioavailability for drugs with solubility/dissolution limited absorption. A simulated stomach duodenum model comprising four compartments was used to assess supersaturation and precipitation kinetics as a function of time. It integrates physiologically relevant fluid volumes, fluid transfer rates, and pH changes of the upper GI tract. Monoexponential gastric emptying patterns simulating the fasted state were compared to linear gastric emptying patterns simulating the fed state. The effect of different surfactants commonly used in oral preparations, specifically, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), poloxamer-188, and polysorbate-80, on dipyridamole supersaturation was investigated while maintaining surface tension of the simulated gastric fluids at physiological levels and without obtaining artificial micellar solubilization of the drug. The supersaturation behavior of different dose strengths of dipyridamole was explored. Significant levels of dipyridamole supersaturation were observed in the duodenal compartment under all the different in vivo relevant conditions explored. Dipyridamole supersaturation ratios of up to 11-fold have been observed, and supersaturation has been maintained for up to 120 min. Lower duodenal concentrations of dipyridamole were observed under linear gastric emptying patterns compared to mononexponential gastric emptying. The mean duodenal area under concentration-time curves (AUC60min) for the dipyridamole concentration profile in the duodenal compartment is significantly different for all the surfactants explored (P supersaturation/precipitation kinetics of weakly

  3. The anatomy, physics, and physiology of gas exchange surfaces: is there a universal function for pulmonary surfactant in animal respiratory structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgeig, Sandra; Bernhard, Wolfgang; Biswas, Samares C; Daniels, Christopher B; Hall, Stephen B; Hetz, Stefan K; Lang, Carol J; Maina, John N; Panda, Amiya K; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Possmayer, Fred; Veldhuizen, Ruud A; Yan, Wenfei

    2007-10-01

    (Orgeig and Daniels) This surfactant symposium reflects the integrative and multidisciplinary aims of the 1st ICRB, by encompassing in vitro and in vivo research, studies of vertebrates and invertebrates, and research across multiple disciplines. We explore the physical and structural challenges that face gas exchange surfaces in vertebrates and insects, by focusing on the role of the surfactant system. Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins that lines the air-liquid interface of the lungs of all air-breathing vertebrates, where it functions to vary surface tension with changing lung volume. We begin with a discussion of the extraordinary conservation of the blood-gas barrier among vertebrate respiratory organs, which has evolved to be extremely thin, thereby maximizing gas exchange, but simultaneously strong enough to withstand significant distension forces. The principal components of pulmonary surfactant are highly conserved, with a mixed phospholipid and neutral lipid interfacial film that is established, maintained and dynamically regulated by surfactant proteins (SP). A wide variation in the concentrations of individual components exists, however, and highlights lipidomic as well as proteomic adaptations to different physiological needs. As SP-B deficiency in mammals is lethal, oxidative stress to SP-B is detrimental to the biophysical function of pulmonary surfactant and SP-B is evolutionarily conserved across the vertebrates. It is likely that SP-B was essential for the evolutionary origin of pulmonary surfactant. We discuss three specific issues of the surfactant system to illustrate the diversity of function in animal respiratory structures. (1) Temperature: In vitro analyses of the behavior of different model surfactant films under dynamic conditions of surface tension and temperature suggest that, contrary to previous beliefs, the alveolar film may not have to be substantially enriched in the disaturated phospholipid

  4. Lung fibrosis: drug screening and disease biomarker identification with a lung slice culture model and subtracted cDNA Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tong; Lok, Ka Yee; Yu, Changhe; Li, Zhuo

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and irreversible disorder with no appropriate cure. A practical and effective experimental model that recapitulates the disease will greatly benefit the research community and, ultimately, patients. In this study, we tested the lung slice culture (LSC) system for its potential use in drug screening and disease biomarker identification. Fibrosis was induced by treating rat lung slices with 1ng/ml TGF-β1 and 2.5μM CdCl2, quantified by measuring the content of hydroxyproline, and confirmed by detecting the expression of collagen type III alpha 1 (Col3α1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) genes. The anti-fibrotic effects of pirfenidone, spironolactone and eplerenone were assessed by their capability to reduce hydroxyproline content. A subtractive hybridisation technique was used to create two cDNA libraries (subtracted and unsubtracted) from lung slices. The housekeeping gene glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was employed to assess the subtraction efficiency of the subtracted cDNA library. Clones from the two libraries were sequenced and the genes were identified by performing a BLAST search on the NCBI GenBank database. Furthermore, the relevance of the genes to fibrosis formation was verified. The results presented here show that fibrosis was effectively induced in cultured lung slices, which exhibited significantly elevated levels of hydroxyproline and Col3α1/CTGF gene expression. Several inhibitors have demonstrated their anti-fibrotic effects by significantly reducing hydroxyproline content. The subtracted cDNA library, which was enriched for differentially expressed genes, was used to successfully identify genes associated with fibrosis. Collectively, the results indicate that our LSC system is an effective model for the screening of drug candidates and for disease biomarker identification.

  5. Antibodies against beta-lactamase can improve ceftazidime treatment of lung infection with beta-lactam-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a rat model of chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Bagge, Niels; Høiby, Niels

    2002-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that antibodies against the chromosomal beta-lactamase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (a beta ab) might act as beta-lactamase inhibitors in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infection with P. aeruginosa, we compared in a rat model of chronic lung infection the effic...

  6. A study of surfactant-assisted waterflooding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scamehorn, J F; Harwell, J H

    1990-09-01

    In surfactant-assisted waterflooding, a surfactant slug is injected into a reservoir, followed by a brine spacer, followed by second surfactant slug. The charge on the surfactant in the first slug has opposite sign to that in the second slug. When the two slugs mix in the reservoir, a precipitate or coacervate is formed which plugs the permeable region of the reservoir. Subsequently injected water or brine is forced through the low permeability region of the reservoir, increasing sweep efficiency of the waterflood, compared to a waterflood not using surfactants. In this part of the work, two major tasks are performed. First, core floods are performed with oil present to demonstrate the improvement in incremental oil production, as well as permeability modification. Second, a reservoir simulation model will be proposed to further delineate the optimum strategy for implementation of the surfactant-assisted waterflooding, as well as indicate the reservoir types for which it would be most effective. Surfactants utilized were sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl pyridinium chloride. 44 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Study on Pulmonary Surfactant of Sudden Death of Infant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To find the pathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome (S IDS) from changes of pulmonurry surfactant. Methods By means of thin-layer ckromatography technique, surfactant in whole lung specimens of 10 infants with SIDS and 10 control infants without SIDS (dead of nonrespiratory diseases ) were examined qualitatively and quantitatively. Results Eleven components in pulmonary surfactant were examined qualitatively, including lysophosphatidylcholine , sphingomyelin , phosphatidylcholine , phosphatidylserine , phosphatidylinositol , phos phatidylethanolamine , phosphatidylglycerol , diphosphatidylylycerol , phosphatidic acid, cholesterol and neutral lipids. Quantitative examination showed that the amount of surfactant of whole lung specimens in sudden death group [-(8.9±1.0) rng/g wet lung weight] was significantly less than that in control group [-(12. 6±1.4) mg/g uet lung weight, P<0. 01]. Qualitative variance showed that the percentages of phosphatidylcholine (49. 4 % ± 2. 0 % ) and phosphatidylylycerol ( 2. 6 % ± 0. 7 % ) decreased markedly in sudden death group compared with those in control group (61.5 % ± 3. 0 % and 4.3 % ±1. 5%, P < 0. 01 ). Conclusion Before death there is serions defect on metabolism of pulmonary surfactant in sudden death infants, with the amount decreasing and the ratio of its components being disturbed, which is one of the important pathogenies of SIDS.

  8. Study on Pulmonary Surfactant of Sudden Death of Infant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To find the pathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome (S IDS) from changes of pulmonurry surfactant. Methods By means of thin-layer ckromatography technique, surfactant in whole lung specimens of 10 infants with SIDS and 10 control infants without SIDS (dead of nonrespiratory diseases ) were examined qualitatively and quantitatively. Results Eleven components in pulmonary surfactant were examined qualitatively, including lysophosphatidylcholine , sphingomyelin , phosphatidylcholine , phosphatidylserine , phosphatidylinositol , phos phatidylethanolamine , phosphatidylglycerol , diphosphatidylylycerol , phosphatidic acid, cholesterol and neutral lipids. Quantitative examination showed that the amount of surfactant of whole lung specimens in sudden death group [-(8.9±1.0) rng/g wet lung weight] was significantly less than that in control group [-(12. 6±1.4) mg/g uet lung weight, P<0. 01]. Qualitative variance showed that the percentages of phosphatidylcholine (49. 4 % ± 2. 0 % ) and phosphatidylylycerol ( 2. 6 % ± 0. 7 % ) decreased markedly in sudden death group compared with those in control group (61.5 % ± 3. 0 % and 4.3 % ±1. 5%, P < 0. 01 ). Conclusion Before death there is serions defect on metabolism of pulmonary surfactant in sudden death infants, with the amount decreasing and the ratio of its components being disturbed, which is one of the important pathogenies of SIDS.

  9. Sex-specific lung diseases: effect of oestrogen on cultured cells and in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosung Shim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sex prevalence in lung disease suggests that sex-specific hormones may contribute to the pathogenesis and/or progression of at least some lung diseases, such as lung adenocarcinoma, lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM and benign metastasising leiomyoma (BML. Oestrogen is an important hormone in normal lung development and in the pathogenesis of female predominant pulmonary diseases. In vivo and in vitro studies have facilitated our understanding of disease pathogenesis and discovery of potential therapeutic targets. Oestrogen promoted disease progression in cell and animal models of lung adenocarcinoma, LAM and BML. Specifically, oestrogen enhanced tumour growth and metastasis in animal models of these diseases. Furthermore, 17β-estradiol (E2, the most abundant form of oestrogen in humans, increased the size and proliferation of cultured cells of lung adenocarcinoma and LAM. Coupled with the known mechanisms of oestrogen metabolism and signalling, these model systems may provide insights into the diverse effects of oestrogen and other hormones on lung diseases. Anti-oestrogen treatments that target key events of oestrogen synthesis or signalling, such as aromatase activity, oestrogen receptors and signalling pathways, may offer additional opportunities for clinical trials.

  10. A Peptide to Reduce Pulmonary Edema in a Rat Model of Lung Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Schossleitner

    Full Text Available Despite significant advances in organ preservation, surgical techniques and perioperative care, primary graft dysfunction is a serious medical problem in transplantation medicine in general and a specific problem in patients undergoing lung transplantation. As a result, patients develop lung edema, causing reduced tissue oxygenation capacity, reduced lung compliance and increased requirements for mechanical ventilatory support. Yet, there is no effective strategy available to protect the grafted organ from stress reactions induced by ischemia/reperfusion and by the surgical procedure itself.We assessed the effect of a cingulin-derived peptide, XIB13 or a random peptide in an established rat model of allogeneic lung transplantation. Donor lungs and recipients received therapeutic peptide at the time of transplantation and outcome was analyzed 100min and 28 days post grafting.XIB13 improved blood oxygenation and reduced vascular leak 100min post grafting. Even after 28 days, lung edema was significantly reduced by XIB13 and lungs had reduced fibrotic or necrotic zones. Moreover, the induction of an allogeneic T cell response was delayed indicating a reduced antigen exchange between the donor and the host.In summary, we provide a new tool to strengthen endothelial barrier function thereby improving outcomes in lung transplantation.

  11. Conditions for NIR fluorescence-guided tumor resectioning in preclinical lung cancer model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minji; Quan, Yuhua; Choi, Byeong Hyun; Choi, Yeonho; Kim, Hyun Koo; Kim, Beop-Min

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary nodule could be identified by intraoperative fluorescence imaging system from systemic injection of indocyanine green (ICG) which achieves enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effects. This study was performed to evaluate optimal injection time of ICG for detecting cancer during surgery in rabbit lung cancer model. VX2 carcinoma cell was injected in rabbit lung under fluoroscopic computed tomography-guidance. Solitary lung cancer was confirmed on positron emitting tomography with CT (PET/CT) 2 weeks after inoculation. ICG was administered intravenously and fluorescent intensity of lung tumor was measured using the custom-built intraoperative color and fluorescence merged imaging system (ICFIS) for 15 hours. Solitary lung cancer was resected through thoracoscopic version of ICFIS. ICG was observed in all animals. Because Lung has fast blood pulmonary circulation, Fluorescent signal showed maximum intensity earlier than previous studies in other organs. Fluorescent intensity showed maximum intensity within 6-9 hours in rabbit lung cancer. Overall, Fluorescent intensity decreased with increasing time, however, all tumors were detectable using fluorescent images until 12 hours. In conclusion, while there had been studies in other organs showed that optimal injection time was at least 24 hours before operation, this study showed shorter optimal injection time at lung cancer. Since fluorescent signal showed the maximum intensity within 6-9 hours, cancer resection could be performed during this time. This data informed us that optimal injection time of ICG should be evaluated in each different solid organ tumor for fluorescent image guided surgery.

  12. A Peptide to Reduce Pulmonary Edema in a Rat Model of Lung Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterwalder, Richard; Friedl, Heinz P.; Rauscher, Sabine; Gröger, Marion; Kocher, Alfred; Wagner, Christine; Wagner, Stephan N.; Fischer, Gottfried; Schultz, Marcus J.; Wiedemann, Dominik; Petzelbauer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite significant advances in organ preservation, surgical techniques and perioperative care, primary graft dysfunction is a serious medical problem in transplantation medicine in general and a specific problem in patients undergoing lung transplantation. As a result, patients develop lung edema, causing reduced tissue oxygenation capacity, reduced lung compliance and increased requirements for mechanical ventilatory support. Yet, there is no effective strategy available to protect the grafted organ from stress reactions induced by ischemia/reperfusion and by the surgical procedure itself. Methods We assessed the effect of a cingulin-derived peptide, XIB13 or a random peptide in an established rat model of allogeneic lung transplantation. Donor lungs and recipients received therapeutic peptide at the time of transplantation and outcome was analyzed 100min and 28 days post grafting. Results XIB13 improved blood oxygenation and reduced vascular leak 100min post grafting. Even after 28 days, lung edema was significantly reduced by XIB13 and lungs had reduced fibrotic or necrotic zones. Moreover, the induction of an allogeneic T cell response was delayed indicating a reduced antigen exchange between the donor and the host. Conclusions In summary, we provide a new tool to strengthen endothelial barrier function thereby improving outcomes in lung transplantation. PMID:26536466

  13. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  14. Optimization of Variable Ventilation for Physiology, Immune Response and Surfactant Enhancement in Preterm Lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erzsébet Bartolák-Suki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Preterm infants often require mechanical ventilation due to lung immaturity including reduced or abnormal surfactant. Since cyclic stretch with cycle-by-cycle variability is known to augment surfactant release by epithelial cells, we hypothesized that such in vivo mechanotransduction improves surfactant maturation and hence lung physiology in preterm subjects. We thus tested whether breath-by-breath variability in tidal volume (VT in variable ventilation (VV can be tuned for optimal performance in a preterm lamb model. Preterm lambs were ventilated for 3 h with conventional ventilation (CV or two variants of VV that used a maximum VT of 1.5 (VV1 or 2.25 (VV2 times the mean VT. VT was adjusted during ventilation to a permissive pCO2 target range. Respiratory mechanics were monitored continuously using the forced oscillation technique, followed by postmortem bronchoalveolar lavage and tissue collection. Both VVs outperformed CV in blood gas parameters (pH, SaO2, cerebral O2 saturation. However, only VV2 lowered PaCO2 and had a higher specific respiratory compliance than CV. VV2 also increased surfactant protein (SP-B release compared to VV1 and stimulated its production compared to CV. The production and release of proSP-C however, was increased with CV compared to both VVs. There was more SP-A in both VVs than CV in the lung, but VV2 downregulated SP-A in the lavage, whereas SP-D significantly increased in CV in both the lavage and lung. Compared to CV, the cytokines IL-1β, and TNFα decreased with both VVs with less inflammation during VV2. Additionally, VV2 lungs showed the most homogeneous alveolar structure and least inflammatory cell infiltration assessed by histology. CV lungs exhibited over-distension mixed with collapsed and interstitial edematous regions with occasional hemorrhage. Following VV1, some lambs had normal alveolar structure while others were similar to CV. The IgG serum proteins in the lavage, a marker of leakage, were the

  15. MicroRNA-206 regulates surfactant secretion by targeting VAMP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghao; Guo, Yujie; Mishra, Amarjit; Gou, Deming; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Liu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Lung surfactant secretion is a highly regulated process. Our previous studies have shown that VAMP-2 is essential for surfactant secretion. In the present study we investigated the role of miR-206 in surfactant secretion through VAMP-2. VAMP-2 was confirmed to be a target of miR-206 by 3'-untranslational region (3'-UTR) luciferase assay. Mutations in the predicated miR-206 binding sites reduced the binding of miR-206 to the 3'-UTR of VAMP-2. miR-206 decreased the expression of VAMP-2 protein and decreased the lung surfactant secretion in alveolar type II cells. In conclusion, miR-206 regulates lung surfactant secretion by limiting the availability of VAMP-2 protein.

  16. Surfactant therapy in late preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yurdakök

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Late preterm (LPT neonates are at a high risk for respiratory distress soon after birth due to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, transient tachypnea of the newborn, persistent pulmonary hypertension, and pneumonia along with an increased need for surfactant replacement therapy, continuous positive airway pressure, and ventilator support when compared with the term neonates. In the past, studies on outcomes of infants with respiratory distress have primarily focused on extremely premature infants, leading to a gap in knowledge and understanding of the developmental biology and mechanism of pulmonary diseases in LPT neonates. Surfactant deficiency is the most frequent etiology of RDS in very preterm and moderately preterm infants, while cesarean section and lung infection play major roles in RDS development in LPT infants. The clinical presentation and the response to surfactant therapy in LPT infants may be different than that seen in very preterm infants. Incidence of pneumonia and occurrence of pneumothorax are significantly higher in LPT and term infants. High rates of pneumonia in these infants may result in direct injury to the type II alveolar cells of the lung with decreasing synthesis, release, and processing of surfactant. Increased permeability of the alveolar capillary membrane to both fluid and solutes is known to result in entry of plasma proteins into the alveolar hypophase, further inhibiting the surface properties of surfactant. However, the oxygenation index value do not change dramatically after ventilation or surfactant administration in LPT infants with RDS compared to very preterm infants. These finding may indicate a different pathogenesis of RDS in late preterm and term infants. In conclusion, surfactant therapy may be of significant benefit in LPT infants with serious respiratory failure secondary to a number of insults. However, optimal timing and dose of administration are not so clear in this group. Additional

  17. SURFACTANTS IN LUBRICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants are one of the most widely applied materials by consumers and industry. The application areas for surfactants span from everyday mundane tasks such as cleaning, to highly complex processes involving the formulation of pharmaceuticals, foods, pesticides, lubricants, etc. Even though sur...

  18. Dynamic covalent surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minkenberg, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis the development of surfactant aggregates with fast exchange dynamics between the aggregated and non-aggregated state is described. Dynamic surfactant exchange plays an important role in natural systems, for instance in cell signaling, cell division, and uptake and release of cargo. Re

  19. Foaming and foam stability for mixed polymer-surfactant solutions: effects of surfactant type and polymer charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, R; Tcholakova, S; Denkov, N D

    2012-03-20

    Solutions of surfactant-polymer mixtures often exhibit different foaming properties, compared to the solutions of the individual components, due to the strong tendency for formation of polymer-surfactant complexes in the bulk and on the surface of the mixed solutions. A generally shared view in the literature is that electrostatic interactions govern the formation of these complexes, for example between anionic surfactants and cationic polymers. In this study we combine foam tests with model experiments to evaluate and explain the effect of several polymer-surfactant mixtures on the foaminess and foam stability of the respective solutions. Anionic, cationic, and nonionic surfactants (SDS, C(12)TAB, and C(12)EO(23)) were studied to clarify the role of surfactant charge. Highly hydrophilic cationic and nonionic polymers (polyvinylamine and polyvinylformamide, respectivey) were chosen to eliminate the (more trivial) effect of direct hydrophobic interactions between the surfactant tails and the hydrophobic regions on the polymer chains. Our experiments showed clearly that the presence of opposite charges is not a necessary condition for boosting the foaminess and foam stability in the surfactant-polymer mixtures studied. Clear foam boosting (synergistic) effects were observed in the mixtures of cationic surfactant and cationic polymer, cationic surfactant and nonionic polymer, and anionic surfactant and nonionic polymer. The mixtures of anionic surfactant and cationic polymer showed improved foam stability, however, the foaminess was strongly reduced, as compared to the surfactant solutions without polymer. No significant synergistic or antagonistic effects were observed for the mixture of nonionic surfactant (with low critical micelle concentration) and nonionic polymer. The results from the model experiments allowed us to explain the observed trends by the different adsorption dynamics and complex formation pattern in the systems studied.

  20. Optimal flow conditions of a tracheobronchial model to reengineer lung structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarin, Stefano; Aletti, Federico; Baselli, Giuseppe; Garbey, Marc

    2017-03-01

    The high demand for lung transplants cannot be matched by an adequate number of lungs from donors. Since fully ex-novo lungs are far from being feasible, tissue engineering is actively considering implantation of engineered lungs where the devitalized structure of a donor is used as scaffold to be repopulated by stem cells of the receiving patient. A decellularized donated lung is treated inside a bioreactor where transport through the tracheobronchial tree (TBT) will allow for both deposition of stem cells and nourishment for their subsequent growth, thus developing new lung tissue. The key concern is to set optimally the boundary conditions to utilize in the bioreactor. We propose a predictive model of slow liquid ventilation, which combines a one-dimensional (1-D) mathematical model of the TBT and a solute deposition model strongly dependent on fluid velocity across the tree. With it, we were able to track and drive the concentration of a generic solute across the airways, looking for its optimal distribution. This was given by properly adjusting the pumps' regime serving the bioreactor. A feedback system, created by coupling the two models, allowed us to derive the optimal pattern. The TBT model can be easily invertible, thus yielding a straightforward flow/pressure law at the inlet to optimize the efficiency of the bioreactor.

  1. Lung function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005200 The effect of body position changes on lung function, lung CT imaging and pathology in an oleic acid induced acute lung injury model. JI Xin-ping (戢新平), et al. Dept Emergency, 1st Affili Hosp, China Med Univ, Shenyang 110001. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis, 2005;28(1) :33-36. Objective: To study the effect of body position changes on lung mechanics, oxygenation, CT images and pathology in an oleic acid-induced acute lung injury (ALl) model. Methods: The study groups con-

  2. Patterns of lung cancer mortality in 23 countries: Application of the Age-Period-Cohort model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yi-Chia

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking habits do not seem to be the main explanation of the epidemiological characteristics of female lung cancer mortality in Asian countries. However, Asian countries are often excluded from studies of geographical differences in trends for lung cancer mortality. We thus examined lung cancer trends from 1971 to 1995 among men and women for 23 countries, including four in Asia. Methods International and national data were used to analyze lung cancer mortality from 1971 to 1995 in both sexes. Age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR were analyzed in five consecutive five-year periods and for each five-year age group in the age range 30 to 79. The age-period-cohort (APC model was used to estimate the period effect (adjusted for age and cohort effects for mortality from lung cancer. Results The sex ratio of the ASMR for lung cancer was lower in Asian countries, while the sex ratio of smoking prevalence was higher in Asian countries. The mean values of the sex ratio of the ASMR from lung cancer in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Japan for the five 5-year period were 2.10, 2.39, 3.07, and 3.55, respectively. These values not only remained quite constant over each five-year period, but were also lower than seen in the western countries. The period effect, for lung cancer mortality as derived for the 23 countries from the APC model, could be classified into seven patterns. Conclusion Period effects for both men and women in 23 countries, as derived using the APC model, could be classified into seven patterns. Four Asian countries have a relatively low sex ratio in lung cancer mortality and a relatively high sex ratio in smoking prevalence. Factors other than smoking might be important, especially for women in Asian countries.

  3. Modeling Mycobacterium tuberculosis early granuloma formation in experimental human lung tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Ramanarao Parasa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The widely used animal models for tuberculosis (TB display fundamental differences from human TB. Therefore, a validated model that recapitulates human lung TB is attractive for TB research. Here, we describe a unique method for establishment of TB infection in an experimental human lung tissue model. The model is based on cell lines derived from human lungs and primary macrophages from peripheral blood, and displays characteristics of human lung tissue, including evenly integrated macrophages throughout the epithelium, production of extracellular matrix, stratified epithelia and mucus secretion. Establishment of experimental infection in the model tissue with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes TB, resulted in clustering of macrophages at the site of infection, reminiscent of early TB granuloma formation. We quantitated the extent of granuloma formation induced by different strains of mycobacteria and validated our model against findings in other TB models. We found that early granuloma formation is dependent on ESAT-6, which is secreted via the type VII secretion machinery of virulent mycobacteria. Our model, which can facilitate the discovery of the interactions between mycobacteria and host cells in a physiological environment, is the first lung tissue model described for TB.

  4. Modeling Tuberculosis in Lung and Central Nervous System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Kebir, M.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Most cases of TB are pulmonary, i.e. the main infection site is in the lung. In this work, we consider pulmonary TB as well as tuberculous meningitis (TBM). The latter is caused by infection of the meninges in the central

  5. The pathogenesis of lung emphysema: lessons learned from murine models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braber, S.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world and is defined by the Global initiative in Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) as: “a disease state characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. The airflow limi

  6. Research advance on interstitial lung disease in patient with rheumatoid arthritis and serum surfactant proteins%类风湿关节炎合并间质性肺病及血清表面活性蛋白研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋庆珍; 高惠英

    2012-01-01

    The interstitial lung disease can usually be discovered in rheumatoid arthritis,and it has high incidence rate and case fatality.It can be misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis in early period,and appearance pulmonary interstitial fibrosis in end,which is very difficult to treat in clinic.Recent years,there are more research of serum surfactant protein in interstitial lung disease.This articles will review the diagnosis and treatment progress of interstitial lung disease complicated by rheumatoid arthritis,and research advance of serum surfactant proteins on interstitial lung disease,so that provide new approach of early diagnosis and therapeutic efficacy observation of this disease.%类风湿关节炎合并间质性肺病发病率、病死率高,早期易误诊、漏诊,尤其后期出现肺间质纤维化,临床治疗很困难.近年来,血清表面活性蛋白在间质性肺病研究较多.本文基于对类风湿关节炎合并间质性肺病的诊断和治疗进展方面的现代认识及血清表面活性蛋白在间质性肺病的研究进展进行综述,为该疾病早期诊断和治疗效果观察提供新的方法和手段.

  7. Histologic and biochemical alterations predict pulmonary mechanical dysfunction in aging mice with chronic lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Christopher B; Groves, Angela M; Jaggernauth, Smita U; Laskin, Debra L; Gow, Andrew J

    2017-08-01

    Both aging and chronic inflammation produce complex structural and biochemical alterations to the lung known to impact work of breathing. Mice deficient in surfactant protein D (Sftpd) develop progressive age-related lung pathology characterized by tissue destruction/remodeling, accumulation of foamy macrophages and alteration in surfactant composition. This study proposes to relate changes in tissue structure seen in normal aging and in chronic inflammation to altered lung mechanics using a computational model. Alterations in lung function in aging and Sftpd -/- mice have been inferred from fitting simple mechanical models to respiratory impedance data (Zrs), however interpretation has been confounded by the simultaneous presence of multiple coexisting pathophysiologic processes. In contrast to the inverse modeling approach, this study uses simulation from experimental measurements to recapitulate how aging and inflammation alter Zrs. Histologic and mechanical measurements were made in C57BL6/J mice and congenic Sftpd-/- mice at 8, 27 and 80 weeks of age (n = 8/group). An anatomic computational model based on published airway morphometry was developed and Zrs was simulated between 0.5 and 20 Hz. End expiratory pressure dependent changes in airway caliber and recruitment were estimated from mechanical measurements. Tissue elements were simulated using the constant phase model of viscoelasticity. Baseline elastance distribution was estimated in 8-week-old wild type mice, and stochastically varied for each condition based on experimentally measured alteration in elastic fiber composition, alveolar geometry and surfactant composition. Weighing reduction in model error against increasing model complexity allowed for identification of essential features underlying mechanical pathology and their contribution to Zrs. Using a maximum likelihood approach, alteration in lung recruitment and diminished elastic fiber density were shown predictive of mechanical alteration at

  8. Histologic and biochemical alterations predict pulmonary mechanical dysfunction in aging mice with chronic lung inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Massa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Both aging and chronic inflammation produce complex structural and biochemical alterations to the lung known to impact work of breathing. Mice deficient in surfactant protein D (Sftpd develop progressive age-related lung pathology characterized by tissue destruction/remodeling, accumulation of foamy macrophages and alteration in surfactant composition. This study proposes to relate changes in tissue structure seen in normal aging and in chronic inflammation to altered lung mechanics using a computational model. Alterations in lung function in aging and Sftpd -/- mice have been inferred from fitting simple mechanical models to respiratory impedance data (Zrs, however interpretation has been confounded by the simultaneous presence of multiple coexisting pathophysiologic processes. In contrast to the inverse modeling approach, this study uses simulation from experimental measurements to recapitulate how aging and inflammation alter Zrs. Histologic and mechanical measurements were made in C57BL6/J mice and congenic Sftpd-/- mice at 8, 27 and 80 weeks of age (n = 8/group. An anatomic computational model based on published airway morphometry was developed and Zrs was simulated between 0.5 and 20 Hz. End expiratory pressure dependent changes in airway caliber and recruitment were estimated from mechanical measurements. Tissue elements were simulated using the constant phase model of viscoelasticity. Baseline elastance distribution was estimated in 8-week-old wild type mice, and stochastically varied for each condition based on experimentally measured alteration in elastic fiber composition, alveolar geometry and surfactant composition. Weighing reduction in model error against increasing model complexity allowed for identification of essential features underlying mechanical pathology and their contribution to Zrs. Using a maximum likelihood approach, alteration in lung recruitment and diminished elastic fiber density were shown predictive of mechanical

  9. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Hernández, Yamilé; Yero, Daniel; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M.; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as valuable tools to explore host–pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio), and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans) in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here, we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favor of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host–pathogen interactions. PMID:25699030

  10. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamilé eLópez Hernández

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as a valuate tools to explore host-pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio, and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g. Caenorhabditis elegans in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favour of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host-pathogen interactions.

  11. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Hernández, Yamilé; Yero, Daniel; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as valuable tools to explore host-pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio), and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans) in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here, we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favor of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host-pathogen interactions.

  12. A dual role for the immune response in a mouse model of inflammation-associated lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dougan, Michael; Li, Danan; Neuberg, Donna; Mihm, Martin; Googe, Paul; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Dranoff, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Both principal factors known to cause lung cancer, cigarette smoke and asbestos, induce pulmonary inflammation, and pulmonary inflammation has recently been implicated in several murine models of lung cancer. To further investigate the role of inflammation in the development of lung cancer, we generated mice with combined loss of IFN-γ and the β-common cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3. These immunodeficient mice develop chronic pulmonary in...

  13. A dose rate model predicting radon-induced lung cancer risk in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, W.; Lettner, H. (Salzburg Univ. (Austria). Div. of Biophysics); Crawford-Brown, D.J. (North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been used in inhalation studies as a surrogate to estimate human lung cancer risk following exposure to ambient radon progeny. Deposition, mucociliary clearance and dosimetry for the inhalation of radon progeny in the rat lung have been simulated for a variety of inhalation conditions. A state-vector model for radiation carcinogenesis has then been applied to predict the carcinogenic risk in the rat lung for different doses and dose rates. The model is based on the concepts of initiation and promotion, with the irradiation acting both to damage intercellular structures and to change the state of cells surrounding an initiated cell. Predicted lung cancer incidences show fair agreement with the experimental data. Consistent with the experimental evidence is the inverse dose rate effect observed for intermediate cumulative exposures. (author).

  14. Modeling the effects of surfactant, hardness, and natural organic matter on deposition and mobility of silver nanoparticles in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Min; Heo, Jiyong; Her, Namguk; Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Jang, Min; Yoon, Yeomin

    2016-10-15

    This study aims to provide insights into the mechanisms governing the deposition and retention of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in saturated porous media. Column experiments were conducted with quartz sand under saturated conditions to investigate the deposition kinetics of AgNPs, their mobility at different groundwater hardnesses (10-400 mg/L as CaCO3), and humic acid (HA, 0-50 mg/L as dissolved organic carbon [DOC]). An anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), was used as a dispersing agent to prepare a SDS-AgNPs suspension. The deposition kinetics of AgNPs were highly sensitive to the surfactant concentration, ionic strength, and cation type in solution. The breakthrough curves (BTCs) of SDS-AgNPs suggested that the transport and retention were influenced by groundwater hardness and HA. At low water hardness and high HA, high mobility of SDS-AgNPs was observed in saturated conditions. However, the retention of SDS-AgNPs increased substantially in very hard water with a low concentration of HA, because of a decreased primary energy barrier and the straining effect during the course of transport experiments. A modified clean-bed filtration theory and a two-site kinetic attachment model showed good fits with the BTCs of SDS-AgNPs. The fitted model parameters (katt and kstr) could be used successfully to describe that the retention behaviors were dominated by electrostatic and electrosteric repulsion, based on extended Derjaguin-Landau-Vaerwey-Overbeek calculations.

  15. Sucrose esters as biocompatible surfactants for penetration enhancement: An insight into the mechanism of penetration enhancement studied using stratumcorneum model lipids and Langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todosijević, Marija N; Brezesinski, Gerald; Savić, Snežana D; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2017-03-01

    Up to now, the molecular mechanism of the penetration enhancing effect of sucrose esters (SEs) on stratumcorneum (SC) has not been explained in details. In this study, variety of surface sensitive techniques, including surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms, infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), have been used to investigate interactions between SEs and SC intercellular lipids. A monolayer of the mixture of ceramide AS C18:18, stearic acid and cholesterol in the molar ratio of 1:1:0.7 on an aqueous subphase is a good model to mimic a single layer of intercellular SC lipids. The π-A isotherms of mixed monolayers and parameters derived from the curves demonstrated the interaction between nonionic surfactants such as SEs and SC lipids. With increasing SE concentration, the resultant monolayer films became more fluid and better compressible. IRRAS measurements showed that SEs disordered the acyl chains of SC lipids, and the BAM images demonstrated the modification of the domain structures in SC monolayers. Longer chain-SE has a stronger disordering effect and is better miscible with ceramides in comparison to SE with a shorter hydrophobic part. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the disordering effect of SEs on the biomimetic SC model, pointing out that small changes in the structure of surfactant may have a strong influence on a penetration enhancement of lipophilic drugs through intercellular lipids of skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Exhaled flow monitoring can detect bronchial flap-valve obstruction in a mechanical lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, P H; Serina, E R; Barker, S J

    1995-08-01

    Flap-valve obstruction to expiratory flow (V) in a major bronchus can result from inspissated secretions, blood, or foreign body. During inhalation, increasing airway caliber preserves inspired V past the obstruction; during exhalation, decreasing airway diameter causes airflow obstruction and even frank gas trapping. We reasoned that the resultant sequential, biphasic exhalation of the lungs would be best detected by measuring exhaled V versus time. Accordingly, we designed an airway obstruction element in a mechanical lung model to examine flap-valve bronchial obstruction. A mechanical lung simulator was ventilated with a pressure-limited flow generator, where f = 10/min, tidal volume = 850 mL, and respiratory compliance = 40 mL/cm H2O. Airway V (pneumotachometer) and pressure (P) were digitally sampled for 1 min. Then, the circumference of the diaphragm in a respiratory one-way valve was trimmed to generate unidirectional resistance to expiratory V. Measurement sequences were repeated after this flap-valve was interposed in the right "main-stem bronchus." Integration of airway V versus time generated changes in lung volume. During flap-valve obstruction of the right bronchus, the V-time plot revealed preservation of peak expired flow from the normal lung, followed by retarded and decreased flow from the obstructed right lung. Gas trapping of the obstructed lung occurred during conditions of decreased expiratory time and increased expiratory resistance. Airway P could not differentiate between bronchial and tracheal flap-valve obstruction because P decreased abruptly in both conditions. The flow-volume loop displayed less distinctive changes than the flow-time plot, in part because the flow-volume loop was data (flow) plotted against its time integral (volume), with loss of temporal data. In this mechanical lung model, we conclude that bronchial flap-valve obstruction was best detected by the flow-time plot, which could measure the sequential emptying of the

  17. Electroporation-mediated Delivery of Genes in Rodent Models of Lung Contusion

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Several of the biological processes involved in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome after lung contusion are regulated at a genetic and epigenetic level. Thus, strategies to manipulate gene expression in this context are highly desirable not only to elucidate the mechanisms involved but also to look for potential therapies. In the present chapter, we describe mouse and rat models of inducing blunt thoracic injury followed by electroporation-mediated g...

  18. A Highly Efficient Gene Expression Programming (GEP Model for Auxiliary Diagnosis of Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Yu

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is an important and common cancer that constitutes a major public health problem, but early detection of small cell lung cancer can significantly improve the survival rate of cancer patients. A number of serum biomarkers have been used in the diagnosis of lung cancers; however, they exhibit low sensitivity and specificity.We used biochemical methods to measure blood levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, C-reactive protein (CRP, Na+, Cl-, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA, and neuron specific enolase (NSE in 145 small cell lung cancer (SCLC patients and 155 non-small cell lung cancer and 155 normal controls. A gene expression programming (GEP model and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curves incorporating these biomarkers was developed for the auxiliary diagnosis of SCLC.After appropriate modification of the parameters, the GEP model was initially set up based on a training set of 115 SCLC patients and 125 normal controls for GEP model generation. Then the GEP was applied to the remaining 60 subjects (the test set for model validation. GEP successfully discriminated 281 out of 300 cases, showing a correct classification rate for lung cancer patients of 93.75% (225/240 and 93.33% (56/60 for the training and test sets, respectively. Another GEP model incorporating four biomarkers, including CEA, NSE, LDH, and CRP, exhibited slightly lower detection sensitivity than the GEP model, including six biomarkers. We repeat the models on artificial neural network (ANN, and our results showed that the accuracy of GEP models were higher than that in ANN. GEP model incorporating six serum biomarkers performed by NSCLC patients and normal controls showed low accuracy than SCLC patients and was enough to prove that the GEP model is suitable for the SCLC patients.We have developed a GEP model with high sensitivity and specificity for the auxiliary diagnosis of SCLC. This GEP model has the potential for the wide use for detection of SCLC in less

  19. Flexible polyelectrolyte conformation in the presence of cationic and anionic surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, C. B.; Kuhn, P. S.; Diehl, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we have studied the conformation of flexible polyelectrolyte chains in the presence of cationic and anionic surfactant molecules. We developed a simple theoretical model for the formation of the polyelectrolyte-cationic surfactant complexes and mixed micelles formed by cationic and anionic surfactant molecules, in the framework of the Debye-Hückel-Bjerrum-Manning and Flory theories, with the hydrophobic interaction included explicitly as an effective short-ranged attraction between the surfactant hydrocarbon tails. This simple model allows us to calculate the extension of the polyelectrolyte-cationic surfactant complexes as a function of the anionic surfactant concentration, for different types of cationic and anionic surfactant molecules. A discrete conformational transition from a collapsed state to an elongated coil was found, for all surfactant chain lengths we have considered, in agreement with the experimental observations for the unfolding of ​DNA-cationic surfactant complexes.

  20. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  1. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  2. Surfactants in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanković, Tomislav; Hrenović, Jasna

    2010-03-01

    Surfactants are a diverse group of chemicals that are best known for their wide use in detergents and other cleaning products. After use, residual surfactants are discharged into sewage systems or directly into surface waters, and most of them end up dispersed in different environmental compartments such as soil, water or sediment. The toxic effects of surfactants on various aquatic organisms are well known. In general, surfactants are present in the environment at levels below toxicity and in Croatia below the national limit. Most surfactants are readily biodegradable and their amount is greatly reduced with secondary treatment in wastewater treatment plants. The highest concern is the release of untreated wastewater or wastewater that has undergone primary treatment alone. The discharge of wastewater polluted with massive quantities of surfactants could have serious effects on the ecosystem. Future studies of surfactant toxicities and biodegradation are necessary to withdraw highly toxic and non-biodegradable compounds from commercial use and replace them with more environmentally friendly ones.

  3. Spinodal Decomposition in Mixtures Containing Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenekvitz, J.

    1998-03-01

    Spinodal decomposition in mixtures containing two immiscible liquids (A and B) plus surfactant was investigated using a recently developed (J. Melenkevitz and S. H. Javadpour, J. Chem. Phys., 107, 623 (1997).) 3-component Ginzburg-Landau model. The time dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations governing the evolution of structure were numerically integrated in 2-dimensions. We found the growth rate of the average domain size, R(t), decreased with increasing surfactant concentration over a wide range of relative amounts of A and B. This can be attributed to the surfactant accumulating at the growing interface between the immiscible liquids, which leads to a reduction in the surface tension. At late times, the growth rate was noticeably altered when thermal fluctuations were added to the numerical simulations. In this case, power law behavior was observed for R(t) at late times, R(t) ~ t^α, with the exponent α decreasing as the amount of surfactant increased. The dynamics at early times were determined by linearizing the TDGL equations about a uniformly mixed state. The growth rate at ealry times was found to be strongly dependent on the model parameters describing the surfactant miscibility in A and B and the surfactant strength. Comparison with recent measurements on SBR / PB mixtures with added PB-SBR diblock copolymer will also be presented.

  4. Glucocorticoid Clearance and Metabolite Profiling in an In Vitro Human Airway Epithelium Lung Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Sarkar, Ujjal; Lever, Amanda R; Avram, Michael J; Coppeta, Jonathan R; Wishnok, John S; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of microphysiologic epithelial lung models using human cells in a physiologically relevant microenvironment has the potential to be a powerful tool for preclinical drug development and to improve predictive power regarding in vivo drug clearance. In this study, an in vitro model of the airway comprising human primary lung epithelial cells cultured in a microfluidic platform was used to establish a physiologic state and to observe metabolic changes as a function of glucocorticoid exposure. Evaluation of mucus production rate and barrier function, along with lung-specific markers, demonstrated that the lungs maintained a differentiated phenotype. Initial concentrations of 100 nM hydrocortisone (HC) and 30 nM cortisone (C) were used to evaluate drug clearance and metabolite production. Measurements made using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-mass-accuracy mass spectrometry indicated that HC metabolism resulted in the production of C and dihydrocortisone (diHC). When the airway model was exposed to C, diHC was identified; however, no conversion to HC was observed. Multicompartmental modeling was used to characterize the lung bioreactor data, and pharmacokinetic parameters, including elimination clearance and elimination half-life, were estimated. Polymerse chain reaction data confirmed overexpression of 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11βHSD2) over 11βHSD1, which is biologically relevant to human lung. Faster metabolism was observed relative to a static model on elevated rates of C and diHC formation. Overall, our results demonstrate that this lung airway model has been successfully developed and could interact with other human tissues in vitro to better predict in vivo drug behavior.

  5. Isoforskolin pretreatment attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weimin; Qiang, Dongjin; Zhang, Min; Ma, Limei; Zhang, Yonghui; Qing, Chen; Xu, Yunlong; Zhen, Chunlan; Liu, Jikai; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2011-06-01

    Isoforskolin was isolated from Coleus forskohlii native to Yunnan in China. We hypothesize that isoforskolin pretreatment attenuates acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin). Three acute lung injury models were used: situ perfused rat lung, rat and mouse models of endotoxic shock. Additionally, lipopolysaccharide stimulated proinflammatory cytokine production was evaluated in human mononuclear leukocyte. In situ perfused rat lungs, pre-perfusion with isoforskolin (100, and 200 μM) and dexamethasone (65 μM, positive control) inhibited lipopolysaccharide (10 mg/L) induced increases in lung neutrophil adhesion rate, myeloperoxidase activity, lung weight Wet/Dry ratio, permeability-surface area product value, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels. In rats, pretreatments with isoforskolin (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) and dexamethasone (5mg/kg, i.p.) markedly reduced lipopolysaccharide (6 mg/kg i.v.) induced increases of karyocyte, neutrophil counts and protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and plasma myeloperoxidase activity. Lung histopathology showed that morphologic changes induced by lipopolysaccharide were less pronounced in the isoforskolin and dexamethasone pretreated rats. In mice, 5 mg/kg isoforskolin and dexamethasone caused 100% and 80% survival, respectively, after administration of lipopolysaccharide (62.5mg/kg, i.v., 40% survival if untreated). In human mononuclear leukocyte, isoforskolin (50, 100, and 200 μM) and dexamethasone (10 μM) pre-incubation lowered lipopolysaccharide (2 μg/mL) induced secretion of the cytokine TNF-α, and interleukins (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8. In conclusion, pretreatment with isoforskolin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in several models, and it is involved in down-regulation of inflammatory responses and proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8.

  6. Reproduction and evaluation of a rat model of inhalation lung injury caused by black gunpowder smog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-fan LIU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce and evaluate a rat model of inhalation lung injury caused by black gunpowder smog. Methods The smog composition was analyzed and a rat model of inhalation lung injury was reproduced. Forty two healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal control (NC group and 1h, 2h, 6h, 24h, 48h and 96h after inhalation group (n=6. The arterial blood gas, wet to dry weight ratio (W/D of lung, leukocyte count, and protein concentration in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF were determined. Macroscopic and microscopic changes in lung tissue were observed. Results The composition of black gunpowder smog was composed mainly of CO2 and CO, and their concentrations remained stable within 12 minutes. Smog inhalation caused a significant hypoxemia, the concentration of blood COHb reached a peak value 1h, and the W/D of lung reached peak value 2h after inhalation (P<0.05. The amount of leukocytes and content of protein in BALF increased significantly within 24h after inhalation (P<0.05. Histopathological observation showed diffuse hemorrhage, edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in lung tissue as manifestations of acute lung injury, and the injury did not recover at 96h after inhalation. Conclusion The rat model of inhalation lung injury can be reproduced using black gunpowder smog, and it has the advantages of its readiness for reproduction, reliability and stability, and it could be used for the experiment of inhalation injury in a battlefield environment.

  7. Metathesis depolymerizable surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Gregory M.; Wheeler, David R.; Loy, Douglas A.; Simmons, Blake A.; Long, Timothy M.; McElhanon, James R.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Staiger, Chad L.

    2008-04-15

    A class of surfactant molecules whose structure includes regularly spaced unsaturation in the tail group and thus, can be readily decomposed by ring-closing metathesis, and particularly by the action of a transition metal catalyst, to form small molecule products. These small molecules are designed to have increased volatility and/or enhanced solubility as compared to the original surfactant molecule and are thus easily removed by solvent extraction or vacuum extraction at low temperature. By producing easily removable decomposition products, the surfactant molecules become particularly desirable as template structures for preparing meso- and microstructural materials with tailored properties.

  8. Early Impairment of Lung Mechanics in a Murine Model of Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriarte, Juan J.; Meirelles, Thayna; Gorbenko del Blanco, Darya; Nonaka, Paula N.; Campillo, Noelia; Sarri, Elisabet; Navajas, Daniel; Egea, Gustavo; Farré, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Early morbidity and mortality in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) -a connective tissue disease caused by mutations in fibrillin-1 gene- are mainly caused by aorta aneurysm and rupture. However, the increase in the life expectancy of MFS patients recently achieved by reparatory surgery promotes clinical manifestations in other organs. Although some studies have reported respiratory alterations in MFS, our knowledge of how this connective tissue disease modifies lung mechanics is scarce. Hence, we assessed whether the stiffness of the whole lung and of its extracellular matrix (ECM) is affected in a well-characterized MFS mouse model (FBN1C1039G/+). The stiffness of the whole lung and of its ECM were measured by conventional mechanical ventilation and atomic force microscopy, respectively. We studied 5-week and 9-month old mice, whose ages are representative of early and late stages of the disease. At both ages, the lungs of MFS mice were significantly more compliant than in wild type (WT) mice. By contrast, no significant differences were found in local lung ECM stiffness. Moreover, histopathological lung evaluation showed a clear emphysematous-like pattern in MFS mice since alveolar space enlargement was significantly increased compared with WT mice. These data suggest that the mechanism explaining the increased lung compliance in MFS is not a direct consequence of reduced ECM stiffness, but an emphysema-like alteration in the 3D structural organization of the lung. Since lung alterations in MFS are almost fully manifested at an early age, it is suggested that respiratory monitoring could provide early biomarkers for diagnosis and/or follow-up of patients with the Marfan syndrome. PMID:27003297

  9. A numerical study of gas transport in human lung models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Long; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2005-04-01

    Stable Xenon (Xe) gas has been used as an imaging agent for decades in its radioactive form, is chemically inert, and has been used as a ventilation tracer in its non radioactive form during computerized tomography (CT) imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using hyperpolarized Helium (He) gas and Xe has also emerged as a powerful tool to study regional lung structure and function. However, the present state of knowledge regarding intra-bronchial Xe and He transport properties is incomplete. As the use of these gases rapidly advances, it has become critically important to understand the nature of their transport properties and to, in the process, better understand the role of gas density in general in determining regional distribution of respiratory gases. In this paper, we applied the custom developed characteristic-Galerkin finite element method, which solves the three-dimensional (3D) incompressible variable-density Navier-Stokes equations, to study the transport of Xe and He in the CT-based human lung geometries, especially emulating the washin and washout processes. The realistic lung geometries are segmented and reconstructed from CT images as part of an effort to build a normative atlas (NIH HL-064368) documenting airway geometry over 4 decades of age in healthy and disease-state adult humans. The simulation results show that the gas transport process depends on the gas density and the body posture. The implications of these results on the difference between washin and washout time constants are discussed.

  10. The Optimization of Aniline Adsorption from Aqueous Solutions by Raw Bentonite and Bentonite Modified with Cationic Surfactants Using the Taguchi Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Taherkhani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objectives: Aniline is an organic compound widely used in various industries. The release of this compound has had various environmental impacts. Thus, the assessment of efficient and practical methods for the removal of aniline from wastewater of these industries is remarkable. Taguchi model is a model for the analysis of experiments, that predicts both the effects of each factors and the optimum level of them using a certain number of experiment. The purpose of this study was the optimization of aniline adsorption on the raw and modified bentonite with a cationic surfactant using Taguchi model. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study, the raw bentonite and modified bentonite was prepared in a few steps. Then, 4 main factors (i.e. pollutant concentration, contact time, pH, and adsorbent dosage on 4 levels were selected by Matrix L16 trials and the experiments were conducted in this matrix. The factors were also ranked based on the R-value. Then , the data were analyzed with Minitab 17 software. Finally, the adsorption of aniline on raw and modified bentonite was determined in optimal conditions. Results: The optimization of adsorption process using Taguchi model showed that the factors of importance for optimizing respectively were: contact time of 360 minutes, pH =10 pH, ani-line initial concentration of 300 mg/L and adsorbent dosages of 40 g/L. The maximum ad-sorption of aniline onto raw bentonite and modified bentonite with cationic surfactant in op-timal conditions were determined 81.86 and 8.75, respectively. The results revealed that Freundlich isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided a better ?t to the ex-perimental data. Conclusion: The results showed that the bentonite modified with cationic surfactant is efficient in the removal of aniline. At the same time, since bentonite is cheap and easily accessible ,it is considered a desirable adsorbant. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2015; 22 (1:55-64

  11. Predictive Accuracy of the PanCan Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Model -External Validation based on CT from the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde M.; van Riel, Sarah J.; Saghir, Zaigham

    2015-01-01

    ; in fact opposing effects of sex were observed in the two cohorts. Thus, female sex appeared to lower the risk (p = 0.047 and p = 0.040) in the DLCST. Conclusions: High risk discrimination was validated in the DLCST cohort, mainly determined by nodule size. Age and family history of lung cancer were......Objectives: Lung cancer risk models should be externally validated to test generalizability and clinical usefulness. The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST) is a population-based prospective cohort study, used to assess the discriminative performances of the PanCan models. Methods: From...... used to evaluate risk discrimination. Results: AUCs of 0.826–0.870 were found for DLCST data based on PanCan risk prediction models. In the DLCST, age and family history were significant predictors (p = 0.001 and p = 0.013). Female sex was not confirmed to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer...

  12. Synthesis and characterization of gold graphene composite with dyes as model substrates for decolorization: a surfactant free laser ablation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Siddhardha, R S; Lakshman Kumar, V; Kaniyoor, Adarsh; Sai Muthukumar, V; Ramaprabhu, S; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, A M; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2014-12-10

    A facile surfactant free laser ablation mediated synthesis (LAMS) of gold-graphene composite is reported here. The material was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, powdered X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Zeta potential measurements and UV-Visible spectroscopic techniques. The as-synthesized gold-graphene composite was effectively utilized as catalyst for decolorization of 4 important textile and laser dyes. The integration of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with high surface area graphene has enhanced the catalytic activity of AuNPs. This enhanced activity is attributed to the synergistic interplay of pristine gold's electronic relay and π-π stacking of graphene with the dyes. This is evident when the Rhodamine B (RB) reduction rate of the composite is nearly twice faster than that of commercial citrate capped AuNPs of similar size. In case of Methylene blue (MB) the rate of reduction is 17,000 times faster than uncatalyzed reaction. This synthetic method opens door to laser ablation based fabrication of metal catalysts on graphene for improved performance without the aid of linkers and surfactants.

  13. Airflow in a Multiscale Subject-Specific Breathing Human Lung Model

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A; Tawhai, Merryn H; Lin, Ching-Long

    2013-01-01

    The airflow in a subject-specific breathing human lung is simulated with a multiscale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) lung model. The three-dimensional (3D) airway geometry beginning from the mouth to about 7 generations of airways is reconstructed from the multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) image at the total lung capacity (TLC). Along with the segmented lobe surfaces, we can build an anatomically-consistent one-dimensional (1D) airway tree spanning over more than 20 generations down to the terminal bronchioles, which is specific to the CT resolved airways and lobes (J Biomech 43(11): 2159-2163, 2010). We then register two lung images at TLC and the functional residual capacity (FRC) to specify subject-specific CFD flow boundary conditions and deform the airway surface mesh for a breathing lung simulation (J Comput Phys 244:168-192, 2013). The 1D airway tree bridges the 3D CT-resolved airways and the registration-derived regional ventilation in the lung parenchyma, thus a multiscale model. Larg...

  14. RAGE/NF-κB signaling mediates lipopolysaccharide induced acute lung injury in neonate rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhong; Wu, Rong; Tian, Yian; Yu, Min; Tang, Yun; Cheng, Huaipin; Tian, Zhaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to induce acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Accumulating data suggest the crucial role of RAGE in the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. However, the mechanism by which RAGE mediates inflammatory lung injury in the neonates remains elusive. In this study we established LPS-induced ALI model in neonate rats, and investigated the role of RAGE/NF-κB signaling in mediating ALI. We found that RAGE antibody or bortezomib reduced LPS-induced histopathological abnormalities in the lung and lung damage score. RAGE antibody or bortezomib also reduced TNF-α level in both serum and BALF of the rats. Furthermore, RAGE antibody or bortezomib significantly reduced LPS-induced upregulation of RAGE and NF-κB expression in the lung. In conclusion, we established ALI model in neonate rats to demonstrate that LPS induced inflammatory lung injury via RAGE/NF-κB signaling. Interference with RAGE/NF-κB signaling is a potential approach to prevent and treat sepsis-related ALI/ARDS.

  15. A 4DCT imaging-based breathing lung model with relative hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Choi, Sanghun; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2016-12-01

    To reproduce realistic airway motion and airflow, the authors developed a deforming lung computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model based on four-dimensional (4D, space and time) dynamic computed tomography (CT) images. A total of 13 time points within controlled tidal volume respiration were used to account for realistic and irregular lung motion in human volunteers. Because of the irregular motion of 4DCT-based airways, we identified an optimal interpolation method for airway surface deformation during respiration, and implemented a computational solid mechanics-based moving mesh algorithm to produce smooth deforming airway mesh. In addition, we developed physiologically realistic airflow boundary conditions for both models based on multiple images and a single image. Furthermore, we examined simplified models based on one or two dynamic or static images. By comparing these simplified models with the model based on 13 dynamic images, we investigated the effects of relative hysteresis of lung structure with respect to lung volume, lung deformation, and imaging methods, i.e., dynamic vs. static scans, on CFD-predicted pressure drop. The effect of imaging method on pressure drop was 24 percentage points due to the differences in airflow distribution and airway geometry.

  16. Angiogenesis inhibition using an oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing endostatin in a murine lung cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Jonathan M; Schmitt, Anthony D; McGinn, Christopher M; Fuchs, Bryan C; Kuruppu, Darshini; Tanabe, Kenneth K; Lanuti, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Herpes-mediated viral oncolysis alone is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors. In this study we used a replication conditional, endostatin-expressing herpes simplex virus-1 mutant (HSV-Endo) in a murine lung cancer model. We hypothesized that the anti-angiogenic action of endostatin would improve upon the oncolytic effect of HSV-1. HSV-Endo was evaluated in a pulmonary metastases and orthotopic flank model, where there was significantly less tumor burden and reduced microvessel density compared to a control virus. Endostatin expression appears to improve the anti-tumor effect of HSV-1 in a lung cancer model.

  17. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Imbibition in an originally oil-wet 2D capillary is the fastest in the case of Alf-38 and slowest in the case of DTAB (among the surfactants studied). Force of adhesion studies and contact angle measurements show that greater wettability alteration is possible with these anionic surfactants than the cationic surfactant studied. The water imbibition rate does not increase monotonically with an increase in the surfactant concentration. A numerical model has been developed that fits the rate of imbibition. Plans for the next quarter include conducting simulation and imbibition studies.

  18. A novel dual ex vivo lung perfusion technique improves immediate outcomes in an experimental model of lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y; Noda, K; Isse, K; Tobita, K; Maniwa, Y; Bhama, J K; D'Cunha, J; Bermudez, C A; Luketich, J D; Shigemura, N

    2015-05-01

    The lungs are dually perfused by the pulmonary artery and the bronchial arteries. This study aimed to test the feasibility of dual-perfusion techniques with the bronchial artery circulation and pulmonary artery circulation synchronously perfused using ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) and evaluate the effects of dual-perfusion on posttransplant lung graft function. Using rat heart-lung blocks, we developed a dual-perfusion EVLP circuit (dual-EVLP), and compared cellular metabolism, expression of inflammatory mediators, and posttransplant graft function in lung allografts maintained with dual-EVLP, standard-EVLP, or cold static preservation. The microvasculature in lung grafts after transplant was objectively evaluated using microcomputed tomography angiography. Lung grafts subjected to dual-EVLP exhibited significantly better lung graft function with reduced proinflammatory profiles and more mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to better posttransplant function and compliance, as compared with standard-EVLP or static cold preservation. Interestingly, lung grafts maintained on dual-EVLP exhibited remarkably increased microvasculature and perfusion as compared with lungs maintained on standard-EVLP. Our results suggest that lung grafts can be perfused and preserved using dual-perfusion EVLP techniques that contribute to better graft function by reducing proinflammatory profiles and activating mitochondrial respiration. Dual-EVLP also yields better posttransplant graft function through increased microvasculature and better perfusion of the lung grafts after transplantation. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties.

  20. Modeling of deposition and clearance of inhaled Ni compounds in the human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, T H; Yu, C P; Oberdörster, G

    1999-08-01

    By extrapolation from the rat study, a mathematical model of deposition, clearance, and retention kinetics for inhaled Ni compounds (high-temperature (green) NiO, Ni(3)S(2), and NiSO(4). 6H(2)O) in the alveolar region of the human lung has been developed. For human deposition, an updated version of an earlier model (C. P. Yu and C. K. Diu, 1982, Am. Ind. Hyg. Assoc. J.) was used in this study. Because of the profound differences in physiological and ventilation conditions between humans and rats, humans were found to have a higher alveolar deposition fraction than rats when exposed to the same Ni compounds. However, when normalized to the lung weight, the deposition rate per gram of lung in humans is much smaller than in rats. In the development of a clearance model, a single-compartment model in the lung was used and a general assumption was made that the clearance of the insoluble and moderately soluble nickel compounds (high-temperature (green) NiO and Ni(3)S(2), respectively) depends highly on the volume of retained particles in the lungs. As for the highly soluble nickel compound (NiSO(4). 6H(2)O), the clearance rate coefficient was assumed to depend on the retained particle mass and total alveolar surface. These clearance rate coefficients were extrapolated from the rat data. The retention half-times for high temperature (green) NiO and Ni(3)S(2) particles in humans were found to be much longer than in rats, whereas the retention half-time for NiSO(4). 6H(2)O particles was about the same for both species. The lung burden results in humans for various exposure conditions are predicted and the equivalent exposure concentrations for humans which lead to the same lung burdens found in rats were calculated.

  1. Quantification by SIFT-MS of acetaldehyde released by lung cells in a 3D model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Abigail V; Chippendale, Thomas W E; Yang, Ying; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, David; Sulé-Suso, Josep

    2013-01-07

    Our previous studies have shown that both lung cancer cells and non-malignant lung cells release acetaldehyde in vitro. However, data from other laboratories have produced conflicting results. Furthermore, all these studies have been carried out in 2D models which are less physiological cell growth systems when compared to 3D models. Therefore, we have carried out further work on the release of acetaldehyde by lung cells in 3D collagen hydrogels. Lung cancer cells CALU-1 and non-malignant lung cells NL20 were seeded in these hydrogels at different cell concentrations and the release of acetaldehyde was measured with the Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry (SIFT-MS) technique. The data obtained showed that the amount of acetaldehyde released by both cell types grown in a 3D model is higher when compared to that of the same cells grown in 2D models. More importantly, acetaldehyde from the headspace of lung cancer cells could be measured even at a low cell concentration (10(5) cells per hydrogel). The differential of acetaldehyde release could be, depending on the cell concentration, more than 3 fold higher for cancer cells when compared to non-malignant lung cells. This pilot study is the first to study acetaldehyde emission from albeit only two cell types cultured in 3D scaffolds. Clearly, from such limited data the behaviour of other cell types and of tumour cells in vivo cannot be predicted with confidence. Nevertheless, this work represents another step in the search for volatile biomarkers of tumour cells, the ultimate goal of which is to exploit volatile compounds in exhaled breath and other biological fluids as biomarkers of tumours in vivo.

  2. Application of artificial neural network model combined with four biomarkers in auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoran; Yang, Yongli; Tan, Shanjuan; Wang, Sihua; Feng, Xiaolei; Cui, Liuxin; Feng, Feifei; Yu, Songcheng; Wang, Wei; Wu, Yongjun

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the application of artificial neural network model in the auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer and compare the effects of back-propagation (BP) neural network with Fisher discrimination model for lung cancer screening by the combined detections of four biomarkers of p16, RASSF1A and FHIT gene promoter methylation levels and the relative telomere length. Real-time quantitative methylation-specific PCR was used to detect the levels of three-gene promoter methylation, and real-time PCR method was applied to determine the relative telomere length. BP neural network and Fisher discrimination analysis were used to establish the discrimination diagnosis model. The levels of three-gene promoter methylation in patients with lung cancer were significantly higher than those of the normal controls. The values of Z(P) in two groups were 2.641 (0.008), 2.075 (0.038) and 3.044 (0.002), respectively. The relative telomere lengths of patients with lung cancer (0.93 ± 0.32) were significantly lower than those of the normal controls (1.16 ± 0.57), t = 4.072, P neural network were 0.670 (0.569-0.761) and 0.760 (0.664-0.840). The AUC of BP neural network was higher than that of Fisher discrimination analysis, and Z(P) was 0.76. Four biomarkers are associated with lung cancer. BP neural network model for the prediction of lung cancer is better than Fisher discrimination analysis, and it can provide an excellent and intelligent diagnosis tool for lung cancer.

  3. Inactivation of pulmonary surfactant due to serum-inhibited adsorption and reversal by hydrophilic polymers: experimental

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taeusch, H William; de la Serna, Jorge Bernardino; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2005-01-01

    The rate of change of surface pressure, pi, in a Langmuir trough following the deposition of surfactant suspensions on subphases containing serum, with or without polymers, is used to model a likely cause of surfactant inactivation in vivo: inhibition of surfactant adsorption due to competitive...... adsorption of surface active serum proteins. Aqueous suspensions of native porcine surfactant, organic extracts of native surfactant, and the clinical surfactants Curosurf, Infasurf, and Survanta spread on buffered subphases increase the surface pressure, pi, to approximately 40 mN/m within 2 min....... The variation with concentration, temperature, and mode of spreading confirmed Brewster angle microscopy observations that subphase to surface adsorption of surfactant is the dominant form of surfactant transport to the interface. However (with the exception of native porcine surfactant), similar rapid...

  4. Edaravone attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury by inhibiting oxidative stress in a canine lung transplantation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jin-zhi; SHEN Bao-zhong; LI Ye; ZHANG Tong; XU Wan-hai; LIU Xiao-wei; LU Hong-guang

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous reports have confirmed that edaravone has protective effects against ischemia-reperfusion(IR) injury of many organs.In this study,we investigated the effect of edaravone on preventing IR injury of the lung in a canine lung transplantation model. Methods Twelve weight-matched pairs of random-bred dogs were randomized into two groups.Within each pair,one dog served as donor and the other as recipient.In the study group,prostaglandin EI(PGEl)(8 μg/kg)was injected into the donor pulmonary artery(PA)before occlusion and the donor lungs were flushed with 1.0L of LPD solution containing edaravone(10mg/kg)and stored in the same LPD solution at a temperature of 1.C for 8 hours.The left single lung transplantation was then performed and recipients received intravenous injection with edaravone l 1 0 mg/kg)at the onset of reperfusion.In the control group,edaravone was substituted by the same volume of sterile saline solution.Another six dogs were obtained as normal control group in which left lungs were dissected after thoracotomy without an IR injury.One hour after repeffusion.or after dissection of the left lung,the right lung was excluded from peffusion and ventilation after which,cardiopulmonary parameters were measured.Wet/dry ratios,malondiaIdehyde(MDA)and myeloperoxidase (MPO)levels were assessed and histological analysis of lung tissue performed at the same time.Results All animals survived until the end of the experiment.The study group showed significantly decreased wet/dry ratios(treated:(74.1±4.2)%vs control:(86.8±5.2)%,P<0.01),MDA levels(treated:0.50±0.08 vs control:0.88±0.15,P <0.01)and MPO activity(treated:0.23±0.05 vs control:0.43±0.07,P

  5. Theoretical Models for the Quantification of Lung Injury Using Ventilation and Perfusion Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Brook

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes two approaches to modelling lung disease: one based on a multi-compartment statistical model with a log normal distribution of ventilation perfusion ratio (V˙/Q˙ values; and the other on a bifurcating tree which emulates the anatomical structure of the lung. In the statistical model, the distribution becomes bimodal, when the V˙/Q˙ values of a randomly selected number of compartments are reduced by 85% to simulate lung disease. For the bifurcating tree model a difference in flow to the left and right branches coupled with a small random variation in flow ratio between generations results in a log normal distribution of flows in the terminal branches. Restricting flow through branches within the tree to simulate lung disease transforms this log normal distribution to a bi-modal one. These results are compatible with those obtained from experiments using the multiple inert gas elimination technique, where log normal distributions of V˙/Q˙ ratio become bimodal in the presence of lung disease.

  6. Lung and Intestine: A Specific Link in an Ulcerative Colitis Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To investigate the link and mechanisms between intestine and lung in the ulcerative colitis (UC rat model. Materials and Methods. We used the UC rat model by immunological sensitization combined with local 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS in 50% ethanol enema, observed dynamically animal general state and body weight, examined the histological and functional changes in the colon, lung, liver, and kidney tissues, and detected microvascular endothelium response towards inflammation characterized with the expression of iNOS, TXB2, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A in the colon and lung tissue. Results. Pulmonary function results suggested ventilator disorder, and pathological findings showed interstitial pneumonia. There were no significant changes in the liver and kidney function and histopathology. The colon and lung tissue iNOS, TXB2, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and VEGF-A expression of the model rats was significantly higher than the normal rats at both time points. Conclusions. Our study is the first to demonstrate the close association between the large intestine and lung in the immune-TNBS-ethanol-induced UC rat model. Different organs and tissues with the same embryonic origin may share the same pathological specificities in a disease. The present study provided a new way of thinking for pathological changes in clinical complex diseases manifested with multiorgan damage.

  7. Effects of silicon surfactant in rigid polyurethane foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The rigid polyurethane foams (RPUFs have been fabricated from high functional crude 4,4’-di-phenylmethane diisocyanate (CMDI and polypropylene glycols (PPGs for a wide range of surfactant concentration with an environmently friendly blowing agent (HFC 365mfc. Cream time, gel time, and tack-free time increased with the addition of surfactant. Foam density decreased rapidly to a minimum at 0.5 pphp (part per hundred polyol surfactant due to the increased blowing efficiency with surfactant. Surface tension rapidly decreased to an asymptotic value at 2 pphp surfactant. In accordance with this, cell size decreased and closed cell content increased rapidly to constant values at low surfactant concentrations (<1 pphp. The decrease of cell size was accompanied by the decrease of thermal conductivity to give a linear relatiohship between the two implying that the series model of heat transfer is applicable.

  8. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifart, Carola; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf; Müller, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus; von Wichert, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  9. Metabolism of exogenously administered natural surfactant in the newborn lamb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatz, T.; Ikegami, M.; Jobe, A.

    1982-09-01

    (/sup 3/H)-Palmitate labeled natural lamb surfactant and free (/sup 14/C)-choline were mixed with the lung fluid of 11 term lambs at cesarean section, before the first breath. After receiving the isotope, the lambs were delivered, allowed to breathe spontaneously, and were subsequently sacrificed from 5 min to 96 h of age. Alveolar washes, lung homogenates, microsomal and lamellar body fractions of lungs, and pulmonary alveolar macrophages were examined for the presence of labeled phosphatidylcholine. Analysis of the labeled natural surfactant kinetic data revealed an apparent t 1/2 of phosphatidylcholine in the whole lung of 6.0 days. This half-life can be interpreted only as a rough estimate. Appearance of considerable (/sup 3/H) labeled phosphatidylcholine in the lung homogenates demonstrated uptake of phosphatidylcholine from alveoli into lung tissue. The surfactant-associated label in homogenates was localized preferentially to lamellar body fractions. Some of the administered (/sup 14/C)-choline appeared in phosphatidylcholine. Almost all of this labeled phosphatidylcholine was associated with the homogenate. Extremely small % of administered (3H) and (14C) were found in pulmonary alveolar macrophages.

  10. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Developiing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b...biomarkers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis

  11. Characterization of free breathing patterns with 5D lung motion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Tianyu; Lu Wei; Yang Deshan; Mutic, Sasa; Noel, Camille E.; Parikh, Parag J.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the quiet respiration breathing motion model parameters for lung cancer and nonlung cancer patients. Methods: 49 free breathing patient 4DCT image datasets (25 scans, cine mode) were collected with simultaneous quantitative spirometry. A cross-correlation registration technique was employed to track the lung tissue motion between scans. The registration results were applied to a lung motion model: X-vector=X-vector{sub 0}+{alpha}-vector{beta}-vector f, where X-vector is the position of a piece of tissue located at reference position X-vector{sub 0} during a reference breathing phase (zero tidal volume v, zero airflow f). {alpha}-vector is a parameter that characterizes the motion due to air filling (motion as a function of tidal volume v) and {beta}-vector is the parameter that accounts for the motion due to the imbalance of dynamical stress distributions during inspiration and exhalation that causes lung motion hysteresis (motion as a function of airflow f). The parameters {alpha}-vector and {beta}-vector together provide a quantitative characterization of breathing motion that inherently includes the complex hysteresis interplay. The {alpha}-vector and {beta}-vector distributions were examined for each patient to determine overall general patterns and interpatient pattern variations. Results: For 44 patients, the greatest values of |{alpha}-vector| were observed in the inferior and posterior lungs. For the rest of the patients, |{alpha}-vector| reached its maximum in the anterior lung in three patients and the lateral lung in two patients. The hysteresis motion {beta}-vector had greater variability, but for the majority of patients, |{beta}-vector| was largest in the lateral lungs. Conclusions: This is the first report of the three-dimensional breathing motion model parameters for a large cohort of patients. The model has the potential for noninvasively predicting lung motion. The majority of patients exhibited similar |{alpha}-vector| maps

  12. Modeling lung motion using consistent image registration in four-dimensional computed tomography for radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Song, Joo Hyun; Christensen, Gary E.; Parikh, Parag J.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel A.

    2006-03-01

    Respiratory motion is a significant source of error in conformal radiation therapy for the thorax and upper abdomen. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) has been proposed to reduce the uncertainty caused by internal respiratory organ motion. A 4D CT dataset is retrospectively reconstructed at various stages of a respiratory cycle. An important tool for 4D treatment planning is deformable image registration. An inverse consistent image registration is used to model lung motion from one respiratory stage to another during a breathing cycle. This diffeomorphic registration jointly estimates the forward and reverse transformations providing more accurate correspondence between two images. Registration results and modeled motions in the lung are shown for three example respiratory stages. The results demonstrate that the consistent image registration satisfactorily models the large motions in the lung, providing a useful tool for 4D planning and delivering.

  13. The role of pneumolysin in mediating lung damage in a lethal pneumococcal pneumonia murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirofski Liise-Anne

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intranasal inoculation of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 serotype 2 causes fatal pneumonia in mice. The cytotoxic and inflammatory properties of pneumolysin (PLY have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods To examine the role of PLY in this experimental model we performed ELISA assays for PLY quantification. The distribution patterns of PLY and apoptosis were established by immunohistochemical detection of PLY, caspase-9 activity and TUNEL assay on tissue sections from mice lungs at various times, and the results were quantified with image analysis. Inflammatory and apoptotic cells were also quantified on lung tissue sections from antibody treated mice. Results In bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL, total PLY was found at sublytic concentrations which were located in alveolar macrophages and leukocytes. The bronchoalveolar epithelium was PLY-positive, while the vascular endothelium was not PLY reactive. The pattern and extension of cellular apoptosis was similar. Anti-PLY antibody treatment decreased the lung damage and the number of apoptotic and inflammatory cells in lung tissues. Conclusion The data strongly suggest that in vivo lung injury could be due to the pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory activity of PLY, rather than its cytotoxic activity. PLY at sublytic concentrations induces lethal inflammation in lung tissues and is involved in host cell apoptosis, whose effects are important to pathogen survival.

  14. Immunogenetic basis of environmental lung disease: Lessons from the berylliosis model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saltini, C.; Richeldi, L. [Univ. di Modena, Dept. di Scienze Mediche, Modena (Italy); Amicosante, M. [Univ. di Roma `Tor Vergata`, Dept. di Biologia, Roma (Italy); Franchi, A. [Univ. de Modena, Dept. Medicina Interna, Modena (Italy); Lombardi, G. [Hammersmith Hospital, Dept. of Immunology, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-01

    The role of genetic factors has been hypothesized in the pathogenesis of a number of chronic inflammatory lung diseases. The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus on human chromosome 6 have been identified as important determinants in diseases caused both by inorganic and organic compounds such as beryllium, gold, acid anhydrides, isocyanates and grass pollens. Since many environmental factors are the determinants of the immunopathogenesis of asthma, pulmonary granulomatous disorders, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and fibrotic lung disorders, an understanding of the interaction between environmental factors is crucial to epidemiology, prevention and treatment of these disorders. Berylliosis is an environmental chronic inflammatory disorder of the lung caused by inhalation of beryllium dusts. A human leukocyte antigen class II marker (HLA-DP Glu69) has been found to be strongly associated with the disease. In in vitro studies, the gene has been shown to play a direct role in the immunopathogenesis of the disease. In human studies, the gene has been shown to confer increased susceptibility to beryllium in exposed workers, thus suggesting that HLA gene markers may be used as epidemiological probes to identify population groups at higher risk of environmental lung diseases, to identify environmental levels of lung immunotoxicants that would be safe for the entire population and the prevent disease risk associated with occupation, manufactured products and the environment. Studies on the associations between human leukocyte antigens and chronic inflammatory lung disorders are reviewed in the context of the berylliosis model. (au) 123 refs.

  15. The role of surfactant treatment in preterm infants and term newborns with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirbelauer, J; Speer, C P

    2009-05-01

    Surfactant treatment in preterm infants and term newborns with (acute respiratory distress syndrome) ARDS-like severe respiratory failure has become part of an individualized treatment strategy in many intensive care units around the world. These babies constitute heterogeneous groups of gestational ages, lung maturity, as well as of the underlying disease processes and postnatal interventions. The pathophysiology of respiratory failure in preterm infants is characterized by a combination of primary surfactant deficiency and surfactant inactivation as a result of plasma proteins leaking into the airways from areas of epithelial disruption and injury. Various pre- and postnatal factors, such as exposure to chorioamnionitis, pneumonia, sepsis and asphyxia, induce an injurious inflammatory response in the lungs of preterm infants, which may subsequently affect surfactant function, synthesis and alveolar stability. Surfactant inactivation--and dysfunction--is also a hallmark in newborns with meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS), pneumonia and other disorders affecting the pulmonary function. Although for the majority of suggested indications no data from randomized controlled trials exist, a surfactant replacement that counterbalances surfactant inactivation seems to improve oxygenation and lung function in many babies with ARDS without any apparent negative side effects. Newborns with MAS will definitely benefit from a reduced need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Clinical experience seems to justify surfactant treatment in neonates with ARDS.

  16. Method of Isolated Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion in a Rat Model: Lessons Learned from Developing a Rat EVLP Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kevin; Bobba, Christopher; Eren, Emre; Spata, Tyler; Tadres, Malak; Hayes,, Don; Black, Sylvester M.

    2015-01-01

    The number of acceptable donor lungs available for lung transplantation is severely limited due to poor quality. Ex-Vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP) has allowed lung transplantation in humans to become more readily available by enabling the ability to assess organs and expand the donor pool. As this technology expands and improves, the ability to potentially evaluate and improve the quality of substandard lungs prior to transplant is a critical need. In order to more rigorously evaluate these approaches, a reproducible animal model needs to be established that would allow for testing of improved techniques and management of the donated lungs as well as to the lung-transplant recipient. In addition, an EVLP animal model of associated pathologies, e.g., ventilation induced lung injury (VILI), would provide a novel method to evaluate treatments for these pathologies. Here, we describe the development of a rat EVLP lung program and refinements to this method that allow for a reproducible model for future expansion. We also describe the application of this EVLP system to model VILI in rat lungs. The goal is to provide the research community with key information and “pearls of wisdom”/techniques that arose from trial and error and are critical to establishing an EVLP system that is robust and reproducible. PMID:25741794

  17. The orthotopic left lung transplantation in rats: a valuable experimental model without using cuff technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-chun; Wang, Dian-jun; Yin, Ni; Yin, Bang-liang; Fang, Rui-xin; Xiao, Xue-jun; Wu, Yue-Heng

    2008-11-01

    Advances in the field of clinical lung transplantation must rely on observations made in animal models. In this study, we introduced a new procedure in the rat, orthotopic left lung transplantation without using the cuff technique, in which the donor pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein, and membranous parts of the bronchus were anastomosed continuously in the lumen using a mattress suture under a surgical microscope; meanwhile, a second, low-pressure perfusion through the pulmonary artery and turnover of the vascular stump were made, which also made the vessel anastomosis easy. Transplantations were completed in 68 rats (89.5%), the mean time used for suturing the left lung hilar structure was 23.5 +/- 4.6 min. All lung grafts had good life-sustaining function because of there being no cuff-induced granulation tissue in bronchial anastomotic stoma, and three out of 12 allografts were observed with active bronchiolitis obliterans lesions at 8 weeks after transplantation. This model is a simple, valuable experimental model for studying lung transplantation and new therapies for preventing acute or chronic rejection.

  18. Dynamic lung modeling and tumor tracking using deformable image registration and geometric smoothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongjie; Jing, Yiming; Liang, Xinghua; Xu, Guoliang; Dong, Lei

    2012-09-01

    A greyscale-based fully automatic deformable image registration algorithm, based on an optical flow method together with geometric smoothing, is developed for dynamic lung modeling and tumor tracking. In our computational processing pipeline, the input data is a set of 4D CT images with 10 phases. The triangle mesh of the lung model is directly extracted from the more stable exhale phase (Phase 5). In addition, we represent the lung surface model in 3D volumetric format by applying a signed distance function and then generate tetrahedral meshes. Our registration algorithm works for both triangle and tetrahedral meshes. In CT images, the intensity value reflects the local tissue density. For each grid point, we calculate the displacement from the static image (phase 5) to match with the moving image (other phases) by using merely intensity values of the CT images. The optical flow computation is followed by a regularization of the deformation field using geometric smoothing. Lung volume change and the maximum lung tissue movement are used to evaluate the accuracy of the application. Our testing results suggest that the application of deformable registration algorithm is an effective way for delineating and tracking tumor motion in image-guided radiotherapy.

  19. A model of fluid, erythrocyte, and solute transport in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, R J; Tack, G; Harris, T R

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model of fluid, solute, and red cell transport in the lung has been developed that includes the effects of simultaneous changes in lung vascular and interstitial volumes. The model provides separate arterial, microvascular, and venous pulmonary regions and a systemic vascular region in addition to a pulmonary interstitial compartment. Pressure, volume, hematocrit, flow, and concentration of up to 12 solutes and tracers can be computed in each compartment. Computer code is written in the C programming language, with Microsoft Excel serving as a user interface. Implementation is currently on PC-486 microcomputer systems, but the core program can easily be moved to other computer systems. The user can select different models for the blood-interstitial barrier (e.g., multiple pore, nonlinear Patlak equation), osmotic pressure-concentration relationships (e.g., Nitta, Navar-Navar), solute reflection coefficients interstitial macromolecule exclusion, or lymph barrier characteristics. Each model parameter or a combination of parameters can be altered with time in a predetermined fashion. The model is particularly useful in interpreting lung experimental data where simultaneous changes occur in vascular and extravascular compartments. Several applications are presented and discussed, including interpretation of optical filtration experiments, venous occlusion experiments, external detection of macromolecular exchange, and blood-lymph studies that use exogenous tracers. A number of limitations of the model are identified and improvements are proposed. A major strength of the model is that it is specifically designed to incorporate newly discovered relationships as the field of lung physiology expands.

  20. Effect of pentoxifylline on lung inflammation and gas exchange in a sepsis-induced acute lung injury model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.S. Oliveira-Junior

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental models of sepsis-induced pulmonary alterations are important for the study of pathogenesis and for potential intervention therapies. The objective of the present study was to characterize lung dysfunction (low PaO2 and high PaCO2, and increased cellular infiltration, protein extravasation, and malondialdehyde (MDA production assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage in a sepsis model consisting of intraperitoneal (ip injection of Escherichia coli and the protective effects of pentoxifylline (PTX. Male Wistar rats (weighing between 270 and 350 g were injected ip with 10(7 or 10(9 CFU/100 g body weight or saline and samples were collected 2, 6, 12, and 24 h later (N = 5 each group. PaO2, PaCO2 and pH were measured in blood, and cellular influx, protein extravasation and MDA concentration were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage. In a second set of experiments either PTX or saline was administered 1 h prior to E. coli ip injection (N = 5 each group and the animals were observed for 6 h. Injection of 10(7 or 10(9 CFU/100 g body weight of E. coli induced acidosis, hypoxemia, and hypercapnia. An increased (P < 0.05 cell influx was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage, with a predominance of neutrophils. Total protein and MDA concentrations were also higher (P < 0.05 in the septic groups compared to control. A higher tumor necrosis factor-alpha (P < 0.05 concentration was also found in these animals. Changes in all parameters were more pronounced with the higher bacterial inoculum. PTX administered prior to sepsis reduced (P < 0.05 most functional alterations. These data show that an E. coli ip inoculum is a good model for the induction of lung dysfunction in sepsis, and suitable for studies of therapeutic interventions.

  1. A GPU-based framework for modeling real-time 3D lung tumor conformal dosimetry with subject-specific lung tumor motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min Yugang; Santhanam, Anand; Ruddy, Bari H [University of Central Florida, FL (United States); Neelakkantan, Harini; Meeks, Sanford L [M D Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, FL (United States); Kupelian, Patrick A, E-mail: anand.santhanam@orlandohealth.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-09-07

    In this paper, we present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based simulation framework to calculate the delivered dose to a 3D moving lung tumor and its surrounding normal tissues, which are undergoing subject-specific lung deformations. The GPU-based simulation framework models the motion of the 3D volumetric lung tumor and its surrounding tissues, simulates the dose delivery using the dose extracted from a treatment plan using Pinnacle Treatment Planning System, Phillips, for one of the 3DCTs of the 4DCT and predicts the amount and location of radiation doses deposited inside the lung. The 4DCT lung datasets were registered with each other using a modified optical flow algorithm. The motion of the tumor and the motion of the surrounding tissues were simulated by measuring the changes in lung volume during the radiotherapy treatment using spirometry. The real-time dose delivered to the tumor for each beam is generated by summing the dose delivered to the target volume at each increase in lung volume during the beam delivery time period. The simulation results showed the real-time capability of the framework at 20 discrete tumor motion steps per breath, which is higher than the number of 4DCT steps (approximately 12) reconstructed during multiple breathing cycles.

  2. Expression of aquaporin-1 and aquaporin-3 in lung tissue of rat model with ischemia-reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Song; LI Xiang-nan

    2010-01-01

    @@ End-stage lung diseases are common and frequentlyoccurring diseases which are difficult for clinical treatment. In recent years, lung transplantation has become a widely accepted and effective therapeutic option for patients with the end-stage pulmonary diseases. Early pulmonary edema resulting from ischemia-reperfusion injury accounts for the major part of mortality and morbidity after lung transplantation. The water channel proteins in lung injury have been little studied, and their impact on the formation of pulmonary edema remains unclear. In this study, we established a rat lung ischemia-reperfusion model to study its impact on the expressions of water channel proteins in lung tissue and explore a new approach to lung transplantation in pulmonary edema pathogenesis.

  3. NTCP modelling of lung toxicity after SBRT comparing the universal survival curve and the linear quadratic model for fractionation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wennberg, Berit M.; Baumann, Pia; Gagliardi, Giovanna (Dept. of Medical Physics, Karolinska Univ. Hospital and the Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)), e-mail: berit.wennberg@karolinska.se (and others)

    2011-05-15

    Background. In SBRT of lung tumours no established relationship between dose-volume parameters and the incidence of lung toxicity is found. The aim of this study is to compare the LQ model and the universal survival curve (USC) to calculate biologically equivalent doses in SBRT to see if this will improve knowledge on this relationship. Material and methods. Toxicity data on radiation pneumonitis grade 2 or more (RP2+) from 57 patients were used, 10.5% were diagnosed with RP2+. The lung DVHs were corrected for fractionation (LQ and USC) and analysed with the Lyman- Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. In the LQ-correction alpha/beta = 3 Gy was used and the USC parameters used were: alpha/beta = 3 Gy, D{sub 0} = 1.0 Gy, n = 10, alpha 0.206 Gy-1 and d{sub T} = 5.8 Gy. In order to understand the relative contribution of different dose levels to the calculated NTCP the concept of fractional NTCP was used. This might give an insight to the questions of whether 'high doses to small volumes' or 'low doses to large volumes' are most important for lung toxicity. Results and Discussion. NTCP analysis with the LKB-model using parameters m = 0.4, D50 = 30 Gy resulted for the volume dependence parameter (n) with LQ correction n = 0.87 and with USC correction n = 0.71. Using parameters m = 0.3, D{sub 50} = 20 Gy n = 0.93 with LQ correction and n 0.83 with USC correction. In SBRT of lung tumours, NTCP modelling of lung toxicity comparing models (LQ,USC) for fractionation correction, shows that low dose contribute less and high dose more to the NTCP when using the USC-model. Comparing NTCP modelling of SBRT data and data from breast cancer, lung cancer and whole lung irradiation implies that the response of the lung is treatment specific. More data are however needed in order to have a more reliable modelling

  4. Prognostic model for brain metastases from lung adenocarcinoma identified with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongwei; Wang, Weili; Jia, Haixia; Lian, Jianhong; Cao, Jianzhong; Zhang, Xiaqin; Song, Xing; Jia, Sufang; Li, Zhengran; Cao, Xing; Zhou, Wei; Han, Songye; Yang, Weihua; Xi, Yanfen; Lian, Shenming

    2017-09-01

    Several indices have been developed to predict survival of brain metastases (BM) based on prognostic factors. However, such models were designed for general brain metastases from different kinds of cancers, and prognostic factors vary between cancers and histological subtypes. Recently, studies have indicated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status may be a potential prognostic biological factor in BM from lung adenocarcinoma. Thus, we sought to define the role of EGFR mutation in prognoses and introduce a prognostic model specific for BM from lung adenocarcinoma. Data of 256 patients with BM from lung adenocarcinoma identified with EGFR mutations were collected. Independent prognostic factors were confirmed using a Cox regression model. The new prognostic model was developed based on the results of multivariable analyses. The score of each factor was calculated by six-month survival. Prognostic groups were divided into low, medium, and high risk based on the total scores. The prediction ability of the new model was compared to the three existing models. EGFR mutation and Karnofsky performance status were independent prognostic factors and were thus integrated into the new prognostic model. The new model was superior to the three other scoring systems regarding the prediction of three, six, and 12-month survival by pairwise comparison of the area under the curve. Our proposed prognostic model specific for BM from lung adenocarcinoma incorporating EGFR mutation status was valid in predicting patient survival. Further verification is warranted, with prospective testing using large sample sizes. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Progress in pulmonary surfactant-associated protein A in lung injury after cardiopulmonary bypass%肺表面活性物质相关蛋白A在体外循环后肺损伤中作用的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    经俊; 李元海

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung injury after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is a severe complication ofcardiac surgery,which is closely related to the rate of heart surgery and postoperative mortality.The effect of pulmonary surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) in lung injury after CPB has been paid more attention by scientists recently.Objective To provide theoretic basis for clinical and basic,were reviewed the research process of the effects of SP-A in lung injury after CPB.Content Molecular structures,genes,receptors,regulation and physiological role of SP-A and the research process of effects of SP-A in lung injury after CPB were all reviewed.Trend With the development of molecular biology techniques,cloned or synthetic human SP-A,and the help of construction of vector for eukaryotic cells in vivo expression,SP-A become a new direction of treatment of lung injury after CPB.%背景 体外循环(cardiopulmonary bypass,CPB)后肺损伤是心脏手术重要的并发症,它与术后死亡率和心脏手术成功率有密切关系,而肺表面活性物质相关蛋白A(pulmonary surfactant-associated protein A,SP-A)在CPB后肺损伤中的作用近年来受到关注. 目的 对SP-A在CPB后肺损伤中作用的最新研究进展进行综述,为临床基础研究提供理论依据.内容 介绍SP-A的分子结构、基因、受体、调控及生理作用,重点阐述SP-A在CPB后肺损伤中的研究进展. 趋向 随着分子生物学技术的发展,克隆或合成人类SP-A、构建载体在体内进行真核细胞表达成为可能,为治疗CPB后肺损伤提供了一个新的发展方向.

  6. High Oxygen Concentrations Adversely Affect the Performance of Pulmonary Surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Craig D; Boloori-Zadeh, Parnian; Silva, Maricris R; Gouldstone, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Although effective in the neonatal population, exogenous pulmonary surfactant has not demonstrated a benefit in pediatric and adult subjects with hypoxic lung injury despite a sound physiologic rationale. Importantly, neonatal surfactant replacement therapy is administered in conjunction with low fractional FIO2 while pediatric/adult therapy is administered with high FIO2 . We suspected a connection between FIO2 and surfactant performance. Therefore, we sought to assess a possible mechanism by which the activity of pulmonary surfactant is adversely affected by direct oxygen exposure in in vitro experiments. The mechanical performance of pulmonary surfactant was evaluated using 2 methods. First, Langmuir-Wilhelmy balance was utilized to study the reduction in surface area (δA) of surfactant to achieve a low bound value of surface tension after repeated compression and expansion cycles. Second, dynamic light scattering was utilized to measure the size of pulmonary surfactant particles in aqueous suspension. For both experiments, comparisons were made between surfactant exposed to 21% and 100% oxygen. The δA of surfactant was 21.1 ± 2.0% and 35.8 ± 2.0% during exposure to 21% and 100% oxygen, respectively (P = .02). Furthermore, dynamic light-scattering experiments revealed a micelle diameter of 336.0 ± 12.5 μm and 280.2 ± 11.0 μm in 21% and 100% oxygen, respectively (P < .001), corresponding to a ∼16% decrease in micelle diameter following exposure to 100% oxygen. The characteristics of pulmonary surfactant were adversely affected by short-term exposure to oxygen. Specifically, surface tension studies revealed that short-term exposure of surfactant film to high concentrations of oxygen expedited the frangibility of pulmonary surfactant, as shown with the δA. This suggests that reductions in pulmonary compliance and associated adverse effects could begin to take effect in a very short period of time. If these findings can be demonstrated in vivo, a role for

  7. The Role of Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase in Models of Lung Tumor Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rymaszewski, Amy L.; Tate, Everett; Yimbesalu, Joannes P. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and MCW Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States); Gelman, Andrew E. [Department of Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Jarzembowski, Jason A. [Department of Pathology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States); Zhang, Hao; Pritchard, Kirkwood A. Jr. [Department of Surgery and MCW Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States); Vikis, Haris G., E-mail: hvikis@mcw.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and MCW Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting.

  8. A novel telomerase activator suppresses lung damage in a murine model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Saux, Claude Jourdan; Davy, Philip; Brampton, Christopher; Ahuja, Seema S; Fauce, Steven; Shivshankar, Pooja; Nguyen, Hieu; Ramaseshan, Mahesh; Tressler, Robert; Pirot, Zhu; Harley, Calvin B; Allsopp, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of diseases associated with telomere dysfunction, including AIDS, aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis, has bolstered interest in telomerase activators. We report identification of a new small molecule activator, GRN510, with activity ex vivo and in vivo. Using a novel mouse model, we tested the potential of GRN510 to limit fibrosis induced by bleomycin in mTERT heterozygous mice. Treatment with GRN510 at 10 mg/kg/day activated telomerase 2-4 fold both in hematopoietic progenitors ex vivo and in bone marrow and lung tissue in vivo, respectively. Telomerase activation was countered by co-treatment with Imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor. In this model of bleomycin-induced fibrosis, treatment with GRN510 suppressed the development of fibrosis and accumulation of senescent cells in the lung via a mechanism dependent upon telomerase activation. Treatment of small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) or lung fibroblasts ex vivo with GRN510 revealed telomerase activating and replicative lifespan promoting effects only in the SAEC, suggesting that the mechanism accounting for the protective effects of GRN510 against induced lung fibrosis involves specific types of lung cells. Together, these results support the use of small molecule activators of telomerase in therapies to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  9. A novel telomerase activator suppresses lung damage in a murine model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Jourdan Le Saux

    Full Text Available The emergence of diseases associated with telomere dysfunction, including AIDS, aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis, has bolstered interest in telomerase activators. We report identification of a new small molecule activator, GRN510, with activity ex vivo and in vivo. Using a novel mouse model, we tested the potential of GRN510 to limit fibrosis induced by bleomycin in mTERT heterozygous mice. Treatment with GRN510 at 10 mg/kg/day activated telomerase 2-4 fold both in hematopoietic progenitors ex vivo and in bone marrow and lung tissue in vivo, respectively. Telomerase activation was countered by co-treatment with Imetelstat (GRN163L, a potent telomerase inhibitor. In this model of bleomycin-induced fibrosis, treatment with GRN510 suppressed the development of fibrosis and accumulation of senescent cells in the lung via a mechanism dependent upon telomerase activation. Treatment of small airway epithelial cells (SAEC or lung fibroblasts ex vivo with GRN510 revealed telomerase activating and replicative lifespan promoting effects only in the SAEC, suggesting that the mechanism accounting for the protective effects of GRN510 against induced lung fibrosis involves specific types of lung cells. Together, these results support the use of small molecule activators of telomerase in therapies to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  10. Differential Gene Expression in Chemically Induced Mouse Lung Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruisheng Yao

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of similarities in histopathology and tumor progression stages between mouse and human lung adenocarcinomas, the mouse lung tumor model with lung adenomas as the endpoint has been used extensively to evaluate the efficacy of putative lung cancer chemopreventive agents. In this study, a competitive cDNA library screening (CCLS was employed to determine changes in the expression of mRNA in chemically induced lung adenomas compared with paired normal lung tissues. A total of 2555 clones having altered expression in tumors were observed following competitive hybridization between normal lung and lung adenomas after primary screening of over 160,000 clones from a mouse lung cDNA library. Among the 755 clones confirmed by dot blot hybridization, 240 clones were underexpressed, whereas 515 clones were overexpressed in tumors. Sixty-five clones with the most frequently altered expression in six individual tumors were confirmed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. When examining the 58 known genes, 39 clones had increased expression and 19 had decreased expression, whereas the 7 novel genes showed overexpression. A high percentage (>60% of overexpressed or underexpressed genes was observed in at least two or three of the lesions. Reproducibly overexpressed genes included ERK-1, JAK-1, surfactant proteins A, B, and C, NFAT1, α-1 protease inhibitor, helix-loop-helix ubiquitous kinase (CHUK, α-adaptin, α-1 PI2, thioether S-methyltransferase, and CYP2C40. Reproducibly underexpressed genes included paroxanase, ALDH II, CC10, von Ebner salivary gland protein, and α- and β-globin. In addition, CCLS identified several novel genes or genes not previously associated with lung carcinogenesis, including a hypothetical protein (FLJ11240 and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor homologue. This study shows the efficacy of this methodology for identifying genes with altered expression. These genes may prove to be helpful in our understanding of the genetic basis of

  11. Comparing benefits from many possible computed tomography lung cancer screening programs: extrapolating from the National Lung Screening Trial using comparative modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela M McMahon

    Full Text Available The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST demonstrated that in current and former smokers aged 55 to 74 years, with at least 30 pack-years of cigarette smoking history and who had quit smoking no more than 15 years ago, 3 annual computed tomography (CT screens reduced lung cancer-specific mortality by 20% relative to 3 annual chest X-ray screens. We compared the benefits achievable with 576 lung cancer screening programs that varied CT screen number and frequency, ages of screening, and eligibility based on smoking.We used five independent microsimulation models with lung cancer natural history parameters previously calibrated to the NLST to simulate life histories of the US cohort born in 1950 under all 576 programs. 'Efficient' (within model programs prevented the greatest number of lung cancer deaths, compared to no screening, for a given number of CT screens. Among 120 'consensus efficient' (identified as efficient across models programs, the average starting age was 55 years, the stopping age was 80 or 85 years, the average minimum pack-years was 27, and the maximum years since quitting was 20. Among consensus efficient programs, 11% to 40% of the cohort was screened, and 153 to 846 lung cancer deaths were averted per 100,000 people. In all models, annual screening based on age and smoking eligibility in NLST was not efficient; continuing screening to age 80 or 85 years was more efficient.Consensus results from five models identified a set of efficient screening programs that include annual CT lung cancer screening using criteria like NLST eligibility but extended to older ages. Guidelines for screening should also consider harms of screening and individual patient characteristics.

  12. Effects of Surfactant on Solubility and Microbial Conversion of Steroid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Enhancing the dispersion and dissolution of substrate particles in substrate/water suspension is a feasible way to improve steroid bioconversion. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of applying surfactant to microbial conversion system on the dispersion, solubilization and in turn bioconversion of steroid substrate. The model system is hydroxylation of substrate 16α-,17α-epoxy-4-pregnene-3,20-dine by microbial enzymes from Rhizopus nigricanl. The results show that the presence of substrate leads to an increase in critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant PSE compared with the normal CMC of PSE in aqueous solution. The grinding time during substrate suspension preparation affects the substrate aqueous solubility differently with the varied surfactant concentrations while barely making any difference in substrate solubility in the absence of surfactant. The properly prolonged grinding time can make up for the loss in substrate solubility arising from the reduction in surfactant concentration. The surfactant complexes composed of surfactants PSE and MGE at appropriate ratios are screened out with orthodoxy experiment method, the interaction between PSE and MGE exerts the most prominent effects on substrate bioconversion, and the surfactant complexes show more beneficial effects on steroid bioconversion than the surfactant PSE used alone.

  13. In silico modelling and validation of differential expressed proteins in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagavathi S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aims predict the three dimensional structure of three major proteins responsible for causing Lung cancer. Methods: These are the differentially expressed proteins in lung cancer dataset. Initially, the structural template for these proteins is identified from structural database using homology search and perform homology modelling approach to predict its native 3D structure. Three-dimensional model obtained was validated using Ramachandran plot analysis to find the reliability of the model. Results: Four proteins were differentially expressed and were significant proteins in causing lung cancer. Among the four proteins, Matrixmetallo proteinase (P39900 had a known 3D structure and hence was not considered for modelling. The remaining proteins Polo like kinase I Q58A51, Trophinin B1AKF1, Thrombomodulin P07204 were modelled and validated. Conclusions: The three dimensional structure of proteins provides insights about the functional aspect and regulatory aspect of the protein. Thus, this study will be a breakthrough for further lung cancer related studies.

  14. Development of a dynamic model for the lung lobes and airway tree in the NCAT phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, J. M.; Segars, W. P.; Knisley, S. B.; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2003-06-01

    The four-dimensional (4-D) NCAT phantom was developed to realistically model human anatomy based on the visible human data and cardiac and respiratory motions based on 4-D tagged magnetic resonance imaging and respiratory-gated CT data from normal human subjects. Currently, the 4-D NCAT phantom does not include the airway tree or its motion within the lungs. Also, each lung is defined with a single surface; the individual lobes are not distinguished. The authors further the development of the phantom by creating dynamic models for the individual lung lobes and for the airway tree in each lobe. NURBS surfaces for the lobes and an initial airway tree model (/spl sim/ 4 generations) were created through manual segmentation of the visible human data. A mathematical algorithm with physiological constraints was used to extend the original airway model to fill each lobe. For each parent airway branch inside a lobe, the algorithm extends the airway tree by creating two daughter branches modeled with cylindrical tubes. Parameters for the cylindrical tubes such as diameter, length, and angle are constrained based on flow parameters and available lung space.

  15. Studies on the Cloud Points of Nonionic Surfactants with QSPR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Mei-ling; WANG Zheng-wu; ZHANG Ge-xin; GU Jin; CUN Zhe; TAO Fu-ming

    2007-01-01

    With quantum chemical parameters, topological indexes, and physical ehemistry parameters as descriptors, a quantitative structure-property relationship(QSPR) has been found for the cloud points of four series of nonionic surfactants(a total of 65 surfactants). The best-regressed model includes six descriptors, and the correlation coefficient of multiple determination is as high as 0. 962.

  16. New mechanisms for phase separation in polymer-surfactant mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Currie, E.P.K.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Borisov, O.V.

    2000-01-01

    The cooperative association of ionic surfactants with polymer chains leads to quite novel features in the phase behaviour of polymer solutions. Using an analytic mean-field model, we analyze phase equilibria in solutions of neutral polymers mixed with ionic surfactants. We predict the possibilities

  17. NUMERICAL SIMULATION AND FIELD IMPLEMENTATION OF SURFACTANT FLOODING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the features of surfactant flooding, a mathematical model for surfactant flooding is established. The adsorption-retention, convection diffusion of surfactant and influence of concentration change upon relative permeability curve are included in the model. The novel description of adsorption quantity of surfactant and relative permeability curve are presented, which enhance the coincidence between mathematical model and field practice, the relative errors of main development indexes are within 6%. The model is applied to the numerical research of the surfactant flooding in the untabulated beds of Xing1-3 surfactant flooding pilot site of No.4 Oil Production Company of Daqing Oilfield, the influences of surfactant concentration, injection quantity, slug combination mode upon the development effect and economic benefit are quantitatively analyzed, the injection scheme is optimized as follows: surfactant concentration is 0.5%, slug volume is 0.02 PV, slug combination mode is 2 slugs. After the implementation of scheme in oilfield, the cumulative increase of oil is 2186.0 t, up to nearly 30%.

  18. Lung-On-A-Chip Technologies for Disease Modeling and Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konar, Dipasri; Devarasetty, Mahesh; Yildiz, Didem V.; Atala, Anthony; Murphy, Sean V.

    2016-01-01

    Animal and two-dimensional cell culture models have had a profound impact on not only lung research but also medical research at large, despite inherent flaws and differences when compared with in vivo and clinical observations. Three-dimensional (3D) tissue models are a natural progression and extension of existing techniques that seek to plug the gaps and mitigate the drawbacks of two-dimensional and animal technologies. In this review, we describe the transition of historic models to contemporary 3D cell and organoid models, the varieties of current 3D cell and tissue culture modalities, the common methods for imaging these models, and finally, the applications of these models and imaging techniques to lung research. PMID:27127414

  19. Transient exposure of pulmonary surfactant to hyaluronan promotes structural and compositional transformations into a highly active state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Cruz, Antonio; Richter, Ralf P; Taeusch, H William; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2013-10-11

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipid-protein complex that lowers surface tension at the respiratory air-liquid interface, stabilizing the lungs against physical forces tending to collapse alveoli. Dysfunction of surfactant is associated with respiratory pathologies such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or meconium aspiration syndrome where naturally occurring surfactant-inhibitory agents such as serum, meconium, or cholesterol reach the lung. We analyzed the effect of hyaluronan (HA) on the structure and surface behavior of pulmonary surfactant to understand the mechanism for HA-promoted surfactant protection in the presence of inhibitory agents. In particular, we found that HA affects structural properties such as the aggregation state of surfactant membranes and the size, distribution, and order/packing of phase-segregated lipid domains. These effects do not require a direct interaction between surfactant complexes and HA and are accompanied by a compositional reorganization of large surfactant complexes that become enriched with saturated phospholipid species. HA-exposed surfactant reaches very high efficiency in terms of rapid and spontaneous adsorption of surfactant phospholipids at the air-liquid interface and shows significantly improved resistance to inactivation by serum or cholesterol. We propose that physical effects pertaining to the formation of a meshwork of interpenetrating HA polymer chains are responsible for the changes in surfactant structure and composition that enhance surfactant function and, thus, resistance to inactivation. The higher resistance of HA-exposed surfactant to inactivation persists even after removal of the polymer, suggesting that transient exposure of surfactant to polymers like HA could be a promising strategy for the production of more efficient therapeutic surfactant preparations.

  20. Removal of cationic surfactant (CTAB from aqueous solution on to activated carbon obtained from corncob.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Yakout

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct and indirect releases of large quantities of surfactants to the environment may result in serious health and environmental problems. Therefore, surfactants should be removed from water before water is released to the environment or delivered for public use. Using powdered activated carbon (PAC as adsorbent may be an effective technique to remove surfactants. In this study, the removal of surfactants by PAC was investigated and the influencesof the operating parameters on the effectiveness on adsorption rate were studied. Cationic surfactant, Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB was selected for the experiments. A series of batch experiments were performed to determine the sorption isotherms of surfactants to PAC. The results showed that carbon structure affect mainly on the surfactant adsorption. Surfactant equilibrium data fitted very well to the binary langmuir model. The pseudo first-,second- order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were applied. Both, the external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion mechanisms involve in CTAB sorption.

  1. Comparison of actual tidal volume in neonatal lung model volume control ventilation using three ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, H; Endo, Y; Ejima, Y; Matsubara, M; Kurosawa, S

    2011-07-01

    In neonates, small changes in tidal volumes (V(T)) may lead to complications. Previous studies have shown a significant difference between ventilator-measured tidal volume and tidal volume delivered (actual V(T)). We evaluated the accuracy of three different ventilators to deliver small V(T) during volume-controlled ventilation. We tested Servo 300, 840 ventilator and Evita 4 Neoflow ventilators with lung models simulating normal and injured neonatal lung compliance models. Gas volume delivered from the ventilator into the test circuit (V(TV)) and actual V(T) to the test lung were measured using Ventrak respiration monitors at set V(T) (30 ml). The gas volume increase of the breathing circuit was then calculated. Tidal volumes of the SV300 and PB840 in both lung models were similar to the set V(T) and the actual tidal volumes in the injured model (20.7 ml and 19.8 ml, respectively) were significantly less than that in the normal model (27.4 ml and 23.4 ml). PB840 with circuit compliance compensation could not improve the actual V(T). V(TV) of the EV4N in the normal and the injured models (37.8 ml and 46.6 ml) were markedly increased compared with set V(T), and actual V(T) were similar to set V(T) in the normal and injured model (30.2 ml and 31.9 ml, respectively). EV4N measuring V(T) close to the lung could match actual V(T) to almost the same value as the set V(T) however the gas volume of the breathing circuit was increased. If an accurate value for the patient's actual V(T) is needed, this V(T) must be measured by a sensor located between the Y-piece and the tracheal tube.

  2. Mouse lung infection model to assess Rhodococcus equi virulence and vaccine protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Iglesias, Patricia; Scortti, Mariela; MacArthur, Iain; Hapeshi, Alexia; Rodriguez, Héctor; Prescott, John F; Vazquez-Boland, José A

    2014-08-06

    The pathogenic actinomycete Rhodococcus equi causes severe purulent lung infections in foals and immunocompromised people. Although relatively unsusceptible to R. equi, mice are widely used for in vivo studies with this pathogen. The most commonly employed mouse model is based on systemic (intravenous) infection and determination of R. equi burdens in spleen and liver. Here, we investigated the murine lung for experimental infection studies with R. equi. Using a 10(7)CFU intranasal challenge in BALB/c mice, virulent R. equi consistently survived in quantifiable numbers up to 10 days in the lungs whereas virulence-deficient R. equi bacteria were rapidly cleared. An internally controlled virulence assay was developed in which the test R. equi strains are co-inoculated and monitored in the same mouse. Isogenic R. equi bacteria lacking either the plasmid vapA gene or the entire virulence plasmid were compared using this competitive assay. Both strains showed no significant differences in in vivo fitness in the lung, indicating that the single loss of the virulence factor VapA was sufficient to account for the full attenuation seen in the absence of the virulence plasmid. To test the adequacy of the lung infection model for monitoring R. equi vaccine efficacy, BA