WorldWideScience

Sample records for model linking nasa

  1. A communications model for an ISAS to NASA span link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James L.; Mcguire, Robert E.; Lopez-Swafford, Brian

    1987-01-01

    The authors propose that an initial computer-to-computer communication link use the public packet switched networks (PPSN) Venus-P in Japan and TELENET in the U.S. When the traffic warrants it, this link would then be upgraded to a dedicated leased line that directly connects into the Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN). The proposed system of hardware and software will easily support migration to such a dedicated link. It therefore provides a cost effective approach to the network problem. Once a dedicated line becomes operation it is suggested that the public networks link and continue to coexist, providing a backup capability.

  2. Linking Formal and Informal Science Education: A Successful Model using Libraries, Volunteers and NASA Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, M. S.; Lafayette Library; Learning Center Foundation (Lllcf)

    2011-12-01

    In these times of budget cuts, tight school schedules, and limited opportunities for student field trips and teacher professional development, it is especially difficult to expose elementary and middle school students to the latest STEM information-particularly in the space sciences. Using our library as a facilitator and catalyst, we built a volunteer-based, multi-faceted, curriculum-linked program for students and teachers in local middle schools (Grade 8) and showcased new astronomical and planetary science information using mainly NASA resources and volunteer effort. The project began with the idea of bringing free NASA photo exhibits (FETTU) to the Lafayette and Antioch Libraries for public display. Subsequently, the effort expanded by adding layers of activities that brought space and science information to teachers, students and the pubic at 5 libraries and schools in the 2 cities, one of which serves a diverse, underserved community. Overall, the effort (supported by a pilot grant from the Bechtel Foundation) included school and library based teacher workshops with resource materials; travelling space museum visits with hands-on activities (Chabot-to-Go); separate powerpoint presentations for students and adults at the library; and concurrent ancillary space-related themes for young children's programs at the library. This pilot project, based largely on the use of free government resources and online materials, demonstrated that volunteer-based, standards-linked STEM efforts can enhance curriculum at the middle school, with libraries serving a special role. Using this model, we subsequently also obtained a small NASA-Space Grant award to bring star parties and hand-on science activities to three libraries this Fall, linking with numerous Grade 5 teachers and students in two additional underserved areas of our county. It's not necessary to reinvent the wheel, you just collect the pieces and build on what you already have.

  3. LERC-SLAM - THE NASA LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER SATELLITE LINK ATTENUATION MODEL PROGRAM (IBM PC VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of rain attenuation affecting the communication between a satellite and an earth terminal is an important consideration in planning satellite links. The NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model Program (LeRC-SLAM) provides a static and dynamic statistical assessment of the impact of rain attenuation on a communications link established between an earth terminal and a geosynchronous satellite. The program is designed for use in the specification, design and assessment of satellite links for any terminal location in the continental United States. The basis for LeRC-SLAM is the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model, which uses a log-normal cumulative probability distribution to describe the random process of rain attenuation on satellite links. The derivation of the statistics for the rainrate process at the specified terminal location relies on long term rainfall records compiled by the U.S. Weather Service during time periods of up to 55 years in length. The theory of extreme value statistics is also utilized. The user provides 1) the longitudinal position of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit, 2) the geographical position of the earth terminal in terms of latitude and longitude, 3) the height above sea level of the terminal site, 4) the yearly average rainfall at the terminal site, and 5) the operating frequency of the communications link (within 1 to 1000 GHz, inclusive). Based on the yearly average rainfall at the terminal location, LeRC-SLAM calculates the relevant rain statistics for the site using an internal data base. The program then generates rain attenuation data for the satellite link. This data includes a description of the static (i.e., yearly) attenuation process, an evaluation of the cumulative probability distribution for attenuation effects, and an evaluation of the probability of fades below selected fade depths. In addition, LeRC-SLAM calculates the elevation and azimuth angles of the terminal

  4. LERC-SLAM - THE NASA LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER SATELLITE LINK ATTENUATION MODEL PROGRAM (MACINTOSH VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of rain attenuation affecting the communication between a satellite and an earth terminal is an important consideration in planning satellite links. The NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model Program (LeRC-SLAM) provides a static and dynamic statistical assessment of the impact of rain attenuation on a communications link established between an earth terminal and a geosynchronous satellite. The program is designed for use in the specification, design and assessment of satellite links for any terminal location in the continental United States. The basis for LeRC-SLAM is the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model, which uses a log-normal cumulative probability distribution to describe the random process of rain attenuation on satellite links. The derivation of the statistics for the rainrate process at the specified terminal location relies on long term rainfall records compiled by the U.S. Weather Service during time periods of up to 55 years in length. The theory of extreme value statistics is also utilized. The user provides 1) the longitudinal position of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit, 2) the geographical position of the earth terminal in terms of latitude and longitude, 3) the height above sea level of the terminal site, 4) the yearly average rainfall at the terminal site, and 5) the operating frequency of the communications link (within 1 to 1000 GHz, inclusive). Based on the yearly average rainfall at the terminal location, LeRC-SLAM calculates the relevant rain statistics for the site using an internal data base. The program then generates rain attenuation data for the satellite link. This data includes a description of the static (i.e., yearly) attenuation process, an evaluation of the cumulative probability distribution for attenuation effects, and an evaluation of the probability of fades below selected fade depths. In addition, LeRC-SLAM calculates the elevation and azimuth angles of the terminal

  5. Response model parameter linking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrett, M.L.D.

    2015-01-01

    With a few exceptions, the problem of linking item response model parameters from different item calibrations has been conceptualized as an instance of the problem of equating observed scores on different test forms. This thesis argues, however, that the use of item response models does not require

  6. NASA 3D Models: Aqua

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aqua, Latin for water, is a NASA Earth Science satellite mission named for the large amount of information that the mission is collecting about the Earth's water...

  7. NASA 3D Models: Terra

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA launched the Earth Observing System's flagship satellite Terra, named for Earth, on December 18, 1999. Terra has been collecting data about Earth's changing...

  8. NASA 3D Models: TRMM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) designed to monitor and study...

  9. NASA 3D Models: SORCE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) is a NASA-sponsored satellite mission that is providing state-of-the-art measurements of incoming x-ray,...

  10. NASA 3D Models: Cassini

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cassini spacecraft from SPACE rendering package, built by Michael Oberle under NASA contract at JPL. Includes orbiter only, Huygens probe detached. Accurate except...

  11. Linking Item Response Model Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Wim J; Barrett, Michelle D

    2016-09-01

    With a few exceptions, the problem of linking item response model parameters from different item calibrations has been conceptualized as an instance of the problem of test equating scores on different test forms. This paper argues, however, that the use of item response models does not require any test score equating. Instead, it involves the necessity of parameter linking due to a fundamental problem inherent in the formal nature of these models-their general lack of identifiability. More specifically, item response model parameters need to be linked to adjust for the different effects of the identifiability restrictions used in separate item calibrations. Our main theorems characterize the formal nature of these linking functions for monotone, continuous response models, derive their specific shapes for different parameterizations of the 3PL model, and show how to identify them from the parameter values of the common items or persons in different linking designs.

  12. Link Adaptation for Mitigating Earth-To-Space Propagation Effects on the NASA SCaN Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcoyne, Deirdre K.; Headley, William C.; Leffke, Zach J.; Rowe, Sonya A.; Mortensen, Dale J.; Reinhart, Richard C.; McGwier, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    In Earth-to-Space communications, well-known propagation effects such as path loss and atmospheric loss can lead to fluctuations in the strength of the communications link between a satellite and its ground station. Additionally, the typically unconsidered effect of shadowing due to the geometry of the satellite and its solar panels can also lead to link degradation. As a result of these anticipated channel impairments, NASA's communication links have been traditionally designed to handle the worst-case impact of these effects through high link margins and static, lower rate, modulation formats. The work presented in this paper aims to relax these constraints by providing an improved trade-off between data rate and link margin through utilizing link adaptation. More specifically, this work provides a simulation study on the propagation effects impacting NASA's SCaN Testbed flight software-defined radio (SDR) as well as proposes a link adaptation algorithm that varies the modulation format of a communications link as its signal-to-noise ratio fluctuates. Ultimately, the models developed in this work will be utilized to conduct real-time flight experiments on-board the NASA SCaN Testbed.

  13. Developing Experimental Models for NASA Missions with ASSL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Vassev

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available NASA's new age of space exploration augurs great promise for deep space exploration missions whereby spacecraft should be independent, autonomous, and smart. Nowadays NASA increasingly relies on the concepts of autonomic computing, exploiting these to increase the survivability of remote missions, particularly when human tending is not feasible. Autonomic computing has been recognized as a promising approach for the development of self-managing spacecraft systems that employ onboard intelligence and rely less on control links. The Autonomic System Specification Language (ASSL is a framework for formally specifying and generating autonomic systems. As part of long-term research targeted at the development of models for space exploration missions that rely on principles of autonomic computing, we have employed ASSL to develop formal models and generate functional prototypes for NASA missions. This helps to validate features and perform experiments through simulation. Here, we discuss our work on developing such missions with ASSL.

  14. NASA 60 GHz intersatellite communication link definition study. Baseline document

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The overall system and component concepts for a 60 GHz intersatellite communications link system (ICLS) are described. The ICLS was designed to augment the capabilities of the current Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), providing a data rate capacity large enough to accommodate the expected rates for user satellites (USAT's) in the post-1995 timeframe. The use of 60 GHz for the anticipated successor to TDRSS, the Tracking and Data Acquisition System (TDAS), was selected because of current technology development that will enable multigigibit data rates. Additionally, the attenuation of the earth's atmosphere at 60 GHz means that there is virtually no possibility of terrestrially generated interference (intentional or accidental) or terrestrially based intercept. The ICLS includes the following functional areas: (1) the ICLS payload package on the GEO TDAS satellite that communicates simultaneously with up to five LEO USAT's; (2) the payload package on the USAT that communicates with the TDAS satellite; and (3) the crosslink payload package on the TDAS satellite that communicates with another TDAS satellite. Two methods of data relay on-board the TDAS spacecraft were addressed. One is a complete baseband system (demod and remod) with a bi-directional 2 Gbps data stream; the other is a channelized system wherein some of the channels are baseband and others are merely frequency translated before re-transmission. Descriptions of the TDAS antenna, transmitter, receiver, and mechanical designs are presented.

  15. NASA Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, B. H.; Law, E.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling Portals provide web-based suites of interactive visualization and analysis tools to enable mission planners, planetary scientists, students, and the general public to access mapped lunar data products from past and current missions for the Moon, Mars, and Vesta. New portals for additional planetary bodies are being planned. This presentation will recap significant enhancements to these toolsets during the past year and look forward to the results of the exciting work currently being undertaken. Additional data products and tools continue to be added to the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP). These include both generalized products as well as polar data products specifically targeting potential sites for the Resource Prospector mission. Current development work on LMMP also includes facilitating mission planning and data management for lunar CubeSat missions, and working with the NASA Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office's Lunar Apollo Sample database in order to help better visualize the geographic contexts from which samples were retrieved. A new user interface provides, among other improvements, significantly enhanced 3D visualizations and navigation. Mars Trek, the project's Mars portal, has now been assigned by NASA's Planetary Science Division to support site selection and analysis for the Mars 2020 Rover mission as well as for the Mars Human Landing Exploration Zone Sites. This effort is concentrating on enhancing Mars Trek with data products and analysis tools specifically requested by the proposing teams for the various sites. Also being given very high priority by NASA Headquarters is Mars Trek's use as a means to directly involve the public in these upcoming missions, letting them explore the areas the agency is focusing upon, understand what makes these sites so fascinating, follow the selection process, and get caught up in the excitement of exploring Mars. The portals also serve as

  16. The NASA Severe Thunderstorm Observations and Regional Modeling (NASA STORM) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Lang, Timothy J.; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Case, Jonathan L.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Bailey, Jeffrey; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Severe Storm Thunderstorm Observations and Regional Modeling(NASA STORM) project enhanced NASA’s severe weather research capabilities, building upon existing Earth Science expertise at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). During this project, MSFC extended NASA’s ground-based lightning detection capacity to include a readily deployable lightning mapping array (LMA). NASA STORM also enabled NASA’s Short-term Prediction and Research Transition (SPoRT) to add convection allowing ensemble modeling to its portfolio of regional numerical weather prediction (NWP) capabilities. As a part of NASA STORM, MSFC developed new open-source capabilities for analyzing and displaying weather radar observations integrated from both research and operational networks. These accomplishments enabled by NASA STORM are a step towards enhancing NASA’s capabilities for studying severe weather and positions them for any future NASA related severe storm field campaigns.

  17. The link between aerospace industry and NASA during the Apollo years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcat, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Made in the frame of a French master on political history of USA in Paris IV La Sorbonne University, this subject is the third part of " The Economy of Apollo during the 60s". Nicolas Turcat is actually preparing his PhD in History of Innovation (DEA—Paris IV La Sorbonne). Our actual subject is " the link between aerospace industry and NASA during the Apollo years". This speech will highlight on some aspects of the link between NASA and aerospace industry. NASA could achieve the Apollo mission safely and under heavy financial pressure during the sixties due to a new type of organization for a civil agency; the contractor system. In fact, Military used it since the 1950s. And we will see how the development of this type of contract permitted a better interaction between the two parts. NASA would make another type of link with universities and technical institutes; a real brain trust was created, and between 1961 and 1967, 10,000 students worked and more than 200 universities on Apollo program. We will try to study briefly the procurement plan and process during the Apollo years. Without entering the " spin-offs debate", we will try to watch different aspects of the impacts and realities of the contractor and subcontractor system. We will see that would create a political debate inside USA when presidents Johnson and Nixon would decide to reduce Apollo program. Which states will benefit Apollo program? Or questions like how the debate at the end of the 1960s will become more and more political? Actually, almost 60% of the country's R&D was focused on Apollo, economical and moreover, political impacts would be great. We will try to study this under the light of different example: and particularly in California. The industrial and military complex was a part of the Apollo program. Apollo reoriented the aim of this complex for making it the first aerospace industry. Since this time, USA had not only acquired space ambition but real space capabilities. But more than

  18. NASA Standard for Models and Simulations: Philosophy and Requirements Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattnig, Steve R.; Luckring, James M.; Morrison, Joseph H.; Sylvester, Andre J.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Zang, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Following the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report, the NASA Administrator chartered an executive team (known as the Diaz Team) to identify those CAIB report elements with NASA-wide applicability and to develop corrective measures to address each element. One such measure was the development of a standard for the development, documentation, and operation of models and simulations. This report describes the philosophy and requirements overview of the resulting NASA Standard for Models and Simulations.

  19. NASA 3D Models: Landsat 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Landsat Program is a series of Earth-observing satellite missions jointly managed by NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey. Since 1972, Landsat satellites have...

  20. NASA 3D Models: QuikSCAT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) is equipped with a specialized microwave radar that measures near-surface wind speed and direction under all weather and cloud...

  1. NASA Handbook for Models and Simulations: An Implementation Guide for NASA-STD-7009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide technical information, clarification, examples, processes, and techniques to help institute good modeling and simulation practices in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). As a companion guide to NASA-STD- 7009, Standard for Models and Simulations, this Handbook provides a broader scope of information than may be included in a Standard and promotes good practices in the production, use, and consumption of NASA modeling and simulation products. NASA-STD-7009 specifies what a modeling and simulation activity shall or should do (in the requirements) but does not prescribe how the requirements are to be met, which varies with the specific engineering discipline, or who is responsible for complying with the requirements, which depends on the size and type of project. A guidance document, which is not constrained by the requirements of a Standard, is better suited to address these additional aspects and provide necessary clarification. This Handbook stems from the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation (2003), which called for Agency-wide improvements in the "development, documentation, and operation of models and simulations"' that subsequently elicited additional guidance from the NASA Office of the Chief Engineer to include "a standard method to assess the credibility of the models and simulations."2 General methods applicable across the broad spectrum of model and simulation (M&S) disciplines were sought to help guide the modeling and simulation processes within NASA and to provide for consistent reporting ofM&S activities and analysis results. From this, the standardized process for the M&S activity was developed. The major contents of this Handbook are the implementation details of the general M&S requirements ofNASA-STD-7009, including explanations, examples, and suggestions for improving the credibility assessment of an M&S-based analysis.

  2. Prediction Activities at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) is a core NASA resource for the development and use of satellite observations through the integrating tools of models and assimilation systems. Global ocean, atmosphere and land surface models are developed as components of assimilation and forecast systems that are used for addressing the weather and climate research questions identified in NASA's science mission. In fact, the GMAO is actively engaged in addressing one of NASA's science mission s key questions concerning how well transient climate variations can be understood and predicted. At weather time scales the GMAO is developing ultra-high resolution global climate models capable of resolving high impact weather systems such as hurricanes. The ability to resolve the detailed characteristics of weather systems within a global framework greatly facilitates addressing fundamental questions concerning the link between weather and climate variability. At sub-seasonal time scales, the GMAO is engaged in research and development to improve the use of land information (especially soil moisture), and in the improved representation and initialization of various sub-seasonal atmospheric variability (such as the MJO) that evolves on time scales longer than weather and involves exchanges with both the land and ocean The GMAO has a long history of development for advancing the seasonal-to-interannual (S-I) prediction problem using an older version of the coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM). This includes the development of an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) to facilitate the multivariate assimilation of ocean surface altimetry, and an EnKF developed for the highly inhomogeneous nature of the errors in land surface models, as well as the multivariate assimilation needed to take advantage of surface soil moisture and snow observations. The importance of decadal variability, especially that associated with long-term droughts is well recognized by the

  3. Solar Irradiance Modelling with NASA WW GIS Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Piragnolo, Marco; Masiero, Andrea; Fissore, Francesca; Pirotti, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present preliminary results regarding a proof-of-concept project which aims to provide tools for mapping the amount of solar radiation reaching surfaces of objects, accounting for obstructions between objects themselves. The implementation uses the NASA World Wind development platform (NASA WW) to model the different physical phenomena that participate in the process, from the calculation of the Sun’s position relative to the area that is being considered, to the interaction b...

  4. Link mining models, algorithms, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Philip S; Faloutsos, Christos

    2010-01-01

    This book presents in-depth surveys and systematic discussions on models, algorithms and applications for link mining. Link mining is an important field of data mining. Traditional data mining focuses on 'flat' data in which each data object is represented as a fixed-length attribute vector. However, many real-world data sets are much richer in structure, involving objects of multiple types that are related to each other. Hence, recently link mining has become an emerging field of data mining, which has a high impact in various important applications such as text mining, social network analysi

  5. Rational Models for Inflation-Linked Derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Henrik; Macrina, Andrea; Skovmand, David

    2018-01-01

    We construct models for the pricing and risk management of inflation-linked derivatives. The model is rational in the sense that affine payoffs written on the consumer price index have prices that are rational functions of the state variables. The nominal pricing kernel is constructed in a multip......We construct models for the pricing and risk management of inflation-linked derivatives. The model is rational in the sense that affine payoffs written on the consumer price index have prices that are rational functions of the state variables. The nominal pricing kernel is constructed...... in a multiplicative manner that allows for closed-form pricing of vanilla inflation products suchlike zero-coupon swaps, caps and floors, year-on-year swaps, caps and floors, and the exotic limited price index swap. The model retains the attractive features of a nominal multi-curve interest rate model such as closed...

  6. Link Prediction via Sparse Gaussian Graphical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Link prediction is an important task in complex network analysis. Traditional link prediction methods are limited by network topology and lack of node property information, which makes predicting links challenging. In this study, we address link prediction using a sparse Gaussian graphical model and demonstrate its theoretical and practical effectiveness. In theory, link prediction is executed by estimating the inverse covariance matrix of samples to overcome information limits. The proposed method was evaluated with four small and four large real-world datasets. The experimental results show that the area under the curve (AUC value obtained by the proposed method improved by an average of 3% and 12.5% compared to 13 mainstream similarity methods, respectively. This method outperforms the baseline method, and the prediction accuracy is superior to mainstream methods when using only 80% of the training set. The method also provides significantly higher AUC values when using only 60% in Dolphin and Taro datasets. Furthermore, the error rate of the proposed method demonstrates superior performance with all datasets compared to mainstream methods.

  7. Solar Irradiance Modelling with NASA WW GIS Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Piragnolo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present preliminary results regarding a proof-of-concept project which aims to provide tools for mapping the amount of solar radiation reaching surfaces of objects, accounting for obstructions between objects themselves. The implementation uses the NASA World Wind development platform (NASA WW to model the different physical phenomena that participate in the process, from the calculation of the Sun’s position relative to the area that is being considered, to the interaction between atmosphere and solid obstructions, e.g., terrain or buildings. A more complete understanding of the distribution of energy from the Sun illuminating elements on the Earth’s surface adds value to applications ranging from planning the renewable energy potential of an area to ecological analyses.

  8. NASA AVOSS Fast-Time Wake Prediction Models: User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nash'at N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing and testing fast-time wake transport and decay models to safely enhance the capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS). The fast-time wake models are empirical algorithms used for real-time predictions of wake transport and decay based on aircraft parameters and ambient weather conditions. The aircraft dependent parameters include the initial vortex descent velocity and the vortex pair separation distance. The atmospheric initial conditions include vertical profiles of temperature or potential temperature, eddy dissipation rate, and crosswind. The current distribution includes the latest versions of the APA (3.4) and the TDP (2.1) models. This User's Guide provides detailed information on the model inputs, file formats, and the model output. An example of a model run and a brief description of the Memphis 1995 Wake Vortex Dataset is also provided.

  9. NASA 60 GHz intersatellite communication link definition study. Addendum A: Mixed baseband and IF signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    As part of a definition study for a 60 GHz intersatellite communications link system (ICLS), baseline design concepts for a channelized crosslink were identified. The crosslink would allow communications between geostationary satellites of the planned Tracking and Data Acquisition System (TDAS) and would accommodate a mixture of frequency translation coherent links (bent pipe links) and baseband-in/baseband-out links (mod/demod links). A 60 GHz communication system was developed for sizing and analyzing the crosslink. For the coherent links this system translates incoming signals directly up to the 60 GHz band; trunks the signals across from one satellite to a second satellite at 60 GHz then down converts to the proper frequency for re-transmission from the second satellite without converting to any intermediate frequencies. For the baseband-in/baseband-out links the baseband data is modulated on to the 60 GHz carrier at the transmitting satellite and demodulated at the receiving satellite. The frequency plan, equipment diagrams, and link calculations are presented along with results from sizing and reliability analyses.

  10. NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model assimilating ESRID data global monthly 2/3x1.25 degrees VR2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model -- Assimilated Monthly Data The NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) is a comprehensive, interactive ocean biogeochemical model...

  11. Air Quality Forecasts Using the NASA GEOS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Christoph A.; Knowland, K. Emma; Nielsen, Jon E.; Orbe, Clara; Ott, Lesley; Pawson, Steven; Saunders, Emily; Duncan, Bryan; Follette-Cook, Melanie; Liu, Junhua; hide

    2018-01-01

    We provide an introduction to a new high-resolution (0.25 degree) global composition forecast produced by NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation office. The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) model has been expanded to provide global near-real-time forecasts of atmospheric composition at a horizontal resolution of 0.25 degrees (25 km). Previously, this combination of detailed chemistry and resolution was only provided by regional models. This system combines the operational GEOS-5 weather forecasting model with the state-of-the-science GEOS-Chem chemistry module (version 11) to provide detailed chemical analysis of a wide range of air pollutants such as ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). The resolution of the forecasts is the highest resolution compared to current, publically-available global composition forecasts. Evaluation and validation of modeled trace gases and aerosols compared to surface and satellite observations will be presented for constituents relative to health air quality standards. Comparisons of modeled trace gases and aerosols against satellite observations show that the model produces realistic concentrations of atmospheric constituents in the free troposphere. Model comparisons against surface observations highlight the model's capability to capture the diurnal variability of air pollutants under a variety of meteorological conditions. The GEOS-5 composition forecasting system offers a new tool for scientists and the public health community, and is being developed jointly with several government and non-profit partners. Potential applications include air quality warnings, flight campaign planning and exposure studies using the archived analysis fields.

  12. NASA GRC UAS Project - Communications Modeling and Simulation Development Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaza, Rafael; Bretmersky, Steven; Dailey, Justin; Satapathy, Goutam; Ditzenberger, David; Ye, Chris; Kubat, Greg; Chevalier, Christine; Nguyen, Thanh

    2014-01-01

    The integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace represents new operational concepts required in civil aviation. These new concepts are evolving as the nation moves toward the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) under the leadership of the Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO), and through ongoing work by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The desire and ability to fly UAS in the National Air Space (NAS) in the near term has increased dramatically, and this multi-agency effort to develop and implement a national plan to successfully address the challenges of UAS access to the NAS in a safe and timely manner is well underway. As part of the effort to integrate UAS in the National Airspace, NASA Glenn Research Center is currently involved with providing research into Communications systems and Communication system operations in order to assist with developing requirements for this implementation. In order to provide data and information regarding communication systems performance that will be necessary, NASA GRC is tasked with developing and executing plans for simulations of candidate future UAS command and control communications, in line with architectures and communications technologies being developed and or proposed by NASA and relevant aviation organizations (in particular, RTCA SC-203). The simulations and related analyses will provide insight into the ability of proposed communications technologies and system architectures to enable safe operation of UAS, meeting UAS in the NAS project goals (including performance requirements, scalability, and interoperability), and ultimately leading to a determination of the ability of NextGen communication systems to accommodate UAS. This presentation, compiled by the NASA GRC Modeling and Simulation team, will provide an update to this ongoing effort at NASA GRC as follow-up to the overview of the planned simulation effort presented at ICNS in 2013. The objective

  13. Applying Model Based Systems Engineering to NASA's Space Communications Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Kul; Barnes, Patrick; Reinert, Jessica; Golden, Bert

    2013-01-01

    System engineering practices for complex systems and networks now require that requirement, architecture, and concept of operations product development teams, simultaneously harmonize their activities to provide timely, useful and cost-effective products. When dealing with complex systems of systems, traditional systems engineering methodology quickly falls short of achieving project objectives. This approach is encumbered by the use of a number of disparate hardware and software tools, spreadsheets and documents to grasp the concept of the network design and operation. In case of NASA's space communication networks, since the networks are geographically distributed, and so are its subject matter experts, the team is challenged to create a common language and tools to produce its products. Using Model Based Systems Engineering methods and tools allows for a unified representation of the system in a model that enables a highly related level of detail. To date, Program System Engineering (PSE) team has been able to model each network from their top-level operational activities and system functions down to the atomic level through relational modeling decomposition. These models allow for a better understanding of the relationships between NASA's stakeholders, internal organizations, and impacts to all related entities due to integration and sustainment of existing systems. Understanding the existing systems is essential to accurate and detailed study of integration options being considered. In this paper, we identify the challenges the PSE team faced in its quest to unify complex legacy space communications networks and their operational processes. We describe the initial approaches undertaken and the evolution toward model based system engineering applied to produce Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) PSE products. We will demonstrate the practice of Model Based System Engineering applied to integrating space communication networks and the summary of its

  14. Analysis of NASA Common Research Model Dynamic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishna, S.; Acheson, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent NASA Common Research Model (CRM) tests at the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) and Ames 11-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel (11-foot TWT) have generated an experimental database for CFD code validation. The database consists of force and moment, surface pressures and wideband wing-root dynamic strain/wing Kulite data from continuous sweep pitch polars. The dynamic data sets, acquired at 12,800 Hz sampling rate, are analyzed in this study to evaluate CRM wing buffet onset and potential CRM wing flow separation.

  15. NASA Air Force Cost Model (NAFCOM): Capabilities and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Julie; Culver, George; Naderi, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    NAFCOM is a parametric estimating tool for space hardware. Uses cost estimating relationships (CERs) which correlate historical costs to mission characteristics to predict new project costs. It is based on historical NASA and Air Force space projects. It is intended to be used in the very early phases of a development project. NAFCOM can be used at the subsystem or component levels and estimates development and production costs. NAFCOM is applicable to various types of missions (crewed spacecraft, uncrewed spacecraft, and launch vehicles). There are two versions of the model: a government version that is restricted and a contractor releasable version.

  16. Building Hybrid Rover Models for NASA: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeke, Thomas; Dearden, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Particle filters have recently become popular for diagnosis and monitoring of hybrid systems. In this paper we describe our experiences using particle filters on a real diagnosis problem, the NASA Ames Research Center's K-9 rover. As well as the challenge of modelling the dynamics of the system, there are two major issues in applying a particle filter to such a model. The first is the asynchronous nature of the system-observations from different subsystems arrive at different rates, and occasionally out of order, leading to large amounts of uncertainty in the state of the system. The second issue is data interpretation. The particle filter produces a probability distribution over the state of the system, from which summary statistics that can be used for control or higher-level diagnosis must be extracted. We describe our approaches to both these problems, as well as other modelling issues that arose in this domain.

  17. Link model simulation and power penalty specification of the versatile link systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, D; Weidberg, A; Vasey, F; Zhu, L; Prosser, A; Liu, C; Xiang, A; Liu, T; Ye, J; Huffman, T

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents simulation and experimental studies of optical power penalties on the Versatile Link, a common R\\&D project on high-speed optical link for SLHC experiments. The 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10GbE) link model is examined and conservative link power penalties are predicted. We conduct parameter sensitivity analyses and find that the transmitter characteristics affect the link power penalties most. Power penalty differences of multi-mode and single-mode commerical transceiver modules over different fiber lengths are tested to be within the simulation limits. The optical power budgets are then proposed for different Versatile Link variants.

  18. Comparison of the NASA Common Research Model European Transonic Wind Tunnel Test Data to NASA Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Melissa; Quest, Juergen; Rudnik, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations of the NASA Common Research Model have been conducted in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility, the NASA Ames 11-ft wind tunnel, and the European Transonic Wind Tunnel. In the NASA Ames 11-ft wind tunnel, data have been obtained at only a chord Reynolds number of 5 million for a wing/body/tail = 0 degree incidence configuration. Data have been obtained at chord Reynolds numbers of 5, 19.8 and 30 million for the same configuration in the National Transonic Facility and in the European Transonic Facility. Force and moment, surface pressure, wing bending and twist, and surface flow visualization data were obtained in all three facilities but only the force and moment and surface pressure data are presented herein.

  19. Aeroelastic tailoring via ribs orientation of NASA Common Research Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y. N.; Harmin, M. Y.; Rafie, A. S. M.

    2017-12-01

    A baseline model in reference to the NASA Common Research Model is selected to illustrate the concept of aeroelastic tailoring of wing ribs structure by varying the orientation of the ribs. This enables the torsional-bending modes characteristic to be altered, which results in a possibility of improvement in the aeroelastic performance without having to compromise its overall weight. Two strategies are implanted in this work: the first strategy considers the whole ribs to be oriented in parallel while the second one is by dividing the wing into six parts where the ribs are allowed to be oriented in parallel within their part only. In many cases, there are a significant improvement with up to 5.5% of flutter increment via orientating the ribs section, hence leading to a possibility in significant structural weight reduction.

  20. NASA GISS Climate Change Research Initiative: A Multidisciplinary Vertical Team Model for Improving STEM Education by Using NASA's Unique Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    CCRI is a year-long STEM education program designed to bring together teams of NASA scientists, graduate, undergraduate and high school interns and high school STEM educators to become immersed in NASA research focused on atmospheric and climate changes in the 21st century. GISS climate research combines analysis of global datasets with global models of atmospheric, land surface, and oceanic processes to study climate change on Earth and other planetary atmospheres as a useful tool in assessing our general understanding of climate change. CCRI interns conduct research, gain knowledge in assigned research discipline, develop and present scientific presentations summarizing their research experience. Specifically, CCRI interns write a scientific research paper explaining basic ideas, research protocols, abstract, results, conclusion and experimental design. Prepare and present a professional presentation of their research project at NASA GISS, prepare and present a scientific poster of their research project at local and national research symposiums along with other federal agencies. CCRI Educators lead research teams under the direction of a NASA GISS scientist, conduct research, develop research based learning units and assist NASA scientists with the mentoring of interns. Educators create an Applied Research STEM Curriculum Unit Portfolio based on their research experience integrating NASA unique resources, tools and content into a teacher developed unit plan aligned with the State and NGSS standards. STEM Educators also Integrate and implement NASA unique units and content into their STEM courses during academic year, perform community education STEM engagement events, mentor interns in writing a research paper, oral research reporting, power point design and scientific poster design for presentation to local and national audiences. The CCRI program contributes to the Federal STEM Co-STEM initiatives by providing opportunities, NASA education resources and

  1. Criteria for Evaluating Alternative Network and Link Layer Protocols for the NASA Constellation Program Communication Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbenek, Daniel; Soloff, Jason; Lieb, Erica

    2010-01-01

    Selecting a communications and network architecture for future manned space flight requires an evaluation of the varying goals and objectives of the program, development of communications and network architecture evaluation criteria, and assessment of critical architecture trades. This paper uses Cx Program proposed exploration activities as a guideline; lunar sortie, outpost, Mars, and flexible path options are described. A set of proposed communications network architecture criteria are proposed and described. They include: interoperability, security, reliability, and ease of automating topology changes. Finally a key set of architecture options are traded including (1) multiplexing data at a common network layer vs. at the data link layer, (2) implementing multiple network layers vs. a single network layer, and (3) the use of a particular network layer protocol, primarily IPv6 vs. Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN). In summary, the protocol options are evaluated against the proposed exploration activities and their relative performance with respect to the criteria are assessed. An architectural approach which includes (a) the capability of multiplexing at both the network layer and the data link layer and (b) a single network layer for operations at each program phase, as these solutions are best suited to respond to the widest array of program needs and meet each of the evaluation criteria.

  2. A statistical model for telecommunication link design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of the current telecommunication link design technique and a description is presented of an alternative method, called the probability distribution method (PDM), which is free of the disadvantages of the current technique while retaining its advantages. The PDM preserves the simplicity of the design control table (DCT) format. The use of the DCT as a management design control tool is continued. The telecommunication link margin probability density function used presents the probability of achieving any particular value of link performance. It is, therefore, possible to assess the performance risk and other tradeoffs.

  3. A mathematical model for dynamics of occurrence probability of missing links in predicted missing link list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In most of the link prediction methods, all predicted missing links are ranked according to their scores. In the practical application of prediction results, starting from the first link that has the highest score in the ranking list, we verify each link one by one through experiments or other ways. Nevertheless, how to find an occurrence pattern of true missing links in the ranking list has seldomly reported. In present study, I proposed a mathematical model for relationship between cumulative number of predicted true missing links (y and cumulative number of predicted missing links (x: y=K(1-e^(-rx/K, where K is the expected total number of true missing links, and r is the intrinsic (maximum occurrence probability of true missing links. It can be used to predict the changes of occurrence probability of true missing links, assess the effectiveness of a prediction method, and help find the mechanism of link missing in the network. The model was validated by six prediction methods using the data of tumor pathways.

  4. Improving NASA's Multiscale Modeling Framework for Tropical Cyclone Climate Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bo-Wen; Nelson, Bron; Cheung, Samson; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2013-01-01

    One of the current challenges in tropical cyclone (TC) research is how to improve our understanding of TC interannual variability and the impact of climate change on TCs. Recent advances in global modeling, visualization, and supercomputing technologies at NASA show potential for such studies. In this article, the authors discuss recent scalability improvement to the multiscale modeling framework (MMF) that makes it feasible to perform long-term TC-resolving simulations. The MMF consists of the finite-volume general circulation model (fvGCM), supplemented by a copy of the Goddard cumulus ensemble model (GCE) at each of the fvGCM grid points, giving 13,104 GCE copies. The original fvGCM implementation has a 1D data decomposition; the revised MMF implementation retains the 1D decomposition for most of the code, but uses a 2D decomposition for the massive copies of GCEs. Because the vast majority of computation time in the MMF is spent computing the GCEs, this approach can achieve excellent speedup without incurring the cost of modifying the entire code. Intelligent process mapping allows differing numbers of processes to be assigned to each domain for load balancing. The revised parallel implementation shows highly promising scalability, obtaining a nearly 80-fold speedup by increasing the number of cores from 30 to 3,335.

  5. NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM2008 (Beta Version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbery, Eugene G.; Krisko, Paula H.

    2009-01-01

    This is an interim document intended to accompany the beta-release of the ORDEM2008 model. As such it provides the user with a guide for its use, a list of its capabilities, a brief summary of model development, and appendices included to educate the user as to typical runtimes for different orbit configurations. More detailed documentation will be delivered with the final product. ORDEM2008 supersedes NASA's previous model - ORDEM2000. The availability of new sensor and in situ data, the re-analysis of older data, and the development of new analytical techniques, has enabled the construction of this more comprehensive and sophisticated model. Integrated with the software is an upgraded graphical user interface (GUI), which uses project-oriented organization and provides the user with graphical representations of numerous output data products. These range from the conventional average debris size vs. flux magnitude for chosen analysis orbits, to the more complex color-contoured two-dimensional (2-D) directional flux diagrams in terms of local spacecraft pitch and yaw.

  6. TraceLink: A model of amnesia and consolidation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeter, M.; Murre, J.M.J.

    2005-01-01

    A connectionist model is presented, the TraceLink model, that implements an autonomous "off-line" consolidation process. The model consists of three subsystems: (1) a trace system (neocortex), (2) a link system (hippocampus and adjacent regions), and (3) a modulatory system (basal forebrain and

  7. Does NASA SMAP Improve the Accuracy of Power Outage Models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiring, S. M.; McRoberts, D. B.; Toy, B.; Alvarado, B.

    2016-12-01

    Electric power utilities make critical decisions in the days prior to hurricane landfall that are primarily based on the estimated impact to their service area. For example, utilities must determine how many repair crews to request from other utilities, the amount of material and equipment they will need to make repairs, and where in their geographically expansive service area to station crews and materials. Accurate forecasts of the impact of an approaching hurricane within their service area are critical for utilities in balancing the costs and benefits of different levels of resources. The Hurricane Outage Prediction Model (HOPM) are a family of statistical models that utilize predictions of tropical cyclone windspeed and duration of strong winds, along with power system and environmental variables (e.g., soil moisture, long-term precipitation), to forecast the number and location of power outages. This project assesses whether using NASA SMAP soil moisture improves the accuracy of power outage forecasts as compared to using model-derived soil moisture from NLDAS-2. A sensitivity analysis is employed since there have been very few tropical cyclones making landfall in the United States since SMAP was launched. The HOPM is used to predict power outages for 13 historical tropical cyclones and the model is run using twice, once with NLDAS soil moisture and once with SMAP soil moisture. Our results demonstrate that using SMAP soil moisture can have a significant impact on power outage predictions. SMAP has the potential to enhance the accuracy of power outage forecasts. Improved outage forecasts reduce the duration of power outages which reduces economic losses and accelerates recovery.

  8. NASA Lewis Launch Collision Probability Model Developed and Analyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D

    1999-01-01

    There are nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the earth. These objects encompass manned objects, active and decommissioned satellites, spent rocket bodies, and debris. They range from a few centimeters across to the size of the MIR space station. Anytime a new satellite is launched, the launch vehicle with its payload attached passes through an area of space in which these objects orbit. Although the population density of these objects is low, there always is a small but finite probability of collision between the launch vehicle and one or more of these space objects. Even though the probability of collision is very low, for some payloads even this small risk is unacceptable. To mitigate the small risk of collision associated with launching at an arbitrary time within the daily launch window, NASA performs a prelaunch mission assurance Collision Avoidance Analysis (or COLA). For the COLA of the Cassini spacecraft, the NASA Lewis Research Center conducted an in-house development and analysis of a model for launch collision probability. The model allows a minimum clearance criteria to be used with the COLA analysis to ensure an acceptably low probability of collision. If, for any given liftoff time, the nominal launch vehicle trajectory would pass a space object with less than the minimum required clearance, launch would not be attempted at that time. The model assumes that the nominal positions of the orbiting objects and of the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time, and therefore, that any tracked object that comes within close proximity of the launch vehicle can be identified. For any such pair, these nominal positions can be used to calculate a nominal miss distance. The actual miss distances may differ substantially from the nominal miss distance, due, in part, to the statistical uncertainty of the knowledge of the objects positions. The model further assumes that these position uncertainties can be described with position covariance matrices

  9. A Managerial Approach to NASA's Cultural Changes: Open System Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aytekin, Yasin; Long, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    This project describes NASA's culture during two important time periods (1958-1972) and (1996-2004) and explains its relative fit with its system components -- task, people, resources, and structure...

  10. A Managerial Approach to NASA's Cultural Changes: Open System Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aytekin, Yasin; Long, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    ... them. During the first period (1958-1972), NASA was established and it landed the first man on the moon, a remarkable accomplishment given the advances in science and technology required to complete this mission...

  11. Modeling techniques used in the communications link analysis and simulation system (CLASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, W. R.; Mckenzie, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    CLASS (Communications Link Analysis and Simulation System) is a software package developed for NASA to predict the communication and tracking performance of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) services. The modeling techniques used in CLASS are described. The components of TDRSS and the performance parameters to be computed by CLASS are too diverse to permit the use of a single technique to evaluate all performance measures. Hence, each CLASS module applies the modeling approach best suited for a particular subsystem and/or performance parameter in terms of model accuracy and computational speed.

  12. Developing Experimental Models for NASA Missions with ASSL

    OpenAIRE

    Emil Vassev; Mike Hinchey

    2010-01-01

    NASA's new age of space exploration augurs great promise for deep space exploration missions whereby spacecraft should be independent, autonomous, and smart. Nowadays NASA increasingly relies on the concepts of autonomic computing, exploiting these to increase the survivability of remote missions, particularly when human tending is not feasible. Autonomic computing has been recognized as a promising approach for the development of self-managing spacecraft systems that employ onboard intellige...

  13. The NASA MSFC Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model-2007 Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, F.W.; Justus, C.G.

    2008-01-01

    Reference or standard atmospheric models have long been used for design and mission planning of various aerospace systems. The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM) was developed in response to the need for a design reference atmosphere that provides complete global geographical variability, and complete altitude coverage (surface to orbital altitudes) as well as complete seasonal and monthly variability of the thermodynamic variables and wind components. A unique feature of GRAM is that, addition to providing the geographical, height, and monthly variation of the mean atmospheric state, it includes the ability to simulate spatial and temporal perturbations in these atmospheric parameters (e.g. fluctuations due to turbulence and other atmospheric perturbation phenomena). A summary comparing GRAM features to characteristics and features of other reference or standard atmospheric models, can be found Guide to Reference and Standard Atmosphere Models. The original GRAM has undergone a series of improvements over the years with recent additions and changes. The software program is called Earth-GRAM2007 to distinguish it from similar programs for other bodies (e.g. Mars, Venus, Neptune, and Titan). However, in order to make this Technical Memorandum (TM) more readable, the software will be referred to simply as GRAM07 or GRAM unless additional clarity is needed. Section 1 provides an overview of the basic features of GRAM07 including the newly added features. Section 2 provides a more detailed description of GRAM07 and how the model output generated. Section 3 presents sample results. Appendices A and B describe the Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) data and the Global Gridded Air Statistics (GGUAS) database. Appendix C provides instructions for compiling and running GRAM07. Appendix D gives a description of the required NAMELIST format input. Appendix E gives sample output. Appendix F provides a list of available

  14. Validation Testing of a Peridynamic Impact Damage Model Using NASA's Micro-Particle Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baber, Forrest E.; Zelinski, Brian J.; Guven, Ibrahim; Gray, Perry

    2017-01-01

    Through a collaborative effort between the Virginia Commonwealth University and Raytheon, a peridynamic model for sand impact damage has been developed1-3. Model development has focused on simulating impacts of sand particles on ZnS traveling at velocities consistent with aircraft take-off and landing speeds. The model reproduces common features of impact damage including pit and radial cracks, and, under some conditions, lateral cracks. This study focuses on a preliminary validation exercise in which simulation results from the peridynamic model are compared to a limited experimental data set generated by NASA's recently developed micro-particle gun (MPG). The MPG facility measures the dimensions and incoming and rebound velocities of the impact particles. It also links each particle to a specific impact site and its associated damage. In this validation exercise parameters of the peridynamic model are adjusted to fit the experimentally observed pit diameter, average length of radial cracks and rebound velocities for 4 impacts of 300 µm glass beads on ZnS. Results indicate that a reasonable fit of these impact characteristics can be obtained by suitable adjustment of the peridynamic input parameters, demonstrating that the MPG can be used effectively as a validation tool for impact modeling and that the peridynamic sand impact model described herein possesses not only a qualitative but also a quantitative ability to simulate sand impact events.

  15. Cross-link guided molecular modeling with ROSETTA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Kahraman

    Full Text Available Chemical cross-links identified by mass spectrometry generate distance restraints that reveal low-resolution structural information on proteins and protein complexes. The technology to reliably generate such data has become mature and robust enough to shift the focus to the question of how these distance restraints can be best integrated into molecular modeling calculations. Here, we introduce three workflows for incorporating distance restraints generated by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry into ROSETTA protocols for comparative and de novo modeling and protein-protein docking. We demonstrate that the cross-link validation and visualization software Xwalk facilitates successful cross-link data integration. Besides the protocols we introduce XLdb, a database of chemical cross-links from 14 different publications with 506 intra-protein and 62 inter-protein cross-links, where each cross-link can be mapped on an experimental structure from the Protein Data Bank. Finally, we demonstrate on a protein-protein docking reference data set the impact of virtual cross-links on protein docking calculations and show that an inter-protein cross-link can reduce on average the RMSD of a docking prediction by 5.0 Å. The methods and results presented here provide guidelines for the effective integration of chemical cross-link data in molecular modeling calculations and should advance the structural analysis of particularly large and transient protein complexes via hybrid structural biology methods.

  16. Development of an Integrated Nonlinear Aeroservoelastic Flight Dynamic Model of the NASA Generic Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a recent development of an integrated fully coupled aeroservoelastic flight dynamic model of the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM). The integrated model couples nonlinear flight dynamics to a nonlinear aeroelastic model of the GTM. The nonlinearity includes the coupling of the rigid-body aircraft states in the partial derivatives of the aeroelastic angle of attack. Aeroservoelastic modeling of the control surfaces which are modeled by the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap is also conducted. The R.T. Jones' method is implemented to approximate unsteady aerodynamics. Simulations of the GTM are conducted with simulated continuous and discrete gust loads..

  17. NASA's Use of Human Behavior Models for Concept Development and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Brian F.

    2012-01-01

    Overview of NASA's use of computational approaches and methods to support research goals, of human performance models, with a focus on examples of the methods used in Code TH and TI at NASA Ames, followed by an in depth review of MIDAS' current FAA work.

  18. Modelling flexible link manipulators in the three-dimensional space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, David

    The force/torque relationship between the joints and the end effector of flexible link manipulators is affected not only by the motion of the joints but also by translations and rotations of the links due to their bending and torsion effects. These inaccuracies in the force/torque relationship for flexible manipulators in the three-dimensional space are addressed. This thesis presents the development of a systematic technique for determining for force/torque relationship between the joints and the end effector for flexible link manipulators. The proposed technique accounts for link bending and torsion in the kinematic equations of a flexible manipulator while considering rigid hubs and tools attached to the ends of the links. A procedure for modelling link bending and torsion to within a desired accuracy has also been developed. The resulting model is independent of manipulator configuration. In this technique, vector cross products are used instead of partial derivatives. This reduces inaccuracies which result from approximations made in the kinematic equations when modelling bending and torsion of the links. The magnitude and location of these inaccuracies are characterized. The validity of the proposed technique/procedure and the inaccuracies noted are demonstrated for link bending of a single-link planar manipulator by comparing simulations of the resulting force/torque relationships to results obtained experimentally; however, the experiments were not able to illustrate the torsion effect in the proposed model. Results indicate that the magnitude and location of the errors in the force/torque relationship are dependent upon the rotation due to link deformation, the 'length' of the rest of the manipulator, and the configuration of the manipulator. Although the proposed technique is able to account for the link bending and torsion effects in the kinematic equations of a flexible manipulator, it also suffers from several limitations. These include: translations

  19. Linking spatial and dynamic models for traffic maneuvers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olderog, Ernst-Rüdiger; Ravn, Anders Peter; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    For traffic maneuvers of multiple vehicles on highways we build an abstract spatial and a concrete dynamic model. In the spatial model we show the safety (collision freedom) of lane-change maneuvers. By linking the spatial and dynamic model via suitable refinements of the spatial atoms to distance...

  20. Satellite Models for Global Environmental Change in the NASA Health and Air Quality Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, J.; Estes, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of the environment offers a unique vantage point that can fill in the gaps of environmental, spatial, and temporal data for tracking disease. Health and Air Quality providers and researchers are effective by the global environmental changes that are occurring and they need environmental data to study and understand the geographic, environmental, and meteorological differences in disease. This presentation maintains a diverse constellation of Earth observing research satellites and sponsors research in developing satellite data applications across a wide spectrum of areas including environmental health; infectious disease; air quality standards, policies, and regulations; and the impact of climate change on health and air quality. Successfully providing predictions with the accuracy and specificity required by decision makers will require advancements over current capabilities in a number of interrelated areas. These areas include observations, modeling systems, forecast development, application integration, and the research to operations transition process. This presentation will highlight many projects on which NASA satellites have been a primary partner with local, state, Federal, and international operational agencies over the past twelve years in these areas. Domestic and International officials have increasingly recognized links between environment and health. Health providers and researchers need environmental data to study and understand the geographic, environmental, and meteorological differences in disease. The presentation is directly related to Earth Observing systems and Global Health Surveillance and will present research results of the remote sensing environmental observations of earth and health applications, which can contribute to the health research. As part of NASA approach and methodology they have used Earth Observation Systems and Applications for Health Models to provide a method for bridging gaps of environmental

  1. A novel multilayer model for missing link prediction and future link forecasting in dynamic complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasami, Yasser; Safaei, Farshad

    2018-02-01

    The traditional complex network theory is particularly focused on network models in which all network constituents are dealt with equivalently, while fail to consider the supplementary information related to the dynamic properties of the network interactions. This is a main constraint leading to incorrect descriptions of some real-world phenomena or incomplete capturing the details of certain real-life problems. To cope with the problem, this paper addresses the multilayer aspects of dynamic complex networks by analyzing the properties of intrinsically multilayered co-authorship networks, DBLP and Astro Physics, and presenting a novel multilayer model of dynamic complex networks. The model examines the layers evolution (layers birth/death process and lifetime) throughout the network evolution. Particularly, this paper models the evolution of each node's membership in different layers by an Infinite Factorial Hidden Markov Model considering feature cascade, and thereby formulates the link generation process for intra-layer and inter-layer links. Although adjacency matrixes are useful to describe the traditional single-layer networks, such a representation is not sufficient to describe and analyze the multilayer dynamic networks. This paper also extends a generalized mathematical infrastructure to address the problems issued by multilayer complex networks. The model inference is performed using some Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling strategies, given synthetic and real complex networks data. Experimental results indicate a tremendous improvement in the performance of the proposed multilayer model in terms of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, positive and negative likelihood ratios, F1-score, Matthews correlation coefficient, and accuracy for two important applications of missing link prediction and future link forecasting. The experimental results also indicate the strong predictivepower of the proposed model for the application of

  2. Public Outreach with NASA Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, E.; Day, B.

    2017-09-01

    NASA's Trek family of online portals is an exceptional collection of resources making it easy for students and the public to explore surfaces of planetary bodies using real data from real missions. Exotic landforms on other worlds and our plans to explore them provide inspiring context for science and technology lessons in classrooms, museums, and at home. These portals can be of great value to formal and informal educators, as well as to scientists working to share the excitement of the latest developments in planetary science, and can significantly enhance visibility and public engagement in missions of exploration.

  3. NASA MSFC LIGHTNING NITROGEN OXIDES MODEL (LNOM) DATA FOR DC METROPOLITAN REGION V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) combines detailed, flash-specific measurements of lightning with both theoretical and...

  4. NASA MSFC LIGHTNING NITROGEN OXIDES MODEL (LNOM) DATA FOR NORTH ALABAMA REGION V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) combines detailed, flash-specific measurements of lightning with both theoretical and...

  5. Reducing Tick-Borne Disease in Alabama: Linking Health Risk Perception with Spatial Analysis Using the NASA Earth Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmings, S.; Renneboog, N.; Firsing, S.; Capilouto, E.; Harden, J.; Hyden, R.; Tipre, M.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD) accounts for most vector-borne disease reports in the U.S., and although its existence in Alabama remains controversial, other tick-borne illnesses (TBI) such as Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness (STARI) pose a health concern in the state. Phase One of the Marshall Space Flight Center-UAB DEVELOP study of TBI identified the presence of the chain of infection for LD (Ixodes scapularis ticks carrying Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria) and STARI (Amblyomma americanum ticks and an as-yet-unconfirmed agent) in Alabama. Both LD and STARI are associated with the development of erythema migrans rashes around an infected tick bite, and while treatable with oral antibiotics, a review of educational resources available to state residents revealed low levels of prevention information. To improve prevention, recognition, and treatment of TBI in Alabama, Phase Two builds a health communication campaign based on vector habitat mapping and risk perception assessment. NASA Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) satellite imagery identified likely tick habitats using remotely sensed measurements of vegetation vigor (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and soil moisture. Likely tick habitats, identified as those containing both high vegetation density and soil moisture, included Oak Mountain State Park, Bankhead National Forest, and Talladega National Forest. To target a high-risk group -- outdoor recreation program participants at Alabama universities -- the study developed a behavior survey instrument based on existing studies of LD risk factors and theoretical constructs from the Social Ecological Model and Health Belief Model. The survey instrument was amended to include geographic variables in the assessment of TBI knowledge, attitudes, and prevention behaviors, and the vector habitat model will be expanded to incorporate additional environmental variables and in situ data. Remotely sensed environmental data combined with

  6. Modeling of Atmospheric Turbulence Effect on Terrestrial FSO Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Prokes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric turbulence results in many effects causing fluctuation in the received optical power. Terrestrial laser beam communication is affected above all by scintillations. The paper deals with modeling the influence of scintillation on link performance, using the modified Rytov theory. The probability of correct signal detection in direct detection system in dependence on many parameters such as link distance, power link margin, refractive-index structure parameter, etc. is discussed and different approaches to the evaluation of scintillation effect are compared. The simulations are performed for a horizontal-path propagation of the Gaussian-beam wave.

  7. Virtual Models Linked with Physical Components in Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Birch

    components in the construction process and thereby improving the information handling. The present PhD project has examined the potential of establishing such a digital link between virtual models and physical components in construction. This is done by integrating knowledge of civil engineering, software......) project progress management, and 3) in operation and maintenance. Experiments and implementations in real life projects showed that mobile technology and passive RFID technology delineate an efficient and practically implementable ways to establish the digital links in construction and are ready for use...... virtual models that thoroughly mirror the performance of the final facility and its construction process. However, the potential of the virtual models in construction has not yet been fully utilised. One way to take more advantage of the virtual models is by digitally linking them with the physical...

  8. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Measurements on the NASA Common Research Model in the NASA 11-ft Transonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James H.

    2011-01-01

    The luminescence lifetime technique was used to make pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) measurements on a 2.7% Common Research Model in the NASA Ames 11ft Transonic Wind Tunnel. PSP data were obtained on the upper and lower surfaces of the wing and horizontal tail, as well as one side of the fuselage. Data were taken for several model attitudes of interest at Mach numbers between 0.70 and 0.87. Image data were mapped onto a three-dimensional surface grid suitable both for comparison with CFD and for integration of pressures to determine loads. Luminescence lifetime measurements were made using strobed LED (light-emitting diode) lamps to illuminate the PSP and fast-framing interline transfer cameras to acquire the PSP emission.

  9. Development of a High Resolution Weather Forecast Model for Mesoamerica Using the NASA Ames Code I Private Cloud Computing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew; Case, Jonathan; Venner, Jason; Moreno-Madrinan, Max J.; Delgado, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Two projects at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have collaborated to develop a high resolution weather forecast model for Mesoamerica: The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, which integrates unique NASA satellite and weather forecast modeling capabilities into the operational weather forecasting community. NASA's SERVIR Program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data, and forecast models to improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas.

  10. Link Community Detection Using Generative Model and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dongxiao; Jin, Di; Baquero, Carlos; Liu, Dayou

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of communities in complex networks is a fundamental data analysis problem with applications in various domains. While most of the existing approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, recent studies have shown the advantages and uses of link community discovery in networks. Generative models provide a promising class of techniques for the identification of modular structures in networks, but most generative models mainly focus on the detection of node communities rather than link communities. In this work, we propose a generative model, which is based on the importance of each node when forming links in each community, to describe the structure of link communities. We proceed to fit the model parameters by taking it as an optimization problem, and solve it using nonnegative matrix factorization. Thereafter, in order to automatically determine the number of communities, we extend the above method by introducing a strategy of iterative bipartition. This extended method not only finds the number of communities all by itself, but also obtains high efficiency, and thus it is more suitable to deal with large and unexplored real networks. We test this approach on both synthetic benchmarks and real-world networks including an application on a large biological network, and compare it with two highly related methods. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach over competing methods for the detection of link communities. PMID:24489803

  11. Link Prediction in Weighted Networks: A Weighted Mutual Information Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyao Zhu

    Full Text Available The link-prediction problem is an open issue in data mining and knowledge discovery, which attracts researchers from disparate scientific communities. A wealth of methods have been proposed to deal with this problem. Among these approaches, most are applied in unweighted networks, with only a few taking the weights of links into consideration. In this paper, we present a weighted model for undirected and weighted networks based on the mutual information of local network structures, where link weights are applied to further enhance the distinguishable extent of candidate links. Empirical experiments are conducted on four weighted networks, and results show that the proposed method can provide more accurate predictions than not only traditional unweighted indices but also typical weighted indices. Furthermore, some in-depth discussions on the effects of weak ties in link prediction as well as the potential to predict link weights are also given. This work may shed light on the design of algorithms for link prediction in weighted networks.

  12. Linking knowledge and action through mental models of sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Matthew; Lubell, Mark; Hillis, Vicken

    2014-09-09

    Linking knowledge to action requires understanding how decision-makers conceptualize sustainability. This paper empirically analyzes farmer "mental models" of sustainability from three winegrape-growing regions of California where local extension programs have focused on sustainable agriculture. The mental models are represented as networks where sustainability concepts are nodes, and links are established when a farmer mentions two concepts in their stated definition of sustainability. The results suggest that winegrape grower mental models of sustainability are hierarchically structured, relatively similar across regions, and strongly linked to participation in extension programs and adoption of sustainable farm practices. We discuss the implications of our findings for the debate over the meaning of sustainability, and the role of local extension programs in managing knowledge systems.

  13. Effect of Linked Rules on Business Process Model Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei; Indulska, Marta; Sadiq, Shazia

    2017-01-01

    of business processes has not been empirically evaluated. In this paper, we report on an experiment that investigates the effect of linked rules, a specific rule integration approach, on business process model understanding. Our results indicate that linked rules are associated with better time efficiency......Business process models are widely used in organizations by information systems analysts to represent complex business requirements and by business users to understand business operations and constraints. This understanding is extracted from graphical process models as well as business rules. Prior...... research advocated integrating business rules into business process models to improve the effectiveness of important organizational activities, such as developing shared understanding, effective communication, and process improvement. However, whether such integrated modeling can improve the understanding...

  14. NASA 3D Models: ISS (Hi-res)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A very high resolution model of the International Space Station in many parts. The download includes an image of the final configuration. This model is provided in...

  15. Analysis of sensory ratings data with cumulative link models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen; Brockhoff, Per B.

    2013-01-01

    Examples of categorical rating scales include discrete preference, liking and hedonic rating scales. Data obtained on these scales are often analyzed with normal linear regression methods or with omnibus Pearson chi2 tests. In this paper we propose to use cumulative link models that allow for reg...

  16. Technical Evaluation of the NASA Model for Cancer Risk to Astronauts Due to Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    At the request of NASA, the National Research Council's (NRC's) Committee for Evaluation of Space Radiation Cancer Risk Model reviewed a number of changes that NASA proposes to make to its model for estimating the risk of radiation-induced cancer in astronauts. The NASA model in current use was last updated in 2005, and the proposed model would incorporate recent research directed at improving the quantification and understanding of the health risks posed by the space radiation environment. NASA's proposed model is defined by the 2011 NASA report Space Radiation Cancer Risk Projections and Uncertainties 2010 (Cucinotta et al., 2011). The committee's evaluation is based primarily on this source, which is referred to hereafter as the 2011 NASA report, with mention of specific sections or tables cited more formally as Cucinotta et al. (2011). The overall process for estimating cancer risks due to low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation exposure has been fully described in reports by a number of organizations. They include, more recently: (1) The "BEIR VII Phase 2" report from the NRC's Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) (NRC, 2006); (2) Studies of Radiation and Cancer from the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR, 2006), (3) The 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), ICRP Publication 103 (ICRP, 2007); and (4) The Environmental Protection Agency s (EPA s) report EPA Radiogenic Cancer Risk Models and Projections for the U.S. Population (EPA, 2011). The approaches described in the reports from all of these expert groups are quite similar. NASA's proposed space radiation cancer risk assessment model calculates, as its main output, age- and gender-specific risk of exposure-induced death (REID) for use in the estimation of mission and astronaut-specific cancer risk. The model also calculates the associated uncertainties in REID. The general approach for

  17. Assessment of NASA's Physiographic and Meteorological Datasets as Input to HSPF and SWAT Hydrological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alacron, Vladimir J.; Nigro, Joseph D.; McAnally, William H.; OHara, Charles G.; Engman, Edwin Ted; Toll, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper documents the use of simulated Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer land use/land cover (MODIS-LULC), NASA-LIS generated precipitation and evapo-transpiration (ET), and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) datasets (in conjunction with standard land use, topographical and meteorological datasets) as input to hydrological models routinely used by the watershed hydrology modeling community. The study is focused in coastal watersheds in the Mississippi Gulf Coast although one of the test cases focuses in an inland watershed located in northeastern State of Mississippi, USA. The decision support tools (DSTs) into which the NASA datasets were assimilated were the Soil Water & Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Hydrological Simulation Program FORTRAN (HSPF). These DSTs are endorsed by several US government agencies (EPA, FEMA, USGS) for water resources management strategies. These models use physiographic and meteorological data extensively. Precipitation gages and USGS gage stations in the region were used to calibrate several HSPF and SWAT model applications. Land use and topographical datasets were swapped to assess model output sensitivities. NASA-LIS meteorological data were introduced in the calibrated model applications for simulation of watershed hydrology for a time period in which no weather data were available (1997-2006). The performance of the NASA datasets in the context of hydrological modeling was assessed through comparison of measured and model-simulated hydrographs. Overall, NASA datasets were as useful as standard land use, topographical , and meteorological datasets. Moreover, NASA datasets were used for performing analyses that the standard datasets could not made possible, e.g., introduction of land use dynamics into hydrological simulations

  18. The NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Application to Air Quality Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Khan, Maudood; Biazar, Arastoo; Wang, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Recent improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) and its application to the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system are discussed. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark)(NLDN) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NO(x) (= NO + NO2). The latest LNOM estimates of lightning channel length distributions, lightning 1-m segment altitude distributions, and the vertical profile of lightning NO(x) are presented. The primary improvement to the LNOM is the inclusion of non-return stroke lightning NOx production due to: (1) hot core stepped and dart leaders, (2) stepped leader corona sheath, K-changes, continuing currents, and M-components. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NO(x) for an August 2006 run of CMAQ is discussed.

  19. Updates on Modeling the Water Cycle with the NASA Ames Mars Global Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Montmessin, F.; Brecht, A. S.; Urata, R.; Klassen, D. R.; Wolff, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Global Circulation Models (GCMs) have made steady progress in simulating the current Mars water cycle. It is now widely recognized that clouds are a critical component that can significantly affect the nature of the simulated water cycle. Two processes in particular are key to implementing clouds in a GCM: the microphysical processes of formation and dissipation, and their radiative effects on heating/ cooling rates. Together, these processes alter the thermal structure, change the dynamics, and regulate inter-hemispheric transport. We have made considerable progress representing these processes in the NASA Ames GCM, particularly in the presence of radiatively active water ice clouds. We present the current state of our group's water cycle modeling efforts, show results from selected simulations, highlight some of the issues, and discuss avenues for further investigation.­

  20. Numerical linked-cluster approach to quantum lattice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, Marcos; Bryant, Tyler; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2006-11-03

    We present a novel algorithm that allows one to obtain temperature dependent properties of quantum lattice models in the thermodynamic limit from exact diagonalization of small clusters. Our numerical linked-cluster approach provides a systematic framework to assess finite-size effects and is valid for any quantum lattice model. Unlike high temperature expansions, which have a finite radius of convergence in inverse temperature, these calculations are accurate at all temperatures provided the range of correlations is finite. We illustrate the power of our approach studying spin models on kagomé, triangular, and square lattices.

  1. NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for Local Model Runs in the Environmental Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Carcione, Brian; Wood, Lance; Maloney, Joseph; Estupinan, Jeral; Medlin, Jeffrey M.; Blottman, Peter; Rozumalski, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several products for its National Weather Service (NWS) partners that can be used to initialize local model runs within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Environmental Modeling System (EMS). These real-time datasets consist of surface-based information updated at least once per day, and produced in a composite or gridded product that is easily incorporated into the WRF EMS. The primary goal for making these NASA datasets available to the WRF EMS community is to provide timely and high-quality information at a spatial resolution comparable to that used in the local model configurations (i.e., convection-allowing scales). The current suite of SPoRT products supported in the WRF EMS include a Sea Surface Temperature (SST) composite, a Great Lakes sea-ice extent, a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) composite, and Land Information System (LIS) gridded output. The SPoRT SST composite is a blend of primarily the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System data for non-precipitation coverage over the oceans at 2-km resolution. The composite includes a special lake surface temperature analysis over the Great Lakes using contributions from the Remote Sensing Systems temperature data. The Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Ice Percentage product is used to create a sea-ice mask in the SPoRT SST composite. The sea-ice mask is produced daily (in-season) at 1.8-km resolution and identifies ice percentage from 0 100% in 10% increments, with values above 90% flagged as ice.

  2. A cell-based model system links chromothripsis with hyperploidy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardin, Balca R; Drainas, Alexandros P; Waszak, Sebastian M

    2015-01-01

    A remarkable observation emerging from recent cancer genome analyses is the identification of chromothripsis as a one-off genomic catastrophe, resulting in massive somatic DNA structural rearrangements (SRs). Largely due to lack of suitable model systems, the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis h...... in hyperploid cells. Analysis of primary medulloblastoma cancer genomes verified the link between hyperploidy and chromothripsis in vivo. CAST provides the foundation for mechanistic dissection of complex DNA rearrangement processes....

  3. The Trick Simulation Toolkit: A NASA/Opensource Framework for Running Time Based Physics Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The Trick Simulation Toolkit is a simulation development environment used to create high fidelity training and engineering simulations at the NASA Johnson Space Center and many other NASA facilities. Its purpose is to generate a simulation executable from a collection of user-supplied models and a simulation definition file. For each Trick-based simulation, Trick automatically provides job scheduling, numerical integration, the ability to write and restore human readable checkpoints, data recording, interactive variable manipulation, a run-time interpreter, and many other commonly needed capabilities. This allows simulation developers to concentrate on their domain expertise and the algorithms and equations of their models. Also included in Trick are tools for plotting recorded data and various other supporting utilities and libraries. Trick is written in C/C++ and Java and supports both Linux and MacOSX computer operating systems. This paper describes Trick's design and use at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  4. Continuous Modeling of a Multi-Link Flexible Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit Peled

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of dynamic, infinite dimension, modeling of a transmission is considered. An accurate Laplace transfer function matrix of the system that consists of flexible shafts connected by gears that are either rigid or flexible is found. The first step is deriving a set of single input, infinite dimension, transfer functions for a single uniform link. The building blocks of those transfer functions are time delays, representing the wave motion, and low order rational expressions, representing the boundary phenomena. The next step is combining these individual transfer functions into an overall model of the transmission, by means of the link reaction approach that makes use of the geometric relationships and reaction moments between neighboring links. The outcome is a generalized dynamic model with the moments in the gear pairs as the generalized state vector. The explicit and highly structured form of the transfer functions allows physical insight into the system, exact calculation of natural frequencies and the construction of exact simulation schemes built from standard blocks that are available in multi-purpose simulation software.

  5. Modeling online social networks based on preferential linking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Hai-Bo; Chen Jun; Guo Jin-Li

    2012-01-01

    We study the phenomena of preferential linking in a large-scale evolving online social network and find that the linear preference holds for preferential creation, preferential acceptance, and preferential attachment. Based on the linear preference, we propose an analyzable model, which illustrates the mechanism of network growth and reproduces the process of network evolution. Our simulations demonstrate that the degree distribution of the network produced by the model is in good agreement with that of the real network. This work provides a possible bridge between the micro-mechanisms of network growth and the macrostructures of online social networks

  6. The fuzziness of Jupiter's core: linking formation and evolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helled, Ravit; Lozovsky, Michael; Vazan, Allona; Stevenson, David; Guillot, Tristan; Hubbard, William

    2017-04-01

    Juno data can be used to better constrain Jupiter's internal structure and origin. First, we present Jupiter's primordial internal structure based on formation models and show that Jupiter's core might not be distinct from the envelope, and that the deep interior can have a gradual heavy-element structure. Second, we explore how such a primordial (non-adiabatic) interior affects Jupiter's long-term evolution. Finally, we will discuss the link between these formation and evolution models and Jupiter's current-state internal structure.

  7. STEM Engagement with NASA's Solar System Treks Portals for Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, E. S.; Day, B. H.

    2018-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the uses and capabilities of NASA's Solar System Treks family of online mapping and modeling portals. While also designed to support mission planning and scientific research, this presentation will focus on the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) engagement and public outreach capabilities of these web based suites of data visualization and analysis tools.

  8. A classifier model for detecting pronunciation errors regarding the Nasa Yuwe language’s 32 vowels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Carlos Naranjo Cuervo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Nasa Yuwe language has 32 oral and nasal vowels thereby leading to one being used instead of the other; such confusion can change the meaning of the spoken word in Nasa Yuwe. A set of classifier models have been developed to support correct learning of this language which is in danger of extinction aimed at detecting confusion in the pronunciation of the 32 vowels; about 85% were obtained after experimenting with a variety of linear and nonlinear classifiers, rates of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. A support software prototype was designed with these trained classifiers for the correct pronunciation of the language’s vowels.

  9. NASA-STD-7009 Guidance Document for Human Health and Performance Models and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Marlei; Mulugeta, Lealem; Nelson, Emily S.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous verification, validation, and credibility (VVC) processes are imperative to ensure that models and simulations (MS) are sufficiently reliable to address issues within their intended scope. The NASA standard for MS, NASA-STD-7009 (7009) [1] was a resultant outcome of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) to ensure MS are developed, applied, and interpreted appropriately for making decisions that may impact crew or mission safety. Because the 7009 focus is engineering systems, a NASA-STD-7009 Guidance Document is being developed to augment the 7009 and provide information, tools, and techniques applicable to the probabilistic and deterministic biological MS more prevalent in human health and performance (HHP) and space biomedical research and operations.

  10. NASA and USGS invest in invasive species modeling to evaluate habitat for Africanized Honey Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Invasive non-native species, such as plants, animals, and pathogens, have long been an interest to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and NASA. Invasive species cause harm to our economy (around $120 B/year), the environment (e.g., replacing native biodiversity, forest pathogens negatively affecting carbon storage), and human health (e.g., plague, West Nile virus). Five years ago, the USGS and NASA formed a partnership to improve ecological forecasting capabilities for the early detection and containment of the highest priority invasive species. Scientists from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Fort Collins Science Center developed a longterm strategy to integrate remote sensing capabilities, high-performance computing capabilities and new spatial modeling techniques to advance the science of ecological invasions [Schnase et al., 2002].

  11. Curing critical links in oscillator networks as power flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohden, Martin; Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard; Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Modern societies crucially depend on the robust supply with electric energy so that blackouts of power grids can have far reaching consequences. Typically, large scale blackouts take place after a cascade of failures: the failure of a single infrastructure component, such as a critical transmission line, results in several subsequent failures that spread across large parts of the network. Improving the robustness of a network to prevent such secondary failures is thus key for assuring a reliable power supply. In this article we analyze the nonlocal rerouting of power flows after transmission line failures for a simplified AC power grid model and compare different strategies to improve network robustness. We identify critical links in the grid and compute alternative pathways to quantify the grid’s redundant capacity and to find bottlenecks along the pathways. Different strategies are developed and tested to increase transmission capacities to restore stability with respect to transmission line failures. We show that local and nonlocal strategies typically perform alike: one can equally well cure critical links by providing backup capacities locally or by extending the capacities of bottleneck links at remote locations. (paper)

  12. Modelling and Intelligent Control of an Elastic Link Robot Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Loudini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, precise control of the end-point position of a planar single-link elastic manipulator robot is discussed. The Timoshenko beam theory (TBT has been used to characterize the structural link elasticity including important damping mechanisms. A suitable nonlinear model is derived based on the Lagrangian assumed modes method. Elastic link manipulators are classified as systems possessing highly complex dynamics. In addition, the environment in which they operate may have a lot of disturbances. These give rise to special problems that may be solved using intelligent control techniques. The application of two advanced control strategies based on fuzzy set theory is investigated. The first closed-loop control scheme to be applied is the standard Proportional-Derivative (PD type fuzzy logic controller (FLC, also known as PD-type Mamdani's FLC (MPDFLC. Then, a genetic algorithm (GA is used to optimize the MPDFLC parameters with innovative tuning procedures. Both the MPDFLC and the GA optimized FLC (GAOFLC are implemented and tested to achieve a precise control of the manipulator end-point. The performances of the adopted closed-loop intelligent control strategies are examined via simulation experiments.

  13. Propulsion modeling techniques and applications for the NASA Dryden X-30 real-time simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, John W.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the flight planning activities to date in the current National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program. The government flight-envelope expansion concept and other design flight operational assessments are discussed. The NASA Dryden NASP real-time simulator configuration is examined and hypersonic flight planning simulation propulsion modeling requirements are described. The major propulsion modeling techniques developed by the Edwards flight test team are outlined, and the application value of techniques for developmental hypersonic vehicles are discussed.

  14. Skein Invariants of Links and Their State Sum Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis H. Kauffman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the new skein invariants of classical links, H [ H ] , K [ K ] and D [ D ] , based on the invariants of links, H, K and D, denoting the regular isotopy version of the Homflypt polynomial, the Kauffman polynomial and the Dubrovnik polynomial. The invariants are obtained by abstracting the skein relation of the corresponding invariant and making a new skein algorithm comprising two computational levels: first producing unlinked knotted components, then evaluating the resulting knots. The invariants in this paper, were revealed through the skein theoretic definition of the invariants Θ d related to the Yokonuma–Hecke algebras and their 3-variable generalization Θ , which generalizes the Homflypt polynomial. H [ H ] is the regular isotopy counterpart of Θ . The invariants K [ K ] and D [ D ] are new generalizations of the Kauffman and the Dubrovnik polynomials. We sketch skein theoretic proofs of the well-definedness and topological properties of these invariants. The invariants of this paper are reformulated into summations of the generating invariants (H, K, D on sublinks of the given link L, obtained by partitioning L into collections of sublinks. The first such reformulation was achieved by W.B.R. Lickorish for the invariant Θ and we generalize it to the Kauffman and Dubrovnik polynomial cases. State sum models are formulated for all the invariants. These state summation models are based on our skein template algorithm which formalizes the skein theoretic process as an analogue of a statistical mechanics partition function. Relationships with statistical mechanics models are articulated. Finally, we discuss physical situations where a multi-leveled course of action is taken naturally.

  15. Building Model NASA Satellites: Elementary Students Studying Science Using a NASA-Themed Transmedia Book Featuring Digital Fabrication Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Daniel; An, Song; Boren, Rachel; Slykhuis, David

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of nine lessons incorporating a NASA-themed transmedia book featuring digital fabrication activities on 5th-grade students (n = 29) recognized as advanced in mathematics based on their academic record. Data collected included a pretest and posttest of science content questions taken from released Virginia Standards…

  16. Propulsion System Dynamic Modeling of the NASA Supersonic Concept Vehicle for AeroPropulsoServoElasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Seiel, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A summary of the propulsion system modeling under NASA's High Speed Project (HSP) AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) task is provided with a focus on the propulsion system for the low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. This summary includes details on the effort to date to develop computational models for the various propulsion system components. The objective of this paper is to summarize the model development effort in this task, while providing more detail in the modeling areas that have not been previously published. The purpose of the propulsion system modeling and the overall APSE effort is to develop an integrated dynamic vehicle model to conduct appropriate unsteady analysis of supersonic vehicle performance. This integrated APSE system model concept includes the propulsion system model, and the vehicle structural aerodynamics model. The development to date of such a preliminary integrated model will also be summarized in this report

  17. Effects of Real-Time NASA Vegetation Data on Model Forecasts of Severe Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Bell, Jordan R.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) dataset, which is updated daily using swaths of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data aboard the NASA-EOS Aqua and Terra satellites. NASA SPoRT started generating daily real-time GVF composites at 1-km resolution over the Continental United States beginning 1 June 2010. A companion poster presentation (Bell et al.) primarily focuses on impact results in an offline configuration of the Noah land surface model (LSM) for the 2010 warm season, comparing the SPoRT/MODIS GVF dataset to the current operational monthly climatology GVF available within the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models. This paper/presentation primarily focuses on individual case studies of severe weather events to determine the impacts and possible improvements by using the real-time, high-resolution SPoRT-MODIS GVFs in place of the coarser-resolution NCEP climatological GVFs in model simulations. The NASA-Unified WRF (NU-WRF) modeling system is employed to conduct the sensitivity simulations of individual events. The NU-WRF is an integrated modeling system based on the Advanced Research WRF dynamical core that is designed to represents aerosol, cloud, precipitation, and land processes at satellite-resolved scales in a coupled simulation environment. For this experiment, the coupling between the NASA Land Information System (LIS) and the WRF model is utilized to measure the impacts of the daily SPoRT/MODIS versus the monthly NCEP climatology GVFs. First, a spin-up run of the LIS is integrated for two years using the Noah LSM to ensure that the land surface fields reach an equilibrium state on the 4-km grid mesh used. Next, the spin-up LIS is run in two separate modes beginning on 1 June 2010, one continuing with the climatology GVFs while the

  18. Career and Workforce Impacts of the NASA Planetary Science Summer School: TEAM X model 1999-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Leslie L.; Budney, Charles; Mitchell, Karl; Wessen, Alice; JPL Education Office, JPL Team X

    2016-10-01

    Sponsored by NASA's Planetary Science Division, and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Planetary Science Summer School prepares the next generation of engineers and scientists to participate in future solar system exploration missions. PSSS utilizes JPL's emerging concurrent mission design "Team X" as mentors. With this model, participants learn the mission life cycle, roles of scientists and engineers in a mission environment, mission design interconnectedness and trade-offs, and the importance of teamwork. Applicants are sought who have a strong interest and experience in careers in planetary exploration, and who are science and engineering post-docs, recent PhDs, doctoral or graduate students, and faculty teaching such students. An overview of the program will be presented, along with results of a diversity study conducted in fall 2015 to assess the gender and ethnic diversity of participants since 1999. PSSS seeks to have a positive influence on participants' career choice and career progress, and to help feed the employment pipeline for NASA, aerospace, and related academia. Results will also be presented of an online search that located alumni in fall 2015 related to their current occupations (primarily through LinkedIn and university and corporate websites), as well as a 2015 survey of alumni.

  19. NASA's Solar System Treks: Online Portals for Planetary Mapping and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Brian

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Solar System Treks are a suite of web-based of lunar and planetary mapping and modeling portals providing interactive visualization and analysis tools enabling mission planners, planetary scientists, students, and the general public to access mapped lunar data products from past and current missions for the Moon, Mars, Vesta, and more. New portals for additional planetary bodies are being planned. This presentation will recap significant enhancements to these toolsets during the past year and look ahead to future features and releases. Moon Trek is a new portal replacing its predecessor, the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP), that significantly upgrades and builds upon the capabilities of LMMP. It features greatly improved navigation, 3D visualization, fly-overs, performance, and reliability. Additional data products and tools continue to be added. These include both generalized products as well as polar data products specifically targeting potential sites for NASA's Resource Prospector mission as well as for missions being planned by NASA's international partners. The latest release of Mars Trek includes new tools and data products requested by NASA's Planetary Science Division to support site selection and analysis for Mars Human Landing Exploration Zone Sites. Also being given very high priority by NASA Headquarters is Mars Trek's use as a means to directly involve the public in upcoming missions, letting them explore the areas the agency is focusing upon, understand what makes these sites so fascinating, follow the selection process, and get caught up in the excitement of exploring Mars. Phobos Trek, the latest effort in the Solar System Treks suite, is being developed in coordination with the International Phobos/Deimos Landing Site Working Group, with landing site selection and analysis for JAXA's MMX (Martian Moons eXploration) mission as a primary driver.

  20. NASA's Solar System Treks: Online Portals for Planetary Mapping and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, B. H.; Law, E.

    2017-12-01

    NASA's Solar System Treks are a suite of web-based of lunar and planetary mapping and modeling portals providing interactive visualization and analysis tools enabling mission planners, planetary scientists, students, and the general public to access mapped lunar data products from past and current missions for the Moon, Mars, Vesta, and more. New portals for additional planetary bodies are being planned. This presentation will recap significant enhancements to these toolsets during the past year and look ahead to future features and releases. Moon Trek is a new portal replacing its predecessor, the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP), that significantly upgrades and builds upon the capabilities of LMMP. It features greatly improved navigation, 3D visualization, fly-overs, performance, and reliability. Additional data products and tools continue to be added. These include both generalized products as well as polar data products specifically targeting potential sites for NASA's Resource Prospector mission as well as for missions being planned by NASA's international partners. The latest release of Mars Trek includes new tools and data products requested by NASA's Planetary Science Division to support site selection and analysis for Mars Human Landing Exploration Zone Sites. Also being given very high priority by NASA Headquarters is Mars Trek's use as a means to directly involve the public in upcoming missions, letting them explore the areas the agency is focusing upon, understand what makes these sites so fascinating, follow the selection process, and get caught up in the excitement of exploring Mars. Phobos Trek, the latest effort in the Solar System Treks suite, is being developed in coordination with the International Phobos/Deimos Landing Site Working Group, with landing site selection and analysis for JAXA's MMX mission as a primary driver.

  1. Modeling X-linked ancestral origins in multiparental populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaozhi

    2015-03-04

    The models for the mosaic structure of an individual's genome from multiparental populations have been developed primarily for autosomes, whereas X chromosomes receive very little attention. In this paper, we extend our previous approach to model ancestral origin processes along two X chromosomes in a mapping population, which is necessary for developing hidden Markov models in the reconstruction of ancestry blocks for X-linked quantitative trait locus mapping. The model accounts for the joint recombination pattern, the asymmetry between maternally and paternally derived X chromosomes, and the finiteness of population size. The model can be applied to various mapping populations such as the advanced intercross lines (AIL), the Collaborative Cross (CC), the heterogeneous stock (HS), the Diversity Outcross (DO), and the Drosophila synthetic population resource (DSPR). We further derive the map expansion, density (per Morgan) of recombination breakpoints, in advanced intercross populations with L inbred founders under the limit of an infinitely large population size. The analytic results show that for X chromosomes the genetic map expands linearly at a rate (per generation) of two-thirds times 1 - 10/(9L) for the AIL, and at a rate of two-thirds times 1 - 1/L for the DO and the HS, whereas for autosomes the map expands at a rate of 1 - 1/L for the AIL, the DO, and the HS. Copyright © 2015 Zheng.

  2. Model of Atmospheric Links on Optical Communications from High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subich, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Optical communication links have the potential to solve many of the problems of current radio and microwave links to satellites and high-altitude aircraft. The higher frequency involved in optical systems allows for significantly greater signal bandwidth, and thus information transfer rate, in excess of 10 Gbps, and the highly directional nature of laser-based signals eliminates the need for frequency-division multiplexing seen in radio and microwave links today. The atmosphere, however, distorts an optical signal differently than a microwave signal. While the ionosphere is one of the most significant sources of noise and distortion in a microwave or radio signal, the lower atmosphere affects an optical signal more significantly. Refractive index fluctuations, primarily caused by changes in atmospheric temperature and density, distort the incoming signal in both deterministic and nondeterministic ways. Additionally, suspended particles, such as those in haze or rain, further corrupt the transmitted signal. To model many of the atmospheric effects on the propagating beam, we use simulations based on the beam-propagation method. This method, developed both for simulation of signals in waveguides and propagation in atmospheric turbulence, separates the propagation into a diffraction and refraction problem. The diffraction step is an exact solution, within the limits of numerical precision, to the problem of propagation in free space, and the refraction step models the refractive index variances over a segment of the propagation path. By applying refraction for a segment of the propagation path, then diffracting over that same segment, this method forms a good approximation to true propagation through the atmospheric medium. Iterating over small segments of the total propagation path gives a good approximation to the problem of propagation over the entire path. Parameters in this model, such as initial beam profile and atmospheric constants, are easily modified in a

  3. NASA Perspective and Modeling of Thermal Runaway Propagation Mitigation in Aerospace Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shack, P.; Iannello, C.; Rickman, S.; Button, R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA has traditionally sought to reduce the likelihood of a single cell thermal runaway (TR) in their aerospace batteries to an absolute minimum by employing rigorous screening program of the cells. There was generally a belief that TR propagation resulting in catastrophic failure of the battery was a forgone conclusion for densely packed aerospace lithium-ion batteries. As it turns out, this may not be the case. An increasing number of purportedly TR propagation-resistant batteries are appearing among NASA partners in the commercial sector and the Department of Defense. In the recent update of the battery safety standard (JSC 20793) to address this paradigm shift, the NASA community included requirements for assessing TR severity and identifying simple, low-cost severity reduction measures. Unfortunately, there are no best-practice guidelines for this work in the Agency, so the first project team attempting to meet these requirements would have an undue burden placed upon them. A NASA engineering Safety Center (NESC) team set out to perform pathfinding activities for meeting those requirements. This presentation will provide contextual background to this effort, as well as initial results in attempting to model and simulate TR heat transfer and propagation within battery designs.

  4. Recent Upgrades to NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for the Environmental Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Lafontaine, Frank J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Rozumalski, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several products for its NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS) partners that can initialize specific fields for local model runs within the NOAA/NWS Science and Training Resource Center Environmental Modeling System (EMS). The suite of SPoRT products for use in the EMS consists of a Sea Surface Temperature (SST) composite that includes a Lake Surface Temperature (LST) analysis over the Great Lakes, a Great Lakes sea-ice extent within the SST composite, a real-time Green Vegetation Fraction (GVF) composite, and NASA Land Information System (LIS) gridded output. This paper and companion poster describe each dataset and provide recent upgrades made to the SST, Great Lakes LST, GVF composites, and the real-time LIS runs.

  5. NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model assimilating satellite chlorophyll data global daily VR2017 (NOBM_DAY) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the assimilated daily data from NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM). The NOBM is a comprehensive, interactive ocean biogeochemical model coupled with a...

  6. NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model assimilating satellite chlorophyll data global monthly VR2017 (NOBM_MON) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the assimilated monthly data from NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM). The NOBM is a comprehensive, interactive ocean biogeochemical model coupled with a...

  7. Open Innovation at NASA: A New Business Model for Advancing Human Health and Performance Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.; Keeton, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new business model for advancing NASA human health and performance innovations and demonstrates how open innovation shaped its development. A 45 percent research and technology development budget reduction drove formulation of a strategic plan grounded in collaboration. We describe the strategy execution, including adoption and results of open innovation initiatives, the challenges of cultural change, and the development of virtual centers and a knowledge management tool to educate and engage the workforce and promote cultural change.

  8. Linking an ecosystem model and a landscape model to study forest species response to climate warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong S. He; David J. Mladenoff; Thomas R. Crow

    1999-01-01

    No single model can address forest change from single tree to regional scales. We discuss a framework linking an ecosystem process model {LINKAGES) with a spatial landscape model (LANDIS) to examine forest species responses to climate warming for a large, heterogeneous landscape in northern Wisconsin, USA. Individual species response at the ecosystem scale was...

  9. A Study of the Carbon Cycle Using NASA Observations and the GEOS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawson, Steven; Gelaro, Ron; Ott, Lesley; Putman, Bill; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Koster, Randy; Lee, Eunjee; Oda, Tom; Weir, Brad; Zeng, Fanwei

    2018-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) model has been developed in the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. From its roots in chemical transport and as a General Circulation Model, the GEOS model has been extended to an Earth System Model based on a modular construction using the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF), combining elements developed in house in the GMAO with others that are imported through collaborative research. It is used extensively for research and for product generation, both as a free-running model and as the core of the GMAO's data assimilation system. In recent years, the GMAO's modeling and assimilation efforts have been strongly supported by Piers Sellers, building on both his earlier legacy as an observationally oriented model developer and his post-astronaut career as a dynamic leader into new territory. Piers' long-standing interest in the carbon cycle and the combination of models with observations motivates this presentation, which will focus on the representation of the carbon cycle in the GEOS Earth System Model. Examples will include: (i) the progression from specified land-atmosphere surface fluxes to computations with an interactive model component (Catchment-CN), along with constraints on vegetation distributions using satellite observations; (ii) the use of high-resolution satellite observations to constrain human-generated inputs to the atmosphere; (iii) studies of the consistency of the observed atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations with those in the model simulations. The presentation will focus on year-to-year variations in elements of the carbon cycle, specifically on how the observations can inform the representation of mechanisms in the model and lead to integrity in global carbon dioxide simulations. Further, applications of the GEOS model to the planning of new carbon-climate observations will be addressed, as an example of the work that was strongly supported by

  10. Assimilation of Freeze-Thaw Observations into the NASA Catchment Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, L.; Reichle, R. H.; De Lannoy, G. J.; Kimball, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The land surface freeze/thaw (F/T) state plays a key role in the hydrological and carbon cycles and thus affects water and energy exchanges and net primary productivity at the land surface. To support the level 4 soil moisture and carbon products (value-added, i.e. using a combination of remote sensing data and modeling) for the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, an F/T assimilation algorithm is developed for the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) modeling and assimilation framework. The algorithm includes a newly developed observation operator that diagnoses the landscape F/T state in the GEOS-5 Catchment land surface model. A rule-based approach that incorporates model and observational errors is developed and used for assimilating the categorical F/T measurements into the land surface model (F/T analysis). An Observing System Simulation Experiment is conducted using synthetically generated measurements of the F/T state for a region in North America (90-110oW longitude, 45-55oN latitude). The synthetic 'truth' is generated using the NASA Catchment land surface model forced with surface meteorological fields from the Modern-Era Retrospective Reanalysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). To generate synthetic measurements, the true categorical F/T state is corrupted with a prescribed amount of F/T classification error. The assimilation experiment employs the same Catchment model except that forcing errors (relative to truth) are introduced via the application of meteorological forcing fields from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). The effect of the F/T analysis and classification error on land surface temperature and soil temperature predictions is examined in this research.

  11. The link between laboratory/field observations and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, C.R.; Foley, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The various linkages in system performance assessments that integrate disposal program elements must be understood. The linkage between model development and field/laboratory observations is described as the iterative program of site and system characterization for development of an observational-confirmatory data base. This data base is designed to develop, improve, and support conceptual models for site and system behavior. The program consists of data gathering and experiments to demonstrate understanding at various spatial and time scales and degrees of complexity. Understanding and accounting for the decreasing characterization certainty that arises with increasing space and time scales is an important aspect of the link between models and observations. The performance allocation process for setting performance goals and confidence levels, coupled with a performance assessment approach that provides these performance and confidence estimates, will determine when sufficient characterization has been achieved. At each iteration, performance allocation goals are reviewed and revised as necessary. The updated data base and appropriate performance assessment tools and approaches are utilized to identify and design additional tests and data needs necessary to meet current performance allocation goals

  12. Cloud-enabled large-scale land surface model simulations with the NASA Land Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, D.; Vaughan, G.; Clark, M. P.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Nijssen, B.; Nearing, G. S.; Rheingrover, S.; Kumar, S.; Geiger, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    Developed by the Hydrological Sciences Laboratory at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), the Land Information System (LIS) is a high-performance software framework for terrestrial hydrology modeling and data assimilation. LIS provides the ability to integrate satellite and ground-based observational products and advanced modeling algorithms to extract land surface states and fluxes. Through a partnership with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University of Washington, the LIS model is currently being extended to include the Structure for Unifying Multiple Modeling Alternatives (SUMMA). With the addition of SUMMA in LIS, meaningful simulations containing a large multi-model ensemble will be enabled and can provide advanced probabilistic continental-domain modeling capabilities at spatial scales relevant for water managers. The resulting LIS/SUMMA application framework is difficult for non-experts to install due to the large amount of dependencies on specific versions of operating systems, libraries, and compilers. This has created a significant barrier to entry for domain scientists that are interested in using the software on their own systems or in the cloud. In addition, the requirement to support multiple run time environments across the LIS community has created a significant burden on the NASA team. To overcome these challenges, LIS/SUMMA has been deployed using Linux containers, which allows for an entire software package along with all dependences to be installed within a working runtime environment, and Kubernetes, which orchestrates the deployment of a cluster of containers. Within a cloud environment, users can now easily create a cluster of virtual machines and run large-scale LIS/SUMMA simulations. Installations that have taken weeks and months can now be performed in minutes of time. This presentation will discuss the steps required to create a cloud-enabled large-scale simulation, present examples of its use, and

  13. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model-2010 Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, F. W.; Justus, C. G.

    2011-01-01

    Reference or standard atmospheric models have long been used for design and mission planning of various aerospace systems. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Global Reference Atmospheric Model was developed in response to the need for a design reference atmosphere that provides complete global geographical variability and complete altitude coverage (surface to orbital altitudes), as well as complete seasonal and monthly variability of the thermodynamic variables and wind components. In addition to providing the geographical, height, and monthly variation of the mean atmospheric state, it includes the ability to simulate spatial and temporal perturbations.

  14. Implementation of a vibrationally linked chemical reaction model for DSMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. B.; Bird, Graeme A.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure closely linking dissociation and exchange reactions in air to the vibrational levels of the diatomic molecules has been implemented in both one- and two-dimensional versions of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) programs. The previous modeling of chemical reactions with DSMC was based on the continuum reaction rates for the various possible reactions. The new method is more closely related to the actual physics of dissociation and is more appropriate to the particle nature of DSMC. Two cases are presented: the relaxation to equilibrium of undissociated air initially at 10,000 K, and the axisymmetric calculation of shuttle forebody heating during reentry at 92.35 km and 7500 m/s. Although reaction rates are not used in determining the dissociations or exchange reactions, the new method produces rates which agree astonishingly well with the published rates derived from experiment. The results for gas properties and surface properties also agree well with the results produced by earlier DSMC models, equilibrium air calculations, and experiment.

  15. New Diagnostic, Launch and Model Control Techniques in the NASA Ames HFFAF Ballistic Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents new diagnostic, launch and model control techniques used in the NASA Ames HFFAF ballistic range. High speed movies were used to view the sabot separation process and the passage of the model through the model splap paper. Cavities in the rear of the sabot, to catch the muzzle blast of the gun, were used to control sabot finger separation angles and distances. Inserts were installed in the powder chamber to greatly reduce the ullage volume (empty space) in the chamber. This resulted in much more complete and repeatable combustion of the powder and hence, in much more repeatable muzzle velocities. Sheets of paper or cardstock, impacting one half of the model, were used to control the amplitudes of the model pitch oscillations.

  16. Modelling and experimental validation of two-dimensional transverse vibrations in a flexible robot link

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Paul Haase; Baungaard, Jens Rane

    1996-01-01

    A general model for a rotating homogenous flexible robot link is developed. The model describes two-dimensional transverse vibrations induced by the actuator due to misalignment of the actuator axis of rotation relative to the link symmetry axis and due to translational acceleration of the link...

  17. Direct stratospheric injection of biomass burning emissions: a case study of the 2009 Australian bushfires using the NASA GISS ModelE2 composition-climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Robert; From, Mike; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Shindell, Drew; Flannigan, Mike; Bernath, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Direct stratospheric injection (DSI) of forest fire smoke represents a direct biogeochemical link between the land surface and stratosphere. DSI events occur regularly in the northern and southern extratropics, and have been observed across a wide range of measurements, but their fate and effects are not well understood. DSIs result from explosive, short-lived fires, and their plumes stand out from background concentrations immediately. This makes it easier to associate detected DSIs to individual fires and their estimated emissions. Because the emissions pulses are brief, chemical decay can be more clearly assessed, and because the emissions pulses are so large, a wide range of rare chemical species can be detected. Observational evidence suggests that they can persist in the stratosphere for several months, enhance ozone production, and be self-lofted to the middle stratosphere through shortwave absorption and diabatic heating. None of these phenomena have been evaluated, however, with a physical model. To that end, we are simulating the smoke plumes from the February 2009 Australia 'Black Saturday' bushfires using the NASA GISS ModelE2 composition-climate model, nudged toward horizontal winds from reanalysis. To-date, this is the best-observed DSI in the southern hemisphere. Chemical and aerosol signatures of the plume were observed in a wide array of limb and nadir satellite retrievals. Detailed estimates of fuel consumption and injection height have been made because of the severity of the fires. Uncommon among DSIs events was a large segment of the plume that entrained into the upper equatorial easterlies. Preliminary modeling results show that the relative strengths of the equatorial and extratropical plume segments are sensitive to the plume's initial injection height. This highlights the difficulty in reconciling uncertainty in the reanalysis over the Southern Hemisphere with fairly-well constrained estimates of fire location and injection height at the

  18. Air Quality Forecasts Using the NASA GEOS Model: A Unified Tool from Local to Global Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowland, E. Emma; Keller, Christoph; Nielsen, J. Eric; Orbe, Clara; Ott, Lesley; Pawson, Steven; Saunders, Emily; Duncan, Bryan; Cook, Melanie; Liu, Junhua; hide

    2017-01-01

    We provide an introduction to a new high-resolution (0.25 degree) global composition forecast produced by NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation office. The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) model has been expanded to provide global near-real-time forecasts of atmospheric composition at a horizontal resolution of 0.25 degrees (approximately 25 km). Previously, this combination of detailed chemistry and resolution was only provided by regional models. This system combines the operational GEOS-5 weather forecasting model with the state-of-the-science GEOS-Chem chemistry module (version 11) to provide detailed chemical analysis of a wide range of air pollutants such as ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). The resolution of the forecasts is the highest resolution compared to current, publically-available global composition forecasts. Evaluation and validation of modeled trace gases and aerosols compared to surface and satellite observations will be presented for constituents relative to health air quality standards. Comparisons of modeled trace gases and aerosols against satellite observations show that the model produces realistic concentrations of atmospheric constituents in the free troposphere. Model comparisons against surface observations highlight the model's capability to capture the diurnal variability of air pollutants under a variety of meteorological conditions. The GEOS-5 composition forecasting system offers a new tool for scientists and the public health community, and is being developed jointly with several government and non-profit partners. Potential applications include air quality warnings, flight campaign planning and exposure studies using the archived analysis fields.

  19. Using Model-Based System Engineering to Provide Artifacts for NASA Project Life-Cycle and Technical Reviews Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Edith L.; Weiland, Karen J.

    2017-01-01

    This is the presentation for the AIAA Space conference in September 2017. It highlights key information from Using Model-Based Systems Engineering to Provide Artifacts for NASA Project Life-cycle and Technical Reviews paper.

  20. The link between perceived human resource management practices, engagement and employee behaviour : A moderated mediation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfes, K.; Shantz, A.D.; Truss, C.; Soane, E.C.

    2013-01-01

    This study contributes to our understanding of the mediating and moderating processes through which human resource management (HRM) practices are linked with behavioural outcomes. We developed and tested a moderated mediation model linking perceived HRM practices to organisational citizenship

  1. Toward linking demographic and economic models for impact assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, C.A.; Meenan, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Yucca Mountain Project, in Southern Nevada, is to evaluate the effects of the development of a high-level nuclear waste repository. As described in the Section 175 Report to the Congress of the US, the temporal scope of this repository project encompasses approximately 70 years and includes four phases: Site characterization and licensing, construction, operation, and closure and decommissioning. If retrieval of the waste were to be required, the temporal scope of the repository project could be extended to approximately 100 years. The study of the potential socioeconomic effects of this project is the foundation for this paper. This paper focuses on the economic and demographic aspects and a possible method to interface the two. First, the authors briefly discuss general socioeconomic modeling theory from a county level view point, as well as methods for the apportionment of county level data to sub-county areas. Next, the authors describe the unique economic and demographic conditions which exist in Nevada at both the state and county levels. Finally, the authors evaluate a possible procedure for analyzing repository effects at a sub-county level; this involves discussion of an interface linking the economic and demographic aspects, which is based on the reconciliation of supply and demand for labor. The authors conclude that the basis for further model development may rely on the interaction of supply and demand to produce change in wage rates. These changes in expected wages should be a justification for allocating economic migrants (who may respond to Yucca Mountain Project development) into various communities

  2. Linking the M&Rfi Weather Generator with Agrometeorological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovsky, Martin; Trnka, Miroslav

    2015-04-01

    Realistic meteorological inputs (representing the present and/or future climates) for the agrometeorological model simulations are often produced by stochastic weather generators (WGs). This contribution presents some methodological issues and results obtained in our recent experiments. We also address selected questions raised in the synopsis of this session. The input meteorological time series for our experiments are produced by the parametric single site weather generator (WG) Marfi, which is calibrated from the available observational data (or interpolated from surrounding stations). To produce meteorological series representing the future climate, the WG parameters are modified by climate change scenarios, which are prepared by the pattern scaling method: the standardised scenarios derived from Global or Regional Climate Models are multiplied by the change in global mean temperature (ΔTG) determined by the simple climate model MAGICC. The presentation will address following questions: (i) The dependence of the quality of the synthetic weather series and impact results on the WG settings. An emphasis will be put on an effect of conditioning the daily WG on monthly WG (presently being one of our hot topics), which aims at improvement of the reproduction of the low-frequency weather variability. Comparison of results obtained with various WG settings is made in terms of climatic and agroclimatic indices (including extreme temperature and precipitation characteristics and drought indices). (ii) Our methodology accounts for the uncertainties coming from various sources. We will show how the climate change impact results are affected by 1. uncertainty in climate modelling, 2. uncertainty in ΔTG, and 3. uncertainty related to the complexity of the climate change scenario (focusing on an effect of inclusion of changes in variability into the climate change scenarios). Acknowledgements: This study was funded by project "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific

  3. Propulsion System Dynamic Modeling for the NASA Supersonic Concept Vehicle: AeroPropulsoServoElasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph; Seidel, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    A summary of the propulsion system modeling under NASA's High Speed Project (HSP) AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) task is provided with a focus on the propulsion system for the low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. This summary includes details on the effort to date to develop computational models for the various propulsion system components. The objective of this paper is to summarize the model development effort in this task, while providing more detail in the modeling areas that have not been previously published. The purpose of the propulsion system modeling and the overall APSE effort is to develop an integrated dynamic vehicle model to conduct appropriate unsteady analysis of supersonic vehicle performance. This integrated APSE system model concept includes the propulsion system model, and the vehicle structural-aerodynamics model. The development to date of such a preliminary integrated model will also be summarized in this report.propulsion system dynamics, the structural dynamics, and aerodynamics.

  4. NASA Common Research Model Test Envelope Extension With Active Sting Damping at NTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Melissa B.; Balakrishna, S.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Common Research Model (CRM) high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnel testing program was established to generate an experimental database for applied Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation studies. During transonic wind tunnel tests, the CRM encounters large sting vibrations when the angle of attack approaches the second pitching moment break, which can sometimes become divergent. CRM transonic test data analysis suggests that sting divergent oscillations are related to negative net sting damping episodes associated with flow separation instability. The National Transonic Facility (NTF) has been addressing remedies to extend polar testing up to and beyond the second pitching moment break point of the test articles using an active piezoceramic damper system for both ambient and cryogenic temperatures. This paper reviews CRM test results to gain understanding of sting dynamics with a simple model describing the mechanics of a sting-model system and presents the performance of the damper under cryogenic conditions.

  5. Ignition-and-Growth Modeling of NASA Standard Detonator and a Linear Shaped Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Sirri

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to quantitatively investigate the ignition and shock sensitivity of NASA Standard Detonator (NSD) and the shock wave propagation of a linear shaped charge (LSC) after being shocked by NSD flyer plate. This combined explosive train was modeled as a coupled Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) model with LS-DYNA hydro code. An ignition-and-growth (I&G) reactive model based on unreacted and reacted Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equations of state was used to simulate the shock initiation. Various NSD-to-LSC stand-off distances were analyzed to calculate the shock initiation (or failure to initiate) and detonation wave propagation along the shaped charge. Simulation results were verified by experimental data which included VISAR tests for NSD flyer plate velocity measurement and an aluminum target severance test for LSC performance verification. Parameters used for the analysis were obtained from various published data or by using CHEETAH thermo-chemical code.

  6. Improving Power System Modeling. A Tool to Link Capacity Expansion and Production Cost Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diakov, Victor [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cole, Wesley [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sullivan, Patrick [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brinkman, Gregory [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Capacity expansion models (CEM) provide a high-level long-term view at the prospects of the evolving power system. In simulating the possibilities of long-term capacity expansion, it is important to maintain the viability of power system operation in the short-term (daily, hourly and sub-hourly) scales. Production-cost models (PCM) simulate routine power system operation on these shorter time scales using detailed load, transmission and generation fleet data by minimizing production costs and following reliability requirements. When based on CEM 'predictions' about generating unit retirements and buildup, PCM provide more detailed simulation for the short-term system operation and, consequently, may confirm the validity of capacity expansion predictions. Further, production cost model simulations of a system that is based on capacity expansion model solution are 'evolutionary' sound: the generator mix is the result of logical sequence of unit retirement and buildup resulting from policy and incentives. The above has motivated us to bridge CEM with PCM by building a capacity expansion - to - production cost model Linking Tool (CEPCoLT). The Linking Tool is built to onset capacity expansion model prescriptions onto production cost model inputs. NREL's ReEDS and Energy Examplar's PLEXOS are the capacity expansion and the production cost models, respectively. Via the Linking Tool, PLEXOS provides details of operation for the regionally-defined ReEDS scenarios.

  7. Model reduction in mathematical pharmacology : Integration, reduction and linking of PBPK and systems biology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Thomas J; van der Graaf, Piet H; Tindall, Marcus J

    2018-03-26

    In this paper we present a framework for the reduction and linking of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models with models of systems biology to describe the effects of drug administration across multiple scales. To address the issue of model complexity, we propose the reduction of each type of model separately prior to being linked. We highlight the use of balanced truncation in reducing the linear components of PBPK models, whilst proper lumping is shown to be efficient in reducing typically nonlinear systems biology type models. The overall methodology is demonstrated via two example systems; a model of bacterial chemotactic signalling in Escherichia coli and a model of extracellular regulatory kinase activation mediated via the extracellular growth factor and nerve growth factor receptor pathways. Each system is tested under the simulated administration of three hypothetical compounds; a strong base, a weak base, and an acid, mirroring the parameterisation of pindolol, midazolam, and thiopental, respectively. Our method can produce up to an 80% decrease in simulation time, allowing substantial speed-up for computationally intensive applications including parameter fitting or agent based modelling. The approach provides a straightforward means to construct simplified Quantitative Systems Pharmacology models that still provide significant insight into the mechanisms of drug action. Such a framework can potentially bridge pre-clinical and clinical modelling - providing an intermediate level of model granularity between classical, empirical approaches and mechanistic systems describing the molecular scale.

  8. Turbulence investigation of the NASA common research model wing tip vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čantrak Đorđe S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents high-speed stereo particle image velocimetry investigation of the NASA Common Research Model wing tip vortex. A three-percent scaled semi–span model, without nacelle and pylon, was tested in the 32- by 48-inch Indraft tunnel, at the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at the NASA Ames Research Center. Turbulence investigation of the wing tip vortex is presented. Measurements of the wing-tip vortex were performed in a vertical cross-stream plane three tip-chords downstream of the wing tip trailing edge with a 2 kHz sampling rate. Experimental data are analyzed in the invariant anisotropy maps for three various angles of attack (0°, 2°, and 4° and the same speed generated in the tunnel (V∞ = 50 m/s. This corresponds to a chord Reynolds number 2.68x105, where the chord length of 3” is considered the characteristic length. The region of interest was x = 220 mm and y = 90 mm. The 20 000 particle image velocimetry samples were acquired at each condition. Velocity fields and turbulence statistics are given for all cases, as well as turbulence structure in the light of the invariant theory. Prediction of the wing tip vortices is still a challenge for the computational fluid dynamics codes due to significant pressure and velocity gradients. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. TR 35046

  9. NASA's Student Airborne Research Program as a model for effective professional development experience in Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, S. L.; Kudela, R. M.; Clinton, N. E.; Atkins, N.; Austerberry, D.; Johnson, M.; McGonigle, J.; McIntosh, K.; O'Shea, J. J.; Shirshikova, Z.; Singer, N.; Snow, A.; Woods, R.; Schaller, E.; Shetter, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    With over half of the current earth and space science workforce expected to retire within the next 15 years, NASA has responded by cultivating young minds through programs such as the Student Airborne Research Program (SARP). SARP is a competitive internship that introduces upper-level undergraduates and early graduate students to Earth System Science research and NASA's Airborne Science Program. The program serves as a model for recruitment of very high caliber students into the scientific workforce. Its uniqueness derives from total vertical integration of hands-on experience at every stage of airborne science: aircraft instrumentation, flight planning, mission participation, field-work, analysis, and reporting of results in a competitive environment. At the conclusion of the program, students presented their work to NASA administrators, faculty, mentors, and the other participants with the incentive of being selected as best talk and earning a trip to the fall AGU meeting to present their work at the NASA booth. We hope lessons learned can inform the decisions of scientists at the highest levels seeking to broaden the appeal of research. In 2011, SARP was divided into three disciplinary themes: Oceanography, Land Use, and Atmospheric Chemistry. Each research group was mentored by an upper-level graduate student who was supervised by an expert faculty member. A coordinator managed the program and was supervised by a senior research scientist/administrator. The program is a model of knowledge transfer among the several levels of research: agency administration to the program coordinator, established scientific experts to the research mentors, and the research mentors to the pre-career student participants. The outcomes from this program include mission planning and institutional knowledge transfer from administrators and expert scientists to the coordinator and research mentors; personnel and project management from the coordinator and expert scientists to the

  10. Modeling and Analysis of Multidiscipline Research Teams at NASA Langley Research Center: A Systems Thinking Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Jones, Kenneth M.; Silcox, Richard J.; Silva, Walter A.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Multidisciplinary analysis and design is inherently a team activity due to the variety of required expertise and knowledge. As a team activity, multidisciplinary research cannot escape the issues that affect all teams. The level of technical diversity required to perform multidisciplinary analysis and design makes the teaming aspects even more important. A study was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop a model of multidiscipline teams that can be used to help understand their dynamics and identify key factors that influence their effectiveness. The study sought to apply the elements of systems thinking to better understand the factors, both generic and Langley-specific, that influence the effectiveness of multidiscipline teams. The model of multidiscipline research teams developed during this study has been valuable in identifying means to enhance team effectiveness, recognize and avoid problem behaviors, and provide guidance for forming and coordinating multidiscipline teams.

  11. The Trick Simulation Toolkit: A NASA/Open source Framework for Running Time Based Physics Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, John M.; Lin, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and use at of the Trick Simulation Toolkit, a simulation development environment for creating high fidelity training and engineering simulations at the NASA Johnson Space Center and many other NASA facilities. It describes Trick's design goals and how the development environment attempts to achieve those goals. It describes how Trick is used in some of the many training and engineering simulations at NASA. Finally it describes the Trick NASA/Open source project on Github.

  12. Software engineering and Ada (Trademark) training: An implementation model for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Sue; Freedman, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    The choice of Ada for software engineering for projects such as the Space Station has resulted in government and industrial groups considering training programs that help workers become familiar with both a software culture and the intricacies of a new computer language. The questions of how much time it takes to learn software engineering with Ada, how much an organization should invest in such training, and how the training should be structured are considered. Software engineering is an emerging, dynamic discipline. It is defined by the author as the establishment and application of sound engineering environments, tools, methods, models, principles, and concepts combined with appropriate standards, guidelines, and practices to support computing which is correct, modifiable, reliable and safe, efficient, and understandable throughout the life cycle of the application. Neither the training programs needed, nor the content of such programs, have been well established. This study addresses the requirements for training for NASA personnel and recommends an implementation plan. A curriculum and a means of delivery are recommended. It is further suggested that a knowledgeable programmer may be able to learn Ada in 5 days, but that it takes 6 to 9 months to evolve into a software engineer who uses the language correctly and effectively. The curriculum and implementation plan can be adapted for each NASA Center according to the needs dictated by each project.

  13. Testing of the Trim Tab Parametric Model in NASA Langley's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Watkins, Anthony N.; Korzun, Ashley M.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    In support of NASA's Entry, Descent, and Landing technology development efforts, testing of Langley's Trim Tab Parametric Models was conducted in Test Section 2 of NASA Langley's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The objectives of these tests were to generate quantitative aerodynamic data and qualitative surface pressure data for experimental and computational validation and aerodynamic database development. Six component force-and-moment data were measured on 38 unique, blunt body trim tab configurations at Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5, angles of attack from -4deg to +20deg, and angles of sideslip from 0deg to +8deg. Configuration parameters investigated in this study were forebody shape, tab area, tab cant angle, and tab aspect ratio. Pressure Sensitive Paint was used to provide qualitative surface pressure mapping for a subset of these flow and configuration variables. Over the range of parameters tested, the effects of varying tab area and tab cant angle were found to be much more significant than varying tab aspect ratio relative to key aerodynamic performance requirements. Qualitative surface pressure data supported the integrated aerodynamic data and provided information to aid in future analyses of localized phenomena for trim tab configurations.

  14. The NASA Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) Next Generation Space Weather Data Warehouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, M. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Zheng, Y.; Rastaetter, L.; Chulaki, A.; Pembroke, A. D.; Wiegand, C.; Mullinix, R.; Boblitt, J.; Mendoza, A. M. M.; Swindell, M. J., IV; Bakshi, S. S.; Mays, M. L.; Shim, J. S.; Hesse, M.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables, supports, and performs research and development for next generation space science and space weather models. The CCMC currently hosts a large and expanding collection of state-or-the-art, physics-based space weather models that have been developed by the international research community. There are many tools and services provided by the CCMC that are currently available world-wide, along with the ongoing development of new innovative systems and software for research, discovery, validation, visualization, and forecasting. Over the history of the CCMC's existence, there has been one constant engineering challenge - describing, managing, and disseminating data. To address the challenges that accompany an ever-expanding number of models to support, along with a growing catalog of simulation output - the CCMC is currently developing a flexible and extensible space weather data warehouse to support both internal and external systems and applications. This paper intends to chronicle the evolution and future of the CCMC's data infrastructure, and the current infrastructure re-engineering activities that seek to leverage existing community data model standards like SPASE and the IMPEx Simulation Data Model.

  15. JPL Thermal Design Modeling Philosophy and NASA-STD-7009 Standard for Models and Simulations - A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    The Standard JPL thermal engineering practice prescribes worst-case methodologies for design. In this process, environmental and key uncertain thermal parameters (e.g., thermal blanket performance, interface conductance, optical properties) are stacked in a worst case fashion to yield the most hot- or cold-biased temperature. Thus, these simulations would represent the upper and lower bounds. This, effectively, represents JPL thermal design margin philosophy. Uncertainty in the margins and the absolute temperatures is usually estimated by sensitivity analyses and/or by comparing the worst-case results with "expected" results. Applicability of the analytical model for specific design purposes along with any temperature requirement violations are documented in peer and project design review material. In 2008, NASA released NASA-STD-7009, Standard for Models and Simulations. The scope of this standard covers the development and maintenance of models, the operation of simulations, the analysis of the results, training, recommended practices, the assessment of the Modeling and Simulation (M&S) credibility, and the reporting of the M&S results. The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) project thermal control system M&S activity was chosen as a case study determining whether JPL practice is in line with the standard and to identify areas of non-compliance. This paper summarizes the results and makes recommendations regarding the application of this standard to JPL thermal M&S practices.

  16. Network Formation Models With Costs for Establishing Links

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slikker, M.; van den Nouweland, C.G.A.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we study endogenous formation of communication networks in situations where the economic possibilities of groups of players can be described by a cooperative game. We concentrate on the in uence that the existence of costs for establishing communication links has on the communication

  17. Mathematical Modelling of a Two – Link Planar Manipulator Arm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... transformation matrices relating gripper's (generally known as the end – effector) frame with the base / reference frame have being derived using Denavit – Hartenberg matrix. Keywords: Manipulator Arm, Frame, Link, Joint, End – Effector, Mapping, Kinematics. Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics, ...

  18. PyrE, an interactive fire module within the NASA-GISS Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezuman, K.; Bauer, S. E.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2017-12-01

    Fires directly affect the composition of the atmosphere and Earth's radiation balance by emitting a suite of reactive gases and particles. Having an interactive fire module in an Earth System Model allows us to study the natural and anthropogenic drivers, feedbacks, and interactions of biomass burning in different time periods. To do so we have developed PyrE, the NASA-GISS interactive fire emissions model. PyrE uses the flammability, ignition, and suppression parameterization proposed by Pechony and Shindell (2009), and is coupled to a burned area and surface recovery parameterization. The burned area calculation follows CLM's approach (Li et al., 2012), paired with an offline recovery scheme based on Ent's Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM) carbon pool turnover time. PyrE is driven by environmental variables calculated by climate simulations, population density data, MODIS fire counts and LAI retrievals, as well as GFED4s emissions. Since the model development required extensive use of reference datasets, in addition to comparing it to GFED4s BA, we evaluate it by studying the effect of fires on atmospheric composition and climate. Our results show good agreement globally, with some regional differences. Finally, we quantify the present day fire radiative forcing. The development of PyrE allowed us for the first time to interactively simulate climate and fire activity with GISS-ModelE3

  19. Air Quality Modeling Using the NASA GEOS-5 Multispecies Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Christoph A.; Pawson, Steven; Wargan, Krzysztof; Weir, Brad

    2018-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) data assimilation system (DAS) has been expanded to include chemically reactive tropospheric trace gases including ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and carbon monoxide (CO). This system combines model analyses from the GEOS-5 model with detailed atmospheric chemistry and observations from MLS (O3), OMI (O3 and NO2), and MOPITT (CO). We show results from a variety of assimilation test experiments, highlighting the improvements in the representation of model species concentrations by up to 50% compared to an assimilation-free control experiment. Taking into account the rapid chemical cycling of NO2 when applying the assimilation increments greatly improves assimilation skills for NO2 and provides large benefits for model concentrations near the surface. Analysis of the geospatial distribution of the assimilation increments suggest that the free-running model overestimates biomass burning emissions but underestimates lightning NOx emissions by 5-20%. We discuss the capability of the chemical data assimilation system to improve atmospheric composition forecasts through improved initial value and boundary condition inputs, particularly during air pollution events. We find that the current assimilation system meaningfully improves short-term forecasts (1-3 day). For longer-term forecasts more emphasis on updating the emissions instead of initial concentration fields is needed.

  20. Updating the NASA LEO Orbital Debris Environment Model with Recent Radar and Optical Observations and in Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J.-C.; Anz-Meador, P.; Matney, M. J.; Kessler, D. J.; Theall, J.; Johnson, N. L.

    2000-01-01

    The Low Earth Orbit (LEO, between 200 and 2000 km altitudes) debris environment has been constantly measured by NASA Johnson Space Center's Liquid Mirror Telescope (LMT) since 1996 (Africano et al. 1999, NASA JSC-28826) and by Haystack and Haystack Auxiliary radars at MIT Lincoln Laboratory since 1990 (Settecerri et al. 1999, NASA JSC-28744). Debris particles as small as 3 mm can be detected by the radars and as small as 3 cm can be measured by LMT. Objects about 10 cm in diameter and greater are tracked and catalogued by the US Space Surveillance Network. Much smaller (down to several micrometers) natural and debris particle populations can be estimated based on in situ measurements, such as Long Duration Exposure Facility, and based on analyses of returned surfaces, such as Hubble Space Telescope solar arrays, European Retrievable Carrier, and Space Shuttles. To increase our understanding of the current LEO debris environment, the Orbital Debris Program Office at NASA JSC has initiated an effort to improve and update the ORDEM96 model (Kessler et al. 1996, NASA TM-104825) utilizing the recently available data. This paper gives an overview of the new NASA orbital debris engineering model, ORDEM2000.

  1. Automated model integration at source code level: An approach for implementing models into the NASA Land Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Mocko, D. M.; Kumar, S.; Nearing, G. S.; Arsenault, K. R.; Geiger, J. V.

    2014-12-01

    Model integration bridges the data flow between modeling frameworks and models. However, models usually do not fit directly into a particular modeling environment, if not designed for it. An example includes implementing different types of models into the NASA Land Information System (LIS), a software framework for land-surface modeling and data assimilation. Model implementation requires scientific knowledge and software expertise and may take a developer months to learn LIS and model software structure. Debugging and testing of the model implementation is also time-consuming due to not fully understanding LIS or the model. This time spent is costly for research and operational projects. To address this issue, an approach has been developed to automate model integration into LIS. With this in mind, a general model interface was designed to retrieve forcing inputs, parameters, and state variables needed by the model and to provide as state variables and outputs to LIS. Every model can be wrapped to comply with the interface, usually with a FORTRAN 90 subroutine. Development efforts need only knowledge of the model and basic programming skills. With such wrappers, the logic is the same for implementing all models. Code templates defined for this general model interface could be re-used with any specific model. Therefore, the model implementation can be done automatically. An automated model implementation toolkit was developed with Microsoft Excel and its built-in VBA language. It allows model specifications in three worksheets and contains FORTRAN 90 code templates in VBA programs. According to the model specification, the toolkit generates data structures and procedures within FORTRAN modules and subroutines, which transfer data between LIS and the model wrapper. Model implementation is standardized, and about 80 - 90% of the development load is reduced. In this presentation, the automated model implementation approach is described along with LIS programming

  2. PHOTOGRAMMETRIC TRACKING OF AERODYNAMIC SURFACES AND AEROSPACE MODELS AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Shortis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerospace engineers require measurements of the shape of aerodynamic surfaces and the six degree of freedom (6DoF position and orientation of aerospace models to analyse structural dynamics and aerodynamic forces. The measurement technique must be non-contact, accurate, reliable, have a high sample rate and preferably be non-intrusive. Close range photogrammetry based on multiple, synchronised, commercial-off-the-shelf digital cameras can supply surface shape and 6DoF data at 5-15Hz with customisable accuracies. This paper describes data acquisition systems designed and implemented at NASA Langley Research Center to capture surface shapes and 6DoF data. System calibration and data processing techniques are discussed. Examples of experiments and data outputs are described.

  3. Interface Management for a NASA Flight Project Using Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipavetz, Kevin; Shull, Thomas A.; Infeld, Samatha; Price, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The goal of interface management is to identify, define, control, and verify interfaces; ensure compatibility; provide an efficient system development; be on time and within budget; while meeting stakeholder requirements. This paper will present a successful seven-step approach to interface management used in several NASA flight projects. The seven-step approach using Model Based Systems Engineering will be illustrated by interface examples from the Materials International Space Station Experiment-X (MISSE-X) project. The MISSE-X was being developed as an International Space Station (ISS) external platform for space environmental studies, designed to advance the technology readiness of materials and devices critical for future space exploration. Emphasis will be given to best practices covering key areas such as interface definition, writing good interface requirements, utilizing interface working groups, developing and controlling interface documents, handling interface agreements, the use of shadow documents, the importance of interface requirement ownership, interface verification, and product transition.

  4. A Summary of the NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) and Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harld

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center introduced the Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) a couple of years ago to combine routine state-of-the-art measurements of lightning with empirical laboratory results of lightning NOx production. The routine measurements included VHF lightning source data [such as from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA)], and ground flash location, peak current, and stroke multiplicity data from the National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark) (NLDN). Following these initial runs of LNOM, the model was updated to include several non-return stroke lightning NOx production mechanisms, and provided the impact of lightning NOx on an August 2006 run of CMAQ. In this study, we review the evolution of the LNOM in greater detail and discuss the model?s latest upgrades and applications. Whereas previous applications were limited to five summer months of data for North Alabama thunderstorms, the most recent LNOM analyses cover several years. The latest statistics of ground and cloud flash NOx production are provided.

  5. Lightning NOx Statistics Derived by NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) Data Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold

    2013-01-01

    What is the LNOM? The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) [Koshak et al., 2009, 2010, 2011; Koshak and Peterson 2011, 2013] analyzes VHF Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark) (NLDN) data to estimate the lightning nitrogen oxides (LNOx) produced by individual flashes. Figure 1 provides an overview of LNOM functionality. Benefits of LNOM: (1) Does away with unrealistic "vertical stick" lightning channel models for estimating LNOx; (2) Uses ground-based VHF data that maps out the true channel in space and time to < 100 m accuracy; (3) Therefore, true channel segment height (ambient air density) is used to compute LNOx; (4) True channel length is used! (typically tens of kilometers since channel has many branches and "wiggles"); (5) Distinction between ground and cloud flashes are made; (6) For ground flashes, actual peak current from NLDN used to compute NOx from lightning return stroke; (7) NOx computed for several other lightning discharge processes (based on Cooray et al., 2009 theory): (a) Hot core of stepped leaders and dart leaders, (b) Corona sheath of stepped leader, (c) K-change, (d) Continuing Currents, and (e) M-components; and (8) LNOM statistics (see later) can be used to parameterize LNOx production for regional air quality models (like CMAQ), and for global chemical transport models (like GEOS-Chem).

  6. The NASA/MSFC Global Reference Atmospheric Model: 1999 Version (GRAM-99)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, C. G.; Johnson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    The latest version of Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM-99) is presented and discussed. GRAM-99 uses either (binary) Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) or (ASCII) Global Gridded Upper Air Statistics (GGUAS) CD-ROM data sets, for 0-27 km altitudes. As with earlier versions, GRAM-99 provides complete geographical and altitude coverage for each month of the year. GRAM-99 uses a specially-developed data set, based on Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) data, for 20-120 km altitudes, and NASA's 1999 version Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET-99) model for heights above 90 km. Fairing techniques assure smooth transition in overlap height ranges (20-27 km and 90-120 km). GRAM-99 includes water vapor and 11 other atmospheric constituents (O3, N2O, CO, CH4, CO2, N2, O2, O, A, He and H). A variable-scale perturbation model provides both large-scale (wave) and small-scale (stochastic) deviations from mean values for thermodynamic variables and horizontal and vertical wind components. The small-scale perturbation model includes improvements in representing intermittency ("patchiness"). A major new feature is an option to substitute Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) data for conventional GRAM climatology when a trajectory passes sufficiently near any RRA site. A complete user's guide for running the program, plus sample input and output, is provided. An example is provided for how to incorporate GRAM-99 as subroutines in other programs (e.g., trajectory codes).

  7. Estimating Rain Attenuation In Satellite Communication Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Attenuation computed with help of statistical model and meteorological data. NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model (SLAM) program QuickBASIC computer program evaluating static and dynamic statistical assessment of impact of rain attenuation on communication link established between Earth terminal and geosynchronous satellite. Application in specification, design, and assessment of satellite communication links for any terminal location in continental United States. Written in Microsoft QuickBASIC.

  8. Dimming and Brightening in Europe: Transient Climate Simulations with NASA GISS Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, L.; Rind, D. H.

    2017-12-01

    The observed reduction in surface solar radiation from about 1950 to mid-1980s, the so-called "dimming effect", and more recent renewed increase after 1990 are simulated with the NASA GISS ModelE2. A decrease of global mean solar radiation ranges between -0.87 and -1.59 W/m2 with both non-interactive and interactive aerosol-cloud models supporting the "global dimming" phenomenon for the second half of the 20th century. An increase of global mean solar radiation (brightening) ranges between 0.58 and 1.53 W/m2 with both models. Both dimming and brightening are more pronounced for absorbed solar radiation averaged over the European land surface ranging between -1.1 and -2.28 W/m2 for 1971-1986 and between 2.4 and 4.24 W/m2 for 1987-2007. The linear regression is stronger for the brightening than for the dimming. The total cloud cover is decreasing for both "dimming" and "brightening" periods in the interactive model although the negative trends are not significant. In general, the total cloud cover was larger for the "dimming" than for the "brightening". The shortwave cloud radiative forcings that include both the direct and aerosol-cloud albedo effects, do not follow the cloud cover changes, and they reflect the changes in optical depth of clouds. The changes in the cloud properties are significant in the non-interactive model. In conclusion, the cloud cover is not an important factor in "dimming" and "brightening" in both models although some changes in clouds are significant. The analysis shows that both the direct and the first indirect radiative effects of aerosols are playing important roles in both "dimming" and "brightening". Both aerosol effects are contributing more to "dimming" and "brightening" than the cloud radiative effect does.

  9. Spatial variability in compartmental fate modelling : Linking fugacity models and GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wania, F

    1996-03-01

    A new approach is presented which is designed to address the spatial heterogeneity of the environment in compartmental mass balance models of chemical fate in the environment. It rests on the assumption of chemical equilibration within one phase despite prevailing environmental heterogeneity. Composite D- and Z-values are derived from sub-unit specific environmental parameters and are used to solve mass balance equations which can be adopted essentially unchanged from existing compartmental fugacity models. With the resulting common fugacity value for each compartment, sub-unit specific concentrations and process rates can be calculated. The approach is illustrated using the QWASI lake model to calculate the fate of hexachlorobenzene in a hypothetical lake sub-divided in four distinct sub-units. The approach allows the subdivision of each compartment in a large number of sub-units with distinct environmental characteristics without substantially increasing model complexity. This is a necessary condition for linking fugacity models to geographical information systems.

  10. Model-Based Systems Engineering With the Architecture Analysis and Design Language (AADL) Applied to NASA Mission Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Fernandez, Michela Miche

    2014-01-01

    The potential of Model Model Systems Engineering (MBSE) using the Architecture Analysis and Design Language (AADL) applied to space systems will be described. AADL modeling is applicable to real-time embedded systems- the types of systems NASA builds. A case study with the Juno mission to Jupiter showcases how this work would enable future missions to benefit from using these models throughout their life cycle from design to flight operations.

  11. Sensitivity of aerosol indirect forcing and autoconversion to cloud droplet parameterization: an assessment with the NASA Global Modeling Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulou, R. P.; Meshkhidze, N.; Nenes, A.

    2006-12-01

    The aerosol indirect forcing is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in assessments of anthropogenic climate change [IPCC, 2001]. Much of this uncertainty arises from the approach used for linking cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) to precursor aerosol. Global Climate Models (GCM) use a wide range of cloud droplet activation mechanisms ranging from empirical [Boucher and Lohmann, 1995] to detailed physically- based formulations [e.g., Abdul-Razzak and Ghan, 2000; Fountoukis and Nenes, 2005]. The objective of this study is to assess the uncertainties in indirect forcing and autoconversion of cloud water to rain caused by the application of different cloud droplet parameterization mechanisms; this is an important step towards constraining the aerosol indirect effects (AIE). Here we estimate the uncertainty in indirect forcing and autoconversion rate using the NASA Global Model Initiative (GMI). The GMI allows easy interchange of meteorological fields, chemical mechanisms and the aerosol microphysical packages. Therefore, it is an ideal tool for assessing the effect of different parameters on aerosol indirect forcing. The aerosol module includes primary emissions, chemical production of sulfate in clear air and in-cloud aqueous phase, gravitational sedimentation, dry deposition, wet scavenging in and below clouds, and hygroscopic growth. Model inputs include SO2 (fossil fuel and natural), black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), mineral dust and sea salt. The meteorological data used in this work were taken from the NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO) and two different GCMs: the NASA GEOS4 finite volume GCM (FVGCM) and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies version II' (GISS II') GCM. Simulations were carried out for "present day" and "preindustrial" emissions using different meteorological fields (i.e. DAO, FVGCM, GISS II'); cloud droplet number concentration is computed from the correlations of Boucher and Lohmann [1995], Abdul-Razzak and Ghan [2000

  12. Current Status of Post-combustor Trace Chemistry Modeling and Simulation at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Thomas; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2003-01-01

    The overall objective of the current effort at NASA GRC is to evaluate, develop, and apply methodologies suitable for modeling intra-engine trace chemical changes over post combustor flow path relevant to the pollutant emissions from aircraft engines. At the present time, the focus is the high pressure turbine environment. At first, the trace chemistry model of CNEWT were implemented into GLENN-HT as well as NCC. Then, CNEWT, CGLENN-HT, and NCC were applied to the trace species evolution in a cascade of Cambridge University's No. 2 rotor and in a turbine vane passage. In general, the results from these different codes provide similar features. However, the details of some of the quantities of interest can be sensitive to the differences of these codes. This report summaries the implementation effort and presents the comparison of the No. 2 rotor results obtained from these different codes. The comparison of the turbine vane passage results is reported elsewhere. In addition to the implementation of trace chemistry model into existing CFD codes, several pre/post-processing tools that can handle the manipulations of the geometry, the unstructured and structured grids as well as the CFD solutions also have been enhanced and seamlessly tied with NCC, CGLENN-HT, and CNEWT. Thus, a complete CFD package consisting of pre/post-processing tools and flow solvers suitable for post-combustor intra-engine trace chemistry study is assembled.

  13. Design and construction of 2 transonic airfoil models for tests in the NASA Langley C.3-M TCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaechterle, G.; Ludewig, K. H.; Stanewsky, E.; Ray, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a NASA/DFVLR cooperation program two transonic airfoils were tested in the NASA Langley 0.3-m TCT. Model design and construction was carried out by DFVLR. The models designed and constructed performed extremely well under cryogenic conditions. Essentially no permanent changes in surface quality and geometric dimensions occurred during the tests. The aerodynamic results from the TCT tests which demonstrate the large sensitivity of the airfoil CAST 10-Z/DOAZ to Reynolds number changes compared well with results from other facilities at ambient temperatures.

  14. Surface Lander Missions to Mars: Support via Analysis of the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James R.; Bridger, Alison F.C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized the near-surface martian wind environment as calculated with a set of numerical simulations carried out with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (Mars GCM). These wind environments are intended to offer future spacecraft missions to the martian surface a data base from which to choose those locations which meet the mission's criteria for minimal near surface winds to enable a successful landing. We also became involved in the development and testing of the wind sensor which is currently onboard the Mars-bound Pathfinder lander. We began this effort with a comparison of Mars GCM produced winds with those measured by the Viking landers during their descent through the martian atmosphere and their surface wind measurements during the 3+ martian year lifetime of the mission. Unexpected technical difficulties in implementing the sophisticated Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) scheme of Haberle et al. (1993) within the Mars GCM precluded our carrying out this investigation with the desired improvement to the model's treatment of the PBL. Thus, our results from this effort are not as conclusive as we had anticipated. As it turns out, similar difficulties have been experienced by other Mars modelling groups in attempting to implement very similar PBL routines into their GCMs (Mars General Circulation Model Intercomparison Workshop, held at Oxford University, United Kingdom, July 22-24, 1996; organized by J. Murphy, J. Hollingsworth, M. Joshi). These problems, which arise due to the nature of the time stepping in each of the models, are near to being resolved at the present. The model discussions which follow herein are based upon results using the existing, less sophisticated PBL routine. We fully anticipate implementing the tools we have developed in the present effort to investigate GCM results with the new PBL scheme implemented, and thereafter producing the technical document detailing results from the analysis tools developed during this

  15. NASA Models of Space Radiation Induced Cancer, Circulatory Disease, and Central Nervous System Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori J.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2013-01-01

    The risks of late effects from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are potentially a limitation to long-term space travel. The late effects of highest concern have significant lethality including cancer, effects to the central nervous system (CNS), and circulatory diseases (CD). For cancer and CD the use of age and gender specific models with uncertainty assessments based on human epidemiology data for low LET radiation combined with relative biological effectiveness factors (RBEs) and dose- and dose-rate reduction effectiveness factors (DDREF) to extrapolate these results to space radiation exposures is considered the current "state-of-the-art". The revised NASA Space Risk Model (NSRM-2014) is based on recent radio-epidemiology data for cancer and CD, however a key feature of the NSRM-2014 is the formulation of particle fluence and track structure based radiation quality factors for solid cancer and leukemia risk estimates, which are distinct from the ICRP quality factors, and shown to lead to smaller uncertainties in risk estimates. Many persons exposed to radiation on earth as well as astronauts are life-time never-smokers, which is estimated to significantly modify radiation cancer and CD risk estimates. A key feature of the NASA radiation protection model is the classification of radiation workers by smoking history in setting dose limits. Possible qualitative differences between GCR and low LET radiation increase uncertainties and are not included in previous risk estimates. Two important qualitative differences are emerging from research studies. The first is the increased lethality of tumors observed in animal models compared to low LET radiation or background tumors. The second are Non- Targeted Effects (NTE), which include bystander effects and genomic instability, which has been observed in cell and animal models of cancer risks. NTE's could lead to significant changes in RBE and DDREF estimates for GCR particles, and the potential

  16. A wide-temperature range wire-line communication link using the NASA Glenn SiC JFET technology, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has demonstrated a resolve for a flagship mission in the coming years to revisit Venus and land instruments on the surface. Venus has a corrosive, high pressure...

  17. NASA Thesaurus

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Thesaurus contains the authorized NASA subject terms used to index and retrieve materials in the NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) and the NTRS...

  18. Modeled Forecasts of Dengue Fever in San Juan, Puerto Rico Using NASA Satellite Enhanced Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, C.; Quattrochi, D. A.; Zavodsky, B.; Case, J.

    2015-12-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is an important mosquito transmitted disease that is strongly influenced by meteorological and environmental conditions. Recent research has focused on forecasting DF case numbers based on meteorological data. However, these forecasting tools have generally relied on empirical models that require long DF time series to train. Additionally, their accuracy has been tested retrospectively, using past meteorological data. Consequently, the operational utility of the forecasts are still in question because the error associated with weather and climate forecasts are not reflected in the results. Using up-to-date weekly dengue case numbers for model parameterization and weather forecast data as meteorological input, we produced weekly forecasts of DF cases in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Each week, the past weeks' case counts were used to re-parameterize a process-based DF model driven with updated weather forecast data to generate forecasts of DF case numbers. Real-time weather forecast data was produced using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction (NWP) system enhanced using additional high-resolution NASA satellite data. This methodology was conducted in a weekly iterative process with each DF forecast being evaluated using county-level DF cases reported by the Puerto Rico Department of Health. The one week DF forecasts were accurate especially considering the two sources of model error. First, weather forecasts were sometimes inaccurate and generally produced lower than observed temperatures. Second, the DF model was often overly influenced by the previous weeks DF case numbers, though this phenomenon could be lessened by increasing the number of simulations included in the forecast. Although these results are promising, we would like to develop a methodology to produce longer range forecasts so that public health workers can better prepare for dengue epidemics.

  19. Assimilation of MODIS Snow Cover Fraction Observations into the NASA Catchment Land Surface Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ally M. Toure

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The NASA Catchment land surface model (CLSM is the land model component used for the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA. Here, the CLSM versions of MERRA and MERRA-Land are evaluated using snow cover fraction (SCF observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS. Moreover, a computationally-efficient empirical scheme is designed to improve CLSM estimates of SCF, snow depth, and snow water equivalent (SWE through the assimilation of MODIS SCF observations. Results show that data assimilation (DA improved SCF estimates compared to the open-loop model without assimilation (OL, especially in areas with ephemeral snow cover and mountainous regions. A comparison of the SCF estimates from DA against snow cover estimates from the NOAA Interactive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System showed an improvement in the probability of detection of up to 28% and a reduction in false alarms by up to 6% (relative to OL. A comparison of the model snow depth estimates against Canadian Meteorological Centre analyses showed that DA successfully improved the model seasonal bias from −0.017 m for OL to −0.007 m for DA, although there was no significant change in root-mean-square differences (RMSD (0.095 m for OL, 0.093 m for DA. The time-average of the spatial correlation coefficient also improved from 0.61 for OL to 0.63 for DA. A comparison against in situ SWE measurements also showed improvements from assimilation. The correlation increased from 0.44 for OL to 0.49 for DA, the bias improved from −0.111 m for OL to −0.100 m for DA, and the RMSD decreased from 0.186 m for OL to 0.180 m for DA.

  20. The NASA/MSFC Global Reference Atmospheric Model-1995 version (GRAM-95)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, C. G.; Jeffries, W. R., III; Yung, S. P.; Johnson, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    The latest version of the Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM-95) is presented and discussed. GRAM-95 uses the new Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) CD-ROM data set, for 0- to 27-km altitudes. As with earlier versions, GRAM-95 provides complete geographical and altitude coverage for each month of the year. Individual years 1985 to 1991 and a period-of-record (1980 to 1991) can be simulated for the GUACA height range. GRAM-95 uses a specially developed data set, based on Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) data, for the 20- to 120-km height range, and the NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET) model for heights above 90 km. Fairing techniques assure a smooth transition in the overlap height ranges (20 to 27 km and 90 to 120 km). In addition to the traditional GRAM variables of pressure, density, temperature and wind components, GRAM-95 now includes water vapor and 11 other atmospheric constituents (O3, N2O, CO, CH4, CO2, N2, O2, O, A, He, and H). A new, variable-scale perturbation model provides both large-scale and small-scale deviations from mean values for the thermodynamic variables and horizontal and vertical wind components. The perturbation model includes new features that simulate intermittency (patchiness) in turbulence and small-scale perturbation fields. The density perturbations and density gradients (density shears) computed by the new model compare favorably in their statistical characteristics with observed density perturbations and density shears from 32 space shuttle reentry profiles. GRAM-95 provides considerable improvement in wind estimates from the new GUACA data set, compared to winds calculated from the geostrophic wind relations previously used in the 0- to 25-km height range. The GRAM-95 code has been put into a more modular form, easier to incorporate as subroutines in other programs (e.g., trajectory codes). A complete user's guide for running the program, plus sample input and output, is provided.

  1. Conceptual Processes for Linking Eutrophication and Network Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    1 PURPOSE: This three-year study investigates the coupling of eutrophication and network models, applies the results to a specific problem , and...affect water quality problems such as low dissolved oxygen? No straightforward means of coupling the two modeling approaches is available or...Dorothy H. Tillman, Dr. Carl F. Cerco, and Mr. Mark R. Noel of the Water Quality and Contaminant Modeling Branch, Enviromental Laboratory (EL

  2. Modeling X-linked ancestral origins in multiparental populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, Chaozhi

    2015-01-01

    The models for the mosaic structure of an individual's genome from multiparental populations have been developed primarily for autosomes, whereas X chromosomes receive very little attention. In this paper, we extend our previous approach to model ancestral origin processes along two X chromosomes

  3. Theory and Practice: An Integrative Model Linking Class and Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Joan Granucci; Cooper, Marlene

    2006-01-01

    Social work has evolved over the years taking on the challenges of the times. The profession now espouses a breadth of theoretical approaches and treatment modalities. We have developed a model to help graduate social work students master the skill of integrating theory and social work practice. The Integrative Model has five components: (l) The…

  4. Linking statistical bias description to multiobjective model calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, P.; Schuwirth, N.

    2012-09-01

    In the absence of model deficiencies, simulation results at the correct parameter values lead to an unbiased description of observed data with remaining deviations due to observation errors only. However, this ideal cannot be reached in the practice of environmental modeling, because the required simplified representation of the complex reality by the model and errors in model input lead to errors that are reflected in biased model output. This leads to two related problems: First, ignoring bias of output in the statistical model description leads to bias in parameter estimates, model predictions and, in particular, in the quantification of their uncertainty. Second, as there is no objective choice of how much bias to accept in which output variable, it is not possible to design an "objective" model calibration procedure. The first of these problems has been addressed by introducing a statistical (Bayesian) description of bias, the second by suggesting the use of multiobjective calibration techniques that cannot easily be used for uncertainty analysis. We merge the ideas of these two approaches by using the prior of the statistical bias description to quantify the importance of multiple calibration objectives. This leads to probabilistic inference and prediction while still taking multiple calibration objectives into account. The ideas and technical details of the suggested approach are outlined and a didactical example as well as an application to environmental data are provided to demonstrate its practical feasibility and computational efficiency.

  5. Linking Time and Space Scales in Distributed Hydrological Modelling - a case study for the VIC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsen, Lieke; Teuling, Adriaan; Torfs, Paul; Zappa, Massimiliano; Mizukami, Naoki; Clark, Martyn; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2015-04-01

    One of the famous paradoxes of the Greek philosopher Zeno of Elea (~450 BC) is the one with the arrow: If one shoots an arrow, and cuts its motion into such small time steps that at every step the arrow is standing still, the arrow is motionless, because a concatenation of non-moving parts does not create motion. Nowadays, this reasoning can be refuted easily, because we know that motion is a change in space over time, which thus by definition depends on both time and space. If one disregards time by cutting it into infinite small steps, motion is also excluded. This example shows that time and space are linked and therefore hard to evaluate separately. As hydrologists we want to understand and predict the motion of water, which means we have to look both in space and in time. In hydrological models we can account for space by using spatially explicit models. With increasing computational power and increased data availability from e.g. satellites, it has become easier to apply models at a higher spatial resolution. Increasing the resolution of hydrological models is also labelled as one of the 'Grand Challenges' in hydrology by Wood et al. (2011) and Bierkens et al. (2014), who call for global modelling at hyperresolution (~1 km and smaller). A literature survey on 242 peer-viewed articles in which the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model was used, showed that the spatial resolution at which the model is applied has decreased over the past 17 years: From 0.5 to 2 degrees when the model was just developed, to 1/8 and even 1/32 degree nowadays. On the other hand the literature survey showed that the time step at which the model is calibrated and/or validated remained the same over the last 17 years; mainly daily or monthly. Klemeš (1983) stresses the fact that space and time scales are connected, and therefore downscaling the spatial scale would also imply downscaling of the temporal scale. Is it worth the effort of downscaling your model from 1 degree to 1

  6. MODELING THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE AND LAND USE CHANGE ON CARBON AND TRACE GAS BUDGETS OVER THE AMAZON REGION USING NASA SATELLITE PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the LBA-ECO Phase III synthesis efforts for remote sensing and predictive modeling of Amazon carbon, water, and trace gas fluxes, we are evaluating results from the regional ecosystem model called NASA-CASA (Carnegie-Ames Stanford Approach). The NASA-CASA model has bee...

  7. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center presents Enhancing Standards Based Science Curriculum through NASA Content Relevancy: A Model for Sustainable Teaching-Research Integration Dr. Robert Gabrys, Raquel Marshall, Dr. Evelina Felicite-Maurice, Erin McKinley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. H.; Gabrys, R.

    2016-12-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a systemic educator professional development model for the integration of NASA climate change resources into the K-12 classroom. The desired outcome of this model is to prepare teachers in STEM disciplines to be globally engaged and knowledgeable of current climate change research and its potential for content relevancy alignment to standard-based curriculum. The application and mapping of the model is based on the state education needs assessment, alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and implementation framework developed by the consortium of district superintendents and their science supervisors. In this presentation, we will demonstrate best practices for extending the concept of inquiry-based and project-based learning through the integration of current NASA climate change research into curriculum unit lessons. This model includes a significant teacher development component focused on capacity development for teacher instruction and pedagogy aimed at aligning NASA climate change research to related NGSS student performance expectations and subsequent Crosscutting Concepts, Science and Engineering Practices, and Disciplinary Core Ideas, a need that was presented by the district steering committee as critical for ensuring sustainability and high-impact in the classroom. This model offers a collaborative and inclusive learning community that connects classroom teachers to NASA climate change researchers via an ongoing consultant/mentoring approach. As a result of the first year of implementation of this model, Maryland teachers are implementing NGSS unit lessons that guide students in open-ended research based on current NASA climate change research.

  8. An Assessment of Uncertainties in the NASA GISS ModelE GCM due to Variations in the Representation of Aerosol/Cloud Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, G. G.; Menon, S.; Sednev, I.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol indirect effects are known to have a significant impact on the evolution of the climate system. However, their representation via cloud/aerosol microphysics remains a major source of uncertainty in climate models. This study assesses uncertainties in the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE global climate model produced by different representations of the cloud/aerosol interaction scheme. By varying the complexity of the cloud microphysics scheme included in the model and analyzing the range of results against cloud properties obtained from satellite retrievals, we evaluate the effect of the different schemes on climate. We examine four sets of simulations with the GISS ModelE: (1) using a new aerosol/cloud microphysics package implemented in ModelE (based on the two-moment cloud microphysics scheme recently implemented in CCSM), (2) using a version of the microphysics scheme previously included in ModelE, (3) using prescribed aerosol concentrations and fixed cloud droplet number (the main link between aerosols and the cloud microphysics scheme), and (4) varying the environment conditions with which the new aerosol/cloud microphysics package is run. The global mean cloud properties are analyzed and compared to global mean ranges as obtained from satellite retrievals. Results show that important climate parameters, such as total cloud cover, can be underestimated by 8-15% using the new aerosol/cloud microphysics scheme. Liquid water path (LWP) is particularly affected by variations to the aerosol/cloud microphysics representation, exhibiting both global mean variations of ~20% and strong regional differences. Significant variability in LWP between the various simulations may be attributed to differences in the autoconversion scheme used in the differing representations of aerosol/cloud interactions. These LWP differences significantly affect radiative parameters, such as cloud optical depth and net cloud forcing (used to evaluate the

  9. AddRemove : A new link model for use in QM/MM studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, M

    2003-01-01

    The division of a system under study in a quantum mechanical (QM) and a classical system in QM/MM molecular mechanical calculations is sometimes very natural, but a problem arises in the case of bonds crossing the QM/MM boundary. A new link model that uses a capping (link) atom to satisfy the

  10. Comparison of Methods for Modeling a Hydraulic Loader Crane With Flexible Translational Links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Andersen, Torben O.; Nielsen, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    not hold for translational links. Hence, special care has to be taken when including flexible translational links. In the current paper, different methods for modeling a hydraulic loader crane with a telescopic arm are investigated and compared using both the finite segment (FS) and AMs method...

  11. Modeling the video distribution link in the Next Generation Optical Access Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaya, F.; Cárdenas, A.; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a model for the design and optimization of the video distribution link in the next generation optical access network. We analyze the video distribution performance in a SCM-WDM link, including the noise, the distortion and the fiber optic nonlinearities. Additionally, we...

  12. A link based network route choice model with unrestricted choice set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens; Frejinger, Emma; Karlstrom, Anders

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the path choice problem, formulating and discussing an econometric random utility model for the choice of path in a network with no restriction on the choice set. Starting from a dynamic specification of link choices we show that it is equivalent to a static model...... of the multinomial logit form but with infinitely many alternatives. The model can be consistently estimated and used for prediction in a computationally efficient way. Similarly to the path size logit model, we propose an attribute called link size that corrects utilities of overlapping paths but that is link...... additive. The model is applied to data recording path choices in a network with more than 3000 nodes and 7000 links....

  13. NASA and Earth Science Week: a Model for Engaging Scientists and Engineers in Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerin, T. G.; deCharon, A.; Brown de Colstoun, E. C.; Chambers, L. H.; Woroner, M.; Taylor, J.; Callery, S.; Jackson, R.; Riebeek, H.; Butcher, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Earth Science Week (ESW) - the 2nd full week in October - is a national and international event to help the public, particularly educators and students, gain a better understanding and appreciation for the Earth sciences. The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) organizes ESW, along with partners including NASA, using annual themes (e.g., the theme for 2014 is Earth's Connected Systems). ESW provides a unique opportunity for NASA scientists and engineers across multiple missions and projects to share NASA STEM, their personal stories and enthusiasm to engage and inspire the next generation of Earth explorers. Over the past five years, NASA's ESW campaign has been planned and implemented by a cross-mission/cross-project group, led by the NASA Earth Science Education and Pubic Outreach Forum, and utilizing a wide range of media and approaches (including both English- and Spanish-language events and content) to deliver NASA STEM to teachers and students. These included webcasts, social media (blogs, twitter chats, Google+ hangouts, Reddit Ask Me Anything), videos, printed and online resources, and local events and visits to classrooms. Dozens of NASA scientists, engineers, and communication and education specialists contribute and participate each year. This presentation will provide more information about this activity and offer suggestions and advice for others engaging scientists and engineers in education and outreach programs and events.

  14. Modeling and control of a hydraulically actuated flexible-prismatic link robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, L.; Kress, R.; Jansen, J.

    1996-12-01

    Most of the research related to flexible link manipulators to date has focused on single link, fixed length, single plane of vibration test beds. In addition, actuation has been predominantly based upon electromagnetic motors. Ironically, these elements are rarely found in the existing industrial long reach systems. This manuscript describes a new hydraulically actuated, long reach manipulator with a flexible prismatic link at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Focus is directed towards both modeling and control of hydraulic actuators as well as flexible links that have variable natural frequencies

  15. Linking Experimental Characterization and Computational Modeling in Microstructural Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, Melik Cumhar [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    It is known that by controlling microstructural development, desirable properties of materials can be achieved. The main objective of our research is to understand and control interface dominated material properties, and finally, to verify experimental results with computer simulations. In order to accomplish this objective, we studied the grain growth in detail with experimental techniques and computational simulations. We obtained 5170-grain data from an Aluminum-film (120μm thick) with a columnar grain structure from the Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Experimentally obtained starting microstructure and grain boundary properties are input for the three-dimensional grain growth simulation. In the computational model, minimization of the interface energy is the driving force for the grain boundary motion. The computed evolved microstructure is compared with the final experimental microstructure, after annealing at 550 ºC. Two different measures were introduced as methods of comparing experimental and computed microstructures. Modeling with anisotropic mobility explains a significant amount of mismatch between experiment and isotropic modeling. We have shown that isotropic modeling has very little predictive value. Microstructural evolution in columnar Aluminum foils can be correctly modeled with anisotropic parameters. We observed a strong similarity between grain growth experiments and anisotropic three-dimensional simulations.

  16. Linking Experimental Characterization and Computational Modeling in Microstructural Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, Melik Cumhur [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    It is known that by controlling microstructural development, desirable properties of materials can be achieved. The main objective of our research is to understand and control interface dominated material properties, and finally, to verify experimental results with computer simulations. In order to accomplish this objective, we studied the grain growth in detail with experimental techniques and computational simulations. We obtained 5170-grain data from an Aluminum-film (120μm thick) with a columnar grain structure from the Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Experimentally obtained starting microstructure and grain boundary properties are input for the three-dimensional grain growth simulation. In the computational model, minimization of the interface energy is the driving force for the grain boundary motion. The computed evolved microstructure is compared with the final experimental microstructure, after annealing at 550 ºC. Two different measures were introduced as methods of comparing experimental and computed microstructures. Modeling with anisotropic mobility explains a significant amount of mismatch between experiment and isotropic modeling. We have shown that isotropic modeling has very little predictive value. Microstructural evolution in columnar Aluminum foils can be correctly modeled with anisotropic parameters. We observed a strong similarity

  17. NASA Earth Observation Systems and Applications for Public Health and Air Quality Models and Decisions Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Sue; Haynes, John; Omar, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Health and Air Quality providers and researchers need environmental data to study and understand the geographic, environmental, and meteorological differences in disease. Satellite remote sensing of the environment offers a unique vantage point that can fill in the gaps of environmental, spatial, and temporal data for tracking disease. This presentation will demonstrate the need for collaborations between multi-disciplinary research groups to develop the full potential of utilizing Earth Observations in studying health. Satellite earth observations present a unique vantage point of the earth's environment from space, which offers a wealth of health applications for the imaginative investigator. The presentation is directly related to Earth Observing systems and Global Health Surveillance and will present research results of the remote sensing environmental observations of earth and health applications, which can contribute to the public health and air quality research. As part of NASA approach and methodology they have used Earth Observation Systems and Applications for Public Health and Air Quality Models to provide a method for bridging gaps of environmental, spatial, and temporal data for tracking disease. This presentation will provide an overview of projects dealing with infectious diseases, water borne diseases and air quality and how many environmental variables effect human health. This presentation will provide a venue where the results of both research and practice using satellite earth observations to study weather and it's role in public health research.

  18. NASA Earth Observation Systems and Applications for Public Health and Air Quality Models and Decisions Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, S. M.; Haynes, J. A.; Omar, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Health and Air Quality providers and researchers need environmental data to study and understand the geographic, environmental, and meteorological differences in disease. Satellite remote sensing of the environment offers a unique vantage point that can fill in the gaps of environmental, spatial, and temporal data for tracking disease. This presentation will demonstrate the need for collaborations between multi-disciplinary research groups to develop the full potential of utilizing Earth Observations in studying health. Satellite earth observations present a unique vantage point of the earth's environment from space, which offers a wealth of health applications for the imaginative investigator. The presentation is directly related to Earth Observing systems and Global Health Surveillance and will present research results of the remote sensing environmental observations of earth and health applications, which can contribute to the public health and air quality research. As part of NASA approach and methodology they have used Earth Observation Systems and Applications for Public Health and Air Quality Models to provide a method for bridging gaps of environmental, spatial, and temporal data for tracking disease. This presentation will provide an overview of projects dealing with infectious diseases, water borne diseases and air quality and how many environmental variables effect human health. This presentation will provide a venue where the results of both research and practice using satellite earth observations to study weather and it's role in public health research.

  19. Characterizing Cognitive Aging in Humans with Links to Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene E Alexander

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available With the population of older adults expected to grow rapidly over the next two decades, it has become increasingly important to advance research efforts to elucidate the mechanisms associated with cognitive aging, with the ultimate goal of developing effective interventions and prevention therapies. Although there has been a vast research literature on the use of cognitive tests to evaluate the effects of aging and age-related neurodegenerative disease, the need for a set of standardized measures to characterize the cognitive profiles specific to healthy aging has been widely recognized. Here we present a review of selected methods and approaches that have been applied in human research studies to evaluate the effects of aging on cognition, including executive function, memory, processing speed, language, and visuospatial function. The effects of healthy aging on each of these cognitive domains are discussed with examples from cognitive/experimental and clinical/neuropsychological approaches. Further, we consider those measures that have clear conceptual and methodological links to tasks currently in use for non-human animal studies of aging, as well as those that have the potential for translation to animal aging research. Having a complementary set of measures to assess the cognitive profiles of healthy aging across species provides a unique opportunity to enhance research efforts for cross-sectional, longitudinal, and intervention studies of cognitive aging. Taking a cross-species, translational approach will help to advance cognitive aging research, leading to a greater understanding of associated neurobiological mechanisms with the potential for developing effective interventions and prevention therapies for age-related cognitive decline.

  20. Model-Based Fault Detection and Diagnosis System for NASA Mars Subsurface Drill Prototype

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Drilling Automation for Mars Environment (DAME) project, led by NASA Ames Research Center, is aimed at developing a lightweight, low-power drill prototype that...

  1. The indirect link between perceived parenting and adolescent future orientation : A multiple-step model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seginer, R.; Vermulst, A.A.; Shoyer, S.

    2004-01-01

    The indirect links between perceived mothers' and fathers' autonomous-accepting parenting and future orientation were examined in a mediational model consisting of five steps: perceived mothers' and fathers' autonomous-accepting parenting, self-evaluation, and the motivational, cognitive

  2. An integrative model linking feedback environment and organizational citizenship behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jei-Chen; Chiu, Su-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Past empirical evidence has suggested that a positive supervisor feedback environment may enhance employees' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). In this study, we aim to extend previous research by proposing and testing an integrative model that examines the mediating processes underlying the relationship between supervisor feedback environment and employee OCB. Data were collected from 259 subordinate-supervisor dyads across a variety of organizations in Taiwan. We used structural equation modeling to test our hypotheses. The results demonstrated that supervisor feedback environment influenced employees' OCB indirectly through (1) both positive affective-cognition and positive attitude (i.e., person-organization fit and organizational commitment), and (2) both negative affective-cognition and negative attitude (i.e., role stressors and job burnout). Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  3. Linking density functional and mode coupling models for supercooled liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Premkumar, Leishangthem; Bidhoodi, Neeta; Das, Shankar P.

    2015-01-01

    We compare predictions from two familiar models of the metastable supercooled liquid respectively constructed with thermodynamic and dynamic approach. In the so called density functional theory (DFT) the free energy $F[\\rho]$ of the liquid is a functional of the inhomogeneous density $\\rho({\\bf r})$. The metastable state is identified as a local minimum of $F[\\rho]$. The sharp density profile characterizing $\\rho({\\bf r})$ is identified as a single particle oscillator, whose frequency is obta...

  4. Links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics: a model for information in economics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Emmanuel

    2016-05-28

    This paper tallies the links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics, and attempts to show whether those links can aid in beginning to build a formal template which is usable in economics models where time is (a)symmetric and memory is absent or present. An objective of this paper is to contemplate whether those formalisms can allow us to model information in economics in a novel way. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. Excess Loss Model for Low Elevation Links in Urban Areas for UAVs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Simunek

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the link between an UAV and a ground control station in an urban area. This link shows a unique geometry which is somewhere in between the purely terrestrial (e.g., a macro-cell channel and the land mobile satellite case (LMS. We describe a measurement campaign which reproduces the UAV link conditions and shows how the excess loss is mainly dependent on the elevation angle and fairly independent of the distance. Finally, we propose a simple physical model for predicting the excess loss based on a combination of diffracted and reflected components. Results from this model are in good agreement with the measurements.

  6. Modeling water quality, temperature, and flow in Link River, south-central Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2016-09-09

    The 2.1-km (1.3-mi) Link River connects Upper Klamath Lake to the Klamath River in south-central Oregon. A CE-QUAL-W2 flow and water-quality model of Link River was developed to provide a connection between an existing model of the upper Klamath River and any existing or future models of Upper Klamath Lake. Water-quality sampling at six locations in Link River was done during 2013–15 to support model development and to provide a better understanding of instream biogeochemical processes. The short reach and high velocities in Link River resulted in fast travel times and limited water-quality transformations, except for dissolved oxygen. Reaeration through the reach, especially at the falls in Link River, was particularly important in moderating dissolved oxygen concentrations that at times entered the reach at Link River Dam with marked supersaturation or subsaturation. This reaeration resulted in concentrations closer to saturation downstream at the mouth of Link River.

  7. A mouse model for nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB12) links hearing loss to defects in tip links of mechanosensory hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwander, Martin; Xiong, Wei; Tokita, Joshua; Lelli, Andrea; Elledge, Heather M.; Kazmierczak, Piotr; Sczaniecka, Anna; Kolatkar, Anand; Wiltshire, Tim; Kuhn, Peter; Holt, Jeffrey R.; Kachar, Bechara; Tarantino, Lisa; Müller, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Deafness is the most common form of sensory impairment in humans and is frequently caused by single gene mutations. Interestingly, different mutations in a gene can cause syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of deafness, as well as progressive and age-related hearing loss. We provide here an explanation for the phenotypic variability associated with mutations in the cadherin 23 gene (CDH23). CDH23 null alleles cause deaf-blindness (Usher syndrome type 1D; USH1D), whereas missense mutations cause nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB12). In a forward genetic screen, we have identified salsa mice, which suffer from hearing loss due to a Cdh23 missense mutation modeling DFNB12. In contrast to waltzer mice, which carry a CDH23 null allele mimicking USH1D, hair cell development is unaffected in salsa mice. Instead, tip links, which are thought to gate mechanotransduction channels in hair cells, are progressively lost. Our findings suggest that DFNB12 belongs to a new class of disorder that is caused by defects in tip links. We propose that mutations in other genes that cause USH1 and nonsyndromic deafness may also have distinct effects on hair cell development and function. PMID:19270079

  8. Investigating Sensitivity to Saharan Dust in Tropical Cyclone Formation Using Nasa's Adjoint Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As tropical cyclones develop from easterly waves coming of the coast of Africa they interact with dust from the Sahara desert. There is a long standing debate over whether this dust inhibits or advances the developing storm and how much influence it has. Dust can surround the storm and absorb incoming solar radiation, cooling the air below. As a result an energy source for the system is potentially diminished, inhibiting growth of the storm. Alternatively dust may interact with clouds through micro-physical processes, for example by causing more moisture to condense, potentially increasing the strength. As a result of climate change, concentrations and amount of dust in the atmosphere will likely change. It it is important to properly understand its effect on tropical storm formation. The adjoint of an atmospheric general circulation model provides a very powerful tool for investigating sensitivity to initial conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently developed an adjoint version of the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) dynamical core, convection scheme, cloud model and radiation schemes. This is extended so that the interaction between dust and radiation is also accounted for in the adjoint model. This provides a framework for examining the sensitivity to dust in the initial conditions. Specifically the set up allows for an investigation into the extent to which dust affects cyclone strength through absorption of radiation. In this work we investigate the validity of using an adjoint model for examining sensitivity to dust in hurricane formation. We present sensitivity results for a number of systems that developed during the Atlantic hurricane season of 2006. During this period there was a significant outbreak of Saharan dust and it is has been argued that this outbreak was responsible for the relatively calm season. This period was also covered by an extensive observation campaign. It is shown that the

  9. Linking density functional and mode coupling models for supercooled liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Leishangthem; Bidhoodi, Neeta; Das, Shankar P

    2016-03-28

    We compare predictions from two familiar models of the metastable supercooled liquid, respectively, constructed with thermodynamic and dynamic approaches. In the so called density functional theory the free energy F[ρ] of the liquid is a functional of the inhomogeneous density ρ(r). The metastable state is identified as a local minimum of F[ρ]. The sharp density profile characterizing ρ(r) is identified as a single particle oscillator, whose frequency is obtained from the parameters of the optimum density function. On the other hand, a dynamic approach to supercooled liquids is taken in the mode coupling theory (MCT) which predict a sharp ergodicity-non-ergodicity transition at a critical density. The single particle dynamics in the non-ergodic state, treated approximately, represents a propagating mode whose characteristic frequency is computed from the corresponding memory function of the MCT. The mass localization parameters in the above two models (treated in their simplest forms) are obtained, respectively, in terms of the corresponding natural frequencies depicted and are shown to have comparable magnitudes.

  10. Linking density functional and mode coupling models for supercooled liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premkumar, Leishangthem; Bidhoodi, Neeta; Das, Shankar P. [School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2016-03-28

    We compare predictions from two familiar models of the metastable supercooled liquid, respectively, constructed with thermodynamic and dynamic approaches. In the so called density functional theory the free energy F[ρ] of the liquid is a functional of the inhomogeneous density ρ(r). The metastable state is identified as a local minimum of F[ρ]. The sharp density profile characterizing ρ(r) is identified as a single particle oscillator, whose frequency is obtained from the parameters of the optimum density function. On the other hand, a dynamic approach to supercooled liquids is taken in the mode coupling theory (MCT) which predict a sharp ergodicity-non-ergodicity transition at a critical density. The single particle dynamics in the non-ergodic state, treated approximately, represents a propagating mode whose characteristic frequency is computed from the corresponding memory function of the MCT. The mass localization parameters in the above two models (treated in their simplest forms) are obtained, respectively, in terms of the corresponding natural frequencies depicted and are shown to have comparable magnitudes.

  11. Linking nitrogen deposition to nitrate concentrations in groundwater below nature areas : modelling approach and data requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonten, L.T.C.; Mol-Dijkstra, J.P.; Wieggers, H.J.J.; Vries, de W.; Pul, van W.A.J.; Hoek, van den K.W.

    2009-01-01

    This study determines the most suitable model and required model improvements to link atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and other elements in the Netherlands to measurements of nitrogen and other elements in the upper groundwater. The deterministic model SMARTml was found to be the most suitable

  12. Modelling soil nitrogen: The MAGIC model with nitrogen retention linked to carbon turnover using decomposer dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oulehle, F.; Cosby, B.J.; Wright, R.F.; Hruška, J.; Kopáček, J.; Krám, P.; Evans, C.D.; Moldan, F.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new formulation of the acidification model MAGIC that uses decomposer dynamics to link nitrogen (N) cycling to carbon (C) turnover in soils. The new model is evaluated by application to 15–30 years of water chemistry data at three coniferous-forested sites in the Czech Republic where deposition of sulphur (S) and N have decreased by >80% and 40%, respectively. Sulphate concentrations in waters have declined commensurately with S deposition, but nitrate concentrations have shown much larger decreases relative to N deposition. This behaviour is inconsistent with most conceptual models of N saturation, and with earlier versions of MAGIC which assume N retention to be a first-order function of N deposition and/or controlled by the soil C/N ratio. In comparison with earlier versions, the new formulation more correctly simulates observed short-term changes in nitrate leaching, as well as long-term retention of N in soils. The model suggests that, despite recent deposition reductions and recovery, progressive N saturation will lead to increased future nitrate leaching, ecosystem eutrophication and re-acidification. - Highlights: ► New version of the biogeochemical model MAGIC developed to simulate C/N dynamics. ► New formulation of N retention based directly on the decomposer processes. ► The new formulation simulates observed changes in nitrate leaching and in soil C/N. ► The model suggests progressive N saturation at sites examined. ► The model performance meets a growing need for realistic process-based simulations. - Process-based modelling of nitrogen dynamics and acidification in forest ecosystems.

  13. Linking effort and fishing mortality in a mixed fisheries model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, Thomas Talund; Hoff, Ayoe; Frost, Hans Staby

    2012-01-01

    Since the implementation of the Common Fisheries Policy of the European Union in 1983, the management of EU fisheries has been enormously challenging. The abundance of many fish stocks has declined because too much fishing capacity has been utilised on healthy fish stocks. Today, this decline...... in fish stocks has led to overcapacity in many fisheries, leading to incentives for overfishing. Recent research has shown that the allocation of effort among fleets can play an important role in mitigating overfishing when the targeting covers a range of species (multi-species—i.e., so-called mixed...... fisheries), while simultaneously optimising the overall economic performance of the fleets. The so-called FcubEcon model, in particular, has elucidated both the biologically and economically optimal method for allocating catches—and thus effort—between fishing fleets, while ensuring that the quotas...

  14. Linking Memories across Time via Neuronal and Dendritic Overlaps in Model Neurons with Active Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kastellakis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Memories are believed to be stored in distributed neuronal assemblies through activity-induced changes in synaptic and intrinsic properties. However, the specific mechanisms by which different memories become associated or linked remain a mystery. Here, we develop a simplified, biophysically inspired network model that incorporates multiple plasticity processes and explains linking of information at three different levels: (1 learning of a single associative memory, (2 rescuing of a weak memory when paired with a strong one, and (3 linking of multiple memories across time. By dissecting synaptic from intrinsic plasticity and neuron-wide from dendritically restricted protein capture, the model reveals a simple, unifying principle: linked memories share synaptic clusters within the dendrites of overlapping populations of neurons. The model generates numerous experimentally testable predictions regarding the cellular and sub-cellular properties of memory engrams as well as their spatiotemporal interactions.

  15. Model Deformation Measurements of Sonic Boom Models in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura K.; Garbeff, Theodore J.; Heineck, James T.

    2015-01-01

    The deformations of two sonic-boom models were measured by stereo photogrammetry during tests in the 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The models were geometrically similar but one was 2.75 times as large as the other. Deformation measurements were made by simultaneously imaging the upper surfaces of the models from two directions by calibrated cameras that were mounted behind windows of the test section. Bending and twist were measured at discrete points using conventional circular targets that had been marked along the leading and trailing edges of the wings and tails. In addition, continuous distributions of bending and twist were measured from ink speckles that had been applied to the upper surfaces of the model. Measurements were made at wind-on (M = 1.6) and wind-off conditions over a range of angles of attack between 2.5 deg. and 5.0 deg. At each condition, model deformation was determined by comparing the wind-off and wind-on coordinates of each measurement point after transforming the coordinates to reference coordinates tied to the model. The necessary transformations were determined by measuring the positions of a set of targets on the rigid center-body of the models whose model-axes coordinates were known. Smoothly varying bending and twist measurements were obtained at all conditions. Bending displacements increased in proportion to the square of the distance to the centerline. Maximum deflection of the wingtip of the larger model was about 5 mm (2% of the semispan) and that of the smaller model was 0.9 mm (1% of the semispan). The change in wing twist due to bending increased in direct proportion to distance from the centerline and reached a (absolute) maximum of about -1? at the highest angle of attack for both models. The measurements easily resolved bending displacements as small as 0.05 mm and bending-induced changes in twist as small as 0.05 deg.

  16. Preliminary Results of a U.S. Deep South Modeling Experiment Using NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for Operational National Weather Service Local Model Runs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lance; Medlin, Jeffrey M.; Case, Jon

    2012-01-01

    A joint collaborative modeling effort among the NWS offices in Mobile, AL, and Houston, TX, and NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center began during the 2011-2012 cold season, and continued into the 2012 warm season. The focus was on two frequent U.S. Deep South forecast challenges: the initiation of deep convection during the warm season; and heavy precipitation during the cold season. We wanted to examine the impact of certain NASA produced products on the Weather Research and Forecasting Environmental Modeling System in improving the model representation of mesoscale boundaries such as the local sea-, bay- and land-breezes (which often leads to warm season convective initiation); and improving the model representation of slow moving, or quasi-stationary frontal boundaries (which focus cold season storm cell training and heavy precipitation). The NASA products were: the 4-km Land Information System, a 1-km sea surface temperature analysis, and a 4-km greenness vegetation fraction analysis. Similar domains were established over the southeast Texas and Alabama coastlines, each with an outer grid with a 9 km spacing and an inner nest with a 3 km grid spacing. The model was run at each NWS office once per day out to 24 hours from 0600 UTC, using the NCEP Global Forecast System for initial and boundary conditions. Control runs without the NASA products were made at the NASA SPoRT Center. The NCAR Model Evaluation Tools verification package was used to evaluate both the positive and negative impacts of the NASA products on the model forecasts. Select case studies will be presented to highlight the influence of the products.

  17. Modeling and Representing National Climate Assessment Information using Linked Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Tilmes, C.; Smith, A.; Zednik, S.; Fox, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    Every four years, earth scientists work together on a National Climate Assessment (NCA) report which integrates, evaluates, and interprets the findings of climate change and impacts on affected industries such as agriculture, natural environment, energy production and use, etc. Given the amount of information presented in each report, and the wide range of information sources and topics, it can be difficult for users to find and identify desired information. To ease the user effort of information discovery, well-structured metadata is needed that describes the report's key statements and conclusions and provide for traceable provenance of data sources used. We present an assessment ontology developed to describe terms, concepts and relations required for the NCA metadata. Wherever possible, the assessment ontology reuses terms from well-known ontologies such as Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) ontology, Dublin Core (DC) vocabulary. We have generated sample National Climate Assessment metadata conforming to our assessment ontology and publicly exposed via a SPARQL-endpoint and website. We have also modeled provenance information for the NCA writing activities using the W3C recommendation-candidate PROV-O ontology. Using this provenance the user will be able to trace the sources of information used in the assessment and therefore make trust decisions. In the future, we are planning to implement a faceted browser over the metadata to enhance metadata traversal and information discovery.

  18. How to Develop and Interpret a Credibility Assessment of Numerical Models for Human Research: NASA-STD-7009 Demystified

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Walton, Marlei; Myers, Jerry G.

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of the Columbia accident, the NASA-STD-7009 [1] credibility assessment was developed as a unifying platform to describe model credibility and the uncertainties in its modeling predictions. This standard is now being adapted by NASAs Human Research Program to cover a wide range of numerical models for human research. When used properly, the standard can improve the process of code development by encouraging the use of best practices. It can also give management more insight in making informed decisions through a better understanding of the models capabilities and limitations.To a newcomer, the abstractions presented in NASA-STD-7009 and the sheer volume of information that must be absorbed can be overwhelming. This talk is aimed at describing the credibility assessment, which is the heart of the standard, in plain terms. It will outline how to develop a credibility assessment under the standard. It will also show how to quickly interpret the graphs and tables that result from the assessment and how to drill down from the top-level view to the foundation of the assessment. Finally, it will highlight some of the resources that are available for further study.

  19. Atmospheric Rotational Effects on Mars Based on the NASA Ames General Circulation Model: Angular Momentum Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Braulio V.; Haberle, Robert M.; Schaeffer, James

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the investigation is to determine the motion of the rotational axis of Mars as a result of mass variations in the atmosphere and condensation and sublimation of CO2 ice on the polar caps. A planet experiences this type of motion if it has an atmosphere, which is changing its mass distribution with respect to the solid body of the planet and/or it is asymmetrically changing the amount of ice at the polar caps. The physical principle involved is the conservation of angular momentum, one can get a feeling for it by sitting on a well oiled swivel chair holding a rotating wheel on a horizontal direction and then changing the rotation axis of the wheel to a vertical direction. The person holding the wheel and the chair would begin to rotate in opposite direction to the rotation of the wheel. The motions of Mars atmosphere and the ice caps variations are obtained from a mathematical model developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. The model produces outputs for a time span of one Martian year, which is equivalent to 687 Earth days. The results indicate that Mars axis of rotation moves in a spiral with respect to a reference point on the surface of the planet. It can move as far away as 35.3 cm from the initial location as a result of both mass variations in the atmosphere and asymmetric ice variations at the polar caps. Furthermore the pole performs close to two revolutions around the reference point during a Martian year. This motion is a combination of two motions, one produced by the atmospheric mass variations and another due to the variations in the ice caps. The motion due to the atmospheric variations is a spiral performing about two and a half revolutions around the reference point during which the pole can move as far as 40.9 cm. The motion due to variations in the ice caps is a spiral performing almost three revolutions during which the pole can move as far as 32.8 cm.

  20. Evaluating the Impacts of NASA/SPoRT Daily Greenness Vegetation Fraction on Land Surface Model and Numerical Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jordan R.; Case, Jonathan L.; Molthan, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center develops new products and techniques that can be used in operational meteorology. The majority of these products are derived from NASA polar-orbiting satellite imagery from the Earth Observing System (EOS) platforms. One such product is a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) dataset, which is produced from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data aboard the NASA EOS Aqua and Terra satellites. NASA SPoRT began generating daily real-time GVF composites at 1-km resolution over the Continental United States (CONUS) on 1 June 2010. The purpose of this study is to compare the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) climatology GVF product (currently used in operational weather models) to the SPoRT-MODIS GVF during June to October 2010. The NASA Land Information System (LIS) was employed to study the impacts of the new SPoRT-MODIS GVF dataset on land surface models apart from a full numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. For the 2010 warm season, the SPoRT GVF in the western portion of the CONUS was generally higher than the NCEP climatology. The eastern CONUS GVF had variations both above and below the climatology during the period of study. These variations in GVF led to direct impacts on the rates of heating and evaporation from the land surface. The second phase of the project is to examine the impacts of the SPoRT GVF dataset on NWP using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two separate WRF model simulations were made for individual severe weather case days using the NCEP GVF (control) and SPoRT GVF (experimental), with all other model parameters remaining the same. Based on the sensitivity results in these case studies, regions with higher GVF in the SPoRT model runs had higher evapotranspiration and lower direct surface heating, which typically resulted in lower (higher) predicted 2-m temperatures (2-m dewpoint temperatures). The opposite was true

  1. NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS) comprises an electronics module, a gas supply module, and the incubator module housing the rotating wall vessel and its support systems. Nutrient media are pumped through an oxygenator and the culture vessel. The shell rotates at 0.5 rpm while the irner filter typically rotates at 11.5 rpm to produce a gentle flow that ensures removal of waste products as fresh media are infused. Periodically, some spent media are pumped into a waste bag and replaced by fresh media. When the waste bag is filled, an astronaut drains the waste bag and refills the supply bag through ports on the face of the incubator. Pinch valves and a perfusion pump ensure that no media are exposed to moving parts. An Experiment Control Computer controls the Bioreactor, records conditions, and alerts the crew when problems occur. The crew operates the system through a laptop computer displaying graphics designed for easy crew training and operation. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. See No. 0101825 for a version with major elements labeled, and No. 0103180 for an operational schematic. 0101816

  2. Recent Upgrades to NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for the Environmental Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Rozumalski, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several products for its National Weather Service (NWS) partners that can initialize specific fields for local model runs within the NOAA/NWS Science and Training Resource Center (STRC) Environmental Modeling System (EMS). In last year's NWA abstract on this topic, the suite of SPoRT products supported in the STRC EMS was presented, which includes a Sea Surface Temperature (SST) composite, a Great Lakes sea-ice extent, a Green Vegetation Fraction (GVF) composite, and NASA Land Information System (LIS) gridded output. This abstract and companion presentation describes recent upgrades made to the SST and GVF composites, as well as the real-time LIS runs. The Great Lakes sea-ice product is unchanged from 2011. The SPoRT SST composite product has been expanded geographically and as a result, the resolution has been coarsened from 1 km to 2 km to accommodate the larger domain. The expanded domain covers much of the northern hemisphere from eastern Asia to western Europe (0 N to 80 N latitude and 150 E to 10 E longitude). In addition, the NESDIS POES-GOES product was added to fill in gaps caused by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) being unable to sense in cloudy regions, replacing the recently-lost Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS with negligible change to product fidelity. The SST product now runs twice per day for Terra and Aqua combined data collections from 0000 to 1200 UTC and from 1200 to 0000 UTC, with valid analysis times at 0600 and 1800 UTC. The twice-daily compositing technique reduces the overall latency of the previous version while still representing the diurnal cycle characteristics. The SST composites are available at approximately four hours after the end of each collection period (i.e. 1600 UTC for the nighttime analysis and 0400 UTC for the daytime analysis). The real-time MODIS GVF composite has only received minor updates in the

  3. Pricing of premiums for equity-linked life insurance based on joint mortality models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaman; Parmikanti, K.; Irianingsih, I.; Supian, S.

    2018-03-01

    Life insurance equity - linked is a financial product that not only offers protection, but also investment. The calculation of equity-linked life insurance premiums generally uses mortality tables. Because of advances in medical technology and reduced birth rates, it appears that the use of mortality tables is less relevant in the calculation of premiums. To overcome this problem, we use a combination mortality model which in this study is determined based on Indonesian Mortality table 2011 to determine the chances of death and survival. In this research, we use the Combined Mortality Model of the Weibull, Inverse-Weibull, and Gompertz Mortality Model. After determining the Combined Mortality Model, simulators calculate the value of the claim to be given and the premium price numerically. By calculating equity-linked life insurance premiums well, it is expected that no party will be disadvantaged due to the inaccuracy of the calculation result

  4. NASA SPoRT Modeling and Data Assimilation Research and Transition Activities Using WRF, LIS and GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Blankenship, Clay B.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Berndt, Emily B.

    2014-01-01

    weather research and forecasting ===== The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has numerous modeling and data assimilation (DA) activities in which the WRF model is a key component. SPoRT generates realtime, research satellite products from the MODIS and VIIRS instruments, making the data available to NOAA/NWS partners running the WRF/EMS, including: (1) 2-km northwestern-hemispheric SST composite, (2) daily, MODIS green vegetation fraction (GVF) over CONUS, and (3) NASA Land Information System (LIS) runs of the Noah LSM over the southeastern CONUS. Each of these datasets have been utilized by specific SPoRT partners in local EMS model runs, with select offices evaluating the impacts using a set of automated scripts developed by SPoRT that manage data acquisition and run the NCAR Model Evaluation Tools verification package. SPoRT is engaged in DA research with the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) and Ensemble Kalman Filter in LIS for soil moisture DA. Ongoing DA projects using GSI include comparing the impacts of assimilating Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances versus retrieved profiles, and an analysis of extra-tropical cyclones with intense non-convective winds. As part of its Early Adopter activities for the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, SPoRT is conducting bias correction and soil moisture DA within LIS to improve simulations using the NASA Unified-WRF (NU-WRF) for both the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity and upcoming SMAP mission data. SPoRT has also incorporated real-time global GVF data into LIS and WRF from the VIIRS product being developed by NOAA/NESDIS. This poster will highlight the research and transition activities SPoRT conducts using WRF, NU-WRF, EMS, LIS, and GSI.

  5. Use of a MOSFET for radiation monitoring in space and comparison with the NASA trapped particle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Joon; Min, Kyoung-Wook; Ko, Dai-Ho [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seon, Jong-Ho [Satrec Initiative Company Limited, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    We apply the model for radiation effects on MOSFETs with concurrent thermal annealing to the case of space radiation. The results of total dose experiments on board KITSAT-1 are analyzed using the model. We find that the difference in responses of the two RADFETs, specially designed MOSFETs with thick gate oxides, comes from the built-in shielding effects due to the satellite structures. The oscillatory behavior seen in the threshold voltage shifts is identified to be the effect of a temperature variation. The estimated total dose is compared with that of the NASA trapped particle model.

  6. UAS in the NAS Project: Large-Scale Communication Architecture Simulations with NASA GRC Gen5 Radio Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubat, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a description and performance characterization of the large-scale, Relay architecture, UAS communications simulation capability developed for the NASA GRC, UAS in the NAS Project. The system uses a validated model of the GRC Gen5 CNPC, Flight-Test Radio model. Contained in the report is a description of the simulation system and its model components, recent changes made to the system to improve performance, descriptions and objectives of sample simulations used for test and verification, and a sampling and observations of results and performance data.

  7. Long-Term Model Assimilated Aerosols from MERRA-2: Data and Services at NASA GES DISC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Suhung; Ostrenga, Dana; Huwe, Paul; Vollmer, Bruce; Kempler, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2) is the atmospheric reanalysis conducted with NASA assimilation system GEOS-5. Alongside the meteorological data assimilation, MERRA-2 includes an interactive analysis of aerosols, land, ocean, and ice that feed back into circulation.

  8. A Framework for Linking Population Model Development with Ecological Risk Assessment Objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The value of models that link organism‐level impacts to the responses of a population in ecological risk assessments (ERAs) has been demonstrated extensively over the past few decades. There is little debate about the utility of these models to translate multiple organism&#...

  9. A Simple Forecasting Model Linking Macroeconomic Policy to Industrial Employment Demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malley, James R.; Hady, Thomas F.

    A study detailed further a model linking monetary and fiscal policy to industrial employment in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas of four United States regions. The model was used to simulate the impacts on area and regional employment of three events in the economy: changing real gross national product (GNP) via monetary policy, holding the…

  10. Development of a High Resolution Weather Forecast Model for Mesoamerica Using the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Case, Jonathan L.; Venner, Jason; Moreno-Madrinan, Max. J.; Delgado, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two years, scientists in the Earth Science Office at NASA fs Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have explored opportunities to apply cloud computing concepts to support near real ]time weather forecast modeling via the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Collaborators at NASA fs Short ]term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center and the SERVIR project at Marshall Space Flight Center have established a framework that provides high resolution, daily weather forecasts over Mesoamerica through use of the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform at Ames Research Center. Supported by experts at Ames, staff at SPoRT and SERVIR have established daily forecasts complete with web graphics and a user interface that allows SERVIR partners access to high resolution depictions of weather in the next 48 hours, useful for monitoring and mitigating meteorological hazards such as thunderstorms, heavy precipitation, and tropical weather that can lead to other disasters such as flooding and landslides. This presentation will describe the framework for establishing and providing WRF forecasts, example applications of output provided via the SERVIR web portal, and early results of forecast model verification against available surface ] and satellite ]based observations.

  11. Use of an Existing Airborne Radon Data Base in the Verification of the NASA/AEAP Core Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritz, Mark A.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to apply the tropospheric atmospheric radon (Rn222) measurements to the development and verification of the global 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model under development by NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP). The AEAP project had two principal components: (1) a modeling effort, whose goal was to create, test and apply an elaborate three-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport model (the NASA/AEAP Core model to an evaluation of the possible short and long-term effects of aircraft emissions on atmospheric chemistry and climate--and (2) a measurement effort, whose goal was to obtain a focused set of atmospheric measurements that would provide some of the observational data used in the modeling effort. My activity in this project was confined to the first of these components. Both atmospheric transport and atmospheric chemical reactions (as well the input and removal of chemical species) are accounted for in the NASA/AEAP Core model. Thus, for example, in assessing the effect of aircraft effluents on the chemistry of a given region of the upper troposphere, the model must keep track not only of the chemical reactions of the effluent species emitted by aircraft flying in this region, but also of the transport into the region of these (and other) species from other, remote sources--for example, via the vertical convection of boundary layer air to the upper troposphere. Radon, because of its known surface source and known radioactive half-life, and freedom from chemical production or loss, and from removal from the atmosphere by physical scavenging, is a recognized and valuable tool for testing the transport components of global transport and circulation models.

  12. NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP): Research Summaries 1997-1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylo, M. J.; DeCola, P. L.; Kaye, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Under the mandate contained in the FY 1976 NASA Authorization Act, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed and is implementing a comprehensive program of research, technology development, and monitoring of the Earth's upper atmosphere, with emphasis on the upper troposphere and stratosphere. This program aims at expanding our chemical and physical understanding to permit both the quantitative analysis of current perturbations as well as the assessment of possible future changes in this important region of our environment. It is carried out jointly by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP), both managed within the Research Division in the Office of Earth Science at NASA. Significant contributions to this effort have also been provided by the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) of NASA's Office of Aero-Space Technology. The long-term objectives of the present program are to perform research to: understand the physics, chemistry, and transport processes of the upper troposphere and the stratosphere and their control on the distribution of atmospheric chemical species such as ozone; assess possible perturbations to the composition of the atmosphere caused by human activities and natural phenomena (with a specific emphasis on trace gas geographical distributions, sources, and sinks and the role of trace gases in defining the chemical composition of the upper atmosphere); understand the processes affecting the distributions of radiatively active species in the atmosphere, and the importance of chemical-radiative-dynamical feedbacks on the meteorology and climatology of the stratosphere and troposphere; and understand ozone production, loss, and recovery in an atmosphere with increasing abundances of greenhouse gases. The current report is composed of two parts. Part 1 summarizes the objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported

  13. Potential Investigation of Linking PROSAIL with the Ross-Li BRDF Model for Vegetation Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Methods that link different models for investigating the retrieval of canopy biophysical/structural variables have been substantially adopted in the remote sensing community. To retrieve global biophysical parameters from multiangle data, the kernel-driven bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF model has been widely applied to satellite multiangle observations to model (interpolate/extrapolate the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF in an arbitrary direction of viewing and solar geometries. Such modeled BRFs, as an essential information source, are then input into an inversion procedure that is devised through a large number of simulation analyses from some widely used physical models that can generalize such an inversion relationship between the BRFs (or their simple algebraic composite and the biophysical/structural parameter. Therefore, evaluation of such a link between physical models and kernel-driven models contributes to the development of such inversion procedures to accurately retrieve vegetation properties, particularly based on the operational global BRDF parameters derived from satellite multiangle observations (e.g., MODIS. In this study, the main objective is to investigate the potential for linking a popular physical model (PROSAIL with the widely used kernel-driven Ross-Li models. To do this, the BRFs and albedo are generated by the physical PROSAIL in a forward model, and then the simulated BRFs are input into the kernel-driven BRDF model for retrieval of the BRFs and albedo in the same viewing and solar geometries. To further strengthen such an investigation, a variety of field-measured multiangle reflectances have also been used to investigate the potential for linking these two models. For simulated BRFs generated by the PROSAIL model at 659 and 865 nm, the two models are generally comparable to each other, and the resultant root mean square errors (RMSEs are 0.0092 and 0.0355, respectively, although some

  14. Evaluating the Contribution of NASA Remotely-Sensed Data Sets on a Convection-Allowing Forecast Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Case, Jonathan L.; Molthan, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center is a collaborative partnership between NASA and operational forecasting partners, including a number of National Weather Service forecast offices. SPoRT provides real-time NASA products and capabilities to help its partners address specific operational forecast challenges. One challenge that forecasters face is using guidance from local and regional deterministic numerical models configured at convection-allowing resolution to help assess a variety of mesoscale/convective-scale phenomena such as sea-breezes, local wind circulations, and mesoscale convective weather potential on a given day. While guidance from convection-allowing models has proven valuable in many circumstances, the potential exists for model improvements by incorporating more representative land-water surface datasets, and by assimilating retrieved temperature and moisture profiles from hyper-spectral sounders. In order to help increase the accuracy of deterministic convection-allowing models, SPoRT produces real-time, 4-km CONUS forecasts using a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model (hereafter SPoRT-WRF) that includes unique NASA products and capabilities including 4-km resolution soil initialization data from the Land Information System (LIS), 2-km resolution SPoRT SST composites over oceans and large water bodies, high-resolution real-time Green Vegetation Fraction (GVF) composites derived from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, and retrieved temperature and moisture profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). NCAR's Model Evaluation Tools (MET) verification package is used to generate statistics of model performance compared to in situ observations and rainfall analyses for three months during the summer of 2012 (June-August). Detailed analyses of specific severe weather outbreaks during the summer

  15. Dynamic Impact Testing and Model Development in Support of NASA's Advanced Composites Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Pereira, J. Michael; Goldberg, Robert; Rassaian, Mostafa

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an executive overview of the HEDI effort for NASA's Advanced Composites Program and establish the foundation for the remaining papers to follow in the 2018 SciTech special session NASA ACC High Energy Dynamic Impact. The paper summarizes the work done for the Advanced Composites Program to advance our understanding of the behavior of composite materials during high energy impact events and to advance the ability of analytical tools to provide predictive simulations. The experimental program carried out at GRC is summarized and a status on the current development state for MAT213 will be provided. Future work will be discussed as the HEDI effort transitions from fundamental analysis and testing to investigating sub-component structural concept response to impact events.

  16. A minimal model for stabilization of biomolecules by hydrocarbon cross-linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, K.; Hübsch, A.; McCammon, J. A.

    2006-04-01

    Programmed cell death regulating protein motifs play an essential role in the development of an organism, its immune response, and disease-related cellular mechanisms. Among those motifs the BH3 domain of the BCL-2 family is found to be of crucial importance. Recent experiments showed how the isolated, otherwise unstructured BH3 peptide can be modified by a hydrocarbon linkage to regain function. We parametrized a reduced, dynamic model for the stability effects of such covalent cross-linking and confirmed that the model reproduces the reinforcement of the structural stability of the BH3 motif by cross-linking. We show that an analytically solvable model for thermostability around the native state is not capable of reproducing the stabilization effect. This points to the crucial importance of the peptide dynamics and the fluctuations neglected in the analytic model for the cross-linking system to function properly. This conclusion is supported by a thorough analysis of a simulated Gō model. The resulting model is suitable for rational design of generic cross-linking systems in silicio.

  17. The Chain-Link Fence Model: A Framework for Creating Security Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Houghton, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    A long standing problem in information technology security is how to help reduce the security footprint. Many specific proposals exist to address specific problems in information technology security. Most information technology solutions need to be repeatable throughout the course of an information systems lifecycle. The Chain-Link Fence Model is a new model for creating and implementing information technology procedures. This model was validated by two different methods: the first being int...

  18. Model Deformation and Optical Angle of Attack Measurement System in the NASA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Laura K.; Drain, Bethany A.; Schairer, Edward T.; Heineck, James T.; Bell, James H.

    2017-01-01

    Both AoA and MDM measurements can be made using an optical system that relies on photogrammetry. Optical measurements are being requested by customers in wind tunnels with increasing frequency due to their non-intrusive nature and recent hardware and software advances that allow measurements to become near real time. The NASA Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel is currently developing a system based on photogrammetry to measure model deformation and model angle of attack. This paper describes the new system, its development, its use on recent tests and plans to further develop the system.

  19. NASA Model of "Threat and Error" in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: Patterns of Error Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Edward; Pham-Hung, Eric; Nosikova, Yaroslavna; Halvorsen, Fredrik; Gritti, Michael; Schwartz, Steven; Caldarone, Christopher A; Van Arsdell, Glen

    2017-04-01

    We introduced the National Aeronautics and Space Association threat-and-error model to our surgical unit. All admissions are considered flights, which should pass through stepwise deescalations in risk during surgical recovery. We hypothesized that errors significantly influence risk deescalation and contribute to poor outcomes. Patient flights (524) were tracked in real time for threats, errors, and unintended states by full-time performance personnel. Expected risk deescalation was wean from mechanical support, sternal closure, extubation, intensive care unit (ICU) discharge, and discharge home. Data were accrued from clinical charts, bedside data, reporting mechanisms, and staff interviews. Infographics of flights were openly discussed weekly for consensus. In 12% (64 of 524) of flights, the child failed to deescalate sequentially through expected risk levels; unintended increments instead occurred. Failed deescalations were highly associated with errors (426; 257 flights; p associated with a 29% rate of failed deescalation versus 4% in flights with no consequential error (p < 0.0001). The most dangerous errors were apical errors typically (84%) occurring in the operating room, which caused chains of propagating unintended states (n = 110): these had a 43% (47 of 110) rate of failed deescalation (versus 4%; p < 0.0001). Chains of unintended state were often (46%) amplified by additional (up to 7) errors in the ICU that would worsen clinical deviation. Overall, failed deescalations in risk were extremely closely linked to brain injury (n = 13; p < 0.0001) or death (n = 7; p < 0.0001). Deaths and brain injury after pediatric cardiac surgery almost always occur from propagating error chains that originate in the operating room and are often amplified by additional ICU errors. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Discovering link communities in complex networks by an integer programming model and a genetic algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenping Li

    Full Text Available Identification of communities in complex networks is an important topic and issue in many fields such as sociology, biology, and computer science. Communities are often defined as groups of related nodes or links that correspond to functional subunits in the corresponding complex systems. While most conventional approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, some recent studies start partitioning links to find overlapping communities straightforwardly. In this paper, we propose a new quantity function for link community identification in complex networks. Based on this quantity function we formulate the link community partition problem into an integer programming model which allows us to partition a complex network into overlapping communities. We further propose a genetic algorithm for link community detection which can partition a network into overlapping communities without knowing the number of communities. We test our model and algorithm on both artificial networks and real-world networks. The results demonstrate that the model and algorithm are efficient in detecting overlapping community structure in complex networks.

  1. Discovering link communities in complex networks by an integer programming model and a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenping; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Liu, Hongwei; Zhang, Shihua

    2013-01-01

    Identification of communities in complex networks is an important topic and issue in many fields such as sociology, biology, and computer science. Communities are often defined as groups of related nodes or links that correspond to functional subunits in the corresponding complex systems. While most conventional approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, some recent studies start partitioning links to find overlapping communities straightforwardly. In this paper, we propose a new quantity function for link community identification in complex networks. Based on this quantity function we formulate the link community partition problem into an integer programming model which allows us to partition a complex network into overlapping communities. We further propose a genetic algorithm for link community detection which can partition a network into overlapping communities without knowing the number of communities. We test our model and algorithm on both artificial networks and real-world networks. The results demonstrate that the model and algorithm are efficient in detecting overlapping community structure in complex networks.

  2. Evaluating the Impacts of NASA/SPoRT Daily Greenness Vegetation Fraction on Land Surface Model and Numerical Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jordan R.; Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Kumar, Sujay V.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) dataset, which is updated daily using swaths of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data aboard the NASA EOS Aqua and Terra satellites. NASA SPoRT began generating daily real-time GVF composites at 1-km resolution over the Continental United States (CONUS) on 1 June 2010. The purpose of this study is to compare the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) climatology GVF product (currently used in operational weather models) to the SPoRT-MODIS GVF during June to October 2010. The NASA Land Information System (LIS) was employed to study the impacts of the SPoRT-MODIS GVF dataset on a land surface model (LSM) apart from a full numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. For the 2010 warm season, the SPoRT GVF in the western portion of the CONUS was generally higher than the NCEP climatology. The eastern CONUS GVF had variations both above and below the climatology during the period of study. These variations in GVF led to direct impacts on the rates of heating and evaporation from the land surface. In the West, higher latent heat fluxes prevailed, which enhanced the rates of evapotranspiration and soil moisture depletion in the LSM. By late Summer and Autumn, both the average sensible and latent heat fluxes increased in the West as a result of the more rapid soil drying and higher coverage of GVF. The impacts of the SPoRT GVF dataset on NWP was also examined for a single severe weather case study using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two separate coupled LIS/WRF model simulations were made for the 17 July 2010 severe weather event in the Upper Midwest using the NCEP and SPoRT GVFs, with all other model parameters remaining the same. Based on the sensitivity results, regions with higher GVF in the SPoRT model runs had higher evapotranspiration and

  3. Reconciling bottom-up and top-down carbon flux estimates using NASA's GEOS-Carb modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, L.; Baker, D. F.; Chatterjee, A.; Collatz, G. J.; Gregg, W. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Oda, T.; Rousseaux, C. S.; Wang, J. S.; Weir, B.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) began in 2010 with the goal of better understanding carbon stocks and fluxes using remote sensing observations. Models play a critical role in achieving this goal by integrating diverse observations of the carbon cycle (e.g. vegetation characteristics, ocean color, night lights, precipitation) to produce estimates of flux, which is not directly observable at a global scale. Built around NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model and data assimilation system, the GEOS-Carb system supports CMS by providing data-driven, bottom-up and top-down flux estimates and high-resolution global estimates of carbon dioxide concentration. Because all modeling components use a consistent set of meteorological forcing from GEOS-5, this system provides a unique, physically consistent view of the relationship between carbon flux and climate. We will present 1) an overview of the GEOS-Carb modeling system, products, and available web tools, 2) recent results placing 2015, a record-breaking meteorological year, in the context of the 13-year GEOS-Carb record, and 3) future directions in global modeling in support of science policy and satellite mission planning.

  4. A Model Linked to E. Coli Related to Electrostrictive Energy in Cancer Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. BASAK

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper has focused on a new concept in respect of the status of oxidant/antioxidant in cancer cell following radiation therapy. And in this respect a model has been developed linked with an environment of E.Coli in which TrpRS II is induced after radiation damage. It is interesting to note that Electrostrictive energy is the input to the model the output of which is the oxidant/antioxidant ratio. This ratio is related to the status of Electrostrictive energy derived from capacitance relaxation phenomenon (US patent No. US Patent No. TK Basak 5691178, 1997 in cancer cell. The oxidant/antioxidant ratio is linked to Electrostrictive energy with increasing pH. This paper discusses about the status of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation after radiation therapy linked to E.Coli environment against the pH gradient is indicative for the treatment of cancer.

  5. Linking Adverse Outcome Pathways to Dynamic Energy Budgets: A Conceptual Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Cheryl [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Nisbet, Roger [University of California Santa Barbara; Antczak, Philipp [University of Liverpool, UK; Reyero, Natalia [Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg; Gergs, Andre [Gaiac; Lika, Dina [University of Crete; Mathews, Teresa J. [ORNL; Muller, Eric [University of California, Santa Barbara; Nacci, Dianne [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); Peace, Angela L. [ORNL; Remien, Chris [University of Idaho; Schulz, Irv [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Watanabe, Karen [Arizona State University

    2018-02-01

    Ecological risk assessment quantifies the likelihood of undesirable impacts of stressors, primarily at high levels of biological organization. Data used to inform ecological risk assessments come primarily from tests on individual organisms or from suborganismal studies, indicating a disconnect between primary data and protection goals. We know how to relate individual responses to population dynamics using individual-based models, and there are emerging ideas on how to make connections to ecosystem services. However, there is no established methodology to connect effects seen at higher levels of biological organization with suborganismal dynamics, despite progress made in identifying Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) that link molecular initiating events to ecologically relevant key events. This chapter is a product of a working group at the National Center for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) that assessed the feasibility of using dynamic energy budget (DEB) models of individual organisms as a “pivot” connecting suborganismal processes to higher level ecological processes. AOP models quantify explicit molecular, cellular or organ-level processes, but do not offer a route to linking sub-organismal damage to adverse effects on individual growth, reproduction, and survival, which can be propagated to the population level through individual-based models. DEB models describe these processes, but use abstract variables with undetermined connections to suborganismal biology. We propose linking DEB and quantitative AOP models by interpreting AOP key events as measures of damage-inducing processes in a DEB model. Here, we present a conceptual model for linking AOPs to DEB models and review existing modeling tools available for both AOP and DEB.

  6. NASA Human Spaceflight Scenarios - Do All Our Models Still Say No?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Edgar

    2017-01-01

    Historically, NASA human spaceflight planning has included healthy doses of life cycle cost analysis. Planners put projects and their cost estimates in a budget context. Estimated costs became expected budgets. Regardless, real budgets rarely matched expectations. So plans would come and go as NASA canceled projects. New projects would arise and the cycle would begin again. Repeatedly, NASA schedule and performance ambitions come up against costs growing at double-digit rates while budgets barely rise a couple of percent a year. Significant skepticism greets proposed NASA programs at birth, as cost estimates for new projects are traditionally very high, and worse, far off the mark for those carried forward. In this environment the current "capability driven framework" for NASA human spaceflight evolved, where long term life cycle cost analysis are even viewed as possibly counter-productive. Here, a space exploration project, for example the Space Launch System, focuses on immediate goals. A life cycle is that of a project, not a program, and for only that span of time to a near term milestone like a first test launch. Unfortunately, attempting to avoid some pitfalls in long-term life cycle cost analysis breeds others. Government audits have noted that limiting the scope of cost analysis "does not provide the transparency necessary to assess long-term affordability" making it difficult to understand if NASA "is progressing in a cost-effective and affordable manner." Even in this short-term framework, NASA realizes the importance of long-term considerations, that it must "maximize the efficiency and sustainability of the Exploration Systems development programs", that this is "critical to free resources for re-investment...such as other required deep space exploration capabilities." Assuming the value of long-term life cycle cost analysis, where due diligence meets reconnaissance, and accepting past shortcomings, the work here approaches life cycle cost analysis for

  7. Summary goodness-of-fit statistics for binary generalized linear models with noncanonical link functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canary, Jana D; Blizzard, Leigh; Barry, Ronald P; Hosmer, David W; Quinn, Stephen J

    2016-05-01

    Generalized linear models (GLM) with a canonical logit link function are the primary modeling technique used to relate a binary outcome to predictor variables. However, noncanonical links can offer more flexibility, producing convenient analytical quantities (e.g., probit GLMs in toxicology) and desired measures of effect (e.g., relative risk from log GLMs). Many summary goodness-of-fit (GOF) statistics exist for logistic GLM. Their properties make the development of GOF statistics relatively straightforward, but it can be more difficult under noncanonical links. Although GOF tests for logistic GLM with continuous covariates (GLMCC) have been applied to GLMCCs with log links, we know of no GOF tests in the literature specifically developed for GLMCCs that can be applied regardless of link function chosen. We generalize the Tsiatis GOF statistic originally developed for logistic GLMCCs, (TG), so that it can be applied under any link function. Further, we show that the algebraically related Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL) and Pigeon-Heyse (J(2) ) statistics can be applied directly. In a simulation study, TG, HL, and J(2) were used to evaluate the fit of probit, log-log, complementary log-log, and log models, all calculated with a common grouping method. The TG statistic consistently maintained Type I error rates, while those of HL and J(2) were often lower than expected if terms with little influence were included. Generally, the statistics had similar power to detect an incorrect model. An exception occurred when a log GLMCC was incorrectly fit to data generated from a logistic GLMCC. In this case, TG had more power than HL or J(2) . © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/London School of Economics.

  8. Innovation @ NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the activities National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is doing to encourage innovation across the agency. All information provided is available publicly.

  9. NASA Applied Sciences' DEVELOP National Program: a unique model cultivating capacity in the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, K. W.; Favors, J. E.; Childs-Gleason, L. M.; Ruiz, M. L.; Rogers, L.; Allsbrook, K. N.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA DEVELOP National Program takes a unique approach to cultivating the next generation of geoscientists through interdisciplinary research projects that address environmental and public policy issues through the application of NASA Earth observations. Competitively selected teams of students, recent graduates, and early career professionals take ownership of project proposals outlining basic application concepts and have ten weeks to research core scientific challenges, engage partners and end-users, demonstrate prototypical solutions, and finalize and document their results and outcomes. In this high pressure, results-driven environment emerging geoscience professionals build strong networks, hone effective communication skills, and learn how to call on the varied strengths of a multidisciplinary team to achieve difficult objectives. The DEVELOP approach to workforce development has a variety of advantages over classic apprenticeship-style internship systems. Foremost is the experiential learning of grappling with real-world applied science challenges as a primary actor instead of as an observer or minor player. DEVELOP participants gain experience that fosters personal strengths and service to others, promoting a balance of leadership and teamwork in order to successfully address community needs. The program also advances understanding of Earth science data and technology amongst participants and partner organizations to cultivate skills in managing schedules, risks and resources to best optimize outcomes. Individuals who come through the program gain experience and networking opportunities working within NASA and partner organizations that other internship and academic activities cannot replicate providing not only skill development but an introduction to future STEM-related career paths. With the competitive nature and growing societal role of science and technology in today's global community, DEVELOP fosters collaboration and advances environmental

  10. A hierarchically adaptable spatial regression model to link aggregated health data and environmental data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truong Ngoc Phuong, Phuong; Stein, A.

    2017-01-01

    Health data and environmental data are commonly collected at different levels of aggregation. A persistent challenge of using a spatial regression model to link these data is that their associations can vary as a function of aggregation. This results into ecological fallacy if association at one

  11. Linking HR strategy, e-HR goals, architectures, and outcomes: a model and case study evidence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddington, Martin; Martin, Graeme; Bondarouk, T.V.; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Ruel, H.; Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria; Looise, J.C.; Looise, Jan C.

    2011-01-01

    Building on our earlier model of the links between HR strategy, e-HR goals, architectures, and outcomes, we illustrate the relationship between some of these elements with data from three global organizations. In doing so, we aim to help academics and practitioners understand this increasingly

  12. Link Budget Analysis and Modeling of Short-Range UWB Channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irahhauten, Z.; Dacuna, J.; Janssen, G.J.M.; Nikookar, H.; Yarovoy, A.G.; Ligthart, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Ultrawideband (UWB) technology is an attractive alternative for short-range applications, e.g., wireless personal area networks. In these applications, transmit and receive antennas are very close to each other and the far-field condition assumed in most of the link budget models may not be

  13. Evaluation of mobile ad hoc network reliability using propagation-based link reliability model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmavathy, N.; Chaturvedi, Sanjay K.

    2013-01-01

    A wireless mobile ad hoc network (MANET) is a collection of solely independent nodes (that can move randomly around the area of deployment) making the topology highly dynamic; nodes communicate with each other by forming a single hop/multi-hop network and maintain connectivity in decentralized manner. MANET is modelled using geometric random graphs rather than random graphs because the link existence in MANET is a function of the geometric distance between the nodes and the transmission range of the nodes. Among many factors that contribute to the MANET reliability, the reliability of these networks also depends on the robustness of the link between the mobile nodes of the network. Recently, the reliability of such networks has been evaluated for imperfect nodes (transceivers) with binary model of communication links based on the transmission range of the mobile nodes and the distance between them. However, in reality, the probability of successful communication decreases as the signal strength deteriorates due to noise, fading or interference effects even up to the nodes' transmission range. Hence, in this paper, using a propagation-based link reliability model rather than a binary-model with nodes following a known failure distribution to evaluate the network reliability (2TR m , ATR m and AoTR m ) of MANET through Monte Carlo Simulation is proposed. The method is illustrated with an application and some imperative results are also presented

  14. Translational PKPD modeling in schizophrenia: linking receptor occupancy of antipsychotics to efficacy and safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilla Reddy, Venkatesh; Kozielska, Magdalena; Johnson, Martin; Vermeulen, An; Liu, Jing; de Greef, Rik; Groothuis, Genoveva; Danhof, Meindert; Proost, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To link the brain dopamine D2 receptor occupancy (D2RO) of antipsychotic drugs with clinical endpoints of efficacy and safety to assess the therapeutic window of D2RO. Methods: Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) models were developed to predict the D2 receptor occupancy of

  15. The Chain-Link Fence Model: A Framework for Creating Security Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    A long standing problem in information technology security is how to help reduce the security footprint. Many specific proposals exist to address specific problems in information technology security. Most information technology solutions need to be repeatable throughout the course of an information systems lifecycle. The Chain-Link Fence Model is…

  16. Long-term Engagement in Authentic Research with NASA (LEARN): Lessons Learned from an Innovative Model for Teacher Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, M. R.; Kollmeyer, R.; Joseph, J.; Yang, M. M.; Omar, A. H.; Harte, T.; Taylor, J.; Lewis, P. M.; Weisman, A.; Hyater-Adams, S.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA LEARN Project is an innovative program that provides long-term immersion in the practice of atmospheric science for middle and high school in-service teachers. Working alongside NASA scientists and using authentic NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Research and Analysis (R&A) related and mission-based research data, teachers develop individual research topics of interest during two weeks in the summer while on-site at NASA Langley. With continued, intensive mentoring and guidance of NASA scientists, the teachers further develop their research throughout the academic year through virtual group meetings and data team meetings mirroring scientific collaborations. At the end of the first year, the LEARN teachers present scientific posters. During summer 2013, Cohort 1 (7 teachers) presented posters at an open session and discussed their research topics with Cohort 2 (6 teachers) and science and educator personnel at Langley. The LEARN experience has had such an impact that 6 teachers from Cohort 1 have elected to continue a second year of research working alongside Cohort 2 and LEARN scientists. In addition, Cohort 1 teachers have brought their LEARN experiences back to their classrooms in a variety of ways. The LEARN project evaluation has provided insights into the outcomes of this research experience for teachers and particularly effective program elements. In particular, the LEARN evaluation has focused on how an extended research experience for teachers spanning a full year influences teacher views of science and classroom integration of scientific principles. Early findings indicate that teachers' perceptions of the scientific enterprise have changed, and that LEARN provided substantial resources to help them take real-world research to their students. Teachers also valued the teamwork and cohort approach. In addition, the LEARN evaluation focuses on the experiences of scientists involved in the LEARN program and how their experiences working with

  17. Reaction-Diffusion Degradation Model for Delayed Erosion of Cross-Linked Polyanhydride Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Domanskyi, Sergii; Poetz, Katie L.; Shipp, Devon A.; Privman, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We develop a theoretical model to explain the long induction interval of water intake that precedes the onset of erosion due to degradation caused by hydrolysis in the recently synthesized and studied cross-linked polyanhydrides. Various kinetic mechanisms are incorporated in the model in an attempt to explain the experimental data for the mass loss profile. Our key finding is that the observed long induction interval is attributable to the nonlinear dependence of the degradation rate constan...

  18. A prosthesis-specific multi-link segment model of lower-limb amputee sprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigney, Stacey M; Simmons, Anne; Kark, Lauren

    2016-10-03

    Lower-limb amputees commonly utilize non-articulating energy storage and return (ESAR) prostheses for high impact activities such as sprinting. Despite these prostheses lacking an articulating ankle joint, amputee gait analysis conventionally features a two-link segment model of the prosthetic foot. This paper investigated the effects of the selected link segment model׳s marker-set and geometry on a unilateral amputee sprinter׳s calculated lower-limb kinematics, kinetics and energetics. A total of five lower-limb models of the Ottobock ® 1E90 Sprinter were developed, including two conventional shank-foot models that each used a different version of the Plug-in-Gait (PiG) marker-set to test the effect of prosthesis ankle marker location. Two Hybrid prosthesis-specific models were then developed, also using the PiG marker-sets, with the anatomical shank and foot replaced by prosthesis-specific geometry separated into two segments. Finally, a Multi-link segment (MLS) model was developed, consisting of six segments for the prosthesis as defined by a custom marker-set. All full-body musculoskeletal models were tested using four trials of experimental marker trajectories within OpenSim 3.2 (Stanford, California, USA) to find the affected and unaffected hip, knee and ankle kinematics, kinetics and energetics. The geometry of the selected lower-limb prosthesis model was found to significantly affect all variables on the affected leg (p prosthesis-specific spatial, inertial and elastic properties from full-body models significantly affects the calculated amputee gait characteristics, and we therefore recommend the implementation of a MLS model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. NASA-modified precipitation products to improve USEPA nonpoint source water quality modeling for the Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Joseph; Toll, David; Partington, Ed; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Lee, Shihyan; Gutierrez-Magness, Angelica; Engman, Ted; Arsenault, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    The USEPA has estimated that over 20,000 water bodies within the United States do not meet water quality standards. One of the regulations in the Clean Water Act of 1972 requires states to monitor the total maximum daily load, or the amount of pollution that can be carried by a water body before it is determined to be "polluted," for any watershed in the United States (Copeland, 2005). In response to this mandate, the USEPA developed Better Assessment Science Integrating Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) as a decision support tool for assessing pollution and to guide the decision-making process for improving water quality. One of the models in BASINS, the Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF), computes continuous streamflow rates and pollutant concentration at each basin outlet. By design, precipitation and other meteorological data from weather stations serve as standard model input. In practice, these stations may be unable to capture the spatial heterogeneity of precipitation events, especially if they are few and far between. An attempt was made to resolve this issue by substituting station data with NASA-modified/NOAA precipitation data. Using these data within HSPF, streamflow was calculated for seven watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Basin during low flow periods, convective storm periods, and annual flows. In almost every case, the modeling performance of HSPF increased when using the NASA-modified precipitation data, resulting in better streamflow statistics and, potentially, in improved water quality assessment.

  20. NASA Jet Noise Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The presentation highlights NASA's jet noise research for 2016. Jet-noise modeling efforts, jet-surface interactions results, acoustic characteristics of multi-stream jets, and N+2 Supersonic Aircraft system studies are presented.

  1. Instantaneous thermal modeling of the DC-link capacitor in PhotoVoltaic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Ma, Ke; Wang, Huai

    2015-01-01

    , instantaneous thermal modeling approaches considering mission profiles for the DC-link capacitor in single-phase PV systems are explored in this paper. These thermal modelling approaches are based on: a) fast Fourier transform, b) look-up tables, and c) ripple current reconstruction. Moreover, the thermal...... thermal loading from the operating conditions. As a consequence, it offers new insights into the temperature monitoring and reliability-oriented design of the DC-link capacitors, and thus a more reliable operation of single-phase grid-connected PV systems can be enhanced. Study results on a 3-kW single......-phase grid-connected PV system have been adopted to demonstrate a look-up table based modelling approach, where real-field daily ambient conditions are considered....

  2. Dynamic Modelling and Trajectory Tracking of Parallel Manipulator with Flexible Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhengsheng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly focuses on dynamic modelling and real-time control for a parallel manipulator with flexible link. The Lagrange principle and assumed modes method (AMM substructure technique is presented to formulate the dynamic modelling of a two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF parallel manipulator with flexible links. Then, the singular perturbation technique (SPT is used to decompose the nonlinear dynamic system into slow time-scale and fast time-scale subsystems. Furthermore, the SPT is employed to transform the differential algebraic equations (DAEs for kinematic constraints into explicit ordinary differential equations (ODEs, which makes real-time control possible. In addition, a novel composite control scheme is presented; the computed torque control is applied for a slow subsystem and the H∞ technique for the fast subsystem, taking account of the model uncertainty and outside disturbance. The simulation results show the composite control can effectively achieve fast and accurate tracking control.

  3. A proposed model of psychodynamic psychotherapy linked to Erik Erikson's eight stages of psychosocial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Zelda Gillian

    2017-09-01

    Just as Freud used stages of psychosexual development to ground his model of psychoanalysis, it is possible to do the same with Erik Erikson's stages of development with regards to a model of psychodynamic psychotherapy. This paper proposes an eight-stage model of psychodynamic psychotherapy linked to Erik Erikson's eight stages of psychosocial development. Various suggestions are offered. One such suggestion is that as each of Erikson's developmental stages is triggered by a crisis, in therapy it is triggered by the client's search. The resolution of the search often leads to the development of another search, which implies that the therapy process comprises a series of searches. This idea of a series of searches and resolutions leads to the understanding that identity is developmental and therapy is a space in which a new sense of identity may emerge. The notion of hope is linked to Erikson's stage of Basic Trust and the proposed model of therapy views hope and trust as essential for the therapy process. Two clinical vignettes are offered to illustrate these ideas. Psychotherapy can be approached as an eight-stage process and linked to Erikson's eight stages model of development. Psychotherapy may be viewed as a series of searches and thus as a developmental stage resolution process, which leads to the understanding that identity is ongoing throughout the life span. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. NASA Applied Sciences Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Sue M.; Haynes, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's strategic Goals: a) Develop a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics consistent with the redirection of human spaceflight program to focus on exploration. b) Study Earth from space to advance scientific understanding and meet societal needs. NASA's partnership efforts in global modeling and data assimilation over the next decade will shorten the distance from observations to answers for important, leading-edge science questions. NASA's Applied Sciences program will continue the Agency's efforts in benchmarking the assimilation of NASA research results into policy and management decision-support tools that are vital for the Nation's environment, economy, safety, and security. NASA also is working with NOAH and inter-agency forums to transition mature research capabilities to operational systems, primarily the polar and geostationary operational environmental satellites, and to utilize fully those assets for research purposes.

  5. Structure and evolution of protein interaction networks: a statistical model for link dynamics and gene duplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Andreas

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure of molecular networks derives from dynamical processes on evolutionary time scales. For protein interaction networks, global statistical features of their structure can now be inferred consistently from several large-throughput datasets. Understanding the underlying evolutionary dynamics is crucial for discerning random parts of the network from biologically important properties shaped by natural selection. Results We present a detailed statistical analysis of the protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on several large-throughput datasets. Protein pairs resulting from gene duplications are used as tracers into the evolutionary past of the network. From this analysis, we infer rate estimates for two key evolutionary processes shaping the network: (i gene duplications and (ii gain and loss of interactions through mutations in existing proteins, which are referred to as link dynamics. Importantly, the link dynamics is asymmetric, i.e., the evolutionary steps are mutations in just one of the binding parters. The link turnover is shown to be much faster than gene duplications. Both processes are assembled into an empirically grounded, quantitative model for the evolution of protein interaction networks. Conclusions According to this model, the link dynamics is the dominant evolutionary force shaping the statistical structure of the network, while the slower gene duplication dynamics mainly affects its size. Specifically, the model predicts (i a broad distribution of the connectivities (i.e., the number of binding partners of a protein and (ii correlations between the connectivities of interacting proteins, a specific consequence of the asymmetry of the link dynamics. Both features have been observed in the protein interaction network of S. cerevisiae.

  6. Towards Controlling the Glycoform: A Model Framework Linking Extracellular Metabolites to Antibody Glycosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Jedrzejewski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycoproteins represent the largest group of the growing number of biologically-derived medicines. The associated glycan structures and their distribution are known to have a large impact on pharmacokinetics. A modelling framework was developed to provide a link from the extracellular environment and its effect on intracellular metabolites to the distribution of glycans on the constant region of an antibody product. The main focus of this work is the mechanistic in silico reconstruction of the nucleotide sugar donor (NSD metabolic network by means of 34 species mass balances and the saturation kinetics rates of the 60 metabolic reactions involved. NSDs are the co-substrates of the glycosylation process in the Golgi apparatus and their simulated dynamic intracellular concentration profiles were linked to an existing model describing the distribution of N-linked glycan structures of the antibody constant region. The modelling framework also describes the growth dynamics of the cell population by means of modified Monod kinetics. Simulation results match well to experimental data from a murine hybridoma cell line. The result is a modelling platform which is able to describe the product glycoform based on extracellular conditions. It represents a first step towards the in silico prediction of the glycoform of a biotherapeutic and provides a platform for the optimisation of bioprocess conditions with respect to product quality.

  7. NASA OSMA NDE Program Additive Manufacturing Foundational Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess; Walker, James; Burke, Eric; Wells, Douglas; Nichols, Charles

    2016-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  8. NASA Workshop on Distributed Parameter Modeling and Control of Flexible Aerospace Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Virginia B. (Compiler); Keckler, Claude R. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    Although significant advances have been made in modeling and controlling flexible systems, there remains a need for improvements in model accuracy and in control performance. The finite element models of flexible systems are unduly complex and are almost intractable to optimum parameter estimation for refinement using experimental data. Distributed parameter or continuum modeling offers some advantages and some challenges in both modeling and control. Continuum models often result in a significantly reduced number of model parameters, thereby enabling optimum parameter estimation. The dynamic equations of motion of continuum models provide the advantage of allowing the embedding of the control system dynamics, thus forming a complete set of system dynamics. There is also increased insight provided by the continuum model approach.

  9. Simulink models for performance analysis of high speed DQPSK modulated optical link

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharan, Lucky, E-mail: luckysharan@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Rupanshi,, E-mail: f2011222@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Chaubey, V. K., E-mail: vkc@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in [EEE Department, BITS-Pilani, Rajasthan, 333031 (India)

    2016-03-09

    This paper attempts to present the design approach for development of simulation models to study and analyze the transmission of 10 Gbps DQPSK signal over a single channel Peer to Peer link using Matlab Simulink. The simulation model considers the different optical components used in link design with their behavior represented initially by theoretical interpretation, including the transmitter topology, Mach Zehnder Modulator(MZM) module and, the propagation model for optical fibers etc. thus allowing scope for direct realization in experimental configurations. It provides the flexibility to incorporate the various photonic components as either user-defined or fixed and, can also be enhanced or removed from the model as per the design requirements. We describe the detailed operation and need of every component model and its representation in Simulink blocksets. Moreover the developed model can be extended in future to support Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) system, thereby allowing high speed transmission with N × 40 Gbps systems. The various compensation techniques and their influence on system performance can be easily investigated by using such models.

  10. Simulink models for performance analysis of high speed DQPSK modulated optical link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Lucky; Rupanshi, Chaubey, V. K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper attempts to present the design approach for development of simulation models to study and analyze the transmission of 10 Gbps DQPSK signal over a single channel Peer to Peer link using Matlab Simulink. The simulation model considers the different optical components used in link design with their behavior represented initially by theoretical interpretation, including the transmitter topology, Mach Zehnder Modulator(MZM) module and, the propagation model for optical fibers etc. thus allowing scope for direct realization in experimental configurations. It provides the flexibility to incorporate the various photonic components as either user-defined or fixed and, can also be enhanced or removed from the model as per the design requirements. We describe the detailed operation and need of every component model and its representation in Simulink blocksets. Moreover the developed model can be extended in future to support Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) system, thereby allowing high speed transmission with N × 40 Gbps systems. The various compensation techniques and their influence on system performance can be easily investigated by using such models.

  11. Security in the data link layer of the OSI model on LANs wired Cisco

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira Santos, María Genoveva; Alcívar Marcillo, Pedro Antonio

    2018-01-01

    There are no technologies or protocols completely secure in network infrastructures, for this reason, this document aims to demonstrate the importance of configuring security options on network equipments. On this occasion we will focus on the data link layer of the OSI model, which is where controls have begun to be implemented at level of protocols. The tools that are used in the research facilitate the implementation of a virtual laboratory, which consists of a base operating system (windo...

  12. A Study of Business Incubators: Models, Best Practices, and Recommendations for NASA and Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted to provide NASA-Kennedy Space Center with information and recommendations to support establishing one or more technology-based business incubators In Florida. The study involved assembling information about incubators: why they succeed, why they fail, how they are organized, and what services they provide. Consequently, this study focuses on widely-recognized "best practices," needed to establish successful technology- based business incubators. The findings are used to optimize the design and implementation of one or more technology-based business incubators to be established in Florida. Recommendations reflect both the essential characteristics of successful incubators and the optimal business demographics in Florida. Appendix A provides a fuller description of the objectives of the study. Technology-based business incubators are an increasing catalyst of new business development across the USi Incubators focus on providing entrepreneurs and small start-up firms with a wide array of support services necessary to bring forth new products and processes based on technologies developed in the nation's federal and private laboratories and universities. Appendix B provides extensive discussion of findings relative to technology- based business incubators.

  13. Mechanisms linking socioeconomic status to smoking cessation: a structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Businelle, Michael S; Kendzor, Darla E; Reitzel, Lorraine R; Costello, Tracy J; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila; Li, Yisheng; Mazas, Carlos A; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin; Cinciripini, Paul M; Greisinger, Anthony J; Wetter, David W

    2010-05-01

    Although there has been a socioeconomic gradient in smoking prevalence, cessation, and disease burden for decades, these disparities have become even more pronounced over time. The aim of the current study was to develop and test a conceptual model of the mechanisms linking socioeconomic status (SES) to smoking cessation. The conceptual model was evaluated using a latent variable modeling approach in a sample of 424 smokers seeking treatment (34% African American; 33% Latino; 33% White). Hypothesized mechanisms included social support, neighborhood disadvantage, negative affect/stress, agency, and craving. The primary outcome was Week 4 smoking status. As was hypothesized, SES had significant direct and indirect effects on cessation. Specifically, neighborhood disadvantage, social support, negative affect/stress, and agency mediated the relation between SES and smoking cessation. A multiple group analysis indicated that the model was a good fit across racial/ethnic groups. The present study yielded one of the more comprehensive models illuminating the specific mechanisms that link SES and smoking cessation. Policy, community, and individual-level interventions that target low SES smokers and address the specific pathways identified in the current model could potentially attenuate the impact of SES on cessation. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Modeling, control and simulation of a chain link STATCOM in EMTP-RV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Nikunj M. [Siemens Energy and Automation, 100 Technology Drive, Alpharetta, GA 30005 (United States); Sood, Vijay K. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), Oshawa, ON L1H 7K4 (Canada); Ramachandran, V. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Concordia University, Montreal, QC H3G 1M8 (Canada)

    2009-03-15

    This paper describes an alternative STATic synchronous COMpensator (STATCOM), by connecting a number of gate turn off (GTO) thyristor converters in series on the ac side of the system. Each GTO converter forms one 'link' of a 1-phase, full-bridge voltage-source-converter (VSC) and is referred to as a 'Chain Link Converter' (CLC). Each GTO of a chain link STATCOM (CLS), is switched 'ON/OFF' only once per cycle of the fundamental frequency by using a sinusoidal pulse width modulation (SPWM) technique. Approximate models of a 3-phase CLS using dq-transformation are derived to design two controllers for controlling reactive current and ac voltage to stabilize the system voltage at the point of common coupling (PCC). A novel technique, called the rotated gate signal pattern (RGSP), is used for balancing the voltages of the link dc capacitors. The performance investigation of the CLS system when used in a radial line is carried out under steady- and transient-state operating conditions by means of the simulation package; EMTP-RV and the results are presented. (author)

  15. Ontologies to Support RFID-Based Link between Virtual Models and Construction Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Birch; Christiansson, Per; Svidt, Kjeld

    2010-01-01

    as the foundation for information sharing between trading partners, reuse of data from one phase in construction to the next, integration of process and product models with enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, easy access of information, communication of data through networks, reading of data stored...... of errors, it gives a better production basis, and it improves clarity and enhances communication compared to traditional 2D drafting methods. However, there is still much unutilized potential in the virtual models, especially for use in the construction and operation phases. A digital link between...

  16. On the missing link in ecology: improving communication between modellers and experimentalists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuschele, Jan; Ekvall, Mikael T.; Mariani, Patrizio

    2017-01-01

    Collaboration between modellers and experimentalists is essential in ecological research, however, different obstacles linking both camps often hinder scientific progress. In this commentary, we discuss several issues of the current state of affairs in this research loop. Backed by an online survey...... amongst fellow ecologists, modellers and experimentalists alike, we identify two major areas that need to be mended. Firstly, differences in language and jargon lead to a lack of exchange of ideas and to unrealistic mutual expectations. And secondly, constraint data sharing, accessibility and quality...... future research collaboration and to increase the impact of single ecological studies alike....

  17. The New Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) Software: One Model for NASA Remote Sensing Virtual Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Don J.; Rapchun, David A.; Jones, Hollis H.

    2001-01-01

    The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) instrument has been the most frequently used airborne instrument built in-house at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, having flown scientific research missions on-board various aircraft to many locations in the United States, Azores, Brazil, and Kuwait since 1983. The CAR instrument is capable of measuring scattered light by clouds in fourteen spectral bands in UV, visible and near-infrared region. This document describes the control, data acquisition, display, and file storage software for the new version of CAR. This software completely replaces the prior CAR Data System and Control Panel with a compact and robust virtual instrument computer interface. Additionally, the instrument is now usable for the first time for taking data in an off-aircraft mode. The new instrument is controlled via a LabVIEW v5. 1.1-developed software interface that utilizes, (1) serial port writes to write commands to the controller module of the instrument, and (2) serial port reads to acquire data from the controller module of the instrument. Step-by-step operational procedures are provided in this document. A suite of other software programs has been developed to complement the actual CAR virtual instrument. These programs include: (1) a simulator mode that allows pretesting of new features that might be added in the future, as well as demonstrations to CAR customers, and development at times when the instrument/hardware is off-location, and (2) a post-experiment data viewer that can be used to view all segments of individual data cycles and to locate positions where 'start' and stop' byte sequences were incorrectly formulated by the instrument controller. The CAR software described here is expected to be the basis for CAR operation for many missions and many years to come.

  18. NASA-Modified Precipitation Products to Improve EPA Nonpoint Source Water Quality Modeling for the Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Joseph; Toll, David; Partington, Ed; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Lee, Shihyan; Gutierrez-Magness, Angelica; Engman, Ted; Arsenault, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that over 20,000 water bodies within the United States do not meet water quality standards. Ninety percent of the impairments are typically caused by nonpoint sources. One of the regulations in the Clean Water Act of 1972 requires States to monitor the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), or the amount of pollution that can be carried by a water body before it is determined to be "polluted", for any watershed in the U.S.. In response to this mandate, the EPA developed Better Assessment Science Integrating Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) as a Decision Support Tool (DST) for assessing pollution and to guide the decision making process for improving water quality. One of the models in BASINS, the Hydrological Simulation Program -- Fortran (HSPF), computes daily stream flow rates and pollutant concentration at each basin outlet. By design, precipitation and other meteorological data from weather stations serve as standard model input. In practice, these stations may be unable to capture the spatial heterogeneity of precipitation events especially if they are few and far between. An attempt was made to resolve this issue by substituting station data with NASA modified/NOAA precipitation data. Using these data within HSPF, stream flow was calculated for seven watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Basin during low flow periods, convective storm periods, and annual flows. In almost every case, the modeling performance of HSPF increased when using the NASA-modified precipitation data, resulting in better stream flow statistics and, ultimately, in improved water quality assessment.

  19. The Long, Hard Journey: Expanding the Use of NASA Data and Models for Sustainable Development Planning Around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Maudood; Limaye, Ashutosh; Crosson, William; Unal, Alper; Kete, nancy; Rickman, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, the National Research Council's committee on Extending Observations and Research Results to Practical Applications recommended that NASA's Applied Science Program (ASP) directly engage with a broader community of users - not just federal agencies. Soon afterwards, scientists at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center began discussions on a collaborative research project with EMBARQ - the World Resource Institute's Center for Sustainable Transport. The discussions initially focused on how best to utilize satellite observations and atmospheric models for assessing the impact of a proposed transportation project on land use and air quality. Discussions exposed the participants to a broad spectrum of science and policy challenges that these diverse organizations face on a routine basis. It brought into clear focus the need for an observation-modeling system that will allow a proactive approach towards development planning, and the fact that satellite systems do not always provide the spatial and temporal resolution useful for urban-scale applications, underscoring the need for earth system models to bridge this gap. Realizing the significant risk that unplanned urbanization and climate change pose to the social and functional stability of large cities, both organizations decided to expand the scope of their preliminary discussion to include water resources and agriculture. A pilot project, funded by NASA ASP, EMBARQ and Istanbul Technical University focused on quantifying the magnitude and extent of urbanization in Istanbul, and analyzed the combined effect of urbanization and projected climate change on local climate, air quality, and its consequent effects on agricultural productivity. Preliminary results show that Istanbul has undergone a significant amount of Land Use/Land Cover change over the past two decades. While some forested areas have been lost to urban-landscapes, urbanization has mostly occurred over former croplands due to the fact that in

  20. Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2007 (Earth-GRAM07) Applications for the NASA Constellation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Fred W.; Justus, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    Engineering models of the atmosphere are used extensively by the aerospace community for design issues related to vehicle ascent and descent. The Earth Global Reference Atmosphere Model version 2007 (Earth-GRAM07) is the latest in this series and includes a number of new features. Like previous versions, Earth-GRAM07 provides both mean values and perturbations for density, temperature, pressure, and winds, as well as monthly- and geographically-varying trace constituent concentrations. From 0 km to 27 km, thermodynamics and winds are based on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) climatology. For altitudes between 20 km and 120 km, the model uses data from the Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP). Above 120 km, EarthGRAM07 now provides users with a choice of three thermosphere models: the Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET-2007) model; the Jacchia-Bowman 2006 thermosphere model (JB2006); and the Naval Research Labs Mass Spectrometer, Incoherent Scatter Radar Extended Model (NRL MSIS E-OO) with the associated Harmonic Wind Model (HWM-93). In place of these datasets, Earth-GRAM07 has the option of using the new 2006 revised Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) data, the earlier (1983) RRA data, or the user may also provide their own data as an auxiliary profile. Refinements of the perturbation model are also discussed which include wind shears more similar to those observed at the Kennedy Space Center than the previous version Earth-GRAM99.

  1. Linking Simple Economic Theory Models and the Cointegrated Vector AutoRegressive Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels Framroze

    This paper attempts to clarify the connection between simple economic theory models and the approach of the Cointegrated Vector-Auto-Regressive model (CVAR). By considering (stylized) examples of simple static equilibrium models, it is illustrated in detail, how the theoretical model and its...

  2. Linking Land Change with Driving Forces and Actors: Four Conceptual Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Hersperger

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Models in land change research are often chosen arbitrarily based on practical rather than theoretical considerations. More specifically, research on land change is often based on a research framework with three crucial elements - driving forces, actors, and land change - in an ad hoc and case-specific configuration. The lack of solid and widely applicable concepts about the conceptual link between these three elements can negatively affect individual research projects and hamper communication and generalizations beyond the individual project. We present four basic models for linking land change with driving forces and actors. These models are illustrated with examples from the research literature. Based on the main characteristics of the models and practical considerations, we propose guidelines for choosing among the four models for specific studies. More generally, we want to raise awareness that land change research is especially demanding with respect to conceptual backgrounds and that conceptual considerations will help improve the scientific quality of individual studies as well as their potential contribution towards generic theories of land change.

  3. Application of the NASA A-Train to Evaluate Clouds Simulated by the Weather Research and Forecast Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William M.

    2008-01-01

    The CloudSat Mission, part of the NASA A-Train, is providing the first global survey of cloud profiles and cloud physical properties, observing seasonal and geographical variations that are pertinent to evaluating the way clouds are parameterized in weather and climate forecast models. CloudSat measures the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation from space through the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), a 94 GHz nadir-looking radar measuring the power backscattered by clouds as a function of distance from the radar. One of the goals of the CloudSat mission is to evaluate the representation of clouds in forecast models, thereby contributing to improved predictions of weather, climate and the cloud-climate feedback problem. This paper highlights potential limitations in cloud microphysical schemes currently employed in the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) modeling system. The horizontal and vertical structure of explicitly simulated cloud fields produced by the WRF model at 4-km resolution are being evaluated using CloudSat observations in concert with products derived from MODIS and AIRS. A radiative transfer model is used to produce simulated profiles of radar reflectivity given WRF input profiles of hydrometeor mixing ratios and ambient atmospheric conditions. The preliminary results presented in the paper will compare simulated and observed reflectivity fields corresponding to horizontal and vertical cloud structures associated with midlatitude cyclone events.

  4. Parallelization of the NASA Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model for Massively Parallel Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hann-Ming Henry Juang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Massively parallel computing, using a message passing interface (MPI, has been implemented into a three-dimensional version of the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE model. The implementation uses the domainresemble concept to design a code structure for both the whole domain and sub-domains after decomposition. Instead of inserting a group of MPI related statements into the model routine, these statements are packed into a single routine. In other words, only a single call statement to the model code is utilized once in a place, thus there is minimal impact on the original code. Therefore, the model is easily modified and/or managed by the model developers and/or users, who have little knowledge of massively parallel computing.

  5. Simulations of the mid-Pliocene Warm Period using two versions of the NASA/GISS ModelE2-R Coupled Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Chandler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP bears many similarities to aspects of future global warming as projected by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2007. Both marine and terrestrial data point to high-latitude temperature amplification, including large decreases in sea ice and land ice, as well as expansion of warmer climate biomes into higher latitudes. Here we present our most recent simulations of the mid-Pliocene climate using the CMIP5 version of the NASA/GISS Earth System Model (ModelE2-R. We describe the substantial impact associated with a recent correction made in the implementation of the Gent-McWilliams ocean mixing scheme (GM, which has a large effect on the simulation of ocean surface temperatures, particularly in the North Atlantic Ocean. The effect of this correction on the Pliocene climate results would not have been easily determined from examining its impact on the preindustrial runs alone, a useful demonstration of how the consequences of code improvements as seen in modern climate control runs do not necessarily portend the impacts in extreme climates. Both the GM-corrected and GM-uncorrected simulations were contributed to the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP Experiment 2. Many findings presented here corroborate results from other PlioMIP multi-model ensemble papers, but we also emphasise features in the ModelE2-R simulations that are unlike the ensemble means. The corrected version yields results that more closely resemble the ocean core data as well as the PRISM3D reconstructions of the mid-Pliocene, especially the dramatic warming in the North Atlantic and Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Sea, which in the new simulation appears to be far more realistic than previously found with older versions of the GISS model. Our belief is that continued development of key physical routines in the atmospheric model, along with higher resolution and recent corrections to mixing parameterisations in the ocean

  6. Kinematic modeling of mobile robot with rocker-bogie link structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Taig-Gi; Yi, Soo-Yeong

    2005-12-01

    A method for kinematic modeling of a mobile robot with rocker-bogie link mechanism was described. By using the well-known concept of the instantaneous coordinates, it derives the kinematic model for the full six degree of freedom motion including the x, y, and z motions and the pitch, roll, and yaw rotations. The kinematic model here implies both of the forward and the inverse kinematic equations. The forward kinematic equation with the wheel Jacobian matrices can be used to obtain the robot position and orientation from the measured wheel velocities and the rocker-bogie joint angles. On the contrary, the inverse kinematic equation implies a resulting robot motions consisting of body velocity and turning rate from the individual wheel velocities. Through the computer simulation, the kinematic model of the mobile robot was verified.

  7. Modeling and data analysis of the NASA-WSTF frictional heating apparatus - Effects of test parameters on friction coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sheng-Hu; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Benz, Frank J.; Yuen, Walter W.

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical model is being developed jointly by the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) to analyze data generated from the WSTF frictional heating test facility. Analyses of the data generated in the first seconds of the frictional heating test are shown to be effective in determining the friction coefficient between the rubbing interfaces. Different friction coefficients for carobn steel and Monel K-500 are observed. The initial condition of the surface is shown to affect only the initial value of the friction coefficient but to have no significant influence on the average steady-state friction coefficient. Rotational speed and the formation of oxide film on the rotating surfaces are shown to have a significant effect on the friction coefficient.

  8. GLGM-3: A Degree-ISO Lunar Gravity Model from the Historical Tracking Data of NASA Moon Orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarico, E.; Lemoine, F. G.; Han, Shin-Chan; Smith, D. E.

    2010-01-01

    In preparation for the radio science experiment of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission, we analyzed the available radio tracking data of previous NASA lunar orbiters. Our goal was to use these historical observations in combination with the new low-altitude data to be obtained by LRO. We performed Precision Orbit Determination on trajectory arcs from Lunar Orbiter 1 in 1966 to Lunar Prospector in 1998, using the GEODYN II program developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. We then created a set of normal equations and solved for the coefficients of a spherical harmonics expansion of the lunar gravity potential up to degree and order 150. The GLGM-3 solution obtained with a global Kaula constraint (2.5 x 10(exp -4)/sq l) shows good agreement with model LP150Q from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, especially over the nearside. The levels of data fit with both gravity models are very similar (Doppler RMS of approx.0.2 and approx. 1-2 mm/s in the nominal and extended phases, respectiVely). Orbit overlaps and uncertainties estimated from the covariance matrix also agree well. GLGM-3 shows better correlation with lunar topography and admittance over the nearside at high degrees of expansion (l > 100), particularly near the poles. We also present three companion solutions, obtained with the same data set but using alternate inversion strategies that modify the power law constraint and expectation of the individual spherical harmonics coefficients. We give a detailed discussion of the performance of this family of gravity field solutions in terms of observation fit, orbit quality, and geophysical consistency.

  9. Application of a linked stress release model in Corinth Gulf and Central Ionian Islands (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangira, Ourania; Vasiliadis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria

    2017-06-01

    Spatio-temporal stress changes and interactions between adjacent fault segments consist of the most important component in seismic hazard assessment, as they can alter the occurrence probability of strong earthquake onto these segments. The investigation of the interactions between adjacent areas by means of the linked stress release model is attempted for moderate earthquakes ( M ≥ 5.2) in the Corinth Gulf and the Central Ionian Islands (Greece). The study areas were divided in two subareas, based on seismotectonic criteria. The seismicity of each subarea is investigated by means of a stochastic point process and its behavior is determined by the conditional intensity function, which usually gets an exponential form. A conditional intensity function of Weibull form is used for identifying the most appropriate among the models (simple, independent and linked stress release model) for the interpretation of the earthquake generation process. The appropriateness of the models was decided after evaluation via the Akaike information criterion. Despite the fact that the curves of the conditional intensity functions exhibit similar behavior, the use of the exponential-type conditional intensity function seems to fit better the data.

  10. Latent constructs model explaining the attachment-linked variation in autobiographical remembering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öner, Sezin; Gülgöz, Sami

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we proposed a latent constructs model to characterise the qualitative aspects of autobiographical remembering and investigated the structural relations in the model that may vary across individuals. Primarily, we focused on the memories of romantic relationships and argued that attachment anxiety and avoidance would be reflected in the ways that individuals encode, rehearse, or remember autobiographical memories in close relationships. Participants reported two positive and two negative relationship-specific memories and rated the characteristics for each memory. As predicted, the basic memory model yielded appropriate fit, indicating that event characteristics (EC) predicted the frequency of rehearsal (RC) and phenomenology at retrieval (PC). When attachment variables were integrated, the model showed that rehearsal mediated the link between anxiety and PC, especially for negative memories. On the other hand, for avoidance EC was the key factor mediating the link between avoidance and RC, as well as PC. Findings were discussed with respect to autobiographical memory functions emphasising a systematically, integrated framework.

  11. The Tropical Subseasonal Variability Simulated in the NASA GISS General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daehyun; Sobel, Adam H.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Chen, Yonghua; Camargo, Suzana J.; Yao, Mao-Sung; Kelley, Maxwell; Nazarenko, Larissa

    2012-01-01

    The tropical subseasonal variability simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model, Model E2, is examined. Several versions of Model E2 were developed with changes to the convective parameterization in order to improve the simulation of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). When the convective scheme is modified to have a greater fractional entrainment rate, Model E2 is able to simulate MJO-like disturbances with proper spatial and temporal scales. Increasing the rate of rain reevaporation has additional positive impacts on the simulated MJO. The improvement in MJO simulation comes at the cost of increased biases in the mean state, consistent in structure and amplitude with those found in other GCMs when tuned to have a stronger MJO. By reinitializing a relatively poor-MJO version with restart files from a relatively better-MJO version, a series of 30-day integrations is constructed to examine the impacts of the parameterization changes on the organization of tropical convection. The poor-MJO version with smaller entrainment rate has a tendency to allow convection to be activated over a broader area and to reduce the contrast between dry and wet regimes so that tropical convection becomes less organized. Besides the MJO, the number of tropical-cyclone-like vortices simulated by the model is also affected by changes in the convection scheme. The model simulates a smaller number of such storms globally with a larger entrainment rate, while the number increases significantly with a greater rain reevaporation rate.

  12. A linked simulation-optimization model for solving the unknown groundwater pollution source identification problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayvaz, M Tamer

    2010-09-20

    This study proposes a linked simulation-optimization model for solving the unknown groundwater pollution source identification problems. In the proposed model, MODFLOW and MT3DMS packages are used to simulate the flow and transport processes in the groundwater system. These models are then integrated with an optimization model which is based on the heuristic harmony search (HS) algorithm. In the proposed simulation-optimization model, the locations and release histories of the pollution sources are treated as the explicit decision variables and determined through the optimization model. Also, an implicit solution procedure is proposed to determine the optimum number of pollution sources which is an advantage of this model. The performance of the proposed model is evaluated on two hypothetical examples for simple and complex aquifer geometries, measurement error conditions, and different HS solution parameter sets. Identified results indicated that the proposed simulation-optimization model is an effective way and may be used to solve the inverse pollution source identification problems. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. NASA Enterprise Architecture and Its Use in Transition of Research Results to Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisbie, T. E.; Hall, C. M.

    2006-12-01

    Enterprise architecture describes the design of the components of an enterprise, their relationships and how they support the objectives of that enterprise. NASA Stennis Space Center leads several projects involving enterprise architecture tools used to gather information on research assets within NASA's Earth Science Division. In the near future, enterprise architecture tools will link and display the relevant requirements, parameters, observatories, models, decision systems, and benefit/impact information relationships and map to the Federal Enterprise Architecture Reference Models. Components configured within the enterprise architecture serving the NASA Applied Sciences Program include the Earth Science Components Knowledge Base, the Systems Components database, and the Earth Science Architecture Tool. The Earth Science Components Knowledge Base systematically catalogues NASA missions, sensors, models, data products, model products, and network partners appropriate for consideration in NASA Earth Science applications projects. The Systems Components database is a centralized information warehouse of NASA's Earth Science research assets and a critical first link in the implementation of enterprise architecture. The Earth Science Architecture Tool is used to analyze potential NASA candidate systems that may be beneficial to decision-making capabilities of other Federal agencies. Use of the current configuration of NASA enterprise architecture (the Earth Science Components Knowledge Base, the Systems Components database, and the Earth Science Architecture Tool) has far exceeded its original intent and has tremendous potential for the transition of research results to operational entities.

  14. An Ensemble Recentering Kalman Filter with an Application to Argo Temperature Data Assimilation into the NASA GEOS-5 Coupled Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppenne, Christian L.

    2013-01-01

    A two-step ensemble recentering Kalman filter (ERKF) analysis scheme is introduced. The algorithm consists of a recentering step followed by an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) analysis step. The recentering step is formulated such as to adjust the prior distribution of an ensemble of model states so that the deviations of individual samples from the sample mean are unchanged but the original sample mean is shifted to the prior position of the most likely particle, where the likelihood of each particle is measured in terms of closeness to a chosen subset of the observations. The computational cost of the ERKF is essentially the same as that of a same size EnKF. The ERKF is applied to the assimilation of Argo temperature profiles into the OGCM component of an ensemble of NASA GEOS-5 coupled models. Unassimilated Argo salt data are used for validation. A surprisingly small number (16) of model trajectories is sufficient to significantly improve model estimates of salinity over estimates from an ensemble run without assimilation. The two-step algorithm also performs better than the EnKF although its performance is degraded in poorly observed regions.

  15. Linking the Power and Transport Sectors—Part 2: Modelling a Sector Coupling Scenario for Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Robinius

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available “Linking the power and transport sectors—Part 1” describes the general principle of “sector coupling” (SC, develops a working definition intended of the concept to be of utility to the international scientific community, contains a literature review that provides an overview of relevant scientific papers on this topic and conducts a rudimentary analysis of the linking of the power and transport sectors on a worldwide, EU and German level. The aim of this follow-on paper is to outline an approach to the modelling of SC. Therefore, a study of Germany as a case study was conducted. This study assumes a high share of renewable energy sources (RES contributing to the grid and significant proportion of fuel cell vehicles (FCVs in the year 2050, along with a dedicated hydrogen pipeline grid to meet hydrogen demand. To construct a model of this nature, the model environment “METIS” (models for energy transformation and integration systems we developed will be described in more detail in this paper. Within this framework, a detailed model of the power and transport sector in Germany will be presented in this paper and the rationale behind its assumptions described. Furthermore, an intensive result analysis for the power surplus, utilization of electrolysis, hydrogen pipeline and economic considerations has been conducted to show the potential outcomes of modelling SC. It is hoped that this will serve as a basis for researchers to apply this framework in future to models and analysis with an international focus.

  16. Assessing Air-Sea Interaction in the Evolving NASA GEOS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayson, Carol Anne; Roberts, J. Brent

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand how the climate responds to variations in forcing, one necessary component is to understand the full distribution of variability of exchanges of heat and moisture between the atmosphere and ocean. Surface heat and moisture fluxes are critical to the generation and decay of many coupled air-sea phenomena. These mechanisms operate across a number of scales and contain contributions from interactions between the anomalous (i.e. non-mean), often extreme-valued, flux components. Satellite-derived estimates of the surface turbulent and radiative heat fluxes provide an opportunity to assess results from modeling systems. Evaluation of only time mean and variability statistics, however only provides limited traceability to processes controlling what are often regime-dependent errors. This work will present an approach to evaluate the representation of the turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface in the current and evolving Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) model. A temperature and moisture vertical profile-based clustering technique is used to identify robust weather regimes, and subsequently intercompare the turbulent fluxes and near-surface parameters within these regimes in both satellite estimates and GEOS-driven data sets. Both model reanalysis (MERRA) and seasonal-to-interannual coupled GEOS model simulations will be evaluated. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the distribution of the fluxes including extremes, and the representation of near-surface forcing variables directly related to their estimation. Results from these analyses will help identify the existence and source of regime-dependent biases in the GEOS model ocean surface turbulent fluxes. The use of the temperature and moisture profiles for weather-state clustering will be highlighted for its potential broad application to 3-D output typical of model simulations.

  17. An open source web interface for linking models to infrastructure system databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, S.; Mohamed, K.; Harou, J. J.; Rheinheimer, D. E.; Medellin-Azuara, J.; Meier, P.; Tilmant, A.; Rosenberg, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    Models of networked engineered resource systems such as water or energy systems are often built collaboratively with developers from different domains working at different locations. These models can be linked to large scale real world databases, and they are constantly being improved and extended. As the development and application of these models becomes more sophisticated, and the computing power required for simulations and/or optimisations increases, so has the need for online services and tools which enable the efficient development and deployment of these models. Hydra Platform is an open source, web-based data management system, which allows modellers of network-based models to remotely store network topology and associated data in a generalised manner, allowing it to serve multiple disciplines. Hydra Platform uses a web API using JSON to allow external programs (referred to as `Apps') to interact with its stored networks and perform actions such as importing data, running models, or exporting the networks to different formats. Hydra Platform supports multiple users accessing the same network and has a suite of functions for managing users and data. We present ongoing development in Hydra Platform, the Hydra Web User Interface, through which users can collaboratively manage network data and models in a web browser. The web interface allows multiple users to graphically access, edit and share their networks, run apps and view results. Through apps, which are located on the server, the web interface can give users access to external data sources and models without the need to install or configure any software. This also ensures model results can be reproduced by removing platform or version dependence. Managing data and deploying models via the web interface provides a way for multiple modellers to collaboratively manage data, deploy and monitor model runs and analyse results.

  18. Biomine: predicting links between biological entities using network models of heterogeneous databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eronen Lauri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological databases contain large amounts of data concerning the functions and associations of genes and proteins. Integration of data from several such databases into a single repository can aid the discovery of previously unknown connections spanning multiple types of relationships and databases. Results Biomine is a system that integrates cross-references from several biological databases into a graph model with multiple types of edges, such as protein interactions, gene-disease associations and gene ontology annotations. Edges are weighted based on their type, reliability, and informativeness. We present Biomine and evaluate its performance in link prediction, where the goal is to predict pairs of nodes that will be connected in the future, based on current data. In particular, we formulate protein interaction prediction and disease gene prioritization tasks as instances of link prediction. The predictions are based on a proximity measure computed on the integrated graph. We consider and experiment with several such measures, and perform a parameter optimization procedure where different edge types are weighted to optimize link prediction accuracy. We also propose a novel method for disease-gene prioritization, defined as finding a subset of candidate genes that cluster together in the graph. We experimentally evaluate Biomine by predicting future annotations in the source databases and prioritizing lists of putative disease genes. Conclusions The experimental results show that Biomine has strong potential for predicting links when a set of selected candidate links is available. The predictions obtained using the entire Biomine dataset are shown to clearly outperform ones obtained using any single source of data alone, when different types of links are suitably weighted. In the gene prioritization task, an established reference set of disease-associated genes is useful, but the results show that under favorable

  19. Application of cross-linked and hydrolyzed arabinoxylans in baking of model rye bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buksa, Krzysztof; Nowotna, Anna; Ziobro, Rafał

    2016-02-01

    The role of water extractable arabinoxylan with varying molar mass and structure (cross-linked vs. hydrolyzed) in the structure formation of rye bread was examined using a model bread. Instead of the normal flour, the dough contained starch, arabinoxylan and protein, which were isolated from rye wholemeal. It was observed that the applied mixes of these constituents result in a product closely resembling typical rye bread, even if arabinoxylan was modified (by cross-linking or hydrolysis). The levels of arabinoxylan required for bread preparation depended on its modification and mix composition. At 3% protein, the maximum applicable level of poorly soluble cross-linked arabinoxylan was 3%, as higher amounts of this preparation resulted in an extensively viscous dough and diminished bread volume. On the other hand highly soluble, hydrolyzed arabinoxylan could be used at a higher level (6%) together with larger amounts of rye protein (3% or 6%). Further addition of arabinoxylan leads to excessive water absorption, resulting in a decreased viscosity of the dough during baking and insufficient gas retention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling and Performance Analysis of 10 Gbps Inter-satellite Optical Wireless Communication Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mehtab

    2017-12-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication has the advantages of two of the most predominant data transmission technologies - optical fiber communication and wireless communication. Most of the technical aspects of FSO are similar to that of optical fiber communication, with major difference in the information signal propagation medium which is free space in case of FSO rather than silica glass in optical fiber communication. One of the most important applications of FSO is inter-satellite optical wireless communication (IsOWC) links which will be deployed in the future in space. The IsOWC links have many advantages over the previously existing microwave satellite communication technologies such as higher bandwidth, lower power consumption, low cost of implementation, light size, and weight. In this paper, modeling and performance analysis of a 10-Gbps inter-satellite communication link with two satellites separated at a distance of 1,200 km has been done using OPTISYSTEM simulation software. Performance has been analyzed on the basis of quality factor, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and total power of the received signal.

  1. Implementation of a Transition Model in a NASA Code and Validation Using Heat Transfer Data on a Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Ali A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize and document the work done to enable a NASA CFD code to model laminar-turbulent transition process on an isolated turbine blade. The ultimate purpose of the present work is to down-select a transition model that would allow the flow simulation of a variable speed power turbine to be accurately performed. The flow modeling in its final form will account for the blade row interactions and their effects on transition which would lead to accurate accounting for losses. The present work only concerns itself with steady flows of variable inlet turbulence. The low Reynolds number k- model of Wilcox and a modified version of the same model will be used for modeling of transition on experimentally measured blade pressure and heat transfer. It will be shown that the k- model and its modified variant fail to simulate the transition with any degree of accuracy. A case is thus made for the adoption of more accurate transition models. Three-equation models based on the work of Mayle on Laminar Kinetic Energy were explored. The three-equation model of Walters and Leylek was thought to be in a relatively mature state of development and was implemented in the Glenn-HT code. Two-dimensional heat transfer predictions of flat plate flow and two-dimensional and three-dimensional heat transfer predictions on a turbine blade were performed and reported herein. Surface heat transfer rate serves as sensitive indicator of transition. With the newly implemented model, it was shown that the simulation of transition process is much improved over the baseline k- model for the single Reynolds number and pressure ratio attempted; while agreement with heat transfer data became more satisfactory. Armed with the new transition model, total-pressure losses of computed three-dimensional flow of E3 tip section cascade were compared to the experimental data for a range of incidence angles. The results obtained, form a partial loss bucket for the chosen blade

  2. Random blebbing motion: A simple model linking cell structural properties to migration characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Thomas E.; Gaffney, Eamonn A.; Goriely, Alain

    2017-07-01

    If the plasma membrane of a cell is able to delaminate locally from its actin cortex, a cellular bleb can be produced. Blebs are pressure-driven protrusions, which are noteworthy for their ability to produce cellular motion. Starting from a general continuum mechanics description, we restrict ourselves to considering cell and bleb shapes that maintain approximately spherical forms. From this assumption, we obtain a tractable algebraic system for bleb formation. By including cell-substrate adhesions, we can model blebbing cell motility. Further, by considering mechanically isolated blebbing events, which are randomly distributed over the cell, we can derive equations linking the macroscopic migration characteristics to the microscopic structural parameters of the cell. This multiscale modeling framework is then used to provide parameter estimates, which are in agreement with current experimental data. In summary, the construction of the mathematical model provides testable relationships between the bleb size and cell motility.

  3. Continuum mechanical model for cross-linked actin networks with contractile bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, J. P. S.; Parente, M. P. L.; Natal Jorge, R. M.

    2018-01-01

    In the context of a mechanical approach to cell biology, there is a close relationship between cellular function and mechanical properties. In recent years, an increasing amount of attention has been given to the coupling between biochemical and mechanical signals by means of constitutive models. In particular, on the active contractility of the actin cytoskeleton. Given the importance of the actin contraction on the physiological functions, this study propose a constitutive model to describe how the filamentous network controls its mechanics actively. Embedded in a soft isotropic ground substance, the network behaves as a viscous mechanical continuum, comprised of isotropically distributed cross-linked actin filaments and actomyosin bundles. Trough virtual rheometry experiments, the present model relates the dynamics of the myosin motors with the network stiffness, which is to a large extent governed by the time-scale of the applied deformations/forces.

  4. Link between hopping models and percolation scaling laws for charge transport in mixtures of small molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Gwang Ha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mixed host compositions that combine charge transport materials with luminescent dyes offer superior control over exciton formation and charge transport in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs. Two approaches are typically used to optimize the fraction of charge transport materials in a mixed host composition: either an empirical percolative model, or a hopping transport model. We show that these two commonly-employed models are linked by an analytic expression which relates the localization length to the percolation threshold and critical exponent. The relation is confirmed both numerically and experimentally through measurements of the relative conductivity of Tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenylamine (TCTA :1,3-bis(3,5-dipyrid-3-yl-phenylbenzene (BmPyPb mixtures with different concentrations, where the TCTA plays a role as hole conductor and the BmPyPb as hole insulator. The analytic relation may allow the rational design of mixed layers of small molecules for high-performance OLEDs.

  5. Linking genes to ecosystem trace gas fluxes in a large-scale model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, L. K.; Cueva, A.; Volkmann, T. H. M.; Sengupta, A.; Troch, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    Soil microorganisms mediate biogeochemical cycles through biosphere-atmosphere gas exchange with significant impact on atmospheric trace gas composition. Improving process-based understanding of these microbial populations and linking their genomic potential to the ecosystem-scale is a challenge, particularly in soil systems, which are heterogeneous in biodiversity, chemistry, and structure. In oligotrophic systems, such as the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) at Biosphere 2, atmospheric trace gas scavenging may supply critical metabolic needs to microbial communities, thereby promoting tight linkages between microbial genomics and trace gas utilization. This large-scale model system of three initially homogenous and highly instrumented hillslopes facilitates high temporal resolution characterization of subsurface trace gas fluxes at hundreds of sampling points, making LEO an ideal location to study microbe-mediated trace gas fluxes from the gene to ecosystem scales. Specifically, we focus on the metabolism of ubiquitous atmospheric reduced trace gases hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4), which may have wide-reaching impacts on microbial community establishment, survival, and function. Additionally, microbial activity on LEO may facilitate weathering of the basalt matrix, which can be studied with trace gas measurements of carbonyl sulfide (COS/OCS) and carbon dioxide (O-isotopes in CO2), and presents an additional opportunity for gene to ecosystem study. This work will present initial measurements of this suite of trace gases to characterize soil microbial metabolic activity, as well as links between spatial and temporal variability of microbe-mediated trace gas fluxes in LEO and their relation to genomic-based characterization of microbial community structure (phylogenetic amplicons) and genetic potential (metagenomics). Results from the LEO model system will help build understanding of the importance of atmospheric inputs to

  6. Probabilistic Model for Free-Space Optical Links Under Continental Fog Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzuki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The error characteristics of a free-space optical (FSO channel are significantly different from the fiber based optical links and thus require a deep physical understanding of the propagation channel. In particular different fog conditions greatly influence the optical transmissions and thus a channel model is required to estimate the detrimental fog effects. In this paper we shall present the probabilistic model for radiation fog from the measured data over a 80 m FSO link installed at Graz, Austria. The fog events are classified into thick fog, moderate fog, light fog and general fog based on the international code of visibility range. We applied some probability distribution functions (PDFs such as Kumaraswamy, Johnson SB and Logistic distribution, to the actual measured optical attenuations. The performance of each distribution is evaluated by Q-Q and P-P plots. It is found that Kumaraswamy distribution is the best fit for general fog, while Logistic distribution is the optimum choice for thick fog. On the other hand, Johnson SB distribution best fits the moderate and light fog related measured attenuation data. The difference in these probabilistic models and the resultant variation in the received signal strength under different fog types needs to be considered in designing an efficient FSO system.

  7. SIMO optical wireless links with nonzero boresight pointing errors over M modeled turbulence channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varotsos, G. K.; Nistazakis, H. E.; Petkovic, M. I.; Djordjevic, G. T.; Tombras, G. S.

    2017-11-01

    Over the last years terrestrial free-space optical (FSO) communication systems have demonstrated an increasing scientific and commercial interest in response to the growing demands for ultra high bandwidth, cost-effective and secure wireless data transmissions. However, due the signal propagation through the atmosphere, the performance of such links depends strongly on the atmospheric conditions such as weather phenomena and turbulence effect. Additionally, their operation is affected significantly by the pointing errors effect which is caused by the misalignment of the optical beam between the transmitter and the receiver. In order to address this significant performance degradation, several statistical models have been proposed, while particular attention has been also given to diversity methods. Here, the turbulence-induced fading of the received optical signal irradiance is studied through the M (alaga) distribution, which is an accurate model suitable for weak to strong turbulence conditions and unifies most of the well-known, previously emerged models. Thus, taking into account the atmospheric turbulence conditions along with the pointing errors effect with nonzero boresight and the modulation technique that is used, we derive mathematical expressions for the estimation of the average bit error rate performance for SIMO FSO links. Finally, proper numerical results are given to verify our derived expressions and Monte Carlo simulations are also provided to further validate the accuracy of the analysis proposed and the obtained mathematical expressions.

  8. Modeling channel interference in an orbital angular momentum-multiplexed laser link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita, Jaime A.; Neifeld, Mark A.; Vasic, Bane V.

    2009-08-01

    We study the effects of optical turbulence on the energy crosstalk among constituent orbital angular momentum (OAM) states in a vortex-based multi-channel laser communication link and determine channel interference in terms of turbulence strength and OAM state separation. We characterize the channel interference as a function of C2n and transmit OAM state, and propose probability models to predict the random fluctuations in the received signals for such architecture. Simulations indicate that turbulence-induced channel interference is mutually correlated across receive channels.

  9. A Review of the Recent NASA Long-Term Orbital Debris Environment Projection and Active Debris Removal Modeling Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) developed a high fidelity debris evolutionary model, LEGEND (a LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris model), in 2004 to enhance its capability to better model the near-Earth environment. LEGEND can mimic the growth of the historical debris population and project it into the future based on user-defined scenarios. The first major LEGEND study concluded that even without any future launches, the LEO population would continue to increase due to mutual collisions among existing objects. In reality, the increase will be worse than this prediction because of ongoing satellite launches and unexpected major breakups. Even with a full implementation of the commonly-adopted mitigation measures, the LEO population growth is inevitable. To preserve the near-Earth environment for future generations, active debris removal (ADR) must be considered. A follow-up LEGEND ADR study was completed recently. The main results indicate that (1) the mass and collision probability of each object can be used to establish an effective removal selection criterion and (2) a removal rate of 5 objects per year is sufficient to stabilize the LEO environment. Due to the limitation of removal techniques, however, different target selection criteria (in size, altitude, inclination, etc.) may be more practical. A careful evaluation of the effectiveness of different proposed techniques must be carried out to maximize the long-term benefit to the environment.

  10. Test of an 0.8-Scale Model of the AH-64 Apache in the NASA Langley Full- Scale Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    available test rigs - the NASA Generalized Rotor Model System (GRMS) and the Navy Hub and Pylon Evaluation Rig (HPER). Computer programs studying the...I, USAAVSCOM TM-87-D-5 V US ARMY AVIATION SYSTEMS COMMAND TEST OF AN 0.8-SCALE MODEL OF THE AH-64 APACHE IN THE NASA LANGLEY FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL...I% DTIC TAB [ Unan~nounced %] J st f iaton By- PDistributIon / . . AvnI1qbIlitV C -Idns... Dist l SP cI~o: *5* % , -- 5 ~V . - ~5 \\ .\\% TABLE OF

  11. Soil Moisture Data Assimilation in the NASA Land Information System for Local Modeling Applications and Improved Situational Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Blakenship, Clay B.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Early Adopter (EA) program, the NASA Shortterm Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has implemented a data assimilation (DA) routine into the NASA Land Information System (LIS) for soil moisture retrievals from the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The SMAP EA program promotes application-driven research to provide a fundamental understanding of how SMAP data products will be used to improve decision-making at operational agencies. SPoRT has partnered with select NOAA/NWS Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) that use output from a real-time regional configuration of LIS, without soil moisture DA, to initialize local numerical weather prediction (NWP) models and enhance situational awareness. Improvements to local NWP with the current LIS have been demonstrated; however, a better representation of the land surface through assimilation of SMOS (and eventually SMAP) retrievals is expected to lead to further model improvement, particularly during warm-season months. SPoRT will collaborate with select WFOs to assess the impact of soil moisture DA on operational forecast situations. Assimilation of the legacy SMOS instrument data provides an opportunity to develop expertise in preparation for using SMAP data products shortly after the scheduled launch on 5 November 2014. SMOS contains a passive L-band radiometer that is used to retrieve surface soil moisture at 35-km resolution with an accuracy of 0.04 cu cm cm (exp -3). SMAP will feature a comparable passive L-band instrument in conjunction with a 3-km resolution active radar component of slightly degraded accuracy. A combined radar-radiometer product will offer unprecedented global coverage of soil moisture at high spatial resolution (9 km) for hydrometeorological applications, balancing the resolution and accuracy of the active and passive instruments, respectively. The LIS software framework manages land surface model

  12. Linking normative models of natural tasks to descriptive models of neural response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaini, Priyank; Burge, Johannes

    2017-10-01

    Understanding how nervous systems exploit task-relevant properties of sensory stimuli to perform natural tasks is fundamental to the study of perceptual systems. However, there are few formal methods for determining which stimulus properties are most useful for a given natural task. As a consequence, it is difficult to develop principled models for how to compute task-relevant latent variables from natural signals, and it is difficult to evaluate descriptive models fit to neural response. Accuracy maximization analysis (AMA) is a recently developed Bayesian method for finding the optimal task-specific filters (receptive fields). Here, we introduce AMA-Gauss, a new faster form of AMA that incorporates the assumption that the class-conditional filter responses are Gaussian distributed. Then, we use AMA-Gauss to show that its assumptions are justified for two fundamental visual tasks: retinal speed estimation and binocular disparity estimation. Next, we show that AMA-Gauss has striking formal similarities to popular quadratic models of neural response: the energy model and the generalized quadratic model (GQM). Together, these developments deepen our understanding of why the energy model of neural response have proven useful, improve our ability to evaluate results from subunit model fits to neural data, and should help accelerate psychophysics and neuroscience research with natural stimuli.

  13. Individual-based modeling of fish: Linking to physical models and water quality.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.A.

    1997-08-01

    The individual-based modeling approach for the simulating fish population and community dynamics is gaining popularity. Individual-based modeling has been used in many other fields, such as forest succession and astronomy. The popularity of the individual-based approach is partly a result of the lack of success of the more aggregate modeling approaches traditionally used for simulating fish population and community dynamics. Also, recent recognition that it is often the atypical individual that survives has fostered interest in the individual-based approach. Two general types of individual-based models are distribution and configuration. Distribution models follow the probability distributions of individual characteristics, such as length and age. Configuration models explicitly simulate each individual; the sum over individuals being the population. DeAngelis et al (1992) showed that, when distribution and configuration models were formulated from the same common pool of information, both approaches generated similar predictions. The distribution approach was more compact and general, while the configuration approach was more flexible. Simple biological changes, such as making growth rate dependent on previous days growth rates, were easy to implement in the configuration version but prevented simple analytical solution of the distribution version.

  14. Development of Multidimensional Gap Conductance model using Virtual Link Gap Element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The gap conductance that determines temperature gradient between pellet and cladding can be quite sensitive to gap thickness. For instance, once the gap size increases up to several micrometers in certain region, difference of pellet surface temperatures increases up to 100 Kelvin. Therefore, iterative thermo-mechanical coupled analysis is required to solve temperature distribution throughout pellet and cladding. Recently, multidimensional fuel performance codes have been being developed in the advanced countries to evaluate thermal behavior of fuel for off normal conditions and DBA(design based accident) conditions using the Finite Element Method (FEM). FRAPCON-FRAPTRAN code system, which is well known as the verified and reliable code, incorporates 1D thermal module and multidimensional mechanical module. In this code, multidimensional gap conductance model is not applied. ALCYONE developed by CEA introduces equivalent heat convection coefficient that represents multidimensional gap conductance as a function of gap thickness. BISON, which is multidimensional fuel performance code developed by INL, owns multidimensional gap conductance model using projected thermal contact. In general, thermal contact algorithm is nonlinear calculation which is expensive approach numerically. The gap conductance model for multi-dimension is difficult issue in terms of convergence and nonlinearity because gap conductance is function of gap thickness which depends on mechanical analysis at each iteration step. In this paper, virtual link gap (VLG) element has been proposed to resolve convergence issue and nonlinear characteristic of multidimensional gap conductance. In terms of calculation accuracy and convergence efficiency, the proposed VLG model was evaluated. LWR fuel performance codes should incorporate thermo-mechanical loop to solve gap conductance problem, iteratively. However, gap conductance in multidimensional model is difficult issue owing to its nonlinearity and

  15. NASA's Carbon Cycle OSSE Initiative - Informing future space-based observing strategies through advanced modeling and data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, L.; Sellers, P. J.; Schimel, D.; Moore, B., III; O'Dell, C.; Crowell, S.; Kawa, S. R.; Pawson, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Baker, D. F.; Schuh, A. E.

    2017-12-01

    Satellite observations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are critically needed to improve understanding of the contemporary carbon budget and carbon-climate feedbacks. Though current carbon observing satellites have provided valuable data in regions not covered by surface in situ measurements, limited sampling of key regions and small but spatially coherent biases have limited the ability to estimate fluxes at the time and space scales needed for improved process-level understanding and informed decision-making. Next generation satellites will improve coverage in data sparse regions, either through use of active remote sensing, a geostationary vantage point, or increased swath width, but all techniques have limitations. The relative strengths and weaknesses of these approaches and their synergism have not previously been examined. To address these needs, a significant subset of the US carbon modeling community has come together with support from NASA to conduct a series of coordinated observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs), with close collaboration in framing the experiments and in analyzing the results. Here, we report on the initial phase of this initiative, which focused on creating realistic, physically consistent synthetic CO2 and CH4 observational datasets for use in inversion and signal detection experiments. These datasets have been created using NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System Model (GEOS) to represent the current state of atmospheric carbon as well as best available estimates of expected flux changes. Scenarios represented include changes in urban emissions, release of permafrost soil carbon, changes in carbon uptake in tropical and mid-latitude forests, changes in the Southern Ocean sink, and changes in both anthropogenic and natural methane emissions. This GEOS carbon `nature run' was sampled by instrument simulators representing the most prominent observing strategies with a focus on consistently representing the impacts of

  16. Linking 1D coastal ocean modelling to environmental management: an ensemble approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussap, Giulia; Zavatarelli, Marco; Pinardi, Nadia

    2017-12-01

    The use of a one-dimensional interdisciplinary numerical model of the coastal ocean as a tool contributing to the formulation of ecosystem-based management (EBM) is explored. The focus is on the definition of an experimental design based on ensemble simulations, integrating variability linked to scenarios (characterised by changes in the system forcing) and to the concurrent variation of selected, and poorly constrained, model parameters. The modelling system used was previously specifically designed for the use in "data-rich" areas, so that horizontal dynamics can be resolved by a diagnostic approach and external inputs can be parameterised by nudging schemes properly calibrated. Ensembles determined by changes in the simulated environmental (physical and biogeochemical) dynamics, under joint forcing and parameterisation variations, highlight the uncertainties associated to the application of specific scenarios that are relevant to EBM, providing an assessment of the reliability of the predicted changes. The work has been carried out by implementing the coupled modelling system BFM-POM1D in an area of Gulf of Trieste (northern Adriatic Sea), considered homogeneous from the point of view of hydrological properties, and forcing it by changing climatic (warming) and anthropogenic (reduction of the land-based nutrient input) pressure. Model parameters affected by considerable uncertainties (due to the lack of relevant observations) were varied jointly with the scenarios of change. The resulting large set of ensemble simulations provided a general estimation of the model uncertainties related to the joint variation of pressures and model parameters. The information of the model result variability aimed at conveying efficiently and comprehensibly the information on the uncertainties/reliability of the model results to non-technical EBM planners and stakeholders, in order to have the model-based information effectively contributing to EBM.

  17. Dynamically linking economic models to ecological condition for coastal zone management: Application to sustainable tourism planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvarskas, Anthony

    2017-03-01

    While the development of the tourism industry can bring economic benefits to an area, it is important to consider the long-run impact of the industry on a given location. Particularly when the tourism industry relies upon a certain ecological state, those weighing different development options need to consider the long-run impacts of increased tourist numbers upon measures of ecological condition. This paper presents one approach for linking a model of recreational visitor behavior with an ecological model that estimates the impact of the increased visitors upon the environment. Two simulations were run for the model using initial parameters available from survey data and water quality data for beach locations in Croatia. Results suggest that the resilience of a given tourist location to the changes brought by increasing tourism numbers is important in determining its long-run sustainability. Further work should investigate additional model components, including the tourism industry, refinement of the relationships assumed by the model, and application of the proposed model in additional areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Linking models of human behaviour and climate alters projected climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckage, Brian; Gross, Louis J.; Lacasse, Katherine; Carr, Eric; Metcalf, Sara S.; Winter, Jonathan M.; Howe, Peter D.; Fefferman, Nina; Franck, Travis; Zia, Asim; Kinzig, Ann; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2018-01-01

    Although not considered in climate models, perceived risk stemming from extreme climate events may induce behavioural changes that alter greenhouse gas emissions. Here, we link the C-ROADS climate model to a social model of behavioural change to examine how interactions between perceived risk and emissions behaviour influence projected climate change. Our coupled climate and social model resulted in a global temperature change ranging from 3.4-6.2 °C by 2100 compared with 4.9 °C for the C-ROADS model alone, and led to behavioural uncertainty that was of a similar magnitude to physical uncertainty (2.8 °C versus 3.5 °C). Model components with the largest influence on temperature were the functional form of response to extreme events, interaction of perceived behavioural control with perceived social norms, and behaviours leading to sustained emissions reductions. Our results suggest that policies emphasizing the appropriate attribution of extreme events to climate change and infrastructural mitigation may reduce climate change the most.

  19. A mediation model linking body weight, cognition, and sleep-disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruyt, Karen; Gozal, David

    2012-01-15

    Academic success involves the ability to use cognitive skills in a school environment. Poor academic performance has been linked to disrupted sleep associated with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). In parallel, poor sleep is associated with increased risk for obesity, and weight management problems have been linked to executive dysfunction, suggesting that interactions may be operational between SDB and obesity to adversely affect neurocognitive outcomes. To test whether mediator relationships exist between body weight, SDB, and cognition. Structural equation modeling was conducted on data from 351 children in a community-based cohort assessed with the core subtests of the Differential Abilities Scales after an overnight polysomnogram. Body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index, and cognitive abilities were modeled as latent constructs. In a sample of predominantly white children 6 to 10 years of age, SDB amplified the adverse cognitive and weight outcomes by 0.55- to 0.46-fold, respectively. Weight amplified the risk by 0.39- to 0.40-fold for SDB and cognitive outcomes, respectively. Poor ability to perform complex mental processing functions increased the risk of adverse weight and SDB outcomes by 2.9- and 7.9-fold, respectively. Cognitive functioning in children is adversely affected by frequent health-related problems, such as obesity and SDB. Furthermore, poorer integrative mental processing may place a child at a bigger risk for adverse health outcomes.

  20. Non-constant link tension coefficient in the tumbling-snake model subjected to simple shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanou, Pavlos S.; Kröger, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The authors of the present study have recently presented evidence that the tumbling-snake model for polymeric systems has the necessary capacity to predict the appearance of pronounced undershoots in the time-dependent shear viscosity as well as an absence of equally pronounced undershoots in the transient two normal stress coefficients. The undershoots were found to appear due to the tumbling behavior of the director u when a rotational Brownian diffusion term is considered within the equation of motion of polymer segments, and a theoretical basis concerning the use of a link tension coefficient given through the nematic order parameter had been provided. The current work elaborates on the quantitative predictions of the tumbling-snake model to demonstrate its capacity to predict undershoots in the time-dependent shear viscosity. These predictions are shown to compare favorably with experimental rheological data for both polymer melts and solutions, help us to clarify the microscopic origin of the observed phenomena, and demonstrate in detail why a constant link tension coefficient has to be abandoned.

  1. DFT Modeling of Cross-Linked Polyethylene: Role of Gold Atoms and Dispersion Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaško, Martin; Mach, Pavel; Antušek, Andrej; Urban, Miroslav

    2018-02-08

    Using DFT modeling, we analyze the concerted action of gold atoms and dispersion interactions in cross-linked polyethylene. Our model consists of two oligomer chains (PEn) with 7, 11, 15, 19, or 23 carbon atoms in each oligomer cross-linked with one to three Au atoms through C-Au-C bonds. In structures with a single gold atom the C-Au-C bond is located in the central position of the oligomer. Binding energies (BEs) with respect to two oligomer radical fragments and Au are as high as 362-489 kJ/mol depending on the length of the oligomer chain. When the dispersion contribution in PEn-Au-PEn oligomers is omitted, BE is almost independent of the number of carbon atoms, lying between 293 and 296 kJ/mol. The dispersion energy contributions to BEs in PEn-Au-PEn rise nearly linearly with the number of carbon atoms in the PEn chain. The carbon-carbon distance in the C-Au-C moiety is around 4.1 Å, similar to the bond distance between saturated closed shell chains in the polyethylene crystal. BEs of pure saturated closed shell PEn-PEn oligomers are 51-187 kJ/mol. Both Au atoms and dispersion interactions contribute considerably to the creation of nearly parallel chains of oligomers with reasonably high binding energies.

  2. Aeroelastic Tailoring of the NASA Common Research Model via Novel Material and Structural Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutte, Christine V.; Stanford, Bret K.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Moore, James B.

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the use of tow steered composite laminates, functionally graded metals (FGM), thickness distributions, and curvilinear rib/spar/stringer topologies for aeroelastic tailoring. Parameterized models of the Common Research Model (CRM) wing box have been developed for passive aeroelastic tailoring trade studies. Metrics of interest include the wing weight, the onset of dynamic flutter, and the static aeroelastic stresses. Compared to a baseline structure, the lowest aggregate static wing stresses could be obtained with tow steered skins (47% improvement), and many of these designs could reduce weight as well (up to 14%). For these structures, the trade-off between flutter speed and weight is generally strong, although one case showed both a 100% flutter improvement and a 3.5% weight reduction. Material grading showed no benefit in the skins, but moderate flutter speed improvements (with no weight or stress increase) could be obtained by grading the spars (4.8%) or ribs (3.2%), where the best flutter results were obtained by grading both thickness and material. For the topology work, large weight reductions were obtained by removing an inner spar, and performance was maintained by shifting stringers forward and/or using curvilinear ribs: 5.6% weight reduction, a 13.9% improvement in flutter speed, but a 3.0% increase in stress levels. Flutter resistance was also maintained using straightrotated ribs although the design had a 4.2% lower flutter speed than the curved ribs of similar weight and stress levels were higher. These results will guide the development of a future design optimization scheme established to exploit and combine the individual attributes of these technologies.

  3. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve P. Crampton

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease.

  4. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Steve P.; Morawski, Peter A.; Bolland, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease. PMID:25147296

  5. Numerical linked-cluster algorithms. II. t-J models on the square lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, Marcos; Bryant, Tyler; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2007-06-01

    We discuss the application of a recently introduced numerical linked-cluster (NLC) algorithm to strongly correlated itinerant models. In particular, we present a study of thermodynamic observables: chemical potential, entropy, specific heat, and uniform susceptibility for the t-J model on the square lattice, with Jt=0.5 and 0.3. Our NLC results are compared with those obtained from high-temperature expansions (HTE) and the finite-temperature Lanczos method (FTLM). We show that there is a sizeable window in temperature where NLC results converge without extrapolations whereas HTE diverges. Upon extrapolations, the overall agreement between NLC, HTE, and FTLM is excellent in some cases down to 0.25t . At intermediate temperatures NLC results are better controlled than other methods, making it easier to judge the convergence and numerical accuracy of the method.

  6. Linking sediment fingerprinting and modeling outputs for a Spanish Pyrenean river catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazón, Leticia; Latorre, Borja; Gaspar, Leticia; Blake, Williams H.; Smith, Hugh G.; Navas, Ana

    2015-04-01

    Indirect techniques to study fine sediment redistribution in river catchments could provide unique and diverse information, which, when combined become a powerful tool to address catchment management problems. Such combinations could solve limitations of individual techniques and provide different lines of information to address a particular problem. The Barasona reservoir has suffered from siltation since its construction, with the loss of over one third of its storage volume in around 30 study years (period 1972-1996). Information on sediment production from tributary catchments for the reservoir is required to develop management plans for maintaining reservoir sustainability. Large spatial variability in sediment delivery was found in previous studies in the Barasona catchment and the major sediment sources identified included badlands developed in the middle part of the catchment and the agricultural fields in its lower part. From the diverse range of indirect techniques, fingerprinting sediment sources and computer models could be linked to obtain a more holistic view of the processes related to sediment redistribution in the Barasona river catchment (1509 km2, Central Spanish Pyrenees), which comprises agricultural and forest land uses. In the present study, the results from a fingerprinting procedure and the SWAT model were compared and combined to improve the knowledge of land use sediment source contributions to the reservoir. Samples from the study catchment were used to define soil parameters for the model and for fingerprinting the land use sources. The fingerprinting approach provided information about relative contributions from land use sources to the superficial sediment samples taken from the reservoir infill. The calibration and validation of the model provided valuable information, for example on the timescale of sediment production from the different land uses within the catchment. Linking results from both techniques enabled us to achieve a

  7. Development of conceptual ecological models linking management of the Missouri River to pallid sturgeon population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Parsley, Michael J.; Annis, Mandy L.; Colvin, Michael E.; Welker, Timothy L.; James, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    This report documents the process of developing and refining conceptual ecological models (CEMs) for linking river management to pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) population dynamics in the Missouri River. The refined CEMs are being used in the Missouri River Pallid Sturgeon Effects Analysis to organize, document, and formalize an understanding of pallid sturgeon population responses to past and future management alternatives. The general form of the CEMs, represented by a population-level model and component life-stage models, was determined in workshops held in the summer of 2013. Subsequently, the Missouri River Pallid Sturgeon Effects Analysis team designed a general hierarchical structure for the component models, refined the graphical structure, and reconciled variation among the components and between models developed for the upper river (Upper Missouri & Yellowstone Rivers) and the lower river (Missouri River downstream from Gavins Point Dam). Importance scores attributed to the relations between primary biotic characteristics and survival were used to define a candidate set of working dominant hypotheses about pallid sturgeon population dynamics. These CEMs are intended to guide research and adaptive-management actions to benefit pallid sturgeon populations in the Missouri River.

  8. Mesoscale models for stacking faults, deformation twins and martensitic transformations: Linking atomistics to continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibey, Sandeep A.

    We present a hierarchical approach that spans multiple length scales to describe defect formation---in particular, formation of stacking faults (SFs) and deformation twins---in fcc crystals. We link the energy pathways (calculated here via ab initio density functional theory, DFT) associated with formation of stacking faults and twins to corresponding heterogeneous defect nucleation models (described through mesoscale dislocation mechanics). Through the generalized Peieirls-Nabarro model, we first correlate the width of intrinsic SFs in fcc alloy systems to their nucleation pathways called generalized stacking fault energies (GSFE). We then establish a qualitative dependence of twinning tendency in fee metals and alloys---specifically, in pure Cu and dilute Cu-xAl (x= 5.0 and 8.3 at.%)---on their twin-energy pathways called the generalized planar fault energies (GPFE). We also link the twinning behavior of Cu-Al alloys to their electronic structure by determining the effect of solute Al on the valence charge density redistribution at the SF through ab initio DFT. Further, while several efforts have been undertaken to incorporate twinning for predicting stress-strain response of fcc materials, a fundamental law for critical twinning stress has not yet emerged. We resolve this long-standing issue by linking quantitatively the twin-energy pathways (GPFE) obtained via ab initio DFT to heterogeneous, dislocation-based twin nucleation models. We establish an analytical expression that quantitatively predicts the critical twinning stress in fcc metals in agreement with experiments without requiring any empiricism at any length scale. Our theory connects twinning stress to twin-energy pathways and predicts a monotonic relation between stress and unstable twin stacking fault energy revealing the physics of twinning. We further demonstrate that the theory holds for fcc alloys as well. Our theory inherently accounts for directional nature of twinning which available

  9. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclones to Parameterized Convection in the NASA GEOS5 Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Reale, Oreste; Lee, Myong-In; Molod, Andrea M.; Suarez, Max J.

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of tropical cyclones (TCs) to changes in parameterized convection is investigated to improve the simulation of TCs in the North Atlantic. Specifically, the impact of reducing the influence of the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert (RAS) scheme-based parameterized convection is explored using the Goddard Earth Observing System version5 (GEOS5) model at 0.25 horizontal resolution. The years 2005 and 2006 characterized by very active and inactive hurricane seasons, respectively, are selected for simulation. A reduction in parameterized deep convection results in an increase in TC activity (e.g., TC number and longer life cycle) to more realistic levels compared to the baseline control configuration. The vertical and horizontal structure of the strongest simulated hurricane shows the maximum lower-level (850-950hPa) wind speed greater than 60 ms and the minimum sea level pressure reaching 940mb, corresponding to a category 4 hurricane - a category never achieved by the control configuration. The radius of the maximum wind of 50km, the location of the warm core exceeding 10 C, and the horizontal compactness of the hurricane center are all quite realistic without any negatively affecting the atmospheric mean state. This study reveals that an increase in the threshold of minimum entrainment suppresses parameterized deep convection by entraining more dry air into the typical plume. This leads to cooling and drying at the mid- to upper-troposphere, along with the positive latent heat flux and moistening in the lower-troposphere. The resulting increase in conditional instability provides an environment that is more conducive to TC vortex development and upward moisture flux convergence by dynamically resolved moist convection, thereby increasing TC activity.

  10. Linking Murine and Human Plasmodium falciparum Challenge Models in a Translational Path for Antimalarial Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, James S.; Marquart, Louise; Sekuloski, Silvana; Trenholme, Katharine; Elliott, Suzanne; Griffin, Paul; Rockett, Rebecca; O'Rourke, Peter; Sloots, Theo; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Martínez, María-Santos; Duparc, Stephan; Leroy, Didier; Wells, Timothy N. C.; Baker, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Effective progression of candidate antimalarials is dependent on optimal dosing in clinical studies, which is determined by a sound understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD). Recently, two important translational models for antimalarials have been developed: the NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) model, whereby mice are engrafted with noninfected and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes, and the induced blood-stage malaria (IBSM) model in human volunteers. The antimalarial mefloquine was used to directly measure the PK/PD in both models, which were compared to previously published trial data for malaria patients. The clinical part was a single-center, controlled study using a blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum challenge inoculum in volunteers to characterize the effectiveness of mefloquine against early malaria. The study was conducted in three cohorts (n = 8 each) using different doses of mefloquine. The characteristic delay in onset of action of about 24 h was seen in both NSG and IBSM systems. In vivo 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were estimated at 2.0 μg/ml and 1.8 μg/ml in the NSG and IBSM models, respectively, aligning with 1.8 μg/ml reported previously for patients. In the IBSM model, the parasite reduction ratios were 157 and 195 for the 10- and 15-mg/kg doses, within the range of previously reported clinical data for patients but significantly lower than observed in the mouse model. Linking mouse and human challenge models to clinical trial data can accelerate the accrual of critical data on antimalarial drug activity. Such data can guide large clinical trials required for development of urgently needed novel antimalarial combinations. (This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry [http://anzctr.org.au] under registration number ACTRN12612000323820.) PMID:27044554

  11. Using Coupled Simulation Models to Link Pastoral Decision Making and Ecosystem Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall B. Boone

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, pastoral people were able to more freely use the services their semi-arid and arid ecosystems provide, and they adapted to changes in ways that improved their well-being. More recently, their ability to adapt has been constrained due to changes from within and from outside their communities. To compare possible responses by pastoral communities, we modeled ecosystem services and tied those services to decisions that people make at the household level. We created an agent-based household model called DECUMA, joined that model with the ecosystem model SAVANNA, and applied the linked models to southeastern Kajiado District, Kenya. The structure of the new agent-based model and linkages between the models are described, and then we demonstrate the model results using a scenario that shows changes in Maasai well-being in response to drought. We then explore two additional but related scenarios, quantifying household well-being if access to a grazing reserve is lost and if access is lost but those most affected are compensated. In the second scenario, households in group ranches abutting the grazing reserve that lost access had large declines in livestock populations, less food energy from animal sources, increased livestock sales and grain purchases, and increased need for supplemental foods. Households in more distant areas showed no changes or had increases in livestock populations because their herds had fewer animals with which to compete for forage. When households neighboring the grazing reserve were compensated for the lease of the lands they had used, they prospered. We describe some benefits and limitations of the agent-based approach.

  12. NASA's Water Solutions Using Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA Water Resources works within Earth sciences to leverage investments of space-based observation, model results, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities into water resources management decision support tools for the sustainable use of water. Earth science satellite observations and modelling products provide a huge volume of valuable data in both near-real-time and extended back nearly 50 years about the Earth's land surface conditions such as land cover type, vegetation type and health, precipitation, snow, soil moisture, and water levels and radiation. Observations of this type combined with models and analysis enable satellite-based assessment of the water cycle. With increasing population pressure and water usage coupled with climate variability and change, water issues are being reported by numerous groups as the most critical environmental problems facing us in the 21st century. Competitive uses and the prevalence of river basins and aquifers that extend across boundaries engender political tensions between communities, stakeholders and countries. The NASA Water Resources Program has the objective to provide NASA products to help deal with these issues with the goal for the sustainable use of water. The Water Resources program organizes its projects under five functional themes: 1) stream-flow and flood forecasting; 2) water consumptive use (includes evapotranspiration) and irrigation; 3) drought; 4) water quality; and 5) climate and water resources. NASA primarily works with national and international groups such as other US government agencies (NOAA, EPA, USGS, USAID) and various other groups to maximize the widest use of the water products. A summary of NASA's water activities linked to helping solve issues for developing countries will be highlighted.

  13. Regression models for linking patterns of growth to a later outcome: infant growth and childhood overweight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K. Wills

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regression models are widely used to link serial measures of anthropometric size or changes in size to a later outcome. Different parameterisations of these models enable one to target different questions about the effect of growth, however, their interpretation can be challenging. Our objective was to formulate and classify several sets of parameterisations by their underlying growth pattern contrast, and to discuss their utility using an expository example. Methods We describe and classify five sets of model parameterisations in accordance with their underlying growth pattern contrast (conditional growth; being bigger v being smaller; becoming bigger and staying bigger; growing faster v being bigger; becoming and staying bigger versus being bigger. The contrasts are estimated by including different sets of repeated measures of size and changes in size in a regression model. We illustrate these models in the setting of linking infant growth (measured on 6 occasions: birth, 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months in weight-for-height-for-age z-scores to later childhood overweight at 8y using complete cases from the Norwegian Childhood Growth study (n = 900. Results In our expository example, conditional growth during all periods, becoming bigger in any interval and staying bigger through infancy, and being bigger from birth were all associated with higher odds of later overweight. The highest odds of later overweight occurred for individuals who experienced high conditional growth or became bigger in the 3 to 6 month period and stayed bigger, and those who were bigger from birth to 24 months. Comparisons between periods and between growth patterns require large sample sizes and need to consider how to scale associations to make comparisons fair; with respect to the latter, we show one approach. Conclusion Studies interested in detrimental growth patterns may gain extra insight from reporting several sets of growth pattern

  14. Linked linear mixed models: A joint analysis of fixation locations and fixation durations in natural reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenstein, Sven; Matuschek, Hannes; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2017-06-01

    The complexity of eye-movement control during reading allows measurement of many dependent variables, the most prominent ones being fixation durations and their locations in words. In current practice, either variable may serve as dependent variable or covariate for the other in linear mixed models (LMMs) featuring also psycholinguistic covariates of word recognition and sentence comprehension. Rather than analyzing fixation location and duration with separate LMMs, we propose linking the two according to their sequential dependency. Specifically, we include predicted fixation location (estimated in the first LMM from psycholinguistic covariates) and its associated residual fixation location as covariates in the second, fixation-duration LMM. This linked LMM affords a distinction between direct and indirect effects (mediated through fixation location) of psycholinguistic covariates on fixation durations. Results confirm the robustness of distributed processing in the perceptual span. They also offer a resolution of the paradox of the inverted optimal viewing position (IOVP) effect (i.e., longer fixation durations in the center than at the beginning and end of words) although the opposite (i.e., an OVP effect) is predicted from default assumptions of psycholinguistic processing efficiency: The IOVP effect in fixation durations is due to the residual fixation-location covariate, presumably driven primarily by saccadic error, and the OVP effect (at least the left part of it) is uncovered with the predicted fixation-location covariate, capturing the indirect effects of psycholinguistic covariates. We expect that linked LMMs will be useful for the analysis of other dynamically related multiple outcomes, a conundrum of most psychonomic research.

  15. On the Performance Analysis of Free-Space Optical Links under Generalized Turbulence and Misalignment Models

    KAUST Repository

    AlQuwaiee, Hessa

    2016-11-01

    One of the potential solutions to the radio frequency (RF) spectrum scarcity problem is optical wireless communications (OWC), which utilizes the unlicensed optical spectrum. Long-range outdoor OWC are usually referred to in the literature as free-space optical (FSO) communications. Unlike RF systems, FSO is immune to interference and multi-path fading. Also, the deployment of FSO systems is flexible and much faster than optical fibers. These attractive features make FSO applicable for broadband wireless transmission such as optical fiber backup, metropolitan area network, and last mile access. Although FSO communication is a promising technology, it is negatively affected by two physical phenomenon, namely, scintillation due to atmospheric turbulence and pointing errors. These two critical issues have prompted intensive research in the last decade. To quantify the effect of these two factors on FSO system performance, we need effective mathematical models. In this work, we propose and study a generalized pointing error model based on the Beckmann distribution. Then, we aim to generalize the FSO channel model to span all turbulence conditions from weak to strong while taking pointing errors into consideration. Since scintillation in FSO is analogous to the fading phenomena in RF, diversity has been proposed too to overcome the effect of irradiance fluctuations. Thus, several combining techniques of not necessarily independent dual-branch free-space optical links were investigated over both weak and strong turbulence channels in the presence of pointing errors. On another front, improving the performance, enhancing the capacity and reducing the delay of the communication link has been the motivation of any newly developed schemes, especially for backhauling. Recently, there has been a growing interest in practical systems to integrate RF and FSO technologies to solve the last mile bottleneck. As such, we also study in this thesis asymmetric an RF-FSO dual-hop relay

  16. Introducing technology learning for energy technologies in a national CGE model through soft links to global and national energy models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a method to model the influence by global policy scenarios, particularly spillover of technology learning, on the energy service demand of the non-energy sectors of the national economy. It is exemplified by Norway. Spillover is obtained from the technology-rich global Energy Technology Perspective model operated by the International Energy Agency. It is provided to a national hybrid model where a national bottom-up Markal model carries forward spillover into a national top-down CGE model at a disaggregated demand category level. Spillover of technology learning from the global energy technology market will reduce national generation costs of energy carriers. This may in turn increase demand in the non-energy sectors of the economy because of the rebound effect. The influence of spillover on the Norwegian economy is most pronounced for the production level of industrial chemicals and for the demand for electricity for residential energy services. The influence is modest, however, because all existing electricity generating capacity is hydroelectric and thus compatible with the low emission policy scenario. In countries where most of the existing generating capacity must be replaced by nascent energy technologies or carbon captured and storage the influence on demand is expected to be more significant. - Highlights: → Spillover of global technology learning may be forwarded into a macroeconomic model. → The national electricity price differs significantly between the different global scenarios. → Soft-linking global and national models facilitate transparency in the technology learning effect chain.

  17. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Xin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily timescales. We demonstrate that ambient CO2 concentrations influence daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  18. NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Program UARP and Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP): Research Summaries 1994 - 1996. Report to Congress and the Environmental Protection Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Rose (Compiler); Wolfe, Kathy (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    Under the mandate contained in the FY 1976 NASA Authorization Act, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed and is implementing a comprehensive program of research, technology, and monitoring of the Earth's upper atmosphere, with emphasis on the stratosphere. This program aims at expanding our understanding to permit both the quantitative analysis of current perturbations as well as the assessment of possible future changes in this important region of our environment. It is carried out jointly by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP), both managed within the Science Division in the Office of Mission to Planet Earth at NASA. Significant contributions to this effort are also provided by the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) of NASA's Office of Aeronautics. The long-term objectives of the present program are to perform research to: understand the physics, chemistry, and transport processes of the upper atmosphere and their effect on the distribution of chemical species in the stratosphere, such as ozone; understand the relationship of the trace constituent composition of the lower stratosphere and the lower troposphere to the radiative balance and temperature distribution of the Earth's atmosphere; and accurately assess possible perturbations of the upper atmosphere caused by human activities as well as by natural phenomena. In compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Public Law 101-549, NASA has prepared a report on the state of our knowledge of the Earth's upper atmosphere, particularly the stratosphere, and on the progress of UARP and ACMAP. The report for the year 1996 is composed of two parts. Part 1 summarizes the objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported under NASA UARP and ACMAP in a document entitled, Research Summary 1994-1996. Part 2 is entitled Present State of Knowledge of the Upper Atmosphere

  19. NASA AVOSS Fast-Time Models for Aircraft Wake Prediction: User's Guide (APA3.8 and TDP2.1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nash'at N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Matthew J.; Limon Duparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's current distribution of fast-time wake vortex decay and transport models includes APA (Version 3.8) and TDP (Version 2.1). This User's Guide provides detailed information on the model inputs, file formats, and model outputs. A brief description of the Memphis 1995, Dallas/Fort Worth 1997, and the Denver 2003 wake vortex datasets is given along with the evaluation of models. A detailed bibliography is provided which includes publications on model development, wake field experiment descriptions, and applications of the fast-time wake vortex models.

  20. Towards Linking 3D SAR and Lidar Models with a Spatially Explicit Individual Based Forest Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanoglu, B.; Ranson, J.; Sun, G.; Armstrong, A. H.; Fischer, R.; Huth, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we present a parameterization of the FORMIND individual-based gap model (IBGM)for old growth Atlantic lowland rainforest in La Selva, Costa Rica for the purpose of informing multisensor remote sensing techniques for above ground biomass techniques. The model was successfully parameterized and calibrated for the study site; results show that the simulated forest reproduces the structural complexity of Costa Rican rainforest based on comparisons with CARBONO inventory plot data. Though the simulated stem numbers (378) slightly underestimated the plot data (418), particularly for canopy dominant intermediate shade tolerant trees and shade tolerant understory trees, overall there was a 9.7% difference. Aboveground biomass (kg/ha) showed a 0.1% difference between the simulated forest and inventory plot dataset. The Costa Rica FORMIND simulation was then used to parameterize a spatially explicit (3D) SAR and lidar backscatter models. The simulated forest stands were used to generate a Look Up Table as a tractable means to estimate aboveground forest biomass for these complex forests. Various combinations of lidar and radar variables were evaluated in the LUT inversion. To test the capability of future data for estimation of forest height and biomass, we considered data of 1) L- (or P-) band polarimetric data (backscattering coefficients of HH, HV and VV); 2) L-band dual-pol repeat-pass InSAR data (HH/HV backscattering coefficients and coherences, height of scattering phase center at HH and HV using DEM or surface height from lidar data as reference); 3) P-band polarimetric InSAR data (canopy height from inversion of PolInSAR data or use the coherences and height of scattering phase center at HH, HV and VV); 4) various height indices from waveform lidar data); and 5) surface and canopy top height from photon-counting lidar data. The methods for parameterizing the remote sensing models with the IBGM and developing Look Up Tables will be discussed. Results

  1. NASA Astrophysics Technology Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2012-01-01

    July 2010, NASA Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) initiated an activity to create and maintain a NASA integrated roadmap for 15 key technology areas which recommend an overall technology investment strategy and prioritize NASA?s technology programs to meet NASA?s strategic goals. Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems(SIOSS) roadmap addresses technology needs to achieve NASA?s highest priority objectives -- not only for the Science Mission Directorate (SMD), but for all of NASA.

  2. Putting the five-factor model into context: evidence linking big five traits to narrative identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggatt, Peter

    2006-10-01

    The study examined relationships between the Big Five personality traits and thematic content extracted from self-reports of life history data. One hundred and five "mature age" university students (M=30.1 years) completed the NEO PI-R trait measure, and the Personality Web Protocol. The protocol examines constituents of identity by asking participants to describe 24 key "attachments" from their life histories (significant events, people, places, objects, and possessions). Participants sorted these attachments into clusters and provided a self-descriptive label for each cluster (e.g., "adventurous self"). It was predicted that the thematic content of these cluster labels would be systematically related to Big Five trait scores (e.g., that labels referring to strength or positive emotions would be linked to Extraversion). The hypothesized links were obtained for each of the Big Five trait domains except Conscientiousness. Results are discussed with a view to broadening our understanding of the Five-Factor Model in relation to units of personality other than traits.

  3. PDF Estimation and Liquid Water Content Based Attenuation Modeling for Fog in Terrestrial FSO Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Muhammad

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial Free-space optical communication (FSO links have yet to achieve a mass market success due to the ever elusive 99.999% availability requirement. The terrestrial FSO links are heavily affected by atmospheric fog. To design systems which can achieve high availability and reliability in the presence of fog, accurate and better models of fog attenuation need to be developed. The current article puts forth appropriate probability density function estimates for received signal strength (hereafter RSS under fog conditions, where variations in the RSS during foggy events have been statistically characterized. Moreover, from the surface observations of fog density, liquid water content (hereafter LWC of fog is estimated. The actual measured optical attenuations are then compared with the optical attenuations estimated from LWC. The results presented suggest that fog density measurements carried out are accurate representation of the fog intensity and the attenuation predictions obtained by the LWC estimate match the actual measured optical attenuations. This suggests that the LWC is a useful parameter besides visibility range to predict optical attenuations in the presence of hydrometeors.

  4. Estimating the Burden of Medically Attended Norovirus Gastroenteritis: Modeling Linked Primary Care and Hospitalization Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Thomas; Cattaert, Tom; Harris, John; Lopman, Ben; Tam, Clarence C; Ferreira, Germano

    2017-11-15

    Norovirus is the leading cause of community-acquired and nosocomial acute gastroenteritis. Routine testing for norovirus is seldom undertaken, and diagnosis is mainly based on presenting symptoms. This makes understanding the burden of medically attended norovirus-attributable gastroenteritis (MA-NGE) and targeting care and prevention strategies challenging. We used linked population-based healthcare datasets (Clinical Practice Research Datalink General Practice OnLine Database linked with Hospital Episode Statistics Admitted Patient Care) to model the incidence of MA-NGE associated with primary care consultations or hospitalizations according to age groups in England in the period July 2007-June 2013. Mean annual incidence rates of MA-NGE were 4.9/1000 person-years and 0.7/1000 person-years for episodes involving primary care or hospitalizations, respectively. Incidence rates were highest in children aged gastroenteritis hospitalization rates were second highest in adults aged >65 years (1.7/1000 person-years). In this particular study, the burden of MA-NGE estimated from healthcare datasets was higher than previously estimated in small cohort studies in England. Routinely collected primary care and hospitalization datasets are useful resources to estimate and monitor the burden of MA-NGE in a population over time. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  5. Modeling and characterization of VCSEL-based avionics full-duplex ethernet (AFDX) gigabit links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Khadijetou S.; Rissons, A.; Gambardella, E.; Bajon, D.; Mollier, J.-C.

    2008-02-01

    Low cost and intrinsic performances of 850 nm Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) compared to Light Emitting Diodes make them very attractive for high speed and short distances data communication links through optical fibers. Weight saving and Electromagnetic Interference withstanding requirements have led to the need of a reliable solution to improve existing avionics high speed buses (e.g. AFDX) up to 1Gbps over 100m. To predict and optimize the performance of the link, the physical behavior of the VCSEL must be well understood. First, a theoretical study is performed through the rate equations adapted to VCSEL in large signal modulation. Averaged turn-on delays and oscillation effects are analytically computed and analyzed for different values of the on- and off state currents. This will affect the eye pattern, timing jitter and Bit Error Rate (BER) of the signal that must remain within IEEE 802.3 standard limits. In particular, the off-state current is minimized below the threshold to allow the highest possible Extinction Ratio. At this level, the spontaneous emission is dominating and leads to significant turn-on delay, turn-on jitter and bit pattern effects. Also, the transverse multimode behavior of VCSELs, caused by Spatial Hole Burning leads to some dispersion in the fiber and degradation of BER. VCSEL to Multimode Fiber coupling model is provided for prediction and optimization of modal dispersion. Lastly, turn-on delay measurements are performed on a real mock-up and results are compared with calculations.

  6. Mathematical modeling of cross-linking monomer elution from resin-based dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlovic, Dragica; Radisic, Marina; Lausevic, Mila; Zivkovic, Slavoljub; Miletic, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Elution of potentially toxic substances, including monomers, from resin-based dental composites may affect the biocompatibility of these materials in clinical conditions. In addition to the amounts of eluted monomers, mathematical modeling of elution kinetics reveals composite restorations as potential chronic sources of leachable monomers. The aim of this work was to experimentally quantify elution of main cross-linking monomers from four commercial composites and offer a mathematical model of elution kinetics. Composite samples (n = 7 per group) of Filtek Supreme XT (3M ESPE), Tetric EvoCeram (Ivoclar Vivadent), Admira (Voco), and Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE) were prepared in 2-mm thick Teflon moulds and cured with halogen or light-emitting diode light. Monomer elution in ethanol and water was analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography up to 28 days postimmersion. The mathematical model was expressed as a sum of two exponential regression functions representing the first-order kinetics law. Elution kinetics in all cases followed the same mathematical model though differences in rate constants as well as the extent of monomer elution were material-, LCU-, medium-dependent. The proposed mechanisms of elution indicate fast elution from surface and subsurface layers and up to 100 times slower monomer extraction from the bulk polymer. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A Linked Simulation-Optimization (LSO) Model for Conjunctive Irrigation Management using Clonal Selection Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sirajul; Talukdar, Bipul

    2016-09-01

    A Linked Simulation-Optimization (LSO) model based on a Clonal Selection Algorithm (CSA) was formulated for application in conjunctive irrigation management. A series of measures were considered for reducing the computational burden associated with the LSO approach. Certain modifications were incurred to the formulated CSA, so as to decrease the number of function evaluations. In addition, a simple problem specific code for a two dimensional groundwater flow simulation model was developed. The flow model was further simplified by a novel approach of area reduction, in order to save computational time in simulation. The LSO model was applied in the irrigation command of the Pagladiya Dam Project in Assam, India. With a view to evaluate the performance of the CSA, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) was used as a comparison base. The results from the CSA compared well with those from the GA. In fact, the CSA was found to consume less computational time than the GA while converging to the optimal solution, due to the modifications incurred in it.

  8. Variable speed limit strategies analysis with link transmission model on urban expressway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shubin; Cao, Danni

    2018-02-01

    The variable speed limit (VSL) is a kind of active traffic management method. Most of the strategies are used in the expressway traffic flow control in order to ensure traffic safety. However, the urban expressway system is the main artery, carrying most traffic pressure. It has similar traffic characteristics with the expressways between cities. In this paper, the improved link transmission model (LTM) combined with VSL strategies is proposed, based on the urban expressway network. The model can simulate the movement of the vehicles and the shock wave, and well balance the relationship between the amount of calculation and accuracy. Furthermore, the optimal VSL strategy can be proposed based on the simulation method. It can provide management strategies for managers. Finally, a simple example is given to illustrate the model and method. The selected indexes are the average density, the average speed and the average flow on the traffic network in the simulation. The simulation results show that the proposed model and method are feasible. The VSL strategy can effectively alleviate traffic congestion in some cases, and greatly promote the efficiency of the transportation system.

  9. Variable pore connectivity model linking gas diffusivity and air-phase tortuosity to soil matric potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    - and intraaggregate pore regions of aggregated soils. We further suggest that the new model with parameter values of X* = 1.7 and A = 0 may be used for upper limit Dp/Do predictions in risk assessments of, e.g., fluxes of toxic volatile organics from soil to indoor air at polluted soil sites....... of a variable pore connectivity factor, X, as a function of soil matric potential, expressed as pF (=log |−ψ|), for pF values ranging from 1.0 to 3.5. The new model takes the form of X = X* (F/F*)A with F = 1 + pF−1, where X* is the pore network tortuosity at reference F (F*) and A is a model parameter...... that accounts for water blockage. The X–pF relation can be linked to drained pore size to explain the lower probability of the larger but far fewer air-filled pores at lower pF effectively interconnecting and promoting gas diffusion. The model with X* = 2 and A = 0.5 proved promising for generalizing Dp...

  10. MARKAL-MACRO: A linked model for energy-economy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manne, A.S.; Wene, C.O.

    1992-02-01

    MARKAL-MACRO is an experiment in model linkage for energy and economy analysis. This new tool is intended as an improvement over existing methods for energy strategy assessment. It is designed specifically for estimating the costs and analyzing the technologies proposed for reducing environmental risks such as global climate change or regional air pollution. The greenhouse gas debate illustrates the usefulness of linked energy-economy models. A central issue is the coupling between economic growth, the level of energy demands, and the development of an energy system to supply these demands. The debate is often connected with alternative modeling approaches. The competing philosophies may be labeled ''top-down macroeconomic'' and ''bottom-up engineering'' perspectives. MARKAL is a systems engineering (physical process) analysis built on the concept of a Reference Energy System (RES). MARKAL is solved by means of dynamic linear programming. In most applications, the end use demands are fixed, and an economically efficient solution is obtained by minimizing the present value of energy system's costs throughout the planning horizon. MACRO is a macroeconomic model with an aggregated view of long-term economic growth. The basis input factors of production are capital, labor and individual forms of energy. MACRO is solved by nonlinear optimization

  11. A Behavioral Genetic Model of the Mechanisms Underlying the Link Between Obesity and Symptoms of ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patte, Karen A; Davis, Caroline A; Levitan, Robert D; Kaplan, Allan S; Carter-Major, Jacqueline; Kennedy, James L

    2016-01-21

    The ADHD-obesity link has been suggested to result from a shared underlying basis of suboptimal dopamine (DA); however, this theory conflicts evidence that an amplified DA signal increases the risk for overeating and weight gain. A model was tested in which ADHD symptoms, predicted by hypodopaminergic functioning in the prefrontal cortex, in combination with an enhanced appetitive drive, predict hedonic eating and, in turn, higher body mass index (BMI). DRD2 and DRD4 markers were genotyped. The model was tested using structural equation modeling in a nonclinical sample (N = 421 adults). The model was a good fit to the data. Controlling for education, all parameter estimates were significant, except for the DRD4-ADHD symptom pathway. The significant indirect effect indicates that overeating mediated the ADHD symptoms-BMI association. Results support the hypothesis that overeating and elevated DA in the ventral striatum-representative of a greater reward response-contribute to the ADHD symptom-obesity relationship. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. A review of the evidence linking adult attachment theory and chronic pain: presenting a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Pamela; Ownsworth, Tamara; Strong, Jenny

    2008-03-01

    It is now well established that pain is a multidimensional phenomenon, affected by a gamut of psychosocial and biological variables. According to diathesis-stress models of chronic pain, some individuals are more vulnerable to developing disability following acute pain because they possess particular psychosocial vulnerabilities which interact with physical pathology to impact negatively upon outcome. Attachment theory, a theory of social and personality development, has been proposed as a comprehensive developmental model of pain, implicating individual adult attachment pattern in the ontogenesis and maintenance of chronic pain. The present paper reviews and critically appraises studies which link adult attachment theory with chronic pain. Together, these papers offer support for the role of insecure attachment as a diathesis (or vulnerability) for problematic adjustment to pain. The Attachment-Diathesis Model of Chronic Pain developed from this body of literature, combines adult attachment theory with the diathesis-stress approach to chronic pain. The evidence presented in this review, and the associated model, advances our understanding of the developmental origins of chronic pain conditions, with potential application in guiding early pain intervention and prevention efforts, as well as tailoring interventions to suit specific patient needs.

  13. Integrating Engineering Data Systems for NASA Spaceflight Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Robert E.; Tollinger, Irene; Bell, David G.; Berrios, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has a large range of custom-built and commercial data systems to support spaceflight programs. Some of the systems are re-used by many programs and projects over time. Management and systems engineering processes require integration of data across many of these systems, a difficult problem given the widely diverse nature of system interfaces and data models. This paper describes an ongoing project to use a central data model with a web services architecture to support the integration and access of linked data across engineering functions for multiple NASA programs. The work involves the implementation of a web service-based middleware system called Data Aggregator to bring together data from a variety of systems to support space exploration. Data Aggregator includes a central data model registry for storing and managing links between the data in disparate systems. Initially developed for NASA's Constellation Program needs, Data Aggregator is currently being repurposed to support the International Space Station Program and new NASA projects with processes that involve significant aggregating and linking of data. This change in user needs led to development of a more streamlined data model registry for Data Aggregator in order to simplify adding new project application data as well as standardization of the Data Aggregator query syntax to facilitate cross-application querying by client applications. This paper documents the approach from a set of stand-alone engineering systems from which data are manually retrieved and integrated, to a web of engineering data systems from which the latest data are automatically retrieved and more quickly and accurately integrated. This paper includes the lessons learned through these efforts, including the design and development of a service-oriented architecture and the evolution of the data model registry approaches as the effort continues to evolve and adapt to support multiple NASA programs and priorities.

  14. Using Ensemble Short-Term Initialized Coupled NASA GEOS5 Climate Model Integrations to Study Convective Bias Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Charlie; Robertson, Franklin; Molod, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The representation of convective processes, particularly deep convection in the tropics, remains a persistent problem in climate models. In fact structural biases in the distribution of tropical rainfall in the CMIP5 models is hardly different than that of the CMIP3 versions. Given that regional climate change at higher latitudes is sensitive to the configuration of tropical forcing, this persistent bias is a major issue for the credibility of climate change projections. In this study we use model output from integrations of the NASA Global Earth Observing System Five (GEOS5) climate modeling system to study the evolution of biases in the location and intensity of convective processes. We take advantage of a series of hindcast experiments done in support of the US North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) initiative. For these experiments a nine-month forecast using a coupled model configuration is made approximately every five days over the past 30 years. Each forecast is started with an updated analysis of the ocean, atmosphere and land states. For a given calendar month we have approximately 180 forecasts with daily means of various quantities. These forecasts can be averaged to essentially remove "weather scales" and highlight systematic errors as they evolve. Our primary question is to ask how the spatial structure of daily mean precipitation over the tropics evolves from the initial state and what physical processes are involved. Errors in parameterized convection, various water and energy fluxes and the divergent circulation are found to set up on fast time scales (order five days) compared to errors in the ocean, although SST changes can be non-negligible over that time. For the month of June the difference between forecast day five versus day zero precipitation looks quite similar to the difference between the June precipitation climatology and that from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). We focus much of our analysis on the influence of

  15. Modeling Flight: The Role of Dynamically Scaled Free-Flight Models in Support of NASA's Aerospace Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The state of the art in aeronautical engineering has been continually accelerated by the development of advanced analysis and design tools. Used in the early design stages for aircraft and spacecraft, these methods have provided a fundamental understanding of physical phenomena and enabled designers to predict and analyze critical characteristics of new vehicles, including the capability to control or modify unsatisfactory behavior. For example, the relatively recent emergence and routine use of extremely powerful digital computer hardware and software has had a major impact on design capabilities and procedures. Sophisticated new airflow measurement and visualization systems permit the analyst to conduct micro- and macro-studies of properties within flow fields on and off the surfaces of models in advanced wind tunnels. Trade studies of the most efficient geometrical shapes for aircraft can be conducted with blazing speed within a broad scope of integrated technical disciplines, and the use of sophisticated piloted simulators in the vehicle development process permits the most important segment of operations the human pilot to make early assessments of the acceptability of the vehicle for its intended mission. Knowledgeable applications of these tools of the trade dramatically reduce risk and redesign, and increase the marketability and safety of new aerospace vehicles. Arguably, one of the more viable and valuable design tools since the advent of flight has been testing of subscale models. As used herein, the term "model" refers to a physical article used in experimental analyses of a larger full-scale vehicle. The reader is probably aware that many other forms of mathematical and computer-based models are also used in aerospace design; however, such topics are beyond the intended scope of this document. Model aircraft have always been a source of fascination, inspiration, and recreation for humans since the earliest days of flight. Within the scientific

  16. Linking sociological with physiological data: the model of effort-reward imbalance at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, J; Klein, D; Voigt, K H

    1997-01-01

    While socio-epidemiologic studies documented impressive associations of indicators of chronic psychosocial stress with cardiovascular (c.v.) disease evidence on patho-physiologic processes is still limited. In this regard, the concept of heightened c.v. and hormonal reactivity (RE) to mental stress was proposed and explored. While this concept is a static one we suggest a more dynamic two-stage model of RE where recurrent high responsiveness (stage 1) in the long run results in attenuated, reduced maximal RE due to functional adaptation (stage 2). We present results of an indirect test of this hypothesis in a group of 68 healthy middle-aged men undergoing a modified Stroop Test: in men suffering from high chronic work stress in terms of effort-reward imbalance significantly reduced RE in heart rate, adrenaline and cortisol was found after adjusting for relevant confounders. In conclusion, results underscore the potential of linking sociological with physiological data in stress research.

  17. Gene therapy studies in a canine model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsburg, Peter J; De Ravin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L; Sorrentino, Brian P; Burtner, Christopher; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-03-01

    Since the occurrence of T cell leukemias in the original human γ-retroviral gene therapy trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), considerable effort has been devoted to developing safer vectors. This review summarizes gene therapy studies performed in a canine model of XSCID to evaluate the efficacy of γ-retroviral, lentiviral, and foamy viral vectors for treating XSCID and a novel method of vector delivery. These studies demonstrate that durable T cell reconstitution and thymopoiesis with no evidence of any serious adverse events and, in contrast to the human XSCID patients, sustained marking in myeloid cells and B cells with reconstitution of normal humoral immune function can be achieved for up to 5 years without any pretreatment conditioning. The presence of sustained levels of gene-marked T cells, B cells, and more importantly myeloid cells for almost 5 years is highly suggestive of transduction of either multipotent hematopoietic stem cells or very primitive committed progenitors.

  18. Energy-Aware Topology Evolution Model with Link and Node Deletion in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojuan Luo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the complex network theory, a new topological evolving model is proposed. In the evolution of the topology of sensor networks, the energy-aware mechanism is taken into account, and the phenomenon of change of the link and node in the network is discussed. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation are conducted to explore the topology characteristics and network performance with different node energy distribution. We find that node energy distribution has the weak effect on the degree distribution P(k that evolves into the scale-free state, nodes with more energy carry more connections, and degree correlation is nontrivial disassortative. Moreover, the results show that, when nodes energy is more heterogeneous, the network is better clustered and enjoys higher performance in terms of the network efficiency and the average path length for transmitting data.

  19. Assessing the potential of using telecommunication microwave links in urban drainage modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fencl, M; Rieckermann, J; Schleiss, M; Stránský, D; Bareš, V

    2013-01-01

    The ability to predict the runoff response of an urban catchment to rainfall is crucial for managing drainage systems effectively and controlling discharges from urban areas. In this paper we assess the potential of commercial microwave links (MWL) to capture the spatio-temporal rainfall dynamics and thus improve urban rainfall-runoff modelling. Specifically, we perform numerical experiments with virtual rainfall fields and compare the results of MWL rainfall reconstructions to those of rain gauge (RG) observations. In a case study, we are able to show that MWL networks in urban areas are sufficiently dense to provide good information on spatio-temporal rainfall variability and can thus considerably improve pipe flow prediction, even in small subcatchments. In addition, the better spatial coverage also improves the control of discharges from urban areas. This is especially beneficial for heavy rainfall, which usually has a high spatial variability that cannot be accurately captured by RG point measurements.

  20. Neonatal estradiol stimulation prevents epilepsy in Arx model of X-linked infantile spasms syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivetti, Pedro R; Maheshwari, Atul; Noebels, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-22

    Infantile spasms are a catastrophic form of pediatric epilepsy with inadequate treatment. In patients, mutation of ARX, a transcription factor selectively expressed in neuronal precursors and adult inhibitory interneurons, impairs cell migration and causes a major inherited subtype of the disease X-linked infantile spasms syndrome. Using an animal model, the Arx((GCG)10+7) mouse, we determined that brief estradiol (E2) administration during early postnatal development prevented spasms in infancy and seizures in adult mutants. E2 was ineffective when delivered after puberty or 30 days after birth. Early E2 treatment altered mRNA levels of three downstream targets of Arx (Shox2, Ebf3, and Lgi1) and restored depleted interneuron populations without increasing GABAergic synaptic density. Postnatal E2 treatment may induce lasting transcriptional changes that lead to enduring disease modification and could potentially serve as a therapy for inherited interneuronopathies.

  1. Linking state-and-transition simulation and timber supply models for forest biomass production scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza, Jennifer; Abt, Robert C.; McKerrow, Alexa; Collazo, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    We linked state-and-transition simulation models (STSMs) with an economics-based timber supply model to examine landscape dynamics in North Carolina through 2050 for three scenarios of forest biomass production. Forest biomass could be an important source of renewable energy in the future, but there is currently much uncertainty about how biomass production would impact landscapes. In the southeastern US, if forests become important sources of biomass for bioenergy, we expect increased land-use change and forest management. STSMs are ideal for simulating these landscape changes, but the amounts of change will depend on drivers such as timber prices and demand for forest land, which are best captured with forest economic models. We first developed state-and-transition model pathways in the ST-Sim software platform for 49 vegetation and land-use types that incorporated each expected type of landscape change. Next, for the three biomass production scenarios, the SubRegional Timber Supply Model (SRTS) was used to determine the annual areas of thinning and harvest in five broad forest types, as well as annual areas converted among those forest types, agricultural, and urban lands. The SRTS output was used to define area targets for STSMs in ST-Sim under two scenarios of biomass production and one baseline, business-as-usual scenario. We show that ST-Sim output matched SRTS targets in most cases. Landscape dynamics results indicate that, compared with the baseline scenario, forest biomass production leads to more forest and, specifically, more intensively managed forest on the landscape by 2050. Thus, the STSMs, informed by forest economics models, provide important information about potential landscape effects of bioenergy production.

  2. ModelCenter-Integrated Reduced Order Multi-fidelity Optimization Scheme for NASA MDAO Framework, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During Phase I of this effort, ZONA Technology, Inc. significantly improved the medium fidelity design and analysis capability of NASA's MDAO architecture by...

  3. Coupled dynamics of node and link states in complex networks: a model for language competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carro, Adrián; Toral, Raúl; Miguel, Maxi San

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by language competition processes, we present a model of coupled evolution of node and link states. In particular, we focus on the interplay between the use of a language and the preference or attitude of the speakers towards it, which we model, respectively, as a property of the interactions between speakers (a link state) and as a property of the speakers themselves (a node state). Furthermore, we restrict our attention to the case of two socially equivalent languages and to socially inspired network topologies based on a mechanism of triadic closure. As opposed to most of the previous literature, where language extinction is an inevitable outcome of the dynamics, we find a broad range of possible asymptotic configurations, which we classify as: frozen extinction states, frozen coexistence states, and dynamically trapped coexistence states. Moreover, metastable coexistence states with very long survival times and displaying a non-trivial dynamics are found to be abundant. Interestingly, a system size scaling analysis shows, on the one hand, that the probability of language extinction vanishes exponentially for increasing system sizes and, on the other hand, that the time scale of survival of the non-trivial dynamical metastable states increases linearly with the size of the system. Thus, non-trivial dynamical coexistence is the only possible outcome for large enough systems. Finally, we show how this coexistence is characterized by one of the languages becoming clearly predominant while the other one becomes increasingly confined to ‘ghetto-like’ structures: small groups of bilingual speakers arranged in triangles, with a strong preference for the minority language, and using it for their intra-group interactions while they switch to the predominant language for communications with the rest of the population. (paper)

  4. Linking river management to species conservation using dynamic landscape scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Mary C.; Buell, Gary R.; Hay, Lauren E.; Hughes, W. Brian; Jacobson, Robert B.; Jones, John W.; Jones, S.A.; LaFontaine, Jacob H.; Odom, Kenneth R.; Peterson, James T.; Riley, Jeffrey W.; Schindler, J. Stephen; Shea, C.; Weaver, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to conserve stream and river biota could benefit from tools that allow managers to evaluate landscape-scale changes in species distributions in response to water management decisions. We present a framework and methods for integrating hydrology, geographic context and metapopulation processes to simulate effects of changes in streamflow on fish occupancy dynamics across a landscape of interconnected stream segments. We illustrate this approach using a 482 km2 catchment in the southeastern US supporting 50 or more stream fish species. A spatially distributed, deterministic and physically based hydrologic model is used to simulate daily streamflow for sub-basins composing the catchment. We use geographic data to characterize stream segments with respect to channel size, confinement, position and connectedness within the stream network. Simulated streamflow dynamics are then applied to model fish metapopulation dynamics in stream segments, using hypothesized effects of streamflow magnitude and variability on population processes, conditioned by channel characteristics. The resulting time series simulate spatially explicit, annual changes in species occurrences or assemblage metrics (e.g. species richness) across the catchment as outcomes of management scenarios. Sensitivity analyses using alternative, plausible links between streamflow components and metapopulation processes, or allowing for alternative modes of fish dispersal, demonstrate large effects of ecological uncertainty on model outcomes and highlight needed research and monitoring. Nonetheless, with uncertainties explicitly acknowledged, dynamic, landscape-scale simulations may prove useful for quantitatively comparing river management alternatives with respect to species conservation.

  5. Technological Innovations from NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Neal R.

    2006-01-01

    The challenge of human space exploration places demands on technology that push concepts and development to the leading edge. In biotechnology and biomedical equipment development, NASA science has been the seed for numerous innovations, many of which are in the commercial arena. The biotechnology effort has led to rational drug design, analytical equipment, and cell culture and tissue engineering strategies. Biomedical research and development has resulted in medical devices that enable diagnosis and treatment advances. NASA Biomedical developments are exemplified in the new laser light scattering analysis for cataracts, the axial flow left ventricular-assist device, non contact electrocardiography, and the guidance system for LASIK surgery. Many more developments are in progress. NASA will continue to advance technologies, incorporating new approaches from basic and applied research, nanotechnology, computational modeling, and database analyses.

  6. Process-based monitoring and modeling of Karst springs - Linking intrinsic to specific vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epting, Jannis; Page, Rebecca M; Auckenthaler, Adrian; Huggenberger, Peter

    2018-06-01

    The presented work illustrates to what extent field investigations as well as monitoring and modeling approaches are necessary to understand the high discharge dynamics and vulnerability of Karst springs. In complex settings the application of 3D geological models is essential for evaluating the vulnerability of Karst systems. They allow deriving information on catchment characteristics, as the geometry of aquifers and aquitards as well as their displacements along faults. A series of Karst springs in northwestern Switzerland were compared and Karst system dynamics with respect to qualitative and quantitative issues were evaluated. The main objective of the studies was to combine information of catchment characteristics and data from novel monitoring systems (physicochemical and microbiological parameters) to assess the intrinsic vulnerability of Karst springs to microbiological contamination with simulated spring discharges derived from numerical modeling (linear storage models). The numerically derived relation of fast and slow groundwater flow components enabled us to relate different sources of groundwater recharge and to characterize the dynamics of the Karst springs. Our study illustrates that comparably simple model-setups were able to reproduce the overall dynamic intrinsic vulnerability of several Karst systems and that one of the most important processes involved was the temporal variation of groundwater recharge (precipitation, evapotranspiration and snow melt). Furthermore, we make a first attempt on how to link intrinsic to specific vulnerability of Karst springs, which involves activities within the catchment area as human impacts from agriculture and settlements. Likewise, by a more detailed representation of system dynamics the influence of surface water, which is impacted by release events from storm sewers, infiltrating into the Karst system, could be considered. Overall, we demonstrate that our approach can be the basis for a more flexible and

  7. Dynamic root growth and architecture responses to limiting nutrient availability: linking physiological models and experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Johannes A; Schurr, Ulrich; Fiorani, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the study of root phenotypic plasticity in response to sub-optimal environmental factors and the genetic control of these responses have received renewed attention. As a path to increased productivity, in particular for low fertility soils, several applied research projects worldwide target the improvement of crop root traits both in plant breeding and biotechnology contexts. To assist these tasks and address the challenge of optimizing root growth and architecture for enhanced mineral resource use, the development of realistic simulation models is of great importance. We review this research field from a modeling perspective focusing particularly on nutrient acquisition strategies for crop production on low nitrogen and low phosphorous soils. Soil heterogeneity and the dynamics of nutrient availability in the soil pose a challenging environment in which plants have to forage efficiently for nutrients in order to maintain their internal nutrient homeostasis throughout their life cycle. Mathematical models assist in understanding plant growth strategies and associated root phenes that have potential to be tested and introduced in physiological breeding programs. At the same time, we stress that it is necessary to carefully consider model assumptions and development from a whole plant-resource allocation perspective and to introduce or refine modules simulating explicitly root growth and architecture dynamics through ontogeny with reference to key factors that constrain root growth. In this view it is important to understand negative feedbacks such as plant-plant competition. We conclude by briefly touching on available and developing technologies for quantitative root phenotyping from lab to field, from quantification of partial root profiles in the field to 3D reconstruction of whole root systems. Finally, we discuss how these approaches can and should be tightly linked to modeling to explore the root phenome. © 2013.

  8. A conceptual model linking functional gene expression and reductive dechlorination rates of chlorinated ethenes in clay rich groundwater sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jacob; Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    We used current knowledge of cellular processes involved in reductive dechlorination to develop a conceptual model to describe the regulatory system of dechlorination at the cell level; the model links bacterial growth and substrate consumption to the abundance of messenger RNA of functional gene...

  9. An Interpersonal Circumplex Model of Children's Social Goals: Links with Peer-Reported Behavior and Sociometric Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojanen, Tiina; Gronroos, Matti; Salmivalli, Christina

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present research was to develop an assessment model for children's social goals. The aims were (a) to fit children's social goals to a circumplex model and to examine links between goals and peer-reported social behaviors (aggression, withdrawal, and prosocial behavior) in a sample of 276 participants (134 girls, 11- to…

  10. Linking changes in epithelial morphogenesis to cancer mutations using computational modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna A Rejniak

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Most tumors arise from epithelial tissues, such as mammary glands and lobules, and their initiation is associated with the disruption of a finely defined epithelial architecture. Progression from intraductal to invasive tumors is related to genetic mutations that occur at a subcellular level but manifest themselves as functional and morphological changes at the cellular and tissue scales, respectively. Elevated proliferation and loss of epithelial polarization are the two most noticeable changes in cell phenotypes during this process. As a result, many three-dimensional cultures of tumorigenic clones show highly aberrant morphologies when compared to regular epithelial monolayers enclosing the hollow lumen (acini. In order to shed light on phenotypic changes associated with tumor cells, we applied the bio-mechanical IBCell model of normal epithelial morphogenesis quantitatively matched to data acquired from the non-tumorigenic human mammary cell line, MCF10A. We then used a high-throughput simulation study to reveal how modifications in model parameters influence changes in the simulated architecture. Three parameters have been considered in our study, which define cell sensitivity to proliferative, apoptotic and cell-ECM adhesive cues. By mapping experimental morphologies of four MCF10A-derived cell lines carrying different oncogenic mutations onto the model parameter space, we identified changes in cellular processes potentially underlying structural modifications of these mutants. As a case study, we focused on MCF10A cells expressing an oncogenic mutant HER2-YVMA to quantitatively assess changes in cell doubling time, cell apoptotic rate, and cell sensitivity to ECM accumulation when compared to the parental non-tumorigenic cell line. By mapping in vitro mutant morphologies onto in silico ones we have generated a means of linking the morphological and molecular scales via computational modeling. Thus, IBCell in combination with 3D acini

  11. The role of ecological models in linking ecological risk assessment to ecosystem services in agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galic, Nika; Schmolke, Amelie; Forbes, Valery; Baveco, Hans; van den Brink, Paul J

    2012-01-15

    Agricultural practices are essential for sustaining the human population, but at the same time they can directly disrupt ecosystem functioning. Ecological risk assessment (ERA) aims to estimate possible adverse effects of human activities on ecosystems and their parts. Current ERA practices, however, incorporate very little ecology and base the risk estimates on the results of standard tests with several standard species. The main obstacles for a more ecologically relevant ERA are the lack of clear protection goals and the inherent complexity of ecosystems that is hard to approach empirically. In this paper, we argue that the ecosystem services framework offers an opportunity to define clear and ecologically relevant protection goals. At the same time, ecological models provide the tools to address ecological complexity to the degree needed to link measurement endpoints and ecosystem services, and to quantify service provision and possible adverse effects from human activities. We focus on the ecosystem services relevant for agroecosystem functioning, including pollination, biocontrol and eutrophication effects and present modeling studies relevant for quantification of each of the services. The challenges of the ecosystem services approach are discussed as well as the limitations of ecological models in the context of ERA. A broad, multi-stakeholder dialog is necessary to aid the definition of protection goals in terms of services delivered by ecosystems and their parts. The need to capture spatio-temporal dynamics and possible interactions among service providers pose challenges for ecological models as a basis for decision making. However, we argue that both fields are advancing quickly and can prove very valuable in achieving more ecologically relevant ERA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A biological-based model that links genomic instability, bystander effects, and adaptive response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper links genomic instability, bystander effects, and adaptive response in mammalian cell communities via a novel biological-based, dose-response model called NEOTRANS 3 . The model is an extension of the NEOTRANS 2 model that addressed stochastic effects (genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) associated with brief exposure to low radiation doses. With both models, ionizing radiation produces DNA damage in cells that can be associated with varying degrees of genomic instability. Cells with persistent problematic instability (PPI) are mutants that arise via misrepair of DNA damage. Progeny of PPI cells also have PPI and can undergo spontaneous neoplastic transformation. Unlike NEOTRANS 2 , with NEOTRANS 3 newly induced mutant PPI cells and their neoplastically transformed progeny can be suppressed via our previously introduced protective apoptosis-mediated (PAM) process, which can be activated by low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. However, with NEOTRANS 3 (which like NEOTRANS 2 involves cross-talk between nongenomically compromised [e.g., nontransformed, nonmutants] and genomically compromised [e.g., mutants, transformants, etc.] cells), it is assumed that PAM is only activated over a relatively narrow, dose-rate-dependent interval (D PAM ,D off ); where D PAM is a small stochastic activation threshold, and D off is the stochastic dose above which PAM does not occur. PAM cooperates with activated normal DNA repair and with activated normal apoptosis in guarding against genomic instability. Normal repair involves both error-free repair and misrepair components. Normal apoptosis and the error-free component of normal repair protect mammals by preventing the occurrence of mutant cells. PAM selectively removes mutant cells arising via the misrepair component of normal repair, selectively removes existing neoplastically transformed cells, and probably selectively removes other genomically compromised cells when it is activated

  13. A model linking clinical workforce skill mix planning to health and health care dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonnell Geoff

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an attempt to devise a simpler computable tool to assist workforce planners in determining what might be an appropriate mix of health service skills, our discussion led us to consider the implications of skill mixing and workforce composition beyond the 'stock and flow' approach of much workforce planning activity. Methods Taking a dynamic systems approach, we were able to address the interactions, delays and feedbacks that influence the balance between the major components of health and health care. Results We linked clinical workforce requirements to clinical workforce workload, taking into account the requisite facilities, technologies, other material resources and their funding to support clinical care microsystems; gave recognition to productivity and quality issues; took cognisance of policies, governance and power concerns in the establishment and operation of the health care system; and, going back to the individual, gave due attention to personal behaviour and biology within the socio-political family environment. Conclusion We have produced the broad endogenous systems model of health and health care which will enable human resource planners to operate within real world variables. We are now considering the development of simple, computable national versions of this model.

  14. A model linking clinical workforce skill mix planning to health and health care dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masnick, Keith; McDonnell, Geoff

    2010-04-30

    In an attempt to devise a simpler computable tool to assist workforce planners in determining what might be an appropriate mix of health service skills, our discussion led us to consider the implications of skill mixing and workforce composition beyond the 'stock and flow' approach of much workforce planning activity. Taking a dynamic systems approach, we were able to address the interactions, delays and feedbacks that influence the balance between the major components of health and health care. We linked clinical workforce requirements to clinical workforce workload, taking into account the requisite facilities, technologies, other material resources and their funding to support clinical care microsystems; gave recognition to productivity and quality issues; took cognisance of policies, governance and power concerns in the establishment and operation of the health care system; and, going back to the individual, gave due attention to personal behaviour and biology within the socio-political family environment. We have produced the broad endogenous systems model of health and health care which will enable human resource planners to operate within real world variables. We are now considering the development of simple, computable national versions of this model.

  15. ON THE TRANSITIONAL DISK CLASS: LINKING OBSERVATIONS OF T TAURI STARS AND PHYSICAL DISK MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espaillat, C.; Andrews, S.; Qi, C.; Wilner, D.; Ingleby, L.; Calvet, N.; Hernández, J.; Furlan, E.; D'Alessio, P.; Muzerolle, J.

    2012-01-01

    Two decades ago 'transitional disks' (TDs) described spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of T Tauri stars with small near-IR excesses, but significant mid- and far-IR excesses. Many inferred this indicated dust-free holes in disks possibly cleared by planets. Recently, this term has been applied disparately to objects whose Spitzer SEDs diverge from the expectations for a typical full disk (FD). Here, we use irradiated accretion disk models to fit the SEDs of 15 such disks in NGC 2068 and IC 348. One group has a 'dip' in infrared emission while the others' continuum emission decreases steadily at all wavelengths. We find that the former have an inner disk hole or gap at intermediate radii in the disk and we call these objects 'transitional disks' and 'pre-transitional disks' (PTDs), respectively. For the latter group, we can fit these SEDs with FD models and find that millimeter data are necessary to break the degeneracy between dust settling and disk mass. We suggest that the term 'transitional' only be applied to objects that display evidence for a radical change in the disk's radial structure. Using this definition, we find that TDs and PTDs tend to have lower mass accretion rates than FDs and that TDs have lower accretion rates than PTDs. These reduced accretion rates onto the star could be linked to forming planets. Future observations of TDs and PTDs will allow us to better quantify the signatures of planet formation in young disks.

  16. Splice-correcting oligonucleotides restore BTK function in X-linked agammaglobulinemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestas, Burcu; Moreno, Pedro M D; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Mohammad, Dara K; Saleh, Amer F; Sutlu, Tolga; Nordin, Joel Z; Guterstam, Peter; Gustafsson, Manuela O; Kharazi, Shabnam; Piątosa, Barbara; Roberts, Thomas C; Behlke, Mark A; Wood, Matthew J A; Gait, Michael J; Lundin, Karin E; El Andaloussi, Samir; Månsson, Robert; Berglöf, Anna; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C I Edvard

    2014-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is an inherited immunodeficiency that results from mutations within the gene encoding Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Many XLA-associated mutations affect splicing of BTK pre-mRNA and severely impair B cell development. Here, we assessed the potential of antisense, splice-correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs) targeting mutated BTK transcripts for treating XLA. Both the SCO structural design and chemical properties were optimized using 2'-O-methyl, locked nucleic acid, or phosphorodiamidate morpholino backbones. In order to have access to an animal model of XLA, we engineered a transgenic mouse that harbors a BAC with an authentic, mutated, splice-defective human BTK gene. BTK transgenic mice were bred onto a Btk knockout background to avoid interference of the orthologous mouse protein. Using this model, we determined that BTK-specific SCOs are able to correct aberrantly spliced BTK in B lymphocytes, including pro-B cells. Correction of BTK mRNA restored expression of functional protein, as shown both by enhanced lymphocyte survival and reestablished BTK activation upon B cell receptor stimulation. Furthermore, SCO treatment corrected splicing and restored BTK expression in primary cells from patients with XLA. Together, our data demonstrate that SCOs can restore BTK function and that BTK-targeting SCOs have potential as personalized medicine in patients with XLA.

  17. A model linking sources of stress to approach and avoidance coping styles of Turkish basketball referees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshel, Mark Howard; Sutarso, Toto; Ekmekci, Ridvan; Saraswati, Intan W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of this study was to externally validate and test a conceptual transient model involving six paths that linked sources of acute stress to avoidance and approach coping styles among Turkish basketball referees. The sample consisted of 125 Turkish basketball referees ranging in age from 18 to 36 years (mean = 25.58. σ = 3.69). The path analysis tested the relationships simultaneously from stressors, in consecutive order, distractions, subpar performance and verbal abuse, to coping styles, first both avoidance-cognitive and approach-cognitive, and then approach-behaviour. Results indicated that the model achieved a good fit and that all paths tested simultaneously were significant. The distractions stressor was positively related to subpar performance, which, in turn, was positively related to verbal abuse. Verbal abuse was negatively associated with an avoidance-cognitive coping style and positively related to the approach-cognitive coping style. The results also supported a crossover effect of both avoidance-cognitive and approach-cognitive on approach-behaviour. One implication of this study is that coping should be studied in naturally occurring stages, a process-oriented approach. Another implication is that approach and avoidance coping styles, each sub-divided into cognitive and behavioural categories, provide a meaningful framework which provides sports officials a coherent structure for learning and improving ways to cope with acute stress experienced during the contest.

  18. Linked Gauss-Diffusion processes for modeling a finite-size neuronal network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carfora, M F; Pirozzi, E

    2017-11-01

    A Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (LIF) model with stochastic current-based linkages is considered to describe the firing activity of neurons interacting in a (2×2)-size feed-forward network. In the subthreshold regime and under the assumption that no more than one spike is exchanged between coupled neurons, the stochastic evolution of the neuronal membrane voltage is subject to random jumps due to interactions in the network. Linked Gauss-Diffusion processes are proposed to describe this dynamics and to provide estimates of the firing probability density of each neuron. To this end, an iterated integral equation-based approach is applied to evaluate numerically the first passage time density of such processes through the firing threshold. Asymptotic approximations of the firing densities of surrounding neurons are used to obtain closed-form expressions for the mean of the involved processes and to simplify the numerical procedure. An extension of the model to an (N×N)-size network is also given. Histograms of firing times obtained by simulations of the LIF dynamics and numerical firings estimates are compared. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Trans-pacific dust transport: integrated analysis of NASA/CALIPSO and a global aerosol transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Eguchi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Detailed 3-D structures of Trans-Pacific Asian dust transport occurring during 5–15 May 2007 were investigated using the NASA/CALIOP vertical-resolved measurements and a three-dimensional aerosol model (SPRINTARS. Both CALIOP and SPRINTARS dust extinctions showed a good agreement along the way of the transport from the dust source regions across North Pacific into North America. A vertically two-layered dust distribution was observed over the northeastern Pacific and North America. The lower dust layer originated from a dust storm generated in the Gobi Desert on 5 May. It was transported at an altitude of around 4 km MSL and has mixed with Asian anthropogenic air pollutants during the course of transport. The upper dust layer mainly originated from a dust storm that occurred in the Taklimakan Desert 2–3 days after the Gobi dust storm generation. The upper dust cloud was transported in higher altitudes above the major clouds layer during the Trans-Pacific transport. It therefore has remained unmixed with the Asian air pollutants and almost unaffected by wet removal. The decay of its concentration level was small (only one-half after its long-distance transport crossing the Pacific. Our dust budget analysis revealed that the Asian dust flux passing through the longitude plane of 140° E was 2.1 Tg, and one third of that arrived North America. The cases analyzed in this study revealed that, while the Gobi Desert is an important source that can contribute to the long-range dust transport, the Taklimakan Desert appears to be another important source that can contribute to the dust transport occurring particularly at high altitudes.

  20. Impact of improved Greenland ice sheet surface representation in the NASA GISS ModelE2 GCM on simulated surface mass balance and regional climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, P. M.; LeGrande, A. N.; Fischer, E.; Tedesco, M.; Kelley, M.; Schmidt, G. A.; Fettweis, X.

    2017-12-01

    Towards achieving coupled simulations between the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE2 general circulation model (GCM) and ice sheet models (ISMs), improvements have been made to the representation of the ice sheet surface in ModelE2. These include a sub-grid-scale elevation class scheme, a multi-layer snow model, a time-variable surface albedo scheme, and adjustments to parameterization of sublimation/evaporation. These changes improve the spatial resolution and physical representation of the ice sheet surface such that the surface is represented at a level of detail closer to that of Regional Climate Models (RCMs). We assess the impact of these changes on simulated Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface mass balance (SMB). We also compare ModelE2 simulations in which winds have been nudged to match the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim reanalysis with simulations from the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) RCM forced by the same reanalysis. Adding surface elevation classes results in a much higher spatial resolution representation of the surface necessary for coupling with ISMs, but has a negligible impact on overall SMB. Implementing a variable surface albedo scheme increases melt by 100%, bringing it closer to melt simulated by MAR. Adjustments made to the representation of topography-influenced surface roughness length in ModelE2 reduce a positive bias in evaporation relative to MAR. We also examine the impact of changes to the GrIS surface on regional atmospheric and oceanic climate in coupled ocean-atmosphere simulations with ModelE2, finding a general warming of the Arctic due to a warmer GrIS, and a cooler North Atlantic in scenarios with doubled atmospheric CO2 relative to pre-industrial levels. The substantial influence of changes to the GrIS surface on the oceans and atmosphere highlight the importance of including these processes in the GCM, in view of potential feedbacks between the ice sheet

  1. Forging a link between mentoring and collaboration: a new training model for implementation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Douglas A; Baumann, Ana A; Carothers, Bobbi J; Landsverk, John; Proctor, Enola K

    2016-10-13

    publishing peer-reviewed papers. Statistical network models demonstrated that mentoring was strongly and significantly related to subsequent scientific collaboration, which supported a core design principle of the IRI. Future work should establish the link between mentoring and scientific productivity. These results may be of interest to team science, as they suggest the importance of mentoring for future team collaborations, as well as illustrate the utility of network analysis for studying team characteristics and activities.

  2. Collagenase-mediated tissue modeling of corneal ectasia and collagen cross-linking treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Cheng W; Sinha-Roy, Abhijit; Schoenfield, Lynn; McMahon, James T; Dupps, William J

    2012-04-30

    Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) is a method for modifying the natural history of keratoconus and other corneal ectatic diseases. The authors evaluated the use of collagenase for generating an experimental model of ectasia to evaluate the topographic effects of CXL interventions. Nine human corneoscleral specimens unsuitable for transplantation were used. After epithelial debridement, mounting, and pressurization on an artificial anterior chamber, a solution of 10 mg/mL collagenase type II with 15% dextran was applied to five corneas for three hours. Three of these corneas subsequently underwent riboflavin/UV-A CXL. Scheimpflug-based tomography was performed before collagenase exposure, after collagenase exposure, and after CXL to evaluate changes in maximum axial curvature of the anterior surface (K(max)) at three IOP levels. Results were compared to four control eyes exposed to dextran alone. A statistically significant increase in K(max) was seen across all IOP levels in the collagenase group compared to the control group (+6.6 ± 1.1 diopters [D] and +0.3 ± 0.8 D, respectively, at physiological IOP). After CXL, K(max) decreased (-7.6 ± 2.0 D at physiological IOP). Anterior corneal aberrations increased after collagenase exposure and decreased after CXL. Light microscopy showed loss of normal stromal collagen architecture and localized edema after collagenase exposure. A method for generating topographic features of corneal ectasia in human tissue is demonstrated. No significant sensitivity of K(max) to IOP was observed. CXL caused regression of steepening and induced aberrations in this model, consistent with clinical trends. The model may be useful for testing modifications to standard CXL techniques.

  3. Linking hydrologic and bedload transport models to simulate fluvial response to changing precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickert, A. D.; Ng, G. H. C.; Tofelde, S.; Savi, S.; Schildgen, T. F.; Alonso, R. N.; Strecker, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in precipitation can drive river aggradation or incision through their influence on both hillslope processes, which supply sediment to the channel, and sediment transport capacity, which moves sediment downstream. Whether a particular change in precipitation intensity and/or duration will result in aggradation or incision is difficult to predict due to these competing effects. In particular, fluvial response to climate change is sensitive to (1) thresholds and nonlinearities involved in sediment production and sediment transport, (2) how different modes of sediment production affect the grain size of the sediment provided to the channel, and (3) impacts of drainage basin geometry on sediment storage time and locations of rapid sediment production and/or transport. A better mechanistic understanding of the relationship between rainfall and river bed elevation changes will help us to understand modern river channel response to climate change and decipher the causes for fluvial terrace formation. Here we couple a hydrologic model, the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), with a model of sediment transport through a fluvial network, sedFlow, to predict patterns of bed elevation change. We first perform schematic example simulations on an idealized synthetic landscape with a single river channel to show how simple fluvial systems can respond to changes in rainfall. We then expand these numerical tests to full fluvial networks, in which the segments of the tributary network propagate signals of aggradation and incision, leading to a more complex response that embodies the interference between magnitudes and time-scales of sediment transfer in the tributary links. We showcase the possible complexity of the fluvial response with an example from the Quebrada del Toro of NW Argentina, which is currently experiencing rapid and spatially-variable aggradation and incision, possibly in response to an increase in extreme rainfall events in the east-central Andes.

  4. Linking human diseases to animal models using ontology-based phenotype annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Washington

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientists and clinicians who study genetic alterations and disease have traditionally described phenotypes in natural language. The considerable variation in these free-text descriptions has posed a hindrance to the important task of identifying candidate genes and models for human diseases and indicates the need for a computationally tractable method to mine data resources for mutant phenotypes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ontological annotation of disease phenotypes will facilitate the discovery of new genotype-phenotype relationships within and across species. To describe phenotypes using ontologies, we used an Entity-Quality (EQ methodology, wherein the affected entity (E and how it is affected (Q are recorded using terms from a variety of ontologies. Using this EQ method, we annotated the phenotypes of 11 gene-linked human diseases described in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM. These human annotations were loaded into our Ontology-Based Database (OBD along with other ontology-based phenotype descriptions of mutants from various model organism databases. Phenotypes recorded with this EQ method can be computationally compared based on the hierarchy of terms in the ontologies and the frequency of annotation. We utilized four similarity metrics to compare phenotypes and developed an ontology of homologous and analogous anatomical structures to compare phenotypes between species. Using these tools, we demonstrate that we can identify, through the similarity of the recorded phenotypes, other alleles of the same gene, other members of a signaling pathway, and orthologous genes and pathway members across species. We conclude that EQ-based annotation of phenotypes, in conjunction with a cross-species ontology, and a variety of similarity metrics can identify biologically meaningful similarities between genes by comparing phenotypes alone. This annotation and search method provides a novel and efficient means to identify

  5. Linking mathematical modeling with human neuroimaging to segregate verbal working memory maintenance processes from stimulus encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Benjamin S; Brown, Gregory G; Drummond, Sean P A; Turner, Travis H; Mano, Quintino R

    2013-03-01

    A fundamental dissociation for most working memory (WM) theories involves the separation of sensory-perceptual encoding of stimulus information from the maintenance of this information. The present paper reports tests of this separability hypothesis for visually presented pseudowords at both mathematical and neuroimaging levels of analysis. Levels of analysis were linked by two experimental manipulations-visual degradation and pseudoword length variation-that coupled findings from a mathematical modeling study of WM performed in a separate sample to findings from an event-related functional MRI (fMRI) study reported in the present paper. Results from the mathematical modeling study generated parametric signatures of stimulus encoding and WM rehearsal and displacement. These signatures led to specific predictions about neurophysiological responses to study manipulations in a priori regions of interest (ROI). Results demonstrated predicted dissociations of activation signatures in several ROIs. Significant patterns of brain response mirroring the encode signature were observed only during the task encode interval and only in the visual cortex and posterior fusiform gyrus. In contrast, significant brain response mirroring the rehearsal/displacement signature was observed only in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, and supramarginal gyrus. Present findings support the separability hypothesis insofar as brain regions that underlie sensory-perceptual processes demonstrated encode signatures whereas brain regions that support WM maintenance demonstrated the rehearsal/displacement signature. These results also provide evidence for the utility of combining mathematical modeling with fMRI to integrate information across cognitive and neural levels of analysis. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Linking GIS-based models to value ecosystem services in an Alpine region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grêt-Regamey, Adrienne; Bebi, Peter; Bishop, Ian D; Schmid, Willy A

    2008-11-01

    Planning frequently fails to include the valuation of public goods and services. This can have long-term negative economic consequences for a region. This is especially the case in mountainous regions such as the Alps, which depend on tourism and where land-use changes can negatively impact key ecosystem services and hence the economy. In this study, we develop a semi-automatic procedure to value ecosystem goods and services. Several existing process-based models linked to economic valuation methods are integrated into a geographic information system (GIS) platform. The model requires the input of a digital elevation model, a land-cover map, and a spatially explicit temperature dataset. These datasets are available for most regions in Europe. We illustrate the approach by valuing four ecosystem services: avalanche protection, timber production, scenic beauty, and habitat, which are supplied by the "Landschaft Davos", an administrative district in the Swiss Alps. We compare the impacts of a human development scenario and a climate scenario on the value of these ecosystem services. Urban expansion and tourist infrastructure developments have a negative impact on scenic beauty and habitats. These impacts outweigh the benefits of the developments in the long-term. Forest expansion, predictable under a climate change scenario, favours natural avalanche protection and habitats. In general, such non-marketed benefits provided by the case-study region more than compensate for the costs of forest maintenance. Finally, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the approach. Despite its limitations, we show how this approach could well help decision-makers balance the impacts of different planning options on the economic accounting of a region, and guide them in selecting sustainable and economically feasible development strategies.

  7. Is neutrophil elastase the missing link between emphysema and fibrosis? Evidence from two mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martorana Piero A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The separation of emphysema from fibrosis is not as clear-cut as it was thought in early studies. These two pathologies may be present at the same time in human lungs and in mice either instilled with elastolytic enzymes or bleomycin or exposed to cigarette-smoke. According to a current view, emphysema originates from a protease/antiprotease imbalance, and a role for antiproteases has also been suggested in the modulation of the fibrotic process. In this study we investigate in experimental animal models of emphysema and fibrosis whether neutrophil elastase may constitute a pathogenic link between these two pathologies. Methods This study was done in two animal models in which emphysema and fibrosis were induced either by bleomycin (BLM or by chronic exposure to cigarette-smoke. In order to assess the protease-dependence of the BLM-induced lesion, a group mice was treated with 4-(2-aminoethyl-benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride, a serine proteinase inhibitor active toward neutrophil elastase. Lungs from each experimental group were used for the immunohistochemical assessment of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α and for determination of the mean linear intercept as well as the percent volume densities of fibrosis and of emphysematous changes. Additionally, the lungs were also assessed for desmosine content and for the determination of elastase levels in the pulmonary interstitium by means of immunoelectron microscopy. Results We demonstrate that in BLM-treated mice (i the development of elastolytic emphysema precedes that of fibrosis; (ii significant amount of elastase in alveolar interstitium is associated with an increased expression of TGF-β and TGF-α; and finally, (iii emphysematous and fibrotic lesions can be significantly attenuated by using a protease inhibitor active against neutrophil elastase. Also, in a strain of mice that develop both emphysema and fibrosis after

  8. Control model design to limit DC-link voltage during grid fault in a dfig variable speed wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Cajethan M.; Ogbuka, Cosmas U.; Oti, Stephen E.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a control model design capable of inhibiting the phenomenal rise in the DC-link voltage during grid- fault condition in a variable speed wind turbine. Against the use of power circuit protection strategies with inherent limitations in fault ride-through capability, a control circuit algorithm capable of limiting the DC-link voltage rise which in turn bears dynamics that has direct influence on the characteristics of the rotor voltage especially during grid faults is here proposed. The model results so obtained compare favorably with the simulation results as obtained in a MATLAB/SIMULINK environment. The generated model may therefore be used to predict near accurately the nature of DC-link voltage variations during fault given some factors which include speed and speed mode of operation, the value of damping resistor relative to half the product of inner loop current control bandwidth and the filter inductance.

  9. 78 FR 72719 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... join via WebEx, the link is https://nasa.webex.com/ , meeting number is 996 148 277, and password: NACdec2013! (Password is case sensitive). Note: If dialing in, please ``mute'' your telephone. The meeting... basis. Attendees will be required to sign a visitor's register and to comply with NASA security...

  10. Linking land use change to recreational fishery valuation with a spatially explicit behavior model: A case study from Tampa Bay, FL USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawing a link between habitat change and production and delivery of ecosystem services is a priority in coastal estuarine ecosystems. This link is needed to fully understand how human communities can influence ecosystem sustainability. Mechanistic modeling tools are highly fun...

  11. The Transition of High-Resolution NASA MODIS Sea Surface Temperatures into the WRF Environmental Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Jedlove, Gary J.; Santos, Pablo; Medlin, Jeffrey M.; Rozumalski, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed a Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sea surface temperature (SST) composite at 2-km resolution that has been implemented in version 3 of the National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Environmental Modeling System (EMS). The WRF EMS is a complete, full physics numerical weather prediction package that incorporates dynamical cores from both the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) and the Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM). The installation, configuration, and execution of either the ARW or NMM models is greatly simplified by the WRF EMS to encourage its use by NWS Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) and the university community. The WRF EMS is easy to run on most Linux workstations and clusters without the need for compilers. Version 3 of the WRF EMS contains the most recent public release of the WRF-NMM and ARW modeling system (version 3 of the ARW is described in Skamarock et al. 2008), the WRF Pre-processing System (WPS) utilities, and the WRF Post-Processing program. The system is developed and maintained by the NWS National Science Operations Officer Science and Training Resource Coordinator. To initialize the WRF EMS with high-resolution MODIS SSTs, SPoRT developed the composite product consisting of MODIS SSTs over oceans and large lakes with the NCEP Real-Time Global (RTG) filling data over land points. Filling the land points is required due to minor inconsistencies between the WRF land-sea mask and that used to generate the MODIS SST composites. This methodology ensures a continuous field that adequately initializes all appropriate arrays in WRF. MODIS composites covering the Gulf of Mexico, western Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean are generated daily at 0400, 0700, 1600, and 1900 UTC corresponding to overpass times of the NASA Aqua and Terra polar orbiting satellites. The MODIS SST product is output in gridded binary-1 (GRIB-1) data

  12. A statistical rain attenuation prediction model with application to the advanced communication technology satellite project. 3: A stochastic rain fade control algorithm for satellite link power via non linear Markow filtering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic and composite nature of propagation impairments that are incurred on Earth-space communications links at frequencies in and above 30/20 GHz Ka band, i.e., rain attenuation, cloud and/or clear air scintillation, etc., combined with the need to counter such degradations after the small link margins have been exceeded, necessitate the use of dynamic statistical identification and prediction processing of the fading signal in order to optimally estimate and predict the levels of each of the deleterious attenuation components. Such requirements are being met in NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project by the implementation of optimal processing schemes derived through the use of the Rain Attenuation Prediction Model and nonlinear Markov filtering theory.

  13. Simulations of preindustrial, present-day, and 2100 conditions in the NASA GISS composition and climate model G-PUCCINI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Shindell

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of atmospheric composition and climate has been developed at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS that includes composition seamlessly from the surface to the lower mesosphere. The model is able to capture many features of the observed magnitude, distribution, and seasonal cycle of trace species. The simulation is especially realistic in the troposphere. In the stratosphere, high latitude regions show substantial biases during period when transport governs the distribution as meridional mixing is too rapid in this model version. In other regions, including the extrapolar tropopause region that dominates radiative forcing (RF by ozone, stratospheric gases are generally well-simulated. The model's stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE agrees well with values inferred from observations for both the global mean flux and the ratio of Northern (NH to Southern Hemisphere (SH downward fluxes. Simulations of preindustrial (PI to present-day (PD changes show tropospheric ozone burden increases of 11% while the stratospheric burden decreases by 18%. The resulting tropopause RF values are −0.06 W/m2 from stratospheric ozone and 0.40 W/m2 from tropospheric ozone. Global mean mass-weighted OH decreases by 16% from the PI to the PD. STE of ozone also decreased substantially during this time, by 14%. Comparison of the PD with a simulation using 1979 pre-ozone hole conditions for the stratosphere shows a much larger downward flux of ozone into the troposphere in 1979, resulting in a substantially greater tropospheric ozone burden than that seen in the PD run. This implies that reduced STE due to stratospheric ozone depletion may have offset as much as 2/3 of the tropospheric ozone burden increase from PI to PD. However, the model overestimates the downward flux of ozone at high Southern latitudes, so this estimate is likely an upper limit. In the future, the tropospheric ozone burden increases by 101% in 2100 for the A2 scenario

  14. Models for stiffening in cross-linked biopolymer networks : A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dillen, T.; Onck, P. R.; Van der Giessen, E.

    In a recent publication, we studied the mechanical stiffening behavior in two-dimensional (2D) cross-linked networks of semiflexible biopolymer filaments under simple shear [Onck, P.R., Koeman, T., Van Dillen, T., Van der Giessen, E., 2005. Alternative explanation of stiffening in cross-linked

  15. Security in the data link layer of the OSI model on LANs wired Cisco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Genoveva Moreira Santos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There are no technologies or protocols completely secure in network infrastructures, for this reason, this document aims to demonstrate the importance of configuring security options on network equipments. On this occasion we will focus on the data link layer of the OSI model, which is where controls have begun to be implemented at level of protocols. The tools that are used in the research facilitate the implementation of a virtual laboratory, which consists of a base operating system (windows in which virtualbox is installed to mount linux mint, which will generate attacks; while in VMware, we installed a virtual machine that allows you to add the image of a switch to our network simulation software (GNS3, which integrates all the components. The tests were able to identify the vulnerabilities in MAC, ARP, VLAN and STP, and then to proceed to patch these security aws. Keeping the setting by default or ignoring the characteristics of network equipment are usually the reasons why these vulnerabilities exist. Finally, it was proved how easy it can be to run an attack and at the same time to implement security measures on the layer 2 of the OSI.

  16. Constraining denitrification in permeable wave-influenced marine sediment using linked hydrodynamic and biogeochemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, M. B.; Cook, P. L.; Jiang, H.; Traykovski, P.

    2009-12-01

    Permeable marine sediment are ubiquitous complex environments, the biogeochemistry of which are strongly coupled to hydrodynamic process above and within the sediment. The biogeochemical processes in these settings have global scale implications but are poorly understood and challenging to quantify. We present the first simulation of linked turbulent oscillatory flow of the water column, porous media flow, and solute transport in the sediment with oxygen consumption, nitrification, denitrification, and ammonification, informed by field- and/ or experimentally-derived parameters. Nitrification and denitrification were significantly impacted by advective pore water exchange between the sediment and the water column. Denitrification rates showed a maximum at intermediate permeabilities, and were negligible at high permeabilities. Denitrification rates were low, with only ~15% of total N mineralized being denitrified, although this may be increased temporarily following sediment resuspension events. Our model-estimated denitrification rates are about half of previous estimates which do not consider solute advection through the sediment. Given the critical role of sediment permeability, topography, and bottom currents in controlling denitrification rates, an improved knowledge of these factors is vital for obtaining better estimates of denitrification taking place on shelf sediment. Broad application of our approach to myriad conditions will lead to improved predictive capacity, better informed experimental and sampling design, and more holistic understanding of the biogeochemistry of permeable sediment.

  17. Gene therapy model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using a modified foamy virus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-Lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1.

  18. Gene therapy model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using a modified foamy virus vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Horino

    Full Text Available X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1 is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1.

  19. Fast Outage Probability Simulation for FSO Links with a Generalized Pointing Error Model

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Issaid, Chaouki

    2017-02-07

    Over the past few years, free-space optical (FSO) communication has gained significant attention. In fact, FSO can provide cost-effective and unlicensed links, with high-bandwidth capacity and low error rate, making it an exciting alternative to traditional wireless radio-frequency communication systems. However, the system performance is affected not only by the presence of atmospheric turbulences, which occur due to random fluctuations in the air refractive index but also by the existence of pointing errors. Metrics, such as the outage probability which quantifies the probability that the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio is smaller than a given threshold, can be used to analyze the performance of this system. In this work, we consider weak and strong turbulence regimes, and we study the outage probability of an FSO communication system under a generalized pointing error model with both a nonzero boresight component and different horizontal and vertical jitter effects. More specifically, we use an importance sampling approach which is based on the exponential twisting technique to offer fast and accurate results.

  20. Linked-cluster expansion for the Green's function of the infinite-U Hubbard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ehsan; Perepelitsky, Edward; Rigol, Marcos; Shastry, B Sriram

    2014-06-01

    We implement a highly efficient strong-coupling expansion for the Green's function of the Hubbard model. In the limit of extreme correlations, where the onsite interaction is infinite, the evaluation of diagrams simplifies dramatically enabling us to carry out the expansion to the eighth order in powers of the hopping amplitude. We compute the finite-temperature Green's function analytically in the momentum and Matsubara frequency space as a function of the electron density. Employing Padé approximations, we study the equation of state, Kelvin thermopower, momentum distribution function, quasiparticle fraction, and quasiparticle lifetime of the system at temperatures lower than, or of the order of, the hopping amplitude. We also discuss several different approaches for obtaining the spectral functions through analytic continuation of the imaginary frequency Green's function, and show results for the system near half filling. We benchmark our results for the equation of state against those obtained from a numerical linked-cluster expansion carried out to the eleventh order.

  1. A SEQUENTIAL MODEL OF INNOVATION STRATEGY—COMPANY NON-FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE LINKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakhid Slamet Ciptono

    2006-05-01

    dimensions of innovation strategy (partially mediators to company non-financial performance —productivity or operational reliability. The findings provide empirical evidence extending the previous model of Zahra and Das. These findings also provide a basis for useful recommendations to upstream and downstream SBU managers attempting to implement a sequential model of innovation strategy —company non-financial performance links. This study shows that upstream SBUs rely on external innovation sources. They will acquire innovation policies through business partnership development (such as Joint Operation Body for Enhanced Oil Recovery or JOB-EOR, Joint Operation Body for Production Sharing Contract or JOB-PSC; licensing agreements (Technical Assistance Contract or TAC, Consortium Cooperation System; or acquisition with other firms (Joint Operating Contract or JOC. In contrast, downstream SBUs emphasize on generating internal innovation sources to develop their own in-house R&D efforts. The downstream SBUs should make extensive policies of internal innovation sources in their attempts to control the distribution of oil-based fuel and transmission of natural gas for domestic and international markets effectively. Both policies would enhance understanding and ultimately contribute to the improvement of company financial performance —sales, net profit margin, return on assets.

  2. What Is Engagement? Proactivity as the Missing Link in the HEXACO Model of Personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Reinout E; Wawoe, Kilian W; Holtrop, Djurre

    2016-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that proactivity represents the engagement vector in the HEXACO model of personality. Questionnaire data were obtained in five studies, three of which consisted (mostly) of students: Study 1 (N = 188, Mage  = 20.0, 89.4% women), Study 3 (N = 315, Mage  = 20.4, 80.6% women), and Study 4 (N = 309 self-ratings, Mage  = 20.0, 78.3% women; N = 307 other-ratings, Mage  = 24.5, 62.2% women). Participants in the other two studies came from an ISO-certified representative community panel: Study 2 (N = 525, Mage  = 51.2, 52.0% women) and Study 5 (N = 736, Mage  = 42.2, 48.0% women). Proactive Personality and Proactivity were positively related to Extraversion, Conscientiousness, and Openness to Experience, but only weakly related or unrelated to Honesty-Humility, Emotionality, and Agreeableness, supporting the alignment of Proactive Personality/Proactivity with the hypothesized HEXACO engagement vector. Additionally, Proactivity explained incremental variance in self-rated job performance on top of the HEXACO facets that were most closely associated with Proactive Personality/Proactivity, that is, Social Boldness (an Extraversion facet), Diligence (a Conscientiousness facet), and Creativity (an Openness to Experience facet), but not in entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship. Proactivity is the missing engagement link in the HEXACO model of personality. The results are discussed in light of higher-order factors (e.g., general factor of personality and Alpha and Beta) of personality and bandwidth-fidelity controversies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Linking epigenetic function to electrostatics: The DNMT2 structural model example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Gilberto Cavalheiro; Vieira, Gustavo Fioravanti; Sinigaglia, Marialva; Silva Valente, Vera Lúcia da

    2017-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of DNMT2 is very similar to the catalytic domains of bacterial and eukaryotic proteins. However, there is great variability in the region of recognition of the target sequence. While bacterial DNMT2 acts as a DNA methyltransferase, previous studies have indicated low DNA methylation activity in eukaryotic DNMT2, with preference by tRNA methylation. Drosophilids are known as DNMT2-only species and the DNA methylation phenomenon is a not elucidated case yet, as well as the ontogenetic and physiologic importance of DNMT2 for this species group. In addition, more recently study showed that methylation in the genome in Drosophila melanogaster is independent in relation to DNMT2. Despite these findings, Drosophilidae family has more than 4,200 species with great ecological diversity and historical evolution, thus we, therefore, aimed to examine the drosophilids DNMT2 in order to verify its conservation at the physicochemical and structural levels in a functional context. We examined the twenty-six DNMT2 models generated by molecular modelling and five crystallographic structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) using different approaches. Our results showed that despite sequence and structural similarity between species close related, we found outstanding differences when they are analyzed in the context of surface distribution of electrostatic properties. The differences found in the electrostatic potentials may be linked with different affinities and processivity of DNMT2 for its different substrates (DNA, RNA or tRNA) and even for interactions with other proteins involved in the epigenetic mechanisms.

  4. Linking spring phenology with mechanistic models of host movement to predict disease transmission risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Jerod A.; Cross, Paul C.; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Cole, Eric K.; Courtemanch, Alyson B.; Dewey, Sarah R.; Kauffman, Matthew J.

    2018-01-01

    Disease models typically focus on temporal dynamics of infection, while often neglecting environmental processes that determine host movement. In many systems, however, temporal disease dynamics may be slow compared to the scale at which environmental conditions alter host space-use and accelerate disease transmission.Using a mechanistic movement modelling approach, we made space-use predictions of a mobile host (elk [Cervus Canadensis] carrying the bacterial disease brucellosis) under environmental conditions that change daily and annually (e.g., plant phenology, snow depth), and we used these predictions to infer how spring phenology influences the risk of brucellosis transmission from elk (through aborted foetuses) to livestock in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.Using data from 288 female elk monitored with GPS collars, we fit step selection functions (SSFs) during the spring abortion season and then implemented a master equation approach to translate SSFs into predictions of daily elk distribution for five plausible winter weather scenarios (from a heavy snow, to an extreme winter drought year). We predicted abortion events by combining elk distributions with empirical estimates of daily abortion rates, spatially varying elk seroprevelance and elk population counts.Our results reveal strong spatial variation in disease transmission risk at daily and annual scales that is strongly governed by variation in host movement in response to spring phenology. For example, in comparison with an average snow year, years with early snowmelt are predicted to have 64% of the abortions occurring on feedgrounds shift to occurring on mainly public lands, and to a lesser extent on private lands.Synthesis and applications. Linking mechanistic models of host movement with disease dynamics leads to a novel bridge between movement and disease ecology. Our analysis framework offers new avenues for predicting disease spread, while providing managers tools to proactively mitigate

  5. Modeling and Simulation of Pivotal Clinical Trials Using Linked Models for Multiple Endpoints in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease With Roflumilast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facius, Axel; Krause, Andreas; Claret, Laurent; Bruno, Rene; Lahu, Gezim

    2017-08-01

    Roflumilast is a selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor (PDE4i) for the treatment of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In 2 large phase 3 trials in a broader population of COPD patients (BY217/M2-111, ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00076089 and BY217/M2-112, ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00430729), treatment with roflumilast reduced the rate of exacerbations; however, the reduction did not reach statistical significance. Two linked dose-response models for the primary (annualized COPD exacerbation counts) and secondary (change from baseline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV 1 ]) end points were therefore developed to characterize and quantify effect sizes and the patient characteristics influencing them. The models showed that disease severity and bronchitis, particularly the severity of bronchitis expressed in cough-and-sputum scores, were good predictors of exacerbation rates and differential benefit of roflumilast in exacerbation reduction. The models were used to support the rational design of 2 phase 3 randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials (BY217/M2-124, ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00297102 and BY217/M2-125, ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00297115) by identifying the most appropriate patient population using clinical trial simulations. Model predictions for both end points were found to be highly accurate - as confirmed by the results from these trials, which led to the approval of roflumilast as the first oral PDE4i for the treatment of COPD in patients associated with chronic bronchitis and a history of exacerbations. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  6. Modelling and control of three-phase grid-connected power supply with small DC-link capacitor for electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Török, Lajos; Máthé, Lászlo; Nielsen, Carsten Karup

    2016-01-01

    These days electrolyzers are becoming more and more interesting due to the high demand for energy storage in form of hydrogen for renewable power generation using fuel cells. The design of a power supply for such a system is complex especially when the DC-link capacitance is reduced....... By substituting the complex switching model of the power supply with a simplified one, the system dynamics can be better observed. The resonances caused by the small DC link capacitor and grid side inductance can be easier analyzed. A feed forward compensation method is proposed based on the simplified model......-forward compensation signal is created, canceling in such a way the resonance introduced by the grid inductance and the DC-link capacitor from the feed-forward loop. The theoretical work has been validated through experiments on a 5 kW DC power supply used for electrolyser application....

  7. Bone fracture toughness and strength correlate with collagen cross-link maturity in a dose-controlled lathyrism mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNerny, Erin M B; Gong, Bo; Morris, Michael D; Kohn, David H

    2015-03-01

    Collagen cross-linking is altered in many diseases of bone, and enzymatic collagen cross-links are important to bone quality, as evidenced by losses of strength after lysyl oxidase inhibition (lathyrism). We hypothesized that cross-links also contribute directly to bone fracture toughness. A mouse model of lathyrism using subcutaneous injection of up to 500 mg/kg β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) was developed and characterized (60 animals across 4 dosage groups). Three weeks of 150 or 350 mg/kg BAPN treatment in young, growing mice significantly reduced cortical bone fracture toughness, strength, and pyridinoline cross-link content. Ratios reflecting relative cross-link maturity were positive regressors of fracture toughness (HP/[DHLNL + HLNL] r(2)  = 0.208, p toughness and strength. Thus, cross-link profile perturbations associated with bone disease may provide insight into bone mechanical quality and fracture risk. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  8. Linking gene dynamics to vascular hyperplasia - Toward a predictive model of vein graft adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Casarin

    Full Text Available Reductionist approaches, where individual pieces of a process are examined in isolation, have been the mainstay of biomedical research. While these methods are effective in highly compartmentalized systems, they fail to account for the inherent plasticity and non-linearity within the signaling structure. In the current manuscript, we present the computational architecture for tracking an acute perturbation in a biologic system through a multiscale model that links gene dynamics to cell kinetics, with the overall goal of predicting tissue adaptation. Given the complexity of the genome, the problem is made tractable by clustering temporal changes in gene expression into unique patterns. These cluster elements form the core of an integrated network that serves as the driving force for the response of the biologic system. This modeling approach is illustrated using the clinical scenario of vein bypass graft adaptation. Vein segments placed in the arterial circulation for treatment of advanced occlusive disease can develop an aggressive hyperplastic response that narrows the lumen, reduces blood flow, and induces in situ thrombosis. Reducing this hyperplastic response has been a long-standing but unrealized goal of biologic researchers in the field. With repeated failures of single target therapies, the redundant response pathways are thought to be a fundamental issue preventing progress towards a solution. Using the current framework, we demonstrate how theoretical genomic manipulations can be introduced into the system to shift the adaptation to a more beneficial phenotype, where the hyperplastic response is mitigated and the risk of thrombosis reduced. Utilizing our previously published rabbit vein graft genomic data, where grafts were harvested at time points ranging from 2 hours to 28 days and under differential flow conditions, and a customized clustering algorithm, five gene clusters that differentiated the low flow (i.e., pro

  9. The NASA Astrophysics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebulum, Ricardo S.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's scientists are enjoying unprecedented access to astronomy data from space, both from missions launched and operated only by NASA, as well as missions led by other space agencies to which NASA contributed instruments or technology. This paper describes the NASA astrophysics program for the next decade, including NASA's response to the ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey.

  10. Testing the Causal Links between School Climate, School Violence, and School Academic Performance: A Cross-Lagged Panel Autoregressive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbenishty, Rami; Astor, Ron Avi; Roziner, Ilan; Wrabel, Stephani L.

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores the causal link between school climate, school violence, and a school's general academic performance over time using a school-level, cross-lagged panel autoregressive modeling design. We hypothesized that reductions in school violence and climate improvement would lead to schools' overall improved academic performance.…

  11. A cross-linking model for estimating Young's modulus of artificial bone tissue grown on carbon nanotube scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffar, Kaveh PourAkbar; Arshi, Ahmad Reza; JamilPour, Nima; Najafi, Ahmad Raeisi; Rouhi, Gholamreza; Sudak, Les

    2010-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) provide a suitable environment for growth and proliferation of bone cells. The elastic properties exhibited by CNTs can enhance mechanical characteristics of bone mineral phase, hydroxyapatite (HAp), precipitated on such a scaffold. In this article, a simplified model for estimating the axial Young's modulus of a representative volume element (RVE) of CNT-HAp composite is presented. The model is based on the idea of HAp formation on functionalized sites on CNTs as cross-links between HAp matrix and CNT. Modeling results show that the reinforcement role contributed by CNT in the RVE causes a significant increase in the Young's modulus of the composite material which is a direct consequence of transferring stresses from the HAp matrix to the CNT through the cross-links. Similar conclusions may be suggested regarding the improvement of overall mechanical properties of the material. The prediction made by the model lies reasonably well within the limits proposed by conventional Rule-of-Mixtures, and sliding below Voigt's model. The Young's modulus predicted by the model lies adjacent to the Hashin-Shtrikman upper bound as a function of the RVE length (or equivalently CNT aspect ratio). The model simulation indicates that an increase in the CNT aspect ratio and/or number of cross-links in the RVE, results in the prediction to move closer to the estimation made by Voigt as the assumption of perfect bonding between composite phases is approached. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A Mediation Model Linking Body Weight, Cognition, and Sleep-Disordered Breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Spruyt, Karen; Gozal, David

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Academic success involves the ability to use cognitive skills in a school environment. Poor academic performance has been linked to disrupted sleep associated with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). In parallel, poor sleep is associated with increased risk for obesity, and weight management problems have been linked to executive dysfunction, suggesting that interactions may be operational between SDB and obesity to adversely affect neurocognitive outcomes.

  13. Single-step emulation of nonlinear fiber-optic link with gaussian mixture model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Robert; Doberstein, Andy; Haisch, Hansjörg

    2015-01-01

    We use a fast and low-complexity statistical signal processing method to emulate nonlinear noise in fiber links. The proposed emulation technique stands in good agreement with the numerical NLSE simulation for 32 Gbaud DP-16QAM nonlinear transmission.......We use a fast and low-complexity statistical signal processing method to emulate nonlinear noise in fiber links. The proposed emulation technique stands in good agreement with the numerical NLSE simulation for 32 Gbaud DP-16QAM nonlinear transmission....

  14. Spontaneous shaker rat mutant - a new model for X-linked tremor/ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Karla P; Paul, Sharan; Calì, Tito; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Karan, Sukanya; Frizzarin, Martina; Ames, Darren; Zanni, Ginevra; Brini, Marisa; Dansithong, Warunee; Milash, Brett; Scoles, Daniel R; Carafoli, Ernesto; Pulst, Stefan M

    2016-05-01

    The shaker rat is an X-linked recessive spontaneous model of progressive Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration exhibiting a shaking ataxia and wide stance. Generation of Wistar Furth (WF)/Brown Norwegian (BN) F1 hybrids and genetic mapping of F2 sib-sib offspring using polymorphic markers narrowed the candidate gene region to 26 Mbp denoted by the last recombinant genetic marker DXRat21 at 133 Mbp to qter (the end of the long arm). In the WF background, the shaker mutation has complete penetrance, results in a stereotypic phenotype and there is a narrow window for age of disease onset; by contrast, the F2 hybrid phenotype was more varied, with a later age of onset and likely non-penetrance of the mutation. By deep RNA-sequencing, five variants were found in the candidate region; four were novel without known annotation. One of the variants caused an arginine (R) to cysteine (C) change at codon 35 of the ATPase, Ca(2+) transporting, plasma membrane 3 (Atp2b3) gene encoding PMCA3 that has high expression in the cerebellum. The variant was well supported by hundreds of overlapping reads, and was found in 100% of all affected replicas and 0% of the wild-type (WT) replicas. The mutation segregated with disease in all affected animals and the amino acid change was found in an evolutionarily conserved region of PMCA3. Despite strong genetic evidence for pathogenicity, in vitro analyses of PMCA3(R35C) function did not show any differences to WT PMCA3. Because Atp2b3 mutation leads to congenital ataxia in humans, the identified Atp2b3 missense change in the shaker rat presents a good candidate for the shaker rat phenotype based on genetic criteria, but cannot yet be considered a definite pathogenic variant owing to lack of functional changes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Spontaneous shaker rat mutant – a new model for X-linked tremor/ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla P. Figueroa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The shaker rat is an X-linked recessive spontaneous model of progressive Purkinje cell (PC degeneration exhibiting a shaking ataxia and wide stance. Generation of Wistar Furth (WF/Brown Norwegian (BN F1 hybrids and genetic mapping of F2 sib-sib offspring using polymorphic markers narrowed the candidate gene region to 26 Mbp denoted by the last recombinant genetic marker DXRat21 at 133 Mbp to qter (the end of the long arm. In the WF background, the shaker mutation has complete penetrance, results in a stereotypic phenotype and there is a narrow window for age of disease onset; by contrast, the F2 hybrid phenotype was more varied, with a later age of onset and likely non-penetrance of the mutation. By deep RNA-sequencing, five variants were found in the candidate region; four were novel without known annotation. One of the variants caused an arginine (R to cysteine (C change at codon 35 of the ATPase, Ca2+ transporting, plasma membrane 3 (Atp2b3 gene encoding PMCA3 that has high expression in the cerebellum. The variant was well supported by hundreds of overlapping reads, and was found in 100% of all affected replicas and 0% of the wild-type (WT replicas. The mutation segregated with disease in all affected animals and the amino acid change was found in an evolutionarily conserved region of PMCA3. Despite strong genetic evidence for pathogenicity, in vitro analyses of PMCA3R35C function did not show any differences to WT PMCA3. Because Atp2b3 mutation leads to congenital ataxia in humans, the identified Atp2b3 missense change in the shaker rat presents a good candidate for the shaker rat phenotype based on genetic criteria, but cannot yet be considered a definite pathogenic variant owing to lack of functional changes.

  16. Spontaneous shaker rat mutant – a new model for X-linked tremor/ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Karla P.; Paul, Sharan; Calì, Tito; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Karan, Sukanya; Frizzarin, Martina; Ames, Darren; Zanni, Ginevra; Brini, Marisa; Dansithong, Warunee; Milash, Brett; Scoles, Daniel R.; Carafoli, Ernesto; Pulst, Stefan M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The shaker rat is an X-linked recessive spontaneous model of progressive Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration exhibiting a shaking ataxia and wide stance. Generation of Wistar Furth (WF)/Brown Norwegian (BN) F1 hybrids and genetic mapping of F2 sib-sib offspring using polymorphic markers narrowed the candidate gene region to 26 Mbp denoted by the last recombinant genetic marker DXRat21 at 133 Mbp to qter (the end of the long arm). In the WF background, the shaker mutation has complete penetrance, results in a stereotypic phenotype and there is a narrow window for age of disease onset; by contrast, the F2 hybrid phenotype was more varied, with a later age of onset and likely non-penetrance of the mutation. By deep RNA-sequencing, five variants were found in the candidate region; four were novel without known annotation. One of the variants caused an arginine (R) to cysteine (C) change at codon 35 of the ATPase, Ca2+ transporting, plasma membrane 3 (Atp2b3) gene encoding PMCA3 that has high expression in the cerebellum. The variant was well supported by hundreds of overlapping reads, and was found in 100% of all affected replicas and 0% of the wild-type (WT) replicas. The mutation segregated with disease in all affected animals and the amino acid change was found in an evolutionarily conserved region of PMCA3. Despite strong genetic evidence for pathogenicity, in vitro analyses of PMCA3R35C function did not show any differences to WT PMCA3. Because Atp2b3 mutation leads to congenital ataxia in humans, the identified Atp2b3 missense change in the shaker rat presents a good candidate for the shaker rat phenotype based on genetic criteria, but cannot yet be considered a definite pathogenic variant owing to lack of functional changes. PMID:27013529

  17. Preliminary Results of a U.S. Deep South Warm Season Deep Convective Initiation Modeling Experiment using NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for Operational National Weather Service Local Model Runs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlin, Jeffrey M.; Wood, Lance; Zavodsky, Brad; Case, Jon; Molthan, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The initiation of deep convection during the warm season is a forecast challenge in the relative high instability and low wind shear environment of the U.S. Deep South. Despite improved knowledge of the character of well known mesoscale features such as local sea-, bay- and land-breezes, observations show the evolution of these features fall well short in fully describing the location of first initiates. A joint collaborative modeling effort among the NWS offices in Mobile, AL, and Houston, TX, and NASA s Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center was undertaken during the 2012 warm season to examine the impact of certain NASA produced products on the Weather Research and Forecasting Environmental Modeling System. The NASA products were: a 4-km Land Information System data, a 1-km sea surface temperature analysis, and a 4-km greenness vegetation fraction analysis. Similar domains were established over the southeast Texas and Alabama coastlines, each with a 9 km outer grid spacing and a 3 km inner nest spacing. The model was run at each NWS office once per day out to 24 hours from 0600 UTC, using the NCEP Global Forecast System for initial and boundary conditions. Control runs without the NASA products were made at the NASA SPoRT Center. The NCAR Model Evaluation Tools verification package was used to evaluate both the forecast timing and location of the first initiates, with a focus on the impacts of the NASA products on the model forecasts. Select case studies will be presented to highlight the influence of the products.

  18. NASA/NBS (National Aeronautics and Space Administration/National Bureau of Standards) standard reference model for telerobot control system architecture (NASREM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albus, James S.; Mccain, Harry G.; Lumia, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    The document describes the NASA Standard Reference Model (NASREM) Architecture for the Space Station Telerobot Control System. It defines the functional requirements and high level specifications of the control system for the NASA space Station document for the functional specification, and a guideline for the development of the control system architecture, of the 10C Flight Telerobot Servicer. The NASREM telerobot control system architecture defines a set of standard modules and interfaces which facilitates software design, development, validation, and test, and make possible the integration of telerobotics software from a wide variety of sources. Standard interfaces also provide the software hooks necessary to incrementally upgrade future Flight Telerobot Systems as new capabilities develop in computer science, robotics, and autonomous system control.

  19. Air pollution modeling over the Ganges basin and north-west Bay of Bengal in the early post-monsoon season using the NASA GEOS-5 model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishcha, Pavel; da Silva, Arlindo; Starobinets, Boris; Alpert, Pinhas

    2014-05-01

    The Ganges basin is characterized by a significant population growth accompanied by developing industry, agriculture, and increasing transportation. This has resulted in increased anthropogenic emissions and declining air quality. The NASA GEOS-5 model was used to extend the MERRA reanalysis with five atmospheric aerosol components (sulfates, organic carbon, black carbon, desert dust, and sea-salt). The model includes assimilation of bias-corrected Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) from the MODIS sensor on both Terra and Aqua satellites. The obtained eight-year (2002 - 2009) MERRA-driven aerosol dataset (MERRAero) was applied to study AOT and its trends over the Ganges basin and north-west Bay of Bengal (BoB) in the early post-monsoon season. This season is characterized by aerosol transport from the Ganges basin to north-west BoB by prevailing winds; lower cloud fraction compared to the monsoon season; and still significant rainfall of over 150 mm/month. In the early post-monsoon season (October), modeled data showed that AOT was lower over the east of the Ganges basin than over the north-west of the Ganges basin: this was despite the fact that the east of the Ganges basin should have produced higher anthropogenic aerosol emissions due to higher population density, increased industrial output and transportation. This is evidence that higher aerosol emissions do not always correspond to higher AOT over the areas where the effects of meteorological factors on AOT dominate those of aerosol emissions. MODIS AOT assimilation was essential for correcting modeled AOT mainly over the north-west of the Ganges basin, where AOT increments were maximal. Over the east of the Ganges basin and north-west BoB, AOT increments were low and MODIS AOT assimilation did not contribute significantly to modeled AOT. Our analysis showed that increasing AOT trends over north-west BoB (exceeding those over the east of the Ganges basin) were reproduced by GEOS-5, not because of MODIS AOT

  20. Particulate Composite Materials: Numerical Modeling of a Cross-Linked Polymer Reinforced With Alumina-Based Particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Máša, Bohuslav; Náhlík, Luboš; Hutař, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2013), s. 421-428 ISSN 0191-5665. [Mechanics of Composite Materials. Riga, 28.05.2013-01.06.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GD106/09/H035; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : particulate composite * cross-linked polymer * FEM * damage model * hyperelasticity Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.451, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11029-013-9358-y

  1. NASA - Beyond Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Courtenay

    2016-01-01

    NASA is able to achieve human spaceflight goals in partnership with international and commercial teams by establishing common goals and building connections. Presentation includes photographs from NASA missions - on orbit, in Mission Control, and at other NASA facilities.

  2. Dynamic Model and Vibration Characteristics of Planar 3-RRR Parallel Manipulator with Flexible Intermediate Links considering Exact Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianchao Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complexity of the dynamic model of a planar 3-RRR flexible parallel manipulator (FPM, it is often difficult to achieve active vibration control algorithm based on the system dynamic model. To establish a simple and efficient dynamic model of the planar 3-RRR FPM to study its dynamic characteristics and build a controller conveniently, firstly, considering the effect of rigid-flexible coupling and the moment of inertia at the end of the flexible intermediate link, the modal function is determined with the pinned-free boundary condition. Then, considering the main vibration modes of the system, a high-efficiency coupling dynamic model is established on the basis of guaranteeing the model control accuracy. According to the model, the modal characteristics of the flexible intermediate link are analyzed and compared with the modal test results. The results show that the model can effectively reflect the main vibration modes of the planar 3-RRR FPM; in addition the model can be used to analyze the effects of inertial and coupling forces on the dynamics model and the drive torque of the drive motor. Because this model is of the less dynamic parameters, it is convenient to carry out the control program.

  3. Predictability and interpretability of hybrid link-level crash frequency models for urban arterials compared to cluster-based and general negative binomial regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najaf, Pooya; Duddu, Venkata R; Pulugurtha, Srinivas S

    2018-03-01

    Machine learning (ML) techniques have higher prediction accuracy compared to conventional statistical methods for crash frequency modelling. However, their black-box nature limits the interpretability. The objective of this research is to combine both ML and statistical methods to develop hybrid link-level crash frequency models with high predictability and interpretability. For this purpose, M5' model trees method (M5') is introduced and applied to classify the crash data and then calibrate a model for each homogenous class. The data for 1134 and 345 randomly selected links on urban arterials in the city of Charlotte, North Carolina was used to develop and validate models, respectively. The outputs from the hybrid approach are compared with the outputs from cluster-based negative binomial regression (NBR) and general NBR models. Findings indicate that M5' has high predictability and is very reliable to interpret the role of different attributes on crash frequency compared to other developed models.

  4. Application of Design of Experiments and Surrogate Modeling within the NASA Advanced Concepts Office, Earth-to-Orbit Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwack, Mathew R.; Dees, Patrick D.; Holt, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Decisions made during early conceptual design have a large impact upon the expected life-cycle cost (LCC) of a new program. It is widely accepted that up to 80% of such cost is committed during these early design phases. Therefore, to help minimize LCC, decisions made during conceptual design must be based upon as much information as possible. To aid in the decision making for new launch vehicle programs, the Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) provides rapid turnaround pre-phase A and phase A concept definition studies. The ACO team utilizes a proven set of tools to provide customers with a full vehicle mass breakdown to tertiary subsystems, preliminary structural sizing based upon worst-case flight loads, and trajectory optimization to quantify integrated vehicle performance for a given mission. Although the team provides rapid turnaround for single vehicle concepts, the scope of the trade space can be limited due to analyst availability and the manpower requirements for manual execution of the analysis tools. In order to enable exploration of a broader design space, the ACO team has implemented an advanced design methods (ADM) based approach. This approach applies the concepts of design of experiments (DOE) and surrogate modeling to more exhaustively explore the trade space and provide the customer with additional design information to inform decision making. This paper will first discuss the automation of the ACO tool set, which represents a majority of the development effort. In order to fit a surrogate model within tolerable error bounds a number of DOE cases are needed. This number will scale with the number of variable parameters desired and the complexity of the system's response to those variables. For all but the smallest design spaces, the number of cases required cannot be produced within an acceptable timeframe using a manual process. Therefore, automation of the tools was a key enabler for the successful

  5. Longitudinal Links Between Gambling Participation and Academic Performance in Youth: A Test of Four Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Girard, Alain; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2018-01-11

    Gambling participation and low academic performance are related during adolescence, but the causal mechanisms underlying this link are unclear. It is possible that gambling participation impairs academic performance. Alternatively, the link between gambling participation and low academic performance could be explained by common underlying risk factors such as impulsivity and socio-family adversity. It could also be explained by other current correlated problem behaviors such as substance use. The goal of the present study was to examine whether concurrent and longitudinal links between gambling participation and low academic performance exist from age 14 to age 17 years, net of common antecedent factors and current substance use. A convenience sample of 766 adolescents (50.6% males) from a longitudinal twin sample participated in the study. Analyses revealed significant, albeit modest, concurrent links at both ages between gambling participation and academic performance. There was also a longitudinal link between gambling participation at age 14 and academic performance at age 17, which persisted after controlling for age 12 impulsivity and socio-family adversity as well as current substance use. Gambling participation predicts a decrease in academic performance during adolescence, net of concurrent and antecedent personal and familial risk factors.

  6. Time Headway Modelling of Motorcycle-Dominated Traffic to Analyse Traffic Safety Performance and Road Link Capacity of Single Carriageways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Priyantha Wedagama

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop time headway distribution models to analyse traffic safety performance and road link capacities for motorcycle-dominated traffic in Denpasar, Bali. Three road links selected as the case study are Jl. Hayam Wuruk, Jl.Hang Tuah, and Jl. Padma. Data analysis showed that between 55%-80% of motorists in Denpasar during morning and evening peak hours paid less attention to the safe distance with the vehicles in front. The study found that Lognormal distribution models are best to fit time headway data during morning peak hours while either Weibull (3P or Pearson III distributions is for evening peak hours. Road link capacities for mixed traffic predominantly motorcycles are apparently affected by the behaviour of motorists in keeping safe distance with the vehicles in front. Theoretical road link capacities for Jl. Hayam Wuruk, Jl. Hang Tuah and Jl. Padma are 3,186 vehicles/hour, 3,077 vehicles/hour and 1935 vehicles/hour respectively.

  7. Future energy consumption and emissions in East-, Central- and West-China: Insights from soft-linking two global models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Hancheng; Mischke, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    China's role in the global economy and energy markets is expanding, however many uncertainties with regards to the country's future energy consumption and emissions remain. Large regional disparities between China's provinces exist. Scenario analysis for different sub-regions of China...... will be useful for an improved understanding of China's potential future development and associated global impacts. This study soft-links a global dynamic CGE model and a global technology-rich energy system model. Both models are expanded to include East-, Central-, and West-China. This study shows that soft...

  8. Walking the extra byte : A lifecycle model for linked open data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, T.A. van den; Veenstra, A.F.E. van; Folmer, E.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    More and more public organizations publish their data in an open format to increase transparency and foster economic activity. In this modern gold rush, organizations strive to open up as many datasets as possible, without considering the strategic importance of open data. Especially linking data to

  9. Walking the extra byte: A lifecycle model for linked open data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, Erwin; Reuvers, M.; Quak, W.; van den Broek, Tijs; van Veenstra, Anne Fleur; Folmer, Erwin; Folmer, Erwin; Reuvers, M.; Quak, W.

    2011-01-01

    More and more public organizations publish their data in an open format to increase transparency and foster economic activity. In this modern gold rush, organizations strive to open up as many datasets as possible, without considering the strategic importance of open data. Especially linking data to

  10. Sensitizing potential of enzymatically cross-linked peanut proteins in a mouse model of peanut allergy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Joost

    2014-01-01

    SCOPE: The cross-linking of proteins by enzymes to form high-molecular-weight protein, aggregates can be used to tailor the technological or physiological functionality of food products. Aggregation of dietary proteins by food processing may promote allergic sensitization, but the effects of

  11. Markers, Models, and Measurement Error: Exploring the Links between Attention Deficits and Language Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Sean M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The empirical record regarding the expected co-occurrence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and specific language impairment is confusing and contradictory. A research plan is presented that has the potential to untangle links between these 2 common neurodevelopmental disorders. Method: Data from completed and ongoing…

  12. Towards Linking Virtual Models with Physical Objects in Construction using RFID

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Birch; Christiansson, Per; Svidt, Kjeld

    2008-01-01

    and the physical objects in the construction process can improve the information and knowledge handling from design to construction, operation and maintenance. The link can be created by use of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology. This paper describes a review and assessment of existing ontologies...

  13. Pioglitazone halts axonal degeneration in a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morató, Laia; Galino, Jorge; Ruiz, Montserrat; Calingasan, Noel Ylagan; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Dumont, Magali; Naudí, Alba; Martínez, Juan José; Aubourg, Patrick; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Pamplona, Reinald; Galea, Elena; Beal, M. Flint; Ferrer, Isidre; Fourcade, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurometabolic disorder caused by inactivation of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter of very long-chain fatty acids. In mice, ABCD1 loss causes late onset axonal degeneration in the spinal cord in association with locomotor disability resembling the most common phenotype in patients, adrenomyeloneuropathy. Increasing evidence indicates that oxidative stress and bioenergetic failure play major roles in the pathogenesis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether mitochondrial biogenesis is affected in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. We demonstrated that Abcd1 null mice show reduced mitochondrial DNA concomitant with downregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis pathway driven by PGC-1α/PPARγ and reduced expression of mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c, NDUFB8 and VDAC. Moreover, we show that the oral administration of pioglitazone, an agonist of PPARγ, restored mitochondrial content and expression of master regulators of biogenesis, neutralized oxidative damage to proteins and DNA, and reversed bioenergetic failure in terms of ATP levels, NAD+/NADH ratios, pyruvate kinase and glutathione reductase activities. Most importantly, the treatment halted locomotor disability and axonal damage in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy mice. These results lend support to the use of pioglitazone in clinical trials with patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy and reveal novel molecular mechanisms of action of pioglitazone in neurodegeneration. Future studies should address the effects of this anti-diabetic drug on other axonopathies in which oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are contributing factors. PMID:23794606

  14. Pioglitazone halts axonal degeneration in a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morató, Laia; Galino, Jorge; Ruiz, Montserrat; Calingasan, Noel Ylagan; Starkov, Anatoly A; Dumont, Magali; Naudí, Alba; Martínez, Juan José; Aubourg, Patrick; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Pamplona, Reinald; Galea, Elena; Beal, M Flint; Ferrer, Isidre; Fourcade, Stéphane; Pujol, Aurora

    2013-08-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurometabolic disorder caused by inactivation of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter of very long-chain fatty acids. In mice, ABCD1 loss causes late onset axonal degeneration in the spinal cord in association with locomotor disability resembling the most common phenotype in patients, adrenomyeloneuropathy. Increasing evidence indicates that oxidative stress and bioenergetic failure play major roles in the pathogenesis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether mitochondrial biogenesis is affected in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. We demonstrated that Abcd1 null mice show reduced mitochondrial DNA concomitant with downregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis pathway driven by PGC-1α/PPARγ and reduced expression of mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c, NDUFB8 and VDAC. Moreover, we show that the oral administration of pioglitazone, an agonist of PPARγ, restored mitochondrial content and expression of master regulators of biogenesis, neutralized oxidative damage to proteins and DNA, and reversed bioenergetic failure in terms of ATP levels, NAD+/NADH ratios, pyruvate kinase and glutathione reductase activities. Most importantly, the treatment halted locomotor disability and axonal damage in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy mice. These results lend support to the use of pioglitazone in clinical trials with patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy and reveal novel molecular mechanisms of action of pioglitazone in neurodegeneration. Future studies should address the effects of this anti-diabetic drug on other axonopathies in which oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are contributing factors.

  15. Splice-correcting oligonucleotides restore BTK function in X-linked agammaglobulinemia model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bestas, Burcu; Moreno, Pedro M D; Blomberg, K Emelie M

    2014-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is an inherited immunodeficiency that results from mutations within the gene encoding Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Many XLA-associated mutations affect splicing of BTK pre-mRNA and severely impair B cell development. Here, we assessed the potential of antisense...

  16. High-speed PIV applied to the wake of the NASA CRM model in ETW at high Re-number stall conditions for sub- and transonic speeds

    OpenAIRE

    Konrath, Robert; Geisler, Reinhard; Otter, Dirk; Philipp, Florian; Ehlers, Hauke; Agocs, Janos; Quest, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU project ESWIRP the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) using high-speed camera and laser has been used to measure the turbulent flow in the wake of a stalled aircraft wing. The measurements took place on the Common Research Model (CRM) provided by NASA in the pressurized cryogenic European Transonic Wind tunnel (ETW). A specific cryo-PIV system has been used and adapted for using high-speed PIV components under the cryogenic conditions of the wind tunnel faci...

  17. Models and synchronization of time-delayed complex dynamical networks with multi-links based on adaptive control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Haipeng; Wei Nan; Li Lixiang; Xie Weisheng; Yang Yixian

    2010-01-01

    In this Letter, time-delay has been introduced in to split the networks, upon which a model of complex dynamical networks with multi-links has been constructed. Moreover, based on Lyapunov stability theory and some hypotheses, we achieve synchronization between two complex networks with different structures by designing effective controllers. The validity of the results was proved through numerical simulations of this Letter.

  18. Neuromuscular Alterations After Ankle Sprains: An Animal Model to Establish Causal Links After Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Lindsey K; McKeon, Patrick O; Fitzpatrick, Shane G; Beckemeyer, Catherine L; Uhl, Timothy L; Butterfield, Timothy A

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that contribute to the development of chronic ankle instability are not understood. Investigators have developed a hypothetical model in which neuromuscular alterations that stem from damaged ankle ligaments are thought to affect periarticular and proximal muscle activity. However, the retrospective nature of these studies does not allow a causal link to be established. To assess temporal alterations in the activity of 2 periarticular muscles of the rat ankle and 2 proximal muscles of the rat hind limb after an ankle sprain. Controlled laboratory study. Laboratory. Five healthy adult male Long Evans rats (age = 16 weeks, mass = 400.0 ± 13.5 g). Indwelling fine-wire electromyography (EMG) electrodes were implanted surgically into the biceps femoris, medial gastrocnemius, vastus lateralis, and tibialis anterior muscles of the rats. We recorded baseline EMG measurements while the rats walked on a motor-driven treadmill and then induced a closed lateral ankle sprain by overextending the lateral ankle ligaments. After ankle sprain, the rats were placed on the treadmill every 24 hours for 7 days, and we recorded postsprain EMG data. Onset time of muscle activity, phase duration, sample entropy, and minimal detectable change (MDC) were assessed and compared with baseline using 2-tailed dependent t tests. Compared with baseline, delayed onset time of muscle activity was exhibited in the biceps femoris (baseline = -16.7 ± 54.0 milliseconds [ms]) on day 0 (5.2 ± 64.1 ms; t 4 = -4.655, P = .043) and tibialis anterior (baseline = 307.0 ± 64.2 ms) muscles on day 3 (362.5 ± 55.9 ms; t 4 = -5.427, P = .03) and day 6 (357.3 ± 39.6 ms; t 4 = -3.802, P = .02). Longer phase durations were observed for the vastus lateralis (baseline = 321.9 ± 92.6 ms) on day 3 (401.3 ± 101.2 ms; t 3 = -4.001, P = .03), day 4 (404.1 ± 93.0 ms; t 3 = -3.320, P = .048), and day 5 (364.6 ± 105.2 ms; t 3 = -3.963, P = .03) and for the tibialis anterior (baseline = 103.9 ± 16.4 ms

  19. Mutation identification in a canine model of X-linked ectodermal dysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Casal, Margret L.; Scheidt, Jennifer L.; Rhodes, James L.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Werner, Petra

    2005-01-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XHED), an inherited disease recognized in humans, mice, and cattle, is characterized by hypotrichosis, a reduced number or absence of sweat glands, and missing or malformed teeth. In a subset of affected individuals and animals, mutations in the EDA gene (formerly EDI), coding for ectodysplasin, have been found to cause this phenotype. Ectodysplasin is a homotrimeric transmembrane protein with an extracellular TNF-like domain, which has been shown t...

  20. An Integrated Approach Linking Process to Structural Modeling With Microstructural Characterization for Injections-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara; Norris, Robert E.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin

    2008-09-01

    The objective of our work is to enable the optimum design of lightweight automotive structural components using injection-molded long fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). To this end, an integrated approach that links process modeling to structural analysis with experimental microstructural characterization and validation is developed. First, process models for LFTs are developed and implemented into processing codes (e.g. ORIENT, Moldflow) to predict the microstructure of the as-formed composite (i.e. fiber length and orientation distributions). In parallel, characterization and testing methods are developed to obtain necessary microstructural data to validate process modeling predictions. Second, the predicted LFT composite microstructure is imported into a structural finite element analysis by ABAQUS to determine the response of the as-formed composite to given boundary conditions. At this stage, constitutive models accounting for the composite microstructure are developed to predict various types of behaviors (i.e. thermoelastic, viscoelastic, elastic-plastic, damage, fatigue, and impact) of LFTs. Experimental methods are also developed to determine material parameters and to validate constitutive models. Such a process-linked-structural modeling approach allows an LFT composite structure to be designed with confidence through numerical simulations. Some recent results of our collaborative research will be illustrated to show the usefulness and applications of this integrated approach.

  1. Providing culturally informed mental health services to Aboriginal youth: The YouthLink model in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbioni, Daniela; Feehan, Steven; Nicholls, Craig; Soong, Wei; Rigoli, Daniela; Follett, Denise; Carastathis, Geoff; Gomes, Alison; Griffiths, Jennifer; Curtis, Kerry; Smith, Warwick; Waters, Flavie

    2018-03-24

    Aboriginal young people are more likely to experience mental health issues and to access mental health services than other young Australians, yet there are few culturally informed mental health programs and services available. This study describes and documents the effectiveness of the culturally sensitive model within YouthLink, a state-wide mental health service program in Western Australia for young people aged 13 to 24 years of age. A mixed-method design including a descriptive approach reporting on the YouthLink framework and an empirical research design where 40 Aboriginal clients completed client feedback monitoring measures between 2014 and 2016. The YouthLink culturally informed conceptual framework adheres to best practice principles relevant to work with Indigenous people, family and communities. Aboriginal young people indicated improvement across the treatment period as shown by within-group differences between the first and last session scores on feedback measures. Therapeutic alliance (together with lower baseline acuity and female gender) also contributed significantly to positive treatment outcomes. Through a strong role of Aboriginal practitioners, relationships with Aboriginal communities, and greater service flexibility that embraces cultural meaning and knowledge, YouthLink has sought to enhance its response to the needs of Aboriginal youth. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Atmospheric circulation in regional climate models over Central Europe: links to surface air temperature and the influence of driving data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plavcová, Eva; Kyselý, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, 7-8 (2012), s. 1681-1695 ISSN 0930-7575 R&D Project s: GA ČR GAP209/10/2265 Grant - others:ENSEMBLES: EU-FP6(XE) 505539 Program:FP6 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Regional climate models * Global climate models * Atmospheric circulation * Surface air temperature * ENSEMBLES * Central Europe Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 4.231, year: 2012 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00382-011-1278-8#

  3. Models for growth, decline and regrowth of the dendrites of rat Purkinje cells induced from magnitude and link-length analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldenberg, M J; O'Neill, M P; Quackenbush, L J; Pentney, R J

    1993-06-21

    This study examines Purkinje neurons of rats aged 1, 10, 18 and 28 months to investigate growth and decline in the magnitude of the dendritic tree, i.e. the number of exterior links (terminal segments) per cell. Growth in the mean number of exterior links was observed from 1 to 10 months, decline at 18 months and regrowth at 28 months. At 10, 28, and especially at 18 months, the cell size frequency distribution indicates two groups of cells, one of small and the other of large sized cells. The study also examines the relationship of age to lengths of topologically defined links of various types. For each age group we find that exterior links are longer than interior links (non-terminal or intermediate segments). Analysis of the geometric mean lengths of subtypes of exterior and interior links at maturity (10 months) indicates that they follow a Fibonacci series of link lengths, such that mean lengths of topologically defined types of mean exterior links are either about 13 or 8 microns long, while interior links are about 5 microns long. A sequential growth model for adding exterior links is suggested to illustrate a style of growth which could account for the various mean link lengths and the Fibonacci ratio (1.618) between their lengths. Interior link lengths are also dependent on the generation of exterior links from the sides of pre-existing interior links. If the Strahler branching ratio, Rb, should increase owing to growth of terminals from interior links, then mean interior link length would decline. During a period of regression, mean exterior link lengths become shorter and mean interior link lengths become longer. Changes in mean interior link length are much less affected by changes in Rb during regression than is the situation during growth. Finally, the changes in link lengths dictate that the ratio of mean exterior to mean interior link length increases during growth phases from 1 to 10 and 18 to 28 months, and declines during regression from 10 to 28

  4. NOAA SWPC / NASA CCMC Space Weather Modeling Assessment Project: Toward the Validation of Advancements in Heliospheric Space Weather Prediction Within WSA-Enlil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, E. T.; Pizzo, V. J.; Biesecker, D. A.; Mays, M. L.; MacNeice, P. J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Viereck, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    In 2011, NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) transitioned the world's first operational space weather model into use at the National Weather Service's Weather and Climate Operational Supercomputing System (WCOSS). This operational forecasting tool is comprised of the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) solar wind model coupled with the Enlil heliospheric MHD model. Relying on daily-updated photospheric magnetograms produced by the National Solar Observatory's Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG), this tool provides critical predictive knowledge of heliospheric dynamics such as high speed streams and coronal mass ejections. With the goal of advancing this predictive model and quantifying progress, SWPC and NASA's Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) have initiated a collaborative effort to assess improvements in space weather forecasts at Earth by moving from a single daily-updated magnetogram to a sequence of time-dependent magnetograms to drive the ambient inputs for the WSA-Enlil model as well as incorporating the newly developed Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) model. We will provide a detailed overview of the scope of this effort and discuss preliminary results from the first phase focusing on the impact of time-dependent magnetogram inputs to the WSA-Enlil model.

  5. Scandinavian links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Knowles, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    centres, one joins more thinly populated regions, and the last one links peripheral areas. Two of them (The Great Belt Link and the Oresund Link) have been constructed and are in full operation. The third (the Fehmarnbelt Link) has been decided 2008 on bilateral government level. The three links...

  6. Links between circulation indices and precipitation in the Mediterranean in an ensemble of regional climate models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beranová, Romana; Kyselý, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 123, č. 3 (2016), s. 693-701 ISSN 0177-798X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/10/2265 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 505539 - ENSEMBLES Program:FP6 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : atmospheric sciences climatology * atmospheric protection * air quality control * air pollution * waste water technology * water pollution control * water management * aquatic pollution Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.640, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00704-015-1381-6

  7. Design and modeling of an autonomous multi-link snake robot, capable of 3D-motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizkallah Rabel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the design of an autonomous, wheeless, mechanical snake robot that was modeled and built at Notre Dame University – Louaize. The robot is also capable of 3D motion with an ability to climb in the z-direction. The snake is made of a series links, each containing one to three high torque DC motors and a gearing system. They are connected to each other through Aluminum hollow rods that can be rotated through a 180° span. This allows the snake to move in various environments including unfriendly and cluttered ones. The front link has a proximity sensor used to map the environment. This mapping is sent to a microcontroller which controls and adapts the motion pattern of the snake. The snake can therefore choose to avoid obstacles, or climb over them if their height is within its range. The presented model is made of five links, but this number can be increased as their role is repetitive. The novel design is meant to overcome previous limitations by allowing 3D motion through electric actuators and low energy consumption.

  8. Online Simulations of Global Aerosol Distributions in the NASA GEOS-4 Model and Comparisons to Satellite and Ground-Based Aerosol Optical Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarco, Peter; daSilva, Arlindo; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We have implemented a module for tropospheric aerosols (GO CART) online in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 4 model and simulated global aerosol distributions for the period 2000-2006. The new online system offers several advantages over the previous offline version, providing a platform for aerosol data assimilation, aerosol-chemistry-climate interaction studies, and short-range chemical weather forecasting and climate prediction. We introduce as well a methodology for sampling model output consistently with satellite aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrievals to facilitate model-satellite comparison. Our results are similar to the offline GOCART model and to the models participating in the AeroCom intercomparison. The simulated AOT has similar seasonal and regional variability and magnitude to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer observations. The model AOT and Angstrom parameter are consistently low relative to AERONET in biomass-burning-dominated regions, where emissions appear to be underestimated, consistent with the results of the offline GOCART model. In contrast, the model AOT is biased high in sulfate-dominated regions of North America and Europe. Our model-satellite comparison methodology shows that diurnal variability in aerosol loading is unimportant compared to sampling the model where the satellite has cloud-free observations, particularly in sulfate-dominated regions. Simulated sea salt burden and optical thickness are high by a factor of 2-3 relative to other models, and agreement between model and satellite over-ocean AOT is improved by reducing the model sea salt burden by a factor of 2. The best agreement in both AOT magnitude and variability occurs immediately downwind of the Saharan dust plume.

  9. Linking population viability, habitat suitability, and landscape simulation models for conservation planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Larson; Frank R., III Thompson; Joshua J. Millspaugh; William D. Dijak; Stephen R. Shifley

    2004-01-01

    Methods for habitat modeling based on landscape simulations and population viability modeling based on habitat quality are well developed, but no published study of which we are aware has effectively joined them in a single, comprehensive analysis. We demonstrate the application of a population viability model for ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapillus)...

  10. Linking the Leadership Identity Development Model to Collegiate Recreation and Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stacey L

    2015-01-01

    The Leadership Identity Development (LID) Model (Komives, Owen, Longerbeam, Mainella, & Osteen, 2005) provides a stage leadership development model for college students that can be applied to collegiate recreation student staff, volunteers, participants, and varsity student-athletes. This chapter provides guidance to implement the model in these settings and to create environments that support development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  11. Recreation Value of Water to Wetlands in the San Joaquin Valley: Linked Multinomial Logit and Count Data Trip Frequency Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, Michael; Loomis, John

    1992-10-01

    The recreational benefits from providing increased quantities of water to wildlife and fisheries habitats is estimated using linked multinomial logit site selection models and count data trip frequency models. The study encompasses waterfowl hunting, fishing and wildlife viewing at 14 recreational resources in the San Joaquin Valley, including the National Wildlife Refuges, the State Wildlife Management Areas, and six river destinations. The economic benefits of increasing water supplies to wildlife refuges were also examined by using the estimated models to predict changing patterns of site selection and overall participation due to increases in water allocations. Estimates of the dollar value per acre foot of water are calculated for increases in water to refuges. The resulting model is a flexible and useful tool for estimating the economic benefits of alternative water allocation policies for wildlife habitat and rivers.

  12. Simulations of the Mid-Pliocene Warm Period Using Two Versions of the NASA-GISS ModelE2-R Coupled Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, M. A.; Sohl, L. E.; Jonas, J. A.; Dowsett, H. J.; Kelley, M.

    2013-01-01

    The mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP) bears many similarities to aspects of future global warming as projected by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2007). Both marine and terrestrial data point to high-latitude temperature amplification, including large decreases in sea ice and land ice, as well as expansion of warmer climate biomes into higher latitudes. Here we present our most recent simulations of the mid-Pliocene climate using the CMIP5 version of the NASAGISS Earth System Model (ModelE2-R). We describe the substantial impact associated with a recent correction made in the implementation of the Gent-McWilliams ocean mixing scheme (GM), which has a large effect on the simulation of ocean surface temperatures, particularly in the North Atlantic Ocean. The effect of this correction on the Pliocene climate results would not have been easily determined from examining its impact on the preindustrial runs alone, a useful demonstration of how the consequences of code improvements as seen in modern climate control runs do not necessarily portend the impacts in extreme climates.Both the GM-corrected and GM-uncorrected simulations were contributed to the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) Experiment 2. Many findings presented here corroborate results from other PlioMIP multi-model ensemble papers, but we also emphasize features in the ModelE2-R simulations that are unlike the ensemble means. The corrected version yields results that more closely resemble the ocean core data as well as the PRISM3D reconstructions of the mid-Pliocene, especially the dramatic warming in the North Atlantic and Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Sea, which in the new simulation appears to be far more realistic than previously found with older versions of the GISS model. Our belief is that continued development of key physical routines in the atmospheric model, along with higher resolution and recent corrections to mixing parameterisations in the ocean model, have led

  13. NASA's unique networking environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1988-01-01

    Networking is an infrastructure technology; it is a tool for NASA to support its space and aeronautics missions. Some of NASA's networking problems are shared by the commercial and/or military communities, and can be solved by working with these communities. However, some of NASA's networking problems are unique and will not be addressed by these other communities. Individual characteristics of NASA's space-mission networking enviroment are examined, the combination of all these characteristics that distinguish NASA's networking systems from either commercial or military systems is explained, and some research areas that are important for NASA to pursue are outlined.

  14. Developing a Framework to Link Catchment Modelling tools to Decision Support Systems for Catchment Management and Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Russell; Owen, Gareth

    2015-04-01

    Over the past few years a series of catchment monitoring studies in the UK have developed a wide range of tools to enable managers and planners to make informed decisions to target several key outcomes. These outcomes include the mitigation of diffuse pollution and the reduction of flood risk. Good progress has been but additional steps are still required to link together more detailed models that represent catchment processes with the decision support systems (often termed matrices; i.e. DSMs) which form the basis of these planning and management tools. Examples include: (i) the FARM tools developed by the PROACTIVE team at Newcastle University to assess different catchment management options for mitigating against flooding events, (ii) TOPMANAGE, a suite of algorithms that link with high resolution DEMs to enable surface flow pathways, having the potential to be mitigated by Natural Flood Management (NFM) features (in order to target diffuse pollution due to nutrients and sediments) to be identified. To date, these DSMs have not been underpinned by models that can be run in real-time to quantify the benefits in terms of measurable reductions in flood or nutrient pollution risks. Their use has therefore been mostly as qualitative assessment tools. This study aims to adapt an existing spreadsheet-based model, the CRAFT, in order for it to become fully coupled to a DSM approach. Previous catchment scale applications of the CRAFT have focussed on meso-scale studies where any management interventions at a local scale are unlikely to be detectable at the monitoring point (the catchment outlet). The model has however been reasonably successful in identifying potential flow and transport pathways that link the headwater subcatchments to the outlet. Furthermore, recent enhancements to the model enable features such as sedimentation ponds and lagoons that can trap and remove nutrients and sediments to be added, once data become available from different types of NFM

  15. QSAR DataBank repository: open and linked qualitative and quantitative structure-activity relationship models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruusmann, V; Sild, S; Maran, U

    2015-01-01

    Structure-activity relationship models have been used to gain insight into chemical and physical processes in biomedicine, toxicology, biotechnology, etc. for almost a century. They have been recognized as valuable tools in decision support workflows for qualitative and quantitative predictions. The main obstacle preventing broader adoption of quantitative structure-activity relationships [(Q)SARs] is that published models are still relatively difficult to discover, retrieve and redeploy in a modern computer-oriented environment. This publication describes a digital repository that makes in silico (Q)SAR-type descriptive and predictive models archivable, citable and usable in a novel way for most common research and applied science purposes. The QSAR DataBank (QsarDB) repository aims to make the processes and outcomes of in silico modelling work transparent, reproducible and accessible. Briefly, the models are represented in the QsarDB data format and stored in a content-aware repository (a.k.a. smart repository). Content awareness has two dimensions. First, models are organized into collections and then into collection hierarchies based on their metadata. Second, the repository is not only an environment for browsing and downloading models (the QDB archive) but also offers integrated services, such as model analysis and visualization and prediction making. The QsarDB repository unlocks the potential of descriptive and predictive in silico (Q)SAR-type models by allowing new and different types of collaboration between model developers and model users. The key enabling factor is the representation of (Q)SAR models in the QsarDB data format, which makes it easy to preserve and share all relevant data, information and knowledge. Model developers can become more productive by effectively reusing prior art. Model users can make more confident decisions by relying on supporting information that is larger and more diverse than before. Furthermore, the smart repository

  16. Evidence for link between modelled trends in Antarctic sea ice and underestimated westerly wind changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purich, Ariaan; Cai, Wenju; England, Matthew H; Cowan, Tim

    2016-02-04

    Despite global warming, total Antarctic sea ice coverage increased over 1979-2013. However, the majority of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 models simulate a decline. Mechanisms causing this discrepancy have so far remained elusive. Here we show that weaker trends in the intensification of the Southern Hemisphere westerly wind jet simulated by the models may contribute to this disparity. During austral summer, a strengthened jet leads to increased upwelling of cooler subsurface water and strengthened equatorward transport, conducive to increased sea ice. As the majority of models underestimate summer jet trends, this cooling process is underestimated compared with observations and is insufficient to offset warming in the models. Through the sea ice-albedo feedback, models produce a high-latitude surface ocean warming and sea ice decline, contrasting the observed net cooling and sea ice increase. A realistic simulation of observed wind changes may be crucial for reproducing the recent observed sea ice increase.

  17. Markers, Models, and Measurement Error: Exploring the Links Between Attention Deficits and Language Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Sean M

    2016-02-01

    The empirical record regarding the expected co-occurrence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and specific language impairment is confusing and contradictory. A research plan is presented that has the potential to untangle links between these 2 common neurodevelopmental disorders. Data from completed and ongoing research projects examining the relative value of different clinical markers for separating cases of specific language impairment from ADHD are presented. The best option for measuring core language impairments in a manner that does not potentially penalize individuals with ADHD is to focus assessment on key grammatical and verbal memory skills. Likewise, assessment of ADHD symptoms through standardized informant rating scales is optimized when they are adjusted for overlapping language and academic symptoms. As a collection, these clinical metrics set the stage for further examination of potential linkages between attention deficits and language impairments.

  18. Percolation model for electron conduction in films of metal nanoparticles linked by organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, K.H.; Herrmann, J.; Raguse, B.; Baxter, G.; Reda, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: We have investigated theoretically and experimentally the temperature dependence of the conductance of films of Au nanoparticles linked by alkane dithiol molecules in the temperature range between 5 K and 300 K. Conduction in these films is due to tunneling of single electrons between neighbouring metal nanoparticles. During tunnelling an electron has to overcome the Coulomb charging energy. We find that the observed temperature dependence of the conductance is non-Arrhenius like and can be described in terms of a percolation theory which takes account of disorder in the system. Disorder in our nanoparticle films is caused by variations in the nanoparticle size, fluctuations in the separation gaps between adjacent nanoparticles and by offset charges. To explain in detail our experimental data, a wide distribution of separation gaps and charging energies is needed. We find that a wide Coulomb charging energy distribution can arise from random offset charges even if the nanoparticle size distribution is narrow

  19. Diaphragm Repair with a Novel Cross-Linked Collagen Biomaterial in a Growing Rabbit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Steffi; Decaluwe, Herbert; Ruol, Michele; Manodoro, Stefano; Kramer, Manuel; Till, Holger; Deprest, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia and large defects often require patch closure. Acellular collagen matrices (ACM) have been suggested as an alternative to synthetic durable patches as they are remodeled by the host or could also be used for tissue engineering purposes. Materials and Methods 2.0x1.0 cm diaphragmatic defects were created in 6-weeks old New-Zealand white rabbits. We compared reconstruction with a purpose-designed cross-linked ACM (Matricel) to 4-layer non-cross-linked small intestinal submucosa (SIS) and a 1-layer synthetic Dual Mesh (Gore-Tex). Unoperated animals or animals undergoing primary closure (4/0 polyglecaprone) served as age-matched controls. 60 (n = 25) resp. 90 (n = 17) days later, animals underwent chest x-ray and obduction for gross examination of explants, scoring of adhesion and inflammatory response. Also, uniaxial tensiometry was done, comparing explants to contralateral native diaphragmatic tissue. Results Overall weight nearly doubled from 1,554±242 g at surgery to 2,837±265 g at obduction (+84%). X-rays did show rare elevation of the left diaphragm (SIS = 1, Gore-Tex = 1, unoperated control = 1), but no herniation of abdominal organs. 56% of SIS and 10% of Matricel patches degraded with visceral bulging in four (SIS = 3, Matricel = 1). Adhesion scores were limited: 0.5 (Matricel) to 1 (SIS, Gore-Tex) to the left lung (p = 0.008) and 2.5 (Gore-Tex), 3 (SIS) and 4 (Matricel) to the liver (pGore-Tex (pGore-Tex implants (p<0.05). Conclusions Matricel induced a macrophage-dominated inflammatory response, more adhesions, had appropriate strength but a lesser compliance compared to native tissue. The herein investigated ACM is not a viable option for CDH repair. PMID:26147985

  20. Is intervertebral disc pressure linked to herniation?: An in-vitro study using a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Mamiko; Gooyers, Chad E; Karakolis, Thomas; Noguchi, Kimihiro; Callaghan, Jack P

    2016-06-14

    Approximately 40% of low back pain cases have been attributed to internal disc disruption. This disruption mechanism may be linked to intradiscal pressure changes, since mechanical loading directly affects the pressure and the stresses that the inner annulus fibrosus experiences. The objective of this study was to characterize cycle-varying changes in four dependent measures (intradiscal pressure, flexion-extension moments, specimen height loss, and specimen rotation angle) using a cyclic flexion-extension (CFE) loading protocol known to induce internal disc disruption. A novel bore-screw pressure sensor system was used to instrument 14 porcine functional spinal units. The CFE loading protocol consisted of 3600 cycles of flexion-extension range of motion (average 18.30 (SD 3.76) degrees) at 1Hz with 1500N of compressive load. On average, intradiscal pressure and specimen height decreased by 47% and 62%, respectively, and peak moments increased by 102%. From 900 to 2100 cycles, all variables exhibited significant changes between successive time points, except for the specimen posture at maximum pressure, which demonstrated a significant shift towards flexion limit after 2700 cycles. There were no further changes in pressure range after 2100 cycles, whereas peak moments and height loss were significantly different from prior time points throughout the CFE protocol. Twelve of the 14 specimens showed partial herniation; however, injury type was not significantly correlated to any of the dependent measures. Although change in pressure was not predictive of damage type, the increase in pressure range seen during this protocol supports the premise that repetitive combined loading (i.e., radial compression, tension and shear) imposes damage to the inner annulus fibrosus, and its failure mechanism may be linked to fatigue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diaphragm Repair with a Novel Cross-Linked Collagen Biomaterial in a Growing Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Steffi; Decaluwe, Herbert; Ruol, Michele; Manodoro, Stefano; Kramer, Manuel; Till, Holger; Deprest, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia and large defects often require patch closure. Acellular collagen matrices (ACM) have been suggested as an alternative to synthetic durable patches as they are remodeled by the host or could also be used for tissue engineering purposes. 2.0x1.0 cm diaphragmatic defects were created in 6-weeks old New-Zealand white rabbits. We compared reconstruction with a purpose-designed cross-linked ACM (Matricel) to 4-layer non-cross-linked small intestinal submucosa (SIS) and a 1-layer synthetic Dual Mesh (Gore-Tex). Unoperated animals or animals undergoing primary closure (4/0 polyglecaprone) served as age-matched controls. 60 (n = 25) resp. 90 (n = 17) days later, animals underwent chest x-ray and obduction for gross examination of explants, scoring of adhesion and inflammatory response. Also, uniaxial tensiometry was done, comparing explants to contralateral native diaphragmatic tissue. Overall weight nearly doubled from 1,554±242 g at surgery to 2,837±265 g at obduction (+84%). X-rays did show rare elevation of the left diaphragm (SIS = 1, Gore-Tex = 1, unoperated control = 1), but no herniation of abdominal organs. 56% of SIS and 10% of Matricel patches degraded with visceral bulging in four (SIS = 3, Matricel = 1). Adhesion scores were limited: 0.5 (Matricel) to 1 (SIS, Gore-Tex) to the left lung (p = 0.008) and 2.5 (Gore-Tex), 3 (SIS) and 4 (Matricel) to the liver (pGore-Tex (pGore-Tex implants (p<0.05). Matricel induced a macrophage-dominated inflammatory response, more adhesions, had appropriate strength but a lesser compliance compared to native tissue. The herein investigated ACM is not a viable option for CDH repair.

  2. Modeling the links between young swimmers' performance: energetic and biomechanic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Tiago M; Costa, Mário; Marinho, Daniel A; Coelho, Joel; Moreira, Marc; Silva, António J

    2010-08-01

    The aim was to develop a path-flow analysis model for young swimmers' performance based on biomechanical and energetic parameters, using structural equation modeling. Thirty-eight male young swimmers served as subjects. Performance was assessed by the 200-m freestyle event. For biomechanical assessment the stroke length, the stroke frequency and the swimming velocity were analyzed. Energetics assessment included the critical velocity, the stroke index and the propulsive efficiency. The confirmatory model explained 79% of swimming performance after deleting the stroke index-performance path, which was nonsignificant (SRMR = 0.06). As a conclusion, the model is appropriate to explain performance in young swimmers.

  3. Effect of Anatomical Modeling on Space Radiation Dose Estimates: A Comparison of Doses for NASA Phantoms and 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile UF Hybrid Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, A.; VanBaalen, M.; Shavers, M.; Semones, E.; Dodge, C.; Bolch, W.

    2010-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed dose to individual organs of a space crewmember is affected by the geometry of the anatomical model of the astronaut used in the radiation transport calculation. For astronaut dosimetry, NASA currently uses the computerized anatomical male (CAM) and computerized anatomical female (CAF) stylized phantoms to represent astronauts in its operational radiation dose analyses. These phantoms are available in one size and in two body positions. In contrast, the UF Hybrid Adult Male and Female (UFHADM and UFHADF) phantoms have organ shapes based on actual CT data. The surfaces of these phantoms are defined by non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces, and are thus flexible in terms of body morphometry and extremity positioning. In this study, UFHADM and UFHADF are scaled to dimensions corresponding to 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (PCTL) male and female astronauts. A ray-tracing program is written in Visual Basic 2008, which is then used to create areal density maps for dose points corresponding to various organs within the phantoms. The areal density maps, along with appropriate space radiation spectra, are input into the NASA program couplet HZETRN/BRYNTRN, and organ doses are calculated. The areal density maps selected tissues and organs of the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared. In addition, the organ doses for the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared to organ doses for CAM and CAF.

  4. Stereo Photogrammetry Measurements of the Position and Attitude of a Nozzle-Plume/Shock-Wave Interaction Model in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura K.; Drain, Bethany A.; Heineck, James T.; Durston, Donald A.

    2017-01-01

    Stereo photogrammetry was used to measure the position and attitude of a slender body of revolution during nozzle-plume/shock-wave interaction tests in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The model support system was designed to allow the model to be placed at many locations in the test section relative to a pressure rail on one sidewall. It included a streamwise traverse as well as a thin blade that offset the model axis from the sting axis. With these features the support system was more flexible than usual resulting in higher-than-usual uncertainty in the position and attitude of the model. Also contributing to this uncertainty were the absence of a balance, so corrections for sting deflections could not be applied, and the wings-vertical orientation of the model, which precluded using a gravity-based accelerometer to measure pitch angle. Therefore, stereo photogrammetry was chosen to provide independent measures of the model position and orientation. This paper describes the photogrammetry system and presents selected results from the test.

  5. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a NASA funded facility, delivering heavy ion beams to a target area where scientists...

  6. A Novel Grey Prediction Model Combining Markov Chain with Functional-Link Net and Its Application to Foreign Tourist Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chung Hu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Grey prediction models for time series have been widely applied to demand forecasting because only limited data are required for them to build a time series model without any statistical assumptions. Previous studies have demonstrated that the combination of grey prediction with neural networks helps grey prediction perform better. Some methods have been presented to improve the prediction accuracy of the popular GM(1,1 model by using the Markov chain to estimate the residual needed to modify a predicted value. Compared to the previous Grey-Markov models, this study contributes to apply the functional-link net to estimate the degree to which a predicted value obtained from the GM(1,1 model can be adjusted. Furthermore, the troublesome number of states and their bounds that are not easily specified in Markov chain have been determined by a genetic algorithm. To verify prediction performance, the proposed grey prediction model was applied to an important grey system problem—foreign tourist forecasting. Experimental results show that the proposed model provides satisfactory results compared to the other Grey-Markov models considered.

  7. Development of a model for activated sludge aeration systems: linking air supply, distribution, and demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraa, Oliver; Rieger, Leiv; Alex, Jens

    2017-02-01

    During the design of a water resource recovery facility, it is becoming industry practice to use simulation software to assist with process design. Aeration is one of the key components of the activated sludge process, and is one of the most important aspects of modelling wastewater treatment systems. However, aeration systems are typically not modelled in detail in most wastewater treatment process modelling studies. A comprehensive dynamic aeration system model has been developed that captures both air supply and demand. The model includes sub-models for blowers, pipes, fittings, and valves. An extended diffuser model predicts both oxygen transfer efficiency within an aeration basin and pressure drop across the diffusers. The aeration system model allows engineers to analyse aeration systems as a whole to determine biological air requirements, blower performance, air distribution, control valve impacts, controller design and tuning, and energy costs. This enables engineers to trouble-shoot the entire aeration system including process, equipment and controls. It also allows much more realistic design of these highly complex systems.

  8. LINKING MICROBES TO CLIMATE: INCORPORATING MICROBIAL ACTIVITY INTO CLIMATE MODELS COLLOQUIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLong, Edward; Harwood, Caroline; Reid, Ann

    2011-01-01

    This report explains the connection between microbes and climate, discusses in general terms what modeling is and how it applied to climate, and discusses the need for knowledge in microbial physiology, evolution, and ecology to contribute to the determination of fluxes and rates in climate models. It recommends with a multi-pronged approach to address the gaps.

  9. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J.M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k c and k ¯ and

  10. Modelling control of avian influenza in poultry: the link with data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de M.C.M.; Hagenaars, T.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the use of modelling in the evaluation of strategies designed to control epidemics of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in poultry. Referring to a number of published models for HPAI transmission in poultry, the authors describe the different ways that

  11. Modelling quality attributes of truss tomatoes: Linking colour and firmness maturity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, R.E.; Huijben, T.P.M.; Tijskens, L.M.M.; Kooten, van O.

    2007-01-01

    Postharvest life of tomatoes is limited by colour and firmness when unripe and by firmness when over-ripe. Up till now, little effort has been devoted to develop quality models that deal with both the colour and firmness development. Here, tomato colour and firmness models are presented as a

  12. Cognitive Models: The Missing Link to Learning Fraction Multiplication and Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Belinda V.

    2008-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study aims to streamline cognitive models on fraction multiplication and division that contain the most worthwhile features of other existing models. Its exploratory nature and its approach to proof elicitation can be used to help establish its effectiveness in building students' understanding of fractions as compared to…

  13. An interpersonal circumplex model of children's social goals: links with peer-reported behavior and sociometric status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojanen, Tiina; Grönroos, Matti; Salmivalli, Christina

    2005-09-01

    The objective of the present research was to develop an assessment model for children's social goals. The aims were (a) to fit children's social goals to a circumplex model and to examine links between goals and peer-reported social behaviors (aggression, withdrawal, and prosocial behavior) in a sample of 276 participants (134 girls, 11- to 12-year-olds) and (b) to replicate these findings and examine whether social behavior mediates the relationship between goals and sociometric status in an independent cross-validation sample of 310 participants (143 girls, 11- to 13-year-olds). Results showed a satisfactory fit to the circumplex model and adequate psychometric properties of the goal scales of the new measure, the Interpersonal Goals Inventory for Children. Other findings included significant and meaningful relations between goals and peer-reported behavior. Social behavior mediated the relations between goals and sociometric status. Copyright 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Age-specific distributions from coarse-count data: An epidemiological and demographic application of a penalized composite link model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Silvia

    Vital statistics are often available to health researchers on a low resolution. In mortality analysis the distribution of deaths by age is often aggregated in groups of 5 years of age with a wide open-ended interval that sums a total for persons above age 85. The data that the researcher observes...... are therefore only an aggregate of true latent values. Grouping vital statistics in relatively wide bins before making them available is due to several reasons: Protect the privacy of patients; enable a compact presentation of the data; assemble scares observations; make them comparable with other databases...... a non-parametric method is developed to efficiently estimate age-at-death distributions and mortality rates from coarsely grouped data. The approach is based on a yet unexplored statistical model, the penalized composite link model, which extends generalized linear models. Observations are treated...

  15. Effect of land cover on atmospheric processes and air quality over the continental United States – a NASA Unified WRF (NU-WRF model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Tao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The land surface plays a crucial role in regulating water and energy fluxes at the land–atmosphere (L–A interface and controls many processes and feedbacks in the climate system. Land cover and vegetation type remains one key determinant of soil moisture content that impacts air temperature, planetary boundary layer (PBL evolution, and precipitation through soil-moisture–evapotranspiration coupling. In turn, it will affect atmospheric chemistry and air quality. This paper presents the results of a modeling study of the effect of land cover on some key L–A processes with a focus on air quality. The newly developed NASA Unified Weather Research and Forecast (NU-WRF modeling system couples NASA's Land Information System (LIS with the community WRF model and allows users to explore the L–A processes and feedbacks. Three commonly used satellite-derived land cover datasets – i.e., from the US Geological Survey (USGS and University of Maryland (UMD, which are based on the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR, and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS – bear large differences in agriculture, forest, grassland, and urban spatial distributions in the continental United States, and thus provide an excellent case to investigate how land cover change would impact atmospheric processes and air quality. The weeklong simulations demonstrate the noticeable differences in soil moisture/temperature, latent/sensible heat flux, PBL height, wind, NO2/ozone, and PM2.5 air quality. These discrepancies can be traced to associate with the land cover properties, e.g., stomatal resistance, albedo and emissivity, and roughness characteristics. It also implies that the rapid urban growth may have complex air quality implications with reductions in peak ozone but more frequent high ozone events.

  16. Atomic model of a cell-wall cross-linking enzyme in complex with an intact bacterial peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanda, Paul; Triboulet, Sébastien; Laguri, Cédric; Bougault, Catherine M; Ayala, Isabel; Callon, Morgane; Arthur, Michel; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-24

    The maintenance of bacterial cell shape and integrity is largely attributed to peptidoglycan, a highly cross-linked biopolymer. The transpeptidases that perform this cross-linking are important targets for antibiotics. Despite this biomedical importance, to date no structure of a protein in complex with an intact bacterial peptidoglycan has been resolved, primarily due to the large size and flexibility of peptidoglycan sacculi. Here we use solid-state NMR spectroscopy to derive for the first time an atomic model of an l,d-transpeptidase from Bacillus subtilis bound to its natural substrate, the intact B. subtilis peptidoglycan. Importantly, the model obtained from protein chemical shift perturbation data shows that both domains-the catalytic domain as well as the proposed peptidoglycan recognition domain-are important for the interaction and reveals a novel binding motif that involves residues outside of the classical enzymatic pocket. Experiments on mutants and truncated protein constructs independently confirm the binding site and the implication of both domains. Through measurements of dipolar-coupling derived order parameters of bond motion we show that protein binding reduces the flexibility of peptidoglycan. This first report of an atomic model of a protein-peptidoglycan complex paves the way for the design of new antibiotic drugs targeting l,d-transpeptidases. The strategy developed here can be extended to the study of a large variety of enzymes involved in peptidoglycan morphogenesis.

  17. Linking “Micro” to “Macro” Models of State Breakdown to Improve Methods for Political Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Turchin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Three predictive problems bedevil our ability to foresee political crises and state breakdown: (1 how to tell when a previously stable state falls into a situation of hidden but dangerous instability; (2 how to tell, once a certain level of instability has appeared in the form of protests, riots, or regional rebellions, whether chaos will grow and accelerate into revolution or civil war, or if the protests are likely to be contained and dampen out; and (3 how to tell which individuals and groups are likely to be the main source of mobilization for radical movements, and whether opposition networks will link up, grow and spread, or be isolated and contained. Prior work has focused on each of these problems separately. However, all three issues are crucial to understanding and foreseeing conflict dynamics. These issues operate on different time-scales and require separate models. In this article we discuss how better models of each process could be developed and, crucially, integrated with data for a more effective prediction system. A major theoretical challenge for us is to link these different approaches in order to increase their predictive power. A major empirical challenge is to identify data (direct or proxy that can be used to parameterize, validate, and test our models.

  18. Linking Resource-Based Strategies to Customer-Focused Performance for Professional Services: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Lu Wu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper links professional service firms’ resource-based strategies to their customer-focused performance for formulating service quality improvement priorities. The research applies the structural equation modelling approach to survey data from Hong Kong construction consultants to test some hypotheses. The study validates the various measures of firms’ resource-based strategies and customer-focused performance and bridges the gaps in firms’ organizational learning, core competences and customer-focused performance mediated by their strategic flexibility. The research results have practical implications for professional service firms to deploy resources appropriately to first enhance different competences and then improve customerfocused performance using their different competences.

  19. Is there any link between accreditation programs and the models of organizational excellence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Tobal Berssaneti

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether accredited health organizations perform better management practices than non-accredited ones. METHOD The study was developed in two stages: a literature review, and a study of multiple cases in 12 healthcare organizations in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. It surveyed articles comparing hospital accreditation with the EFQM (European Foundation for Quality Management model of excellence in management. According to the pertinent literature, the accreditation model and the EFQM model are convergent and supplementary in some aspects. RESULTS With 99% confidence, one can say that there is evidence that accredited organizations scored better in the evaluation based on the EFQM model in comparison to non-accredited organizations. This result was also confirmed in the comparison of results between the categories Facilitators and Results in the EFQM model. CONCLUSION There is convergence between the accreditation model and the EFQM excellence model, suggesting that accreditation helps the healthcare sector to implement the best management practices already used by other business sectors.

  20. On the asymptotic ergodic capacity of FSO links with generalized pointing error model

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Quwaiee, Hessa

    2015-09-11

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication systems are negatively affected by two physical phenomenon, namely, scintillation due to atmospheric turbulence and pointing errors. To quantize the effect of these two factors on FSO system performance, we need an effective mathematical model for them. Scintillations are typically modeled by the log-normal and Gamma-Gamma distributions for weak and strong turbulence conditions, respectively. In this paper, we propose and study a generalized pointing error model based on the Beckmann distribution. We then derive the asymptotic ergodic capacity of FSO systems under the joint impact of turbulence and generalized pointing error impairments. © 2015 IEEE.

  1. Diaphragm Repair with a Novel Cross-Linked Collagen Biomaterial in a Growing Rabbit Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffi Mayer

    Full Text Available Neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia and large defects often require patch closure. Acellular collagen matrices (ACM have been suggested as an alternative to synthetic durable patches as they are remodeled by the host or could also be used for tissue engineering purposes.2.0x1.0 cm diaphragmatic defects were created in 6-weeks old New-Zealand white rabbits. We compared reconstruction with a purpose-designed cross-linked ACM (Matricel to 4-layer non-cross-linked small intestinal submucosa (SIS and a 1-layer synthetic Dual Mesh (Gore-Tex. Unoperated animals or animals undergoing primary closure (4/0 polyglecaprone served as age-matched controls. 60 (n = 25 resp. 90 (n = 17 days later, animals underwent chest x-ray and obduction for gross examination of explants, scoring of adhesion and inflammatory response. Also, uniaxial tensiometry was done, comparing explants to contralateral native diaphragmatic tissue.Overall weight nearly doubled from 1,554±242 g at surgery to 2,837±265 g at obduction (+84%. X-rays did show rare elevation of the left diaphragm (SIS = 1, Gore-Tex = 1, unoperated control = 1, but no herniation of abdominal organs. 56% of SIS and 10% of Matricel patches degraded with visceral bulging in four (SIS = 3, Matricel = 1. Adhesion scores were limited: 0.5 (Matricel to 1 (SIS, Gore-Tex to the left lung (p = 0.008 and 2.5 (Gore-Tex, 3 (SIS and 4 (Matricel to the liver (p<0.0001. Tensiometry revealed a reduced bursting strength but normal compliance for SIS. Compliance was reduced in Matricel and Gore-Tex (p<0.01. Inflammatory response was characterized by a more polymorphonuclear cell (SIS resp. macrophage (Matricel type of infiltrate (p<0.05. Fibrosis was similar for all groups, except there was less mature collagen deposited to Gore-Tex implants (p<0.05.Matricel induced a macrophage-dominated inflammatory response, more adhesions, had appropriate strength but a lesser compliance compared to native tissue. The herein

  2. Impact of Radiatively Interactive Dust Aerosols on Dust Transport and Mobilization in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Earth Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarco, P. R.; Rocha Lima, A.; Darmenov, A.; Bloecker, C.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosols scatter and absorb solar and infrared radiation, impacting the energy budget of the Earth system which in turns feeds back on the dynamical processes responsible for mobilization of dust in the first place. In previous work with radiatively interactive aerosols in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System global model (GEOS-5) we found a positive feedback between dust absorption and emissions. Emissions were the largest for the highest shortwave absorption considered, which additionally produced simulated dust transport in the best agreement with observations. The positive feedback found was in contrast to other modeling studies which instead found a negative feedback, where the impact of dust absorption was to stabilize the surface levels of the atmosphere and so reduce wind speeds. A key difference between our model and other models was that in GEOS-5 we simulated generally larger dust particles, with correspondingly larger infrared absorption that led to a pronounced difference in the diurnal cycle of dust emissions versus simulations where these long wave effects were not considered. In this paper we seek to resolve discrepancies between our previous simulations and those of other modeling groups. We revisit the question of dust radiative feedback on emissions with a recent version of the GEOS-5 system running at a higher spatial resolution and including updates to the parameterizations for dust mobilization, initial dust particle size distribution, loss processes, and radiative transfer, and identify key uncertainties that remain based on dust optical property assumptions.

  3. Links Related to the Indoor Air Quality Building Education and Assessment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Indoor Air Quality Building Education and Assessment Model (I-BEAM) is a guidance tool designed for use by building professionals and others interested in indoor air quality in commercial buildings.

  4. Synthesis and molecular modelling studies of phenyl linked oxadiazole-phenylhydrazone hybrids as potent antileishmanial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhammad; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Imran, Syahrul; Anouar, El Hassane; Selvaraj, Manikandan; Jamil, Waqas; Ali, Muhammad; Kashif, Syed Muhammad; Rahim, Fazal; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Adenan, Mohd Ilham

    2017-01-27

    Molecular hybridization yielded phenyl linked oxadiazole-benzohydrazones hybrids 6-35 and were evaluated for their antileishmanial potentials. Compound 10, a 3,4-dihydroxy analog with IC 50 value of 0.95 ± 0.01 μM, was found to be the most potent antileishmanial agent (7 times more active) than the standard drug pentamidine (IC 50  = 7.02 ± 0.09 μM). The current series 6-35 conceded in the identification of thirteen (13) potent antileishmanial compounds with the IC 50 values ranging between 0.95 ± 0.01-78.6 ± 1.78 μM. Molecular docking analysis against pteridine reductase (PTR1) were also performed to probe the mode of action. Selectivity index showed that compounds with higher number of hydroxyl groups have low selectivity index. Theoretical stereochemical assignment was also done for certain derivatives by using density functional calculations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A Pilot Model for the NASA Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) (Single-Axis Pitch Task)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Patrick Mark

    This thesis defines, tests, and validates a descriptive pilot model for a single-axis pitch control task of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER). SAFER is a small propulsive jetpack used by astronauts for self-rescue. Pilot model research supports development of improved self-rescue strategies and technologies through insights into pilot behavior.This thesis defines a multi-loop pilot model. The innermost loop controls the hand controller, the middle loop controls pitch rate, and the outer loop controls pitch angle. A human-in-the-loop simulation was conducted to gather data from a human pilot. Quantitative and qualitative metrics both indicate that the model is an acceptable fit to the human data. Fuel consumption was nearly identical; time to task completion matched very well. There is some evidence that the model responds faster to initial pitch rates than the human, artificially decreasing the model's time to task completion. This pilot model is descriptive, not predictive, of the human pilot. Insights are made into pilot behavior from this research. Symmetry implies that the human responds to positive and negative initial conditions with the same strategy. The human pilot appears indifferent to pitch angles within 0.5 deg, coasts at a constant pitch rate 1.09 deg/s, and has a reaction delay of 0.1 s.

  6. On the sub-model errors of a generalized one-way coupling scheme for linking models at different scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jicai; Zha, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yonggen; Shi, Liangsheng; Zhu, Yan; Yang, Jinzhong

    2017-11-01

    Multi-scale modeling of the localized groundwater flow problems in a large-scale aquifer has been extensively investigated under the context of cost-benefit controversy. An alternative is to couple the parent and child models with different spatial and temporal scales, which may result in non-trivial sub-model errors in the local areas of interest. Basically, such errors in the child models originate from the deficiency in the coupling methods, as well as from the inadequacy in the spatial and temporal discretizations of the parent and child models. In this study, we investigate the sub-model errors within a generalized one-way coupling scheme given its numerical stability and efficiency, which enables more flexibility in choosing sub-models. To couple the models at different scales, the head solution at parent scale is delivered downward onto the child boundary nodes by means of the spatial and temporal head interpolation approaches. The efficiency of the coupling model is improved either by refining the grid or time step size in the parent and child models, or by carefully locating the sub-model boundary nodes. The temporal truncation errors in the sub-models can be significantly reduced by the adaptive local time-stepping scheme. The generalized one-way coupling scheme is promising to handle the multi-scale groundwater flow problems with complex stresses and heterogeneity.

  7. NASA Tech Briefs, May 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Topics include: Test Waveform Applications for JPL STRS Operating Environment; Pneumatic Proboscis Heat-Flow Probe; Method to Measure Total Noise Temperature of a Wireless Receiver During Operation; Cursor Control Device Test Battery; Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Signals Measure Neuronal Activity in the Cortex; ESD Test Apparatus for Soldering Irons; FPGA-Based X-Ray Detection and Measurement for an X-Ray Polarimeter; Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Spacecraft Collision Avoidance Maneuver Decisions; Silicon/Carbon Nanotube Photocathode for Splitting Water; Advanced Materials and Fabrication Techniques for the Orion Attitude Control Motor; Flight Hardware Packaging Design for Stringent EMC Radiated Emission Requirements; RF Reference Switch for Spaceflight Radiometer Calibration; An Offload NIC for NASA, NLR, and Grid Computing; Multi-Scale CNT-Based Reinforcing Polymer Matrix Composites for Lightweight Structures; Ceramic Adhesive and Methods for On-Orbit Repair of Re-Entry Vehicles; Self-Healing Nanocomposites for Reusable Composite Cryotanks; Pt-Ni and Pt-Co Catalyst Synthesis Route for Fuel Cell Applications; Aerogel-Based Multilayer Insulation with Micrometeoroid Protection; Manufacturing of Nanocomposite Carbon Fibers and Composite Cylinders; Optimized Radiator Geometries for Hot Lunar Thermal Environments; A Mission Concept: Re-Entry Hopper-Aero-Space-Craft System on-Mars (REARM-Mars); New Class of Flow Batteries for Terrestrial and Aerospace Energy Storage Applications; Reliability of CCGA 1152 and CCGA 1272 Interconnect Packages for Extreme Thermal Environments; Using a Blender to Assess the Microbial Density of Encapsulated Organisms; Mixed Integer Programming and Heuristic Scheduling for Space Communication; Video Altimeter and Obstruction Detector for an Aircraft; Control Software for Piezo Stepping Actuators; Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-Based Risk Model (GERM) Code; Sasquatch Footprint Tool; and Multi-User Space Link Extension (SLE) System.

  8. Eye-tracking measurements and their link to a normative model of monitoring behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, Catrin; Bruder, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Increasing automation necessitates operators monitoring appropriately (OMA) and raises the question of how to identify them in future selections. A normative model was developed providing criteria for the identification of OMA. According to this model, the monitoring process comprises distinct monitoring phases (orientation, anticipation, detection and recheck) in which attention should be focused on relevant areas. The current study tests the normative model on the basis of eye tracking. The eye-tracking data revealed increased concentration on relevant areas during the orientation and anticipation phase in comparison to the other phases. For the assessment of monitoring behaviour in the context of personnel selection, this implies that the anticipation and orientation phases should be considered separately as they appear to be more important in the context of monitoring than the other phases. A normative model was developed for the assessment of monitoring behaviour. Using the eye-tracking method, this model was tested with applicants for an Air Traffic Controller training programme. The results are relevant for the future selection of human operators, who will have to monitor highly automated systems.

  9. Validity of Quinpirole Sensitization Rat Model of OCD: Linking Evidence from Animal and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuchlik, Ales; Radostová, Dominika; Hatalova, Hana; Vales, Karel; Nekovarova, Tereza; Koprivova, Jana; Svoboda, Jan; Horacek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with 1-3% prevalence. OCD is characterized by recurrent thoughts (obsessions) and repetitive behaviors (compulsions). The pathophysiology of OCD remains unclear, stressing the importance of pre-clinical studies. The aim of this article is to critically review a proposed animal model of OCD that is characterized by the induction of compulsive checking and behavioral sensitization to the D2/D3 dopamine agonist quinpirole. Changes in this model have been reported at the level of brain structures, neurotransmitter systems and other neurophysiological aspects. In this review, we consider these alterations in relation to the clinical manifestations in OCD, with the aim to discuss and evaluate axes of validity of this model. Our analysis shows that some axes of validity of quinpirole sensitization model (QSM) are strongly supported by clinical findings, such as behavioral phenomenology or roles of brain structures. Evidence on predictive validity is contradictory and ambiguous. It is concluded that this model is useful in the context of searching for the underlying pathophysiological basis of the disorder because of the relatively strong biological similarities with OCD.

  10. Population model of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, linking a refractory density approach to conductance-based neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhov, Anton V.; Graham, Lyle J.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a macroscopic approach toward realistic simulations of the population activity of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, based on the known refractory density equation with a different hazard function and on a different single-neuron threshold model. The threshold model is a conductance-based model taking into account adaptation-providing currents, which is reduced by omitting the fast sodium current and instead using an explicit threshold criterion for action potential events. Compared to the full pyramidal neuron model, the threshold model well approximates spike-time moments, postspike refractory states, and postsynaptic current integration. The dynamics of a neural population continuum are described by a set of one-dimensional partial differential equations in terms of the distributions of the refractory density (where the refractory state is defined by the time elapsed since the last action potential), the membrane potential, and the gating variables of the voltage-dependent channels, across the entire population. As the source term in the density equation, the probability density of firing, or hazard function, is derived from the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, assuming that a single neuron is governed by a deterministic average-across-population input and a noise term. A self-similar solution of the FP equation in the subthreshold regime is obtained. Responses of the ensemble to stimulation by a current step and oscillating current are simulated and compared with individual neuron simulations. An example of interictal-like activity of a population of all-to-all connected excitatory neurons is presented.

  11. Modeled hydrologic metrics show links between hydrology and the functional composition of stream assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Christopher J; Yuan, Lester L

    2017-07-01

    Flow alteration is widespread in streams, but current understanding of the effects of differences in flow characteristics on stream biological communities is incomplete. We tested hypotheses about the effect of variation in hydrology on stream communities by using generalized additive models to relate watershed information to the values of different flow metrics at gauged sites. Flow models accounted for 54-80% of the spatial variation in flow metric values among gauged sites. We then used these models to predict flow metrics in 842 ungauged stream sites in the mid-Atlantic United States that were sampled for fish, macroinvertebrates, and environmental covariates. Fish and macroinvertebrate assemblages were characterized in terms of a suite of metrics that quantified aspects of community composition, diversity, and functional traits that were expected to be associated with differences in flow characteristics. We related modeled flow metrics to biological metrics in a series of stressor-response models. Our analyses identified both drying and base flow instability as explaining 30-50% of the observed variability in fish and invertebrate community composition. Variations in community composition were related to variations in the prevalence of dispersal traits in invertebrates and trophic guilds in fish. The results demonstrate that we can use statistical models to predict hydrologic conditions at bioassessment sites, which, in turn, we can use to estimate relationships between flow conditions and biological characteristics. This analysis provides an approach to quantify the effects of spatial variation in flow metrics using readily available biomonitoring data. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  12. Near-surface turbulence as a missing link in modeling evapotranspiration-soil moisture relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Kirchner, James W.

    2017-07-01

    Despite many efforts to develop evapotranspiration (ET) models with improved parametrizations of resistance terms for water vapor transfer into the atmosphere, estimates of ET and its partitioning remain prone to bias. Much of this bias could arise from inadequate representations of physical interactions near nonuniform surfaces from which localized heat and water vapor fluxes emanate. This study aims to provide a mechanistic bridge from land-surface characteristics to vertical transport predictions, and proposes a new physically based ET model that builds on a recently developed bluff-rough bare soil evaporation model incorporating coupled soil moisture-atmospheric controls. The newly developed ET model explicitly accounts for (1) near-surface turbulent interactions affecting soil drying and (2) soil-moisture-dependent stomatal responses to atmospheric evaporative demand that influence leaf (and canopy) transpiration. Model estimates of ET and its partitioning were in good agreement with available field-scale data, and highlight hidden processes not accounted for by commonly used ET schemes. One such process, nonlinear vegetation-induced turbulence (as a function of vegetation stature and cover fraction) significantly influences ET-soil moisture relationships. Our results are particularly important for water resources and land use planning of semiarid sparsely vegetated ecosystems where soil surface interactions are known to play a critical role in land-climate interactions. This study potentially facilitates a mathematically tractable description of the strength (i.e., the slope) of the ET-soil moisture relationship, which is a core component of models that seek to predict land-atmosphere coupling and its feedback to the climate system in a changing climate.

  13. Tradeoffs of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers modeling for the development of driver circuits in short distance optical links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sialm, Gion; Erni, Daniel; Vez, Dominique; Kromer, Christian; Ellinger, Frank; Bona, Gian-Luca; Morf, Thomas; Jäckel, Heinz

    2005-10-01

    In short-distance optical links, the development of driving circuits for vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) requires precise and computationally efficient VCSEL models. A small-signal model of a VCSEL is computationally efficient and simple to implement; however, it does not take into account the nonlinear output behavior of the VCSEL. In contrast, VCSEL models that are highly based on first principles cannot be implemented in standard circuit device simulators, because the simulation of eye diagrams becomes too time consuming. We present another approach using VCSEL models, which are based on the 1-D rate equations. Our analysis shows that they combine efficient extraction and short simulation time with an accurate calculation of eye diagrams over a wide range of ambient temperatures. As different implementations of the rate equations exist, tradeoffs between three different versions are presented and compared with measured GaAs oxide-confined VCSELs. The first model has a linear and the second a logarithmic function of the gain versus the carrier density. The third model considers the additional transport time for carriers to reach the active region with quantum wells. For parameter extraction, a minimum set of parameters is identified, which can be determined from fundamental measurements.

  14. Mutation identification in a canine model of X-linked ectodermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Margret L; Scheidt, Jennifer L; Rhodes, James L; Henthorn, Paula S; Werner, Petra

    2005-07-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XHED), an inherited disease recognized in humans, mice, and cattle, is characterized by hypotrichosis, a reduced number or absence of sweat glands, and missing or malformed teeth. In a subset of affected individuals and animals, mutations in the EDA gene (formerly EDI), coding for ectodysplasin, have been found to cause this phenotype. Ectodysplasin is a homotrimeric transmembrane protein with an extracellular TNF-like domain, which has been shown to be involved in the morphogenesis of hair follicles and tooth buds during fetal development. Some human XHED patients also have concurrent immunodeficiency, due to mutations in the NF-kappaB essential modulator protein (IKBKG; formerly NEMO), which is also encoded on the X chromosome. In a breeding colony of dogs with XHED, immune system defects had been suspected because of frequent pulmonary infections and unexpected deaths resulting from pneumonia. To determine if defects in EDA or IKBKG cause XHED in the dogs, linkage analysis and sequencing experiments were performed. A polymorphic marker near the canine EDA gene showed significant linkage to XHED. The canine EDA gene was sequenced and a nucleotide substitution (G to A) in the splice acceptor site of intron 8 was detected in affected dogs. In the presence of the A residue, a cryptic acceptor site within exon 9 is used, leading to a frame shift and use of a premature stop codon that truncates the translation of both isoforms, EDA-A1 and EDA-A2, resulting in the absence of the TNF-like homology domain, the receptor-binding site of ectodysplasin.

  15. Modeling of a 10-km optical link exploiting power-over-fiber for cabled submarine observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadou, Evangelia; Ghisa, Laura; Quintard, Véronique; Guégan, Mikael; Pérennou, André

    2017-11-01

    The modeling of the simultaneous propagation of high-power and bidirectional data along the same 10-km-long single-mode fiber is discussed. The intense signal carries the energy needed to supply an instrument in the context of cabled submarine observatories. The considered mathematical description takes into account the fiber's nonlinear behavior in terms of Raman and Brillouin scattering to describe spectral propagation in the static regime. By testing our model against measurements, its validity is evaluated. Preliminary results are promising and reveal the path to follow for its improvement.

  16. Summary Reporting for a Linked Interaction Design-Scrum Approach: How Much Modeling Is Useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Frank; Damdul, Namgyal; Kelly, Sandra; Connolly, David

    Identifying the minimum beneficial modeling to support an agile development team is crucial. Often, story cards arranged on wall charts or spontaneously drawn diagrams provide sufficient detail to allow a team to understand an emerging problem. However, what is beneficial when a new stakeholder joins a team after development has commenced and needs to have project background and progress reported? This poster reports on the models produced by a process combining aspects of Interaction Design (ID) and Scrum for internet development in such a scenario.

  17. Drosophila as a Model to Study the Link between Metabolism and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herranz, Hector; Cohen, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular metabolism has recently been recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Investigating the origin and effects of the reprogrammed metabolism of tumor cells, and identifying its genetic mediators, will improve our understanding of how these changes contribute to disease progression and may suggest...... new approaches to therapy. Drosophila melanogaster is emerging as a valuable model to study multiple aspects of tumor formation and malignant transformation. In this review, we discuss the use of Drosophila as model to study how changes in cellular metabolism, as well as metabolic disease, contribute...... to cancer....

  18. Validity of Quinpirole Sensitization Rat Model of OCD: Linking Evidence from Animal and Clinical Studie

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stuchlík, Aleš; Radostová, Dominika; Hatalová, Hana; Valeš, Karel; Nekovářová, Tereza; Kopřivová, J.; Svoboda, Jan; Horáček, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, Oct 26 (2016), č. článku 209. ISSN 1662-5153 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-34524A Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : OCD * quinpirole * animal model * brain circuits * rat * human Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.104, year: 2016

  19. Linking Agricultural Crop Management and Air Quality Models for Regional to National-Scale Nitrogen Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    While nitrogen (N) is an essential element for life, human population growth and demands for energy, transportation and food can lead to excess nitrogen in the environment. A modeling framework is described and implemented to promote a more integrated, process-based and system le...

  20. Linking 3D spatial models of fuels and fire: Effects of spatial heterogeneity on fire behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell A. Parsons; William E. Mell; Peter McCauley

    2011-01-01

    Crownfire endangers fire fighters and can have severe ecological consequences. Prediction of fire behavior in tree crowns is essential to informed decisions in fire management. Current methods used in fire management do not address variability in crown fuels. New mechanistic physics-based fire models address convective heat transfer with computational fluid dynamics (...

  1. What Is Engagement? Proactivity as the Missing Link in the HEXACO Model of Personality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Reinout Everhard; Wawoe, Kilian W.; Holtrop, Djurre

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that proactivity represents the engagement vector in the HEXACO model of personality. Questionnaire data were obtained in five studies, three of which consisted (mostly) of students: Study 1 (N = 188, Mage = 20.0, 89.4% women), Study 3 (N = 315, Mage = 20.4, 80.6% women),

  2. Toward a Dexter-based model for open hypermedia: Unifying embedded references and link objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Trigg, Randall Hagner

    1996-01-01

    Nominated for the Doug Engelbart best paper award. This paper discusses experiences and lessons learned from the design of an open hypermedia system, one that integrates applications and data not ''owned'' by the hypermedia. The Dexter Hypertext Reference Model was used as the basis for the design...

  3. Linking Physical and Numerical Modelling in Hydrogeology Using Sand Tank Experiments and Comsol Multiphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kamini; Loheide, Steven P., II

    2011-01-01

    Visualising subsurface processes in hydrogeology and building intuition for how these processes are controlled by changes in forcing is hard for many undergraduate students. While numerical modelling is one way to help undergraduate students explore outcomes of multiple scenarios, many codes are not user-friendly with respect to defining domains,…

  4. Model of Assessment of Operational Risk Linked with a Working Day of Bank Personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Volodymyr M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article conducts analysis of works of both domestic and foreign scientists, connected with development of risk models in bank activity. It reveals specific features and formulates urgency of development of a model and method of assessment of the operational risk with consideration of fuzzy values. Depending on the nature of the field of identification of fuzzy variables, the article underlines linguistic variables, for which the top and bottom boundaries are determined. The article offers a structural model of assessment of the operational risk, based on the system of fuzzy conclusion, where each term set confronts with a relevant linguistic variable. The process of transformation of qualitative assessments into fuzzy values lies in reflection of the elements of the initial term set in the form of building the belonging functions. The article formulates bases of rules of the fuzzy conclusion system. Results of modelling the assessment of the operational risk are represented in the form of the procedure of fuzzy conclusion and surface with consideration of input linguistic variables.

  5. Computational Modeling of Statistical Learning: Effects of Transitional Probability versus Frequency and Links to Word Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirman, Daniel; Estes, Katharine Graf; Magnuson, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Statistical learning mechanisms play an important role in theories of language acquisition and processing. Recurrent neural network models have provided important insights into how these mechanisms might operate. We examined whether such networks capture two key findings in human statistical learning. In Simulation 1, a simple recurrent network…

  6. The Relationship between BIBFRAME and OCLC's Linked-Data Model of Bibliographic Description: A Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godby, Carol Jean

    2013-01-01

    This document describes a proposed alignment between BIBFRAME (Bibliographic Framework) and a model being explored by the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) with extensions proposed by the Schema Bib Extend project, a Worldwide Web Consortium sponsored (W3C-sponsored) community group tasked with enhancing Schema.org to the description of…

  7. Satellite-based empirical models linking river plume dynamics with hypoxic area andvolume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satellite-based empirical models explaining hypoxic area and volume variation were developed for the seasonally hypoxic (O2 < 2 mg L−1) northern Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi River. Annual variations in midsummer hypoxic area and ...

  8. Input Harmonic Analysis on the Slim DC-Link Drive Using Harmonic State Space Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Feng; Kwon, Jun Bum; Wang, Xiongfei

    2017-01-01

    variation according to the switching instant, the harmonics at the steady-state condition, as well as the coupling between the multiple harmonic impedances. By using this model, the impaction on the harmonics performance by the film capacitor and the grid inductance is derived. Simulation and experimental...

  9. Modelling unsupervised online-learning of artificial grammars: linking implicit and statistical learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmeier, Martin A; Cross, Ian

    2014-07-01

    Humans rapidly learn complex structures in various domains. Findings of above-chance performance of some untrained control groups in artificial grammar learning studies raise questions about the extent to which learning can occur in an untrained, unsupervised testing situation with both correct and incorrect structures. The plausibility of unsupervised online-learning effects was modelled with n-gram, chunking and simple recurrent network models. A novel evaluation framework was applied, which alternates forced binary grammaticality judgments and subsequent learning of the same stimulus. Our results indicate a strong online learning effect for n-gram and chunking models and a weaker effect for simple recurrent network models. Such findings suggest that online learning is a plausible effect of statistical chunk learning that is possible when ungrammatical sequences contain a large proportion of grammatical chunks. Such common effects of continuous statistical learning may underlie statistical and implicit learning paradigms and raise implications for study design and testing methodologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The "P2P" Educational Model Providing Innovative Learning by Linking Technology, Business and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Paul Gordon

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effect and potential of a new educational learning model called Peer to Peer (P2P). The study was focused on Laurea, Hyvinkaa's Finland campus and its response to bridging the gap between traditional educational methods and working reality, where modern technology plays an important role. The study describes and evaluates…

  11. Modelling decision support and uncertainty for large transport infrastructure projects: The CLG-DSS model of the Øresund Fixed Link

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salling, Kim Bang; Leleur, Steen; Jensen, Anders Vestergaard

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a decision support system, named the CLG-DSS model, which makes it possible for decision makers to assess various uncertainties in project appraisal in a systematic and explicit way. This model, a decision support system (DSS) developed within the Danish Centre for Logistics......). A particular concern in the model is the handling of varying information across the assessment criteria and the application of SA to inform the MCS parameter setting. After the presentation of the modelling principles some ex-post case calculations for the Øresund Fixed Link are illuminating different aspects...... of appraisal uncertainty and thereby, at the same time, demonstrate the features of the CLG-DSS model as a useful decision support tool. It is finally concluded that appraisal of large infrastructure projects can be effectively supported by dealing with uncertainty issues in accordance with the principles...

  12. Assessing climate change impacts on runoff from karstic watersheds: NASA/GISS land-surface model improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Reginald Alexander

    The off-line version of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) land-surface hydrological model over- predicted run-off from the karstic Rio Cobre watershed in Jamaica. To assess possible climate change impacts on runoff from the watershed, the model's simulation of observed runoff was improved by adding to it a karst component that has pipe flow features. The improved model was tested on two other karstic watersheds (Yangtze - China and Rio Grande - USA) and the results were encouraging. The impacts that possible climate change may have on the three karstic watersheds were then assessed. The assessment indicates that in a doubled carbon dioxide climate, the Rio Cobre and the Rio Grande may experience decreases in runoff, especially in low flow periods. The Yangtze, on the other hand, may not experience decreases in total runoff, but its peak flow which now occurs in July may be attenuated and shifted to September. The results of the study also show that climate feedbacks convolute climate change assessments and that different results can be obtained from the same climate change scenario depending on the choice of the modeling methodology-that is, on whether the models are coupled or uncoupled.

  13. Identifying data gaps and prioritizing restoration strategies for Fremont cottonwood using linked geomorphic and population models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, E. B.; Stella, J. C.; Fremier, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii) is an important component of semi-arid riparian ecosystems throughout western North America, but its populations are in decline due to flow regulation. Achieving a balance between human resource needs and riparian ecosystem function requires a mechanistic understanding of the multiple geomorphic and biological factors affecting tree recruitment and survival, including the timing and magnitude of river flows, and the concomitant influence on suitable habitat creation and mortality from scour and sedimentation burial. Despite a great deal of empirical research on some components of the system, such as factors affecting cottonwood recruitment, other key components are less studied. Yet understanding the relative influence of the full suite of physical and life-history drivers is critical to modeling whole-population dynamics under changing environmental conditions. We addressed these issues for the Fremont cottonwood population along the Sacramento River, CA using a sensitivity analysis approach to quantify uncertainty in parameters on the outcomes of a patch-based, dynamic population model. Using a broad range of plausible values for 15 model parameters that represent key physical, biological and climatic components of the ecosystem, we ran 1,000 population simulations that consisted of a subset of 14.3 million possible combinations of parameter estimates to predict the frequency of patch colonization and total forest habitat predicted to occur under current hydrologic conditions after 175 years. Results indicate that Fremont cottonwood populations are highly sensitive to the interactions among flow regime, sedimentation rate and the depth of the capillary fringe (Fig. 1). Estimates of long-term floodplain sedimentation rate would substantially improve model accuracy. Spatial variation in sediment texture was also important to the extent that it determines the depth of the capillary fringe, which regulates the availability of

  14. Linking hydrology, ecosystem function, and livelihood sustainability in African papyrus wetlands using a Bayesian Network Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, A.; Gettel, G. M.; Kipkemboi, J.; Rahman, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    Papyrus wetlands in East Africa provide ecosystem services supporting the livelihoods of millions but are rapidly degrading due to economic development. For ecosystem conservation, an integrated understanding of the natural and social processes driving ecosystem change is needed. This research focuses on integrating the causal relationships between hydrology, ecosystem function, and livelihood sustainability in Nyando wetland, western Kenya. Livelihood sustainability is based on ecosystem services that include plant and animal harvest for building material and food, conversion of wetlands to crop and grazing land, water supply, and water quality regulation. Specific objectives were: to integrate studies of hydrology, ecology, and livelihood activities using a Bayesian Network (BN) model and include stakeholder involvement in model development. The BN model (Netica 4.16) had 35 nodes with seven decision nodes describing demography, economy, papyrus market, and rainfall, and two target nodes describing ecosystem function (defined by groundwater recharge, nutrient and sediment retention, and biodiversity) and livelihood sustainability (drinking water supply, crop production, livestock production, and papyrus yield). The conditional probability tables were populated using results of ecohydrological and socio-economic field work and consultations with stakeholders. The model was evaluated for an average year with decision node probabilities set according to data from research, expert opinion, and stakeholders' views. Then, scenarios for dry and wet seasons and for economic development (low population growth and unemployment) and policy development (more awareness of wetland value) were evaluated. In an average year, the probability for maintaining a "good" level of sediment and nutrient retention functions, groundwater recharge, and biodiversity was about 60%. ("Good" is defined by expert opinion based on ongoing field research.) In the dry season, the probability was

  15. Is there any link between accreditation programs and the models of organizational excellence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berssaneti, Fernando Tobal; Saut, Ana Maria; Barakat, Májida Farid; Calarge, Felipe Araujo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether accredited health organizations perform better management practices than non-accredited ones. The study was developed in two stages: a literature review, and a study of multiple cases in 12 healthcare organizations in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. It surveyed articles comparing hospital accreditation with the EFQM (European Foundation for Quality Management) model of excellence in management. According to the pertinent literature, the accreditation model and the EFQM model are convergent and supplementary in some aspects. With 99% confidence, one can say that there is evidence that accredited organizations scored better in the evaluation based on the EFQM model in comparison to non-accredited organizations. This result was also confirmed in the comparison of results between the categories Facilitators and Results in the EFQM model. There is convergence between the accreditation model and the EFQM excellence model, suggesting that accreditation helps the healthcare sector to implement the best management practices already used by other business sectors. Avaliar se as organizações de saúde acreditadas possuem melhores práticas de gestão do que as não acreditadas. A pesquisa foi dividida em duas etapas: revisão da literatura e estudo de casos múltiplos com 12 organizações de saúde, localizadas no estado de São Paulo ‒ Brasil. Foram pesquisados artigos que comparavam a acreditação hospitalar com o modelo de excelência em gestão da EFQM (European Foundation for Quality Management), sendo que a literatura pertinente considera que o modelo de acreditação e o modelo da EFQM são convergentes e, ao mesmo tempo, complementares em determinados aspectos. Com 99% de confiança, pode-se afirmar que há evidência de que as organizações com acreditação obtiveram uma pontuação maior na avaliação baseada no modelo EFQM comparativamente às organizações não acreditadas. Este resultado também se confirmou na comparação dos

  16. Characterizing the Surface Connectivity of Depressional Wetlands: Linking Remote Sensing and Hydrologic Modeling Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, J.; Evenson, G. R.; Vanderhoof, M.; Wu, Q.; Golden, H. E.; Lane, C.

    2017-12-01

    Surface connectivity of wetlands in the 700,000 km2 Prairie Pothole Region of North America (PPR) can occur through fill-spill and fill-merge mechanisms, with some wetlands eventually spilling into stream/river systems. These wetland-to-wetland and wetland-to-stream connections vary both spatially and temporally in PPR watersheds and are important to understanding hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in the landscape. To explore how to best characterize spatial and temporal variability in aquatic connectivity, we compared three approaches, 1) hydrological modeling alone, 2) remotely-sensed data alone, and 3) integrating remotely-sensed data into a hydrological model. These approaches were tested in the Pipestem Creek Watershed, North Dakota across a drought to deluge cycle (1990-2011). A Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was modified to include the water storage capacity of individual non-floodplain wetlands identified in the National Wetland Inventory (NWI) dataset. The SWAT-NWI model simulated the water balance and storage of each wetland and the temporal variability of their hydrologic connections between wetlands during the 21-year study period. However, SWAT-NWI only accounted for fill-spill, and did not allow for the expansion and merging of wetlands situated within larger depressions. Alternatively, we assessed the occurrence of fill-merge mechanisms using inundation maps derived from Landsat images on 19 cloud-free days during the 21 years. We found fill-merge mechanisms to be prevalent across the Pipestem watershed during times of deluge. The SWAT-NWI model was then modified to use LiDAR-derived depressions that account for the potential maximum depression extent, including the merging of smaller wetlands. The inundation maps were used to evaluate the ability of the SWAT-depression model to simulate fill-merge dynamics in addition to fill-spill dynamics throughout the study watershed. Ultimately, using remote sensing to inform and validate

  17. The application of a mathematical model linking structural and functional connectomes in severe brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kuceyeski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following severe injuries that result in disorders of consciousness, recovery can occur over many months or years post-injury. While post-injury synaptogenesis, axonal sprouting and functional reorganization are known to occur, the network-level processes underlying recovery are poorly understood. Here, we test a network-level functional rerouting hypothesis in recovery of patients with disorders of consciousness following severe brain injury. This hypothesis states that the brain recovers from injury by restoring normal functional connections via alternate structural pathways that circumvent impaired white matter connections. The so-called network diffusion model, which relates an individual's structural and functional connectomes by assuming that functional activation diffuses along structural pathways, is used here to capture this functional rerouting. We jointly examined functional and structural connectomes extracted from MRIs of 12 healthy and 16 brain-injured subjects. Connectome properties were quantified via graph theoretic measures and network diffusion model parameters. While a few graph metrics showed groupwise differences, they did not correlate with patients' level of consciousness as measured by the Coma Recovery Scale — Revised. There was, however, a strong and significant partial Pearson's correlation (accounting for age and years post-injury between level of consciousness and network diffusion model propagation time (r = 0.76, p < 0.05, corrected, i.e. the time functional activation spends traversing the structural network. We concluded that functional rerouting via alternate (and less efficient pathways leads to increases in network diffusion model propagation time. Simulations of injury and recovery in healthy connectomes confirmed these results. This work establishes the feasibility for using the network diffusion model to capture network-level mechanisms in recovery of consciousness after severe brain injury.

  18. Linking agricultural crop management and air quality models for regional to national-scale nitrogen assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooter, E. J.; Bash, J. O.; Benson, V.; Ran, L.

    2012-10-01

    While nitrogen (N) is an essential element for life, human population growth and demands for energy, transportation and food can lead to excess nitrogen in the environment. A modeling framework is described and implemented to promote a more integrated, process-based and system-level approach to the estimation of ammonia (NH3) emissions which result from the application of inorganic nitrogen fertilizers to agricultural soils in the United States. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model is used to simulate plant demand-driven fertilizer applications to commercial cropland throughout the continental US. This information is coupled with a process-based air quality model to produce continental-scale NH3 emission estimates. Regional cropland NH3 emissions are driven by the timing and amount of inorganic NH3 fertilizer applied, soil processes, local meteorology, and ambient air concentrations. Initial fertilizer application often occurs when crops are planted. A state-level evaluation of EPIC-simulated, cumulative planted area compares well with similar USDA reported estimates. EPIC-annual, inorganic fertilizer application amounts also agree well with reported spatial patterns produced by others, but domain-wide the EPIC values are biased about 6% low. Preliminary application of the integrated fertilizer application and air quality modeling system produces a modified geospatial pattern of seasonal NH3 emissions that improves current simulations of observed atmospheric particle nitrate concentrations. This modeling framework provides a more dynamic, flexible, and spatially and temporally resolved estimate of NH3 emissions than previous factor-based NH3 inventories, and will facilitate evaluation of alternative nitrogen and air quality policy and adaptation strategies associated with future climate and land use changes.

  19. Linking agricultural crop management and air quality models for regional to national-scale nitrogen assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Cooter

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available While nitrogen (N is an essential element for life, human population growth and demands for energy, transportation and food can lead to excess nitrogen in the environment. A modeling framework is described and implemented to promote a more integrated, process-based and system-level approach to the estimation of ammonia (NH3 emissions which result from the application of inorganic nitrogen fertilizers to agricultural soils in the United States. The United States Department of Agricultu