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Sample records for model legumes medicago

  1. An expression database for roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula under salt stress

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    Dong Jiangli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medicago truncatula is a model legume whose genome is currently being sequenced by an international consortium. Abiotic stresses such as salt stress limit plant growth and crop productivity, including those of legumes. We anticipate that studies on M. truncatula will shed light on other economically important legumes across the world. Here, we report the development of a database called MtED that contains gene expression profiles of the roots of M. truncatula based on time-course salt stress experiments using the Affymetrix Medicago GeneChip. Our hope is that MtED will provide information to assist in improving abiotic stress resistance in legumes. Description The results of our microarray experiment with roots of M. truncatula under 180 mM sodium chloride were deposited in the MtED database. Additionally, sequence and annotation information regarding microarray probe sets were included. MtED provides functional category analysis based on Gene and GeneBins Ontology, and other Web-based tools for querying and retrieving query results, browsing pathways and transcription factor families, showing metabolic maps, and comparing and visualizing expression profiles. Utilities like mapping probe sets to genome of M. truncatula and In-Silico PCR were implemented by BLAT software suite, which were also available through MtED database. Conclusion MtED was built in the PHP script language and as a MySQL relational database system on a Linux server. It has an integrated Web interface, which facilitates ready examination and interpretation of the results of microarray experiments. It is intended to help in selecting gene markers to improve abiotic stress resistance in legumes. MtED is available at http://bioinformatics.cau.edu.cn/MtED/.

  2. The efficiency of nitrogen fixation of the model legume Medicago truncatula (Jemalong A17) is low compared to Medicago sativa.

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    Sulieman, Saad; Schulze, Joachim

    2010-06-15

    Medicago truncatula (Gaertn.) (barrel medic) serves as a model legume in plant biology. Numerous studies have addressed molecular aspects of the biology of M. truncatula, while comparatively little is known about the efficiency of N(2) fixation at the whole plant level. The objective of the present study was to compare the efficiency of N(2) fixation of M. truncatula to the genetically closely related Medicago sativa (L.) (alfalfa). The relative growth of both species relying exclusively on N(2) fixation versus nitrate nutrition, H(2) evolution, nitrogen assimilation, the concentration of amino acids and organic acids in nodules, and (15)N(2) uptake and distribution were studied. M. truncatula showed much lower efficiency of N(2) fixation. Nodule-specific activity was several-fold lower when compared to M. sativa, partially as a result of a lower electron allocation to N(2) versus H(+). M. truncatula or M. sativa plants grown solely on N(2) fixation as a nitrogen source reached about 30% or 80% of growth, respectively, when compared to plants supplied with sufficient nitrate. Moreover, M. truncatula had low %N in shoots and a lower allocation of (15)N to shoots during 1h (15)N(2) labeling period. Amino acid concentration was about 20% higher in M. sativa nodules, largely as a result of more asparagine, while the organic acid concentration was about double in M. sativa, coinciding with a six-fold higher concentration of malate. Total soluble protein in nodules was about three times lower in M. truncatula and the pattern of enzyme activity in that fraction was strongly different. Sucrose cleaving enzymes displayed higher activity in M. truncatula nodules, while the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) was much lower. It is concluded that the low efficiency of the M. truncatula symbiotic system is related to a low capacity of organic acid formation and limited nitrogen export from nodules.

  3. From embryo sac to oil and protein bodies: embryo development in the model legume Medicago truncatula.

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    Wang, Xin-Ding; Song, Youhong; Sheahan, Michael B; Garg, Manohar L; Rose, Ray J

    2012-01-01

    • The cell and developmental biology of zygotic embryogenesis in the model legume Medicago truncatula has received little attention. We studied M. truncatula embryogenesis from embryo sac until cotyledon maturation, including oil and protein body biogenesis. • We characterized embryo development using light and electron microscopy, measurement of protein and lipid fatty acid accumulation and by profiling the expression of key seed storage genes. • Embryo sac development in M. truncatula is of the Polygonum type. A distinctive multicellular hypophysis and suspensor develops before the globular stage and by the early cotyledon stage, the procambium connects the developing apical meristems. In the storage parenchyma of cotyledons, ovoid oil bodies surround protein bodies and the plasma membrane. Four major lipid fatty acids accumulate as cotyledons develop, paralleling the expression of OLEOSIN and the storage protein genes, VICILIN and LEGUMIN. • Zygotic embryogenesis in M. truncatula features the development of a distinctive multicellular hypophysis and an endopolyploid suspensor with basal transfer cell. A clear procambial connection between the apical meristems is evident and there is a characteristic arrangement of oil bodies in the cotyledons and radicle. Our data help link embryogenesis to the genetic regulation of oil and protein body biogenesis in legume seed.

  4. Jasmonate Signalling and Defence Responses in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula-A Focus on Responses to Fusarium Wilt Disease.

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    Thatcher, Louise F; Gao, Ling-Ling; Singh, Karam B

    2016-02-05

    Jasmonate (JA)-mediated defences play important roles in host responses to pathogen attack, in particular to necrotrophic fungal pathogens that kill host cells in order to extract nutrients and live off the dead plant tissue. The root-infecting fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum initiates a necrotrophic growth phase towards the later stages of its lifecycle and is responsible for devastating Fusarium wilt disease on numerous legume crops worldwide. Here we describe the use of the model legume Medicago truncatula to study legume-F. oxysporum interactions and compare and contrast this against knowledge from other model pathosystems, in particular Arabidopsis thaliana-F. oxysporum interactions. We describe publically-available genomic, transcriptomic and genetic (mutant) resources developed in M. truncatula that enable dissection of host jasmonate responses and apply aspects of these herein during the M. truncatula--F. oxysporum interaction. Our initial results suggest not all components of JA-responses observed in M. truncatula are shared with Arabidopsis in response to F. oxysporum infection.

  5. Jasmonate Signalling and Defence Responses in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula—A Focus on Responses to Fusarium Wilt Disease

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    Thatcher, Louise F.; Gao, Ling-Ling; Singh, Karam B.

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA)-mediated defences play important roles in host responses to pathogen attack, in particular to necrotrophic fungal pathogens that kill host cells in order to extract nutrients and live off the dead plant tissue. The root-infecting fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum initiates a necrotrophic growth phase towards the later stages of its lifecycle and is responsible for devastating Fusarium wilt disease on numerous legume crops worldwide. Here we describe the use of the model legume Medicago truncatula to study legume–F. oxysporum interactions and compare and contrast this against knowledge from other model pathosystems, in particular Arabidopsis thaliana–F. oxysporum interactions. We describe publically-available genomic, transcriptomic and genetic (mutant) resources developed in M. truncatula that enable dissection of host jasmonate responses and apply aspects of these herein during the M. truncatula-–F. oxysporum interaction. Our initial results suggest not all components of JA-responses observed in M. truncatula are shared with Arabidopsis in response to F. oxysporum infection. PMID:27135231

  6. Jasmonate Signalling and Defence Responses in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula—A Focus on Responses to Fusarium Wilt Disease

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    Louise F. Thatcher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmonate (JA-mediated defences play important roles in host responses to pathogen attack, in particular to necrotrophic fungal pathogens that kill host cells in order to extract nutrients and live off the dead plant tissue. The root-infecting fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum initiates a necrotrophic growth phase towards the later stages of its lifecycle and is responsible for devastating Fusarium wilt disease on numerous legume crops worldwide. Here we describe the use of the model legume Medicago truncatula to study legume–F. oxysporum interactions and compare and contrast this against knowledge from other model pathosystems, in particular Arabidopsis thaliana–F. oxysporum interactions. We describe publically-available genomic, transcriptomic and genetic (mutant resources developed in M. truncatula that enable dissection of host jasmonate responses and apply aspects of these herein during the M. truncatula-–F. oxysporum interaction. Our initial results suggest not all components of JA-responses observed in M. truncatula are shared with Arabidopsis in response to F. oxysporum infection.

  7. The molecular genetic linkage map of the model legume Medicago truncatula: an essential tool for comparative legume genomics and the isolation of agronomically important genes

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    Ané Jean-Michel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The legume Medicago truncatula has emerged as a model plant for the molecular and genetic dissection of various plant processes involved in rhizobial, mycorrhizal and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions. Aiming to develop essential tools for such genetic approaches, we have established the first genetic map of this species. Two parental homozygous lines were selected from the cultivar Jemalong and from the Algerian natural population (DZA315 on the basis of their molecular and phenotypic polymorphism. Results An F2 segregating population of 124 individuals between these two lines was obtained using an efficient manual crossing technique established for M. truncatula and was used to construct a genetic map. This map spans 1225 cM (average 470 kb/cM and comprises 289 markers including RAPD, AFLP, known genes and isoenzymes arranged in 8 linkage groups (2n = 16. Markers are uniformly distributed throughout the map and segregation distortion is limited to only 3 linkage groups. By mapping a number of common markers, the eight linkage groups are shown to be homologous to those of diploid alfalfa (M. sativa, implying a good level of macrosynteny between the two genomes. Using this M. truncatula map and the derived F3 populations, we were able to map the Mtsym6 symbiotic gene on linkage group 8 and the SPC gene, responsible for the direction of pod coiling, on linkage group 7. Conclusions These results demonstrate that Medicago truncatula is amenable to diploid genetic analysis and they open the way to map-based cloning of symbiotic or other agronomically-important genes using this model plant.

  8. Establishment of a root proteome reference map for the model legume Medicago truncatula using the expressed sequence tag database for peptide mass fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathesius, U; Keijzers, Guido; Natera, S H

    2001-01-01

    We have established a proteome reference map for Medicago truncatula root proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with peptide mass fingerprinting to aid the dissection of nodulation and root developmental pathways by proteome analysis. M. truncatula has been chosen as a model....... This proteome map will be updated continuously (http://semele.anu.edu.au/2d/2d.html) and will be a powerful tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of root symbioses in legumes....

  9. Genetic Mapping of a Major Resistance Gene to Pea Aphid (Acyrthosipon pisum in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula

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    Lars G. Kamphuis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to the Australian pea aphid (PA; Acyrthosiphon pisum biotype in cultivar Jester of the model legume Medicago truncatula is mediated by a single dominant gene and is phloem-mediated. The genetic map position for this resistance gene, APR (Acyrthosiphon pisum resistance, is provided and shows that APR maps 39 centiMorgans (cM distal of the A. kondoi resistance (AKR locus, which mediates resistance to a closely related species of the same genus bluegreen aphid (A. kondoi. The APR region on chromosome 3 is dense in classical nucleotide binding site leucine-rich repeats (NLRs and overlaps with the region harbouring the RAP1 gene which confers resistance to a European PA biotype in the accession Jemalong A17. Further screening of a core collection of M. truncatula accessions identified seven lines with strong resistance to PA. Allelism experiments showed that the single dominant resistance to PA in M. truncatula accessions SA10481 and SA1516 are allelic to SA10733, the donor of the APR locus in cultivar Jester. While it remains unclear whether there are multiple PA resistance genes in an R-gene cluster or the resistance loci identified in the other M. truncatula accessions are allelic to APR, the introgression of APR into current M. truncatula cultivars will provide more durable resistance to PA.

  10. A functional genomics approach to (iso)flavonoid glycosylation in the model legume Medicago truncatula.

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    Modolo, Luzia V; Blount, Jack W; Achnine, Lahoucine; Naoumkina, Marina A; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Dixon, Richard A

    2007-07-01

    Analysis of over 200,000 expressed sequence tags from a range of Medicago truncatula cDNA libraries resulted in the identification of over 150 different family 1 glycosyltransferase (UGT) genes. Of these, 63 were represented by full length clones in an EST library collection. Among these, 19 gave soluble proteins when expressed in E. coli, and these were screened for catalytic activity against a range of flavonoid and isoflavonoid substrates using a high-throughput HPLC assay method. Eight UGTs were identified with activity against isoflavones, flavones, flavonols or anthocyanidins, and several showed high catalytic specificity for more than one class of (iso)flavonoid substrate. All tested UGTs preferred UDP-glucose as sugar donor. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Medicago (iso)flavonoid glycosyltransferase gene sequences fell into a number of different clades, and several clustered with UGTs annotated as glycosylating non-flavonoid substrates. Quantitative RT-PCR and DNA microarray analysis revealed unique transcript expression patterns for each of the eight UGTs in Medicago organs and cell suspension cultures, and comparison of these patterns with known phytochemical profiles suggested in vivo functions for several of the enzymes.

  11. MtVRN2 is a Polycomb VRN2-like gene which represses the transition to flowering in the model legume Medicago truncatula.

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    Jaudal, Mauren; Zhang, Lulu; Che, Chong; Hurley, Daniel G; Thomson, Geoffrey; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Putterill, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Optimising the timing of flowering contributes to successful sexual reproduction and yield in agricultural plants. FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) genes, first identified in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), promote flowering universally, but the upstream flowering regulatory pathways can differ markedly among plants. Flowering in the model legume, Medicago truncatula (Medicago) is accelerated by winter cold (vernalisation) followed by long day (LD) photoperiods leading to elevated expression of the floral activator, FT-like gene FTa1. However, Medicago, like some other plants, lacks the activator CONSTANS (CO) and the repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) genes which directly regulate FT and are key to LD and vernalisation responses in Arabidopsis. Conversely, Medicago has a VERNALISATION2-LIKE VEFS-box gene (MtVRN2). In Arabidopsis AtVRN2 is a key member of a Polycomb complex involved in stable repression of Arabidopsis FLC after vernalisation. VRN2-like genes have been identified in other eudicot plants, but their function has never been reported. We show that Mtvrn2 mutants bypass the need for vernalisation for early flowering in LD conditions in Medicago. Investigation of the underlying mechanism by transcriptome analysis reveals that Mtvrn2 mutants precociously express FTa1 and other suites of genes including floral homeotic genes. Double-mutant analysis indicates that early flowering is dependent on functional FTa1. The broad significance of our study is that we have demonstrated a function for a VRN2-like VEFS gene beyond the Brassicaceae. In particular, MtVRN2 represses the transition to flowering in Medicago by regulating the onset of expression of the potent floral activator, FTa1.

  12. Genome sequence of Ensifer meliloti strain WSM1022; a highly effective microsymbiont of the model legume Medicago truncatula A17.

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    Terpolilli, Jason; Hill, Yvette; Tian, Rui; Howieson, John; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-12-20

    Ensifer meliloti WSM1022 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Medicago. WSM1022 was isolated in 1987 from a nodule recovered from the roots of the annual Medicago orbicularis growing on the Cyclades Island of Naxos in Greece. WSM1022 is highly effective at fixing nitrogen with M. truncatula and other annual species such as M. tornata and M. littoralis and is also highly effective with the perennial M. sativa (alfalfa or lucerne). In common with other characterized E. meliloti strains, WSM1022 will nodulate but fixes poorly with M. polymorpha and M. sphaerocarpos and does not nodulate M. murex. Here we describe the features of E. meliloti WSM1022, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,649,661 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 121 scaffolds of 125 contigs containing 6,323 protein-coding genes and 75 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  13. From model to crop: functional analysis of a STAY-GREEN gene in the model legume Medicago truncatula and effective use of the gene for alfalfa improvement.

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    Zhou, Chuanen; Han, Lu; Pislariu, Catalina; Nakashima, Jin; Fu, Chunxiang; Jiang, Qingzhen; Quan, Li; Blancaflor, Elison B; Tang, Yuhong; Bouton, Joseph H; Udvardi, Michael; Xia, Guangmin; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2011-11-01

    Medicago truncatula has been developed into a model legume. Its close relative alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the most widely grown forage legume crop in the United States. By screening a large population of M. truncatula mutants tagged with the transposable element of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cell type1 (Tnt1), we identified a mutant line (NF2089) that maintained green leaves and showed green anthers, central carpels, mature pods, and seeds during senescence. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that the mutation was caused by Tnt1 insertion in a STAY-GREEN (MtSGR) gene. Transcript profiling analysis of the mutant showed that loss of the MtSGR function affected the expression of a large number of genes involved in different biological processes. Further analyses revealed that SGR is implicated in nodule development and senescence. MtSGR expression was detected across all nodule developmental zones and was higher in the senescence zone. The number of young nodules on the mutant roots was higher than in the wild type. Expression levels of several nodule senescence markers were reduced in the sgr mutant. Based on the MtSGR sequence, an alfalfa SGR gene (MsSGR) was cloned, and transgenic alfalfa lines were produced by RNA interference. Silencing of MsSGR led to the production of stay-green transgenic alfalfa. This beneficial trait offers the opportunity to produce premium alfalfa hay with a more greenish appearance. In addition, most of the transgenic alfalfa lines retained more than 50% of chlorophylls during senescence and had increased crude protein content. This study illustrates the effective use of knowledge gained from a model system for the genetic improvement of an important commercial crop.

  14. Seed shape in model legumes: approximation by a cardioid reveals differences in ethylene insensitive mutants of Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula.

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    Cervantes, Emilio; Martín, José Javier; Chan, Pick Kuen; Gresshoff, Peter M; Tocino, Ángel

    2012-09-15

    Seed shape in the model legumes Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula is described. Based in previous work with Arabidopsis, the outline of the longitudinal sections of seeds is compared with a cardioid curve. L. japonicus seeds adjust well to an unmodified cardioid, whereas accurate adjustment in M. truncatula is obtained by the simple transformation of scaling the vertical axis by a factor equal to the Golden Ratio. Adjustments of seed shape measurements with simple geometrical forms are essential tools for the statistical analysis of variations in seed shape under different conditions or in mutants. The efficiency of the adjustment to a cardioid in the model plants suggests that seed morphology may be related to genome complexity. Seeds of ethylene insensitive mutants present differences in size and shape as well as altered responses to imbibition. The biological implication and meaning of these relationships are discussed.

  15. Microsatellite diversity and broad scale geographic structure in a model legume: building a set of nested core collection for studying naturally occurring variation in Medicago truncatula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronfort, Joelle; Bataillon, Thomas; Santoni, Sylvain

    2006-01-01

    scheme. Conclusion The stratification inferred is discussed considering potential historical events like expansion, refuge history and admixture between neighbouring groups. Information on the allelic richness and the inferred population structure are used to build a nested core-collection. The set......Abstract               Acknowledgements References   Background Exploiting genetic diversity requires previous knowledge of the extent and structure of the variation occurring in a species. Such knowledge can in turn be used to build a core-collection, i.e. a subset of accessions that aim...... at representing the genetic diversity of this species with a minimum of repetitiveness. We investigate the patterns of genetic diversity and population structure in a collection of 346 inbred lines representing the breadth of naturally occurring diversity in the Legume plant model Medicago truncatula using 13...

  16. Mass Spectrometric-Based Selected Reaction Monitoring of Protein Phosphorylation during Symbiotic Signaling in the Model Legume, Medicago truncatula.

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    Lori K Van Ness

    Full Text Available Unlike the major cereal crops corn, rice, and wheat, leguminous plants such as soybean and alfalfa can meet their nitrogen requirement via endosymbiotic associations with soil bacteria. The establishment of this symbiosis is a complex process playing out over several weeks and is facilitated by the exchange of chemical signals between these partners from different kingdoms. Several plant components that are involved in this signaling pathway have been identified, but there is still a great deal of uncertainty regarding the early events in symbiotic signaling, i.e., within the first minutes and hours after the rhizobial signals (Nod factors are perceived at the plant plasma membrane. The presence of several protein kinases in this pathway suggests a mechanism of signal transduction via posttranslational modification of proteins in which phosphate is added to the hydroxyl groups of serine, threonine and tyrosine amino acid side chains. To monitor the phosphorylation dynamics and complement our previous untargeted 'discovery' approach, we report here the results of experiments using a targeted mass spectrometric technique, Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM that enables the quantification of phosphorylation targets with great sensitivity and precision. Using this approach, we confirm a rapid change in the level of phosphorylation in 4 phosphosites of at least 4 plant phosphoproteins that have not been previously characterized. This detailed analysis reveals aspects of the symbiotic signaling mechanism in legumes that, in the long term, will inform efforts to engineer this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in important non-legume crops such as rice, wheat and corn.

  17. Mass Spectrometric-Based Selected Reaction Monitoring of Protein Phosphorylation during Symbiotic Signaling in the Model Legume, Medicago truncatula.

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    Van Ness, Lori K; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Maeda, Junko; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A; Sussman, Michael R; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the major cereal crops corn, rice, and wheat, leguminous plants such as soybean and alfalfa can meet their nitrogen requirement via endosymbiotic associations with soil bacteria. The establishment of this symbiosis is a complex process playing out over several weeks and is facilitated by the exchange of chemical signals between these partners from different kingdoms. Several plant components that are involved in this signaling pathway have been identified, but there is still a great deal of uncertainty regarding the early events in symbiotic signaling, i.e., within the first minutes and hours after the rhizobial signals (Nod factors) are perceived at the plant plasma membrane. The presence of several protein kinases in this pathway suggests a mechanism of signal transduction via posttranslational modification of proteins in which phosphate is added to the hydroxyl groups of serine, threonine and tyrosine amino acid side chains. To monitor the phosphorylation dynamics and complement our previous untargeted 'discovery' approach, we report here the results of experiments using a targeted mass spectrometric technique, Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) that enables the quantification of phosphorylation targets with great sensitivity and precision. Using this approach, we confirm a rapid change in the level of phosphorylation in 4 phosphosites of at least 4 plant phosphoproteins that have not been previously characterized. This detailed analysis reveals aspects of the symbiotic signaling mechanism in legumes that, in the long term, will inform efforts to engineer this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in important non-legume crops such as rice, wheat and corn.

  18. From Model to Crop: Functional Analysis of a STAY-GREEN Gene in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula and Effective Use of the Gene for Alfalfa Improvement1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuanen; Han, Lu; Pislariu, Catalina; Nakashima, Jin; Fu, Chunxiang; Jiang, Qingzhen; Quan, Li; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Tang, Yuhong; Bouton, Joseph H.; Udvardi, Michael; Xia, Guangmin; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Medicago truncatula has been developed into a model legume. Its close relative alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the most widely grown forage legume crop in the United States. By screening a large population of M. truncatula mutants tagged with the transposable element of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cell type1 (Tnt1), we identified a mutant line (NF2089) that maintained green leaves and showed green anthers, central carpels, mature pods, and seeds during senescence. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that the mutation was caused by Tnt1 insertion in a STAY-GREEN (MtSGR) gene. Transcript profiling analysis of the mutant showed that loss of the MtSGR function affected the expression of a large number of genes involved in different biological processes. Further analyses revealed that SGR is implicated in nodule development and senescence. MtSGR expression was detected across all nodule developmental zones and was higher in the senescence zone. The number of young nodules on the mutant roots was higher than in the wild type. Expression levels of several nodule senescence markers were reduced in the sgr mutant. Based on the MtSGR sequence, an alfalfa SGR gene (MsSGR) was cloned, and transgenic alfalfa lines were produced by RNA interference. Silencing of MsSGR led to the production of stay-green transgenic alfalfa. This beneficial trait offers the opportunity to produce premium alfalfa hay with a more greenish appearance. In addition, most of the transgenic alfalfa lines retained more than 50% of chlorophylls during senescence and had increased crude protein content. This study illustrates the effective use of knowledge gained from a model system for the genetic improvement of an important commercial crop. PMID:21957014

  19. Legume adaptation to sulfur deficiency revealed by comparing nutrient allocation and seed traits in Medicago truncatula.

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    Zuber, Hélène; Poignavent, Germain; Le Signor, Christine; Aimé, Delphine; Vieren, Eric; Tadla, Charlène; Lugan, Raphaël; Belghazi, Maya; Labas, Valérie; Santoni, Anne-Lise; Wipf, Daniel; Buitink, Julia; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Salon, Christophe; Gallardo, Karine

    2013-12-01

    Reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions and the use of sulfur-free mineral fertilizers are decreasing soil sulfur levels and threaten the adequate fertilization of most crops. To provide knowledge regarding legume adaptation to sulfur restriction, we subjected Medicago truncatula, a model legume species, to sulfur deficiency at various developmental stages, and compared the yield, nutrient allocation and seed traits. This comparative analysis revealed that sulfur deficiency at the mid-vegetative stage decreased yield and altered the allocation of nitrogen and carbon to seeds, leading to reduced levels of major oligosaccharides in mature seeds, whose germination was dramatically affected. In contrast, during the reproductive period, sulfur deficiency had little influence on yield and nutrient allocation, but the seeds germinated slowly and were characterized by low levels of a biotinylated protein, a putative indicator of germination vigor that has not been previously related to sulfur nutrition. Significantly, plants deprived of sulfur at an intermediary stage (flowering) adapted well by remobilizing nutrients from source organs to seeds, ensuring adequate quantities of carbon and nitrogen in seeds. This efficient remobilization of photosynthates may be explained by vacuolar sulfate efflux to maintain leaf metabolism throughout reproductive growth, as suggested by transcript and metabolite profiling. The seeds from these plants, deprived of sulfur at the floral transition, contained normal levels of major oligosaccharides but their germination was delayed, consistent with low levels of sucrose and the glycolytic enzymes required to restart seed metabolism during imbibition. Overall, our findings provide an integrative view of the legume response to sulfur deficiency.

  20. LegumeIP: an integrative database for comparative genomics and transcriptomics of model legumes.

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    Li, Jun; Dai, Xinbin; Liu, Tingsong; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2012-01-01

    Legumes play a vital role in maintaining the nitrogen cycle of the biosphere. They conduct symbiotic nitrogen fixation through endosymbiotic relationships with bacteria in root nodules. However, this and other characteristics of legumes, including mycorrhization, compound leaf development and profuse secondary metabolism, are absent in the typical model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We present LegumeIP (http://plantgrn.noble.org/LegumeIP/), an integrative database for comparative genomics and transcriptomics of model legumes, for studying gene function and genome evolution in legumes. LegumeIP compiles gene and gene family information, syntenic and phylogenetic context and tissue-specific transcriptomic profiles. The database holds the genomic sequences of three model legumes, Medicago truncatula, Glycine max and Lotus japonicus plus two reference plant species, A. thaliana and Populus trichocarpa, with annotations based on UniProt, InterProScan, Gene Ontology and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. LegumeIP also contains large-scale microarray and RNA-Seq-based gene expression data. Our new database is capable of systematic synteny analysis across M. truncatula, G. max, L. japonicas and A. thaliana, as well as construction and phylogenetic analysis of gene families across the five hosted species. Finally, LegumeIP provides comprehensive search and visualization tools that enable flexible queries based on gene annotation, gene family, synteny and relative gene expression.

  1. Nitrogen transfer from forage legumes to grass in a systematic planting design. [Medicago sativa; Lotus corniculatus; Phalaris arundinacea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brophy, L.S.; Heichel, G.H.; Russelle, M.P.

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is the most important forage legume in the USA, but N transfer from this or other perennial forage species to companion grasses growing in a mixed sward is poorly understood. Furthermore, interplant distances and legume/grass ratios have seldom been controlled in studies of N transfer from legumes to non-legumes. The objectives of this field study were: (i) to determine the amount of N transferred from alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus carniculatus L.) to reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.); (ii) to define conditions of distance and species ratio under which N transfer occurs; (iii) to compare the two legumes for N transfer; and (iv) to determine the effect of grass proximity on legume N/sub 2/ fixation. Legumes were interplanted with grass in single-species rows within km/sup 2/ plots on a Typic hapludoll soil labeled with /sup 15/N. Analysis of herbage showed significantly lower /sup 15/N concentration in grass near legumes than in grass grown alone, and significantly lower /sup 15/N concentration in legumes near grass than legumes in monoculture. Calculations using isotope dilution methods showed that grass derived a maximum of 68% of its N from alfalfa and 79% from trefoil. This N represented 13% of the N/sub 2/ fixed by trefoil and 17% of that fixed by alfalfa. The results indicated that N transfer occurred over a distance of 20 cm with maximum N transfer in areas of high legume/grass ratio. At third harvest, N derived from symbiosis was significantly higher (95% in alfalfa, 92% in trefoil) for legumes grown in mixture with grass than for legumes grown in monoculture (86% in alfalfa, 80% in trefoil). These results indicate that significant N transfer occurred, and that the amount of N transferred was dependent on interspecies distance and legume/grass ratio.

  2. Genome sequence of Ensifer medicae strain WSM1369; an effective microsymbiont of the annual legume Medicago sphaerocarpos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpolilli, Jason; Garau, Giovanni; Hill, Yvette; Tian, Rui; Howieson, John; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-12-20

    Ensifer medicae WSM1369 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Medicago. WSM1369 was isolated in 1993 from a nodule recovered from the roots of Medicago sphaerocarpos growing at San Pietro di Rudas, near Aggius in Sardinia (Italy). WSM1369 is an effective microsymbiont of the annual forage legumes M. polymorpha and M. sphaerocarpos. Here we describe the features of E. medicae WSM1369, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,402,557 bp standard draft genome is arranged into 307 scaffolds of 307 contigs containing 6,656 protein-coding genes and 79 RNA-only encoding genes. This rhizobial genome is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  3. Mapping the genetic basis of symbiotic variation in legume-rhizobium interactions in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorton, Amanda J; Heath, Katy D; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Baranger, Alain; Stinchcombe, John R

    2012-11-01

    Mutualisms are known to be genetically variable, where the genotypes differ in the fitness benefits they gain from the interaction. To date, little is known about the loci that underlie such genetic variation in fitness or whether the loci influencing fitness are partner specific, and depend on the genotype of the interaction partner. In the legume-rhizobium mutualism, one set of potential candidate genes that may influence the fitness benefits of the symbiosis are the plant genes involved in the initiation of the signaling pathway between the two partners. Here we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in Medicago truncatula in two different rhizobium strain treatments to locate regions of the genome influencing plant traits, assess whether such regions are dependent on the genotype of the rhizobial mutualist (QTL × rhizobium strain), and evaluate the contribution of sequence variation at known symbiosis signaling genes. Two of the symbiotic signaling genes, NFP and DMI3, colocalized with two QTL affecting average fruit weight and leaf number, suggesting that natural variation in nodulation genes may potentially influence plant fitness. In both rhizobium strain treatments, there were QTL that influenced multiple traits, indicative of either tight linkage between loci or pleiotropy, including one QTL with opposing effects on growth and reproduction. There was no evidence for QTL × rhizobium strain or genotype × genotype interactions, suggesting either that such interactions are due to small-effect loci or that more genotype-genotype combinations need to be tested in future mapping studies.

  4. Analysis of Large Seeds from Three Different Medicago truncatula Ecotypes Reveals a Potential Role of Hormonal Balance in Final Size Determination of Legume Grains

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    Kaustav Bandyopadhyay

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Legume seeds are important as protein and oil source for human diet. Understanding how their final seed size is determined is crucial to improve crop yield. In this study, we analyzed seed development of three accessions of the model legume, Medicago truncatula, displaying contrasted seed size. By comparing two large seed accessions to the reference accession A17, we described mechanisms associated with large seed size determination and potential factors modulating the final seed size. We observed that early events during embryogenesis had a major impact on final seed size and a delayed heart stage embryo development resulted to large seeds. We also observed that the difference in seed growth rate was mainly due to a difference in embryo cell number, implicating a role of cell division rate. Large seed accessions could be explained by an extended period of cell division due to a longer embryogenesis phase. According to our observations and recent reports, we observed that auxin (IAA and abscisic acid (ABA ratio could be a key determinant of cell division regulation at the end of embryogenesis. Overall, our study highlights that timing of events occurring during early seed development play decisive role for final seed size determination.

  5. Analysis of Large Seeds from Three Different Medicago truncatula Ecotypes Reveals a Potential Role of Hormonal Balance in Final Size Determination of Legume Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Kaustav; Uluçay, Orhan; Şakiroğlu, Muhammet; Udvardi, Michael K.; Verdier, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Legume seeds are important as protein and oil source for human diet. Understanding how their final seed size is determined is crucial to improve crop yield. In this study, we analyzed seed development of three accessions of the model legume, Medicago truncatula, displaying contrasted seed size. By comparing two large seed accessions to the reference accession A17, we described mechanisms associated with large seed size determination and potential factors modulating the final seed size. We observed that early events during embryogenesis had a major impact on final seed size and a delayed heart stage embryo development resulted to large seeds. We also observed that the difference in seed growth rate was mainly due to a difference in embryo cell number, implicating a role of cell division rate. Large seed accessions could be explained by an extended period of cell division due to a longer embryogenesis phase. According to our observations and recent reports, we observed that auxin (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) ratio could be a key determinant of cell division regulation at the end of embryogenesis. Overall, our study highlights that timing of events occurring during early seed development play decisive role for final seed size determination. PMID:27618017

  6. Toxicogenomic Responses of the Model Legume Medicago truncatula to Aged Biosolids Containing a Mixture of Nanomaterials (TiO₂, Ag, and ZnO) from a Pilot Wastewater Treatment Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun; Unrine, Jason M; Judy, Jonathan D; Lewis, Ricky W; Guo, Jing; McNear, David H; Tsyusko, Olga V

    2015-07-21

    Toxicogenomic responses in Medicago truncatula A17 were monitored following exposure to biosolids-amended soils. Treatments included biosolids produced using a pilot wastewater treatment plant with either no metal introduced into the influent (control); bulk/ionic TiO2, ZnO, and AgNO3 added to influent (bulk/dissolved treatment); or Ag, ZnO, and TiO2 engineered nanomaterials added to influent (ENM treatment) and then added to soil, which was aged in the field for 6 months. In our companion study, we found inhibition of nodulation in the ENM but not in the bulk/dissolved treatment. Gene expression profiling revealed highly distinct profiles with more than 10-fold down-regulation in 239 genes in M. truncatula roots from the ENM treatment, while gene expression patterns were similar between bulk/dissolved and control treatments. In response to ENM exposure, many of the identified biological pathways, gene ontologies, and individual genes are associated with nitrogen metabolism, nodulation, metal homeostasis, and stress responses. Expression levels of nine genes were independently confirmed with qRT-PCR. Exposure to ENMs induced unique shifts in expression profiles and biological pathways compared with bulk/dissolved treatment, despite the lack of difference in bioavailable metal fractions, metal oxidation state, and coordination environment between ENM and bulk/dissolved biosolids. As populations of Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm2011 were similar in bulk/dissolved and ENM treatments, our results suggest that inhibition of nodulation in the ENM treatment was primarily due to phytotoxicity, likely caused by enhanced bioavailability of Zn ions.

  7. Lipo-chitooligosaccharidic symbiotic signals are recognized by LysM receptor-like kinase LYR3 in the legume Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegmann, Judith; Canova, Sophie; Lachaud, Christophe; Uhlenbroich, Sandra; Gasciolli, Virginie; Pichereaux, Carole; Rossignol, Michel; Rosenberg, Charles; Cumener, Marie; Pitorre, Delphine; Lefebvre, Benoit; Gough, Clare; Samain, Eric; Fort, Sébastien; Driguez, Hugues; Vauzeilles, Boris; Beau, Jean-Marie; Nurisso, Alessandra; Imberty, Anne; Cullimore, Julie; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2013-09-20

    While chitooligosaccharides (COs) derived from fungal chitin are potent elicitors of defense reactions, structurally related signals produced by certain bacteria and fungi, called lipo-chitooligosaccharides (LCOs), play important roles in the establishment of symbioses with plants. Understanding how plants distinguish between friend and foe through the perception of these signals is a major challenge. We report the synthesis of a range of COs and LCOs, including photoactivatable probes, to characterize a membrane protein from the legume Medicago truncatula. By coupling photoaffinity labeling experiments with proteomics and transcriptomics, we identified the likely LCO-binding protein as LYR3, a lysin motif receptor-like kinase (LysM-RLK). LYR3, expressed heterologously, exhibits high-affinity binding to LCOs but not COs. Homology modeling, based on the Arabidopsis CO-binding LysM-RLK AtCERK1, suggests that LYR3 could accommodate the LCO in a conserved binding site. The identification of LYR3 opens up ways for the molecular characterization of LCO/CO discrimination.

  8. Molecular adaptation in flowering and symbiotic recognition pathways: insights from patterns of polymorphism in the legume Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronfort Joëlle

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied patterns of molecular adaptation in the wild Mediterranean legume Medicago truncatula. We focused on two phenotypic traits that are not functionally linked: flowering time and perception of symbiotic microbes. Phenology is an important fitness component, especially for annual plants, and many instances of molecular adaptation have been reported for genes involved in flowering pathways. While perception of symbiotic microbes is also integral to adaptation in many plant species, very few reports of molecular adaptation exist for symbiotic genes. Here we used data from 57 individuals and 53 gene fragments to quantify the overall strength of both positive and purifying selection in M. truncatula and asked if footprints of positive selection can be detected at key genes of rhizobia recognition pathways. Results We examined nucleotide variation among 57 accessions from natural populations in 53 gene fragments: 5 genes involved in nitrogen-fixing bacteria recognition, 11 genes involved in flowering, and 37 genes used as control loci. We detected 1757 polymorphic sites yielding an average nucleotide diversity (pi of 0.003 per site. Non-synonymous variation is under sizable purifying selection with 90% of amino-acid changing mutations being strongly selected against. Accessions were structured in two groups consistent with geographical origins. Each of these two groups harboured an excess of rare alleles, relative to expectations of a constant-sized population, suggesting recent population expansion. Using coalescent simulations and an approximate Bayesian computation framework we detected several instances of genes departing from selective neutrality within each group and showed that the polymorphism of two nodulation and four flowering genes has probably been shaped by recent positive selection. Conclusion We quantify the intensity of purifying selection in the M. truncatula genome and show that putative footprints of

  9. Medicago PhosphoProtein Database: a repository for Medicago truncatula phosphoprotein data

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    Christopher M. Rose

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of legume crops to fix atmospheric nitrogen via a symbiotic association with soil rhizobia makes them an essential component of many agricultural systems. Initiation of this symbiosis requires protein phosphorylation-mediated signaling in response to rhizobial signals named Nod factors. Medicago truncatula (Medicago is the model system for studying legume biology, making the study of its phosphoproteome essential. Here, we describe the Medicago Phosphoprotein Database (http://phospho.medicago.wisc.edu, a repository built to house phosphoprotein, phosphopeptide, and phosphosite data specific to Medicago. Currently, the Medicago Phosphoprotein Database holds 3,457 unique phosphopeptides that contain 3,404 non-redundant sites of phosphorylation on 829 proteins. Through the web-based interface, users are allowed to browse identified proteins or search for proteins of interest. Furthermore, we allow users to conduct BLAST searches of the database using both peptide sequences and phosphorylation motifs as queries. The data contained within the database are available for download to be investigated at the user’s discretion. The Medicago Phosphoprotein Database will be updated continually with novel phosphoprotein and phosphopeptide identifications, with the intent of constructing an unparalleled compendium of large-scale Medicago phosphorylation data.

  10. Small RNA pathways and diversity in model legumes: lessons from genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar eBustos-Sanmamed

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Small non coding RNAs (smRNA participate in the regulation of development, cell differentiation, adaptation to environmental constraints and defense responses in plants. They negatively regulate gene expression by degrading specific mRNA targets, repressing their translation or modifying chromatin conformation through homologous interaction with target loci. MicroRNAs (miRNA and short-interfering RNAs (siRNA are generated from long double stranded RNA (dsRNA that are cleaved into 20- to 24-nucleotide dsRNAs by RNase III proteins called DICERs (DCL. One strand of the duplex is then loaded onto effective complexes containing different ARGONAUTE (AGO proteins. In this review, we explored smRNA diversity in model legumes and compiled available data from miRBAse, the miRNA database, and from 22 reports of smRNA deep sequencing or miRNA identification genome-wide in Medicago truncatula, Glycine max and Lotus japonicus. In addition to conserved miRNAs present in other plant species, 229, 179 and 35 novel miRNA families were identified respectively in these 3 legumes, among which several seems legume-specific. New potential functions of several miRNAs in the legume-specific nodulation process are discussed. Furthermore, a new category of siRNA, the phased siRNAs, which seems to mainly regulate disease-resistance genes, was recently discovered in legumes. Despite that the genome sequence of model legumes are not yet fully completed, further analysis was performed by database mining of gene families and protein characteristics of DCLs and AGOs in these genomes. Although most components of the smRNA pathways are conserved, identifiable homologs of key smRNA players from non-legumes could not yet be detected in M. truncatula available genomic and expressed sequence databases. In addition, an important gene diversification was observed in the three legumes. Functional significance of these variant isoforms may reflect peculiarities of smRNA biogenesis in

  11. Expression of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor TaMYB14 from Trifolium arvense activates proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in the legumes Trifolium repens and Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Kerry R; Collette, Vern; Fraser, Karl; Greig, Margaret; Xue, Hong; Richardson, Kim; Jones, Chris; Rasmussen, Susanne

    2012-07-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are oligomeric flavonoids and one group of end products of the phenylpropanoid pathway. PAs have been reported to be beneficial for human and animal health and are particularly important in pastoral agricultural systems for improved animal production and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, the main forage legumes grown in these systems, such as Trifolium repens and Medicago sativa, do not contain any substantial amounts of PAs in leaves. We have identified from the foliar PA-accumulating legume Trifolium arvense an R2R3-MYB transcription factor, TaMYB14, and provide evidence that this transcription factor is involved in the regulation of PA biosynthesis in legumes. TaMYB14 expression is necessary and sufficient to up-regulate late steps of the phenylpropanoid pathway and to induce PA biosynthesis. RNA interference silencing of TaMYB14 resulted in almost complete cessation of PA biosynthesis in T. arvense, whereas Nicotiana tabacum, M. sativa, and T. repens plants constitutively expressing TaMYB14 synthesized and accumulated PAs in leaves up to 1.8% dry matter. Targeted liquid chromatography-multistage tandem mass spectrometry analysis identified foliar PAs up to degree of polymerization 6 in leaf extracts. Hence, genetically modified M. sativa and T. repens plants expressing TaMYB14 provide a viable option for improving animal health and mitigating the negative environmental impacts of pastoral animal production systems.

  12. Genotype delimitation in the Nod-independent model legume Aeschynomene evenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Brown, Spencer; Boursot, Marc; Giraud, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Research on the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis has been so far focused on two model legumes, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, which use a sophisticated infection process involving infection thread formation. However, in 25% of the legumes, the bacterial entry occurs more simply in an intercellular fashion. Among them, some semi-aquatic Aeschynomene species present the distinctive feature to form nitrogen-fixing nodules on both roots and stems following elicitation by photosynthetic bradyrhizobia that do not produce Nod factors. This interaction is believed to represent a living testimony of the ancestral state of the rhizobium-legume symbiosis. To decipher the molecular mechanisms of this unique Nod-independent nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, we previously identified A. evenia C. Wright as an appropriate model legume, because it displays all the requisites for molecular and genetic approaches. To advance the use of this new model legume species, here we characterized the intraspecific diversity found in A. evenia. For this, the accessions available in germplasm banks were collected and subjected to morphological investigations, genotyping with RAPD and SSR markers, molecular phylogenies using ITS and single nuclear gene sequences, and cross-compatibility tests. These combined analyses revealed an important intraspecific differentiation that led us to propose a new taxonomic classification for A. evenia comprising two subspecies and four varieties. The A. evenia ssp. evenia contains var. evenia and var. pauciciliata whereas A. evenia ssp. serrulata comprises var. serrulata and var. major. This study provides information to exploit efficiently the diversity encountered in A. evenia and proposes subsp. evenia as the most appropriate subspecies for future projects aimed at identifying plant determinants of the Nod-independent symbiotic process.

  13. Genotype delimitation in the Nod-independent model legume Aeschynomene evenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Arrighi

    Full Text Available Research on the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis has been so far focused on two model legumes, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, which use a sophisticated infection process involving infection thread formation. However, in 25% of the legumes, the bacterial entry occurs more simply in an intercellular fashion. Among them, some semi-aquatic Aeschynomene species present the distinctive feature to form nitrogen-fixing nodules on both roots and stems following elicitation by photosynthetic bradyrhizobia that do not produce Nod factors. This interaction is believed to represent a living testimony of the ancestral state of the rhizobium-legume symbiosis. To decipher the molecular mechanisms of this unique Nod-independent nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, we previously identified A. evenia C. Wright as an appropriate model legume, because it displays all the requisites for molecular and genetic approaches. To advance the use of this new model legume species, here we characterized the intraspecific diversity found in A. evenia. For this, the accessions available in germplasm banks were collected and subjected to morphological investigations, genotyping with RAPD and SSR markers, molecular phylogenies using ITS and single nuclear gene sequences, and cross-compatibility tests. These combined analyses revealed an important intraspecific differentiation that led us to propose a new taxonomic classification for A. evenia comprising two subspecies and four varieties. The A. evenia ssp. evenia contains var. evenia and var. pauciciliata whereas A. evenia ssp. serrulata comprises var. serrulata and var. major. This study provides information to exploit efficiently the diversity encountered in A. evenia and proposes subsp. evenia as the most appropriate subspecies for future projects aimed at identifying plant determinants of the Nod-independent symbiotic process.

  14. WRKY domain-encoding genes of a crop legume chickpea (Cicer arietinum): comparative analysis with Medicago truncatula WRKY family and characterization of group-III gene(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kamal; Srivastava, Vikas; Purayannur, Savithri; Kaladhar, V Chandra; Cheruvu, Purnima Jaiswal; Verma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The WRKY genes have been identified as important transcriptional modulators predominantly during the environmental stresses, but they also play critical role at various stages of plant life cycle. We report the identification of WRKY domain (WD)-encoding genes from galegoid clade legumes chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). In total, 78 and 98 WD-encoding genes were found in chickpea and barrel medic, respectively. Comparative analysis suggests the presence of both conserved and unique WRKYs, and expansion of WRKY family in M. truncatula primarily by tandem duplication. Exclusively found in galegoid legumes, CaWRKY16 and its orthologues encode for a novel protein having a transmembrane and partial Exo70 domains flanking a group-III WD. Genomic region of galegoids, having CaWRKY16, is more dynamic when compared with millettioids. In onion cells, fused CaWRKY16-EYFP showed punctate fluorescent signals in cytoplasm. The chickpea WRKY group-III genes were further characterized for their transcript level modulation during pathogenic stress and treatments of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) by real-time PCR. Differential regulation of genes was observed during Ascochyta rabiei infection and SA treatment. Characterization of A. rabiei and SA inducible gene CaWRKY50 showed that it localizes to plant nucleus, binds to W-box, and have a C-terminal transactivation domain. Overexpression of CaWRKY50 in tobacco plants resulted in early flowering and senescence. The in-depth comparative account presented here for two legume WRKY genes will be of great utility in hastening functional characterization of crop legume WRKYs and will also help in characterization of Exo70Js. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  15. Genomic survey, gene expression analysis and structural modeling suggest diverse roles of DNA methyltransferases in legumes.

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    Rohini Garg

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays a crucial role in development through inheritable gene silencing. Plants possess three types of DNA methyltransferases (MTases, namely Methyltransferase (MET, Chromomethylase (CMT and Domains Rearranged Methyltransferase (DRM, which maintain methylation at CG, CHG and CHH sites. DNA MTases have not been studied in legumes so far. Here, we report the identification and analysis of putative DNA MTases in five legumes, including chickpea, soybean, pigeonpea, Medicago and Lotus. MTases in legumes could be classified in known MET, CMT, DRM and DNA nucleotide methyltransferases (DNMT2 subfamilies based on their domain organization. First three MTases represent DNA MTases, whereas DNMT2 represents a transfer RNA (tRNA MTase. Structural comparison of all the MTases in plants with known MTases in mammalian and plant systems have been reported to assign structural features in context of biological functions of these proteins. The structure analysis clearly specified regions crucial for protein-protein interactions and regions important for nucleosome binding in various domains of CMT and MET proteins. In addition, structural model of DRM suggested that circular permutation of motifs does not have any effect on overall structure of DNA methyltransferase domain. These results provide valuable insights into role of various domains in molecular recognition and should facilitate mechanistic understanding of their function in mediating specific methylation patterns. Further, the comprehensive gene expression analyses of MTases in legumes provided evidence of their role in various developmental processes throughout the plant life cycle and response to various abiotic stresses. Overall, our study will be very helpful in establishing the specific functions of DNA MTases in legumes.

  16. Genomic survey, gene expression analysis and structural modeling suggest diverse roles of DNA methyltransferases in legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rohini; Kumari, Romika; Tiwari, Sneha; Goyal, Shweta

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a crucial role in development through inheritable gene silencing. Plants possess three types of DNA methyltransferases (MTases), namely Methyltransferase (MET), Chromomethylase (CMT) and Domains Rearranged Methyltransferase (DRM), which maintain methylation at CG, CHG and CHH sites. DNA MTases have not been studied in legumes so far. Here, we report the identification and analysis of putative DNA MTases in five legumes, including chickpea, soybean, pigeonpea, Medicago and Lotus. MTases in legumes could be classified in known MET, CMT, DRM and DNA nucleotide methyltransferases (DNMT2) subfamilies based on their domain organization. First three MTases represent DNA MTases, whereas DNMT2 represents a transfer RNA (tRNA) MTase. Structural comparison of all the MTases in plants with known MTases in mammalian and plant systems have been reported to assign structural features in context of biological functions of these proteins. The structure analysis clearly specified regions crucial for protein-protein interactions and regions important for nucleosome binding in various domains of CMT and MET proteins. In addition, structural model of DRM suggested that circular permutation of motifs does not have any effect on overall structure of DNA methyltransferase domain. These results provide valuable insights into role of various domains in molecular recognition and should facilitate mechanistic understanding of their function in mediating specific methylation patterns. Further, the comprehensive gene expression analyses of MTases in legumes provided evidence of their role in various developmental processes throughout the plant life cycle and response to various abiotic stresses. Overall, our study will be very helpful in establishing the specific functions of DNA MTases in legumes.

  17. Aeschynomene evenia, a model plant for studying the molecular genetics of the nod-independent rhizobium-legume symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Brown, Spencer C; Rodier-Goud, Marguerite; Boursot, Marc; Fardoux, Joel; Patrel, Delphine; Gully, Djamel; Fabre, Sandrine; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Giraud, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Research on the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis has been focused, thus far, on two model legumes, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, which use a sophisticated infection process involving infection thread formation. However, in 25% of the legumes, the bacterial entry occurs more simply in an intercellular fashion. Among them, some Aeschynomene spp. are nodulated by photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium spp. that do not produce Nod factors. This interaction is believed to represent a living testimony of the ancestral state of the rhizobium-legume symbiosis. To decipher the mechanisms of this Nod-independent process, we propose Aeschynomene evenia as a model legume because it presents all the characteristics required for genetic and molecular analysis. It is a short-perennial and autogamous species, with a diploid and relatively small genome (2n=20; 460 Mb/1C). A. evenia 'IRFL6945' is nodulated by the well-characterized photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS278 and is efficiently transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Aeschynomene evenia is genetically homozygous but polymorphic accessions were found. A manual hybridization procedure has been set up, allowing directed crosses. Therefore, it should be relatively straightforward to unravel the molecular determinants of the Nod-independent process in A. evenia. This should shed new light on the evolution of rhizobium-legume symbiosis and could have important agronomic implications.

  18. Legume and Lotus japonicus Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirakawa, Hideki; Mun, Terry; Sato, Shusei

    2014-01-01

    Since the genome sequence of Lotus japonicus, a model plant of family Fabaceae, was determined in 2008 (Sato et al. 2008), the genomes of other members of the Fabaceae family, soybean (Glycine max) (Schmutz et al. 2010) and Medicago truncatula (Young et al. 2011), have been sequenced. In this sec....... In this section, we introduce representative, publicly accessible online resources related to plant materials, integrated databases containing legume genome information, and databases for genome sequence and derived marker information of legume species including L. japonicus...

  19. The proteome of seed development in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Svend; Laursen, Brian S; Ornfelt, Jane H; Jochimsen, Bjarne; Staerfeldt, Hans Henrik; Friis, Carsten; Nielsen, Kasper; Goffard, Nicolas; Besenbacher, Søren; Krusell, Lene; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Thøgersen, Ida B; Enghild, Jan J; Stougaard, Jens

    2009-03-01

    We have characterized the development of seeds in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Like soybean (Glycine max) and pea (Pisum sativum), Lotus develops straight seed pods and each pod contains approximately 20 seeds that reach maturity within 40 days. Histological sections show the characteristic three developmental phases of legume seeds and the presence of embryo, endosperm, and seed coat in desiccated seeds. Furthermore, protein, oil, starch, phytic acid, and ash contents were determined, and this indicates that the composition of mature Lotus seed is more similar to soybean than to pea. In a first attempt to determine the seed proteome, both a two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis approach and a gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach were used. Globulins were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and five legumins, LLP1 to LLP5, and two convicilins, LCP1 and LCP2, were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. For two distinct developmental phases, seed filling and desiccation, a gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach was used, and 665 and 181 unique proteins corresponding to gene accession numbers were identified for the two phases, respectively. All of the proteome data, including the experimental data and mass spectrometry spectra peaks, were collected in a database that is available to the scientific community via a Web interface (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/cgi-bin/lotus/db.cgi). This database establishes the basis for relating physiology, biochemistry, and regulation of seed development in Lotus. Together with a new Web interface (http://bioinfoserver.rsbs.anu.edu.au/utils/PathExpress4legumes/) collecting all protein identifications for Lotus, Medicago, and soybean seed proteomes, this database is a valuable resource for comparative seed proteomics and pathway analysis within and beyond the legume family.

  20. Legume genomes: more than peas in a pod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Nevin Dale; Mudge, Joann; Ellis, T H Noel

    2003-04-01

    A growing array of sequence-based tools is helping to reveal the organization, evolution and syntenic relationships of legume genomes. The results indicate that legumes form a coherent taxonomic group with frequent and widespread macro- and microsynteny. This is good news for two model legume systems, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus. Indeed, both models have recently been used to clone and characterize genes for nodulation-related receptors that were originally described in legumes with more complex genomes. Studies of legume genomes have also provided insight into genome size, gene clustering, genome duplications and repetitive elements. To understand legume genomes better, it will be necessary to develop tools for studying under-represented taxa beyond the relatively small group of economically important species that have been examined so far.

  1. The pgip family in soybean and three other legume species: evidence for a birth-and-death model of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalunke, Raviraj M; Cenci, Alberto; Volpi, Chiara; O'Sullivan, Donal M; Sella, Luca; Favaron, Francesco; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2014-07-18

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) plant cell wall glycoproteins involved in plant immunity. They are typically encoded by gene families with a small number of gene copies whose evolutionary origin has been poorly investigated. Here we report the complete characterization of the full complement of the pgip family in soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) and the characterization of the genomic region surrounding the pgip family in four legume species. BAC clone and genome sequence analyses showed that the soybean genome contains two pgip loci. Each locus is composed of three clustered genes that are induced following infection with the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, and remnant sequences of pgip genes. The analyzed homeologous soybean genomic regions (about 126 Kb) that include the pgip loci are strongly conserved and this conservation extends also to the genomes of the legume species Phaseolus vulgaris L., Medicago truncatula Gaertn. and Cicer arietinum L., each containing a single pgip locus. Maximum likelihood-based gene trees suggest that the genes within the pgip clusters have independently undergone tandem duplication in each species. The paleopolyploid soybean genome contains two pgip loci comprised in large and highly conserved duplicated regions, which are also conserved in bean, M. truncatula and C. arietinum. The genomic features of these legume pgip families suggest that the forces driving the evolution of pgip genes follow the birth-and-death model, similar to that proposed for the evolution of resistance (R) genes of NBS-LRR-type.

  2. The Medicago truncatula gene expression atlas web server

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Yuhong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legumes (Leguminosae or Fabaceae play a major role in agriculture. Transcriptomics studies in the model legume species, Medicago truncatula, are instrumental in helping to formulate hypotheses about the role of legume genes. With the rapid growth of publically available Affymetrix GeneChip Medicago Genome Array GeneChip data from a great range of tissues, cell types, growth conditions, and stress treatments, the legume research community desires an effective bioinformatics system to aid efforts to interpret the Medicago genome through functional genomics. We developed the Medicago truncatula Gene Expression Atlas (MtGEA web server for this purpose. Description The Medicago truncatula Gene Expression Atlas (MtGEA web server is a centralized platform for analyzing the Medicago transcriptome. Currently, the web server hosts gene expression data from 156 Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago genome arrays in 64 different experiments, covering a broad range of developmental and environmental conditions. The server enables flexible, multifaceted analyses of transcript data and provides a range of additional information about genes, including different types of annotation and links to the genome sequence, which help users formulate hypotheses about gene function. Transcript data can be accessed using Affymetrix probe identification number, DNA sequence, gene name, functional description in natural language, GO and KEGG annotation terms, and InterPro domain number. Transcripts can also be discovered through co-expression or differential expression analysis. Flexible tools to select a subset of experiments and to visualize and compare expression profiles of multiple genes have been implemented. Data can be downloaded, in part or full, in a tabular form compatible with common analytical and visualization software. The web server will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate new gene expression data and genome annotation, and is accessible

  3. MtPAR MYB transcription factor acts as an on switch for proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    MtPAR (Medicago truncatula proanthocyanidin regulator) is an MYB family transcription factor that functions as a key regulator of proanthocyanidin (PA) biosynthesis in the model legume Medicago truncatula. MtPAR expression is confined to the seed coat, the site of PA accumulation. Loss-of-function par mutants contained substantially less PA in the seed coat than the wild type, whereas levels of anthocyanin and other specialized metabolites were normal in the mutants. In contrast, massive accu...

  4. The Mitochondrial Complexome of Medicago truncatula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiirika, Leonard Muriithi; Behrens, Christof; Braun, Hans-Peter; Colditz, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Legumes (Fabaceae, Leguminosae) are unique in their ability to carry out an elaborate endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation process with rhizobia proteobacteria. The symbiotic nitrogen fixation enables the host plants to grow almost independently of any other nitrogen source. Establishment of symbiosis requires adaptations of the host cellular metabolism, here foremost of the energy metabolism mainly taking place in mitochondria. Since the early 1990s, the galegoid legume Medicago truncatula Gaertn. is a well-established model for studying legume biology, but little is known about the protein complement of mitochondria from this species. An initial characterization of the mitochondrial proteome of M. truncatula (Jemalong A17) was published recently. In the frame of this study, mitochondrial protein complexes were characterized using Two-dimensional (2D) Blue native (BN)/SDS-PAGE. From 139 detected spots, the “first hit” (=most abundant) proteins of 59 spots were identified by mass spectrometry. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the mitochondrial “complexome” (the “protein complex proteome”) of M. truncatula via 2D BN/SDS-PAGE in combination with highly sensitive MS protein identification. In total, 1,485 proteins were identified within 158 gel spots, representing 467 unique proteins. Data evaluation by the novel GelMap annotation tool allowed recognition of protein complexes of low abundance. Overall, at least 36 mitochondrial protein complexes were found. To our knowledge several of these complexes were described for the first time in Medicago. The data set is accessible under http://www.gelmap.de/medicago/. The mitochondrial protein complex proteomes of Arabidopsis available at http://www.gelmap.de/arabidopsis/ and Medicago are compared. PMID:23596449

  5. How many peas in a pod? Legume genes responsible for mutualistic symbioses underground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchi, Hiroshi; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Hayashi, Makoto; Hakoyama, Tsuneo; Nakagawa, Tomomi; Umehara, Yosuke; Suganuma, Norio; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2010-09-01

    The nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between legume plants and Rhizobium bacteria is the most prominent plant-microbe endosymbiotic system and, together with mycorrhizal fungi, has critical importance in agriculture. The introduction of two model legume species, Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula, has enabled us to identify a number of host legume genes required for symbiosis. A total of 26 genes have so far been cloned from various symbiotic mutants of these model legumes, which are involved in recognition of rhizobial nodulation signals, early symbiotic signaling cascades, infection and nodulation processes, and regulation of nitrogen fixation. These accomplishments during the past decade provide important clues to understanding not only the molecular mechanisms underlying plant-microbe endosymbiotic associations but also the evolutionary aspects of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between legume plants and Rhizobium bacteria. In this review we survey recent progress in molecular genetic studies using these model legumes.

  6. Transformation of Medicago truncatula via infiltration of seedlings or flowering plants with Agrobacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trieu, A.T.; Burleigh, S.H.; Kardailsky, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    Two rapid and simple in planta transformation methods have been developed for the model legume Medicago truncatula. The first approach is based on a method developed for transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana and involves infiltration of flowering plants with a suspension of Agrobacterium. The se...

  7. Discovery AP2/ERF family genes in silico in Medicago truncatula

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    Medicago truncatula is a legume model plant due to its small genome and it has been used to study the molecular ... To investigate the roles of AP2/EREBP in M. truncatula, ..... Zhuang J, Chen JM, Yao QH, Xiong F, Sun CC, Zhou XR, Zhang J,.

  8. LegumeIP 2.0--a platform for the study of gene function and genome evolution in legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Dai, Xinbin; Zhuang, Zhaohong; Zhao, Patrick X

    2016-01-04

    The LegumeIP 2.0 database hosts large-scale genomics and transcriptomics data and provides integrative bioinformatics tools for the study of gene function and evolution in legumes. Our recent updates in LegumeIP 2.0 include gene and protein sequences, gene models and annotations, syntenic regions, protein families and phylogenetic trees for six legume species: Medicago truncatula, Glycine max (soybean), Lotus japonicus, Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), Cicer arietinum (chickpea) and Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea) and two outgroup reference species: Arabidopsis thaliana and Poplar trichocarpa. Moreover, the LegumeIP 2.0 features the following new data resources and bioinformatics tools: (i) an integrative gene expression atlas for four model legumes that include 550 array hybridizations from M. truncatula, 962 gene expression profiles of G. max, 276 array hybridizations from L. japonicas and 56 RNA-Seq-based gene expression profiles for C. arietinum. These datasets were manually curated and hierarchically organized based on Experimental Ontology and Plant Ontology so that users can browse, search, and retrieve data for their selected experiments. (ii) New functions/analytical tools to query, mine and visualize large-scale gene sequences, annotations and transcriptome profiles. Users may select a subset of expression experiments and visualize and compare expression profiles for multiple genes. The LegumeIP 2.0 database is freely available to the public at http://plantgrn.noble.org/LegumeIP/.

  9. MTGD: The Medicago truncatula genome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Bidwell, Shelby L; Tang, Haibao; Town, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    Medicago truncatula, a close relative of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), is a model legume used for studying symbiotic nitrogen fixation, mycorrhizal interactions and legume genomics. J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI; formerly TIGR) has been involved in M. truncatula genome sequencing and annotation since 2002 and has maintained a web-based resource providing data to the community for this entire period. The website (http://www.MedicagoGenome.org) has seen major updates in the past year, where it currently hosts the latest version of the genome (Mt4.0), associated data and legacy project information, presented to users via a rich set of open-source tools. A JBrowse-based genome browser interface exposes tracks for visualization. Mutant gene symbols originally assembled and curated by the Frugoli lab are now hosted at JCVI and tie into our community annotation interface, Medicago EuCAP (to be integrated soon with our implementation of WebApollo). Literature pertinent to M. truncatula is indexed and made searchable via the Textpresso search engine. The site also implements MedicMine, an instance of InterMine that offers interconnectivity with other plant 'mines' such as ThaleMine and PhytoMine, and other model organism databases (MODs). In addition to these new features, we continue to provide keyword- and locus identifier-based searches served via a Chado-backed Tripal Instance, a BLAST search interface and bulk downloads of data sets from the iPlant Data Store (iDS). Finally, we maintain an E-mail helpdesk, facilitated by a JIRA issue tracking system, where we receive and respond to questions about the website and requests for specific data sets from the community.

  10. Unraveling the effect of arsenic on the model Medicago-Ensifer interaction: a transcriptomic meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, Alejandro; Pérez-Palacios, Patricia; Doukkali, Bouchra; Molina-Sánchez, María D; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I; Caviedes, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Llorente, Ignacio D; Pajuelo, Eloísa

    2015-01-01

    The genetic regulation underlying the effect of arsenic (As(III)) on the model symbiosis Medicago-Ensifer was investigated using a combination of physiological (split-roots), microscopy and genetic (microarrays, qRT-PCR and composite plants) tools. Nodulation was very sensitive to As(III) (median inhibitory dose (ID50) = 20 μM). The effect on root elongation and on nodulation was local (nonsystemic). A battery of stress (salt, drought, heat shock, metals, etc.)-related genes were induced. Glutathione played a pivotal role in tolerance/detoxification, together with secondary metabolites ((iso)flavonoids and phenylpropanoids). However, antioxidant enzymes were not activated. Concerning the symbiotic interaction, molecular evidence suggesting that rhizobia alleviate As stress is for the first time provided. Chalcone synthase (which is involved in the first step of the legume-rhizobia cross-talk) was strongly enhanced, suggesting that the plants are biased to establish symbiotic interactions under As(III) stress. In contrast, 13 subsequent nodulation genes (involved in nodulation factors (Nod factors) perception, infection, thread initiation and progression, and nodule morphogenesis) were repressed. Overexpression of the ethylene responsive factor ERN in composite plants reduced root stress and partially restored nodulation, whereas overexpression of the early nodulin ENOD12 enhanced nodulation both in the presence and, particularly, in the absence of As, without affecting root elongation. Several transcription factors were identified, which could be additional targets for genetic engineering aiming to improve nodulation and/or alleviate root stress induced by this toxic.

  11. Immature seeds and embryos of Medicago truncatula cultured in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochatt, Sergio J

    2011-01-01

    Legumes are an important source of proteins and lipids for food and feed. In addition, they are -environmentally friendly because of their capacity to fix nitrogen through a symbiosis with Rhizobium that permits them to produce abundant proteins even in the absence of nitrogen fertilization. Seed development in plants follows three chronological steps (1) seed coat differentiation, embryo morphogenesis and endosperm development; (2) embryo maturation with storage accumulation and (3) dehydration and the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. Finally, germination occurs when the environmental conditions become favourable. Working with the model legume Medicago truncatula, an in vitro protocol was developed for the culture of immature embryos that permits their development in a way comparable to that observed in plants.In this chapter, the usefulness of this system for investigating embryo development in legumes is outlined.

  12. Background and History of the Lotus japonicus Model Legume System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    , focusing on endosymbiosis. Several important discoveries have been made, and the Lotus community has contributed novel results, promoting our understanding of plant biology as well as our understanding of properties and characteristics typical for plants belonging to the legume family. Progress has been...

  13. Oil body biogenesis and biotechnology in legume seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Youhong; Wang, Xin-Ding; Rose, Ray J

    2017-09-02

    The seeds of many legume species including soybean, Pongamia pinnata and the model legume Medicago truncatula store considerable oil, apart from protein, in their cotyledons. However, as a group, legume storage strategies are quite variable and provide opportunities for better understanding of carbon partitioning into different storage products. Legumes with their ability to fix nitrogen can also increase the sustainability of agricultural systems. This review integrates the cell biology, biochemistry and molecular biology of oil body biogenesis before considering biotechnology strategies to enhance oil body biosynthesis. Cellular aspects of packaging triacylglycerol (TAG) into oil bodies are emphasized. Enhancing seed oil content has successfully focused on the up-regulation of the TAG biosynthesis pathways using overexpression of enzymes such as diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 and transcription factors such as WRINKLE1 and LEAFY COTYLEDON1. While these strategies are central, decreasing carbon flow into other storage products and maximizing the packaging of oil bodies into the cytoplasm are other strategies that need further examination. Overall there is much potential for integrating carbon partitioning, up-regulation of fatty acid and TAG synthesis and oil body packaging, for enhancing oil levels. In addition to the potential for integrated strategies to improving oil yields, the capacity to modify fatty acid composition and use of oil bodies as platforms for the production of recombinant proteins in seed of transgenic legumes provide other opportunities for legume biotechnology.

  14. MtPAR MYB transcription factor acts as an on switch for proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdier, Jerome; Zhao, Jian; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Ge, Shujun; Liu, Chenggang; He, Xianzhi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Dixon, Richard A; Udvardi, Michael K

    2012-01-31

    MtPAR (Medicago truncatula proanthocyanidin regulator) is an MYB family transcription factor that functions as a key regulator of proanthocyanidin (PA) biosynthesis in the model legume Medicago truncatula. MtPAR expression is confined to the seed coat, the site of PA accumulation. Loss-of-function par mutants contained substantially less PA in the seed coat than the wild type, whereas levels of anthocyanin and other specialized metabolites were normal in the mutants. In contrast, massive accumulation of PAs occurred when MtPAR was expressed ectopically in transformed hairy roots of Medicago. Transcriptome analysis of par mutants and MtPAR-expressing hairy roots, coupled with yeast one-hybrid analysis, revealed that MtPAR positively regulates genes encoding enzymes of the flavonoid-PA pathway via a probable activation of WD40-1. Expression of MtPAR in the forage legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa) resulted in detectable levels of PA in shoots, highlighting the potential of this gene for biotechnological strategies to increase PAs in forage legumes for reduction of pasture bloat in ruminant animals.

  15. [Natural nucleotide polymorphism of the Srlk gene that determines salt stress tolerance in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnevskaia, M S; Pavlov, A V; Dziubenko, E A; Dziubenko, N I; Potokina, E K

    2014-04-01

    Based on legume genome syntheny, the nucleotide sequence of Srlk gene, key role of which in response to salt stress was demonstrated for the model species Medicago truncatula, was identified in the major forage and siderate crop alfalfa (Medicago sativa). In twelve alfalfa samples originating from regions with contrasting growing conditions, 19 SNPs were revealed in the Srlk gene. For two nonsynonymous SNPs, molecular markers were designed that could be further used to analyze the association between Srlk gene nucleotide polymorphism and the variability in salt stress tolerance among alfalfa cultivars.

  16. TRUNCATULIX--a data warehouse for the legume community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckel, Kolja; Runte, Kai J; Bekel, Thomas; Dondrup, Michael; Jakobi, Tobias; Küster, Helge; Goesmann, Alexander

    2009-02-11

    Databases for either sequence, annotation, or microarray experiments data are extremely beneficial to the research community, as they centrally gather information from experiments performed by different scientists. However, data from different sources develop their full capacities only when combined. The idea of a data warehouse directly adresses this problem and solves it by integrating all required data into one single database - hence there are already many data warehouses available to genetics. For the model legume Medicago truncatula, there is currently no such single data warehouse that integrates all freely available gene sequences, the corresponding gene expression data, and annotation information. Thus, we created the data warehouse TRUNCATULIX, an integrative database of Medicago truncatula sequence and expression data. The TRUNCATULIX data warehouse integrates five public databases for gene sequences, and gene annotations, as well as a database for microarray expression data covering raw data, normalized datasets, and complete expression profiling experiments. It can be accessed via an AJAX-based web interface using a standard web browser. For the first time, users can now quickly search for specific genes and gene expression data in a huge database based on high-quality annotations. The results can be exported as Excel, HTML, or as csv files for further usage. The integration of sequence, annotation, and gene expression data from several Medicago truncatula databases in TRUNCATULIX provides the legume community with access to data and data mining capability not previously available. TRUNCATULIX is freely available at http://www.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de/truncatulix/.

  17. Cyclin-like F-box protein plays a role in growth and development of the three model species Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boycheva I

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Irina Boycheva,1 Valya Vassileva,2 Miglena Revalska,1 Grigor Zehirov,2 Anelia Iantcheva1 1Department of Functional Genetics Legumes, 2AgroBioInstitute, Department of Plant Stress Molecular Biology, Institute of Plant Physiology and Genetics, Sofia, Bulgaria Abstract: In eukaryotes, F-box proteins are one of the main components of the SCF complex that belongs to the family of ubiquitin E3 ligases, which catalyze protein ubiquitination and maintain the balance between protein synthesis and degradation. In the present study, we clarified the role and function of the gene encoding cyclin-like F-box protein from Medicago truncatula using transgenic plants of the model species M. truncatula, Lotus japonicas, and Arabidopsis thaliana generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Morphological and transcriptional analyses combined with flow cytometry and histochemistry demonstrated the participation of this protein in many aspects of plant growth and development, including processes of indirect somatic embryogenesis and symbiotic nodulation. The cyclin-like F-box gene showed expression in all plant organs and tissues comprised of actively dividing cells. The observed variations in root and hypocotyl growth, leaf and silique development, ploidy levels, and leaf parameters in the obtained transgenic lines demonstrated the effects of this gene on organ development. Furthermore, knockdown of cyclin-like F-box led to accumulation of higher levels of the G2/M transition-specific gene cyclin B1:1 (CYCB1:1, suggesting its possible role in cell cycle control. Together, the collected data suggest a similar role of the cyclin-like F-box protein in the three model species, providing evidence for the functional conservation of the studied gene. Keywords: cyclin-like F-box, model legumes, Arabidopsis thaliana, plant growth, plant development, cell cycle

  18. LysM domains of Medicago truncatula NFP protein involved in Nod factor perception. Glycosylation state, molecular modeling and docking of chitooligosaccharides and Nod factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Lonneke; Lefebvre, Benoit; Cullimore, Julie; Imberty, Anne

    2006-09-01

    The establishment of the symbiosis between legume plants and rhizobial bacteria depends on the production of rhizobial lipo-chitooligosaccharidic signals (the Nod factors) that are specifically recognized by roots of the host plant. In Medicago truncatula, specific recognition of Sinorhizobium meliloti and its Nod factors requires the NFP (Nod factor perception) gene, which encodes a putative serine/threonine receptor-like kinase (RLK). The extracellular region of this protein contains three tandem lysin motifs (LysMs), a short peptide domain that is implicated in peptidoglycan or chitin binding in various bacterial or eukaryotic proteins, respectively. We report here the homology modeling of the three LysM domains of M. truncatula NFP based on the structure of a LysM domain of the Escherichia coli membrane-bound lytic murein transglycosidase D (MltD). Expression of NFP in a homologous system (M. truncatula roots) revealed that the protein is highly N-glycosylated, probably with both high-mannose and complex glycans. Surface analysis and docking calculations performed on the models of the three domains were used to predict the most favored binding modes for chitooligosaccharides and Nod factors. A convergent model can be proposed where the sulfated, O-acetylated lipo-chitooligosaccharidic Nod factor of S. meliloti binds in similar orientation to the three LysM domains of M. truncatula NFP. N-glycosylation is not expected to interfere with Nod factor binding in this orientation.

  19. The Proteome of Seed Development in the Model Legume Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend; Laursen, Brian S.; Ornfelt, Jane H.

    2009-01-01

    We have characterized the development of seeds in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Like soybean (Glycine max) and pea (Pisum sativum), Lotus develops straight seed pods and each pod contains approximately 20 seeds that reach maturity within 40 days. Histological sections show the characteristic...

  20. Modeling of desorption of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) stems and leaves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ArabHosseini, A.; Huisman, W.; Müller, J.

    2011-01-01

    The equilibrium moisture content of agricultural products is necessary to optimize drying process and helps to keep the quality of the product during the period of storage. The main aim of this research was to find the best model which could define well, the exchange of moisture between alfalfa

  1. Modeling of desorption of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) stems and leaves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ArabHosseini, A.; Huisman, W.; Müller, J.

    2011-01-01

    The equilibrium moisture content of agricultural products is necessary to optimize drying process and helps to keep the quality of the product during the period of storage. The main aim of this research was to find the best model which could define well, the exchange of moisture between alfalfa (Med

  2. Metabolite profiling of Triterpene Saponins in medicago truncatula hairy roots by liquid chromatography fourier transform Ion Cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Pollier, Jacob; Morreel, Kris; Geelen, Danny; Goossens, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Triterpenes are one of the largest classes of plant natural products, with an enormous variety in structure and bioactivities. Here, triterpene saponins from hairy roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula were profiled with reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to negative-ion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC ESI FT-ICR MS). Owing to the accuracy of the FT-ICR MS, reliable molecular formulas of the detected compounds could be ...

  3. Evolutionary history of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in Lotus, Medicago, and Phaseolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P; Benson, Benjamin V; Macarthur, Kenton J; Piya, Sarbottam

    2013-11-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) genes encode proteins that mediate various signaling pathways associated with biotic and abiotic stress responses in eukaryotes. The MAPK genes form a 3-tier signal transduction cascade between cellular stimuli and physiological responses. Recent identification of soybean MAPKs and availability of genome sequences from other legume species allowed us to identify their MAPK genes. The main objectives of this study were to identify MAPKs in 3 legume species, Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula, and Phaseolus vulgaris, and to assess their phylogenetic relationships. We used approaches in comparative genomics for MAPK gene identification and named the newly identified genes following Arabidopsis MAPK nomenclature model. We identified 19, 18, and 15 MAPKs and 7, 4, and 9 MAPKKs in the genome of Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula, and Phaseolus vulgaris, respectively. Within clade placement of MAPKs and MAPKKs in the 3 legume species were consistent with those in soybean and Arabidopsis. Among 5 clades of MAPKs, 4 founder clades were consistent to MAPKs of other plant species and orthologs of MAPK genes in the fifth clade-"Clade E" were consistent with those in soybean. Our results also indicated that some gene duplication events might have occurred prior to eudicot-monocot divergence. Highly diversified MAPKs in soybean relative to those in 3 other legume species are attributable to the polyploidization events in soybean. The identification of the MAPK genes in the legume species is important for the legume crop improvement; and evolutionary relationships and functional divergence of these gene members provide insights into plant genome evolution.

  4. Differences in Crenate Broomrape Parasitism Dynamics on Three Legume Crops Using a Thermal Time Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-de-Luque, Alejandro; Flores, Fernando; Rubiales, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Root parasitic weeds are a major limiting production factor in a number of crops, and control is difficult. Genetic resistance and chemical control lead the fight, but without unequivocal success. Models that help to describe and even predict the evolution of parasitism underground are a valuable tool for herbicide applications, and even could help in breeding programs. Legumes are heavily affected by Orobanche crenata (crenate broomrape) in the Mediterranean basin. This work presents a descriptive model based on thermal time and correlating growing degree days (GDD) with the different developmental stages of the parasite. The model was developed in three different legume crops (faba bean, grass pea and lentil) attacked by crenate broomrape. The developmental stages of the parasite strongly correlated with the GDD and differences were found depending on the host crop. PMID:28018421

  5. Proteome analysis of pod and seed development in the model legume Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nautrup-Pedersen, G.; Dam, S.; Laursen, B. S.;

    2010-01-01

    Legume pods serve important functions during seed development and are themselves sources of food and feed. Compared to seeds, the metabolism and development of pods are not well-defined. The present characterization of pods from the model legume Lotus japonicus, together with the detailed analyses...... seed proteins, including 263 proteins distinguishing the pod. The complete data set is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/cgi-bin/lotus/db.cgi , where spots in a reference map are linked to experimental data, such as matched peptides, quantification values, and gene accessions. Identified pod...... of the pod and seed proteomes in five developmental stages, paves the way for comparative pathway analysis and provides new metabolic information. Proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem-mass spectrometry. These analyses lead to the identification of 604 pod proteins and 965...

  6. cell- and tissue-specific transcriptome analyses of Medicago truncatula root nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Limpens

    Full Text Available Legumes have the unique ability to host nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria as symbiosomes inside root nodule cells. To get insight into this key process, which forms the heart of the endosymbiosis, we isolated specific cells/tissues at different stages of symbiosome formation from nodules of the model legume Medicago truncatula using laser-capture microdissection. Next, we determined their associated expression profiles using Affymetrix Medicago GeneChips. Cells were collected from the nodule infection zone divided into a distal (where symbiosome formation and division occur and proximal region (where symbiosomes are mainly differentiating, as well as infected cells from the fixation zone containing mature nitrogen fixing symbiosomes. As non-infected cells/tissue we included nodule meristem cells and uninfected cells from the fixation zone. Here, we present a comprehensive gene expression map of an indeterminate Medicago nodule and selected genes that show specific enriched expression in the different cells or tissues. Validation of the obtained expression profiles, by comparison to published gene expression profiles and experimental verification, indicates that the data can be used as digital "in situ". This digital "in situ" offers a genome-wide insight into genes specifically associated with subsequent stages of symbiosome and nodule cell development, and can serve to guide future functional studies.

  7. Comprehensive Comparative Genomic and Transcriptomic Analyses of the Legume Genes Controlling the Nodulation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zhenzhen; Pingault, Lise; Nourbakhsh-Rey, Mehrnoush; Libault, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is one of the most essential plant nutrients and one of the major factors limiting crop productivity. Having the goal to perform a more sustainable agriculture, there is a need to maximize biological nitrogen fixation, a feature of legumes. To enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling the interaction between legumes and rhizobia, the symbiotic partner fixing and assimilating the atmospheric nitrogen for the plant, researchers took advantage of genetic and genomic resources developed across different legume models (e.g., Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Glycine max, and Phaseolus vulgaris) to identify key regulatory protein coding genes of the nodulation process. In this study, we are presenting the results of a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis to highlight orthologous and paralogous relationships between the legume genes controlling nodulation. Mining large transcriptomic datasets, we also identified several orthologous and paralogous genes characterized by the induction of their expression during nodulation across legume plant species. This comprehensive study prompts new insights into the evolution of the nodulation process in legume plant and will benefit the scientific community interested in the transfer of functional genomic information between species.

  8. Proteomics and Metabolomics: two emerging areas for legume improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abirami eRamalingam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The crop legumes such as chickpea, common bean, cowpea, peanut, pigeonpea, soybean, etc. are important source of nutrition and contribute to a significant amount of biological nitrogen fixation (>20 million tons of fixed nitrogen in agriculture. However, the production of legumes is constrained due to abiotic and biotic stresses. It is therefore imperative to understand the molecular mechanisms of plant response to different stresses and identify key candidate genes regulating tolerance which can be deployed in breeding programs. The information obtained from transcriptomics has facilitated the identification of candidate genes for the given trait of interest and utilizing them in crop breeding programs to improve stress tolerance. However, the mechanisms of stress tolerance are complex due to the influence of multi-genes and post-transcriptional regulations. Furthermore, stress conditions greatly affect gene expression which in turn causes modifications in the composition of plant proteomes and metabolomes. Therefore, functional genomics involving various proteomics and metabolomics approaches have been obligatory for understanding plant stress tolerance. These approaches have also been found useful to unravel different pathways related to plant and seed development as well as symbiosis. Proteome and metabolome profiling using high-throughput based systems have been extensively applied in the model legume species Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, as well as in the model crop legume, soybean, to examine stress signalling pathways, cellular and developmental processes and nodule symbiosis. Moreover, the availability of protein reference maps as well as proteomics and metabolomics databases greatly support research and understanding of various biological processes in legumes. Protein-protein interaction techniques, particularly the yeast two-hybrid system have been advantageous for studying symbiosis and stress signalling in legumes. In

  9. A snapshot of functional genetic studies in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Kang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the current context of food security, increase of plant protein production in a sustainable manner represents one of the major challenges of agronomic research, which could be partially resolved by increased cultivation of legume crops. Medicago truncatula is now a well-established model for legume genomic and genetic studies. With the establishment of genomics tools and mutant populations in M. truncatula, it has become an important resource to answer some of the basic biological questions related to plant development and stress tolerance. This review has an objective to overview a decade of genetic studies in this model plant from generation of mutant populations to nowadays. To date, the three biological fields, which have been extensively studied in M. truncatula, are the symbiotic nitrogen fixation, the seed development, and the abiotic stress tolerance, due to their significant agronomic impacts. In this review, we summarize functional genetic studies related to these three major biological fields. We integrated analyses of a nearly exhaustive list of genes into their biological contexts in order to provide an overview of the forefront research advances in this important legume model plant.

  10. Quantitative trait locus analysis of symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Akiyoshi; Gondo, Takahiro; Akashi, Ryo; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Arima, Susumu; Suzuki, Akihiro

    2012-05-01

    Many legumes form nitrogen-fixing root nodules. An elevation of nitrogen fixation in such legumes would have significant implications for plant growth and biomass production in agriculture. To identify the genetic basis for the regulation of nitrogen fixation, quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was conducted with recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross Miyakojima MG-20 × Gifu B-129 in the model legume Lotus japonicus. This population was inoculated with Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 and grown for 14 days in pods containing vermiculite. Phenotypic data were collected for acetylene reduction activity (ARA) per plant (ARA/P), ARA per nodule weight (ARA/NW), ARA per nodule number (ARA/NN), NN per plant, NW per plant, stem length (SL), SL without inoculation (SLbac-), shoot dry weight without inoculation (SWbac-), root length without inoculation (RLbac-), and root dry weight (RWbac-), and finally 34 QTLs were identified. ARA/P, ARA/NN, NW, and SL showed strong correlations and QTL co-localization, suggesting that several plant characteristics important for symbiotic nitrogen fixation are controlled by the same locus. QTLs for ARA/P, ARA/NN, NW, and SL, co-localized around marker TM0832 on chromosome 4, were also co-localized with previously reported QTLs for seed mass. This is the first report of QTL analysis for symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity traits.

  11. Proteome analysis of pod and seed development in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautrup-Pedersen, Gitte; Dam, Svend; Laursen, Brian S; Siegumfeldt, Astrid L; Nielsen, Kasper; Goffard, Nicolas; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik; Friis, Carsten; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Lorentzen, Andrea; Roepstorff, Peter; Stougaard, Jens

    2010-11-01

    Legume pods serve important functions during seed development and are themselves sources of food and feed. Compared to seeds, the metabolism and development of pods are not well-defined. The present characterization of pods from the model legume Lotus japonicus, together with the detailed analyses of the pod and seed proteomes in five developmental stages, paves the way for comparative pathway analysis and provides new metabolic information. Proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem-mass spectrometry. These analyses lead to the identification of 604 pod proteins and 965 seed proteins, including 263 proteins distinguishing the pod. The complete data set is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/cgi-bin/lotus/db.cgi , where spots in a reference map are linked to experimental data, such as matched peptides, quantification values, and gene accessions. Identified pod proteins represented enzymes from 85 different metabolic pathways, including storage globulins and a late embryogenesis abundant protein. In contrast to seed maturation, pod maturation was associated with decreasing total protein content, especially proteins involved in protein biosynthesis and photosynthesis. Proteins detected only in pods included three enzymes participating in the urea cycle and four in nitrogen and amino group metabolism, highlighting the importance of nitrogen metabolism during pod development. Additionally, five legume seed proteins previously unassigned in the glutamate metabolism pathway were identified.

  12. Identification of nutrient and physical seed trait QTL in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Melinda A; Grusak, Michael A

    2009-08-01

    Legume seeds have the potential to provide a significant portion of essential micronutrients to the human diet. To identify the genetic basis for seed nutrient density, quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was conducted with the Miyakojima MG-20 x Gifu B-129 recombinant inbred population from the model legume Lotus japonicus. This population was grown to seed under greenhouse conditions in 2006 and 2007. Phenotypic data were collected for seed calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), phosphorus (P), sulfur (S), and zinc (Zn) concentrations and content. Data for physical seed traits (average seed mass and seed-pod allocation values) were also collected. Based on these phenotypic data, QTL analyses identified 103 QTL linked to 55 different molecular markers. Transgressive segregation, identified within this recombinant inbred population for both seed nutrient and physical traits, suggests new allelic combinations are available for agronomic trait improvement. QTL co-localization was also seen, suggesting that common transport processes might contribute to seed nutrient loading. Identification of loci involved in seed mineral density can be an important first step in identifying the genetic factors and, consequently, the physiological processes involved in mineral distribution to developing seeds. Longer term research efforts will focus on facilitating agronomic breeding efforts through ortholog identification in related crop legumes.

  13. In silico identification of known osmotic stress responsive genes from Arabidopsis in soybean and Medicago

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    Nina M. Soares-Cavalcanti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants experience various environmental stresses, but tolerance to these adverse conditions is a very complex phenomenon. The present research aimed to evaluate a set of genes involved in osmotic response, comparing soybean and medicago with the well-described Arabidopsis thaliana model plant. Based on 103 Arabidopsis proteins from 27 categories of osmotic stress response, comparative analyses against Genosoja and Medicago truncatula databases allowed the identification of 1,088 soybean and 1,210 Medicago sequences. The analysis showed a high number of sequences and high diversity, comprising genes from all categories in both organisms. Genes with unknown function were among the most representative, followed by transcription factors, ion transport proteins, water channel, plant defense, protein degradation, cellular structure, organization & biogenesis and senescence. An analysis of sequences with unknown function allowed the annotation of 174 soybean and 217 Medicago sequences, most of them concerning transcription factors. However, for about 30% of the sequences no function could be attributed using in silico procedures. The establishment of a gene set involved in osmotic stress responses in soybean and barrel medic will help to better understand the survival mechanisms for this type of stress condition in legumes.

  14. Unveiling common responses of Medicago truncatula to appropriate and inappropriate rust species

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    Maria Carlota eVaz Patto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the nature of effective defense mechanisms in legumes to pathogens of remotely related plant species. Some rust species are among pathogens with broad host range causing dramatic losses in various crop plants. To understand and compare the different host and nonhost resistance responses of legume species against rusts, we characterized the reaction of the model legume Medicago truncatula to one appropriate (Uromyces striatus and two inappropriate (U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus rusts. We found that similar pre and post-haustorial mechanisms of resistance appear to be operative in M. truncatula against appropriate and inappropriate rust fungus. The appropriate U. striatus germinated better on M. truncatula accessions then the inappropriate U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus, but once germinated, germ tubes of the three rusts had a similar level of success in finding stomata and forming an appressoria over a stoma. However responses to different inappropriate rust species also showed some specificity, suggesting a combination of non specific and specific responses underlying this legume nonhost resistance to rust fungi. Further genetic and expression analysis studies will contribute to the development of the necessary molecular tools to use the present information on host and nonhost resistance mechanisms to breed for broad-spectrum resistance to rust in legume species.

  15. TRUNCATULIX – a data warehouse for the legume community

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    Runte Kai J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Databases for either sequence, annotation, or microarray experiments data are extremely beneficial to the research community, as they centrally gather information from experiments performed by different scientists. However, data from different sources develop their full capacities only when combined. The idea of a data warehouse directly adresses this problem and solves it by integrating all required data into one single database – hence there are already many data warehouses available to genetics. For the model legume Medicago truncatula, there is currently no such single data warehouse that integrates all freely available gene sequences, the corresponding gene expression data, and annotation information. Thus, we created the data warehouse TRUNCATULIX, an integrative database of Medicago truncatula sequence and expression data. Results The TRUNCATULIX data warehouse integrates five public databases for gene sequences, and gene annotations, as well as a database for microarray expression data covering raw data, normalized datasets, and complete expression profiling experiments. It can be accessed via an AJAX-based web interface using a standard web browser. For the first time, users can now quickly search for specific genes and gene expression data in a huge database based on high-quality annotations. The results can be exported as Excel, HTML, or as csv files for further usage. Conclusion The integration of sequence, annotation, and gene expression data from several Medicago truncatula databases in TRUNCATULIX provides the legume community with access to data and data mining capability not previously available. TRUNCATULIX is freely available at http://www.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de/truncatulix/.

  16. Tannin containing legumes as a model for nutraceuticals against digestive parasites in livestock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoste, H.; Torres-Acosta, J. F. J.; Sandoval-Castro, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    approaches for a more integrated management of these infections. The use of nutraceuticals in the control of GINs is one of the alternatives which has been widely studied for 20 years. The objectives of this review are: (i) to define and illustrate the concept of 'nutraceutical' in the context of veterinary...... parasitology based on data obtained on the most studied models to control GINs in small ruminants, the tannin-containing legumes (Fabaceae); (ii) to illustrate how the 'nutraceutical concept' could be expanded to other plants, other livestock production systems and other GI parasitic diseases, and (iii...

  17. Root developmental programs shape the Medicago truncatula nodule meristem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, H.; Xiao, T.T.; Kulikova, O.; Wan, X.; Bisseling, T.; Scheres, B.; Heidstra, R.

    2015-01-01

    Nodules on the roots of legume plants host nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria. Several lines of evidence indicate that nodules are evolutionarily related to roots. We determined whether developmental control of the Medicago truncatula nodule meristem bears resemblance to that in root meristems

  18. Quantitative trait locus analysis of multiple agronomic traits in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondo, Takahiro; Sato, Shusei; Okumura, Kenji; Tabata, Satoshi; Akashi, Ryo; Isobe, Sachiko

    2007-07-01

    The first quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of multiple agronomic traits in the model legume Lotus japonicus was performed with a population of recombinant inbred lines derived from Miyakojima MG-20 x Gifu B-129. Thirteen agronomic traits were evaluated in 2004 and 2005: traits of vegetative parts (plant height, stem thickness, leaf length, leaf width, plant regrowth, plant shape, and stem color), flowering traits (flowering time and degree), and pod and seed traits (pod length, pod width, seeds per pod, and seed mass). A total of 40 QTLs were detected that explained 5%-69% of total variation. The QTL that explained the most variation was that for stem color, which was detected in the same region of chromosome 2 in both years. Some QTLs were colocated, especially those for pod and seed traits. Seed mass QTLs were located at 5 locations that mapped to the corresponding genomic positions of equivalent QTLs in soybean, pea, chickpea, and mung bean. This study provides fundamental information for breeding of agronomically important legume crops.

  19. An experimental and modelling exploration of the host-sanction hypothesis in legume-rhizobia mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Diana E; Carbajal, Juan P; Cannas, Sergio; Pérez-Arnedo, Rebeca; Hidalgo-Perea, Angeles; Olivares, José; Ruiz-Sainz, José E; Sanjuán, Juan

    2009-08-07

    Despite the importance of mutualism as a key ecological process, its persistence in nature is difficult to explain since the existence of exploitative, "cheating" partners that could erode the interaction is common. By analogy with the proposed policing strategy stabilizing intraspecific cooperation, host sanctions against non-N(2) fixing, cheating symbionts have been proposed as a force stabilizing mutualism in legume-Rhizobium symbiosis. Following this proposal, penalizations would include decreased nodular rhizobial viability and/or early nodule senescence in nodules occupied by cheating rhizobia. In this work, we analyse the stability of Rhizobium-legume symbiosis when non-fixing, cheating strains are present, using an experimental and modelling approach. We used split-root experiments with soybean plants inoculated with two rhizobial strains, a cooperative, normal N(2) fixing strain and an isogenic non-fixing, "perfect" cheating mutant derivative that lacks nitrogenase activity but has the same nodulation abilities inoculated to split-root plants. We found no experimental evidence of functioning plant host sanctions to cheater rhizobia based on nodular rhizobia viability and nodule senescence and maturity molecular markers. Based on these experiments, we developed a population dynamic model with and without the inclusion of plant host sanctions. We show that plant populations persist in spite of the presence of cheating rhizobia without the need of incorporating any sanction against the cheater populations in the model, under the realistic assumption that plants can at least get some amount of fixed N(2) from the effectively mutualistic rhizobia occupying some nodules. Inclusion of plant sanctions leads to the unrealistic effect of ultimate extinction of cheater strains in soil. Our simulation results are in agreement with increasing experimental evidence and theoretical work showing that mutualisms can persist in presence of cheating partners.

  20. Tannin containing legumes as a model for nutraceuticals against digestive parasites in livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoste, H; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Sandoval-Castro, C A; Mueller-Harvey, I; Sotiraki, S; Louvandini, H; Thamsborg, S M; Terrill, T H

    2015-08-15

    Parasitic infections with gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) still represent a worldwide major pathological threat associated with the outdoor production of various livestock species. Because of the widespread resistance to synthetic chemical anthelmintics, there is a strong impetus to explore novel approaches for a more integrated management of these infections. The use of nutraceuticals in the control of GINs is one of the alternatives which has been widely studied for 20 years. The objectives of this review are: (i) to define and illustrate the concept of 'nutraceutical' in the context of veterinary parasitology based on data obtained on the most studied models to control GINs in small ruminants, the tannin-containing legumes (Fabaceae); (ii) to illustrate how the 'nutraceutical concept' could be expanded to other plants, other livestock production systems and other GI parasitic diseases, and (iii) to explain how this concept is opening up new research fields for better understanding the interactions between the host, the digestive parasites and the environment.

  1. Novel SINEs families in Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus: bioinformatic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzalski, Marek; Sakowicz, Tomasz

    2011-07-01

    Although short interspersed elements (SINEs) were discovered nearly 30 years ago, the studies of these genomic repeats were mostly limited to animal genomes. Very little is known about SINEs in legumes--one of the most important plant families. Here we report identification, genomic distribution and molecular features of six novel SINE elements in Lotus japonicus (named LJ_SINE-1, -2, -3) and Medicago truncatula (MT_SINE-1, -2, -3), model species of legume. They possess all the structural features commonly found in short interspersed elements including RNA polymerase III promoter, polyA tail and flanking repeats. SINEs described here are present in low to moderate copy numbers from 150 to 3000. Bioinformatic analyses were used to searched public databases, we have shown that three of new SINE elements from M. truncatula seem to be characteristic of Medicago and Trifolium genera. Two SINE families have been found in L. japonicus and one is present in both M. truncatula and L. japonicus. In addition, we are discussing potential activities of the described elements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Three Medicago MtFUL genes have distinct and overlapping expression patterns during vegetative and reproductive development and 35S:MtFULb accelerates flowering and causes a terminal flower phenotype in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauren eJaudal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The timing of the transition to flowering is carefully controlled by plants in order to optimise sexual reproduction and the ensuing production of seeds, grains and fruits. The genetic networks that regulate floral induction are best characterised in the temperate eudicot Arabidopsis in which the florigen gene FT plays a major role in promoting the transition to flowering. Legumes are an important plant group, but less is known about the regulation of their flowering time. In the model legume Medicago truncatula (Medicago, a temperate annual plant like Arabidopsis, flowering is induced by prolonged cold (vernalisation followed by long day lengths (LD. Recent molecular-genetic experiments have revealed that a FT-like gene, MtFTa1, is a central regulator of flowering time in Medicago. Here, we characterize the three Medicago FRUITFULL (FUL MADS transcription factors, MtFULa, MtFULb and MtFULc using phylogenetic analyses, gene expression profiling through developmental time courses, and functional analyses in transgenic plants. MtFULa and MtFULb have similarity in sequence and expression profiles under inductive environmental conditions during both vegetative and reproductive development while MtFULc is only up regulated in the apex after flowering in LD conditions. Sustained up regulation of MtFULs requires functional MtFTa1 but their transcript levels are not affected during cold treatment. Overexpression of MtFULa and MtFULb promotes flowering in transgenic Arabidopsis plants with an additional terminal flower phenotype on some 35S:MtFULb plants. An increase in transcript levels of the MtFULs was also observed in Medicago plants overexpressing MtFTa1. Our results suggest that the MtFULs are targets of MtFTa1. Overall, this work highlights the conserved functions of FUL-like genes in promoting flowering and other roles in plant development and thus contributes to our understanding of the genetic control of the flowering process in Medicago.

  3. Specificity in Legume-Rhizobia Symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Mitchell; Andrews, Morag E

    2017-03-26

    Most species in the Leguminosae (legume family) can fix atmospheric nitrogen (N₂) via symbiotic bacteria (rhizobia) in root nodules. Here, the literature on legume-rhizobia symbioses in field soils was reviewed and genotypically characterised rhizobia related to the taxonomy of the legumes from which they were isolated. The Leguminosae was divided into three sub-families, the Caesalpinioideae, Mimosoideae and Papilionoideae. Bradyrhizobium spp. were the exclusive rhizobial symbionts of species in the Caesalpinioideae, but data are limited. Generally, a range of rhizobia genera nodulated legume species across the two Mimosoideae tribes Ingeae and Mimoseae, but Mimosa spp. show specificity towards Burkholderia in central and southern Brazil, Rhizobium/Ensifer in central Mexico and Cupriavidus in southern Uruguay. These specific symbioses are likely to be at least in part related to the relative occurrence of the potential symbionts in soils of the different regions. Generally, Papilionoideae species were promiscuous in relation to rhizobial symbionts, but specificity for rhizobial genus appears to hold at the tribe level for the Fabeae (Rhizobium), the genus level for Cytisus (Bradyrhizobium), Lupinus (Bradyrhizobium) and the New Zealand native Sophora spp. (Mesorhizobium) and species level for Cicer arietinum (Mesorhizobium), Listia bainesii (Methylobacterium) and Listia angolensis (Microvirga). Specificity for rhizobial species/symbiovar appears to hold for Galega officinalis (Neorhizobium galegeae sv. officinalis), Galega orientalis (Neorhizobium galegeae sv. orientalis), Hedysarum coronarium (Rhizobium sullae), Medicago laciniata (Ensifer meliloti sv. medicaginis), Medicago rigiduloides (Ensifer meliloti sv. rigiduloides) and Trifolium ambiguum (Rhizobium leguminosarum sv. trifolii). Lateral gene transfer of specific symbiosis genes within rhizobial genera is an important mechanism allowing legumes to form symbioses with rhizobia adapted to particular soils

  4. Nitrogen Fixing Legumes in the Plant Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A.A. Al-Fredan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems statement: Numerous authors have used energetic to explain the ecological success of N-fixing plants. Legume biodiversity assessment, species dynamics, nitrogen fixation monitoring and environment impact assessment of these ecological events in Al-Hassa Oasis, Saudi Arabia are rare and need to be continuous and more frequent. Approach: Thus the objectives of this study were to analyze legume abundance within and outside Al-Hassa Oasis and relate it to the distribution of the different genera. Results: Thirty two legume plant species from 20 genera have been recorded within and outside the Oasis. The largest genera were Cassia (4 species, Indigofera (4 and Acacia (3. Annual herbs were the dominant growth form (34% of species recorded, followed by shrubs (28%, perennial herbs (19% and trees (19%. Eighteen alien plant species were recorded (maybe an underestimated number. The nitrogen fixation of the legume plant species in Al-Hassa Oasis was estimated/analyzing the fixing potentiality of these species and nonfixing reference species (Panicum turgidum using the 15N natural abundance method. Species with great nitrogen fixing capacity in Al-Hassa include: Medicago sativa, Vicia faba, Vicia sativa, Melitotus indicus, Dolicus lablab, Melitotus alba and Cliforia ternate. The mean biological fixation contribution of most of the recorded legume plants were high, varying from 3.9% (Indigofera argentea to 64.6% (Medicago sativa. Conclusion: Al-Hassa Oasis is richer than expected based on its location within the desert zone. This study confirms the importance of the Oasis for national flora conservation in the Kingdom. results showed a good potential for use of the 15N natural abundance methodology for evaluating the nitrogen fixation ability of the legume plants under field conditions as well as for the estimation of %Ndfa.

  5. Legume Information System (LegumeInfo.org): a key component of a set of federated data resources for the legume family

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Legume Information System (LIS), at http://legumeinfo.org, is a genomic data portal (GDP) for the legume family. LIS provides access to genetic and genomic information for major crop and model legumes. With more than two-dozen domesticated legume species, there are numerous specialists working o...

  6. Identification of conserved microRNAs and their targets in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jihong; Zhang, Hongyuan; Ding, Yi

    2013-04-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of non-protein coding small RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level in plants and animals. Although thousands of miRNAs were identified in many plant species, only 3 miRNAs have been reported in Lotus Japonicus, a model legume plant. In this study, 80 potential miRNA candidates were identified in 28 ESTs and 52 GSSs of L. japonicus using a homology-based computational analysis. A total of 735 miRNA targets were predicted and some of them encoded transcription factors as well as genes that function in stress response, signal transduction, methylation and others. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that miR156a, miR160a and miR399a participated in seed germination of L. japonicus. GO and KEGG analysis suggested that the predicted miRNAs might target genes involved in lipid, nitrogen, starch sucrose metabolism and signal transduction.

  7. The Medicago sativa gene index 1.2: a web-accessible gene expression atlas for investigating expression differences between Medicago sativa subspecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is the primary forage legume crop species in the United States and plays essential economic and ecological roles in agricultural systems across the country. Modern alfalfa is the result of hybridization between tetraploid M. sativa ssp. sativa and M. sativa ssp. falcata....

  8. Flooding tolerance of forage legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, Gustavo G; Colmer, Timothy D

    2016-06-20

    We review waterlogging and submergence tolerances of forage (pasture) legumes. Growth reductions from waterlogging in perennial species ranged from >50% for Medicago sativa and Trifolium pratense to Lotus corniculatus, L. tenuis, and T. fragiferum For annual species, waterlogging reduced Medicago truncatula by ~50%, whereas Melilotus siculus and T. michelianum were not reduced. Tolerant species have higher root porosity (gas-filled volume in tissues) owing to aerenchyma formation. Plant dry mass (waterlogged relative to control) had a positive (hyperbolic) relationship to root porosity across eight species. Metabolism in hypoxic roots was influenced by internal aeration. Sugars accumulate in M. sativa due to growth inhibition from limited respiration and low energy in roots of low porosity (i.e. 4.5%). In contrast, L. corniculatus, with higher root porosity (i.e. 17.2%) and O2 supply allowing respiration, maintained growth better and sugars did not accumulate. Tolerant legumes form nodules, and internal O2 diffusion along roots can sustain metabolism, including N2 fixation, in submerged nodules. Shoot physiology depends on species tolerance. In M. sativa, photosynthesis soon declines and in the longer term (>10 d) leaves suffer chlorophyll degradation, damage, and N, P, and K deficiencies. In tolerant L corniculatus and L. tenuis, photosynthesis is maintained longer, shoot N is less affected, and shoot P can even increase during waterlogging. Species also differ in tolerance of partial and complete shoot submergence. Gaps in knowledge include anoxia tolerance of roots, N2 fixation during field waterlogging, and identification of traits conferring the ability to recover after water subsides.

  9. NPR1 protein regulates pathogenic and symbiotic interactions between Rhizobium and legumes and non-legumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smadar Peleg-Grossman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Legumes are unique in their ability to establish symbiotic interaction with rhizobacteria from Rhizobium genus, which provide them with available nitrogen. Nodulation factors (NFs produced by Rhizobium initiate legume root hair deformation and curling that entrap the bacteria, and allow it to grow inside the plant. In contrast, legumes and non-legumes activate defense responses when inoculated with pathogenic bacteria. One major defense pathway is mediated by salicylic acid (SA. SA is sensed and transduced to downstream defense components by a redox-regulated protein called NPR1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used Arabidopsis mutants in SA defense pathway to test the role of NPR1 in symbiotic interactions. Inoculation of Sinorhizobium meliloti or purified NF on Medicago truncatula or nim1/npr1 A. thaliana mutants induced root hair deformation and transcription of early and late nodulins. Application of S. meliloti or NF on M. truncatula or A. thaliana roots also induced a strong oxidative burst that lasted much longer than in plants inoculated with pathogenic or mutualistic bacteria. Transient overexpression of NPR1 in M. truncatula suppressed root hair curling, while inhibition of NPR1 expression by RNAi accelerated curling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that, while NPR1 has a positive effect on pathogen resistance, it has a negative effect on symbiotic interactions, by inhibiting root hair deformation and nodulin expression. Our results also show that basic plant responses to Rhizobium inoculation are conserved in legumes and non-legumes.

  10. Soil bulk electrical resistivity and forage ground cover: nonlinear models in an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. case study

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    Roberta Rossi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alfalfa is a highly productive and fertility-building forage crop; its performance, can be highly variable as influenced by within-field soil spatial variability. Characterising the relations between soil and forage- variation is important for optimal management. The aim of this work was to model the relationship between soil electrical resistivity (ER and plant productivity in an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. field in Southern Italy. ER mapping was accomplished by a multi-depth automatic resistivity profiler. Plant productivity was assessed through normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI at 2 dates. A non-linear relationship between NDVI and deep soil ER was modelled within the framework of generalised additive models. The best model explained 70% of the total variability. Soil profiles at six locations selected along a gradient of ER showed differences related to texture (ranging from clay to sandy-clay loam, gravel content (0 to 55% and to the presence of a petrocalcic horizon. Our results prove that multi-depth ER can be used to localise permanent soil features that drive plant productivity.

  11. Peroxiredoxins and NADPH-dependent thioredoxin systems in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Méndez, Alejandro; Matamoros, Manuel A; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Cejudo, Francisco Javier; Rouhier, Nicolas; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Becana, Manuel

    2011-07-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs), thioredoxins (Trxs), and NADPH-thioredoxin reductases (NTRs) constitute central elements of the thiol-disulfide redox regulatory network of plant cells. This study provides a comprehensive survey of this network in the model legume Lotus japonicus. The aims were to identify and characterize these gene families and to assess whether the NTR-Trx systems are operative in nodules. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunological and proteomic approaches were used for expression profiling. We identified seven Prx, 14 Trx, and three NTR functional genes. The PrxQ1 gene was found to be transcribed in two alternative spliced variants and to be expressed at high levels in leaves, stems, petals, pods, and seeds and at low levels in roots and nodules. The 1CPrx gene showed very high expression in the seed embryos and low expression in vegetative tissues and was induced by nitric oxide and cytokinins. In sharp contrast, cytokinins down-regulated all other Prx genes, except PrxQ1, in roots and nodules, but only 2CPrxA and PrxQ1 in leaves. Gene-specific changes in Prx expression were also observed in response to ethylene, abscisic acid, and auxins. Nodules contain significant mRNA and protein amounts of cytosolic PrxIIB, Trxh1, and NTRA and of plastidic NTRC. Likewise, they express cytosolic Trxh3, Trxh4, Trxh8, and Trxh9, mitochondrial PrxIIF and Trxo, and plastidic Trxm2, Trxm4, and ferredoxin-Trx reductase. These findings reveal a complex regulation of Prxs that is dependent on the isoform, tissue, and signaling molecule and support that redox NTR-Trx systems are functional in the cytosol, mitochondria, and plastids of nodules.

  12. Comparative genomics and prediction of conditionally dispensable sequences in legume-infecting Fusarium oxysporum formae speciales facilitates identification of candidate effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Angela H; Sharma, Mamta; Thatcher, Louise F; Azam, Sarwar; Hane, James K; Sperschneider, Jana; Kidd, Brendan N; Anderson, Jonathan P; Ghosh, Raju; Garg, Gagan; Lichtenzveig, Judith; Kistler, H Corby; Shea, Terrance; Young, Sarah; Buck, Sally-Anne G; Kamphuis, Lars G; Saxena, Rachit; Pande, Suresh; Ma, Li-Jun; Varshney, Rajeev K; Singh, Karam B

    2016-03-05

    Soil-borne fungi of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex cause devastating wilt disease on many crops including legumes that supply human dietary protein needs across many parts of the globe. We present and compare draft genome assemblies for three legume-infecting formae speciales (ff. spp.): F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceris (Foc-38-1) and f. sp. pisi (Fop-37622), significant pathogens of chickpea and pea respectively, the world's second and third most important grain legumes, and lastly f. sp. medicaginis (Fom-5190a) for which we developed a model legume pathosystem utilising Medicago truncatula. Focusing on the identification of pathogenicity gene content, we leveraged the reference genomes of Fusarium pathogens F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (tomato-infecting) and F. solani (pea-infecting) and their well-characterised core and dispensable chromosomes to predict genomic organisation in the newly sequenced legume-infecting isolates. Dispensable chromosomes are not essential for growth and in Fusarium species are known to be enriched in host-specificity and pathogenicity-associated genes. Comparative genomics of the publicly available Fusarium species revealed differential patterns of sequence conservation across F. oxysporum formae speciales, with legume-pathogenic formae speciales not exhibiting greater sequence conservation between them relative to non-legume-infecting formae speciales, possibly indicating the lack of a common ancestral source for legume pathogenicity. Combining predicted dispensable gene content with in planta expression in the model legume-infecting isolate, we identified small conserved regions and candidate effectors, four of which shared greatest similarity to proteins from another legume-infecting ff. spp. We demonstrate that distinction of core and potential dispensable genomic regions of novel F. oxysporum genomes is an effective tool to facilitate effector discovery and the identification of gene content possibly linked to host

  13. Role of N-glycosylation sites and CXC motifs in trafficking of Medicago trunculata Nod Factor Perception protein to the plasma membrane.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefebvre, B.; Klaus-Heisen, D.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Hervé, M.; Camut, S.; Auriac, M.C.; Gasciolli, V.; Nurisso, A.; Gadella, T.W.; Cullimore, J.

    2012-01-01

    The lysin motif receptor like kinase, NFP, is a key protein in the legume Medicago truncatula for the perception of lipochitooligosaccharidic Nod Factors, which are secreted bacterial signals essential for establishing the nitrogen-fixing legume-rhizobia symbiosis. Predicted structural and genetic a

  14.  Molecular evolution and positive selection of the symbiotic gene NORK in Medicago truncatula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Mita, Stephane; Santoni, Sylvain; Hochu, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    . The membrane-anchored receptor NORK (nodulation receptor kinase) of the legume Medicago truncatula controls early steps of root infection by two symbiotic microorganisms: nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia) and endomycorrhizal fungi (Glomales). We analyzed the diversity of the gene NORK by sequencing 4...

  15. Molecular signals controlling the inhibition of nodulation by nitrate in Medicago truncatula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorden, Van Giel E.; Verbeek, Rob; Dinh, Peter; Jin, Jian; Green, Alexandra; Ng, Jason Liang Pin; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    The presence of nitrogen inhibits legume nodule formation, but the mechanism of this inhibition is poorly understood. We found that 2.5 mM nitrate and above significantly inhibited nodule initiation but not root hair curling in Medicago trunatula. We analyzed protein abundance in M. truncatula ro

  16. Explaining coexistence of nitrogen fixing and non-fixing rhizobia in legume-rhizobia mutualism using mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, G; Marco, D; Knopoff, D; Torres, G; Turner, C

    2017-10-01

    In the mutualism established between legumes and soil bacteria known as rhizobia, bacteria from soil infect plants roots and reproduce inside root nodules where they fix atmospheric N2 for plant nutrition, receiving carbohydrates in exchange. Host-plant sanctions against non N2 fixing, cheating bacterial symbionts have been proposed to act in the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis, to preserve the mutualistic relationship. Sanctions include decreased rhizobial survival in nodules occupied by cheating rhizobia. Previously, a simple population model experimentally based showed that the coexistence of fixing and cheating rhizobia strains commonly found in field conditions is possible, and that the inclusion of sanctions leads to the extinction of cheating strains in soil. Here, we extend the previous model to include other factors that could complicate the sanction scenario, like horizontal transmission of symbiotic plasmids, turning non-nodulating strains into nodulating rhizobia, and competition between fixing and cheating strains for nodulation. In agreement with previous results, we show that plant populations persist even in the presence of cheating rhizobia without incorporating any sanction against the cheater populations in the model, under the realistic assumption that plants can at least get some amount of fixed N2 from the effectively mutualistic rhizobia occupying some nodules. Inclusion of plant sanctions leads to the unrealistic extinction of cheater strains in soil. Our results agree with increasing experimental evidence and theoretical work showing that mutualisms can persist in presence of cheating partners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An integrated genetic linkage map for white clover (Trifolium repens L.) with alignment to Medicago

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a temperate forage legume with an allotetraploid genome (2n=4×=32) estimated at 1093 Mb. Several linkage maps of various sizes, marker sources and completeness are available, however, no integrated map and marker set has explored consistency of linkage analysis among unrelated mapping populations. Such integrative analysis requires tools for homoeologue matching among populations. Development of these tools provides for a consistent framework map of the white clover genome, and facilitates in silico alignment with the model forage legume, Medicago truncatula. Results This is the first report of integration of independent linkage maps in white clover, and adds to the literature on methyl filtered GeneThresher®-derived microsatellite (simple sequence repeat; SSR) markers for linkage mapping. Gene-targeted SSR markers were discovered in a GeneThresher® (TrGT) methyl-filtered database of 364,539 sequences, which yielded 15,647 SSR arrays. Primers were designed for 4,038 arrays and of these, 465 TrGT-SSR markers were used for parental consensus genetic linkage analysis in an F1 mapping population (MP2). This was merged with an EST-SSR consensus genetic map of an independent population (MP1), using markers to match homoeologues and develop a multi-population integrated map of the white clover genome. This integrated map (IM) includes 1109 loci based on 804 SSRs over 1274 cM, covering 97% of the genome at a moderate density of one locus per 1.2 cM. Eighteen candidate genes and one morphological marker were also placed on the IM. Despite being derived from disparate populations and marker sources, the component maps and the derived IM had consistent representations of the white clover genome for marker order and genetic length. In silico analysis at an E-value threshold of 1e-20 revealed substantial co-linearity with the Medicago truncatula genome, and indicates a translocation between T. repens groups 2 and 6 relative to

  18. Inhibition of the catalase activity from Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa by sodium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera García, Noel A; Iribarne, Carmen; Palma, Francisco; Lluch, Carmen

    2007-08-01

    Changes in catalase activity during the development of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis as well as its response in salinized plants of Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa, was studied. Besides, it was examined the behavior of the enzyme, isolated from leaves and root nodules, during in vitro incubation with NaCl doses. Nodule catalase activities of both legumes were assayed with several enzyme inhibitors and also purified. Leaf catalase activity of Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa decreased and increased respectively throughout the ontogeny, but root nodule catalase kept a high and stable value. This last result suggests that both legumes require the maintenance of high nodule catalase in nitrogen-fixing nodules. Under salt stress conditions leaf and nodule catalase activity decreased in both, grain and pasture legumes. Because catalase from leaf of Medicago sativa and nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris were relatively sensitive to NaCl during in vitro experiments, the detoxifying role of this enzyme for H(2)O(2) should be limited in such conditions. Both catalases, from determinate and indeterminate nodules, were affected neither by oxygen nor superoxide radicals but showed a strong (Phaseolus vulgaris) or partial (Medicago sativa) inhibition with dithiothreitol, dithionite and beta-mercaptoethanol. Besides, cyanide was the most potent inhibitor of nodule catalases. Finally, catalases partially purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography migrated at 42 (Phaseolus vulgaris) and 46kDa (Medicago sativa) on SDS-PAGE, whereas native forms on sephacryl S-300 columns exhibited a molecular mass of 59 and 48kDa (Phaseolus vulgaris) and 88 and 53kDa (Medicago sativa).

  19. The Proteome of Seed Development in the Model Legume Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend; Laursen, Brian S.; Ornfelt, Jane H.

    2009-01-01

    three developmental phases of legume seeds and the presence of embryo, endosperm, and seed coat in desiccated seeds. Furthermore, protein, oil, starch, phytic acid, and ash contents were determined, and this indicates that the composition of mature Lotus seed is more similar to soybean than to pea....... In a first attempt to determine the seed proteome, both a two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis approach and a gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach were used. Globulins were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and five legumins, LLP1 to LLP5...

  20. Comparative Analysis of the Symbiotic Efficiency of Medicago truncatula and Medicago sativa under Phosphorus Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam-Son Phan Tran

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P-deficiency is a major abiotic stress that limits legume growth in many types of soils. The relationship between Medicago and Sinorhizobium, is known to be affected by different environmental conditions. Recent reports have shown that, in combination with S. meliloti 2011, Medicago truncatula had a lower symbiotic efficiency than Medicago sativa. However, little is known about how Medicago–Sinorhizobium is affected by P-deficiency at the whole-plant level. The objective of the present study was to compare and characterize the symbiotic efficiency of N2 fixation of M. truncatula and M. sativa grown in sand under P-limitation. Under this condition, M. truncatula exhibited a significantly higher rate of N2 fixation. The specific activity of the nodules was much higher in M. truncatula in comparison to M. sativa, partially as a result of an increase in electron allocation to N2 versus H+. Although the main organic acid, succinate, exhibited a strong tendency to decrease under P-deficiency, the more efficient symbiotic ability observed in M. truncatula coincided with an apparent increase in the content of malate in its nodules. Our results indicate that the higher efficiency of the M. truncatula symbiotic system is related to the ability to increase malate content under limited P-conditions.

  1. Adaptive evolution of the symbiotic gene NORK is not correlated with shifts of rhizobial specificity in the genus Medicago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronfort Joëlle

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NODULATION RECEPTOR KINASE (NORK gene encodes a Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR-containing receptor-like protein and controls the infection by symbiotic rhizobia and endomycorrhizal fungi in Legumes. The occurrence of numerous amino acid changes driven by directional selection has been reported in this gene, using a limited number of messenger RNA sequences, but the functional reason of these changes remains obscure. The Medicago genus, where changes in rhizobial associations have been previously examined, is a good model to test whether the evolution of NORK is influenced by rhizobial interactions. Results We sequenced a region of 3610 nucleotides (encoding a 392 amino acid-long region of the NORK protein in 32 Medicago species. We confirm that positive selection in NORK has occurred within the Medicago genus and find that the amino acid positions targeted by selection occur in sites outside of solvent-exposed regions in LRRs, and other sites in the N-terminal region of the protein. We tested if branches of the Medicago phylogeny where changes of rhizobial symbionts occurred displayed accelerated rates of amino acid substitutions. Only one branch out of five tested, leading to M. noeana, displays such a pattern. Among other branches, the most likely for having undergone positive selection is not associated with documented shift of rhizobial specificity. Conclusion Adaptive changes in the sequence of the NORK receptor have involved the LRRs, but targeted different sites than in most previous studies of LRR proteins evolution. The fact that positive selection in NORK tends not to be associated to changes in rhizobial specificity indicates that this gene was probably not involved in evolving rhizobial preferences. Other explanations (e.g. coevolutionary arms race must be tested to explain the adaptive evolution of NORK.

  2. Characterization and genetic dissection of resistance to spotted alfalfa aphid (Therioaphis trifolii) in Medicago truncatula

    KAUST Repository

    Kamphuis, L. G.

    2013-09-21

    Aphids cause significant yield losses in agricultural crops worldwide. Medicago truncatula, a model legume, cultivated pasture species in Australia and close relative of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), was used to study the defence response against Therioaphis trifolii f. maculate [spotted alfalfa aphid (SAA)]. Aphid performance and plant damage were compared among three accessions. A20 is highly susceptible, A17 has moderate resistance, and Jester is strongly resistant. Subsequent analyses using A17 and A20, reciprocal F1s and an A17×A20 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population revealed that this moderate resistance is phloem mediated and involves antibiosis and tolerance but not antixenosis. Electrical penetration graph analysis also identified a novel waveform termed extended potential drop, which occurred following SAA infestation of M. truncatula. Genetic dissection using the RIL population revealed three quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 3, 6, and 7 involved in distinct modes of aphid defence including antibiosis and tolerance. An antibiosis locus resides on linkage group 3 (LG3) and is derived from A17, whereas a plant tolerance and antibiosis locus resides on LG6 and is derived from A20, which exhibits strong temporary tolerance. The loci identified reside in regions harbouring classical resistance genes, and introgression of these loci in current medic cultivars may help provide durable resistance to SAA, while elucidation of their molecular mechanisms may provide valuable insight into other aphid–plant interactions.

  3. Unique and conserved features of floral evocation in legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Lim Chee; Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L

    2014-08-01

    Legumes, with their unique ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, play a vital role in ensuring future food security and mitigating the effects of climate change because they use less fossil energy and produce less greenhouse gases compared with N-fertilized systems. Grain legumes are second only to cereal crops as a source of human and animal food, and they contribute approximately one third of the protein consumed by the human population. The productivity of seed crops, such as grain legumes, is dependent on flowering. Despite the genetic variation and importance of flowering in legume production, studies of the molecular pathways that control flowering in legumes are limited. Recent advances in genomics have revealed that legume flowering pathways are divergent from those of such model species as Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we discuss the current understanding of flowering time regulation in legumes and highlight the unique and conserved features of floral evocation in legumes.

  4. Unique and conserved features of floral evocation in legumes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lim Chee Liew; Mohan B.Singh; Prem L.Bhalla

    2014-01-01

    Legumes, with their unique ability to fix atmo-spheric nitrogen, play a vital role in ensuring future food security and mitigating the effects of climate change because they use less fossil energy and produce less greenhouse gases compared with N-fertilized systems. Grain legumes are second only to cereal crops as a source of human and animal food, and they contribute approximately one third of the protein consumed by the human population. The productivity of seed crops, such as grain legumes, is dependent on flowering. Despite the genetic variation and importance of flowering in legume production, studies of the molecular pathways that control flowering in legumes are limited. Recent advances in genomics have revealed that legume flowering pathways are divergent from those of such model species as Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we discuss the current understanding of flowering time regulation in legumes and highlight the unique and conserved features of floral evocation in legumes.

  5. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins in legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eBattaglia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirms the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions.

  6. Modelling the impact of climatic conditions and plant species on the nitrogen release from mulch of legumes at the soil surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudinat, Germain; Lorin, Mathieu; Valantin-morison, Muriel; Garnier, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    Cover crops provide multiple services to the agro ecosystem. Among them, the use of legumes as cover crop is one of the solutions for limiting the use of herbicides, mineral fertilizers, and insecticides. However, the dynamic of mineralization is difficult to understand because of the difficulty of measuring nitrogen release from mulch in field. Indeed, residues are degraded at the soil surface as mulch, while the nitrogen uptake by the main crop occurred simultaneously in the soil. This work aims to study the dynamics of nitrogen mineralization from legume residues through i) the use of a model able to describe the physical and biological dynamic of mulch and ii) a data set from a field experiment of intercropping systems "oilseed rape-legumes" from different species (grass pea, lentil, Berseem clover, field pea, vetch). The objective of the simulations is to identify the variations of expected quantities of nitrogen from different legumes. The soil-plant model of mulch decomposition PASTIS-Mulch was used to determine the nitrogen supply from mulch available for rapeseed. These simulation results were compared to the data collected in the experimental field of Grignon (France). We performed analyzes of biochemical and physical characteristics of legume residues and monitored the evolution of mulches (moisture, density, cover surface, biomass) in fields. PASTIS simulations of soil temperature, soil moisture, mulch humidity and mulch decomposition were close to the experimental results. The PASTIS model was suitable to simulate the dynamic of legume mulches in the case of "rape - legume" associations. The model simulated nitrogen restitution of aerial and root parts. We found a more rapid nitrogen release by grass pea than other species. Vetch released less nitrogen than the other species. The scenarios for climate conditions were : i) a freezing in December that causes the destruction of plants, or a destruction by herbicide in March, ii) a strong or a weak rainy

  7. Legume proteomics: Progress, prospects, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Divya; Gayen, Dipak; Gayali, Saurabh; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Legumes are the major sources of food and fodder with strong commercial relevance, and are essential components of agricultural ecosystems owing to their ability to carry out endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation. In recent years, legumes have become one of the major choices of plant research. The legume proteomics is currently represented by more than 100 reference maps and an equal number of stress-responsive proteomes. Among the 48 legumes in the protein databases, most proteomic studies have been accomplished in two model legumes, soybean, and barrel medic. This review highlights recent contributions in the field of legume proteomics to comprehend the defence and regulatory mechanisms during development and adaptation to climatic changes. Here, we attempted to provide a concise overview of the progress in legume proteomics and discuss future developments in three broad perspectives: (i) proteome of organs/tissues; (ii) subcellular compartments; and (iii) spatiotemporal changes in response to stress. Such data mining may aid in discovering potential biomarkers for plant growth, in general, apart from essential components involved in stress tolerance. The prospect of integrating proteome data with genome information from legumes will provide exciting opportunities for plant biologists to achieve long-term goals of crop improvement and sustainable agriculture.

  8. The Medicago truncatula lysine motif-receptor-like kinase gene family includes NFP and new nodule-expressed genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arrighi, J.F.; Barre, A.; Amor, Ben B.; Bersoult, A.; Campos Soriano, L.; Mirabella, R.; Carvalho-Niebel, de F.; Journet, E.P.; Ghérardi, M.; Huguet, T.; Geurts, R.; Dénarié, J.; Rougé, P.; Gough, C.

    2006-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are key symbiotic signals responsible for starting the nodulation process in host legume plants. Of the six Medicago truncatula genes controlling a Nod factor signaling pathway, Nod Factor Perception (NFP) was reported as a candidate Nod factor receptor gene. Here, we provide

  9.  Molecular evolution and positive selection of the symbiotic gene NORK in Medicago truncatula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Mita, Stephane; Santoni, Sylvain; Hochu, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    . The membrane-anchored receptor NORK (nodulation receptor kinase) of the legume Medicago truncatula controls early steps of root infection by two symbiotic microorganisms: nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia) and endomycorrhizal fungi (Glomales). We analyzed the diversity of the gene NORK by sequencing 4...

  10. The Medicago truncatula lysine motif-receptor-like kinase gene family includes NFP and new nodule-expressed genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arrighi, J.F.; Barre, A.; Amor, Ben B.; Bersoult, A.; Campos Soriano, L.; Mirabella, R.; Carvalho-Niebel, de F.; Journet, E.P.; Ghérardi, M.; Huguet, T.; Geurts, R.; Dénarié, J.; Rougé, P.; Gough, C.

    2006-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are key symbiotic signals responsible for starting the nodulation process in host legume plants. Of the six Medicago truncatula genes controlling a Nod factor signaling pathway, Nod Factor Perception (NFP) was reported as a candidate Nod factor receptor gene. Here, we provide f

  11. A sequence-based genetic map of Medicago truncatula and comparison of marker colinearity with M. sativa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, H.K.; Kim, D.; Uhm, T.; Limpens, E.H.M.; Lim, H.; Mun, J.H.; Kalo, P.; Penmetsa, R.V.; Seres, A.; Kulikova, O.; Roe, B.A.; Bisseling, T.; Kiss, G.B.; Cook, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    A core genetic map of the legume Medicago truncatula has been established by analyzing the segregation of 288 sequence-characterized genetic markers in an E, population composed of 93 individuals. These molecular markers correspond to 141 ESTs, 80 BAC end sequence tags, and 67 resistance gene analog

  12. Legume Genome Initiative at the University of Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce A. Roe

    2004-02-27

    Consolidated Appropriations Resolution, 2003 Conference Report for the Department of Energy's Biological and Environmental Research (BER) program provided $481,000 for the Legume Genome Initiative at the University of Oklahoma. These funds were used to support our research that is aimed at determining the entire sequence of the gene rich regions of the genome of the legume, Medicago truncatula, by allowing us to obtain a greater degree of finished BAC sequences from the draft sequences we have already obtained through research funded by the Noble Foundation. During the funding period we increased the number of Medicago truncatula BACs with finished (Bermuda standard) sequences from 109 to 359, and the total number of BACs for which we collected sequence data from 584 to 842, 359 of which reached phase 2 (ordered and oriented contigs). We also sequenced a series of pooled BAC clones that cover additional euchromatic (gene rich) genomic regions. This work resulted in 6 refereed publications, see below. Genes whose sequence was determined during this study included multiple members of the plant disease resistance (R-gene) family as well as several genes involved in flavinoid biosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and plant-microbial symbosis. This work also served as a prelude to obtaining NSF funding for the international collaborative effort to complete the entire sequence of the Medicago truncatula genomic euchromatic regions using a BAC based approach.

  13. Leaf morphology in Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp]: QTL analysis, physical mapping and identifying a candidate gene using synteny with model legume species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pottorff Marti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp] exhibits a considerable variation in leaf shape. Although cowpea is mostly utilized as a dry grain and animal fodder crop, cowpea leaves are also used as a high-protein pot herb in many countries of Africa. Results Leaf morphology was studied in the cowpea RIL population, Sanzi (sub-globose leaf shape x Vita 7 (hastate leaf shape. A QTL for leaf shape, Hls (hastate leaf shape, was identified on the Sanzi x Vita 7 genetic map spanning from 56.54 cM to 67.54 cM distance on linkage group 15. SNP marker 1_0910 was the most significant over the two experiments, accounting for 74.7% phenotypic variance (LOD 33.82 in a greenhouse experiment and 71.5% phenotypic variance (LOD 30.89 in a field experiment. The corresponding Hls locus was positioned on the cowpea consensus genetic map on linkage group 4, spanning from 25.57 to 35.96 cM. A marker-trait association of the Hls region identified SNP marker 1_0349 alleles co-segregating with either the hastate or sub-globose leaf phenotype. High co-linearity was observed for the syntenic Hls region in Medicago truncatula and Glycine max. One syntenic locus for Hls was identified on Medicago chromosome 7 while syntenic regions for Hls were identified on two soybean chromosomes, 3 and 19. In all three syntenic loci, an ortholog for the EZA1/SWINGER (AT4G02020.1 gene was observed and is the candidate gene for the Hls locus. The Hls locus was identified on the cowpea physical map via SNP markers 1_0910, 1_1013 and 1_0992 which were identified in three BAC contigs; contig926, contig821 and contig25. Conclusions This study has demonstrated how integrated genomic resources can be utilized for a candidate gene approach. Identification of genes which control leaf morphology may be utilized to improve the quality of cowpea leaves for vegetable and or forage markets as well as contribute to more fundamental research understanding the control of leaf shape in

  14. Multifaceted Investigation of Metabolites During Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago via High Resolution MALDI-MS Imaging and ESI-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemperline, Erin; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Maeda, Junko; Ané, Jean-Michel; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Legumes have developed the unique ability to establish a symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria known as rhizobia. This interaction results in the formation of root nodules in which rhizobia thrive and reduce atmospheric dinitrogen into plant-usable ammonium through biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). Owing to the availability of genetic information for both of the symbiotic partners, the Medicago truncatula- Sinorhizobium meliloti association is an excellent model for examining the BNF process. Although metabolites are important in this symbiotic association, few studies have investigated the array of metabolites that influence this process. Of these studies, most target only a few specific metabolites, the roles of which are either well known or are part of a well-characterized metabolic pathway. Here, we used a multifaceted mass spectrometric (MS) approach to detect and identify the key metabolites that are present during BNF using the Medicago truncatula- Sinorhizobium meliloti association as the model system. High mass accuracy and high resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) Orbitrap instruments were used in this study and provide complementary results for more in-depth characterization of the nitrogen-fixation process. We used well-characterized plant and bacterial mutants to highlight differences between the metabolites that are present in functional versus nonfunctional nodules. Our study highlights the benefits of using a combination of mass spectrometric techniques to detect differences in metabolite composition and the distributions of these metabolites in plant biology.

  15. Diurnal Leaf Starch Content: An Orphan Trait in Forage Legumes

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    Michael E. Ruckle

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Forage legumes have a relatively high biomass yield and crude protein content, but their grazed and harvested biomass lacks the high-energy carbohydrates required to meet the productivity potential of modern livestock breeds. Because of their low carbohydrate content, forage legume diets are typically supplemented with starch rich cereal grains or maize (Zea mays, leading to the disruption of local nutrient cycles. Although plant leaves were first reported to accumulate starch in a diurnal pattern over a century ago, leaf starch content has yet to be exploited as an agronomic trait in forage crops. Forage legumes such as red clover (Trifolium pratense have the genetic potential to accumulate up to one third of their leaf dry mass as starch, but this starch is typically degraded at night to support nighttime growth and respiration. Even when diurnal accumulation is considered with regard to the time the crop is harvested, only limited gains are realized due to environmental effects and post-harvest losses from respiration. Here we present original data for starch metabolism in red clover and place it in the broader context of other forage legumes such as, white clover (T. repens, and alfalfa (Medicago sativa. We review the application of recent advances in molecular breeding, plant biology, and crop phenotyping, to forage legumes to improve and exploit a potentially valuable trait for sustainable ruminant livestock production.

  16. The glucocorticoid-inducible GVG system causes severe growth defects in both root and shoot of the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj; Cvitanich, Cristina; Hougaard, Birgit Kristine; Roussis, Andreas; Grønlund, Mette; Jensen, Dorthe Bødker; Frøkjaer, Line Askou; Jensen, Erik Ostergaard

    2003-12-01

    During the past decade, the legume Lotus japonicus has emerged as an important model system for study of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Controlled expression of genes involved in symbiosis from an inducible promoter at specific time points would be a valuable tool for investigating gene function in L. japonicus. We have attempted to study the function of the putative transcription factors LjNDX and LjCPP1 by expression from the GVG inducible system. This study showed that the GVG system itself causes growth disturbances in L. japonicus. Shoot internode elongation and root pericycle cell division are affected when the chimeric GVG transcription factor is activated. We suggest that deficient auxin signaling could cause the phenotype observed and conclude that the GVG inducible system is not well suited for use in the model legume L. japonicus.

  17. Common bean: a legume model on the rise for unraveling responses and adaptations to iron, zinc and phosphate deficiencies.

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    Norma A Castro Guerrero

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris was domesticated ~8000 years ago in the Americas and today is a staple food worldwide. Besides caloric intake, common bean is also an important source of protein and micronutrients and it is widely appreciated in developing countries for their affordability (compared to animal protein and its long storage life. As a legume, common bean also has the economic and environmental benefit of associating with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, thus reducing the use of synthetic fertilizers, which is key for sustainable agriculture. Despite significant advances in the plant nutrition field, the mechanisms underlying the adaptation of common bean to low nutrient input remains largely unknown. The recent release of the common bean genome offers, for the first time, the possibility of applying techniques and approaches that have been exclusive to model plants to study the adaptive responses of common bean to challenging environments. In this review, we discuss the hallmarks of common bean domestication and subsequent distribution around the globe. We also discuss recent advances in phosphate, iron, and zinc homeostasis, as these nutrients often limit plant growth, development and yield. In addition, iron and zinc are major targets of crop biofortification to improve human nutrition. Developing common bean varieties able to thrive under nutrient limiting conditions will have a major impact on human nutrition, particularly in countries where dry beans are the main source of carbohydrates, protein and minerals.

  18. Beneficial effects of legumes on parameters of the metabolic syndrome: a systematic review of trials in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Rosario; López-Jurado, María; Wanden-Berghe, Carmina; Sanz-Valero, Javier; Porres, Jesús María; Kapravelou, Garyfallia

    2016-08-01

    Legume consumption plays a pivotal role in the prevention and treatment of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). This systematic review aimed to highlight the beneficial effects of legume interventions for the prevention and/or improvement of parameters related to the MetS and the implicated metabolic pathways so far reported. The methodology involved a search in four electronic databases (Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, Cochrane Library) from January 2007 to December 2014, considering as descriptors 'Metabolic Syndrome' and 'Fabaceae' and adequately adjusting the equation in each one of them. In total, forty-one studies were finally included. The majority of the studies described a regulating effect on glucose and lipid metabolism due to legume administration, whereas effects on blood pressure and renal parameters are not fully described. Regarding the metabolic pathways involved, they include the up-regulation of genes related to β-oxidation and acetyl-CoA degradation and the down-regulation of glycolytic and lipogenesis genes, as well as those associated with the acetyl-CoA synthesis. The ameliorating effects of legume consumption on the alterations associated with the MetS are clearly reported and coincide with changes in the expression of protein and genes involved in lipid and glucose metabolism. More research needs to be conducted including more legume species that are highly consumed as part of a healthy dietary pattern.

  19. Concerted changes in N and C primary metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) under water restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Tcherkez, Guillaume,; Molero, Gemma; Gilard, Françoise; AVICE, JEAN-CHRISTOPHE; Nogués, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of nodule N2 fixation in legumes are now well documented, some uncertainty remains on the metabolic consequences of water deficit. In most cases, little consideration is given to other organs and, therefore, the coordinated changes in metabolism in leaves, roots, and nodules are not well known. Here, the effect of water restriction on exclusively N2-fixing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants was investigated, and proteomic, metabolomic, and physiological analyses were ...

  20. Micromonospora from nitrogen fixing nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). A new promising Plant Probiotic Bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Pilar Martínez-Hidalgo; Purificación Galindo-Villardón; Trujillo, Martha E.; Igual, José M.; Eustoquio Martínez-Molina

    2014-01-01

    Biotic interactions can improve agricultural productivity without costly and environmentally challenging inputs. Micromonospora strains have recently been reported as natural endophytes of legume nodules but their significance for plant development and productivity has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to determine the diversity and function of Micromonospora isolated from Medicago sativa root nodules. Micromonospora-like strains from field alfalfa nodules were characteri...

  1. Elevated CO₂ mitigates drought and temperature-induced oxidative stress differently in grasses and legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdElgawad, Hamada; Farfan-Vignolo, Evelyn Roxana; de Vos, Dirk; Asard, Han

    2015-02-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 will affect plant growth, including mitigation of stress impact. Such effects vary considerably between species-groups. Grasses (Lolium perenne, Poa pratensis) and legumes (Medicago lupulina, Lotus corniculatus) were subjected to drought, elevated temperature and elevated CO2. Drought inhibited plant growth, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, and induced osmolytes and antioxidants in all species. In contrast, oxidative damage was more strongly induced in the legumes than in the grasses. Warming generally exacerbated drought effects, whereas elevated CO2 reduced stress impact. In the grasses, photosynthesis and chlorophyll levels were more protected by CO2 than in the legumes. Oxidative stress parameters (lipid peroxidation, H2O2 levels), on the other hand, were generally more reduced in the legumes. This is consistent with changes in molecular antioxidants, which were reduced by elevated CO2 in the grasses, but not in the legumes. Antioxidant enzymes decreased similarly in both species-groups. The ascorbate-glutathione cycle was little affected by drought and CO2. Overall, elevated CO2 reduced drought effects in grasses and legumes, and this mitigation was stronger in the legumes. This is possibly explained by stronger reduction in H2O2 generation (photorespiration and NADPH oxidase), and a higher availability of molecular antioxidants. The grass/legume-specificity was supported by principal component analysis.

  2. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chunxiang; Hernandez, Timothy; Zhou, Chuanen; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a high-quality forage crop widely grown throughout the world. This chapter describes an efficient protocol that allows for the generation of large number of transgenic alfalfa plants by sonication-assisted Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Binary vectors carrying different selectable marker genes that confer resistance to phosphinothricin (bar), kanamycin (npt II), or hygromycin (hph) were used to generate transgenic alfalfa plants. Intact trifoliates collected from clonally propagated plants in the greenhouse were sterilized with bleach and then inoculated with Agrobacterium strain EHA105. More than 80 % of infected leaf pieces could produce rooted transgenic plants in 4-5 months after Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

  3. Transcriptome Sequencing of Lima Bean (Phaseolus lunatus to Identify Putative Positive Selection in Phaseolus and Legumes

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    Fengqi Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The identification of genes under positive selection is a central goal of evolutionary biology. Many legume species, including Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean and Phaseolus lunatus (lima bean, have important ecological and economic value. In this study, we sequenced and assembled the transcriptome of one Phaseolus species, lima bean. A comparison with the genomes of six other legume species, including the common bean, Medicago, lotus, soybean, chickpea, and pigeonpea, revealed 15 and 4 orthologous groups with signatures of positive selection among the two Phaseolus species and among the seven legume species, respectively. Characterization of these positively selected genes using Non redundant (nr annotation, gene ontology (GO classification, GO term enrichment and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analyses revealed that these genes are mostly involved in thylakoids, photosynthesis and metabolism. This study identified genes that may be related to the divergence of the Phaseolus and legume species. These detected genes are particularly good candidates for subsequent functional studies.

  4. Transcription reprogramming during root nodule development in Medicago truncatula.

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    Sandra Moreau

    Full Text Available Many genes which are associated with root nodule development and activity in the model legume Medicago truncatula have been described. However information on precise stages of activation of these genes and their corresponding transcriptional regulators is often lacking. Whether these regulators are shared with other plant developmental programs also remains an open question. Here detailed microarray analyses have been used to study the transcriptome of root nodules induced by either wild type or mutant strains of Sinorhizobium meliloti. In this way we have defined eight major activation patterns in nodules and identified associated potential regulatory genes. We have shown that transcription reprogramming during consecutive stages of nodule differentiation occurs in four major phases, respectively associated with (i early signalling events and/or bacterial infection; plant cell differentiation that is either (ii independent or (iii dependent on bacteroid differentiation; (iv nitrogen fixation. Differential expression of several genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis was observed in early symbiotic nodule zones, suggesting that cytokinin levels are actively controlled in this region. Taking advantage of databases recently developed for M. truncatula, we identified a small subset of gene expression regulators that were exclusively or predominantly expressed in nodules, whereas most other regulators were also activated under other conditions, and notably in response to abiotic or biotic stresses. We found evidence suggesting the activation of the jasmonate pathway in both wild type and mutant nodules, thus raising questions about the role of jasmonate during nodule development. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR was used to analyse the expression of a series of nodule regulator and marker genes at early symbiotic stages in roots and allowed us to distinguish several early stages of gene expression activation or repression.

  5. A simple model for pollen-parent fecundity distributions in bee-pollinated forage legume polycrosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Random mating or panmixis is a fundamental assumption in quantitative genetic theory. Random mating is sometimes thought to occur in actual fact although a large body of empirical work shows that this is often not the case in nature. Models have been developed to model many non-random mating phenome...

  6. Comparative sequence analysis of nitrogen fixation-related genes in six legumes

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    Dong Hyun eKim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Legumes play an important role as food and forage crops in international agriculture especially in developing countries. Legumes have a unique biological process called nitrogen fixation (NF by which they convert atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. Although legume genomes have undergone polyploidization, duplication and divergence, NF-related genes, because of their essential functional role for legumes, might have remained conserved. To understand the relationship of divergence and evolutionary processes in legumes, this study analyzes orthologs and paralogs for selected 20 NF-related genes by using comparative genomic approaches in six legumes i.e. Medicago truncatula (Mt, Cicer arietinum, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan (Cc, Phaseolus vulgaris (Pv and Glycine max (Gm. Subsequently, sequence distances, numbers of synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (Ks and nonsynonymous substitutions per nonsynonymous site (Ka between orthologs and paralogs were calculated and compared across legumes. These analyses suggest the closest relationship between Gm and Cc and the farthest distance between Mt and Pv in 6 legumes. Ks proportional plots clearly showed ancient genome duplication in all legumes, whole genome duplication event in Gm and also speciation pattern in different legumes. This study also reported some interesting observations e.g. no peak at Ks 0.4 in Gm-Gm, location of two independent genes next to each other in Mt and low Ks values for outparalogs for three genes as compared to other 12 genes. In summary, this study underlines the importance of NF-related genes and provides important insights in genome organization and evolutionary aspects of six legume species analyzed.

  7. Sinorhizobium meliloti Controls Nitric Oxide-Mediated Post-Translational Modification of a Medicago truncatula Nodule Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquet, Pauline; Silva, Liliana; Catrice, Olivier; Bruand, Claude; Carvalho, Helena; Meilhoc, Eliane

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in various plant-microbe interactions. In the symbiosis between soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti and model legume Medicago truncatula, NO is required for an optimal establishment of the interaction but is also a signal for nodule senescence. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for NO effects in the legume-rhizobium interaction. Here, we investigate the contribution of the bacterial NO response to the modulation of a plant protein post-translational modification in nitrogen-fixing nodules. We made use of different bacterial mutants to finely modulate NO levels inside M. truncatula root nodules and to examine the consequence on tyrosine nitration of the plant glutamine synthetase, a protein responsible for assimilation of the ammonia released by nitrogen fixation. Our results reveal that S. meliloti possesses several proteins that limit inactivation of plant enzyme activity via NO-mediated post-translational modifications. This is the first demonstration that rhizobia can impact the course of nitrogen fixation by modulating the activity of a plant protein.

  8. (Homo)glutathione depletion modulates host gene expression during the symbiotic interaction between Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciariello, Chiara; Innocenti, Gilles; Van de Velde, Willem; Lambert, Annie; Hopkins, Julie; Clément, Mathilde; Ponchet, Michel; Pauly, Nicolas; Goormachtig, Sofie; Holsters, Marcelle; Puppo, Alain; Frendo, Pierre

    2009-11-01

    Under nitrogen-limiting conditions, legumes interact with symbiotic rhizobia to produce nitrogen-fixing root nodules. We have previously shown that glutathione and homoglutathione [(h)GSH] deficiencies impaired Medicago truncatula symbiosis efficiency, showing the importance of the low M(r) thiols during the nodulation process in the model legume M. truncatula. In this study, the plant transcriptomic response to Sinorhizobium meliloti infection under (h)GSH depletion was investigated using cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. Among 6,149 expression tags monitored, 181 genes displayed significant differential expression between inoculated control and inoculated (h)GSH depleted roots. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the changes in mRNA levels. This transcriptomic analysis shows a down-regulation of genes involved in meristem formation and a modulation of the expression of stress-related genes in (h)GSH-depleted plants. Promoter-beta-glucuronidase histochemical analysis showed that the putative MtPIP2 aquaporin might be up-regulated during nodule meristem formation and that this up-regulation is inhibited under (h)GSH depletion. (h)GSH depletion enhances the expression of salicylic acid (SA)-regulated genes after S. meliloti infection and the expression of SA-regulated genes after exogenous SA treatment. Modification of water transport and SA signaling pathway observed under (h)GSH deficiency contribute to explain how (h)GSH depletion alters the proper development of the symbiotic interaction.

  9. Regulatory patterns of a large family of defensin-like genes expressed in nodules of Medicago truncatula.

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    Sumitha Nallu

    Full Text Available Root nodules are the symbiotic organ of legumes that house nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Many genes are specifically induced in nodules during the interactions between the host plant and symbiotic rhizobia. Information regarding the regulation of expression for most of these genes is lacking. One of the largest gene families expressed in the nodules of the model legume Medicago truncatula is the nodule cysteine-rich (NCR group of defensin-like (DEFL genes. We used a custom Affymetrix microarray to catalog the expression changes of 566 NCRs at different stages of nodule development. Additionally, bacterial mutants were used to understand the importance of the rhizobial partners in induction of NCRs. Expression of early NCRs was detected during the initial infection of rhizobia in nodules and expression continued as nodules became mature. Late NCRs were induced concomitantly with bacteroid development in the nodules. The induction of early and late NCRs was correlated with the number and morphology of rhizobia in the nodule. Conserved 41 to 50 bp motifs identified in the upstream 1,000 bp promoter regions of NCRs were required for promoter activity. These cis-element motifs were found to be unique to the NCR family among all annotated genes in the M. truncatula genome, although they contain sub-regions with clear similarity to known regulatory motifs involved in nodule-specific expression and temporal gene regulation.

  10. Microgravity Effects on the Early Events of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago Truncatula: Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-02-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware to study the effect of μg on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species for the legume family, was inoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early biomolecular events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFU’s). Two sets of experiments were conducted in orbit and in 24-hour delayed ground controls. Experiments were designed to determine if S. meliloti would infect M. truncatula and initiate biomolecular changes associated with nodule formation and if the μg environment altered the host plant and/or bacteria to induce nodule formation upon return to 1g. Initial analysis results demonstrate that the legumes and bacteria cultivated in μg have potential to develop a symbiotic interaction, but suggest that μg alters their ability to form nodules upon return to 1g. (Research supported by NASA ESMD/ Advance Capabilities Division grant NNX10AR09A)

  11. Water-tolerant legume nodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoen, Ward; Goormachtig, Sofie; Holsters, Marcelle

    2010-03-01

    Water-tolerant nodulation is an adaptation of legumes that grow in wet or temporarily flooded habitats. This nodulation mode takes place at lateral root bases via intercellular bacterial invasion in cortical infection pockets. The tropical legume Sesbania rostrata has become a model for the study of the molecular basis of crack entry nodulation compared with root hair curl nodulation. For intercellular invasion, Nodulation Factor (NF) signalling recruits an ethylene-dependent, common Sym gene-independent pathway, leading to local cell death. The NF structure requirements are less stringent than for intracellular invasion in root hairs, which is correlated with a very specific NF-induced calcium spiking signature, presumably necessary for correct gene expression to assemble a functional entry complex in the epidermis.

  12. Medicago truncatula transporter database: a comprehensive database resource for M. truncatula transporters

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    Miao Zhenyan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medicago truncatula has been chosen as a model species for genomic studies. It is closely related to an important legume, alfalfa. Transporters are a large group of membrane-spanning proteins. They deliver essential nutrients, eject waste products, and assist the cell in sensing environmental conditions by forming a complex system of pumps and channels. Although studies have effectively characterized individual M. truncatula transporters in several databases, until now there has been no available systematic database that includes all transporters in M. truncatula. Description The M. truncatula transporter database (MTDB contains comprehensive information on the transporters in M. truncatula. Based on the TransportTP method, we have presented a novel prediction pipeline. A total of 3,665 putative transporters have been annotated based on International Medicago Genome Annotated Group (IMGAG V3.5 V3 and the M. truncatula Gene Index (MTGI V10.0 releases and assigned to 162 families according to the transporter classification system. These families were further classified into seven types according to their transport mode and energy coupling mechanism. Extensive annotations referring to each protein were generated, including basic protein function, expressed sequence tag (EST mapping, genome locus, three-dimensional template prediction, transmembrane segment, and domain annotation. A chromosome distribution map and text-based Basic Local Alignment Search Tools were also created. In addition, we have provided a way to explore the expression of putative M. truncatula transporter genes under stress treatments. Conclusions In summary, the MTDB enables the exploration and comparative analysis of putative transporters in M. truncatula. A user-friendly web interface and regular updates make MTDB valuable to researchers in related fields. The MTDB is freely available now to all users at http://bioinformatics.cau.edu.cn/MtTransporter/.

  13. The effect of fire on the dormancy break of three annual legume seeds

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    Fabio Gresta

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fire is a common phenomenon in the Mediterranean environment and strongly influences vegetal population dynamics through its impact on vegetation and the soil seed bank. Fire is able to break down the seed coat of hard-seeded legumes within the soil and trigger germination. To evaluate the effect of fire on the dormancy break in Medicago ciliaris, Medicago rugosa and Scorpiurus muricatus subsp. subvillosus, the seeds were placed at three different depths (surface, 25 mm and 50 mm and subjected to fires at two different intensities (high and low. As a control sample, a batch of seeds was buried at 25 mm for the duration of the trial and not subjected to fire. Soil temperatures during the fire were compared directly to stubble quantity and indirectly related to soil depth. The two Medicago species survived exposure to 90°C for a few minutes and displayed a significant increase in germination with exposure to high temperatures (over 70°C for several minutes. On the other hand, no germination occurred in Scorpiurus, irrespective of treatment. In conclusion, fire had a significant and positive effect in triggering germination of the Medicago species, but the dispersal strategies of these hard-seeded legumes are only partially interrupted by fire as a large number of seeds (>50% remained non-germinated in the soil.

  14. [Genetic diversity of rhizobia isolated from shrubby and herbaceous legumes in Shenmu arid area, Shaanxi, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Gang; Chen, Wei-Min; Wei, Ge-Hong

    2014-06-01

    Legume, with a strong resistance to the adverse environmental conditions, is one of pioneer plants in the desert region and plays an important role in the protection of the ecological environment. In this study, the symbiosis of rhizobia associating with shrubby and herbaceous legumes in Shenmu area, Shaanxi, China was characterized by the 16S rRNA PCR-RFLP and sequence analysis of involved genes. A total of 55 strains were isolated and purified, including 30 strains from the shrubby legume Amorpha fruticosa and Caragana microphylla, and 25 strains from herbaceous plants Astragalus adsurgens, Medicago sativa and Astragalus melilotoides. Results showed that there were 11 16S rRNA genotypes. The strains isolated from herbaceous legumes belonged to five genus including Mesorhizobium, Ensifer, Rhizobium, Phyllobacterium and Agrobacterium, which were very close related to M. huakuii, M. mediterraneum, M. robiniae, E. fredii, E. meliloti, R. indigoferae, R. radiobacter, P. ifriqiyense and Ag. tumefaciens through the phylogenetic analysis. The strains isolated from shrubby legumes belonged to Mesorhizobium, and they were very close related to M. huakuii and M. mediterraneum which were shared simultaneously by shrubby and herbaceous legumes. All of these indicated the choice of rhizobia by the two types of legumes in the arid area was different, and it might depend on the species of host plant and environmental factors.

  15. Modelling protection behaviour towards micronutrient deficiencies: Case of iodine biofortified vegetable legumes as health intervention for school-going children

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Steur, Hans; Gellynck, Xavier; Makokha, Anselimo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Despite successes recorded in combating iodine deficiency, more than 2 billion people are still at risk of iodine deficiency disorders. Rural landlocked and mountainous areas of developing countries are the hardest hit, hence the need to explore and advance novel strategies such as biofortification. SUBJECTS/METHODS We evaluated adoption, purchase, and consumption of iodine biofortified vegetable legumes (IBVL) using the theory of protection motivations (PMT) integrated with an economic valuation technique. A total of 1,200 participants from three land-locked locations in East Africa were recruited via multi-stage cluster sampling, and data were collected using two, slightly distinct, questionnaires incorporating PMT constructs. The survey also elicited preferences for iodine biofortified foods when offered at a premium or discount. Determinants of protection motivations and preferences for iodine biofortified foods were assessed using path analysis modelling and two-limit Tobit regression, respectively. RESULTS Knowledge of iodine, iodine-health link, salt iodization, and biofortification was very low, albeit lower at the household level. Iodine and biofortification were not recognized as nutrient and novel approaches, respectively. On the other hand, severity, fear, occupation, knowledge, iodine status, household composition, and self-efficacy predicted the intention to consume biofortified foods at the household level; only vulnerability, self-efficacy, and location were the most crucial elements at the school level. In addition, results demonstrated a positive willingness-to-pay a premium or acceptance of a lesser discount for biofortification. Furthermore, preference towards iodine biofortified foods was a function of protection motivations, severity, vulnerability, fear, response efficacy, response cost, knowledge, iodine status, gender, age. and household head. CONCLUSIONS Results lend support for prevention of iodine deficiency in

  16. Modelling protection behaviour towards micronutrient deficiencies: case of iodine biofortified vegetable legumes as health intervention for school-going children

    OpenAIRE

    Mogendi, Joseph Birundu; De Steur, Hans; Gellynck, Xavier; Makokha, Anselimo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Despite successes recorded in combating iodine deficiency, more than 2 billion people are still at risk of iodine deficiency disorders. Rural landlocked and mountainous areas of developing countries are the hardest hit, hence the need to explore and advance novel strategies such as biofortification. SUBJECTS/METHODS: We evaluated adoption, purchase, and consumption of iodine biofortified vegetable legumes (IBVL) using the theory of protection motivations (PMT) integ...

  17. Mineral accumulation in vegetative and reproductive tissues during seed development in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina B. Garcia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing nutrient density in legume seeds is one of several strategies being explored to improve the nutritional quality of the food supply. In order to develop crop varieties with increased seed mineral concentration, a more detailed understanding of mineral translocation within the plant is required. By studying mineral accumulation in different organs within genetically diverse members of the same species, it may be possible to identify variable traits that modulate seed mineral concentration. We utilized two ecotypes (A17 and DZA315.16 of the model legume, Medicago truncatula, to study dry mass and mineral accumulation in the leaves, pod walls, and seeds during reproductive development. The pod wall dry mass was significantly different between the two ecotypes beginning at 12 days after pollination, whereas there was no significant difference in the average dry mass of individual seeds between the two ecotypes at any time point. There were also no significant differences in leaf dry mass between ecotypes; however, we observed expansion of A17 leaves during the first 21 days of pod development, while DZA315.16 leaves did not display a significant increase in leaf area. Mineral profiling of the leaves, pod walls, and seeds highlighted differences in accumulation patterns among minerals within each tissue as well as genotypic differences with respect to individual minerals. Because there were differences in the average seed number per pod, the total seed mineral content per pod was generally higher in A17 than DZA315.16. In addition, mineral partitioning to the seeds tended to be higher in A17 pods. These data revealed that mineral retention within leaves and/or pod walls might attenuate mineral accumulation within the seeds. As a result, strategies to increase seed mineral content should include approaches that will enhance export from these tissues.

  18. Differential expression proteomics to investigate responses and resistance to Orobanche crenata in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Rubiales

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic angiosperm Orobanche crenata infection represents a major constraint for the cultivation of legumes worldwide. The level of protection achieved to date is either incomplete or ephemeral. Hence, an efficient control of the parasite requires a better understanding of its interaction and associated resistance mechanisms at molecular levels. Results In order to study the plant response to this parasitic plant and the molecular basis of the resistance we have used a proteomic approach. The root proteome of two accessions of the model legume Medicago truncatula displaying differences in their resistance phenotype, in control as well as in inoculated plants, over two time points (21 and 25 days post infection, has been compared. We report quantitative as well as qualitative differences in the 2-DE maps between early- (SA 27774 and late-resistant (SA 4087 genotypes after Coomassie and silver-staining: 69 differential spots were observed between non-inoculated genotypes, and 42 and 25 spots for SA 4087 and SA 27774 non-inoculated and inoculated plants, respectively. In all, 49 differential spots were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF following MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Many of the proteins showing significant differences between genotypes and after parasitic infection belong to the functional category of defense and stress-related proteins. A number of spots correspond to proteins with the same function, and might represent members of a multigenic family or post-transcriptional forms of the same protein. Conclusion The results obtained suggest the existence of a generic defense mechanism operating during the early stages of infection and differing in both genotypes. The faster response to the infection observed in the SA 27774 genotype might be due to the action of proteins targeted against key elements needed for the parasite's successful infection, such as protease inhibitors. Our data are discussed and

  19. Nodule carbohydrate catabolism is enhanced in the Medicago truncatula A17-Sinorhizobium medicae WSM419 symbiosis

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    Estibaliz eLarrainzar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The symbiotic association between Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti is a well-established model system in the legume-Rhizobium community. Despite its wide use, the symbiotic efficiency of this model has been recently questioned and an alternative microsymbiont, S. medicae, has been proposed. However, little is known about the physiological mechanisms behind the higher symbiotic efficiency of S. medicae WSM419. In the present study, we inoculated M. truncatula Jemalong A17 with either S. medicae WSM419 or S. meliloti 2011 and compared plant growth, photosynthesis, N2-fixation rates, and plant nodule carbon and nitrogen metabolic activities in the two systems. M. truncatula plants in symbiosis with S. medicae showed increased biomass and photosynthesis rates per plant. Plants grown in symbiosis with S. medicae WSM419 also showed higher N2-fixation rates, which were correlated with a larger nodule biomass, while nodule number was similar in both systems. In terms of plant nodule metabolism, M. truncatula-S. medicae WSM419 nodules showed increased sucrose-catabolic activity, mostly associated with sucrose synthase, accompanied by a reduced starch content, whereas nitrogen-assimilation activities were comparable to those measured in nodules infected with S. meliloti 2011. Taken together, these results suggest that S. medicae WSM419 is able to enhance plant carbon catabolism in M. truncatula nodules, which allows for the maintaining of high symbiotic N2-fixation rates, better growth and improved general plant performance.

  20. Rumen-degradable protein in roll conditioned or macerated legume hays and silages estimated by in situ kinetics vs. alternative methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternatives to the in situ method for estimating rumen-degradable protein (RDP) in diverse forage legumes should be validated. In this study, RDP in roll conditioned or macerated silages and hays of Medicago, Lotus, and Trifolium species with differing polyphenol compositions were estimated from in...

  1. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme

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    Ana Rita Seabra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine Synthetase (GS catalyses the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of glutamine synthetase isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context.

  2. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Ana R; Carvalho, Helena G

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of GS isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context.

  3. Mixed Nodule Infection in Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa Symbiosis Suggest the Presence of Cheating Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checcucci, Alice; Azzarello, Elisa; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Galardini, Marco; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Mancuso, Stefano; Marti, Lucia; Marzano, Maria C; Mocali, Stefano; Squartini, Andrea; Zanardo, Marina; Mengoni, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    In the symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes, host plants can form symbiotic root nodules with multiple rhizobial strains, potentially showing different symbiotic performances in nitrogen fixation. Here, we investigated the presence of mixed nodules, containing rhizobia with different degrees of mutualisms, and evaluate their relative fitness in the Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa model symbiosis. We used three S. meliloti strains, the mutualist strains Rm1021 and BL225C and the non-mutualist AK83. We performed competition experiments involving both in vitro and in vivo symbiotic assays with M. sativa host plants. We show the occurrence of a high number (from 27 to 100%) of mixed nodules with no negative effect on both nitrogen fixation and plant growth. The estimation of the relative fitness as non-mutualist/mutualist ratios in single nodules shows that in some nodules the non-mutualist strain efficiently colonized root nodules along with the mutualist ones. In conclusion, we can support the hypothesis that in S. meliloti-M. sativa symbiosis mixed nodules are formed and allow non-mutualist or less-mutualist bacterial partners to be less or not sanctioned by the host plant, hence allowing a potential form of cheating behavior to be present in the nitrogen fixing symbiosis.

  4. In silico identification of transcription factors in Medicago sativa using available transcriptomic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnikova, Olga A; Shao, Jonathan; Nemchinov, Lev G

    2014-06-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that govern organismal development and response to the environment by regulating gene expression. Information on the amount and diversity of TFs within individual plant species is critical for understanding of their biological roles and evolutionary history across the plant kingdom. Currently, only scattered information on separate TFs is available for alfalfa, the most extensively cultivated forage legume in the world. In the meantime, several large transcriptomic resources that can be used to identify and characterize alfalfa TF genes are freely accessible online. In this study, we have performed an in silico analysis of transcriptome data generated in our laboratory and publicly acquirable from other sources to reveal and systematize alfalfa transcription factors. Transcriptome-wide mining enabled prediction of 983 TFs along with their sequence features and putative phylogenies of the largest families. All data were assembled into a simple open-access database named AlfalfaTFDB ( http://plantpathology.ba.ars.usda.gov/alfalfatfdb.html ). Transcriptomic analysis used in this work represents an effective approach for the identification of TF genes in plants with incomplete genomes, such as alfalfa. Integrated TF repertoires of Medicago sativa will provide an important tool for studying regulation of gene expression in other complex non-model species of agricultural significance.

  5. Identification and expression analysis of multiple FRO gene copies in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del C Orozco-Mosqueda, Ma; Santoyo, G; Farías-Rodríguez, R; Macías-Rodríguez, L; Valencia-Cantero, E

    2012-12-17

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for plant growth. Commonly, this element is found in an oxidized form in soil, which is poorly available for plants. Therefore, plants have evolved ferric-chelate reductase enzymes (FRO) to reduce iron into a more soluble ferrous form. Fe scarcity in plants induce the FRO enzyme activity. Although the legume Medicago truncatula has been employed as a model for FRO activity studies, only one copy of the M. truncatula MtFRO1 gene has been characterized so far. In this study, we identified multiple gene copies of the MtFRO gene in the genome of M. truncatula by an in silico search, using BLAST analysis in the database of the M. truncatula Genome Sequencing Project and the National Center for Biotechnology Information, and also determined whether they are functional. We identified five genes apart from MtFRO1, which had been already characterized. All of the MtFRO genes exhibited high identity with homologous FRO genes from Lycopersicon esculentum, Citrus junos and Arabidopsis thaliana. The gene copies also presented characteristic conserved FAD and NADPH motifs, transmembrane regions and oxidoreductase signature motifs. We also detected expression in five of the putative MtFRO sequences by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis, performed with mRNA from root and shoot tissues. Iron scarcity might be a condition for an elevated expression of the MtFRO genes observed in different M. truncatula tissues.

  6. Medicago truncatula Rop GTPases expression in young nodules

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    Lucia Kusu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Small GTPases are monomeric guanine nucleotide binding proteins with molecular weight of 21 to 30 kD. Plants have plantspecific small GTPases, termed Rop (Rho GTPases from plants which serve as signaling proteins in plant signal transduction. To have better understanding on nodulation process in legume, which Rop proteins that play a dominant role in nodule formation would be determined. Therefore, the expression of five Medicago truncatula Rop GTPase genes (MtRops in young nodules were studied in this experiment. RT-PCR method was used to examine the expression of MtRops. The MtRops expression in inoculated M. truncatula plants were compared with those in uninoculated plants. Results of this studies showed that the expression of MtRop5 and MtRop6 were significantly induced in young nodules, it was suggesting that these Rops may have important role during nodule formation.

  7. Alfalfa (Medicago Sativa L As A Promising Forage In Indonesia

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    Sajimin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L or Lucerne is a perennial herbaceous legume with superior forage quality. It is the most important forage crop in the world and it was the first domesticated forage crop. Alfalfa is able to fix nitrogen from the air through a symbiotic relationship with Rhizobium bacteria with N production 7.85 – 10.37 g/m2. Its rooting system can reach 4.5 m that allows it to escape drought. Forage production can reach 15.48 tons of dry matter per ha/year and containing 18.0 – 29.1 % crude protein. Plants can live 3 to 12 years depending on climatic conditions and crop varieties. However, alfalfa is not a tropical plant, thus it has not been widely cultivated in Indonesia. The problem of alfalfa cultivation are high pest attacks and competition with weeds. Therefore, alfalfa cultivation requires attention and good management to obtain optimum yield.

  8. IDENTIFICATION AND OCCURRENCE OF FUSARIUM SPECIES ON SEEDS OF COMMON WETCH, WHITE LUPINE AND SOME WILD LEGUMES

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    Tihomir Miličević

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence and occurrence of Fusarium species was examined on the seeds of cultivated legumes – common vetch (Vicia sativa, white lupine (Lupinus albus, and wild legumes: bird’s-foot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus, wild alfalfa (Medicago sativa, black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia, honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos, sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis, bird vetch (Vicia cracca and meadow vetchling (Lathyrus pratensis. Thirteen Fusarium species were identified - F. verticillioides, F. acuminatum, F. avenaceum, F. tricinctum F. oxysporum, F. scirpi, F. semitectum, F. culmorum, F. proliferatum, F. pseudograminearum, F. sporotrichioides, F. sambucinum and F. heterosporum. Species F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum were determined on seeds of the cultivated legumes (common vetch and white lupine. Other 11 Fusarium species were determined on seeds of wild legumes (bird’s-foot trefoil, wild alfalfa, sweet clover and bird vetch among which the most prevalent were species F. avenaceum and F. acuminatum.

  9. Productivity and residual benefits of grain legumes to sorghum under semi-arid conditions in south-western Zimbabwe: Unravelling the effects of water and nitrogen using a simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ncube, B.; Dimes, J.P.; Wijk, van M.T.; Twomlow, S.J.; Giller, K.E.

    2009-01-01

    The APSIM model was used to assess the impact of legumes on sorghum grown in rotation in a nutrient-limited system under dry conditions in south-western Zimbabwe. An experiment was conducted at Lucydale, Matopos Research Station, between 2002 and 2005. The model was used to simulate soil and plant

  10. Evaluation of the estrogenic effects of legume extracts containing phytoestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boué, Stephen M; Wiese, Thomas E; Nehls, Suzanne; Burow, Matthew E; Elliott, Steven; Carter-Wientjes, Carol H; Shih, Betty Y; McLachlan, John A; Cleveland, Thomas E

    2003-04-09

    Seven legume extracts containing phytoestrogens were analyzed for estrogenic activity. Methanol extracts were prepared from soybean (Glycine max L.), green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), alfalfa sprout (Medicago sativa L.), mung bean sprout (Vigna radiata L.), kudzu root (Pueraria lobata L.), and red clover blossom and red clover sprout (Trifolium pratense L.). Extracts of kudzu root and red clover blossom showed significant competitive binding to estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). Estrogenic activity was determined using an estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation assay. Kudzu root, red clover blossom and sprout, mung bean sprout, and alfalfa sprout extracts displayed increased cell proliferation above levels observed with estradiol. The pure estrogen antagonist, ICI 182,780, suppressed cell proliferation induced by the extracts, suggesting an ER-related signaling pathway was involved. The ER subtype-selective activities of legume extracts were examined using transiently transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells. All seven of the extracts exhibited preferential agonist activity toward ERbeta. Using HPLC to collect fractions and MCF-7 cell proliferation, the active components in kudzu root extract were determined to be the isoflavones puerarin, daidzin, genistin, daidzein, and genistein. These results show that several legumes are a source of phytoestrogens with high levels of estrogenic activity.

  11. Therapeutic Potential of Temperate Forage Legumes: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornara, Laura; Xiao, Jianbo; Burlando, Bruno

    2016-07-29

    The discovery of bioactive molecules from botanical sources is an expanding field, preferentially oriented to plants having a tradition of use in medicine and providing high yields and availability. Temperate forage legumes are Fabaceae species that include worldwide-important crops. These plants possess therapeutic virtues that have not only been used in veterinary and folk medicine, but have also attracted the interest of official medicine. We have examined here Medicago sativa (alfalfa), Trifolium pratense and T. repens (clovers), Melilotus albus and M. officinalis (sweet clovers), Lotus corniculatus (birdsfoot trefoil), Onobrychis viciifolia (sainfoin), Lespedeza capitata (roundhead lespedeza), and Galega officinalis (goat's rue). The phytochemical complexes of these species contain secondary metabolites whose pharmacological potentials deserve investigation. Major classes of compounds include alkaloids and amines, cyanogenic glycosides, flavonoids, coumarins, condensed tannins, and saponins. Some of these phytochemicals have been related to antihypercholesterolemia, antidiabetic, antimenopause, anti-inflammatory, antiedema, anthelmintic, and kidney protective effects. Two widely prescribed drugs have been developed starting from temperate forage legumes, namely, the antithrombotic warfarin, inspired from sweet clover's coumarin, and the antidiabetic metformin, a derivative of sainfoin's guanidine. Available evidence suggests that temperate forage legumes are a potentially important resource for the extraction of active principles to be used as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals.

  12. Legume-rhizobia signal exchange: promiscuity and environmental effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Mario A; Nascimento, Luciana R S; Fracetto, Giselle G M

    2015-01-01

    Although signal exchange between legumes and their rhizobia is among the best-known examples of this biological process, most of the more characterized data comes from just a few legume species and environmental stresses. Although a relative wealth of information is available for some model legumes and some of the major pulses such as soybean, little is known about tropical legumes. This relative disparity in current knowledge is also apparent in the research on the effects of environmental stress on signal exchange; cool-climate stresses, such as low-soil temperature, comprise a relatively large body of research, whereas high-temperature stresses and drought are not nearly as well understood. Both tropical legumes and their environmental stress-induced effects are increasingly important due to global population growth (the demand for protein), climate change (increasing temperatures and more extreme climate behavior), and urbanization (and thus heavy metals). This knowledge gap for both legumes and their environmental stresses is compounded because whereas most temperate legume-rhizobia symbioses are relatively specific and cultivated under relatively stable environments, the converse is true for tropical legumes, which tend to be promiscuous, and grow in highly variable conditions. This review will clarify some of this missing information and highlight fields in which further research would benefit our current knowledge.

  13. Grain legumes and human health

    OpenAIRE

    Lambein, Fernand; Kuo, Yu-Haey; Ikegami, Fumio; Kusama-Eguchi, Kuniko; Enneking, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Since early civilisation in different continents, grain legumes have been a part of balanced diets together with cereals. In general the seeds from those two plant families give together a good source of essential amino acids and may have given an evolutionary advantage. A sustainable diet for vegetarians may not be possible without the protein-rich legumes. Consumed alone, legumes can be a mixed blessing because of their deficiency of some essential amino acids. This deficiency can be balanc...

  14. Healthy food trends -- beans and legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy food trends - pulses; Healthy eating - beans and legumes; Weight loss - beans and legumes; Healthy diet - beans and legumes; ... My Plate.gov. Beans and Peas Are Unique Foods. Updated January 12, 2016. www.choosemyplate.gov/vegetables- ...

  15. Construction of two genetic linkage maps in cultivated tetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa using microsatellite and AFLP markers

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    Santoni Sylvain

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alfalfa (Medicago sativa is a major forage crop. The genetic progress is slow in this legume species because of its autotetraploidy and allogamy. The genetic structure of this species makes the construction of genetic maps difficult. To reach this objective, and to be able to detect QTLs in segregating populations, we used the available codominant microsatellite markers (SSRs, most of them identified in the model legume Medicago truncatula from EST database. A genetic map was constructed with AFLP and SSR markers using specific mapping procedures for autotetraploids. The tetrasomic inheritance was analysed in an alfalfa mapping population. Results We have demonstrated that 80% of primer pairs defined on each side of SSR motifs in M. truncatula EST database amplify with the alfalfa DNA. Using a F1 mapping population of 168 individuals produced from the cross of 2 heterozygous parental plants from Magali and Mercedes cultivars, we obtained 599 AFLP markers and 107 SSR loci. All but 3 SSR loci showed a clear tetrasomic inheritance. For most of the SSR loci, the double-reduction was not significant. For the other loci no specific genotypes were produced, so the significant double-reduction could arise from segregation distortion. For each parent, the genetic map contained 8 groups of four homologous chromosomes. The lengths of the maps were 2649 and 3045 cM, with an average distance of 7.6 and 9.0 cM between markers, for Magali and Mercedes parents, respectively. Using only the SSR markers, we built a composite map covering 709 cM. Conclusions Compared to diploid alfalfa genetic maps, our maps cover about 88–100% of the genome and are close to saturation. The inheritance of the codominant markers (SSR and the pattern of linkage repulsions between markers within each homology group are consistent with the hypothesis of a tetrasomic meiosis in alfalfa. Except for 2 out of 107 SSR markers, we found a similar order of markers on

  16. Medicago truncatula and Glycine max: Different Drought Tolerance and Similar Local Response of the Root Nodule Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Quintana, Erena; Lyon, David; Staudinger, Christiana; Wienkoop, Stefanie; González, Esther M

    2015-12-04

    Legume crops present important agronomical and environmental advantages mainly due to their capacity to reduce atmospheric N2 to ammonium via symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF). This process is very sensitive to abiotic stresses such as drought, but the mechanism underlying this response is not fully understood. The goal of the current work is to compare the drought response of two legumes with high economic impact and research importance, Medicago truncatula and Glycine max, by characterizing their root nodule proteomes. Our results show that, although M. truncatula exhibits lower water potential values under drought conditions compared to G. max, SNF declined analogously in the two legumes. Both of their nodule proteomes are very similar, and comparable down-regulation responses in the diverse protein functional groups were identified (mainly proteins related to the metabolism of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur). We suggest lipoxygenases and protein turnover as newly recognized players in SNF regulation. Partial drought conditions applied to a split-root system resulted in the local down-regulation of the entire proteome of drought-stressed nodules in both legumes. The high degree of similarity between both legume proteomes suggests that the vast amount of research conducted on M. truncatula could be applied to economically important legume crops, such as soybean.

  17. [The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Arthrobacter agilis UMCV2 endophytically colonizes Medicago truncatula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles-Garcia, Maria Elizabeth; Flores-Cortez, Idolina; Hernández-Soberano, Christian; Santoyo, Gustavo; Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo

    Arthrobacter agilis UMCV2 is a rhizosphere bacterium that promotes legume growth by solubilization of iron, which is supplied to the plant. A second growth promotion mechanism produces volatile compounds that stimulate iron uptake activities. Additionally, A. agilis UMCV2 is capable of inhibiting the growth of phytopathogens. A combination of quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques were used here to detect and quantify the presence of the bacterium in the internal tissues of the legume Medicago truncatula. Our results demonstrate that A. agilis UMCV2 behaves as an endophytic bacterium of M. truncatula, particularly in environments where iron is available. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcriptome analysis of the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. medicaginis during colonisation of resistant and susceptible Medicago truncatula hosts identifies differential pathogenicity profiles and novel candidate effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Louise F; Williams, Angela H; Garg, Gagan; Buck, Sally-Anne G; Singh, Karam B

    2016-11-03

    Pathogenic members of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex are responsible for vascular wilt disease on many important crops including legumes, where they can be one of the most destructive disease causing necrotrophic fungi. We previously developed a model legume-infecting pathosystem based on the reference legume Medicago truncatula and a pathogenic F. oxysporum forma specialis (f. sp.) medicaginis (Fom). To dissect the molecular pathogenicity arsenal used by this root-infecting pathogen, we sequenced its transcriptome during infection of a susceptible and resistant host accession. High coverage RNA-Seq of Fom infected root samples harvested from susceptible (DZA315) or resistant (A17) M. truncatula seedlings at early or later stages of infection (2 or 7 days post infection (dpi)) and from vegetative (in vitro) samples facilitated the identification of unique and overlapping sets of in planta differentially expressed genes. This included enrichment, particularly in DZA315 in planta up-regulated datasets, for proteins associated with sugar, protein and plant cell wall metabolism, membrane transport, nutrient uptake and oxidative processes. Genes encoding effector-like proteins were identified, including homologues of the F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Secreted In Xylem (SIX) proteins, and several novel candidate effectors based on predicted secretion, small protein size and high in-planta induced expression. The majority of the effector candidates contain no known protein domains but do share high similarity to predicted proteins predominantly from other F. oxysporum ff. spp. as well as other Fusaria (F. solani, F. fujikori, F. verticilloides, F. graminearum and F. pseudograminearum), and from another wilt pathogen of the same class, a Verticillium species. Overall, this suggests these novel effector candidates may play important roles in Fusaria and wilt pathogen virulence. Combining high coverage in planta RNA-Seq with knowledge of fungal pathogenicity

  19. Expression of the apyrase-like APY1 genes in roots of Medicago truncatula is induced rapidly and transiently by stress and not by Sinorhizobium meliloti or Nod factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Gochicoa, Maria-Teresa; Camut, Sylvie; Niebel, Andreas; Cullimore, Julie V

    2003-03-01

    The model legume Medicago truncatula contains at least six apyrase-like genes, five of which (MtAPY1;1, MtAPY1;2, MtAPY1;3, MtAPY1;4, and MtAPY1;5) are members of a legume-specific family, whereas a single gene (MtAPY2) has closer homologs in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis has revealed that the proteins encoded by these two plant gene families are more similar to yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) GDA1 and to two proteins encoded by newly described mammalian genes (ENP5 and 6) than they are to mammalian CD39- and CD39-like proteins. Northern analyses and analyses of the frequencies of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in different cDNA libraries suggest that in roots, leaves, and flowers, the more highly expressed genes are MtAPY1;3/MtAPY2, MtAPY1;3/MtAPY1;5 and MtAPY1;2/MtAPY1;3 respectively. In roots, at least four of the MtAPY1 genes are induced transiently within 3 to 6 h by a stress response that seems to be ethylene independent because it occurs after treatment with an ethylene synthesis inhibitor and also in the skl ethylene-insensitive mutant. This response also occurs in roots of the following symbiotic mutants: dmi1, dmi2, dmi3, nsp, hcl, pdl, lin, and skl. No evidence was obtained for a rapid, transient, and specific induction of the MtAPY genes in roots in response to rhizobia or rhizobial lipochitooligosaccharidic Nod factors. Thus, our data suggest that the apyrase-like genes, which in several legumes have been implicated to play a role in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis (with some members being described as early nodulin genes), are not regulated symbiotically by rhizobia in M. truncatula.

  20. Weed inhibition by sowing legume species in early succession of abandoned fields on Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Hua; Xu, Dang-Hui; Wang, Gang

    2008-01-01

    A major constraint on vegetation succession on abandoned land is dominance by early successional species. Our aim was to inhibit weeds and alter the initial vegetation succession by the introduction of legume species ( Medicago sativa, Melilotus suaveolens, and Astragalus adsurgens) into abandoned fields on the Loess Plateau, China. Results from our study showed that the addition of legume species strongly affected the dominance pattern of the abandoned-field vegetation. The number of naturally colonizing species was inhibited by the introduction of legume species in the first two growing seasons. The strongest effect on weed inhibition appeared by sowing Melilotus suaveolens. Vegetation cover and above-ground biomass increased after introduction of legume species and the number of naturally colonizing plant species showed a positive correlation with above-ground biomass. Later successional species like Stipa breviflora and Astragalus polycladus appeared three years following the introduction of Melilotus suaveolens, indicating that the course of old-field succession may be accelerated by introducing legume species such as Melilotus suaveolens, at least temporarily.

  1. nip, a symbiotic Medicago truncatula mutant that forms root nodules with aberrant infection threads and plant defense-like response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veereshlingam, Harita; Haynes, Janine G; Penmetsa, R Varma; Cook, Douglas R; Sherrier, D Janine; Dickstein, Rebecca

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis, we isolated and studied a novel symbiotic mutant of the model legume Medicago truncatula, designated nip (numerous infections and polyphenolics). When grown on nitrogen-free media in the presence of the compatible bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nip mutant showed nitrogen deficiency symptoms. The mutant failed to form pink nitrogen-fixing nodules that occur in the wild-type symbiosis, but instead developed small bump-like nodules on its roots that were blocked at an early stage of development. Examination of the nip nodules by light microscopy after staining with X-Gal for S. meliloti expressing a constitutive GUS gene, by confocal microscopy following staining with SYTO-13, and by electron microscopy revealed that nip initiated symbiotic interactions and formed nodule primordia and infection threads. The infection threads in nip proliferated abnormally and very rarely deposited rhizobia into plant host cells; rhizobia failed to differentiate further in these cases. nip nodules contained autofluorescent cells and accumulated a brown pigment. Histochemical staining of nip nodules revealed this pigment to be polyphenolic accumulation. RNA blot analyses demonstrated that nip nodules expressed only a subset of genes associated with nodule organogenesis, as well as elevated expression of a host defense-associated phenylalanine ammonia lyase gene. nip plants were observed to have abnormal lateral roots. nip plant root growth and nodulation responded normally to ethylene inhibitors and precursors. Allelism tests showed that nip complements 14 other M. truncatula nodulation mutants but not latd, a mutant with a more severe nodulation phenotype as well as primary and lateral root defects. Thus, the nip mutant defines a new locus, NIP, required for appropriate infection thread development during invasion of the nascent nodule by rhizobia, normal lateral root elongation, and normal regulation of host defense-like responses

  2. Stimulation of nodulation in Medicago truncatula by low concentrations of ammonium: quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis of selected genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Houman; Vessey, J Kevin

    2009-03-01

    Although mineral nitrogen generally has negative effects on nodulation in legume-rhizobia symbioses, low concentrations of ammonium stimulate nodulation in some legumes. In this study, the effects of ammonium and nitrate on growth, nodulation and expression of 2 nitrogen transport and 12 putative nodulation-related genes of the model symbiosis of Medicago truncatula - Sinorhizobium meliloti are investigated. After 3 weeks of hydroponic growth, whole-plant nodulation was enhanced in all the ammonium treatments and up to three-fold in the 0.5 mM treatment compared with the zero-nitrogen control. Specific nodulation (nodules g(-1) root dry weight) was greatly stimulated in the 0.1 and 0.5 mM NH4+ treatments, to a lower extent in the 0.1 mM NO3- treatment, and inhibited in all other treatments. Expression of the 14 selected genes was observed at 0, 6, 12 and 24 h after exposure to rhizobia and nitrogen. Expression of nitrogen transporter genes increased significantly, but responses of the three genes putatively associated with symbiosis signaling/nodule initiation were mixed. There were infrequent responses of genes coding for an ABA-activated protein kinase or a gibberellin-regulated protein, but an ethylene-responsive element-binding factor showed increased expression in various treatments and sampling times. Three auxin-responsive genes and three cytokinin-responsive genes showed varied responses to ammonium and nitrate. This study indicates that low concentrations of ammonium stimulate nodulation in M. truncatula, but the data were inconclusive in verifying the hypothesis that a relatively high ratio of cytokinin to auxin in roots may be an underlying mechanism in this stimulation of nodulation.

  3. How legumes recognize rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Virginia Dalla; Zanetti, María Eugenia; Blanco, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Legume plants have developed the capacity to establish symbiotic interactions with soil bacteria (known as rhizobia) that can convert N2 to molecular forms that are incorporated into the plant metabolism. The first step of this relationship is the recognition of bacteria by the plant, which allows to distinguish potentially harmful species from symbiotic partners. The main molecular determinant of this symbiotic interaction is the Nod Factor, a diffusible lipochitooligosaccharide molecule produced by rhizobia and perceived by LysM receptor kinases; however, other important molecules involved in the specific recognition have emerged over the years. Secreted exopolysaccharides and the lipopolysaccharides present in the bacterial cell wall have been proposed to act as signaling molecules, triggering the expression of specific genes related to the symbiotic process. In this review we will briefly discuss how transcriptomic analysis are helping to understand how multiple signaling pathways, triggered by the perception of different molecules produced by rhizobia, control the genetic programs of root nodule organogenesis and bacterial infection. This knowledge can help to understand how legumes have evolved to recognize and establish complex ecological relationships with particular species and strains of rhizobia, adjusting gene expression in response to identity determinants of bacteria.

  4. Interrelations between Herbage Yield, α-Tocopherol, β-Carotene, Lutein, Protein, and Fiber in Non-Leguminous Forbs, Forage Legumes, and a Grass−Clover Mixture as Affected by Harvest Date

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgersma, Anjo; Søegaard, Karen; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2015-01-01

    lanceolata), three legumes: yellow sweet clover (Melilotus of f icinalis), lucerne (Medicago sativa), and birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) and a perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne)−white clover (Trifolium repens) mixture were sown in a field trial with two replicated and randomized blocks. Forage in 1...

  5. A nonsymbiotic root hair tip growth phenotype in NORK-mutated legumes: implications for nodulation factor-induced signaling and formation of a multifaceted root hair pocket for bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esseling, J.J.; Lhuissier, F.G.P.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Medicago truncatula Does not Make Infections (DMI2) mutant is mutated in the nodulation receptor-like kinase, NORK. Here, we report that NORK-mutated legumes of three species show an enhanced touch response to experimental handling, which results in a nonsymbiotic root hair phenotype. When care

  6. Food legume production in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Food legumes comprise all legumes grown for human food in China as either dry grains or vegetables, except for soybean and groundnut. China has a vast territory with complex ecological conditions. Rotation, intercropping, and mixed cropping involving pulses are normal cropping systems in China. Whether indigenous or introduced crops, pulses have played an important role in Chinese cropping systems and made an important contribution to food resources for humans since ancient times. The six major food legume species (pea, faba bean, common bean, mung bean, adzuki bean, and cowpea are the most well-known pulses in China, as well as those with more local distributions; runner bean, lima bean, chickpea, lentil, grass pea, lupine, rice bean, black gram, hyacinth bean, pigeon pea, velvet bean, winged bean, guar bean, sword bean, and jack bean. China has remained the world's leading producer of peas, faba beans, mung beans, and adzuki beans in recent decades, as documented by FAO statistics and China Agriculture Statistical Reports. The demand for food legumes as a healthy food will markedly increase with the improvement of living standards in China. Since China officially joined the World Trade Organization (WTO in 2001, imports of pea from Canada and Australia have rapidly increased, resulting in reduced prices for dry pea and other food legumes. With reduced profits for food legume crops, their sowing area and total production has decreased within China. At the same time, the rising consumer demand for vegetable food legumes as a healthy food has led to attractive market prices and sharp production increases in China. Vegetable food legumes have reduced growing duration and enable flexibility in cropping systems. In the future, production of dry food legumes will range from stable to slowly decreasing, while production of vegetable food legumes will continue to increase.

  7. Medicago truncatula natural resistance-associated macrophage Protein1 is required for iron uptake by rhizobia-infected nodule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada-Jiménez, Manuel; Castro-Rodríguez, Rosario; Kryvoruchko, Igor; Lucas, M Mercedes; Udvardi, Michael; Imperial, Juan; González-Guerrero, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Iron is critical for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) as a key component of multiple ferroproteins involved in this biological process. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, iron is delivered by the vasculature to the infection/maturation zone (zone II) of the nodule, where it is released to the apoplast. From there, plasma membrane iron transporters move it into rhizobia-containing cells, where iron is used as the cofactor of multiple plant and rhizobial proteins (e.g. plant leghemoglobin and bacterial nitrogenase). MtNramp1 (Medtr3g088460) is the M. truncatula Natural Resistance-Associated Macrophage Protein family member, with the highest expression levels in roots and nodules. Immunolocalization studies indicate that MtNramp1 is mainly targeted to the plasma membrane. A loss-of-function nramp1 mutant exhibited reduced growth compared with the wild type under symbiotic conditions, but not when fertilized with mineral nitrogen. Nitrogenase activity was low in the mutant, whereas exogenous iron and expression of wild-type MtNramp1 in mutant nodules increased nitrogen fixation to normal levels. These data are consistent with a model in which MtNramp1 is the main transporter responsible for apoplastic iron uptake by rhizobia-infected cells in zone II.

  8. LEA polypeptide profiling of recalcitrant and orthodox legume seeds reveals ABI3-regulated LEA protein abundance linked to desiccation tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahaie, Julien; Hundertmark, Michaela; Bove, Jérôme; Leprince, Olivier; Rogniaux, Hélène; Buitink, Julia

    2013-11-01

    In contrast to orthodox seeds that acquire desiccation tolerance during maturation, recalcitrant seeds are unable to survive drying. These desiccation-sensitive seeds constitute an interesting model for comparative analysis with phylogenetically close species that are desiccation tolerant. Considering the importance of LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins as protective molecules both in drought and in desiccation tolerance, the heat-stable proteome was characterized in cotyledons of the legume Castanospermum australe and it was compared with that of the orthodox model legume Medicago truncatula. RNA sequencing identified transcripts of 16 homologues out of 17 LEA genes for which polypeptides are detected in M. truncatula seeds. It is shown that for 12 LEA genes, polypeptides were either absent or strongly reduced in C. australe cotyledons compared with M. truncatula seeds. Instead, osmotically responsive, non-seed-specific dehydrins accumulated to high levels in the recalcitrant cotyledons compared with orthodox seeds. Next, M. truncatula mutants of the abscisic acid insensitive3 (ABI3) gene were characterized. Mature Mtabi3 seeds were found to be desiccation sensitive when dried below a critical water content of 0.4 g H2O g DW(-1). Characterization of the LEA proteome of the Mtabi3 seeds revealed a subset of LEA proteins with severely reduced abundance that were also found to be reduced or absent in C. australe cotyledons. Transcripts of these genes were indeed shown to be ABI3 responsive. The results highlight those LEA proteins that are critical to desiccation tolerance and suggest that comparable regulatory pathways responsible for their accumulation are missing in both desiccation-sensitive genotypes, revealing new insights into the mechanistic basis of the recalcitrant trait in seeds.

  9. Mutualism and adaptive divergence: co-invasion of a heterogeneous grassland by an exotic legume-rhizobium symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie S Porter

    Full Text Available Species interactions play a critical role in biological invasions. For example, exotic plant and microbe mutualists can facilitate each other's spread as they co-invade novel ranges. Environmental context may influence the effect of mutualisms on invasions in heterogeneous environments, however these effects are poorly understood. We examined the mutualism between the legume, Medicago polymorpha, and the rhizobium, Ensifer medicae, which have both invaded California grasslands. Many of these invaded grasslands are composed of a patchwork of harsh serpentine and relatively benign non-serpentine soils. We grew legume genotypes collected from serpentine or non-serpentine soil in both types of soil in combination with rhizobium genotypes from serpentine or non-serpentine soils and in the absence of rhizobia. Legumes invested more strongly in the mutualism in the home soil type and trends in fitness suggested that this ecotypic divergence was adaptive. Serpentine legumes had greater allocation to symbiotic root nodules in serpentine soil than did non-serpentine legumes and non-serpentine legumes had greater allocation to nodules in non-serpentine soil than did serpentine legumes. Therefore, this invasive legume has undergone the rapid evolution of divergence for soil-specific investment in the mutualism. Contrary to theoretical expectations, the mutualism was less beneficial for legumes grown on the stressful serpentine soil than on the non-serpentine soil, possibly due to the inhibitory effects of serpentine on the benefits derived from the interaction. The soil-specific ability to allocate to a robust microbial mutualism may be a critical, and previously overlooked, adaptation for plants adapting to heterogeneous environments during invasion.

  10. LTR retrotransposon landscape in Medicago truncatula: more rapid removal than in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jin-Song

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR elements are ubiquitous Eukaryotic TEs that transpose through RNA intermediates. Accounting for significant proportion of many plant genomes, LTR elements have been well established as one of the major forces underlying the evolution of plant genome size, structure and function. The accessibility of more than 40% of genomic sequences of the model legume Medicago truncatula (Mt has made the comprehensive study of its LTR elements possible. Results We use a newly developed tool LTR_FINDER to identify LTR retrotransposons in the Mt genome and detect 526 full-length elements as well as a great number of copies related to them. These elements constitute about 9.6% of currently available genomic sequences. They are classified into 85 families of which 64 are reported for the first time. The majority of the LTR retrotransposons belong to either Copia or Gypsy superfamily and the others are categorized as TRIMs or LARDs by their length. We find that the copy-number of Copia-like families is 3 times more than that of Gypsy-like ones but the latter contribute more to the genome. The analysis of PBS and protein-coding domain structure of the LTR families reveals that they tend to use only 4–5 types of tRNAs and many families have quite conservative ORFs besides known TE domains. For several important families, we describe in detail their abundance, conservation, insertion time and structure. We investigate the amplification-deletion pattern of the elements and find that the detectable full-length elements are relatively young and most of them were inserted within the last 0.52 MY. We also estimate that more than ten million bp of the Mt genomic sequences have been removed by the deletion of LTR elements and the removal of the full-length structures in Mt has been more rapid than in rice. Conclusion This report is the first comprehensive description and analysis of LTR retrotransposons in the

  11. Metabolite profiling of triterpene saponins in Medicago truncatula hairy roots by liquid chromatography Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollier, Jacob; Morreel, Kris; Geelen, Danny; Goossens, Alain

    2011-06-24

    Triterpenes are one of the largest classes of plant natural products, with an enormous variety in structure and bioactivities. Here, triterpene saponins from hairy roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula were profiled with reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to negative-ion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC ESI FT-ICR MS). Owing to the accuracy of the FT-ICR MS, reliable molecular formulas of the detected compounds could be predicted, which, together with the generated MS(n) spectra, allowed the tentative identification of 79 different saponins, of which 61 had not been detected previously in M. truncatula. Upon collision-induced dissociation of saponins that contain a uronic acid residue in the sugar chain, fragment ions resulting from cross-ring cleavages of the uronic acid residues were observed. The identified saponins are glycosides of 10 different sapogenins, of which three were not detected before in M. truncatula. Zanhic acid glycosides, which are prevalent in the aerial parts of M. truncatula, were absent in the hairy root extracts. This metabolite compendium will facilitate future functional genomic studies of triterpene saponin biosynthesis in M. truncatula.

  12. Medicago truncatula increases its iron-uptake mechanisms in response to volatile organic compounds produced by Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Mosqueda, Maria del Carmen; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes I; Santoyo, Gustavo; Farías-Rodríguez, Rodolfo; Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo

    2013-11-01

    Medicago truncatula represents a model plant species for understanding legume-bacteria interactions. M. truncatula roots form a specific root-nodule symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation generates high iron (Fe) demands for bacterial nitrogenase holoenzyme and plant leghemoglobin proteins. Leguminous plants acquire Fe via "Strategy I," which includes mechanisms such as rhizosphere acidification and enhanced ferric reductase activity. In the present work, we analyzed the effect of S. meliloti volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on the Fe-uptake mechanisms of M. truncatula seedlings under Fe-deficient and Fe-rich conditions. Axenic cultures showed that both plant and bacterium modified VOC synthesis in the presence of the respective symbiotic partner. Importantly, in both Fe-rich and -deficient experiments, bacterial VOCs increased the generation of plant biomass, rhizosphere acidification, ferric reductase activity, and chlorophyll content in plants. On the basis of our results, we propose that M. truncatula perceives its symbiont through VOC emissions, and in response, increases Fe-uptake mechanisms to facilitate symbiosis.

  13. Two distinct plastid genome configurations and unprecedented intraspecies length variation in the accD coding region in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdon, Csanad; Maliga, Pal

    2014-08-01

    We fully sequenced four and partially sequenced six additional plastid genomes of the model legume Medicago truncatula. Three accessions, Jemalong 2HA, Borung and Paraggio, belong to ssp. truncatula, and R108 to ssp. tricycla. We report here that the R108 ptDNA has a ~45-kb inversion compared with the ptDNA in ssp. truncatula, mediated by a short, imperfect repeat. DNA gel blot analyses of seven additional ssp. tricycla accessions detected only one of the two alternative genome arrangements, represented by three and four accessions each. Furthermore, we found a variable number of repeats in the essential accD and ycf1 coding regions. The repeats within accD are recombinationally active, yielding variable-length insertions and deletions in the central part of the coding region. The length of ACCD was distinct in each of the 10 sequenced ecotypes, ranging between 650 and 796 amino acids. The repeats in the ycf1 coding region are also recombinationally active, yielding short indels in 10 regions of the reading frames. Thus, the plastid genome variability we report here could be linked to repeat-mediated genome rearrangements. However, the rate of recombination was sufficiently low, so that no heterogeneity of ptDNA could be observed in populations maintained by single-seed descent.

  14. Modulation of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis in bacteroids within Medicago sativa nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, C; Senatore, B; Arbucci, S; Pieraccini, G; Defez, R

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the dose-response effects of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on Medicago plant growth and dry weight production, we increased the synthesis of IAA in both free-living and symbiosis-stage rhizobial bacteroids during Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. For this purpose, site-directed mutagenesis was applied to modify an 85-bp promoter sequence, driving the expression of iaaM and tms2 genes for IAA biosynthesis. A positive correlation was found between the higher expression of IAA biosynthetic genes in free-living bacteria and the increased production of IAA under both free-living and symbiotic conditions. Plants nodulated by RD65 and RD66 strains, synthetizing the highest IAA concentration, showed a significant (up to 73%) increase in the shoot fresh weight and upregulation of nitrogenase gene, nifH, compared to plants nodulated by the wild-type strain. When these plants were analyzed by confocal microscopy, using an anti-IAA antibody, the strongest signal was observed in bacteroids of Medicago sativa RD66 (Ms-RD66) plants, even when they were located in the senescent nodule zone. We show here a simple system to modulate endogenous IAA biosynthesis in bacteria nodulating legumes suitable to investigate which is the maximum level of IAA biosynthesis, resulting in the maximal increase of plant growth.

  15. Cross-family translational genomics of abiotic stress-responsive genes between Arabidopsis and Medicago truncatula.

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    Daejin Hyung

    Full Text Available Cross-species translation of genomic information may play a pivotal role in applying biological knowledge gained from relatively simple model system to other less studied, but related, genomes. The information of abiotic stress (ABS-responsive genes in Arabidopsis was identified and translated into the legume model system, Medicago truncatula. Various data resources, such as TAIR/AtGI DB, expression profiles and literatures, were used to build a genome-wide list of ABS genes. tBlastX/BlastP similarity search tools and manual inspection of alignments were used to identify orthologous genes between the two genomes. A total of 1,377 genes were finally collected and classified into 18 functional criteria of gene ontology (GO. The data analysis according to the expression cues showed that there was substantial level of interaction among three major types (i.e., drought, salinity and cold stress of abiotic stresses. In an attempt to translate the ABS genes between these two species, genomic locations for each gene were mapped using an in-house-developed comparative analysis platform. The comparative analysis revealed that fragmental colinearity, represented by only 37 synteny blocks, existed between Arabidopsis and M. truncatula. Based on the combination of E-value and alignment remarks, estimated translation rate was 60.2% for this cross-family translation. As a prelude of the functional comparative genomic approaches, in-silico gene network/interactome analyses were conducted to predict key components in the ABS responses, and one of the sub-networks was integrated with corresponding comparative map. The results demonstrated that core members of the sub-network were well aligned with previously reported ABS regulatory networks. Taken together, the results indicate that network-based integrative approaches of comparative and functional genomics are important to interpret and translate genomic information for complex traits such as abiotic stresses.

  16. Transcriptional Regulation and Signaling in Phosphorus Starvation: What About Legumes?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oswaldo Valdés-Lóppez; Georgina Hernández

    2008-01-01

    The availability of soil phosphorus (P), an essential element, is one of the most important requirements for plant growth and crop production. The morphological and physiological adaptations evolved by plants to cope with P starvation have been well characterized. Several P deficiency plant responses are regulated at the transcriptional level. Microarray analysis has generated valuable information on global gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana grown under P-stress. Despite the identification of P responsive genes, little is known about the regulation of gene expression changes. Four transcription factors, PHR1, WRKY75, ZAT6 and BHLH32, involved in P starvation signaling have been characterized in Arabidopsis, and signaling pathways are deciphered. This review analyzes the current knowledge of transcriptional regulation of P starvation responses in Arabidopsis vis-a-vis legumes such as lupine, common bean and Medicago truncatula. The knowledge on regulatory and signaling mechanisms involved in P acquisition and use in legumes will be useful for improvement of these crops, which account for a large proportion of the world's crop production, providing good nutritional quality feed and food.

  17. Identification of a dominant gene in Medicago truncatula that restricts nodulation by Sinorhizobium meliloti strain Rm41

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Leguminous plants are able to form a root nodule symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria called rhizobia. This symbiotic association shows a high level of specificity. Beyond the specificity for the legume family, individual legume species/genotypes can only interact with certain restricted group of bacterial species or strains. Specificity in this system is regulated by complex signal exchange between the two symbiotic partners and thus multiple genetic mechanisms could be involved in the recognition process. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms controlling symbiotic specificity could enable genetic improvement of legume nitrogen fixation, and may also reveal the possible mechanisms that restrict root nodule symbiosis in non-legumes. Results We screened a core collection of Medicago truncatula genotypes with several strains of Sinorhizobium meliloti and identified a naturally occurring dominant gene that restricts nodulation by S. meliloti Rm41. We named this gene as Mt-NS1 (for M.truncatulanodulation specificity 1). We have mapped the Mt-NS1 locus within a small genomic region on M. truncatula chromosome 8. The data reported here will facilitate positional cloning of the Mt-NS1 gene. Conclusions Evolution of symbiosis specificity involves both rhizobial and host genes. From the bacterial side, specificity determinants include Nod factors, surface polysaccharides, and secreted proteins. However, we know relatively less from the host side. We recently demonstrated that a component of this specificity in soybeans is defined by plant NBS-LRR resistance (R) genes that recognize effector proteins delivered by the type III secretion system (T3SS) of the rhizobial symbionts. However, the lack of a T3SS in many sequenced S. meliloti strains raises the question of how the specificity is regulated in the Medicago-Sinorhizobium system beyond Nod-factor perception. Thus, cloning and characterization of Mt-NS1 will add a new dimension to our knowledge about

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis elicits shoot proteome changes that are modified during cadmium stress alleviation in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianinazzi-Pearson Vivienne

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi, which engage a mutualistic symbiosis with the roots of most plant species, have received much attention for their ability to alleviate heavy metal stress in plants, including cadmium (Cd. While the molecular bases of Cd tolerance displayed by mycorrhizal plants have been extensively analysed in roots, very little is known regarding the mechanisms by which legume aboveground organs can escape metal toxicity upon AM symbiosis. As a model system to address this question, we used Glomus irregulare-colonised Medicago truncatula plants, which were previously shown to accumulate and tolerate heavy metal in their shoots when grown in a substrate spiked with 2 mg Cd kg-1. Results The measurement of three indicators for metal phytoextraction showed that shoots of mycorrhizal M. truncatula plants have a capacity for extracting Cd that is not related to an increase in root-to-shoot translocation rate, but to a high level of allocation plasticity. When analysing the photosynthetic performance in metal-treated mycorrhizal plants relative to those only Cd-supplied, it turned out that the presence of G. irregulare partially alleviated the negative effects of Cd on photosynthesis. To test the mechanisms by which shoots of Cd-treated mycorrhizal plants avoid metal toxicity, we performed a 2-DE/MALDI/TOF-based comparative proteomic analysis of the M. truncatula shoot responses upon mycorrhization and Cd exposure. Whereas the metal-responsive shoot proteins currently identified in non-mycorrhizal M. truncatula indicated that Cd impaired CO2 assimilation, the mycorrhiza-responsive shoot proteome was characterised by an increase in photosynthesis-related proteins coupled to a reduction in glugoneogenesis/glycolysis and antioxidant processes. By contrast, Cd was found to trigger the opposite response coupled the up-accumulation of molecular chaperones in shoot of mycorrhizal plants relative to those metal

  19. Role of symbiotic auxotrophy in the Rhizobium-legume symbioses.

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    Jurgen Prell

    Full Text Available Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae mutants unable to transport branched-chain amino acids via the two main amino acid ABC transport complexes AapJQMP and BraDEFGC produce a nitrogen starvation phenotype when inoculated on pea (Pisum sativum plants [1], [2]. Bacteroids in indeterminate pea nodules have reduced abundance and a lower chromosome number. They reduce transcription of pathways for branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis and become dependent on their provision by the host. This has been called "symbiotic auxotrophy".A region important in solute specificity was identified in AapQ and changing P144D in this region reduced branched-chain amino acid transport to a very low rate. Strains carrying P144D were still fully effective for N(2 fixation on peas demonstrating that a low rate of branched amino acid transport in R. leguminosarum bv. viciae supports wild-type rates of nitrogen fixation. The importance of branched-chain amino acid transport was then examined in other legume-Rhizobium symbioses. An aap bra mutant of R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli also showed nitrogen starvation symptoms when inoculated on French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, a plant producing determinate nodules. The phenotype is different from that observed on pea and is accompanied by reduced nodule numbers and nitrogen fixation per nodule. However, an aap bra double mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011 showed no phenotype on alfalfa (Medicago sativa.Symbiotic auxotrophy occurs in both determinate pea and indeterminate bean nodules demonstrating its importance for bacteroid formation and nodule function in legumes with different developmental programmes. However, only small quantities of branched chain amino acids are needed and symbiotic auxotrophy did not occur in the Sinorhizobium meliloti-alfalfa symbiosis under the conditions measured. The contrasting symbiotic phenotypes of aap bra mutants inoculated on different legumes probably reflects altered timing of amino acid

  20. Genome-Wide Association Mapping and Genomic Selection for Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) Forage Quality Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biazzi, Elisa; Nazzicari, Nelson; Pecetti, Luciano; Brummer, E Charles; Palmonari, Alberto; Tava, Aldo; Annicchiarico, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Genetic progress for forage quality has been poor in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), the most-grown forage legume worldwide. This study aimed at exploring opportunities for marker-assisted selection (MAS) and genomic selection of forage quality traits based on breeding values of parent plants. Some 154 genotypes from a broadly-based reference population were genotyped by genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), and phenotyped for leaf-to-stem ratio, leaf and stem contents of protein, neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent lignin (ADL), and leaf and stem NDF digestibility after 24 hours (NDFD), of their dense-planted half-sib progenies in three growing conditions (summer harvest, full irrigation; summer harvest, suspended irrigation; autumn harvest). Trait-marker analyses were performed on progeny values averaged over conditions, owing to modest germplasm × condition interaction. Genomic selection exploited 11,450 polymorphic SNP markers, whereas a subset of 8,494 M. truncatula-aligned markers were used for a genome-wide association study (GWAS). GWAS confirmed the polygenic control of quality traits and, in agreement with phenotypic correlations, indicated substantially different genetic control of a given trait in stems and leaves. It detected several SNPs in different annotated genes that were highly linked to stem protein content. Also, it identified a small genomic region on chromosome 8 with high concentration of annotated genes associated with leaf ADL, including one gene probably involved in the lignin pathway. Three genomic selection models, i.e., Ridge-regression BLUP, Bayes B and Bayesian Lasso, displayed similar prediction accuracy, whereas SVR-lin was less accurate. Accuracy values were moderate (0.3-0.4) for stem NDFD and leaf protein content, modest for leaf ADL and NDFD, and low to very low for the other traits. Along with previous results for the same germplasm set, this study indicates that GBS data can be exploited to improve both quality traits

  1. Ectopic Expression of a Phytase Gene from Medicago truncatula Barrel Medic Enhances Phosphorus Absorption in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Xiao; Jian-Heng Zhang; Maria Harrison; Zeng-Yu Wang

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, the phosphorus-absorption capacity of transgenic Arabidopsis plants ectopically expressing a novel phytase gene from Medicago truncatula Barrel Medic was evaluated. A full-length cDNA encoding an extracellular form of phytase was isolated from the model legume M. truncatula. The phytase gene (MtPHY1) has an open reading frame of 1 632 bp predicted to encode 543 amino acids, including an Nterminal signal peptide of 27 amino acids. The genomic sequence of the MtPHY1 gene is 5 151 bp, containing seven exons interrupted by six introns. Under high-Pi (2 mmol/L) growth conditions, higher levels of MtPHY1transcripts accumulated in the leaf and stem than in the root. The transcript level was reduced in the stem and increased in the root, with no obvious changes in the hybridization signal detected in the leaf under lowPi (10 μmol/L) conditions. Chimeric transgenes were constructed by placing MtPHY1 under the control of the constitutive CaMV35S promoter and the root-specific MtPT1 promoter. Phytase activities in root apoplast of transgenic Arabidopsis were 12.3- to 16.2-fold of that in control plants. The phytase expressed was secreted into the rhizosphere, as demonstrated by HPLC analysis of phytate degradation by root exudates. Ectopic expression of MtPHY1 in Arabidopsis, leading to significant improvement in organic phosphorus absorption and plant growth, indicated that MtPHY1 has great potential for improving plant phosphorus absorption and phytoremediation.

  2. Nodule Initiation Involves the Creation of a New Symplasmic Field in Specific Root Cells of Medicago Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complainville, Arnaud; Brocard, Lysiane; Roberts, Ian; Dax, Edna; Sever, Noa; Sauer, Norbert; Kondorosi, Adam; Wolf, Shmuel; Oparka, Karl; Crespi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The organogenesis of nitrogen-fixing nodules in legume plants is initiated in specific root cortical cells and regulated by long-distance signaling and carbon allocation. Here, we explore cell-to-cell communication processes that occur during nodule initiation in Medicago species and their functional relevance using a combination of fluorescent tracers, electron microscopy, and transgenic plants. Nodule initiation induced symplasmic continuity between the phloem and nodule initials. Macromolecules such as green fluorescent protein could traffic across short or long distances from the phloem into these primordial cells. The created symplasmic field was regulated throughout nodule development. Furthermore, Medicago truncatula transgenic plants expressing a viral movement protein showed increased nodulation. Hence, the establishment of this symplasmic field may be a critical element for the control of nodule organogenesis. PMID:14615602

  3. Molecular cloning of a bifunctional beta-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinosidase from alfalfa roots: heterologous expression in Medicago truncatula and substrate specificity of the purified enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jin-Song; Balland-Vanney, Maud; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Schultze, Michael; Kondorosi, Adam; Kondorosi, Eva; Staehelin, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases are often members of a multigene family, suggesting individual roles for each isoenzyme. Various extracellular glycoside hydrolases have an important but poorly understood function in remodelling the cell wall during plant growth. Here, MsXyl1, a concanavalin A-binding protein from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 3 (beta-D-xylosidase branch) is characterized. Transcripts of MsXyl1 were detected in roots (particularly root tips), root nodules, and flowers. MsXyl1 under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter was expressed in the model legume Medicago truncatula (Gaertner). Concanavalin A-binding proteins from the transgenic plants exhibited 5-8-fold increased activities towards three p-nitrophenyl (PNP) glycosides, namely PNP-beta-D-xyloside, PNP-alpha-L-arabinofuranoside, and PNP-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside. An antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide recognized MsXyl1, which was processed to a 65 kDa form. To characterize the substrate specificity of MsXyl1, the recombinant protein was purified from transgenic M. truncatula leaves by concanavalin A and anion chromatography. MsXyl1cleaved beta-1,4-linked D-xylo-oligosaccharides and alpha-1,5-linked L-arabino-oligosaccharides. Arabinoxylan (from wheat) and arabinan (from sugar beet) were substrates for MsXyl1, whereas xylan (from oat spelts) was resistant to degradation. Furthermore, MsXyl1 released xylose and arabinose from cell wall polysaccharides isolated from alfalfa roots. These data suggest that MsXyl1 is a multifunctional beta-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase/alpha-L-arabinopyranosidase implicated in cell wall turnover of arabinose and xylose, particularly in rapidly growing root tips. Moreover, the findings of this study demonstrate that stable transgenic M. truncatula plants serve as an excellent expression system for purification and characterization of proteins.

  4. Mechanistic action of gibberellins in legume nodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Satomi; Gresshoff, Peter M; Ferguson, Brett J

    2014-10-01

    Legume plants are capable of entering into a symbiotic relationship with rhizobia bacteria. This results in the formation of novel organs on their roots, called nodules, in which the bacteria capture atmospheric nitrogen and provide it as ammonium to the host plant. Complex molecular and physiological changes are involved in the formation and establishment of such nodules. Several phytohormones are known to play key roles in this process. Gibberellins (gibberellic acids; GAs), a class of phytohormones known to be involved in a wide range of biological processes (i.e., cell elongation, germination) are reported to be involved in the formation and maturation of legume nodules, highlighted by recent transcriptional analyses of early soybean symbiotic steps. Here, we summarize what is currently known about GAs in legume nodulation and propose a model of GA action during nodule development. Results from a wide range of studies, including GA application, mutant phenotyping, and gene expression studies, indicate that GAs are required at different stages, with an optimum, tightly regulated level being key to achieve successful nodulation. Gibberellic acids appear to be required at two distinct stages of nodulation: (i) early stages of rhizobia infection and nodule primordium establishment; and (ii) later stages of nodule maturation.

  5. Mechanistic action of gibberellins in legume nodulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satomi Hayashi; Peter MGresshoff; Brett J.Ferguson

    2014-01-01

    Legume plants are capable of entering into a symbiotic relationship with rhizobia bacteria. This results in the formation of novel organs on their roots, cal ed nodules, in which the bacteria capture atmospheric nitrogen and provide it as ammonium to the host plant. Complex molecular and physiological changes are involved in the formation and establishment of such nodules. Several phytohormones are known to play key roles in this process. Gibberel ins (gibberel ic acids;GAs), a class of phytohormones known to be involved in a wide range of biological processes (i.e., cellelongation, germination) are reported to be involved in the formation and maturation of legume nodules, highlighted by recent tran-scriptional analyses of early soybean symbiotic steps. Here, we summarize what is currently known about GAs in legume nodulation and propose a model of GA action during nodule development. Results from a wide range of studies, including GA application, mutant phenotyping, and gene expression studies, indicate that GAs are required at different stages, with an optimum, tightly regulated level being key to achieve successful nodulation. Gibberel ic acids appear to be required at two distinct stages of nodulation:(i) early stages of rhizobia infection and nodule primordium establishment;and (i ) later stages of nodule maturation.

  6. Protein contamination on Klason lignin contents in tropical grasses and legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenio Detmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the extent of protein contamination on Klason lignin (KL in tropical grasses and legumes, and to propose an equation to estimate the protein-free content of Klason lignin (KLp. Five grass (30 samples and 12 legume species (31 samples were evaluated. Legumes had higher KL contents. Protein contamination was significant in both grasses and legumes, but greater in legume samples. The model to predict KLp was based on KL and crude protein (CP contents, as follows: KLp = 0.8807KL - 0.0938KL x D - 0.00338CP (R2=0.935, in which D=0, for grasses, and D=1 for legumes.

  7. Interkingdom Responses to Bacterial Quorum Sensing Signals Regulate Frequency and Rate of Nodulation in Legume-Rhizobia Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Andrew G; Mukherjee, Arijit; Stacy, Danielle M; Lazar, Stephen; Ané, Jean-Michel; Blackwell, Helen E

    2016-11-17

    Density-dependent phenotypic switching in bacteria, the phenomenon of quorum sensing (QS), is instrumental in many pathogenic and mutualistic behaviors. In many Gram-negative bacteria, QS is regulated by N-acylated-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs). Synthetic analogues of these AHLs hold significant promise for regulating QS at the host-symbiont interface. Regulation depends on refined temporal and spatial models of quorums under native conditions. Critical to this is an understanding of how the presence of these signals may affect a prospective host. We screened a library of AHL analogues for their ability to regulate the legume-rhizobia mutualistic symbiosis (nodulation) between Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti. Using an established QS-reporter line of S. meliloti and nodulation assays with wild-type bacteria, we identified compounds capable of increasing either the rate of nodule formation or total nodule number. Most importantly, we identified compounds with activity exclusive to either host or pathogen, underscoring the potential to generate QS modulators selective to bacteria with limited effects on a prospective host.

  8. Effects of different ratios of associations of forage grasses and herbaceous legumes on the bio-mass yield in Bale highland, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedu Aliyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted from 2010/11 to 2012/13 with the objectives of identifying the appropriate types and level of grass-legume association for pasture productivity improvement in highlands of Bale. Accordingly, two herbaceous forage grasses phalaris aquatica L. and Panicum coloratumL. Were integrated with two varieties of herbaceous forage legumes; Medicago sativa l. and Trifolium repens L. in different association ratio. The mean result of six season analyzed data revealed a significant difference (p<0.05 between associations of different forage legumes and grasses as well as different proportions. According to this result, the association of all types of forages 50% legumes to 50% grasses has shown a better result. Association of 50% alfalfa and 50% phalaris, and 75% phalaris and 25 % alfalfa has shown the average dry matter yield of 15.7±3.4 tone/ha with 40.8% legume and 14.0±3.4 tone/ha with 45% legume DM yield respectively. Phalaris 75% with white clover 25% has shown the high yield of 15.5±3.4 t/ha with only 0.8 t/ha white clover. This result indicates that the 50%/50% and 75% /25% proportion of phalaris and alfalfa is a good dry bio-mass yielder and can satisfy the best requirement of grass to legume composition of the pasture.

  9. Testing a pollen-parent fecundity distribution model on seed-parent fecundity distributions in bee-pollinated forage legume polycrosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Random mating (i.e., panmixis) is a fundamental assumption in quantitative genetics. In outcrossing bee-pollinated perennial forage legume polycrosses, mating is assumed by default to follow theoretical random mating. This assumption informs breeders of expected inbreeding estimates based on polycro...

  10. Root developmental programs shape the Medicago truncatula nodule meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Henk J; Xiao, Ting Ting; Kulikova, Olga; Wan, Xi; Bisseling, Ton; Scheres, Ben; Heidstra, Renze

    2015-09-01

    Nodules on the roots of legume plants host nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria. Several lines of evidence indicate that nodules are evolutionarily related to roots. We determined whether developmental control of the Medicago truncatula nodule meristem bears resemblance to that in root meristems through analyses of root meristem-expressed PLETHORA genes. In nodules, MtPLETHORA 1 and 2 are preferentially expressed in cells positioned at the periphery of the meristem abutting nodule vascular bundles. Their expression overlaps with an auxin response maximum and MtWOX5, which is a marker for the root quiescent center. Strikingly, the cells in the central part of the nodule meristem have a high level of cytokinin and display MtPLETHORA 3 and 4 gene expression. Nodule-specific knockdown of MtPLETHORA genes results in a reduced number of nodules and/or in nodules in which meristem activity has ceased. Our nodule gene expression map indicates that the nodule meristem is composed of two distinct domains in which different MtPLETHORA gene subsets are expressed. Our mutant studies show that MtPLETHORA genes function redundantly in nodule meristem maintenance. This indicates that Rhizobium has recruited root developmental programs for nodule formation. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. LC/MS profiling of flavonoid glycoconjugates isolated from hairy roots, suspension root cell cultures and seedling roots of Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszków, Anna; Swarcewicz, Barbara; Banasiak, Joanna; Muth, Dorota; Jasiński, Michał; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2011-12-01

    Hairy roots and suspension cell cultures are commonly used in deciphering different problems related to the biochemistry and physiology of plant secondary metabolites. Here, we address about the issue of possible differences in the profiles of flavonoid compounds and their glycoconjugates derived from various plant materials grown in a standard culture media. We compared profiles of flavonoids isolated from seedling roots, hairy roots, and suspension root cell cultures of a model legume plant, Medicago truncatula. The analyses were conducted with plant isolates as well as the media. The LC/MS profiles of target natural products obtained from M. truncatula seedling roots, hairy roots, and suspension root cell cultures differed substantially. The most abundant compounds in seedlings roots were mono- and diglucuronides of isoflavones and/or flavones. This type of glycosylation was not observed in hairy roots or suspension root cell cultures. The only recognized glycoconjugates in the latter samples were glucose derivatives of isoflavones. Application of a high-resolution mass spectrometer helped evaluate the elemental composition of protonated molecules, such as [M + H](+). Comparison of collision-induced dissociation MS/MS spectra registered with a quadrupole time-of-flight analyzer for tissue extracts and standards allowed us to estimate the aglycone structure on the basis of the pseudo-MS(3) experiment. Structures of these natural products were described according to the registered mass spectra and literature data. The analyses conducted represent an overview of flavonoids and their conjugates in different types of plant material representing the model legume, M. truncatula. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11306-011-0287-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  12. Terminal Bacteroid Differentiation Is Associated With Variable Morphological Changes in Legume Species Belonging to the Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Jesús; Szűcs, Attila; Boboescu, Iulian Z; Gherman, Vasile D; Kondorosi, Éva; Kereszt, Attila

    2016-03-01

    Medicago and closely related legume species from the inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) impose terminal differentiation onto their bacterial endosymbionts, manifested in genome endoreduplication, cell enlargement, and loss of cell-division capacity. Nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) secreted host peptides are plant effectors of this process. As bacteroids in other IRLC legumes, such as Cicer arietinum and Glycyrrhiza lepidota, were reported not to display features of terminal differentiation, we investigated the fate of bacteroids in species from these genera as well as in four other species representing distinct genera of the phylogenetic tree for this clade. Bacteroids in all tested legumes proved to be larger in size and DNA content than cultured cells; however, the degree of cell elongation was rather variable in the different species. In addition, the reproductive ability of the bacteroids isolated from these legumes was remarkably reduced. In all IRLC species with available sequence data, the existence of NCR genes was found. These results indicate that IRLC legumes provoke terminal differentiation of their endosymbionts with different morphotypes, probably with the help of NCR peptides.

  13. CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE 7 modulates plant growth, reproduction, senescence, and determinate nodulation in the model legume Lotus japonicas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, J.; Novero, M.; Charnikhova, T.; Ferrandino, A.; Schubert, A.; Ruyter-Spira, C.P.; Biofante, P.; Lovisolo, C.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are newly identified hormones that regulate multiple aspects of plant development, infection by parasitic weeds, and mutualistic symbiosis in the roots. In this study, the role of SLs was studied for the first time in the model plant Lotus japonicus using transgenic lines silenc

  14. A Laser Dissection-RNAseq Analysis Highlights the Activation of Cytokinin Pathways by Nod Factors in the Medicago truncatula Root Epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Boivin, Stéphane; Rodde, Nathalie; Catrice, Olivier; Kisiala, Anna; Lepage, Agnes; Moreau, Sandra; Roux, Brice; Cottret, Ludovic; Sallet, Erika; Brault, Mathias; Emery, R J Neil; Gouzy, Jérôme; Frugier, Florian; Gamas, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Nod factors (NFs) are lipochitooligosaccharidic signal molecules produced by rhizobia, which play a key role in the rhizobium-legume symbiotic interaction. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression reprogramming induced by purified NF (4 and 24 h of treatment) in the root epidermis of the model legume Medicago truncatula Tissue-specific transcriptome analysis was achieved by laser-capture microdissection coupled to high-depth RNA sequencing. The expression of 17,191 genes was detected in the epidermis, among which 1,070 were found to be regulated by NF addition, including previously characterized NF-induced marker genes. Many genes exhibited strong levels of transcriptional activation, sometimes only transiently at 4 h, indicating highly dynamic regulation. Expression reprogramming affected a variety of cellular processes, including perception, signaling, regulation of gene expression, as well as cell wall, cytoskeleton, transport, metabolism, and defense, with numerous NF-induced genes never identified before. Strikingly, early epidermal activation of cytokinin (CK) pathways was indicated, based on the induction of CK metabolic and signaling genes, including the CRE1 receptor essential to promote nodulation. These transcriptional activations were independently validated using promoter:β-glucuronidase fusions with the MtCRE1 CK receptor gene and a CK response reporter (TWO COMPONENT SIGNALING SENSOR NEW). A CK pretreatment reduced the NF induction of the EARLY NODULIN11 (ENOD11) symbiotic marker, while a CK-degrading enzyme (CYTOKININ OXIDASE/DEHYDROGENASE3) ectopically expressed in the root epidermis led to increased NF induction of ENOD11 and nodulation. Therefore, CK may play both positive and negative roles in M. truncatula nodulation. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. A Sinorhizobium meliloti-specific N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal increases nodule numbers in Medicago truncatula independent of autoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Fabiola Veliz Vallejos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs act as quorum sensing signals that regulate cell-density dependent behaviors in many gram-negative bacteria, in particular those important for plant-microbe interactions. AHLs can also be recognized by plants, and this may influence their interactions with bacteria. Here we tested whether the exposure to AHLs affects the nodule-forming symbiosis between legume hosts and rhizobia. We treated roots of the model legume, Medicago truncatula, with a range of AHLs either from its specific symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, or from the potential pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Agrobacterium vitis. We found increased numbers of nodules formed on root systems treated with the S. meliloti-specific AHL, 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone, at a concentration of 1 μM, while the other AHLs did not result in significant changes to nodule numbers. We did not find any evidence for altered nodule invasion by the rhizobia. Quantification of flavonoids that could act as nod gene inducers in S. meliloti did not show any correlation with increased nodule numbers. The effects of AHLs were specific for an increase in nodule numbers, but not lateral root numbers or root length. Increased nodule numbers following 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone treatment were under control of autoregulation of nodulation and were still observed in the autoregulation mutant, sunn4 (super numeric nodules4. However, increases in nodule numbers by 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone were not found in the ethylene-insensitive sickle mutant. A comparison between M. truncatula with M. sativa (alfalfa and Trifolium repens (white clover showed that the observed effects of AHLs on nodule numbers were specific to M. truncatula, despite M. sativa nodulating with the same symbiont. We conclude that plant perception of the S. meliloti-specific 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone influences nodule numbers in M. truncatula via an ethylene-dependent, but autoregulation

  16. Queuosine biosynthesis is required for sinorhizobium meliloti-induced cytoskeletal modifications on HeLa Cells and symbiosis with Medicago truncatula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Marchetti

    Full Text Available Rhizobia are symbiotic soil bacteria able to intracellularly colonize legume nodule cells and form nitrogen-fixing symbiosomes therein. How the plant cell cytoskeleton reorganizes in response to rhizobium colonization has remained poorly understood especially because of the lack of an in vitro infection assay. Here, we report on the use of the heterologous HeLa cell model to experimentally tackle this question. We observed that the model rhizobium Sinorhizobium meliloti, and other rhizobia as well, were able to trigger a major reorganization of actin cytoskeleton of cultured HeLa cells in vitro. Cell deformation was associated with an inhibition of the three major small RhoGTPases Cdc42, RhoA and Rac1. Bacterial entry, cytoskeleton rearrangements and modulation of RhoGTPase activity required an intact S. meliloti biosynthetic pathway for queuosine, a hypermodifed nucleoside regulating protein translation through tRNA, and possibly mRNA, modification. We showed that an intact bacterial queuosine biosynthetic pathway was also required for effective nitrogen-fixing symbiosis of S. meliloti with its host plant Medicago truncatula, thus indicating that one or several key symbiotic functions of S. meliloti are under queuosine control. We discuss whether the symbiotic defect of que mutants may originate, at least in part, from an altered capacity to modify plant cell actin cytoskeleton.

  17. Queuosine biosynthesis is required for sinorhizobium meliloti-induced cytoskeletal modifications on HeLa Cells and symbiosis with Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Marta; Capela, Delphine; Poincloux, Renaud; Benmeradi, Nacer; Auriac, Marie-Christine; Le Ru, Aurélie; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Batut, Jacques; Masson-Boivin, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobia are symbiotic soil bacteria able to intracellularly colonize legume nodule cells and form nitrogen-fixing symbiosomes therein. How the plant cell cytoskeleton reorganizes in response to rhizobium colonization has remained poorly understood especially because of the lack of an in vitro infection assay. Here, we report on the use of the heterologous HeLa cell model to experimentally tackle this question. We observed that the model rhizobium Sinorhizobium meliloti, and other rhizobia as well, were able to trigger a major reorganization of actin cytoskeleton of cultured HeLa cells in vitro. Cell deformation was associated with an inhibition of the three major small RhoGTPases Cdc42, RhoA and Rac1. Bacterial entry, cytoskeleton rearrangements and modulation of RhoGTPase activity required an intact S. meliloti biosynthetic pathway for queuosine, a hypermodifed nucleoside regulating protein translation through tRNA, and possibly mRNA, modification. We showed that an intact bacterial queuosine biosynthetic pathway was also required for effective nitrogen-fixing symbiosis of S. meliloti with its host plant Medicago truncatula, thus indicating that one or several key symbiotic functions of S. meliloti are under queuosine control. We discuss whether the symbiotic defect of que mutants may originate, at least in part, from an altered capacity to modify plant cell actin cytoskeleton.

  18. The presence of nodules on legume root systems can alter phenotypic plasticity in response to internal nitrogen independent of nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Chooi-Hua; Nicotra, Adrienne B; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    All higher plants show developmental plasticity in response to the availability of nitrogen (N) in the soil. In legumes, N starvation causes the formation of root nodules, where symbiotic rhizobacteria fix atmospheric N2 for the host in exchange for fixed carbon (C) from the shoot. Here, we tested whether plastic responses to internal [N] of legumes are altered by their symbionts. Glasshouse experiments compared root phenotypes of three legumes, Medicago truncatula, Medicago sativa and Trifolium subterraneum, inoculated with their compatible symbiont partners and grown under four nitrate levels. In addition, six strains of rhizobia, differing in their ability to fix N2 in M. truncatula, were compared to test if plastic responses to internal [N] were dependent on the rhizobia or N2 -fixing capability of the nodules. We found that the presence of rhizobia affected phenotypic plasticity of the legumes to internal [N], particularly in root length and root mass ratio (RMR), in a plant species-dependent way. While root length responses of M. truncatula to internal [N] were dependent on the ability of rhizobial symbionts to fix N2 , RMR response to internal [N] was dependent only on initiation of nodules, irrespective of N2 -fixing ability of the rhizobia strains.

  19. THE POSSIBILITY OF LEGUMES PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glinushkin A.P.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Primary receptacles improve profitability legumes are limiting demonstrations and acts of plant diseases and pests. Pathogens are 25-50% lower yield of soybean, chickpea, beans, peas. Pests focally up to 87% of viable seeds sown reduce the number of plants per 1 ha. Only effective protection against disease and estimates of crop production can increase the average profitability of legume crops by 15-30%. Livestock is very important, but in the Southern Urals requires real support for its production with a positive balance (in the calculations with a deviation of 5%. The most important resource in our opinion may be a reduction in price of fodder. Thus, legumes are sought for animal protein. Soybeans, chickpeas, beans, peas universal culture and the possibility of their use in the food balance for a healthy diet of ordinary people engaged in recreational and other sports niche expands further improve the profitability of their production. Regulation of the balance of the distribution of food and feed produced grain legumes allows fine regulation of the cost of fodder for a particular type of livestock activities. Phytosanitary capabilities , the balance of influence of legumes on arable land, also requires a fine regulation of these processes. Obtaining long-term public support for this production is unlikely in the WTO because actual search for ways to improve the profitability of production of agricultural technologies. In our view, a comprehensive approach taking into account the capacity of local markets for crop production. Such activity can act as a guaranteed quality of agro-technology and animal products from local resources specific zonal conditions of production.

  20. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torreira, Eva [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Seabra, Ana Rita [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Llorca, Óscar [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Robinson, Carol V. [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Carvalho, Helena G. [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Fernández-Tornero, Carlos, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    The experimental models of dicotyledonous cytoplasmic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases unveil a conserved eukaryotic-type decameric architecture, with subtle structural differences in M. truncatula isoenzymes that account for their distinct herbicide resistance. The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  1. Multiple-purpose trees for pastoral farming in New Zealand: with emphasis on tree legumes. [Lucerne Tree: Medick Tree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, D.J.G.; Macfarlane, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    The potential for soil conservation and agroforestry of several native and exotic legumes is discussed. Flowering period, chemical composition of leaves/pods, hardiness to frost and drought, timber value, forage potential for livestock and bees, ornamental value and other products are tabulated with information on up to 38 species. Two low-growing species that have proved useful for slope stabilization as well as forage are tree lucerne (Cytisus palmensis) and tree medick (Medicago arborea), the latter being shrubby and more suitable for cold districts. Gleditsia triacanthos is recommended as a shade and fodder tree for farm pasture.

  2. The symbiotic transcription factor MtEFD and cytokinins are positively acting in the Medicago truncatula and Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Sandra; Fromentin, Justine; Vailleau, Fabienne; Vernié, Tatiana; Huguet, Stéphanie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Frugier, Florian; Gamas, Pascal; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise

    2014-03-01

    • A plant-microbe dual biological system was set up involving the model legume Medicago truncatula and two bacteria, the soil-borne root pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and the beneficial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. • Comparison of transcriptomes under symbiotic and pathogenic conditions highlighted the transcription factor MtEFD (Ethylene response Factor required for nodule Differentiation) as being upregulated in both interactions, together with a set of cytokinin-related transcripts involved in metabolism, signaling and response. MtRR4 (Response Regulator), a cytokinin primary response gene negatively regulating cytokinin signaling and known as a target of MtEFD in nodulation processes, was retrieved in this set of transcripts. • Refined studies of MtEFD and MtRR4 expression during M. truncatula and R. solanacearum interaction indicated differential kinetics of induction and requirement of central regulators of bacterial pathogenicity, HrpG and HrpB. Similar to MtRR4, MtEFD upregulation during the pathogenic interaction was dependent on cytokinin perception mediated by the MtCRE1 (Cytokinin REsponse 1) receptor. • The use of M. truncatula efd-1 and cre1-1 mutants evidenced MtEFD and cytokinin perception as positive factors for bacterial wilt development. These factors therefore play an important role in both root nodulation and root disease development.

  3. An unusual abscisic acid and gibberellic acid synergism increases somatic embryogenesis, facilitates its genetic analysis and improves transformation in Medicago truncatula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim E Nolan

    Full Text Available Somatic embryogenesis (SE can be readily induced in leaf explants of the Jemalong 2HA genotype of the model legume Medicago truncatula by auxin and cytokinin, but rarely in wild-type Jemalong. Gibberellic acid (GA, a hormone not included in the medium, appears to act in Arabidopsis as a repressor of the embryonic state such that low ABA (abscisic acid: GA ratios will inhibit SE. It was important to evaluate the GA effect in M. truncatula in order to formulate generic SE mechanisms, given the Arabidopsis information. It was surprising to find that low ABA:GA ratios in M. truncatula acted synergistically to stimulate SE. The unusual synergism between GA and ABA in inducing SE has utility in improving SE for regeneration and transformation in M. truncatula. Expression of genes previously shown to be important in M. truncatula SE was not increased. In investigating genes previously studied in GA investigations of Arabidopsis SE, there was increased expression of GA2ox and decreased expression of PICKLE, a negative regulator of SE in Arabidopsis. We suggest that in M. truncatula there are different ABA:GA ratios required for down-regulating the PICKLE gene, a repressor of the embryonic state. In M. truncatula it is a low ABA:GA ratio while in Arabidopsis it is a high ABA:GA ratio. In different species the expression of key genes is probably related to differences in how the hormone networks optimise their expression.

  4. Transcriptomic Analysis of Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago truncatula Symbiosis Using Nitrogen Fixation-Deficient Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Claus; Long, Sharon R

    2015-08-01

    The bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti interacts symbiotically with legume plant hosts such as Medicago truncatula to form nitrogen-fixing root nodules. During symbiosis, plant and bacterial cells differentiate in a coordinated manner, resulting in specialized plant cells that contain nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Both plant and bacterial genes are required at each developmental stage of symbiosis. We analyzed gene expression in nodules formed by wild-type bacteria on six plant mutants with defects in nitrogen fixation. We observed differential expression of 482 S. meliloti genes with functions in cell envelope homeostasis, cell division, stress response, energy metabolism, and nitrogen fixation. We simultaneously analyzed gene expression in M. truncatula and observed differential regulation of host processes that may trigger bacteroid differentiation and control bacterial infection. Our analyses of developmentally arrested plant mutants indicate that plants use distinct means to control bacterial infection during early and late symbiotic stages.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of homeobox gene family in legumes: identification, gene duplication and expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Annapurna; Ghangal, Rajesh; Garg, Rohini; Jain, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode transcription factors that are known to play a major role in different aspects of plant growth and development. In the present study, we identified homeobox genes belonging to 14 different classes in five legume species, including chickpea, soybean, Medicago, Lotus and pigeonpea. The characteristic differences within homeodomain sequences among various classes of homeobox gene family were quite evident. Genome-wide expression analysis using publicly available datasets (RNA-seq and microarray) indicated that homeobox genes are differentially expressed in various tissues/developmental stages and under stress conditions in different legumes. We validated the differential expression of selected chickpea homeobox genes via quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Genome duplication analysis in soybean indicated that segmental duplication has significantly contributed in the expansion of homeobox gene family. The Ka/Ks ratio of duplicated homeobox genes in soybean showed that several members of this family have undergone purifying selection. Moreover, expression profiling indicated that duplicated genes might have been retained due to sub-functionalization. The genome-wide identification and comprehensive gene expression profiling of homeobox gene family members in legumes will provide opportunities for functional analysis to unravel their exact role in plant growth and development.

  6. Drought and Recovery: Independently Regulated Processes Highlighting the Importance of Protein Turnover Dynamics and Translational Regulation in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, David; Castillejo, Maria Angeles; Mehmeti-Tershani, Vlora; Staudinger, Christiana; Kleemaier, Christoph; Wienkoop, Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    Climate change in conjunction with population growth necessitates a systems biology approach to characterize plant drought acclimation as well as a more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stress recovery. Plants are exposed to a continuously changing environment. Extremes such as several weeks of drought are followed by rain. This requires a molecular plasticity of the plant enabling drought acclimation and the necessity of deacclimation processes for recovery and continuous growth.During drought stress and subsequent recovery, the metabolome and proteome are regulated through a sequence of molecular processes including synthesis and degradation and molecular interaction networks are part of this regulatory process. In order to study this complex regulatory network, a comprehensive analysis is presented for the first time, investigating protein turnover and regulatory classes of proteins and metabolites during a stress recovery scenario in the model legume Medicago truncatula The data give novel insights into the molecular capacity and differential processes required for acclimation and deacclimation of severe drought stressed plants.Functional cluster and network analyses unraveled independent regulatory mechanisms for stress and recovery with different dynamic phases that during the course of recovery define the plants deacclimation from stress. The combination of relative abundance levels and turnover analysis revealed an early transition phase that seems key for recovery initiation through water resupply and is independent from renutrition. Thus, a first indication for a metabolite and protein-based load capacity was observed necessary for the recovery from drought, an important but thus far ignored possible feature toward tolerance. The data indicate that apart from the plants molecular stress response mechanisms, plasticity may be related to the nutritional status of the plant prior to stress initiation. A new perspective and possible new

  7. Selective recruitment of mRNAs and miRNAs to polyribosomes in response to rhizobia infection in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso, Mauricio Alberto; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Crespi, Martín; Zanetti, María Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Translation of mRNAs is a key regulatory step that contributes to the coordination and modulation of eukaryotic gene expression during development or adaptation to the environment. mRNA stability or translatability can be regulated by the action of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs), which control diverse biological processes. Under low nitrogen conditions, leguminous plants associate with soil bacteria and develop a new organ specialized in nitrogen fixation: the nodule. To gain insight into the translational regulation of mRNAs during nodule formation, the association of mRNAs and sRNAs to polysomes was characterized in roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula during the symbiotic interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti. Quantitative comparison of steady-state and polysomal mRNAs for 15 genes involved in nodulation identified a group of transcripts with slight or no change in total cellular abundance that were significantly upregulated at the level of association with polysomes in response to rhizobia. This group included mRNAs encoding receptors like kinases required either for nodule organogenesis, bacterial infection or both, and transcripts encoding GRAS and NF-Y transcription factors (TFs). Quantitative analysis of sRNAs in total and polysomal RNA samples revealed that mature microRNAs (miRNAs) were associated with the translational machinery, notably, miR169 and miR172, which target the NF-YA/HAP2 and AP2 TFs, respectively. Upon inoculation, levels of miR169 pronouncedly decreased in polysomal complexes, concomitant with the increased accumulation of the NF-YA/HAP2 protein. These results indicate that both mRNAs and miRNAs are subject to differential recruitment to polysomes, and expose the importance of selective mRNA translation during root nodule symbiosis.

  8. Both plant and bacterial nitrate reductases contribute to nitric oxide production in Medicago truncatula nitrogen-fixing nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horchani, Faouzi; Prévot, Marianne; Boscari, Alexandre; Evangelisti, Edouard; Meilhoc, Eliane; Bruand, Claude; Raymond, Philippe; Boncompagni, Eric; Aschi-Smiti, Samira; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud

    2011-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling and defense molecule of major importance in living organisms. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, NO production has been detected in the nitrogen fixation zone of the nodule, but the systems responsible for its synthesis are yet unknown and its role in symbiosis is far from being elucidated. In this work, using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we explored the enzymatic source of NO production in M. truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti nodules under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. When transferred from normoxia to hypoxia, nodule NO production was rapidly increased, indicating that NO production capacity is present in functioning nodules and may be promptly up-regulated in response to decreased oxygen availability. Contrary to roots and leaves, nodule NO production was stimulated by nitrate and nitrite and inhibited by tungstate, a nitrate reductase inhibitor. Nodules obtained with either plant nitrate reductase RNA interference double knockdown (MtNR1/2) or bacterial nitrate reductase-deficient (napA) and nitrite reductase-deficient (nirK) mutants, or both, exhibited reduced nitrate or nitrite reductase activities and NO production levels. Moreover, NO production in nodules was found to be inhibited by electron transfer chain inhibitors, and nodule energy state (ATP-ADP ratio) was significantly reduced when nodules were incubated in the presence of tungstate. Our data indicate that both plant and bacterial nitrate reductase and electron transfer chains are involved in NO synthesis. We propose the existence of a nitrate-NO respiration process in nodules that could play a role in the maintenance of the energy status required for nitrogen fixation under oxygen-limiting conditions.

  9. Responses of lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) and rhizobia to copper-based fungicide application in two contrasting soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Martin; Dober, Melanie; Jöchlinger, Lisa; Keiblinger, Katharina; Soja, Gerhard; Mentler, Axel; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Bruckner, Alexander; Golestani Fard, Alireza; Wenzel, Walter; Zehetner, Franz

    2016-04-01

    For more than 120 years, salts of copper (Cu) have been used in viticulture to prevent damages by fungal diseases. Due to restrictions in the use of synthetic fungicides and mineral fertilizers, organic viticulture depends on Cu as well as on biological nitrogen fixation. Here, we conducted an eco-toxicological pot experiment with an acidic, sandy soil and a calcareous, loamy soil and incrementally increasing fungicide application rates from 0 to 5000 mg Cu kg-1 soil. Lucerne (Medicago sativa L. cultivar. Plato) was grown in the pots for 3 months under greenhouse conditions. Acetylene reduction assays performed with harvested nodules showed no response to elevated soil Cu concentrations indicating that the nitrogen fixing capacity of rhizobia was not compromised by Cu in our experiment. Nevertheless, the nodule biomass was very sensitive to Cu and strongly decreased due to reduced amounts of fine roots and less energy supply by the plant. Legumes are known to be Cu-sensitive, and our contribution also showed a decrease in harvest by 50 % (EC50) at 21 mg kg-1 plant Cu tissue concentration in the acidic soil and at 30 mg kg-1 in the calcareous soil. This corresponded to diffusional fluxes measured by diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) of 202 and 368 fmol cm-2 s-1, respectively. DGT measurements showed that in the acidic soil, Cu was 2 to 10 times more available for plants, depending on the concentration applied, than in the calcareous soil. A modeling approach for estimating the effective concentration (EC) by including the DGT-estimated plant Cu content and the pH produced more accurate values (NRMSE of 21.9 to 20.1 %) than EC directly estimated from DGT.

  10. Cloning and Characterization of a Novel Purple Acid Phosphatase Gene (MtPAP1) from Medicago truncatula Barrel Medic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A novel purple acid phosphatase gene (MtPAP1) was isolated from the model legume Medicago truncatula Barrel Medic. The cDNA was 1 698 bp in length with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1 398 bp capable of encoding an N-terminal signal peptide of 23 amino acids. The transcripts of MtPAP1 were mainly detected in leaves under high-phosphate conditions, whereas under low-phosphate conditions the transcript level was reduced in leaves and increased in roots, with the strongest hybridization signal detected in roots. A chimeric gene construct fusing MtPAP1 and GFPwas made in which the fusion was driven by the CaMV35S promoter. Transgenlc Arabidopsis plants carrying the chimeric gene constructs showed that the fusion protein was mainly located at the apoplast based on confocal microscopic analysis, showing that MtPAP1 could be secreted to the outside of the cell directed by the signal peptide at the N-terminal. The coding region of MtPAP1 without signal peptide was inserted into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-30a (+) and overexpressed in Escherlchia coll BL21(DE3). The acid phosphatase (APase) proteins extracted from bacterial culture were found largely based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. An enzyme activity assay demonstrated that the APase activity in the transformed bacteria was 3.16-fold higher than that of control. The results imply that MtPAP1 functions to improve phosphorus acquisition in plants under conditions of phosphorus (P) stress.

  11. Expression of coordinately regulated defence response genes and analysis of their role in disease resistance in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samac, Deborah A; Peñuela, Silvia; Schnurr, Judy A; Hunt, E Nicole; Foster-Hartnett, Dawn; Vandenbosch, Kathryn A; Gantt, J Stephen

    2011-10-01

    Microarray technology was used to identify the genes associated with disease defence responses in the model legume Medicago truncatula. Transcript profiles from M. truncatula cv. Jemalong genotype A17 leaves inoculated with Colletotrichum trifolii and Erysiphe pisi and roots infected with Phytophthora medicaginis were compared to identify the genes expressed in response to all three pathogens and genes unique to an interaction. The A17 genotype is resistant to C. trifolii and E. pisi, exhibiting a hypersensitive response after inoculation, and is moderately susceptible to P. medicaginis. Among the most strongly up-regulated genes in all three interactions were those encoding a hevein-like protein, thaumatin-like protein (TLP) and members of the pathogenesis response (PR)10 family. Transcripts of genes for enzymes in the phenylpropanoid pathway leading to the production of isoflavonoid phytoalexins increased dramatically in response to inoculation with the foliar pathogens. In P. medicaginis-inoculated roots, transcripts of genes in the phenylpropanoid pathway peaked at 5 days post-inoculation, when symptoms became visible. Transcript accumulation of three PR10 family members, a TLP and chalcone synthase (CHS) was assessed in M. truncatula genotype R108 plants. The R108 plants are resistant to C. trifolii and moderately susceptible to E. pisi and P. medicaginis. Transcript accumulation paralleled the stages of pathogen development. To evaluate the role of a TLP, a PR10 family member and CHS in disease resistance, transgenic R108 plants containing interfering RNA (RNAi) constructs were produced. Reduced expression of PR10 and TLP had no effect on the disease phenotype, whereas reduced expression of CHS resulted in increased susceptibility to necrotrophic pathogens. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2011 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD. NO CLAIM TO ORIGINAL US GOVERNMENT WORKS.

  12. Bradyrhizobium BclA Is a Peptide Transporter Required for Bacterial Differentiation in Symbiosis with Aeschynomene Legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Pierre, Olivier; Timchenko, Tatiana; Alunni, Benoît; Barrière, Quentin; Czernic, Pierre; Villaécija-Aguilar, José-Antonio; Verly, Camille; Bourge, Mickaël; Fardoux, Joël; Mars, Mohamed; Kondorosi, Eva; Giraud, Eric; Mergaert, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Nodules of legume plants are highly integrated symbiotic systems shaped by millions of years of evolution. They harbor nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria called bacteroids. Several legume species produce peptides called nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides in the symbiotic nodule cells which house the bacteroids. NCR peptides are related to antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity. They induce the endosymbionts into a differentiated, enlarged, and polyploid state. The bacterial symbionts, on their side, evolved functions for the response to the NCR peptides. Here, we identified the bclA gene of Bradyrhizobium sp. strains ORS278 and ORS285, which is required for the formation of differentiated and functional bacteroids in the nodules of the NCR peptide-producing Aeschynomene legumes. The BclA ABC transporter promotes the import of NCR peptides and provides protection against the antimicrobial activity of these peptides. Moreover, BclA can complement the role of the related BacA transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti, which has a similar symbiotic function in the interaction with Medicago legumes.

  13. Grain legumes in organic cropping systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, Dr. Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Grain legumes are valuable protein and energy sources in animal feeds and in human diets low in meat. Furthermore, grain legumes strongly benefit the cropping system, via biological fixation of atmospheric N2 - a fundamental process for maintaining soil fertility in organic farming systems. Other positive effects in the crop rotations are recycled N-rich crop residues and the break-crop effect in cereals-rich rotations. However, yield variability in grain legumes is well known and related to...

  14. Molecular basis of lipo-chitooligosaccharide recognition by the lysin motif receptor-like kinase LYR3 in legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, Nikita; Fliegmann, Judith; Rosenberg, Charles; Gasciolli, Virginie; Timmers, Antonius C J; Nurisso, Alessandra; Cullimore, Julie; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2016-05-15

    LYR3 [LysM (lysin motif) receptor-like kinase 3] of Medicago truncatula is a high-affinity binding protein for symbiotic LCO (lipo-chitooligosaccharide) signals, produced by rhizobia bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. The present study shows that LYR3 from several other legumes, but not from two Lupinus species which are incapable of forming the mycorrhizal symbiosis, bind LCOs with high affinity and discriminate them from COs (chitooligosaccharides). The biodiversity of these proteins and the lack of binding to the Lupinus proteins were used to identify features required for high-affinity LCO binding. Swapping experiments between each of the three LysMs of the extracellular domain of the M. truncatula and Lupinus angustifolius LYR3 proteins revealed the crucial role of the third LysM in LCO binding. Site-directed mutagenesis identified a tyrosine residue, highly conserved in all LYR3 LCO-binding proteins, which is essential for high-affinity binding. Molecular modelling suggests that it may be part of a hydrophobic tunnel able to accommodate the LCO acyl chain. The lack of conservation of these features in the binding site of plant LysM proteins binding COs provides a mechanistic explanation of how LCO recognition might differ from CO perception by structurally related LysM receptors. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. A nitrogen-dependent switch in the high affinity ammonium transport in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Daniel; Ludewig, Uwe; Neuhäuser, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Ammonium transporters (AMTs) are crucial for the high affinity primary uptake and translocation of ammonium in plants. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, the genomic set of AMT-type ammonium transporters comprises eight members. Only four genes were abundantly expressed in young seedlings, both in roots and shoots. While the expression of all AMTs in the shoot was not affected by the nitrogen availability, the dominating MtAMT1;1 gene was repressed by nitrogen in roots, despite that cellular nitrogen concentrations were far above deficiency levels. A contrasting de-repression by nitrogen was observed for MtAMT1;4 and MtAMT2;1, which were both expressed at intermediate level. Weak expression was found for MtAMT1;2 and MtAMT2;3, while the other AMTs were not detected in young seedlings. When expressed from their endogenous promoters, translational fusion proteins of MtAMT1;1 and MtAMT2;1 with green fluorescent protein were co-localized in the plasma membrane of rhizodermal cells, but also detected in cortical root layers. Both transporter proteins similarly functionally complemented a yeast strain that is deficient in high affinity ammonium transport, both at acidic and neutral pH. The uptake into yeast mediated by these transporters saturated with Km AMT1;1 = 89 µM and Km AMT2;1 = 123 µM, respectively. When expressed in oocytes, MtAMT1;1 mediated much larger (15)N-ammonium uptake than MtAMT2;1, but NH4 (+) currents were only recorded for MtAMT1;1. These currents saturated with a voltage-dependent Km = 90 µM at -80 mV. The cellular localization and regulation of the AMTs suggests that MtAMT1;1 encodes the major high affinity ammonium transporter gene in low nitrogen grown young M. truncatula roots and despite the similar localization and substrate affinity, MtAMT2;1 appears functionally distinct and more important at higher nitrogen supply.

  16. Exploring the plant-associated bacterial communities in Medicago sativa L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pini Francesco

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant-associated bacterial communities caught the attention of several investigators which study the relationships between plants and soil and the potential application of selected bacterial species in crop improvement and protection. Medicago sativa L. is a legume crop of high economic importance as forage in temperate areas and one of the most popular model plants for investigations on the symbiosis with nitrogen fixing rhizobia (mainly belonging to the alphaproteobacterial species Sinorhizobium meliloti. However, despite its importance, no studies have been carried out looking at the total bacterial community associated with the plant. In this work we explored for the first time the total bacterial community associated with M. sativa plants grown in mesocosms conditions, looking at a wide taxonomic spectrum, from the class to the single species (S. meliloti level. Results Results, obtained by using Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP analysis, quantitative PCR and sequencing of 16 S rRNA gene libraries, showed a high taxonomic diversity as well as a dominance by members of the class Alphaproteobacteria in plant tissues. Within Alphaproteobacteria the families Sphingomonadaceae and Methylobacteriaceae were abundant inside plant tissues, while soil Alphaproteobacteria were represented by the families of Hyphomicrobiaceae, Methylocystaceae, Bradyirhizobiaceae and Caulobacteraceae. At the single species level, we were able to detect the presence of S. meliloti populations in aerial tissues, nodules and soil. An analysis of population diversity on nodules and soil showed a relatively low sharing of haplotypes (30-40% between the two environments and between replicate mesocosms, suggesting drift as main force shaping S. meliloti population at least in this system. Conclusions In this work we shed some light on the bacterial communities associated with M. sativa plants, showing that Alphaproteobacteria may

  17. Genome-Wide Association Mapping and Genomic Selection for Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) Forage Quality Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecetti, Luciano; Brummer, E. Charles; Palmonari, Alberto; Tava, Aldo

    2017-01-01

    Genetic progress for forage quality has been poor in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), the most-grown forage legume worldwide. This study aimed at exploring opportunities for marker-assisted selection (MAS) and genomic selection of forage quality traits based on breeding values of parent plants. Some 154 genotypes from a broadly-based reference population were genotyped by genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), and phenotyped for leaf-to-stem ratio, leaf and stem contents of protein, neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent lignin (ADL), and leaf and stem NDF digestibility after 24 hours (NDFD), of their dense-planted half-sib progenies in three growing conditions (summer harvest, full irrigation; summer harvest, suspended irrigation; autumn harvest). Trait-marker analyses were performed on progeny values averaged over conditions, owing to modest germplasm × condition interaction. Genomic selection exploited 11,450 polymorphic SNP markers, whereas a subset of 8,494 M. truncatula-aligned markers were used for a genome-wide association study (GWAS). GWAS confirmed the polygenic control of quality traits and, in agreement with phenotypic correlations, indicated substantially different genetic control of a given trait in stems and leaves. It detected several SNPs in different annotated genes that were highly linked to stem protein content. Also, it identified a small genomic region on chromosome 8 with high concentration of annotated genes associated with leaf ADL, including one gene probably involved in the lignin pathway. Three genomic selection models, i.e., Ridge-regression BLUP, Bayes B and Bayesian Lasso, displayed similar prediction accuracy, whereas SVR-lin was less accurate. Accuracy values were moderate (0.3–0.4) for stem NDFD and leaf protein content, modest for leaf ADL and NDFD, and low to very low for the other traits. Along with previous results for the same germplasm set, this study indicates that GBS data can be exploited to improve both quality traits

  18. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of Salt Adaptation in Roots of Contrasting Medicago truncatula Genotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ons Zahaf; Anouck Diet; Mounawer Badri; Ana Zabalza; Esther M.González; Hervé Delacroix; Véronique Gruber; Florian Frugier; Martin Crespi; Sandrine Blanchet; Axel de Zélicourt; Beno(i)t Alunni; Julie Plet; Carole Laffont; Laura de Lorenzo; Sandrine Imbeaud; Jean-Laurent Ichanté

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary diversity can be driven by the interaction of plants with different environments.Molecular bases involved in ecological adaptations to abiotic constraints can be explored using genomic tools.Legumes are major crops worldwide and soil salinity is a main stress affecting yield in these plants.We analyzed in the Medicago truncatula legume the root transcriptome of two genotypes having contrasting responses to salt stress:TN1.11,sampled in a salty Tunisian soil,and the reference Jemalong A17 genotype.TN1.11 plants show increased root growth under salt stress as well as a differential accumulation of sodium ions when compared to A17.Transcriptomic analysis revealed specific gene clusters preferentially regulated by salt in root apices of TN1.11,notably those related to the auxin pathway and to changes in histone variant isoforms.Many genes encoding transcription factors (TFs) were also differentially regulated between the two genotypes in response to salt.Among those selected for functional studies,overexpression in roots of the A17 genotype of the bHLH-type TF most differentially regulated between genotypes improved significantly root growth under salt stress.Despite the global complexity of the differential transcriptional responses,we propose that an increase in this bHLH TF expression may be linked to the adaptation of M.truncatula to saline soil environments.

  19. Yield and nutritive quality of forage legumes on reclaimed surface mined land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditsch, D.C.; Collins, M. [University of Kentucky, Quicksand, KY (United States). Robinson Experiment Station

    1998-07-01

    Legumes are important in the long-term nitrogen economy of surface mined lands and for establishing and maintaining quality livestock forage. Little information is available to reclamation specialists for use in selection of forage legume species based on productivity potential, persistence and nutritive quality for livestock. A study was initiated at two sites in the Appalachian coal fields of Kentucky to evaluate monocultures of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.) under management regimes suitable for livestock production. Legumes were harvested at the early bloom stage throughout the growing season for dry matter (DM) yield determination. Forage quality was determined by measuring crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), cellulose (CEL) and acid detergent lignin (ADL). High DM yields were produced by all species during the first production season (range 6.2-9.2 Mg ha{sup -1}) but yields of all species declined rapidly by year three. Birdsfoot trefoil demonstrated slightly greater drought tolerance during mid-season (July/August) than alfalfa and red clover. With the exception of site {number_sign}1 in 1992 (4 harvests), no more than 3 harvests were made during a single growing season. Crude protein concentration of these forage legumes was found to be within the range commonly measured on undisturbed lands. However, high NDF and ADF values were observed above those reported by others for the same species. These results indicate that it may be difficult to maintain a high level of productivity throughout the five-year bonding period under hay management. Management practices such as summer stockpiling may be necessary to compensate for the rapid and wide fluctuations in DM yield and quality due to low water-holding capacity of mine spoils. 15 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Effects of Shade on Nitrogen and Phosphorus Acquisition in Cereal-Legume Intercropping Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marney E. Isaac

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing economic and environmental costs associated with fertilizer use, the need for low-input agroecological systems is on the rise. It is well documented that intercropping legumes can increase the supply of nutrients, through N2-fixation and P mobilization. Concurrently, the integration of trees in the agricultural landscape shows increasing evidence of nutrient inputs through efficient biogeochemical cycles. However, little is known about the effects shade has on legume-crop performance. This research aims to determine whether intercropping of the legumes soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. and alfalfa (Medicago sativa with wheat (Triticum turgidum durum is beneficial for performance, particularly under shady conditions associated with tree-based intercropping. Test species were cultivated in hydroponics with a broad nutrient solution and steady state addition of N for 3 weeks. Individual plants were transferred to rhizoboxes with a 2 mm zone of soil for 16 days under (i full sun or (ii shade to mimic light levels at the tree-crop interface. Under monocropping, shading was found to significantly decrease wheat biomass. Intercropping wheat with alfalfa under full sun had no negative effect on growth but did increase wheat P uptake as compared to monocropped wheat. In contrast, intercropping wheat with soybean under full sun decreased wheat biomass, suggesting competition. However, under shade, this competitive effect was mitigated, as wheat exhibited similar biomass and higher N and P shoot concentration when associated with soybean as compared to monocropped wheat under lower light levels. This effect may be attributed to reduced biomass of soybean combined with higher soybean N2-fixation under shade. Legume-based intercrops may increase nutrient supply and growth but these beneficial effects will be dependent on matching species selection to light levels under tree-based intercropping.

  1. The role of the testa during development and in establishment of dormancy of the legume seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smýkal, Petr; Vernoud, Vanessa; Blair, Matthew W.; Soukup, Aleš; Thompson, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Timing of seed germination is one of the key steps in plant life cycles. It determines the beginning of plant growth in natural or agricultural ecosystems. In the wild, many seeds exhibit dormancy and will only germinate after exposure to certain environmental conditions. In contrast, crop seeds germinate as soon as they are imbibed usually at planting time. These domestication-triggered changes represent adaptations to cultivation and human harvesting. Germination is one of the common sets of traits recorded in different crops and termed the “domestication syndrome.” Moreover, legume seed imbibition has a crucial role in cooking properties. Different seed dormancy classes exist among plant species. Physical dormancy (often called hardseededness), as found in legumes, involves the development of a water-impermeable seed coat, caused by the presence of phenolics- and suberin-impregnated layers of palisade cells. The dormancy release mechanism primarily involves seed responses to temperature changes in the habitat, resulting in testa permeability to water. The underlying genetic controls in legumes have not been identified yet. However, positive correlation was shown between phenolics content (e.g., pigmentation), the requirement for oxidation and the activity of catechol oxidase in relation to pea seed dormancy, while epicatechin levels showed a significant positive correlation with soybean hardseededness. myeloblastosis family of transcription factors, WD40 proteins and enzymes of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway were involved in seed testa color in soybean, pea and Medicago, but were not tested directly in relation to seed dormancy. These phenolic compounds play important roles in defense against pathogens, as well as affecting the nutritional quality of products, and because of their health benefits, they are of industrial and medicinal interest. In this review, we discuss the role of the testa in mediating legume seed germination, with a focus on

  2. The role of the testa during development and in establishment of dormancy of the legume seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr eSmýkal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Timing of seed germination is one of the key steps in plant life cycles. It determines the beginning of plant growth in natural or agricultural ecosystems. In the wild, many seeds exhibit dormancy and will only germinate after exposure to certain environmental conditions. In contrast, crop seeds germinate as soon as they are imbibed usually at planting time. These domestication-triggered changes represent adaptations to cultivation and human harvesting. Germination is one of the common sets of traits recorded in different crops and termed the domestication syndrome. Moreover, legume seed imbibition has a crucial role in cooking properties. Different seed dormancy classes exist among plant species. Physical dormancy (often called hardseededness, as found in legumes, involves the development of a water-impermeable seed coat, caused by the presence of phenolics- and suberin-impregnated layers of palisade cells. The dormancy release mechanism primarily involves seed responses to temperature changes in the habitat, resulting in testa permeability to water. The underlying genetic controls in legumes have not been identified yet. However, positive correlation was shown between phenolics content (e.g., pigmentation, the requirement for oxidation and the activity of catechol oxidase in relation to pea seed dormancy, while epicatechin levels showed a significant positive correlation with soybean hardseededness. MYB transcription factors, WD40 proteins and enzymes of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway were involved in seed testa colour in soybean, pea and Medicago, but were not tested directly in relation to seed dormancy. These phenolic compounds play important roles in defence against pathogens, as well as affecting the nutritional quality of products, and because of their health benefits, they are of industrial and medicinal interest. In this review, we discuss the role of the testa in mediating legume seed germination, with a focus on structural and

  3. Determination of Nutrient Contents and Gas Production Values of Some Legume Forages Grown in the Harran Plain Saline Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boga

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the nutritive value of some legume species in salt-affected soils of South-East Anatolian region using chemical composition and in vitro gas production kinetics. In this study, Lotus corniculatus, Trifolium alexandrinum, Medicago sativa were sown and tested in four different locations. A 3 by 4 factorial design with 3 legume species and 4 salt levels (non salty electrical conductivity (ECECECEC was used in the study. Results indicated that salinity and plants had no significant effect on ash and ether extract. Dry matter (DM, acid detergent fiber, digestible dry matter, dry matter intake (DMI were affected by plant, salinity and plant×salinity interaction. On the other hand neutral detergent fiber, relative feed value (RFV, and DMI were affected by salinity and plant×salinity interaction. Mineral contents were affected by plant species, salinity and salinity×plants interactions. In vitro gas production, their kinetics and estimated parameters such as were not affected by salinity whereas the gas production up to 48 h, organic matter digestibility, metabolizable energy (ME, and net energy lactation (NEL were affected by plant and plant×salt interaction. Generally RFVs of all species ranged from 120 to 210 and were quite satisfactory in salty conditions. Current results show that the feed value of Medicago sativa is higher compared to Lotus corniculatus and Trifolium alexandrinum.

  4. Utilization of summer legumes as bioenergy feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunn hemp (Crotolaria juncea), is a fast growing, high biomass yielding tropical legume that may be a possible southeastern bioenergy crop. When comparing this legume to a commonly grown summer legume—cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata), sunn hemp was superior in biomass yield and subsequent energy yield. S...

  5. Cycling of grain legume residue nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes is the main input of nitrogen in ecological agriculture. The cycling of N-15-labelled mature pea (Pisum sativum L.) residues was studied during three years in small field plots and lysimeters. The residual organic labelled N declined rapidly during the initial...... management methods in order to conserve grain legume residue N sources within the soil-plant system....

  6. Convergent Evolution of Endosymbiont Differentiation in Dalbergioid and Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade Legumes Mediated by Nodule-Specific Cysteine-Rich Peptides1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czernic, Pierre; Gully, Djamel; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Moulin, Lionel; Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Patrel, Delphine; Pierre, Olivier; Fardoux, Joël; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Nguyen, Phuong; Gressent, Frédéric; Da Silva, Corinne; Poulain, Julie; Wincker, Patrick; Rofidal, Valérie; Hem, Sonia; Barrière, Quentin; Arrighi, Jean-François; Mergaert, Peter; Giraud, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional symbiotic interactions require the housing of large numbers of microbial symbionts, which produce essential compounds for the growth of the host. In the legume-rhizobium nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, thousands of rhizobium microsymbionts, called bacteroids, are confined intracellularly within highly specialized symbiotic host cells. In Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade (IRLC) legumes such as Medicago spp., the bacteroids are kept under control by an arsenal of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, which induce the bacteria in an irreversible, strongly elongated, and polyploid state. Here, we show that in Aeschynomene spp. legumes belonging to the more ancient Dalbergioid lineage, bacteroids are elongated or spherical depending on the Aeschynomene spp. and that these bacteroids are terminally differentiated and polyploid, similar to bacteroids in IRLC legumes. Transcriptome, in situ hybridization, and proteome analyses demonstrated that the symbiotic cells in the Aeschynomene spp. nodules produce a large diversity of NCR-like peptides, which are transported to the bacteroids. Blocking NCR transport by RNA interference-mediated inactivation of the secretory pathway inhibits bacteroid differentiation. Together, our results support the view that bacteroid differentiation in the Dalbergioid clade, which likely evolved independently from the bacteroid differentiation in the IRLC clade, is based on very similar mechanisms used by IRLC legumes. PMID:26286718

  7. Convergent Evolution of Endosymbiont Differentiation in Dalbergioid and Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade Legumes Mediated by Nodule-Specific Cysteine-Rich Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czernic, Pierre; Gully, Djamel; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Moulin, Lionel; Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Patrel, Delphine; Pierre, Olivier; Fardoux, Joël; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Nguyen, Phuong; Gressent, Frédéric; Da Silva, Corinne; Poulain, Julie; Wincker, Patrick; Rofidal, Valérie; Hem, Sonia; Barrière, Quentin; Arrighi, Jean-François; Mergaert, Peter; Giraud, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Nutritional symbiotic interactions require the housing of large numbers of microbial symbionts, which produce essential compounds for the growth of the host. In the legume-rhizobium nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, thousands of rhizobium microsymbionts, called bacteroids, are confined intracellularly within highly specialized symbiotic host cells. In Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade (IRLC) legumes such as Medicago spp., the bacteroids are kept under control by an arsenal of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, which induce the bacteria in an irreversible, strongly elongated, and polyploid state. Here, we show that in Aeschynomene spp. legumes belonging to the more ancient Dalbergioid lineage, bacteroids are elongated or spherical depending on the Aeschynomene spp. and that these bacteroids are terminally differentiated and polyploid, similar to bacteroids in IRLC legumes. Transcriptome, in situ hybridization, and proteome analyses demonstrated that the symbiotic cells in the Aeschynomene spp. nodules produce a large diversity of NCR-like peptides, which are transported to the bacteroids. Blocking NCR transport by RNA interference-mediated inactivation of the secretory pathway inhibits bacteroid differentiation. Together, our results support the view that bacteroid differentiation in the Dalbergioid clade, which likely evolved independently from the bacteroid differentiation in the IRLC clade, is based on very similar mechanisms used by IRLC legumes.

  8. Characterisation of the legume SERK-NIK gene superfamily including splice variants: Implications for development and defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Ray J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (SERK genes are part of the regulation of diverse signalling events in plants. Current evidence shows SERK proteins function both in developmental and defence signalling pathways, which occur in response to both peptide and steroid ligands. SERKs are generally present as small gene families in plants, with five SERK genes in Arabidopsis. Knowledge gained primarily through work on Arabidopsis SERKs indicates that these proteins probably interact with a wide range of other receptor kinases and form a fundamental part of many essential signalling pathways. The SERK1 gene of the model legume, Medicago truncatula functions in somatic and zygotic embryogenesis, and during many phases of plant development, including nodule and lateral root formation. However, other SERK genes in M. truncatula and other legumes are largely unidentified and their functions unknown. Results To aid the understanding of signalling pathways in M. truncatula, we have identified and annotated the SERK genes in this species. Using degenerate PCR and database mining, eight more SERK-like genes have been identified and these have been shown to be expressed. The amplification and sequencing of several different PCR products from one of these genes is consistent with the presence of splice variants. Four of the eight additional genes identified are upregulated in cultured leaf tissue grown on embryogenic medium. The sequence information obtained from M. truncatula was used to identify SERK family genes in the recently sequenced soybean (Glycine max genome. Conclusions A total of nine SERK or SERK-like genes have been identified in M. truncatula and potentially 17 in soybean. Five M. truncatula SERK genes arose from duplication events not evident in soybean and Lotus. The presence of splice variants has not been previously reported in a SERK gene. Upregulation of four newly identified SERK genes (in addition to the

  9. Scent glands in legume flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, C R; Souza, C D; Barros, T C; Teixeira, S P

    2014-01-01

    Scent glands, or osmophores, are predominantly floral secretory structures that secrete volatile substances during anthesis, and therefore act in interactions with pollinators. The Leguminosae family, despite being the third largest angiosperm family, with a wide geographical distribution and diversity of habits, morphology and pollinators, has been ignored with respect to these glands. Thus, we localised and characterised the sites of fragrance production and release in flowers of legumes, in which scent plays an important role in pollination, and also tested whether there are relationships between the structure of the scent gland and the pollinator habit: diurnal or nocturnal. Flowers in pre-anthesis and anthesis of 12 legume species were collected and analysed using immersion in neutral red, olfactory tests and anatomical studies (light and scanning electron microscopy). The main production site of floral scent is the perianth, especially the petals. The scent glands are distributed in a restricted way in Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Anadenanthera peregrina, Inga edulis and Parkia pendula, constituting mesophilic osmophores, and in a diffuse way in Bauhinia rufa, Hymenaea courbaril, Erythrostemon gilliesii, Poincianella pluviosa, Pterodon pubescens, Platycyamus regnellii, Mucuna urens and Tipuana tipu. The glands are comprised of cells of the epidermis and mesophyll that secrete mainly terpenes, nitrogen compounds and phenols. Relationships between the presence of osmophores and type of anthesis (diurnal and nocturnal) and the pollinator were not found. Our data on scent glands in Leguminosae are original and detail the type of diffuse release, which has been very poorly studied.

  10. The legume manifesto: (Networkers on Fabaceae, unite!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Legumes have been an important part of cropping systems since the dawn of agriculture. The shift in Europe from draught animals to meat animals coincided with the increasing availability of soybean meal from North and South America, and the Common Agricultural Policy of the European Union promoted the growing of cereals and oilseeds at the expense of other crops so legumes fell out of favour with farmers and decision-makers. Continental concerns about food and feed security, high prices of oil and soybean meal and advances in the application of fundamental molecular genetics to crop species, all mean that now is a good opportunity to promote the return of legumes to European cropping systems by enhancing the efficiency of research and development on this family. Hence we propose the establishment of a Legume Society that will promote information exchange and scientific productivity by uniting the various legume research communities.

  11. Competition between rhizobia under different environmental conditions affects the nodulation of a legume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhao Jun; Yan, Hui; Cui, Qing Guo; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Feng; Chen, Wen Xin

    2017-03-01

    Mutualistic symbiosis and nitrogen fixation of legume rhizobia play a key role in ecological environments. Although many different rhizobial species can form nodules with a specific legume, there is often a dominant microsymbiont, which has the highest nodule occupancy rates, and they are often known as the "most favorable rhizobia". Shifts in the most favorable rhizobia for a legume in different geographical regions or soil types are not well understood. Therefore, in order to explore the shift model, an experiment was designed using successive inoculations of rhizobia on one legume. The plants were grown in either sterile vermiculite or a sandy soil. Results showed that, depending on the environment, a legume could select its preferential rhizobial partner in order to establish symbiosis. For perennial legumes, nodulation is a continuous and sequential process. In this study, when the most favorable rhizobial strain was available to infect the plant first, it was dominant in the nodules, regardless of the existence of other rhizobial strains in the rhizosphere. Other rhizobial strains had an opportunity to establish symbiosis with the plant when the most favorable rhizobial strain was not present in the rhizosphere. Nodule occupancy rates of the most favorable rhizobial strain depended on the competitiveness of other rhizobial strains in the rhizosphere and the environmental adaptability of the favorable rhizobial strain (in this case, to mild vermiculite or hostile sandy soil). To produce high nodulation and efficient nitrogen fixation, the most favorable rhizobial strain should be selected and inoculated into the rhizosphere of legume plants under optimum environmental conditions.

  12. Cooking Has Variable Effects on the Fermentability in the Large Intestine of the Fraction of Meats, Grain Legumes, and Insects That Is Resistant to Digestion in the Small Intestine in an in Vitro Model of the Pig's Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelaert, Christine; Despret, Xavier; Sindic, Marianne; Beckers, Yves; Francis, Frédéric; Portetelle, Daniel; Soyeurt, Hélène; Théwis, André; Bindelle, Jérôme

    2017-01-18

    This study aimed to evaluate the fermentation in the large intestine of indigestible dietary protein sources from animal, insect, and plant origin using an in vitro model of the pig's gastrointestinal tract. Protein sources were used raw and after a cooking treatment. Results showed that the category of the ingredient (meats, insects, or grain legumes) exerts a stronger impact on enzymatic digestibility, fermentation patterns, and bacterial metabolites such as short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) than the cooking treatment. The digestibility and the fermentation characteristics of insects were more affected by the cooking procedure than the other categories. Per gram of consumed food, ingredients from animal origin, namely, meats and insects, were associated with fewer fermentation end-products (gas, H2S, SCFA) than ingredients from plant origin, which is related to their higher small intestinal digestibility.

  13. Spatio-temporal expression patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula defensin-like genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesfin Tesfaye

    Full Text Available Plant genomes contain several hundred defensin-like (DEFL genes that encode short cysteine-rich proteins resembling defensins, which are well known antimicrobial polypeptides. Little is known about the expression patterns or functions of many DEFLs because most were discovered recently and hence are not well represented on standard microarrays. We designed a custom Affymetrix chip consisting of probe sets for 317 and 684 DEFLs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula, respectively for cataloging DEFL expression in a variety of plant organs at different developmental stages and during symbiotic and pathogenic associations. The microarray analysis provided evidence for the transcription of 71% and 90% of the DEFLs identified in Arabidopsis and Medicago, respectively, including many of the recently annotated DEFL genes that previously lacked expression information. Both model plants contain a subset of DEFLs specifically expressed in seeds or fruits. A few DEFLs, including some plant defensins, were significantly up-regulated in Arabidopsis leaves inoculated with Alternaria brassicicola or Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Among these, some were dependent on jasmonic acid signaling or were associated with specific types of immune responses. There were notable differences in DEFL gene expression patterns between Arabidopsis and Medicago, as the majority of Arabidopsis DEFLs were expressed in inflorescences, while only a few exhibited root-enhanced expression. By contrast, Medicago DEFLs were most prominently expressed in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Thus, our data document salient differences in DEFL temporal and spatial expression between Arabidopsis and Medicago, suggesting distinct signaling routes and distinct roles for these proteins in the two plant species.

  14. Spatio-temporal expression patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula defensin-like genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Mesfin; Silverstein, Kevin At; Nallu, Sumitha; Wang, Lin; Botanga, Christopher J; Gomez, S Karen; Costa, Liliana M; Harrison, Maria J; Samac, Deborah A; Glazebrook, Jane; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Gutierrez-Marcos, Jose F; Vandenbosch, Kathryn A

    2013-01-01

    Plant genomes contain several hundred defensin-like (DEFL) genes that encode short cysteine-rich proteins resembling defensins, which are well known antimicrobial polypeptides. Little is known about the expression patterns or functions of many DEFLs because most were discovered recently and hence are not well represented on standard microarrays. We designed a custom Affymetrix chip consisting of probe sets for 317 and 684 DEFLs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula, respectively for cataloging DEFL expression in a variety of plant organs at different developmental stages and during symbiotic and pathogenic associations. The microarray analysis provided evidence for the transcription of 71% and 90% of the DEFLs identified in Arabidopsis and Medicago, respectively, including many of the recently annotated DEFL genes that previously lacked expression information. Both model plants contain a subset of DEFLs specifically expressed in seeds or fruits. A few DEFLs, including some plant defensins, were significantly up-regulated in Arabidopsis leaves inoculated with Alternaria brassicicola or Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Among these, some were dependent on jasmonic acid signaling or were associated with specific types of immune responses. There were notable differences in DEFL gene expression patterns between Arabidopsis and Medicago, as the majority of Arabidopsis DEFLs were expressed in inflorescences, while only a few exhibited root-enhanced expression. By contrast, Medicago DEFLs were most prominently expressed in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Thus, our data document salient differences in DEFL temporal and spatial expression between Arabidopsis and Medicago, suggesting distinct signaling routes and distinct roles for these proteins in the two plant species.

  15. Differential effectiveness of novel and old legume-rhizobia mutualisms: implications for invasion by exotic legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana; Fajardo, Susana; Ruiz-Díez, Beatriz; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2012-09-01

    The degree of specialization in the legume-rhizobium mutualism and the variation in the response to different potential symbionts are crucial factors for understanding the process of invasion by exotic legumes and the consequences for the native resident plants and bacteria. The enhanced novel mutualism hypothesis predicts that exotic invasive legumes would take advantage of native rhizobia present in the invaded soils. However, recent studies have shown that exotic legumes might become invasive by using exotic introduced microsymbionts, and that they could be a source of exotic bacteria for native legumes. To unravel the role of novel and old symbioses in the progress of invasion, nodulation and symbiotic effectiveness were analyzed for exotic invasive plants and native co-occurring legumes in a Mediterranean coastal dune ecosystem. Although most of the studied species nodulated with bacteria from distant origins these novel mutualisms were less effective in terms of nodulation, nitrogenase activity and plant growth than the interactions of plants and bacteria from the same origin. The relative effect of exotic bradyrhizobia was strongly positive for exotic invasive legumes and detrimental for native shrubs. We conclude that (1) the studied invasive legumes do not rely on novel mutualisms but rather need the co-introduction of compatible symbionts, and (2) since exotic rhizobia colonize native legumes in invaded areas, the lack of effectiveness of these novel symbiosis demonstrated here suggests that invasion can disrupt native belowground mutualisms and reduce native legumes fitness.

  16. Soil carbon sequestration by three perennial legume pastures is greater in deeper soil layers than in the surface soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-K. Guan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon (SOC plays a vital role as both a sink for and source of atmospheric carbon. Revegetation of degraded arable land in China is expected to increase soil carbon sequestration, but the role of perennial legumes on soil carbon stocks in semiarid areas has not been quantified. In this study, we assessed the effect of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. and two locally adapted forage legumes, bush clover (Lespedeza davurica S. and milk vetch (Astragalus adsurgens Pall. on the SOC concentration and SOC stock accumulated annually over a 2 m soil profile, and to estimate the long-term potential for SOC sequestration in the soil under the three forage legumes. The results showed that the concentration of SOC of the bare soil decreased slightly over the 7 years, while 7 years of legume growth substantially increased the concentration of SOC over the 0–2.0 m soil depth measured. Over the 7 year growth period the SOC stocks increased by 24.1, 19.9 and 14.6 Mg C ha−1 under the alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch stands, respectively, and decreased by 4.2 Mg C ha−1 under bare soil. The sequestration of SOC in the 1–2 m depth of soil accounted for 79, 68 and 74 % of SOC sequestered through the upper 2 m of soil under alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch, respectively. Conversion of arable land to perennial legume pasture resulted in a significant increase in SOC, particularly at soil depths below 1 m.

  17. NUTRITIONAL AND HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF LEGUMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mebrahtom Gebrelibanos*, Dinka Tesfaye, Y. Raghavendra and Biruk Sintayeyu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Legumes are plants in the family Fabaceae characterized by seeds in pods that are often edible though sometimes poisonous. The nutrient content (protein, carbohydrate and micronutrients of legumes contribute to address under-nutrition, especially protein-calorie malnutrition among children and nursing mothers in developing countries where supplementing cereal-based diets with legumes is suggested as one of the best solutions to protein calorie malnutrition. Anti-nutritional factors, in legumes, may limit their biological value and acceptance as a regular food item, yet they are readily removable and recent research has shown potential health benefits of some of these compounds; and hence, manipulation of processing conditions may be required to remove or reduce only those unwanted components. Moreover, legumes play a role in prevention, improvement and/or treatment of disease conditions such as, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, cancer diseases (e.g breast and prostate cancers and lowers blood cholesterol level. Most of these disease conditions are associated with over-nutrition and obesity and are considered as diseases of the rich. It is, therefore, claimed that including legumes in a health-promoting diet is important in meeting the major dietary recommendations to improve the nutritional status of undernourished as well as over-nourished individuals, and to reduce risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and cancer. In this review, some of the scientific viewpoints that attempt to justify the nutritional contributions, anti-nutritional considerations and health implications of legumes are discussed.

  18. Impact of thermal processing on legume allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2012-12-01

    Food induced allergic manifestations are reported from several parts of the world. Food proteins exert their allergenic potential by absorption through the gastrointestinal tract and can even induce life threatening anaphylaxis reactions. Among all food allergens, legume allergens play an important role in induction of allergy because legumes are a major source of protein for vegetarians. Most of the legumes are cooked either by boiling, roasting or frying before consumption, which can be considered a form of thermal treatment. Thermal processing may also include autoclaving, microwave heating, blanching, pasteurization, canning, or steaming. Thermal processing of legumes may reduce, eliminate or enhance the allergenic potential of a respective legume. In most of the cases, minimization of allergenic potential on thermal treatment has generally been reported. Thus, thermal processing can be considered an important tool by indirectly prevent allergenicity in susceptible individuals, thereby reducing treatment costs and reducing industry/office/school absence in case of working population/school going children. The present review attempts to explore various possibilities of reducing or eliminating allergenicity of leguminous food using different methods of thermal processing. Further, this review summarizes different methods of food processing, major legumes and their predominant allergenic proteins, thermal treatment and its relation with antigenicity, effect of thermal processing on legume allergens; also suggests a path that may be taken for future research to reduce the allergenicity using conventional/nonconventional methods.

  19. Isolation and functional analysis of CONSTANS-LIKE genes suggests that a central role for CONSTANS in flowering time control is not evolutionarily conserved in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert eWong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The zinc finger transcription factor CONSTANS has a well-established central role in the mechanism for photoperiod sensing in Arabidopsis, integrating light and circadian clock signals to upregulate the florigen gene FT under long-day but not short-day conditions. Although CONSTANS-like (COL genes in other species have also been shown to regulate flowering time, it is not clear how widely this central role in photoperiod sensing is conserved.Legumes are a major plant group and various legume species show significant natural variation for photoperiod responsive flowering. Orthologs of several Arabidopsis genes have been shown to participate in photoperiodic flowering in legumes, but the possible function of COL genes as integrators of the photoperiod response has not yet been examined in detail. Here we characterize the COL family in the temperate long-day legume Medicago truncatula, using expression analyses, reverse genetics, transient activation assays and Arabidopsis transformation. Our results provide several lines of evidence suggesting that COL genes are unlikely to have a central role in the photoperiod response mechanism in this species.

  20. Using an ecophysiological framework for characterizing germination and heterotrophic growth of several genotypes of Medicago truncatula

    OpenAIRE

    Brunel, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    Germination and growth of heterotrophic stages are crucial steps for crop establishment. They highly depend on environmental conditions. The analytical framework provided by the emergence model SIMPLE (SImulation of PLant Emergence) has been used for the characterization of Medicago truncatula (M.tr.) during the early stages of its cycle in response to seedbeds physical factors with major impacts on emergence: temperature, water potential, mechanical obstacles. M.tr. is a model species. It wa...

  1. Biomass production by fescue and switchgrass alone and in mixed swards with legumes. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, M. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Univ. of Agronomy

    1994-06-01

    In assessing the role of biomass in alleviating potential global warming, the absence of information on the sustainability of biomass production on soils of limited agricultural potential is cited as a major constraint to the assessment of the role of biomass. Research on the sustainability of yields, recycling of nutrients, and emphasis on reduced inputs of agricultural chemicals in the production of biomass are among the critical research needs to clarify optimum cropping practice in biomass production. Two field experiments were conducted between 1989 and 1993. One study evaluated biomass production and composition of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) grown alone and with bigflower vetch (Vicia grandiflora L.) and the other assessed biomass productivity and composition of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) grown alone and with perennial legumes. Switchgrass received 0, 75 or 150 kg ha{sup {minus}1} of N annually as NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} or was interseeded with vetch. Tall fescue received 0, 75, 150 or 225 kg ha{sup {minus}1} of N annually or was interseeded with alfalfa (Medicago L.) or birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.). It is hoped that production systems can be designed to produce high yields of biomass with minimal inputs of fertilizer N. Achievement of this goal would reduce the potential for movement of NO{sub 3} and other undesirable N forms outside the biomass production system into the environment. In addition, management systems involving legumes could reduce the cost of biomass production.

  2. Crystal structure of isoflavone reductase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; He, Xianzhi; Lin, Jianqiao; Shao, Hui; Chang, Zhenzhan; Dixon, Richard A

    2006-05-19

    Isoflavonoids play important roles in plant defense and exhibit a range of mammalian health-promoting activities. Isoflavone reductase (IFR) specifically recognizes isoflavones and catalyzes a stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction to (3R)-isoflavanone. The crystal structure of Medicago sativa IFR with deletion of residues 39-47 has been determined at 1.6A resolution. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and docking, and comparison with the structures of other NADPH-dependent enzymes, defined the putative binding sites for co-factor and substrate and potential key residues for enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Further mutagenesis has confirmed the role of Lys144 as a catalytic residue. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the enzymatic mechanism and substrate specificity of IFRs as well as the functions of IFR-like proteins.

  3. Molecular mechanisms controlling legume autoregulation of nodulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dugald E. Reid; Brett J. Ferguson; Satomi Hayashi; Yu-Hsiang Lin; Peter M. Gresshoff

    2011-01-01

    .... • Scope Understanding how legume plants maintain control of nodulation to balance the nitrogen gains with their energy needs and developmental costs will assist in increasing their productivity and relative advantage...

  4. Identification of genetic loci associated with crude protein and mineral concentrations in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) using association mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Congjun; Wu, Xinming; Chen, Min; Wang, Yunqi; Liu, Xiqiang; Gong, Pan; Xu, Qingfang; Wang, Xuemin; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Zan

    2017-06-06

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is one of the most important legume forage species in China and many other countries of the world. It provides a quality source of proteins and minerals to animals. Genetic underpinnings for these important traits, however, are elusive. An alfalfa (M. sativa) association mapping study for six traits, namely crude protein (CP), rumen undegraded protein (RUP), and four mineral elements (Ca, K, Mg and P), was conducted in three consecutive years using a large collection encompassing 336 genotypes genotyped with 85 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. All the traits were significantly influenced by genotype, environment, and genotype × environment interaction. Eight-five significant associations (P alfalfa quality. The markers could be used in assisting selection for the individual traits in breeding populations for developing new alfalfa cultivars.

  5. Production of resistant starch by enzymatic debranching in legume flours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Medina, Rocío; Del Mar Muñío, María; Guadix, Emilia M; Guadix, Antonio

    2014-01-30

    Resistant starch (RS) was produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of flours from five different legumes: lentil, chickpea, faba bean, kidney bean and red kidney bean. Each legume was firstly treated thermally, then hydrolyzed with pullulanase for 24h at 50°C and pH 5 and lyophilized. At the end of each hydrolysis reaction, the RS amount ranged from 4.7% for red kidney beans to 7.5% for chickpeas. With respect to the curves of RS against hydrolysis time, a linear increase was observed initially and a plateau was generally achieved by the end of reaction. These curves were successfully modeled by a kinetic equation including three parameters: initial RS, RS at long operation time and a kinetic constant (k). Furthermore, the relative increase in hydrolysis, calculated using the kinetic parameters, was successfully correlated to the percentage of amylose.

  6. Improving legume nodulation and Cu rhizostabilization using a genetically modified rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgadillo, Julián; Lafuente, Alejandro; Doukkali, Bouchra; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Caviedes, Miguel A; Pajuelo, Eloísa; Rodríguez-Llorente, Ignacio D

    2015-01-01

    The rhizobia-legume interaction has been proposed as an interesting and appropriate tool for rhizostabilization of soils contaminated with heavy metals. One of the main requirements to use this symbiosis is the availability of tolerant and symbiotically effective rhizobia. The aim of this work was to improve the symbiotic properties of the arsenic-resistant wild-type strain Ensifer medicae MA11 in Cu-contaminated substrates. The copAB genes from a Cu-resistant Pseudomonas fluorescens strain were expressed in E. medicae MA11 under the control of the nifH promoter. The resulting strain E. medicae MA11-copAB was able to alleviate the toxic effect of Cu in Medicago truncatula. At 300 µM Cu, root and shoot dry matter production, nitrogen content, number of nodules and photosynthetic rate were significantly reduced in plants inoculated with the wild-type strain. However, these parameters were not altered in plants inoculated with the genetically modified strain. Moreover, nodules elicited by this strain were able to accumulate twofold the Cu measured in nodules formed by the wild-type strain. In addition, the engineered E. medicae strain increased Cu accumulation in roots and decreased the content in shoots. Thus, E. medicae MA11-copAB increased the capacity of M. truncatula to rhizostabilize Cu, decreasing the translocation factor and avoiding metal entry into the food chain. The plasmid containing the nifH promoter-copAB construct could be a useful biotool for Cu rhizostabilization using legumes, since it can be transferred to different rhizobia microsymbionts of authoctonous legumes growing in Cu-contaminated soils.

  7. Differential Effects of Legume Species on the Recovery of Soil Microbial Communities, and Carbon and Nitrogen Contents, in Abandoned Fields of the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin Hua; Jiao, Shu Mei; Gao, Rong Qing; Bardgett, Richard D.

    2012-12-01

    Plant-soil interactions are known to influence a wide range of ecosystem-level functions. Moreover, the recovery of these functions is of importance for the successful restoration of soils that have been degraded through intensive and/or inappropriate land use. Here, we assessed the effect of planting treatments commonly used to accelerate rates of grassland restoration, namely introduction of different legume species Medicago sativa, Astragalus adsurgens, Melilotus suaveolens, on the recovery of soil microbial communities and carbon and nitrogen contents in abandoned fields of the Loess Plateau, China. The results showed effects were species-specific, and either positive, neutral or negative depending on the measure and time-scale. All legumes increased basal respiration and metabolic quotient and had a positive effect on activity and functional diversity of the soil microbial community, measured using Biolog EcoPlate. However, soil under Astragalus adsurgens had the highest activity and functional diversity relative to the other treatments. Soil carbon and nitrogen content and microbial biomass were effectively restored in 3-5 years by introducing Medicago sativa and Astragalus adsurgens into early abandoned fields. Soil carbon and nitrogen content were retarded in 3-5 years and microbial biomass was retarded in the fifth year by introducing Melilotus suaveolens. Overall, the restoration practices of planting legumes can significantly affect soil carbon and nitrogen contents, and the biomass, activity, and functional diversity of soil microbial community. Therefore, we propose certain legume species could be used to accelerate ecological restoration of degraded soils, hence assist in the protection and preservation of the environment.

  8. Analysis of Cell Wall-Related Genes in Organs of Medicago sativa L. under Different Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Marc; Legay, Sylvain; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Guerriero, Gea

    2015-07-16

    Abiotic constraints are a source of concern in agriculture, because they can have a strong impact on plant growth and development, thereby affecting crop yield. The response of plants to abiotic constraints varies depending on the type of stress, on the species and on the organs. Although many studies have addressed different aspects of the plant response to abiotic stresses, only a handful has focused on the role of the cell wall. A targeted approach has been used here to study the expression of cell wall-related genes in different organs of alfalfa plants subjected for four days to three different abiotic stress treatments, namely salt, cold and heat stress. Genes involved in different steps of cell wall formation (cellulose biosynthesis, monolignol biosynthesis and polymerization) have been analyzed in different organs of Medicago sativa L. Prior to this analysis, an in silico classification of dirigent/dirigent-like proteins and class III peroxidases has been performed in Medicago truncatula and M. sativa. The final goal of this study is to infer and compare the expression patterns of cell wall-related genes in response to different abiotic stressors in the organs of an important legume crop.

  9. Effect of Microgravity on Early Events of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago Truncatula: Initial Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware to study the effect of microgravity on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species of the legume family, was inoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFUs). Two sets of experiments were conducted in orbit and in 24-hour delayed ground controls. Experiment one was designed to determine if S. meliloti infect M. truncatula and initiate physiological changes associated with nodule formation. Roots of five-day-old M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 (Enodll::gus) were inoculated 24 hr before launch with either S. meliloti strain 1021 or strain ABS7 and integrated into BRIC-PDFU hardware placed in a 4 C Cold Bag for launch on Atlantis. Inoculated plants and uninoculated controls were maintained in the dark at ambient temperature in the middeck of STS-135 for 11 days before fixation in RNAlater(tM) by crew activation of the PDFU. Experiment two was designed to determine if microgravity altered the process of bacterial infection and host plant nodule formation. Seeds of two M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 lines, the Enodll::gus used in experiment 1, and SUNN, a super-nodulating mutant of A17, were germinated on orbit for 11 days in the middeck cabin and returned to Earth alive inside of BRIC-PDFU's at 4 C. S. meliloti strains 1021 and ABS7 were cultivated separately in broth culture on orbit and also returned to Earth alive. After landing, flight- and groundgrown plants and bacteria were transferred from BRIC-PDFU's into Nunc(tm) 4-well plates for reciprocity crosses. Rates of plant growth and nodule development on Buffered Nodulation Medium (lacking nitrogen) were measured for 14 days. Preliminary analysis' of Experiment 1 confirms that

  10. Aphanomyces euteiches cell wall fractions containing novel glucan-chitosaccharides induce defense genes and nuclear calcium oscillations in the plant host Medicago truncatula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaury Nars

    Full Text Available N-acetylglucosamine-based saccharides (chitosaccharides are components of microbial cell walls and act as molecular signals during host-microbe interactions. In the legume plant Medicago truncatula, the perception of lipochitooligosaccharide signals produced by symbiotic rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi involves the Nod Factor Perception (NFP lysin motif receptor-like protein and leads to the activation of the so-called common symbiotic pathway. In rice and Arabidopsis, lysin motif receptors are involved in the perception of chitooligosaccharides released by pathogenic fungi, resulting in the activation of plant immunity. Here we report the structural characterization of atypical chitosaccharides from the oomycete pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, and their biological activity on the host Medicago truncatula. Using a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that these chitosaccharides are linked to β-1,6-glucans, and contain a β-(1,3;1,4-glucan backbone whose β-1,3-linked glucose units are substituted on their C-6 carbon by either glucose or N-acetylglucosamine residues. This is the first description of this type of structural motif in eukaryotic cell walls. Glucan-chitosaccharide fractions of A. euteiches induced the expression of defense marker genes in Medicago truncatula seedlings independently from the presence of a functional Nod Factor Perception protein. Furthermore, one of the glucan-chitosaccharide fractions elicited calcium oscillations in the nucleus of root cells. In contrast to the asymmetric oscillatory calcium spiking induced by symbiotic lipochitooligosaccharides, this response depends neither on the Nod Factor Perception protein nor on the common symbiotic pathway. These findings open new perspectives in oomycete cell wall biology and elicitor recognition and signaling in legumes.

  11. Nutrient and nonnutrient components of legumes, and its chemopreventive activity: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Chino, Xariss; Jiménez-Martínez, Cristian; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Álvarez-González, Isela; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Legumes in combination with other products are the staple food for a large part of the world population, especially the low-income fragment, because their seeds provide valuable amounts of carbohydrates, fiber, and proteins, and have an important composition of essential amino acids, the sulphured amino acids being the limiting ones. Furthermore, legumes also have nonnutritional compounds that may decrease the absorption of nutrients or produce toxic effects; however, it has been reported that depending on the dose, these nonnutritional compounds also have different bioactivities as antioxidant, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic, and anticarcinogenic agents, which have been proven in scientific studies. It has been observed that in countries with a high consumption of legumes, the incidence of colorectal cancer is lower. Some studies have shown that legume seeds are an alternative chemopreventive therapy against various cancers especially colon; this was verified in various animal models of induced by azoxymethane, a colon specific carcinogenic compound, in which a diet was supplemented with different concentrations of beans, lentils, chickpeas, or soybeans, mostly. These studies have proven the anticancer activity of legumes in early stages of carcinogenesis. Therefore, it is important to review the information available to elucidate the chemopreventive mechanisms of action of legume compounds.

  12. Using coloured roots to study root interaction and competition in intercropped legumes and non-legumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosti, Giacomo; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    if a species with coloured roots can be used to examine the interaction in a legume-non-legume intercropping system; (ii) to verify the importance of initial root growth on the successive root development of mixture component plants; (iii) to test if the root interaction in the shallow layers has consequences...

  13. Structural Studies of Medicago truncatula Histidinol Phosphate Phosphatase from Inositol Monophosphatase Superfamily Reveal Details of Penultimate Step of Histidine Biosynthesis in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-05-06

    The penultimate enzyme in the histidine biosynthetic pathway catalyzes dephosphorylation of l-histidinol 1-phosphate (HOLP) into l-histidinol. The recently discovered in Arabidopsis thaliana plant-type histidinol phosphate phosphatase (HPP) shares no homology with the two other HPP superfamilies known previously in prokaryotes and resembles myo-inositol monophosphatases (IMPases). In this work, identification of an HPP enzyme from a model legume, Medicago truncatula (MtHPP) was based on the highest sequence identity to A. thaliana enzyme. Biochemical assays confirmed that MtHPP was able to cleave inorganic phosphate from HOLP but not from d-myo-inositol-1-phosphate, the main substrate of IMPases. Dimers of MtHPP, determined by size exclusion chromatography, in the presence of CO2 or formaldehyde form mutual, methylene-bridged cross-links between Lys(158) and Cys(245) residues. Four high resolution crystal structures, namely complexes with HOLP (substrate), l-histidinol (product), and PO4 (3-) (by-product) as well as the structure showing the cross-linking between two MtHPP molecules, provide detailed structural information on the enzyme. Based on the crystal structures, the enzymatic reaction mechanism of IMPases is accustomed to fit the data for MtHPP. The enzymatic reaction, which requires Mg(2+) cations, is catalyzed mainly by amino acid residues from the N-terminal domain. The C-terminal domain, sharing little identity with IMPases, is responsible for the substrate specificity (i.e. allows the enzyme to distinguish between HOLP and d-myo-inositol-1-phosphate). Structural features, mainly the presence of a conserved Asp(246), allow MtHPP to bind HOLP specifically.

  14. Genome-wide identification, expression analysis of GH3 family genes in Medicago truncatula under stress-related hormones and Sinorhizobium meliloti infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanjun; Yue, Runqing; Sun, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Wei; Zeng, Houqing; Wang, Huizhong; Shen, Chenjia

    2015-01-01

    Auxin plays a pivotal role in the regulation of plant growth and development by controlling the expression of auxin response genes rapidly. As one of the major auxin early response gene families, Gretchen Hagen 3 (GH3) genes are involved in auxin homeostasis by conjugating excess auxins to amino acids. However, how GH3 genes function in environmental stresses and rhizobial infection responses in Medicago truncatula are largely unknown. Here, based on the latest updated M. truncatula genome, a comprehensive identification and expression profiling analysis of MtGH3 genes were performed. Our data showed that most of MtGH3 genes were expressed in tissue-specific manner and were responsive to environmental stress-related hormones. To understand the possible roles of MtGH3 genes involved in symbiosis establishment between M. truncatula and symbiotic bacteria, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to test the expressions of MtGH3 genes during the early phase of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection. The expression levels of most MtGH3 genes were upregulated in shoots and downregulated in roots by S. meliloti infection. The differences in expression responses to S. meliloti infection between roots and shoots were in agreement with the results of free indoleacetic acid (IAA) content measurements. The identification and expression analysis of MtGH3 genes at the early phase of S. meliloti infection may help us to understand the role of GH3-mediated IAA homeostasis in the regulation of nodule formation in model legumes M. truncatula.

  15. Overlaps in the Transcriptional Profiles of Medicago truncatula Roots Inoculated with Two Different Glomus Fungi Provide Insights into the Genetic Program Activated during Arbuscular Mycorrhiza1[w

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohnjec, Natalija; Vieweg, Martin F.; Pühler, Alfred; Becker, Anke; Küster, Helge

    2005-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is a widespread symbiotic association between plants and fungal microsymbionts that supports plant development under nutrient-limiting and various stress conditions. In this study, we focused on the overlapping genetic program activated by two commonly studied microsymbionts in addition to identifying AM-related genes. We thus applied 16,086 probe microarrays to profile the transcriptome of the model legume Medicago truncatula during interactions with Glomus mosseae and Glomus intraradices and specified a total of 201 plant genes as significantly coinduced at least 2-fold, with more than 160 being reported as AM induced for the first time. Several hundred genes were additionally up-regulated during a sole interaction, indicating that the plant genetic program activated in AM to some extent depends on the colonizing microsymbiont. Genes induced during both interactions specified AM-related nitrate, ion, and sugar transporters, enzymes involved in secondary metabolism, proteases, and Kunitz-type protease inhibitors. Furthermore, coinduced genes encoded receptor kinases and other components of signal transduction pathways as well as AM-induced transcriptional regulators, thus reflecting changes in signaling. By the use of reporter gene expression, we demonstrated that one member of the AM-induced gene family encoding blue copper binding proteins (MtBcp1) was both specifically and strongly up-regulated in arbuscule-containing regions of mycorrhizal roots. A comparison of the AM expression profiles to those of nitrogen-fixing root nodules suggested only a limited overlap between the genetic programs orchestrating root endosymbioses. PMID:15778460

  16. Medicago truncatula symbiotic peptide NCR247 contributes to bacteroid differentiation through multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Attila; Maróti, Gergely; Durgő, Hajnalka; Györgypál, Zoltán; Lima, Rui M; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Kereszt, Attila; Mergaert, Peter; Kondorosi, Éva

    2014-04-08

    Symbiosis between rhizobia soil bacteria and legume plants results in the formation of root nodules where plant cells are fully packed with nitrogen fixing bacteria. In the host cells, the bacteria adapt to the intracellular environment and gain the ability for nitrogen fixation. Depending on the host plants, the symbiotic fate of bacteria can be either reversible or irreversible. In Medicago and related legume species, the bacteria undergo a host-directed multistep differentiation process culminating in the formation of elongated and branched polyploid bacteria with definitive loss of cell division ability. The plant factors are nodule-specific symbiotic peptides. Approximately 600 of them are nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides produced in the rhizobium-infected plant cells. NCRs are targeted to the endosymbionts, and concerted action of different sets of peptides governs different stages of endosymbiont maturation, whereas the symbiotic function of individual NCRs is unknown. This study focused on NCR247, a cationic peptide exhibiting in vitro antimicrobial activities. We show that NCR247 acts in those nodule cells where bacterial cell division is arrested and cell elongation begins. NCR247 penetrates the bacteria and forms complexes with many bacterial proteins. Interaction with FtsZ required for septum formation is one of the host interventions for inhibiting bacterial cell division. Complex formation with the ribosomal proteins affects translation and contributes to altered proteome and physiology of the endosymbiont. Binding to the chaperone GroEL amplifies the NCR247-modulated biological processes. We show that GroEL1 of Sinorhizobium meliloti is required for efficient infection, terminal differentiation, and nitrogen fixation.

  17. Nod factor effects on root hair-specific transcriptome of Medicago truncatula: focus on plasma membrane transport systems and reactive oxygen species networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle eDAMIANI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Root hairs are involved in water and nutrient uptake, and thereby in plant autotrophy. In legumes, they also play a crucial role in establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. To obtain a holistic view of Medicago truncatula genes expressed in root hairs and of their regulation during the first hours of the engagement in rhizobial symbiotic interaction, a high throughput RNA sequencing on isolated root hairs from roots challenged or not with lipochitooligosaccharides Nod factors (NF for 4 h or 20 h was carried out. This provided a repertoire of genes displaying expression in root hairs, responding or not to NF and specific or not to legumes. In analyzing the transcriptome dataset, special attention was paid to pumps, transporters or channels active at the plasma membrane, to other proteins likely to play a role in nutrient ion uptake, NF electrical and calcium signaling, control of the redox status or the dynamic reprogramming of root hair transcriptome induced by NF treatment, and to the identification of papilionoid legume-specific genes expressed in root hairs. About 10 percent of the root hair expressed genes were significantly up- or down-regulated by NF treatment, suggesting their involvement in remodeling plant functions to allow establishment of the symbiotic relationship. For instance, NF-induced changes in expression of genes encoding plasma membrane transport systems or disease response proteins indicate that root hairs reduce their involvement in nutrient ion absorption and adapt their immune system in order to engage in the symbiotic interaction. It also appears that the redox status of root hair cells is tuned in response to NF perception. In addition, 1,176 genes that could be considered as papilionoid legume-specific were identified in the M. truncatula root hair transcriptome, from which 141 were found to possess an orthologue in every of the 6 legume genomes that we considered, suggesting their involvement in essential functions

  18. Nod Factor Effects on Root Hair-Specific Transcriptome of Medicago truncatula: Focus on Plasma Membrane Transport Systems and Reactive Oxygen Species Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Isabelle; Drain, Alice; Guichard, Marjorie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Boscari, Alexandre; Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Brunaud, Véronique; Cottaz, Sylvain; Rancurel, Corinne; Da Rocha, Martine; Fizames, Cécile; Fort, Sébastien; Gaillard, Isabelle; Maillol, Vincent; Danchin, Etienne G J; Rouached, Hatem; Samain, Eric; Su, Yan-Hua; Thouin, Julien; Touraine, Bruno; Puppo, Alain; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Pauly, Nicolas; Sentenac, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Root hairs are involved in water and nutrient uptake, and thereby in plant autotrophy. In legumes, they also play a crucial role in establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. To obtain a holistic view of Medicago truncatula genes expressed in root hairs and of their regulation during the first hours of the engagement in rhizobial symbiotic interaction, a high throughput RNA sequencing on isolated root hairs from roots challenged or not with lipochitooligosaccharides Nod factors (NF) for 4 or 20 h was carried out. This provided a repertoire of genes displaying expression in root hairs, responding or not to NF, and specific or not to legumes. In analyzing the transcriptome dataset, special attention was paid to pumps, transporters, or channels active at the plasma membrane, to other proteins likely to play a role in nutrient ion uptake, NF electrical and calcium signaling, control of the redox status or the dynamic reprogramming of root hair transcriptome induced by NF treatment, and to the identification of papilionoid legume-specific genes expressed in root hairs. About 10% of the root hair expressed genes were significantly up- or down-regulated by NF treatment, suggesting their involvement in remodeling plant functions to allow establishment of the symbiotic relationship. For instance, NF-induced changes in expression of genes encoding plasma membrane transport systems or disease response proteins indicate that root hairs reduce their involvement in nutrient ion absorption and adapt their immune system in order to engage in the symbiotic interaction. It also appears that the redox status of root hair cells is tuned in response to NF perception. In addition, 1176 genes that could be considered as "papilionoid legume-specific" were identified in the M. truncatula root hair transcriptome, from which 141 were found to possess an ortholog in every of the six legume genomes that we considered, suggesting their involvement in essential functions specific to legumes. This

  19. Excessive ammonia inhibited transcription of MsU2 gene and furthermore affected accumulation distribution of allantoin and amino acids in alfalfa Medicago sativa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; JIANG Lin-lin; Nomura Mika; Tajima Shigeyuki; CHENG Xian-guo

    2015-01-01

    In legume plants, uricase gene (Nodulin-35) plays a positive role in metabolism of ureide and amide compounds in symbiotic nitrogen-ifxing in the nodules. In this study, a pot experiment was performed to examine the effects of ammonium application on the transcription of MsU2 gene and distribution of major nitrogen compounds in alfalfa Medicago sativa. Data showed that alfalfa plant has a signiifcant difference in contents of nitrogen compounds in xylem saps compared with soybean plant, and belongs to typical amide type legume plants with little ureide accumulation, and the accumulation of asparagines and ureide in the tissues of alfalfa is mainly gathered in the nodules. Northern blotting showed that excessive ammonium signiifcantly inhibited the transcription of MsU2 gene in the nodules and roots, and mRNA accumulation of MsU2 gene in the plants exposed to excessive ammonium decreased gradual y with culture time extension, indicating that application of ammonium signiifcantly inhibited the transcription of MsU2 gene in the alfalfa plants. Although the application of exces-sive ammonium increased the contents of amino acids in various tissues of alfalfa, the accumulation of al antoin relfecting the strength of uricase activity is remarkably reduced in the xylem saps, stems and nodules when alfalfa plants exposed to excessive ammonium, suggesting that application of excessive ammonium generated a negative effect on symbiosis ifxing-nitrogen system due to inhibition of ammonium ion on uricase activity in the nodules of alfalfa. This result seems to imply that application of excessive ammonium in legume plants should not be proposed to avoid affecting the ability of ifxing nitrogen in the nodules of legume plants, and reasonable dose of ammonium should be recommended to effectively utilize the ifxed N from atmosphere in legume plant production.

  20. Identification of drought-responsive microRNAs in Medicago truncatula by genome-wide high-throughput sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Mingui

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, endogenous RNAs that play important regulatory roles in development and stress response in plants by negatively affecting gene expression post-transcriptionally. Identification of miRNAs at the global genome-level by high-throughout sequencing is essential to functionally characterize miRNAs in plants. Drought is one of the common environmental stresses limiting plant growth and development. To understand the role of miRNAs in response of plants to drought stress, drought-responsive miRNAs were identified by high-throughput sequencing in a legume model plant, Medicago truncatula. Results Two hundreds eighty three and 293 known miRNAs were identified from the control and drought stress libraries, respectively. In addition, 238 potential candidate miRNAs were identified, and among them 14 new miRNAs and 15 new members of known miRNA families whose complementary miRNA*s were also detected. Both high-throughput sequencing and RT-qPCR confirmed that 22 members of 4 miRNA families were up-regulated and 10 members of 6 miRNA families were down-regulated in response to drought stress. Among the 29 new miRNAs/new members of known miRNA families, 8 miRNAs were responsive to drought stress with both 4 miRNAs being up- and down-regulated, respectively. The known and predicted targets of the drought-responsive miRNAs were found to be involved in diverse cellular processes in plants, including development, transcription, protein degradation, detoxification, nutrient status and cross adaptation. Conclusions We identified 32 known members of 10 miRNA families and 8 new miRNAs/new members of known miRNA families that were responsive to drought stress by high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs from M. truncatula. These findings are of importance for our understanding of the roles played by miRNAs in response of plants to abiotic stress in general and drought stress in particular.

  1. Two alternative recessive quantitative trait loci influence resistance to spring black stem and leaf spot in Medicago truncatula

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    Oliver Richard P

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the genetic basis of plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens is incomplete and has been characterised in relatively few pathosystems. In this study, the cytology and genetics of resistance to spring black stem and leaf spot caused by Phoma medicaginis, an economically important necrotrophic pathogen of Medicago spp., was examined in the model legume M. truncatula. Results Macroscopically, the resistant response of accession SA27063 was characterised by small, hypersensitive-like spots following inoculation while the susceptible interaction with accessions A17 and SA3054 showed necrotic lesions and spreading chlorosis. No unique cytological differences were observed during early infection (2 populations segregating for resistance to spring black stem and leaf spot were established between SA27063 and the two susceptible accessions, A17 and SA3054. The cross between SA27063 and A17 represented a wider cross than between SA27063 and SA3054, as evidenced by higher genetic polymorphism, reduced fertility and aberrant phenotypes of F2 progeny. In the SA27063 × A17 F2 population a highly significant quantitative trait locus (QTL, LOD = 7.37; P Phoma medicaginis one (rnpm1 genetically mapped to the top arm of linkage group 4 (LG4. rnpm1 explained 33.6% of the phenotypic variance in the population's response to infection depicted on a 1–5 scale and was tightly linked to marker AW256637. A second highly significant QTL (LOD = 6.77; P rnpm2, was located on the lower arm of LG8 in the SA27063 × SA3054 map. rnpm2 explained 29.6% of the phenotypic variance and was fine mapped to a 0.8 cM interval between markers h2_16a6a and h2_21h11d. rnpm1 is tightly linked to a cluster of Toll/Interleukin1 receptor-nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NBS-LRR genes and disease resistance protein-like genes, while no resistance gene analogues (RGAs are apparent in the genomic sequence of the reference accession A17 at the

  2. The Medicago truncatula CRE1 cytokinin receptor regulates lateral root development and early symbiotic interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rizzo, Silvina; Crespi, Martin; Frugier, Florian

    2006-10-01

    Legumes develop different types of lateral organs from their primary root, lateral roots and nodules, the latter depending on a symbiotic interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti. Phytohormones have been shown to function in the control of these organogeneses. However, related signaling pathways have not been identified in legumes. We cloned and characterized the expression of Medicago truncatula genes encoding members of cytokinin signaling pathways. RNA interference of the cytokinin receptor homolog Cytokinin Response1 (Mt CRE1) led to cytokinin-insensitive roots, which showed an increased number of lateral roots and a strong reduction in nodulation. Both the progression of S. meliloti infection and nodule primordia formation were affected. We also identified two cytokinin signaling response regulator genes, Mt RR1 and Mt RR4, which are induced early during the symbiotic interaction. Induction of these genes by S. meliloti infection is altered in mutants affected in the Nod factor signaling pathway; conversely, cytokinin regulation of the early nodulin Nodule Inception1 (Mt NIN) depends on Mt CRE1. Hence, cytokinin signaling mediated by a single receptor, Mt CRE1, leads to an opposite control of symbiotic nodule and lateral root organogenesis. Mt NIN, Mt RR1, and Mt RR4 define a common pathway activated during early S. meliloti interaction, allowing crosstalk between plant cytokinins and bacterial Nod factors signals.

  3. Plant-activated bacterial receptor adenylate cyclases modulate epidermal infection in the Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chang Fu; Garnerone, Anne-Marie; Mathieu-Demazière, Céline; Masson-Boivin, Catherine; Batut, Jacques

    2012-04-24

    Legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia have coevolved a facultative nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. Establishment of the symbiosis requires bacterial entry via root hair infection threads and, in parallel, organogenesis of nodules that subsequently are invaded by bacteria. Tight control of nodulation and infection is required to maintain the mutualistic character of the interaction. Available evidence supports a passive bacterial role in nodulation and infection after the microsymbiont has triggered the symbiotic plant developmental program. Here we identify in Sinorhizobium meliloti, the Medicago symbiont, a cAMP-signaling regulatory cascade consisting of three receptor-like adenylate cyclases, a Crp-like regulator, and a target gene of unknown function. The cascade is activated specifically by a plant signal during nodule organogenesis. Cascade inactivation results in a hyperinfection phenotype consisting of abortive epidermal infection events uncoupled from nodulation. These findings show that, in response to a plant signal, rhizobia play an active role in the control of infection. We suggest that rhizobia may modulate the plant's susceptibility to infection. This regulatory loop likely aims at optimizing legume infection.

  4. Genome sequence of Ensifer medicae Di28; an effective N2-fixing microsymbiont of Medicago murex and M. polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garau, Giovanni; Terpolilli, Jason; Hill, Yvette; Tian, Rui; Howieson, John; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Reddy, Tbk; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Ensifer medicae Di28 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Medicago spp. Di28 was isolated in 1998 from a nodule recovered from the roots of M. polymorpha growing in the south east of Sardinia (Italy). Di28 is an effective microsymbiont of the annual forage legumes M. polymorpha and M. murex and is capable of establishing a partially effective symbiotic association with the perennial M. sativa. Here we describe the features of E. medicae Di28, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,553,624 bp standard draft genome is arranged into 104 scaffolds of 104 contigs containing 6,394 protein-coding genes and 75 RNA-only encoding genes. This rhizobial genome is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  5. Annual legumes for improving soil fertility in the smallholder maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition to providing food, these crops are widely recognised to help maintain soil fertility. ... Most of our knowledge about the soil fertility benefits from annual legumes has ... Smallholder farmers already rotate grain legumes with maize.

  6. Experiences of soil fertility management through legume based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    either sandy soils or sandy loam soils to compare soil rehabilitation benefits of ... to incorporate the legume crop residues in order to maximize the residual nitrogen benefit to the cereal crop. ... different legume technologies either in rotation or.

  7. Rumen degradability of some feed legume seeds

    OpenAIRE

    González, Javier; Andrés, Santiago

    2003-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this work was to determine the effective degradability (ED) of CP for different feed legume seeds and the possible relationship with their physical and chemical characteristics. The ED was measured using nylon bags and rumen outflow rate techniques on three rumen cannulated wethers fed at 40 g DM$\\cdot$kg$^{-0.75}$, with a 2:1 (on DM basis) hay to concentrate diet. Nine seed samples of the following legume species were tested: lupin (Lupinus albus L., cultiv...

  8. Grain legume protein quality: a hot subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaz Patto, Maria Carlota

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Grain legumes, also called pulses, play a key role in the nutritional improvement of food and feed. These legumes are important sources of protein as well as other nutritional compounds. Today, protein is one of the most sought after ingredients in the market and grain legumes represent one of the most sustainable protein sources. However, not all grain legume proteins are nutritionally equal. Their quality varies and depends on their amino acid composition and digestibility. In this article, we review concepts related to grain legume protein quality and discuss challenges regarding their genetic improvement. A comprehensive database of grain legume amino acid profiles and protein digestibility is needed to address the matter of protein quality in grain legume breeding. This database will be enhanced by quantitative information on digestibility-reducing bioactive compounds and the development of reliable screening tools. The achievement of higher protein quality grain legume varieties, better adjusted to animal and human requirements, will cut dietary protein content, associated costs and nitrogen excretion, thus reducing the environmental impact.Las leguminosas grano tienen un alto potencial en alimentación humana y animal siendo una importante fuente de proteínas así como de otros compuestos beneficiosos para la nutrición y salud. La proteína es uno de los ingredientes más demandados y las leguminosas grano son una delas fuentes más sostenible de proteína. Sin embargo, no todas las leguminosas grano son igual de nutritivas, variando la calidad con la composición de aminoácidos y su digestibilidad. En este artículo revisaremos los conceptos de calidad de la proteína y discutiremos las posibilidades de mejora genética. Para abordar con éxito la mejora de la calidad de la proteína será de gran ayuda disponer de bases de datos con los perfiles de aminoácidos y de digestibilidad, así como de información cuantitativa sobre los

  9. Responses of Legumes to Phosphorus Deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorus deficiency is a universal problem in most world soils. Furthermore, of all nutrients, shortage of phosphorus has the biggest impact on legumes, therefore, lots of studies were carried out for identifying responses of legumes to shortage of phosphorus. They concluded that to maintain improved growth under phosphorus deficiency conditions plants develop two major mechanisms: (i) Phosphorus acquisition (root morphology, root exudation and phosphorus uptake mechanisms), (ii) Phosphorus utilization (internal mechanisms associated with better use of absorbed phosphorus at cellular level). The aim of this brief review is to elucidate root morphological changes and rhizophere acidification to phosphorus deficiency.

  10. Use of EST database markers from M. truncatula in the transferability to other forage legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Amaresh

    2011-05-01

    In general tropical forage legumes lack microsatellites or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Development of genic SSR markers from expressed sequence tagged (EST) database is an alternate and efficient approach to generate the standard DNA markers for genome analysis of such crop species. In the present paper a total of 816 EST-SSRs containing perfect repeats of mono (33.5%), di (14.7%), tri (39.3%), tetra (2.7%), penta (0.7%) and hexa (0.4%) nucleotides were identified from 1,87,763 ESTs of Medicago truncatula. Along with, 70 (8.5%) SSRs of a compound type were also observed. Seven primer pairs of tri repeats were tested for cross transferability in 19 accessions of forage legumes comprising 11 genera. At two different annealing temperatures (55 and 60 degreesC) all primer pairs except AJ410087 reacted with many accessions of forage legumes. Atotal of 51 alleles were detected with six M. truncatula EST-SSRs primer-pairs against DNAfrom 19 accessions representing 11 genera where number of alleles ranged from 2 to 13. The cross-transferability of these EST-SSRs was 40.6% at 55 degreesC and 32.3% at 60 degreesC annealing temperature. 24 alleles of the total 50 (48%) at 55 degreesC and 27 of 51 (53%) at 60 degreesC were polymorphic among the accessions. These 27 polymorphic amplicons identified could be used as DNA markers. This study demonstrates the developed SSR markers from M. truncatula ESTs as a valuable genetic markers and also proposes the possibility of transferring these markers between species of different genera of the legumes of forage importance. It was evident from the results obtained with a set of Desmanthus virgatus accessions where SequentialAgglomerative Hierarchical and Nested (SAHN) cluster analysis based on Dice similarity and Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic mean Algorithm (UPGMA) revealed significant variability (24 to 74%) among the accessions. High bootstrap values (>30) supported the nodes generated by dendrogram analysis of

  11. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of a NAC1 transcription factor in Medicago truncatula roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'haeseleer, Katrien; Den Herder, Griet; Laffont, Carole; Plet, Julie; Mortier, Virginie; Lelandais-Brière, Christine; De Bodt, Stefanie; De Keyser, Annick; Crespi, Martin; Holsters, Marcelle; Frugier, Florian; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2011-08-01

    Legume roots develop two types of lateral organs, lateral roots and nodules. Nodules develop as a result of a symbiotic interaction with rhizobia and provide a niche for the bacteria to fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. • The Arabidopsis NAC1 transcription factor is involved in lateral root formation, and is regulated post-transcriptionally by miRNA164 and by SINAT5-dependent ubiquitination. We analyzed in Medicago truncatula the role of the closest NAC1 homolog in lateral root formation and in nodulation. • MtNAC1 shows a different expression pattern in response to auxin than its Arabidopsis homolog and no changes in lateral root number or nodulation were observed in plants affected in MtNAC1 expression. In addition, no interaction was found with SINA E3 ligases, suggesting that post-translational regulation of MtNAC1 does not occur in M. truncatula. Similar to what was found in Arabidopsis, a conserved miR164 target site was retrieved in MtNAC1, which reduced protein accumulation of a GFP-miR164 sensor. Furthermore, miR164 and MtNAC1 show an overlapping expression pattern in symbiotic nodules, and overexpression of this miRNA led to a reduction in nodule number. • This work suggests that regulatory pathways controlling a conserved transcription factor are complex and divergent between M. truncatula and Arabidopsis.

  12. Micromonospora from nitrogen fixing nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). A new promising Plant Probiotic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Galindo-Villardón, Purificación; Trujillo, Martha E; Igual, José M; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio

    2014-09-17

    Biotic interactions can improve agricultural productivity without costly and environmentally challenging inputs. Micromonospora strains have recently been reported as natural endophytes of legume nodules but their significance for plant development and productivity has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to determine the diversity and function of Micromonospora isolated from Medicago sativa root nodules. Micromonospora-like strains from field alfalfa nodules were characterized by BOX-PCR fingerprinting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The ecological role of the interaction of the 15 selected representative Micromonospora strains was tested in M. sativa. Nodulation, plant growth and nutrition parameters were analyzed. Alfalfa nodules naturally contain abundant and highly diverse populations of Micromonospora, both at the intra- and at interspecific level. Selected Micromonospora isolates significantly increase the nodulation of alfalfa by Ensifer meliloti 1021 and also the efficiency of the plant for nitrogen nutrition. Moreover, they promote aerial growth, the shoot-to-root ratio, and raise the level of essential nutrients. Our results indicate that Micromonospora acts as a Rhizobia Helper Bacteria (RHB) agent and has probiotic effects, promoting plant growth and increasing nutrition efficiency. Its ecological role, biotechnological potential and advantages as a plant probiotic bacterium (PPB) are also discussed.

  13. Concerted changes in N and C primary metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) under water restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Molero, Gemma; Gilard, Françoise; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Nogués, Salvador

    2013-02-01

    Although the mechanisms of nodule N(2) fixation in legumes are now well documented, some uncertainty remains on the metabolic consequences of water deficit. In most cases, little consideration is given to other organs and, therefore, the coordinated changes in metabolism in leaves, roots, and nodules are not well known. Here, the effect of water restriction on exclusively N(2)-fixing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants was investigated, and proteomic, metabolomic, and physiological analyses were carried out. It is shown that the inhibition of nitrogenase activity caused by water restriction was accompanied by concerted alterations in metabolic pathways in nodules, leaves, and roots. The data suggest that nodule metabolism and metabolic exchange between plant organs nearly reached homeostasis in asparagine synthesis and partitioning, as well as the N demand from leaves. Typically, there was (i) a stimulation of the anaplerotic pathway to sustain the provision of C skeletons for amino acid (e.g. glutamate and proline) synthesis; (ii) re-allocation of glycolytic products to alanine and serine/glycine; and (iii) subtle changes in redox metabolites suggesting the implication of a slight oxidative stress. Furthermore, water restriction caused little change in both photosynthetic efficiency and respiratory cost of N(2) fixation by nodules. In other words, the results suggest that under water stress, nodule metabolism follows a compromise between physiological imperatives (N demand, oxidative stress) and the lower input to sustain catabolism.

  14. Photosynthate partitioning and nitrogen fixation of alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil. [Lotus corniculatus L. ; Medicago sativa L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shieh, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Nodule mass and number are usually correlated with rates of nitrogen fixation in legumes. Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.) with more than twice the nodule number and mass, however, fixes far less nitrogen than alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) at the same age. In this research, photosynthesis and photosynthate partitioning and utilization in relation to nitrogen fixation of alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil were examined in order to determine their relationship to nitrogen fixation potential. Photosynthate to nodules was studied using /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ labeling techniques. Partitioning patterns were altered by shading and dark depletion treatments. Efficiency of photosynthate utilization was examined by determining turnover of /sup 14/C photosynthate in nodule metabolites and by studying rates of cyanide-resistant and cyanide-sensitive O/sub 2/ uptake. Alfalfa nodule activity was greater than trefoil expressed on a hole pot or nodule dry weight basis. Both shading and dark treatments significantly reduced nodule activity as estimated by the acetylene reduction assay. Shoots of both species were found to be the dominant sinks for photosynthate. Percentage /sup 14/C recovered in alfalfa roots was more than twice that of trefoil at 1,2,3,4 and 24 h after labeling. Greater relative specific radioactivity (RSA) in nodules of both species suggests that they were stronger sinks for current photosynthate than roots.

  15. Molecular Signals Controlling the Inhibition of Nodulation by Nitrate in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giel E. van Noorden

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of nitrogen inhibits legume nodule formation, but the mechanism of this inhibition is poorly understood. We found that 2.5 mM nitrate and above significantly inhibited nodule initiation but not root hair curling in Medicago trunatula. We analyzed protein abundance in M. truncatula roots after treatment with either 0 or 2.5 mM nitrate in the presence or absence of its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti after 1, 2 and 5 days following inoculation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was used to identify 106 differentially accumulated proteins responding to nitrate addition, inoculation or time point. While flavonoid-related proteins were less abundant in the presence of nitrate, addition of Nod gene-inducing flavonoids to the Sinorhizobium culture did not rescue nodulation. Accumulation of auxin in response to rhizobia, which is also controlled by flavonoids, still occurred in the presence of nitrate, but did not localize to a nodule initiation site. Several of the changes included defense- and redox-related proteins, and visualization of reactive oxygen species indicated that their induction in root hairs following Sinorhizobium inoculation was inhibited by nitrate. In summary, the presence of nitrate appears to inhibit nodulation via multiple pathways, including changes to flavonoid metabolism, defense responses and redox changes.

  16. Medicago truncatula root nodule proteome analysis reveals differential plant and bacteroid responses to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Ladrera, Rubén; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; González, Esther M

    2007-07-01

    Drought is one of the environmental factors most affecting crop production. Under drought, symbiotic nitrogen fixation is one of the physiological processes to first show stress responses in nodulated legumes. This inhibition process involves a number of factors whose interactions are not yet understood. This work aims to further understand changes occurring in nodules under drought stress from a proteomic perspective. Drought was imposed on Medicago truncatula 'Jemalong A17' plants grown in symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 2011. Changes at the protein level were analyzed using a nongel approach based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Due to the complexity of nodule tissue, the separation of plant and bacteroid fractions in M. truncatula root nodules was first checked with the aim of minimizing cross contamination between the fractions. Second, the protein plant fraction of M. truncatula nodules was profiled, leading to the identification of 377 plant proteins, the largest description of the plant nodule proteome so far. Third, both symbiotic partners were independently analyzed for quantitative differences at the protein level during drought stress. Multivariate data mining allowed for the classification of proteins sets that were involved in drought stress responses. The isolation of the nodule plant and bacteroid protein fractions enabled the independent analysis of the response of both counterparts, gaining further understanding of how each symbiotic member is distinctly affected at the protein level under a water-deficit situation.

  17. Nitric oxide (NO): a key player in the senescence of Medicago truncatula root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, Yvan; Pierre, Olivier; Boncompagni, Eric; Hérouart, Didier; Meilhoc, Eliane; Bruand, Claude

    2012-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signalling and defence molecule involved in diverse plant developmental processes, as well as in the plant response to pathogens. NO has also been detected at different steps of the symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia. NO is required for an optimal establishment of the Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiotic interaction, but little is known about the role of NO in mature nodules. Here, we investigate the role of NO in the late steps of symbiosis. Genetic and pharmacological approaches were conducted to modulate the NO level inside root nodules, and their effects on nitrogen fixation and root nodule senescence were monitored. An increase in endogenous NO levels led to a decrease in nitrogen fixation and early nodule senescence, characterized by cytological modifications of the nodule structure and the early expression of a specific senescence marker. By contrast, a decrease in NO levels led to a delay in nodule senescence. Together, our results strongly suggest that NO is a signal in developmental as well as stress-induced nodule senescence. In addition, this work demonstrates the pivotal role of the bacterial NO detoxification response in the prevention of early nodule senescence, and hence the maintenance of efficient symbiosis.

  18. Toxic effects of arsenic on Sinorhizobium-Medicago sativa symbiotic interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajuelo, Eloisa [Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Seville, 41012 Seville (Spain); Rodriguez-Llorente, Ignacio D. [Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Seville, 41012 Seville (Spain)], E-mail: irodri@us.es; Dary, Mohammed; Palomares, Antonio J. [Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Seville, 41012 Seville (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    Recently, the Rhizobium-legume symbiotic interaction has been proposed as an interesting tool in bioremediation. However, little is known about the effect of most common contaminants on this process. The phytotoxic effects of arsenic on nodulation of Medicago sativa have been examined in vitro using the highly arsenic resistant and symbiotically effective Sinorhizobium sp. strain MA11. The bacteria were able to grow on plates containing As concentrations as high as 10 mM. Nevertheless, as little as 25-35 {mu}M arsenite produced a 75% decrease in the total number of nodules, due to a 90% reduction in the number of rhizobial infections, as could be determined using the strain MA11 carrying a lacZ reporter gene. This effect was associated to root hair damage and a shorter infective root zone. However, once nodulation was established nodule development seemed to continue normally, although earlier senescence could be observed in nodules of arsenic-grown plants. - First steps of nodulation of alfalfa, in particular infection thread formation, are more sensitive to As than nitrogen fixation due to plant effects.

  19. The RPG gene of Medicago truncatula controls Rhizobium-directed polar growth during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Godfroy, Olivier; de Billy, Françoise; Saurat, Olivier; Jauneau, Alain; Gough, Clare

    2008-07-15

    Rhizobia can infect roots of host legume plants and induce new organs called nodules, in which they fix atmospheric nitrogen. Infection generally starts with root hair curling, then proceeds inside newly formed, intracellular tubular structures called infection threads. A successful symbiotic interaction relies on infection threads advancing rapidly at their tips by polar growth through successive cell layers of the root toward developing nodule primordia. To identify a plant component that controls this tip growth process, we characterized a symbiotic mutant of Medicago truncatula, called rpg for rhizobium-directed polar growth. In this mutant, nitrogen-fixing nodules were rarely formed due to abnormally thick and slowly progressing infection threads. Root hair curling was also abnormal, indicating that the RPG gene fulfils an essential function in the process whereby rhizobia manage to dominate the process of induced tip growth for root hair infection. Map-based cloning of RPG revealed a member of a previously unknown plant-specific gene family encoding putative long coiled-coil proteins we have called RRPs (RPG-related proteins) and characterized by an "RRP domain" specific to this family. RPG expression was strongly associated with rhizobial infection, and the RPG protein showed a nuclear localization, indicating that this symbiotic gene constitutes an important component of symbiotic signaling.

  20. Stoichiometric characteristics of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in leaves of differently aged lucerne (Medicago sativa stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhennan eWang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Element concentration within a plant which is vital to function maintenance and adaptation to environment, may change with plant growth. However, how carbon (C, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P vary stoichiometrically with stand growth, i.e. ages or cuts, was still untouched in perennial species. This study tested the hypothesis that lucerne (Medicago sativa C:N, C:P and N:P should change with stand age and cut. Leaf C:N, C:P and N:P changed with stand age, showing various trends in different cuts of lucerne. Generally the greatest stoichiometric ratios were measured in 8 year stand and in the 2nd cut. They were affected significantly and negatively by total N and P concentrations of leaf, but not by organic C concentration. There were significantly positive correlations among leaf C:N, C:P and N:P. However, leaf C:N, C:P and N:P were hardly affected by soil features. Conclusively, lucerne C, N and P stoichiometry are age- and cut-specific, and regulated mainly by leaf N, P concentrations and stoichiometry. There are few correlations with soil fertility. To our knowledge, it is the first try to elucidate the stoichiometry in the viewpoint of age and cut with a perennial herbaceous legume.

  1. Molecular Signals Controlling the Inhibition of Nodulation by Nitrate in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noorden, Giel E; Verbeek, Rob; Dinh, Quy Dung; Jin, Jian; Green, Alexandra; Ng, Jason Liang Pin; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2016-07-02

    The presence of nitrogen inhibits legume nodule formation, but the mechanism of this inhibition is poorly understood. We found that 2.5 mM nitrate and above significantly inhibited nodule initiation but not root hair curling in Medicago trunatula. We analyzed protein abundance in M. truncatula roots after treatment with either 0 or 2.5 mM nitrate in the presence or absence of its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti after 1, 2 and 5 days following inoculation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was used to identify 106 differentially accumulated proteins responding to nitrate addition, inoculation or time point. While flavonoid-related proteins were less abundant in the presence of nitrate, addition of Nod gene-inducing flavonoids to the Sinorhizobium culture did not rescue nodulation. Accumulation of auxin in response to rhizobia, which is also controlled by flavonoids, still occurred in the presence of nitrate, but did not localize to a nodule initiation site. Several of the changes included defense- and redox-related proteins, and visualization of reactive oxygen species indicated that their induction in root hairs following Sinorhizobium inoculation was inhibited by nitrate. In summary, the presence of nitrate appears to inhibit nodulation via multiple pathways, including changes to flavonoid metabolism, defense responses and redox changes.

  2. Two Direct Targets of Cytokinin Signaling Regulate Symbiotic Nodulation in Medicago truncatula[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Federico; Brault-Hernandez, Marianne; Laffont, Carole; Huault, Emeline; Brault, Mathias; Plet, Julie; Moison, Michael; Blanchet, Sandrine; Ichanté, Jean Laurent; Chabaud, Mireille; Carrere, Sébastien; Crespi, Martin; Chan, Raquel L.; Frugier, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Cytokinin regulates many aspects of plant development, and in legume crops, this phytohormone is necessary and sufficient for symbiotic nodule organogenesis, allowing them to fix atmospheric nitrogen. To identify direct links between cytokinins and nodule organogenesis, we determined a consensus sequence bound in vitro by a transcription factor (TF) acting in cytokinin signaling, the nodule-enhanced Medicago truncatula Mt RR1 response regulator (RR). Among genes rapidly regulated by cytokinins and containing this so-called RR binding site (RRBS) in their promoters, we found the nodulation-related Type-A RR Mt RR4 and the Nodulation Signaling Pathway 2 (NSP2) TF. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that RRBS cis-elements in the RR4 and NSP2 promoters are essential for expression during nodule development and for cytokinin induction. Furthermore, a microRNA targeting NSP2 (miR171 h) is also rapidly induced by cytokinins and then shows an expression pattern anticorrelated with NSP2. Other primary targets regulated by cytokinins depending on the Cytokinin Response1 (CRE1) receptor were a cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX1) and a basic Helix-Loop-Helix TF (bHLH476). RNA interference constructs as well as insertion of a Tnt1 retrotransposon in the bHLH gene led to reduced nodulation. Hence, we identified two TFs, NSP2 and bHLH476, as direct cytokinin targets acting at the convergence of phytohormonal and symbiotic cues. PMID:23023168

  3. Abscisic acid coordinates nod factor and cytokinin signaling during the regulation of nodulation in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yiliang; Kalo, Peter; Yendrek, Craig; Sun, Jongho; Liang, Yan; Marsh, John F; Harris, Jeanne M; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2008-10-01

    Nodulation is tightly regulated in legumes to ensure appropriate levels of nitrogen fixation without excessive depletion of carbon reserves. This balance is maintained by intimately linking nodulation and its regulation with plant hormones. It has previously been shown that ethylene and jasmonic acid (JA) are able to regulate nodulation and Nod factor signal transduction. Here, we characterize the nature of abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of nodulation. We show that application of ABA inhibits nodulation, bacterial infection, and nodulin gene expression in Medicago truncatula. ABA acts in a similar manner as JA and ethylene, regulating Nod factor signaling and affecting the nature of Nod factor-induced calcium spiking. However, this action is independent of the ethylene signal transduction pathway. We show that genetic inhibition of ABA signaling through the use of a dominant-negative allele of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE1 leads to a hypernodulation phenotype. In addition, we characterize a novel locus of M. truncatula, SENSITIVITY TO ABA, that dictates the sensitivity of the plant to ABA and, as such, impacts the regulation of nodulation. We show that ABA can suppress Nod factor signal transduction in the epidermis and can regulate cytokinin induction of the nodule primordium in the root cortex. Therefore, ABA is capable of coordinately regulating the diverse developmental pathways associated with nodule formation and can intimately dictate the nature of the plants' response to the symbiotic bacteria.

  4. api, A novel Medicago truncatula symbiotic mutant impaired in nodule primordium invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teillet, Alice; Garcia, Joseph; de Billy, Françoise; Gherardi, Michèle; Huguet, Thierry; Barker, David G; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Journet, Etienne-Pascal

    2008-05-01

    Genetic approaches have proved to be extremely useful in dissecting the complex nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium-legume endosymbiotic association. Here we describe a novel Medicago truncatula mutant called api, whose primary phenotype is the blockage of rhizobial infection just prior to nodule primordium invasion, leading to the formation of large infection pockets within the cortex of noninvaded root outgrowths. The mutant api originally was identified as a double symbiotic mutant associated with a new allele (nip-3) of the NIP/LATD gene, following the screening of an ethylmethane sulphonate-mutagenized population. Detailed characterization of the segregating single api mutant showed that rhizobial infection is also defective at the earlier stage of infection thread (IT) initiation in root hairs, as well as later during IT growth in the small percentage of nodules which overcome the primordium invasion block. Neither modulating ethylene biosynthesis (with L-alpha-(2-aminoethoxyvinylglycine or 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) nor reducing ethylene sensitivity in a skl genetic background alters the basic api phenotype, suggesting that API function is not closely linked to ethylene metabolism or signaling. Genetic mapping places the API gene on the upper arm of the M. truncatula linkage group 4, and epistasis analyses show that API functions downstream of BIT1/ERN1 and LIN and upstream of NIP/LATD and the DNF genes.

  5. Symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and Medicago truncatula is not significantly affected by silver and silver sulfide nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Jonathan D; Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Mike J; McNear, David; Bertsch, Paul M

    2016-07-01

    Silver (Ag) engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are being released into waste streams and are being discharged, largely as Ag2S aged-ENMs (a-ENMs), into agroecosystems receiving biosolids amendments. Recent research has demonstrated that biosolids containing an environmentally relevant mixture of ZnO, TiO2, and Ag ENMs and their transformation products, including Ag2S a-ENMs, disrupted the symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and legumes. However, this study was unable to unequivocally determine which ENM or combination of ENMs and a-ENMs was responsible for the observed inhibition. Here, we examined further the effects of polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP) coated pristine Ag ENMs (PVP-Ag), Ag2S a-ENMs, and soluble Ag (as AgSO4) at 1, 10, and 100 mg Ag kg(-1) on the symbiosis between the legume Medicago truncatula and the nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Sinorhizobium melliloti in biosolids-amended soil. Nodulation frequency, nodule function, glutathione reductase production, and biomass were not significantly affected by any of the Ag treatments, even at 100 mg kg(-1), a concentration analogous to a worst-case scenario resulting from long-term, repeated biosolids amendments. Our results provide additional evidence that the disruption of the symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and legumes in response to a mixture of ENMs in biosolids-amended soil reported previously may not be attributable to Ag ENMs or their transformation end-products. We anticipate these findings will provide clarity to regulators and industry regarding potential unintended consequences to terrestrial ecosystems resulting from of the use of Ag ENMs in consumer products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Legume crops phylogeny and genetic diversity for science and breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economically, legumes (Fabaceae) represent the second most important family of crop plants after the grass family, Poaceae. Grain legumes account for 27% of world crop production and provide 33% of the dietary protein consumed by humans, while pasture and forage legumes provide vital part of animal ...

  7. Large-scale development of cost-effective SNP marker assays for diversity assessment and genetic mapping in chickpea and comparative mapping in legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, Pavana J; Kumar, Ashish; Penmetsa, Ramachandra Varma; Farmer, Andrew; Schlueter, Jessica A; Chamarthi, Siva K; Whaley, Adam M; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Gaur, Pooran M; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Kavi Kishor, Polavarapu B; Shah, Trushar M; Cook, Douglas R; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2012-01-01

    A set of 2486 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were compiled in chickpea using four approaches, namely (i) Solexa/Illumina sequencing (1409), (ii) amplicon sequencing of tentative orthologous genes (TOGs) (604), (iii) mining of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) (286) and (iv) sequencing of candidate genes (187). Conversion of these SNPs to the cost-effective and flexible throughput Competitive Allele Specific PCR (KASPar) assays generated successful assays for 2005 SNPs. These marker assays have been designated as Chickpea KASPar Assay Markers (CKAMs). Screening of 70 genotypes including 58 diverse chickpea accessions and 12 BC3F2 lines showed 1341 CKAMs as being polymorphic. Genetic analysis of these data clustered chickpea accessions based on geographical origin. Genotyping data generated for 671 CKAMs on the reference mapping population (Cicer arietinum ICC 4958 × Cicer reticulatum PI 489777) were compiled with 317 unpublished TOG-SNPs and 396 published markers for developing the genetic map. As a result, a second-generation genetic map comprising 1328 marker loci including novel 625 CKAMs, 314 TOG-SNPs and 389 published marker loci with an average inter-marker distance of 0.59 cM was constructed. Detailed analyses of 1064 mapped loci of this second-generation chickpea genetic map showed a higher degree of synteny with genome of Medicago truncatula, followed by Glycine max, Lotus japonicus and least with Vigna unguiculata. Development of these cost-effective CKAMs for SNP genotyping will be useful not only for genetics research and breeding applications in chickpea, but also for utilizing genome information from other sequenced or model legumes. PMID:22703242

  8. Molecular docking of Glycine max and Medicago truncatula ureases with urea; bioinformatics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiz, Ertugrul; Vatansever, Recep; Ozyigit, Ibrahim Ilker

    2016-03-01

    Urease (EC 3.5.1.5) is a nickel-dependent metalloenzyme catalyzing the hydrolysis of urea into ammonia and carbon dioxide. It is present in many bacteria, fungi, yeasts and plants. Most species, with few exceptions, use nickel metalloenzyme urease to hydrolyze urea, which is one of the commonly used nitrogen fertilizer in plant growth thus its enzymatic hydrolysis possesses vital importance in agricultural practices. Considering the essentiality and importance of urea and urease activity in most plants, this study aimed to comparatively investigate the ureases of two important legume species such as Glycine max (soybean) and Medicago truncatula (barrel medic) from Fabaceae family. With additional plant species, primary and secondary structures of 37 plant ureases were comparatively analyzed using various bioinformatics tools. A structure based phylogeny was constructed using predicted 3D models of G. max and M. truncatula, whose crystallographic structures are not available, along with three additional solved urease structures from Canavalia ensiformis (PDB: 4GY7), Bacillus pasteurii (PDB: 4UBP) and Klebsiella aerogenes (PDB: 1FWJ). In addition, urease structures of these species were docked with urea to analyze the binding affinities, interacting amino acids and atom distances in urease-urea complexes. Furthermore, mutable amino acids which could potentially affect the protein active site, stability and flexibility as well as overall protein stability were analyzed in urease structures of G. max and M. truncatula. Plant ureases demonstrated similar physico-chemical properties with 833-878 amino acid residues and 89.39-90.91 kDa molecular weight with mainly acidic (5.15-6.10 pI) nature. Four protein domain structures such as urease gamma, urease beta, urease alpha and amidohydro 1 characterized the plant ureases. Secondary structure of plant ureases also demonstrated conserved protein architecture, with predominantly α-helix and random coil structures. In

  9. Genetic Engineering of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Khurshid, Muhammad; Sun, Zhan Min; Tang, Yi Xiong; Zhou, Mei Liang; Wu, Yan Min

    2016-01-01

    Alfalfa is excellent perennial legume forage for its extensive ecological adaptability, high nutrition value, palatability and biological nitrogen fixation. It plays a very important role in the agriculture, animal husbandry and ecological construction. It is cultivated in all continents. With the development of modern plant breeding and genetic engineering techniques, a large amount of work has been carried out on alfalfa. Here we summarize the recent research advances in genetic engineering of alfalfa breeding, including transformation, quality improvement, stress resistance and as a bioreactor. The review article can enables us to understand the research method, direction and achievements of genetic engineering technology of Alfalfa.

  10. From signal to form: Nod factor as a morhogenetic signal molecule to induce symbiotic responses in legume root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esseling, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, research is presented which contributes to a better understanding of nod factor (NF) induced signalling in Iegume root hairs, leading to a successful symbiosis. We mainly use root hairs of the model Iegume Medicago truncatula ('barrel medic') as an experimental system. In the differe

  11. From signal to form: Nod factor as a morhogenetic signal molecule to induce symbiotic responses in legume root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esseling, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, research is presented which contributes to a better understanding of nod factor (NF) induced signalling in Iegume root hairs, leading to a successful symbiosis. We mainly use root hairs of the model Iegume Medicago truncatula ('barrel medic') as an experimental system. In the

  12. LEGUMES UTILISED IN TRADITIONAL FOODS IN IRAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalaram S. Ismael

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Iraq is famous in the traditional food from legumes, especially chickpea, lentil, and beans are fresh and dry seeds and as well as for peas, beans and the seeds of faba, cowpea and chickpeas boiled with salt eaten in the form of Lablabe, or make soup from fresh cowpea, fresh faba bean, fresh fasoulia, as well as lentil soup (shorbat adas and different kinds of salad. Turshi, pickled vegetables and fresh pea, fresh fasoulia in the cuisine of many Balkan and Middle East countries. It is a traditional appetizer, meze. Chickpea is eaten on form falafel . The cuisine of Iraq reflects this rich inheritance as well as strong influence from the culinary traditions of neighbouring Persia, Turkey and the Syria region area. Meals begin with appetizers and salads known as Mezza. Some popular dishes include kebab (often marinated with garlic, lemon and spices, then grilled. It can be challenging to help people adjust their diet to meet their nutrient needs and promote weight loss, while at the same time still keeping them satiated. Nutrient rich legumes can be a valuable part of such a diet. They contain soluble fibre and protein and are low glycemic index, all of which may help promote satiety. Legumes are one of the most sustainable sources of protein in the world. Legumes are also significant sources of resistant starch, which is fermented by colonic bacteria to short chain fatty acids.

  13. Grain legume genetic resources for allele mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequencing capacities for higher throughput at significantly lower costs have enabled larger scale genotyping of plant genetic resources. One challenge to sequencing the USDA grain legume collections of pea, chickpea and lentil core accessions is the amount of heterogeneity in the landrace accessio...

  14. Utilization of summer legumes as bioenergy feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Keri B.; Bauer, Philip J.; Ro, Kyoung S. [United States Department of Agriculture, ARS, Coastal Plains Soil, Water, and Plant Research Center, 2611 W. Lucas St. Florence, SC 29501 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Sunn hemp (Crotolaria juncea), is a fast growing, high biomass yielding tropical legume that may be a possible southeastern bioenergy crop. When comparing this legume to a commonly grown summer legume - cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata), sunn hemp was superior in biomass yield (kg ha{sup -1}) and subsequent energy yield (GJ ha{sup -1}). In one year of the study after 12 weeks of growth, sunn hemp had 10.7 Mg ha{sup -1} of biomass with an energy content of 19.0 Mg ha{sup -1}. This resulted in an energy yield of 204 GJ ha{sup -1}. The energy content was 6% greater than that of cowpeas. Eventhough sunn hemp had a greater amount of ash, plant mineral concentrations were lower in some cases of minerals (K, Ca, Mg, S) known to reduce thermochemical conversion process efficiency. Pyrolytic degradation of both legumes revealed that sunn hemp began to degrade at higher temperatures as well as release greater amounts of volatile matter at a faster rate. (author)

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of phytochemicals from fruits, vegetables, and food legumes: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fengmei; Du, Bin; Xu, Baojun

    2017-06-12

    Inflammation is the first biological response of the immune system to infection, injury or irritation. Evidence suggests that the anti-inflammatory effect is mediated through the regulation of various inflammatory cytokines, such as nitric oxide, interleukins, tumor necrosis factor alpha-α, interferon gamma-γ as well as noncytokine mediator, prostaglandin E2. Fruits, vegetables, and food legumes contain high levels of phytochemicals that show anti-inflammatory effect, but their mechanisms of actions have not been completely identified. The aim of this paper was to summarize the recent investigations and findings regarding in vitro and animal model studies on the anti-inflammatory effects of fruits, vegetables, and food legumes. Specific cytokines released for specific type of physiological event might shed some light on the specific use of each source of phytochemicals that can benefit to counter the inflammatory response. As natural modulators of proinflammatory gene expressions, phytochemical from fruits, vegetables, and food legumes could be incorporated into novel bioactive anti-inflammatory formulations of various nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Finally, these phytochemicals are discussed as the natural promotion strategy for the improvement of human health status. The phenolics and triterpenoids in fruits and vegetables showed higher anti-inflammatory activity than other compounds. In food legumes, lectins and peptides had anti-inflammatory activity in most cases. However, there are lack of human study data on the anti-inflammatory activity of phytochemicals from fruits, vegetables, and food legumes.

  16. Legume growth-promoting rhizobia: an overview on the Mesorhizobium genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjo, Marta; Alexandre, Ana; Oliveira, Solange

    2014-01-20

    The need for sustainable agricultural practices is revitalizing the interest in biological nitrogen fixation and rhizobia-legumes symbioses, particularly those involving economically important legume crops in terms of food and forage. The genus Mesorhizobium includes species with high geographical dispersion and able to nodulate a wide variety of legumes, including important crop species, like chickpea or biserrula. Some cases of legume-mesorhizobia inoculant introduction represent exceptional opportunities to study the rhizobia genomes evolution and the evolutionary relationships among species. Complete genome sequences revealed that mesorhizobia typically harbour chromosomal symbiosis islands. The phylogenies of symbiosis genes, such as nodC, are not congruent with the phylogenies based on core genes, reflecting rhizobial host range, rather than species affiliation. This agrees with studies showing that Mesorhizobium species are able to exchange symbiosis genes through lateral transfer of chromosomal symbiosis islands, thus acquiring the ability to nodulate new hosts. Phylogenetic analyses of the Mesorhizobium genus based on core and accessory genes reveal complex evolutionary relationships and a high genomic plasticity, rendering the Mesorhizobium genus as a good model to investigate rhizobia genome evolution and adaptation to different host plants. Further investigation of symbiosis genes as well as stress response genes will certainly contribute to understand mesorhizobia-legume symbiosis and to develop more effective mesorhizobia inoculants.

  17. In-vitro regeneration studies of an important legume, Cicer arietinum: Hurdles and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragati Kumari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There are several economically important grain legumes including chickpea that play significant role in nutrition of the rural and urban poor in developing world. Plants are subjected to a large number of stresses that may interfere with the normal growth and development. The model legumes are being developed as experimental systems to study a number of key biological questions using molecular tools including genomics and proteomics. Most of the functional genomics approaches rely upon the highthroughput transformation system useful for studying various gene identification strategies. The difficulty to transform a plant varies from species to species in legumes. There is limited success in exchange of the desirable characters by the classical and modern breeding technologies, in important pulse crop chickpea and biotechnological tools like plant tissue culture and genetic transformation techniques have emerged as a potential supplement. The major bottleneck is requirement of an in vitro manipulation of leguminosae members and the availability of reproducible, efficient and better plant regeneration methods. The regeneration and transformation of legumes particularly chickpea suffers due to recalcitrant nature towards rooting and transplantation of the in vitro regenerated plants. This becomes a limiting factor for the application of this technology towards designated mandate of crop improvement programs. This article discusses the hurdles and strategies for transformation of legumes in general and chickpea in particular.

  18. The Medicago truncatula DMI1 protein modulates cytosolic calcium signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peiter, Edgar; Sun, Jongho; Heckmann, Anne Birgitte Lau

    2007-01-01

    In addition to establishing symbiotic relationships with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, legumes also enter into a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with rhizobial bacteria that results in the formation of root nodules. Several genes involved in the development of both arbuscular mycorrhiza and legume...

  19. The Medicago truncatula DMI1 protein modulates cytosolic calcium signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peiter, Edgar; Sun, Jongho; Heckmann, Anne Birgitte Lau

    2007-01-01

    In addition to establishing symbiotic relationships with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, legumes also enter into a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with rhizobial bacteria that results in the formation of root nodules. Several genes involved in the development of both arbuscular mycorrhiza and legume nodu...

  20. Heart of endosymbioses: transcriptomics reveals a conserved genetic program among arbuscular mycorrhizal, actinorhizal and legume-rhizobial symbioses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Tromas

    Full Text Available To improve their nutrition, most plants associate with soil microorganisms, particularly fungi, to form mycorrhizae. A few lineages, including actinorhizal plants and legumes are also able to interact with nitrogen-fixing bacteria hosted intracellularly inside root nodules. Fossil and molecular data suggest that the molecular mechanisms involved in these root nodule symbioses (RNS have been partially recycled from more ancient and widespread arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM symbiosis. We used a comparative transcriptomics approach to identify genes involved in establishing these 3 endosymbioses and their functioning. We analysed global changes in gene expression in AM in the actinorhizal tree C. glauca. A comparison with genes induced in AM in Medicago truncatula and Oryza sativa revealed a common set of genes induced in AM. A comparison with genes induced in nitrogen-fixing nodules of C. glauca and M. truncatula also made it possible to define a common set of genes induced in these three endosymbioses. The existence of this core set of genes is in accordance with the proposed recycling of ancient AM genes for new functions related to nodulation in legumes and actinorhizal plants.

  1. Genome sequence of Ensifer arboris strain LMG 14919(T); a microsymbiont of the legume Prosopis chilensis growing in Kosti, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Wayne; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Munk, Christine; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Willems, Anne

    2014-06-15

    Ensifer arboris LMG 14919(T) is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of several species of legume trees. LMG 14919(T) was isolated in 1987 from a nodule recovered from the roots of the tree Prosopis chilensis growing in Kosti, Sudan. LMG 14919(T) is highly effective at fixing nitrogen with P. chilensis (Chilean mesquite) and Acacia senegal (gum Arabic tree or gum acacia). LMG 14919(T) does not nodulate the tree Leucena leucocephala, nor the herbaceous species Macroptilium atropurpureum, Trifolium pratense, Medicago sativa, Lotus corniculatus and Galega orientalis. Here we describe the features of E. arboris LMG 14919(T), together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,850,303 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 7 scaffolds of 12 contigs containing 6,461 protein-coding genes and 84 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  2. Genome sequence of Ensifer arboris strain LMG 14919T; a microsymbiont of the legume Prosopis chilensis growing in Kosti, Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Wayne; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Munk, Christine; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Willems, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Ensifer arboris LMG 14919T is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of several species of legume trees. LMG 14919T was isolated in 1987 from a nodule recovered from the roots of the tree Prosopis chilensis growing in Kosti, Sudan. LMG 14919T is highly effective at fixing nitrogen with P. chilensis (Chilean mesquite) and Acacia senegal (gum Arabic tree or gum acacia). LMG 14919T does not nodulate the tree Leucena leucocephala, nor the herbaceous species Macroptilium atropurpureum, Trifolium pratense, Medicago sativa, Lotus corniculatus and Galega orientalis. Here we describe the features of E. arboris LMG 14919T, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,850,303 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 7 scaffolds of 12 contigs containing 6,461 protein-coding genes and 84 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197433

  3. Selection for cheating across disparate environments in the legume-rhizobium mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephanie S; Simms, Ellen L

    2014-09-01

    The primary dilemma in evolutionarily stable mutualisms is that natural selection for cheating could overwhelm selection for cooperation. Cheating need not entail parasitism; selection favours cheating as a quantitative trait whenever less-cooperative partners are more fit than more-cooperative partners. Mutualisms might be stabilised by mechanisms that direct benefits to more-cooperative individuals, which counter selection for cheating; however, empirical evidence that natural selection favours cheating in mutualisms is sparse. We measured selection on cheating in single-partner pairings of wild legume and rhizobium lineages, which prevented legume choice. Across contrasting environments, selection consistently favoured cheating by rhizobia, but did not favour legumes that provided less benefit to rhizobium partners. This is the first simultaneous measurement of selection on cheating across both host and symbiont lineages from a natural population. We empirically confirm selection for cheating as a source of antagonistic coevolutionary pressure in mutualism and a biological dilemma for models of cooperation.

  4. Legume consumption and its association with fasting glucose, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in the Indian Migration Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Preet K; Bowen, Liza; Kinra, Sanjay; Bharathi, Ankalmadugu Venkatsubbareddy; Agrawal, Sutapa; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Reddy, Kolli Srinath; Ebrahim, Shah

    2016-11-01

    Legume consumption is associated with lower fasting glucose (FG) and insulin levels in nutrition trials and lower CVD mortality in large-scale epidemiological studies. In India, legumes are widely consumed in various preparations, yet no epidemiological study has evaluated the association of legumes with FG levels, insulin resistance and diabetes risk. The present study aimed to fill this gap. Fasting blood samples, in-person interviews to obtain information on demographic/socio-economic factors, physical activity, alcohol and tobacco use, and anthropometric measurements were collected. Dietary intakes were assessed by an interviewer-administered, validated, semi-quantitative FFQ. Lucknow, Nagpur, Hyderabad and Bangalore, India. Men and women (n 6367) aged 15-76 years - urban residents, urban migrants and their rural siblings. In multivariate random-effects models adjusted for age, BMI, total energy intake, macronutrients, physical activity and rural/migration status, daily legume consumption was not associated with FG (P-for-trend=0·78), insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment score; P-for-trend=0·73) or the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (P-for-trend=0·41). Stratified analyses by vegetarian diet and migration status did not change the findings. Inverse associations between legumes and FG emerged for participants with lower BMI and higher carbohydrate, protein, fat and sugar intakes. Although legumes are essential in traditional Indian diets, as well as in prudent and Mediterranean diets in the West, we did not find an association between legumes and markers of glycaemic control, insulin resistance or diabetes, except for subgroups based on BMI and macronutrient intake. The ubiquitous presence and complexity of legume preparations in Indian diets may contribute to these findings.

  5. Stress responses in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessmann, H.; Edwards, R.; Dixon, R.A. (Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (USA)); Geno, P.W. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The isoflavonoid conjugates medicarpin-3-O-glucoside-6{double prime}-O-malonate (MGM), afrormosin-7-O-glucoside (AG), and afrormosin-7-O-glucoside-6{double prime}-O-malonate (AGM) were isolated and characterized from cell suspension cultures of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), where they were the major constitutive secondary metabolites. They were also found in alfalfa roots but not in other parts of the plant. The phytoalexin medicarpin accumulated rapidly in suspension cultured cells treated with elicitor from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and this was subsequently accompanied by an increase in the levels of MGM. In contrast, net accumulation of afrormosin conjugates was not affected by elicitor treatment. Labeling studies with ({sup 14}C)phenylalanine indicated that afrormosin conjugates were the major de novo synthesized isoflavonoid products in unelicited cells. During elicitation, ({sup 14}C)phenylalanine was incorporated predominantly into medicarpin, although a significant proportion of the newly synthesized medicarpin was also conjugated. Treatment of {sup 14}C-labeled, elicited cells with L-{alpha}-aminooxy-{beta}-phenylpropionic acid, a potent inhibitor of PAL activity in vivo, resulted in the initial appearance of labeled medicarpin of very low specific activity, suggesting that the phytoalexin could be released from a preformed conjugate under these conditions. Our data draw attention to the involvement of isoflavone hydroxylases during the constitutive and elicitor-induced accumulation of isoflavonoids and their conjugates in alfalfa cell cultures.

  6. Production Performance of Root Systems of Four Forage Legume Species and Their Development Characteristics in Loess Plateau,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang; Jianquan; Zhang; Jiyu; Wang; Yanrong; Xie; Wengang; Li; Juncheng

    2014-01-01

    Production performance of four forage legumes species of Medicago sativa,Onobrychis viciifolia,Lotus corniculatus and Galega officinalis were determined,including plant height,above-ground biomass per unit area,tillers per unit area,fertile tillers per unit area,shoot /leaf ratio and fresh /dry matter weight ratio,and the distribution characteristics of their root systems in 0- 100 cm soil layers with 10 cm interval were studied. Results showed that the average aboveground fresh biomass(4 a and 5 a) of four forage legumes species successively were L. corniculatus > M. sativa > O. viciifolia > G. officinalis. The average plant heights in two years successively were O. viciifolia > M. sativa > G. officinalis > L. corniculatus. Tillers per unit area of four forage legume species in two years successively were M. sativa > L. corniculatus > O. viciifolia > G. officinalis. Fertile tillers per unit area in two years were O. viciifolia > M. sativa > L. corniculatus > G. officinalis. Average shoot /leaf ratio in two years were G. officinalis > M. sativa > O. viciifolia > L. corniculatus. Average moisture contents of four forage legume species in two years successively were G. officinalis > L. corniculatus > M. sativa = O. viciifolia. The distribution characteristics of root systems of four forage legumes species in 0- 100 cm soil layers were as follows: the root weights of M. sativa in 0- 40 cm soil layers accounted for about 98. 3% of total root weight,that of O. viciifolia in 0- 30 cm soil layers was 85. 8%,that of L. corniculatus in 0- 10 cm soil layers was 80%,and that of G. officinalis in 0- 40 cm soil layers was 81. 4%. The results suggested that L. corniculatus was suited to plant in slighter degraded pasture to control water and soil erosion in early stage,G. officinalis with strong lateral roots was adapted to degraded grassland in the Loess Plateau where soil nutrient was poor,while O. viciifolia and M. sativa with potentially strong main root were fit for water

  7. Legume Lectins: Proteins with Diverse Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarda-Diaz, Irlanda; Guzman-Partida, Ana Maria; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are a diverse class of proteins distributed extensively in nature. Among these proteins; legume lectins display a variety of interesting features including antimicrobial; insecticidal and antitumor activities. Because lectins recognize and bind to specific glycoconjugates present on the surface of cells and intracellular structures; they can serve as potential target molecules for developing practical applications in the fields of food; agriculture; health and pharmaceutical research. This review presents the current knowledge of the main structural characteristics of legume lectins and the relationship of structure to the exhibited specificities; provides an overview of their particular antimicrobial; insecticidal and antitumor biological activities and describes possible applications based on the pattern of recognized glyco-targets. PMID:28604616

  8. Phenotypical and genotypical characteristics of root-nodulating bacteria isolated from annual Medicago spp. in Soummam Valley (Algeria)

    OpenAIRE

    Sebbane, N.; Sahnoune, M.; Zakhia, Frédéric; Willems, A.; Benallaoua, S.; De Lajudie, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Aims: In the framework of agro-pastoral system management using local annual medics coupled with their native root-nodulating bacteria to extend pasture zones, increase forage yields and improve ovine and bovine breeding in Algeria, we investigated diversity of rhizobia from annual Medicago spp. (Medicago arabica, Medicago polymorpha, Medicago minima and Medicago orbicularis). Methods and Results: Ten nodulating-isolates were characterized by morphological, cultural, physiological and biochem...

  9. Double genetically modified symbiotic system for improved Cu phytostabilization in legume roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Palacios, Patricia; Romero-Aguilar, Asunción; Delgadillo, Julián; Doukkali, Bouchra; Caviedes, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Llorente, Ignacio D; Pajuelo, Eloísa

    2017-06-01

    Excess copper (Cu) in soils has deleterious effects on plant growth and can pose a risk to human health. In the last decade, legume-rhizobium symbioses became attractive biotechnological tools for metal phytostabilization. For this technique being useful, metal-tolerant symbionts are required, which can be generated through genetic manipulation.In this work, a double symbiotic system was engineered for Cu phytostabilization: On the one hand, composite Medicago truncatula plants expressing the metallothionein gene mt4a from Arabidopsis thaliana in roots were obtained to improve plant Cu tolerance. On the other hand, a genetically modified Ensifer medicae strain, expressing copper resistance genes copAB from Pseudomonas fluorescens driven by a nodulation promoter, nifHp, was used for plant inoculation. Our results indicated that expression of mt4a in composite plants ameliorated plant growth and nodulation and enhanced Cu tolerance. Lower levels of ROS-scavenging enzymes and of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), such as malondialdehyde (a marker of lipid peroxidation), suggested reduced oxidative stress. Furthermore, inoculation with the genetically modified Ensifer further improved root Cu accumulation without altering metal loading to shoots, leading to diminished values of metal translocation from roots to shoots. The double modified partnership is proposed as a suitable tool for Cu rhizo-phytostabilization.

  10. Molecular mechanisms controlling legume autoregulation of nodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Dugald E; Ferguson, Brett J; Hayashi, Satomi; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2011-10-01

    High input costs and environmental pressures to reduce nitrogen use in agriculture have increased the competitive advantage of legume crops. The symbiotic relationship that legumes form with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria in root nodules is central to this advantage. Understanding how legume plants maintain control of nodulation to balance the nitrogen gains with their energy needs and developmental costs will assist in increasing their productivity and relative advantage. For this reason, the regulation of nodulation has been extensively studied since the first mutants exhibiting increased nodulation were isolated almost three decades ago. Nodulation is regulated primarily via a systemic mechanism known as the autoregulation of nodulation (AON), which is controlled by a CLAVATA1-like receptor kinase. Multiple components sharing homology with the CLAVATA signalling pathway that maintains control of the shoot apical meristem in arabidopsis have now been identified in AON. This includes the recent identification of several CLE peptides capable of activating nodule inhibition responses, a low molecular weight shoot signal and a role for CLAVATA2 in AON. Efforts are now being focused on directly identifying the interactions of these components and to identify the form that long-distance transport molecules take.

  11. Quantitative understanding of the performance of upland rice – cover legume cropping systems in West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akanvou, R.K.

    2001-01-01

    Keywords: upland rice, relay intercropping, modelling, cover crops, improved fallow.Reducing the long fallow period by replacing the natural fallow with fast growing legume species to improve soil fertility, control weeds or to grow additional forage necessitate selection of suitable species for tho

  12. Legume presence reduces the decomposition rate of non-legume roots, role of plant traits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Deyn, Gerlinde B.; Saar, Sirgi; Barel, Janna; Semchenko, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Plant litter traits are known to play an important role in the rate of litter decomposition and mineralization, both for aboveground and belowground litter. However also the biotic and abiotic environment in which the litter decomposes plays a significant role in the rate of decomposition. The presence of living plants may accelerate litter decomposition rates via a priming effects. The size of this effect is expected to be related to the traits of the litter. In this study we focus on root litter, given that roots and their link to ecosystem processes have received relatively little attention in trait-based research. To test the effect of a growing legume plant on root decomposition and the role of root traits in this we used dead roots of 7 different grassland species (comprising grasses, a forb and legumes), determined their C, N, P content and quantified litter mass loss after eight weeks of incubation in soil with and without white clover. We expected faster root decomposition with white clover, especially for root litter with low N content. In contrast we found slower decomposition of grass and forb roots which were poor in N (negative priming) in presence of white clover, while decomposition rates of legume roots were not affected by the presence of white clover. Overall we found that root decomposition can be slowed down in the presence of a living plant and that this effect depends on the traits of the decomposing roots, with a pronounced reduction in root litter poor in N and P, but not in the relatively nutrient-rich legume root litters. The negative priming effect of legume plants on non-legume litter decomposition may have resulted from preferential substrate utilisation by soil microbes.

  13. Innovations in agronomy for food legumes. A review

    OpenAIRE

    Siddique, Kadambot H. M.; Johansen, Chris; Turner, Neil C.; Jeuffroy, Marie-Helene,; Hashem, Abul; Dogan SAKAR; Gan, Yantai; Alghamdi, Salem S.

    2012-01-01

    Although there is increasing awareness of the importance of food legumes in human, animal and soil health, adoption of improved production technologies for food legume crops is not proceeding at the same pace as for cereal crops. Over the previous decade, the only food legumes to have shown significant production increases have been chickpea, lentil and faba bean in North America, chickpea in Australia, and faba bean in Europe. In smallholder farming in developing countries, production trends...

  14. Impact of Soil Salinity on the Structure of the Bacterial Endophytic Community Identified from the Roots of Caliph Medic (Medicago truncatula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud W Yaish

    Full Text Available In addition to being a forage crop, Caliph medic (Medicago truncatula is also a model legume plant and is used for research focusing on the molecular characterization of the interaction between rhizobia and plants. However, the endophytic microbiome in this plant is poorly defined. Endophytic bacteria play a role in supplying plants with the basic requirements necessary for growth and development. Moreover, these bacteria also play a role in the mechanism of salinity stress adaptation in plants. As a prelude to the isolation and utilization of these bacteria in Caliph medic farming, 41 bacterial OTUs were identified in this project from within the interior of the roots of this plant by pyrosequencing of the small ribosomal subunit gene (16S rDNA using a cultivation-independent approach. In addition, the differential abundance of these bacteria was studied following exposure of the plants to salinity stress. About 29,064 high-quality reads were obtained from the sequencing of six libraries prepared from control and salinity-treated tissues. Statistical analysis revealed that the abundance of ~70% of the OTUs was significantly (p ≤ 0.05 altered in roots that were exposed to salinity stress. Sequence analysis showed a similarity between some of the identified species and other, known, growth-promoting bacteria, marine and salt-stressed soil-borne bacteria, and nitrogen-fixing bacterial isolates. Determination of the amendments to the bacterial community due to salinity stress in Caliph medic provides a crucial step toward developing an understanding of the association of these endophytes, under salt stress conditions, in this model plant. To provide direct evidence regarding their growth promoting activity, a group of endophytic bacteria were isolated from inside of plant roots using a cultivation-dependent approach. Several of these isolates were able to produce ACC-deaminase, ammonia and IAA; and to solubilize Zn+2 and PO4-3. This data is

  15. Remnants of the Legume Ancestral Genome Preserved in Gene-Rich Regions: Insights from Lupinus angustifolius Physical, Genetic, and Comparative Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Książkiewicz, Michał; Zielezinski, Andrzej; Wyrwa, Katarzyna; Szczepaniak, Anna; Rychel, Sandra; Karlowski, Wojciech; Wolko, Bogdan; Naganowska, Barbara

    The narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius) was recently considered as a legume reference species. Genetic resources have been developed, including a draft genome sequence, linkage maps, nuclear DNA libraries, and cytogenetic chromosome-specific landmarks. Here, we used a complex approach, involving DNA fingerprinting, sequencing, genetic mapping, and molecular cytogenetics, to localize and analyze L. angustifolius gene-rich regions (GRRs). A L. angustifolius genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was screened with short sequence repeat (SSR)-based probes. Selected BACs were fingerprinted and assembled into contigs. BAC-end sequence (BES) annotation allowed us to choose clones for sequencing, targeting GRRs. Additionally, BESs were aligned to the scaffolds of the genome sequence. The genetic map was supplemented with 35 BES-derived markers, distributed in 14 linkage groups and tagging 37 scaffolds. The identified GRRs had an average gene density of 19.6 genes/100 kb and physical-to-genetic distance ratios of 11 to 109 kb/cM. Physical and genetic mapping was supported by multi-BAC-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and five new linkage groups were assigned to the chromosomes. Syntenic links to the genome sequences of five legume species (Medicago truncatula, Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, Phaseolus vulgaris, and Cajanus cajan) were identified. The comparative mapping of the two largest lupin GRRs provides novel evidence for ancient duplications in all of the studied species. These regions are conserved among representatives of the main clades of Papilionoideae. Furthermore, despite the complex evolution of legumes, some segments of the nuclear genome were not substantially modified and retained their quasi-ancestral structures. Cytogenetic markers anchored in these regions constitute a platform for heterologous mapping of legume genomes.

  16. Flavones and flavonols play distinct critical roles during nodulation of Medicago truncatula by Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Subramanian, Senthil; Stacey, Gary; Yu, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoids play critical roles in legume-rhizobium symbiosis. However, the role of individual flavonoid compounds in this process has not yet been clearly established. We silenced different flavonoid-biosynthesis enzymes to generate transgenic Medicago truncatula roots with different flavonoid profiles. Silencing of chalcone synthase, the key entry-point enzyme for flavonoid biosynthesis led to flavonoid-deficient roots. Silencing of isoflavone synthase and flavone synthase led to roots deficient for a subset of flavonoids, isoflavonoids (formononetin and biochanin A) and flavones (7,4'-dihydroxyflavone), respectively. When tested for nodulation by Sinorhizobium meliloti, flavonoid-deficient roots had a near complete loss of nodulation, whereas flavone-deficient roots had reduced nodulation. Isoflavone-deficient roots nodulated normally, suggesting that isoflavones might not play a critical role in M. truncatula nodulation, even though they are the most abundant root flavonoids. Supplementation of flavone-deficient roots with 7, 4'-dihydroxyflavone, a major inducer of S. meliloti nod genes, completely restored nodulation. However, the same treatment did not restore nodulation in flavonoid-deficient roots, suggesting that other non-nod gene-inducing flavonoid compounds are also critical to nodulation. Supplementation of roots with the flavonol kaempferol (an inhibitor of auxin transport), in combination with the use of flavone pre-treated S. meliloti cells, completely restored nodulation in flavonoid-deficient roots. In addition, S. meliloti cells constitutively producing Nod factors were able to nodulate flavone-deficient roots, but not flavonoid-deficient roots. These observations indicated that flavones might act as internal inducers of rhizobial nod genes, and that flavonols might act as auxin transport regulators during nodulation. Both these roles of flavonoids appear critical for symbiosis in M. truncatula.

  17. Exploring the nuclear proteome of Medicago truncatula at the switch towards seed filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Ombretta; Rogniaux, Hélène; Firnhaber, Christian; Zuber, Hélène; Küster, Helge; Larré, Colette; Thompson, Richard; Gallardo, Karine

    2008-11-01

    Despite its importance in determining seed composition, and hence quality, regulation of the development of legume seeds is incompletely understood. Because of the cardinal role played by the nucleus in gene expression and regulation, we have characterized the nuclear proteome of Medicago truncatula at the 12 days after pollination (dap) stage that marks the switch towards seed filling. Nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of nuclear protein bands excised from one-dimensional SDS-PAGE identified 179 polypeptides (143 different proteins), providing an insight into the complexity and distinctive feature of the seed nuclear proteome and highlighting new plant nuclear proteins with possible roles in the biogenesis of ribosomal subunits (PESCADILLO-like) or nucleocytoplasmic trafficking (dynamin-like GTPase). The results revealed that nuclei of 12-dap seeds store a pool of ribosomal proteins in preparation for intense protein synthesis activity, occurring subsequently during seed filling. Diverse proteins of the molecular machinery leading to the synthesis of ribosomal subunits were identified along with proteins involved in transcriptional regulation, RNA processing or transport. Some had already been shown to play a role during the early stages of seed formation whereas for others the findings are novel (e.g. the DIP2 and ES43 transcriptional regulators or the RNA silencing-related ARGONAUTE proteins). This study also revealed the presence of chromatin-modifying enzymes and RNA interference proteins that have roles in RNA-directed DNA methylation and may be involved in modifying genome architecture and accessibility during seed filling and maturation.

  18. Transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa) with increased sucrose phosphate synthase activity shows enhanced growth when grown under N2-fixing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebril, Sayed; Seger, Mark; Villanueva, Fabiola Muro; Ortega, Jose Luis; Bagga, Suman; Sengupta-Gopalan, Champa

    2015-10-01

    Overexpression of SPS in alfalfa is accompanied by early flowering, increased plant growth and an increase in elemental N and protein content when grown under N2-fixing conditions. Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS; EC 2.3.1.14) is the key enzyme in the synthesis of sucrose in plants. The outcome of overexpression of SPS in different plants using transgenic approaches has been quite varied, but the general consensus is that increased SPS activity is associated with the production of new sinks and increased sink strength. In legumes, the root nodule is a strong C sink and in this study our objective was to see how increasing SPS activity in a legume would affect nodule number and function. Here we have transformed alfalfa (Medicago sativa, cv. Regen SY), with a maize SPS gene driven by the constitutive CaMV35S promoter. Our results showed that overexpression of SPS in alfalfa, is accompanied by an increase in nodule number and mass and an overall increase in nitrogenase activity at the whole plant level. The nodules exhibited an increase in the level of key enzymes contributing to N assimilation including glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase. Moreover, the stems of the transformants showed higher level of the transport amino acids, Asx, indicating increased export of N from the nodules. The transformants exhibited a dramatic increase in growth both of the shoots and roots, and earlier flowering time, leading to increased yields. Moreover, the transformants showed an increase in elemental N and protein content. The overall conclusion is that increased SPS activity improves the N status and plant performance, suggesting that the availability of more C in the form of sucrose enhances N acquisition and assimilation in the nodules.

  19. Symbiotic rhizobia bacteria trigger a change in localization and dynamics of the Medicago truncatula receptor kinase LYK3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Cara H; Riely, Brendan K; Tricoli, David M; Cook, Doug R; Ehrhardt, David W; Long, Sharon R

    2011-07-01

    To form nitrogen-fixing symbioses, legume plants recognize a bacterial signal, Nod Factor (NF). The legume Medicago truncatula has two predicted NF receptors that direct separate downstream responses to its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. NOD FACTOR PERCEPTION encodes a putative low-stringency receptor that is responsible for calcium spiking and transcriptional responses. LYSIN MOTIF RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 (LYK3) encodes a putative high-stringency receptor that mediates bacterial infection. We localized green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged LYK3 in M. truncatula and found that it has a punctate distribution at the cell periphery consistent with a plasma membrane or membrane-tethered vesicle localization. In buffer-treated control roots, LYK3:GFP puncta are dynamic. After inoculation with compatible S. meliloti, LYK3:GFP puncta are relatively stable. We show that increased LYK3:GFP stability depends on bacterial NF and NF structure but that NF is not sufficient for the change in LYK3:GFP dynamics. In uninoculated root hairs, LYK3:GFP has little codistribution with mCherry-tagged FLOTILLIN4 (FLOT4), another punctate plasma membrane-associated protein required for infection. In inoculated root hairs, we observed an increase in FLOT4:mCherry and LYK3:GFP colocalization; both proteins localize to positionally stable puncta. We also demonstrate that the localization of tagged FLOT4 is altered in plants carrying a mutation that inactivates the kinase domain of LYK3. Our work indicates that LYK3 protein localization and dynamics are altered in response to symbiotic bacteria.

  20. Temporal effects on the composition of a population of Sinorhizobium meliloti associated with Medicago sativa and Melilotus alba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromfield, E S; Butler, G; Barran, L R

    2001-06-01

    An assessment was made of the impact of temporal separation on the composition of a population of Sinorhizobium meliloti associated with Medicago sativa (alfalfa) and Melilotus alba (sweet clover) grown at a single site that had no known history of alfalfa cultivation. Root nodules were sampled on six occasions over two seasons, and a total of 1620 isolates of S. meliloti were characterized on the basis of phage sensitivity using 16 typing phages. Plant infection tests indicated that symbiotic S. meliloti were deficient in the soil at the time of planting and that these bacteria were present at low density during the first season (<10(2)/g of soil); in the second season numbers increased markedly to about 10(5)/g of soil. Overall, 37 and 51 phage types, respectively, were encountered among the nodule isolates from M. sativa and M. alba. The data indicate significant temporal shifts in the frequency and diversity of types associated with the two legume species. Apparent temporal variation with respect to the frequency of types appeared largely unpredictable and was not attributable to any one sampling time. The results indicate an apparent reduction in phenotypic diversity over the course of the experiment. Differential host plant selection of specific types with respect to nodule occupancy was indicated by significant interactions between legume species and either the frequency or diversity of phage types. Isolates from M. sativa that were resistant to lysis by all typing phages (type 14) were unusual in that they were predominant on this host at all sampling times (between 53% and 82% nodule occupancy) and were relatively homogeneous on the basis of DNA hybridization with 98% of the isolates analysed sharing the same nod EFG hybridization profile. In contrast, those isolates from M. alba comprising type 14 were encountered at low total frequency (2%) and were genetically heterogeneous on the basis of Southern hybridization. The implications of the observed

  1. Towards a new classification system for legumes: Progress report from the 6th International Legume Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pontes Coelho Borges, L.M.; Bruneau, A.; Cardoso, D.; Crisp, M.; Delgado-Salinas, A.; Doyle, J.J.; Egan, A.; Herendeen, P.S.; Hughes, C.; Kenicer, G.; Klitgaard, B.; Koenen, E.; Lavin, M.; Lewis, G.; Luckow, M.; Mackinder, B.; Malecot, V.; Miller, J.T.; Pennington, R.T.; Queiroz, de L.P.; Schrire, B.; Simon, M.F.; Steele, K.; Torke, B.; Wieringa, J.J.; Wojciechowski, M.F.; Boatwright, S.; Estrella, de la M.; Mansano, V.D.; Prado, D.E.; Stirton, C.; Wink, M.

    2013-01-01

    Legume systematists have been making great progress in understanding evolutionary relationships within the Leguminosae (Fabaceae), the third largest family of flowering plants. As the phylogenetic picture has become clearer, so too has the need for a revised classification of the family. The

  2. Gene-Silencing-Induced Changes in Carbohydrate Conformation in Relation to Bioenergy Value and Carbohydrate Subfractions in Modeled Plant (Medicago sativa) with Down-Regulation of HB12 and TT8 Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinxin; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Zhang, Yonggen; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-05-13

    Gene silencing with RNA interference (RNAi) technology may be capable of modifying internal structure at a molecular level. This structural modification could affect biofunctions in terms of biodegradation, biochemical metabolism, and bioactive compound availability. The objectives of this study were to (1) Detect gene silencing-induced changes in carbohydrate molecular structure in an alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa spp. sativa: alfalfa) with down-regulation of genes that encode transcription factors TT8 and HB12; (2) Determine gene silencing-induced changes in nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa); and (3) Quantify the correlation between gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes and the nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in animals of ruminants. The experimental treatments included: T1 = Non-transgenic and no-gene silenced alfalfa forage (code "NT"); T2 = HB12-RNAi forage with HB12 gene down regulation (code "HB12"); T3 = TT8-RNAi forage with TT8 gene down regulation (code "TT8"). The HB12 and TT8 gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes were determined by non-invasive and non-destructive advanced molecular spectroscopy in a middle infrared radiation region that focused on structural, non-structural and total carbohydrate compounds. The nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability of the modified forage were determined using NRC-2001 system in terms of total digestive nutrient (TDN), truly digestible fiber (tdNDF), non-fiber carbohydrate (tdNDF), fatty acid (tdFA), crude protein (tdCP) and bioenergy profiles (digestible energy, metabolizable energy, net energy) for ruminants. The carbohydrate subfractions were evaluated using the updated CNCPS 6.0 system. The results showed that gene silencing significantly affected tdNFC (42.3 (NT) vs. 38.7 (HB12) vs. 37.4% Dry Matter (TT8); p = 0.016) and tdCP (20.8 (NT) vs. 19.4 (HB12) vs. 22.3% DM (TT8); p = 0.009). The gene-silencing also affected

  3. Phytohormone regulation of legume-rhizobia interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Brett J; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2014-07-01

    The symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen fixing bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of root nodules. Nodules are highly organized root organs that form in response to Nod factors produced by rhizobia, and they provide rhizobia with a specialized niche to optimize nutrient exchange and nitrogen fixation. Nodule development and invasion by rhizobia is locally controlled by feedback between rhizobia and the plant host. In addition, the total number of nodules on a root system is controlled by a systemic mechanism termed 'autoregulation of nodulation'. Both the local and the systemic control of nodulation are regulated by phytohormones. There are two mechanisms by which phytohormone signalling is altered during nodulation: through direct synthesis by rhizobia and through indirect manipulation of the phytohormone balance in the plant, triggered by bacterial Nod factors. Recent genetic and physiological evidence points to a crucial role of Nod factor-induced changes in the host phytohormone balance as a prerequisite for successful nodule formation. Phytohormones synthesized by rhizobia enhance symbiosis effectiveness but do not appear to be necessary for nodule formation. This review provides an overview of recent advances in our understanding of the roles and interactions of phytohormones and signalling peptides in the regulation of nodule infection, initiation, positioning, development, and autoregulation. Future challenges remain to unify hormone-related findings across different legumes and to test whether hormone perception, response, or transport differences among different legumes could explain the variety of nodules types and the predisposition for nodule formation in this plant family. In addition, the molecular studies carried out under controlled conditions will need to be extended into the field to test whether and how phytohormone contributions by host and rhizobial partners affect the long term fitness of the host and the survival and

  4. Performance of organic grain legumes in Tuscany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Moschini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2005-2007 growing season, few varieties of field bean, high protein pea and white lupin were compared in an organic farm of Central Italy (Mugello area, Tuscany, to evaluate their agronomic performance in terms of grain yield, nutritional quality and competitive ability against weeds. The experiment was performed under rain-fed conditions. Furthermore, grain legumes features were compared between two different sowing seasons (autumnal vs late-winter for two years, in order to get information on the best time of sowing of these species, and the stability of yields of different genotypes in those climatic and soil conditions. These legumes could be an alternative protein source to external soybean, a high-risk alimentary source of genetically modified organisms, in the organic livestock sector. The main findings indicate that higher yields in grain and crude protein were obtained with the pea species and in particular with cultivars Hardy (4.0 t/ha grain yield; 626 kg/ha crude protein yield and Classic (3.1 t/ha grain yield; 557 kg/ha crude protein yield; followed by field bean cv. Chiaro di Torre Lama (2.9 t/ha grain yield; 624 kg/ha crude protein yield and cv. Vesuvio (2.5 t/ha grain yield; 549 kg/ha crude protein yield. Furthermore the field bean is interesting for the stability of yield in both years despite climatic conditions rather different. The white lupin has showed the lower yield but the best values of grain quality, with higher values in lupin Multitalia for dry matter, crude protein and ether extract and in lupin Luxe also for crude fibre, respect to the other legumes analysed. Among lupin varieties, lupin Multitalia showed the best yield results for the pedo-climatic conditions of Mugello area (0.9 t/ha lupin Multitalia; 0.2 t/ha lupin Luxe. The total yield of organic grain legumes, in the experimental site, is resulted higher with an autumnal seeding respect to the late-winter seeding (2.8 t/ha vs 1.9 t/ha.

  5. Comparison of the phytoremediation potentials of Medicago falcata L. And Medicago sativa L. in aged oil-sludge-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, Leonid; Muratova, Anna; Turkovskaya, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Thirteen-year monitoring of the vegetation growing in the industrial and adjacent areas of an oil refinery showed the prevalence of yellow medick (Medicago falcata L.) over other plant species, including alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). A comparative field study of the two Medicago species established that yellow medick and alfalfa exhibited similar resistance to soil petroleum hydrocarbons and that the pollutant concentration in their rhizosphere was 30% lower than that in the surrounding bulk soil. In laboratory pot experiments, yellow medick reduced the contaminant content by 18% owing to the degradation of the major heavy oil fractions, such as paraffins, naphthenes, and alcohol and benzene tars; and it was more successful than alfalfa. Both species were equally effective in stimulating the total number of soil microorganisms, but the number of hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degraders, was larger in the root zone of alfalfa. In turn, yellow medick provided a favorable balance of available nitrogen. Both Medicago species equally stimulated the dehydrogenase and peroxidase activities of the soil, and yellow medick increased the activity of soil polyphenol oxidase but reduced the activity of catalase. The root tissue activity of catalase, ascorbate oxidase, and tyrosinase was grater in alfalfa than in yellow medick. The peroxidase activity of plant roots was similar in both species, but nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed some differences in the peroxidase profiles of the root extracts of alfalfa and yellow medick. Overall, this study suggests that the phytoremediation potentials of yellow medick and alfalfa are similar, with some differences.

  6. Impact of whole-genome and tandem duplications in the expansion and functional diversification of the F-box family in legumes (Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellieny-Rabelo, Daniel; Oliveira, Antônia Elenir Amâncio; Venancio, Thiago Motta

    2013-01-01

    F-box proteins constitute a large gene family that regulates processes from hormone signaling to stress response. F-box proteins are the substrate recognition modules of SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases. Here we report very distinct trends in family size, duplication, synteny and transcription of F-box genes in two nitrogen-fixing legumes, Glycine max (soybean) and Medicago truncatula (alfafa). While the soybean FBX genes emerged mainly through segmental duplications (including whole-genome duplications), M. truncatula genome is dominated by locally-duplicated (tandem) F-box genes. Many of these young FBX genes evolved complex transcriptional patterns, including preferential transcription in different tissues, suggesting that they have probably been recruited to important biochemical pathways (e.g. nodulation and seed development).

  7. Nitrogen transfer from forage legumes to nine neighbouring plants in a multi-species grassland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirhofer-Walzl, Karin; Høgh Jensen, Henning; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Legumes play a crucial role in nitrogen supply to grass-legume mixtures for ruminant fodder. To quantify N transfer from legumes to neighbouring plants in multi-species grasslands we established a grass-legume-herb mixture on a loamy-sandy site in Denmark. White clover (Trifolium repens L.), red...... amounts of N from legumes than dicotyledonous plants which generally have taproots. Slurry application mainly increased N transfer from legumes to grasses. During the growing season the three legumes transferred approximately 40 kg N ha-1 to neighbouring plants. Below-ground N transfer from legumes...

  8. Alfalfa benefits from Medicago truncatula: the RCT1 gene from M. truncatula confers broad-spectrum resistance to anthracnose in alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shengming; Gao, Muqiang; Xu, Chenwu; Gao, Jianchang; Deshpande, Shweta; Lin, Shaoping; Roe, Bruce A; Zhu, Hongyan

    2008-08-26

    Alfalfa is economically the most important forage legume worldwide. A recurrent challenge to alfalfa production is the significant yield loss caused by disease. Although knowledge of molecular mechanisms underlying host resistance should facilitate the genetic improvement of alfalfa, the acquisition of such knowledge is hampered by alfalfa's tetrasomic inheritance and outcrossing nature. However, alfalfa is congeneric with the reference legume Medicago truncatula, providing an opportunity to use M. truncatula as a surrogate to clone the counterparts of many agronomically important genes in alfalfa. In particular, the high degree of sequence identity and remarkably conserved genome structure and function between the two species enables M. truncatula genes to be used directly in alfalfa improvement. Here we report the map-based cloning of RCT1, a host resistance (R) gene in M. truncatula that confers resistance to multiple races of Colletotrichum trifolii, a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease of alfalfa. RCT1 is a member of the Toll-interleukin-1 receptor/nucleotide-binding site/leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NBS-LRR) class of plant R genes and confers broad-spectrum anthracnose resistance when transferred into susceptible alfalfa plants. Thus, RCT1 provides a novel resource to develop anthracnose-resistant alfalfa cultivars and contributes to our understanding of host resistance against the fungal genus Colletotrichum. This work demonstrates the potential of using M. truncatula genes for genetic improvement of alfalfa.

  9. Evaluation of Perennial Forage Legumes and Herbs in Six Mediterranean Environments Evaluación de Leguminosas y Hierbas Forrajeras Perennes en Seis Medioambientes Mediterráneos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Real

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is an absence of drought tolerant herbaceous perennial forage legume and herb options other than lucerne (Medicago sativa L. for environments with Mediterranean-like climates common in extensive areas of Southern Australia, the Mediterranean basin, and Chile. Therefore, a collection of 174 forage perennial legume and herb entries from 103 species and 32 genera was evaluated for adaptation in a diverse range of Mediterranean climatic environments in Southern Australia. The seasonal rainfall distribution varied from moderately to highly winter dominant with long term average annual rainfall ranging from 318 to 655 mm. The entries were rated for productivity and persistence over 3 yr. The 12 entries identified as the most promising for winter, summer, or all-year round production included Bituminaria bituminosa (L. C.H. Stirt. var. albomarginata; Cichorium intybus L.; Cullen australasicum (Schltdl. J.W. Grimes; Dorycnium hirsutum (L. Ser.; Kennedia prostrata R. Br.; Lotononis bainesii Baker, Lotus pedunculatus Cav.; L. corniculatus L.; L. cytisoides L.; Medicago sativa subsp. sativa L.; Medicago sativa subsp. caerulea (Less. ex Ledeb. Schmalh., and M. sativa subsp. falcata (L. Arcang. These entries maintained production and persisted for the period of the evaluation, with the exception of C. intybus and L. corniculatus that declined in persistence over time. The potential role of these species in extensive grazing systems in Mediterranean climatic zones, their attributes and limitations, and current progress in developing them as useful forage plants was discussed.Existe una escasez de leguminosas y hierbas perennes herbáceas además de alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. tolerantes a sequía para ambientes con clima mediterráneo como los que se encuentran en el Sur de Australia, el Mediterráneo y Chile. Por lo tanto, una colección de 174 leguminosas perennes y hierbas correspondientes a 103 especies y 32 géneros fue evaluada por su adaptaci

  10. Induction of prenylated isoflavonoids and stilbenoids in legumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aisyah, S.

    2015-01-01

    The germination of legume seeds in the presence or absence of stress factors was studied with respect to compositional changes in prenylated isoflavonoids and stilbenoids. Different strategies were applied using (i) different types of legume seed, (ii) different stress factors i.e. biotic, abiotic

  11. Nitrogen fertilizer response of cotton in rotation with summer legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential of using summer legumes as N sources in corn and vegetable rotations has recently been documented. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of using summer legumes [Crotolaria juncea and cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata)] as an N source for cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) pro...

  12. Improving germination and establishment of Great Basin legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project, we have collected and evaluated several native western legumes. Germplasm releases were made, but much work remains to be done concerning how to establish these legumes for seed production and on rangelands. We report herein h...

  13. Legumes affect alpine tundra community composition via multiple biotic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soudzilovskaia, N.A.; Aksenova, A.A.; Makarov, M.I.; Onipchenko, V.G.; Logvinenko, O.A.; Braak, ter C.J.F.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.

    2012-01-01

    The soil engineering function of legumes in natural ecosystems is paramount but associated solely with soil nitrogen (N) subsidies, ignoring concomitant biotic interactions such as competitive or inhibitory effects and exchange between mycorrhizas and rhizobia. We aim to (1) disentangle legume effec

  14. Induction of prenylated isoflavonoids and stilbenoids in legumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aisyah, S.

    2015-01-01

    The germination of legume seeds in the presence or absence of stress factors was studied with respect to compositional changes in prenylated isoflavonoids and stilbenoids. Different strategies were applied using (i) different types of legume seed, (ii) different stress factors i.e. biotic, abiotic a

  15. Probing nod factor perception in legumes by fluorescence microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedhart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Plants of the family of legumes are capable of forming a symbiosis with Rhizobium bacteria. These Gram-negative bacteria invade the root system of a host legume and fix nitrogen in a specialized organ, the so-called root nodule. In exchange for sugars, the bacteria convert atmospheric

  16. Physiological and morphological adaptations of herbaceous perennial legumes allow differential access to sources of varyingly soluble phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jiayin; Yang, Jiyun; Lambers, Hans; Tibbett, Mark; Siddique, Kadambot H M; Ryan, Megan H

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of three perennial legume species to access sources of varyingly soluble phosphorus (P) and their associated morphological and physiological adaptations. Two Australian native legumes with pasture potential (Cullen australasicum and Kennedia prostrata) and Medicago sativa cv. SARDI 10 were grown in sand under two P levels (6 and 40 µg P g(-1) ) supplied as Ca(H2 PO4 )2 ·H2 O (Ca-P, highly soluble, used in many fertilizers) or as one of three sparingly soluble forms: Ca10 (OH)2 (PO4 )6 (apatite-P, found in relatively young soils; major constituent of rock phosphate), C6 H6 O24 P6 Na12 (inositol-P, the most common form of organic P in soil) and FePO4 (Fe-P, a poorly-available inorganic source of P). All species grew well with soluble P. When 6 µg P g(-1) was supplied as sparingly soluble P, plant dry weight (DW) and P uptake were very low for C. australasicum and M. sativa (0.1-0.4 g DW) with the exception of M. sativa supplied with apatite-P (1.5 g). In contrast, K. prostrata grew well with inositol-P (1.0 g) and Fe-P (0.7 g), and even better with apatite-P (1.7 g), similar to that with Ca-P (1.9 g). Phosphorus uptake at 6 µg P g(-1) was highly correlated with total root length, total rhizosphere carboxylate content and total rhizosphere acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) activity. These findings provide strong indications that there are opportunities to utilize local Australian legumes in low P pasture systems to access sparingly soluble soil P and increase perennial legume productivity, diversity and sustainability.

  17. [Examination and composition of some legume seeds (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierle, W; el Wahab el Bayâ, A

    1977-05-26

    The chemical composition of some legume seeds is reviewed. It was found that soy (Glycine soja), field beans (Vicia faba), Vicia sativa and Lens culingris (red seeds) have the highest protein content. There were only minor differences in amino acid composition except for glutamic acid. The lysine content of legume seeds was high. Lysine is the most limiting essential amino acid in cereal proteins, therefore cereal products can be improved nutritionally by addition of legume seed flour. Examination of polar lipids by thin layer chromatography revealed that lecithin, phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl inositol were the major components. However, Lupinus angustifolius contained two unknown polar lipid classes.--In contrary to previous literature the ripe legume seeds contained only a very small amount of galactosyl diglycerides; however legume seeds contain higher amounts of the compounds. The conection between biosynthesis of linolenic acid and the presence of galactosyl diglycerides in higher plants is discussed.

  18. Legumes steam allergy in childhood: Update of the reported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaliti, G; Pavone, P; Spataro, G; Giunta, L; Guglielmo, F; Falsaperla, R

    2015-01-01

    In the past few decades, the prevalence of allergic diseases has deeply increased, with a key role played by food allergies. Legumes seem to play a major role towards the overall increase in the scenario of food allergy, since they are an appreciated source, consumed worldwide, due to their high protein content, variable amounts of lipids and for the presence of vitamins. In literature there are numerous descriptions of adverse reactions after ingestion of uncooked and cooked legumes. Nevertheless, cases of allergic reactions induced by inhaling vapours from cooking legumes have rarely been described. Herein the authors report an update of the literature data on allergic reactions caused by legume steam inhalation, underlying the possible pathogenic mechanism of these atopic events and the knowledge of literature data in paediatric age. The importance of this review is the focus on the clinical aspects concerning legume vapour allergy, referring to literature data in childhood.

  19. NFP, a LysM protein controlling Nod factor perception, also intervenes in Medicago truncatula resistance to pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Thomas; Nars, Amaury; Bonhomme, Maxime; Bottin, Arnaud; Huguet, Stéphanie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Bono, Jean-Jacques; Cullimore, Julie; Dumas, Bernard; Gough, Clare; Jacquet, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Plant LysM proteins control the perception of microbial-derived N-acetylglucosamine compounds for the establishment of symbiosis or activation of plant immunity. This raises questions about how plants, and notably legumes, can differentiate friends and foes using similar molecular actors and whether any receptors can intervene in both symbiosis and resistance. To study this question, nfp and lyk3 LysM-receptor like kinase mutants of Medicago truncatula that are affected in the early steps of nodulation, were analysed following inoculation with Aphanomyces euteiches, a root oomycete. The role of NFP in this interaction was further analysed by overexpression of NFP and by transcriptome analyses. nfp, but not lyk3, mutants were significantly more susceptible than wildtype plants to A. euteiches, whereas NFP overexpression increased resistance. Transcriptome analyses on A. euteiches inoculation showed that mutation in the NFP gene led to significant changes in the expression of c. 500 genes, notably involved in cell dynamic processes previously associated with resistance to pathogen penetration. nfp mutants also showed an increased susceptibility to the fungus Colletotrichum trifolii. These results demonstrate that NFP intervenes in M. truncatula immunity, suggesting an unsuspected role for NFP in the perception of pathogenic signals. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Flavonoids and Auxin Transport Inhibitors Rescue Symbiotic Nodulation in the Medicago truncatula Cytokinin Perception Mutant cre1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jason Liang Pin; Hassan, Samira; Truong, Thy T; Hocart, Charles H; Laffont, Carole; Frugier, Florian; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2015-08-01

    Initiation of symbiotic nodules in legumes requires cytokinin signaling, but its mechanism of action is largely unknown. Here, we tested whether the failure to initiate nodules in the Medicago truncatula cytokinin perception mutant cre1 (cytokinin response1) is due to its altered ability to regulate auxin transport, auxin accumulation, and induction of flavonoids. We found that in the cre1 mutant, symbiotic rhizobia cannot locally alter acro- and basipetal auxin transport during nodule initiation and that these mutants show reduced auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) accumulation and auxin responses compared with the wild type. Quantification of flavonoids, which can act as endogenous auxin transport inhibitors, showed a deficiency in the induction of free naringenin, isoliquiritigenin, quercetin, and hesperetin in cre1 roots compared with wild-type roots 24 h after inoculation with rhizobia. Coinoculation of roots with rhizobia and the flavonoids naringenin, isoliquiritigenin, and kaempferol, or with the synthetic auxin transport inhibitor 2,3,5,-triiodobenzoic acid, rescued nodulation efficiency in cre1 mutants and allowed auxin transport control in response to rhizobia. Our results suggest that CRE1-dependent cytokinin signaling leads to nodule initiation through the regulation of flavonoid accumulation required for local alteration of polar auxin transport and subsequent auxin accumulation in cortical cells during the early stages of nodulation.

  1. Adjustment of host cells for accommodation of symbiotic bacteria: vacuole defunctionalization, HOPS suppression, and TIP1g retargeting in Medicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrin, Aleksandr; Kaiser, Brent N; Geiger, Dietmar; Tyerman, Stephen D; Wen, Zhengyu; Bisseling, Ton; Fedorova, Elena E

    2014-09-01

    In legume-rhizobia symbioses, the bacteria in infected cells are enclosed in a plant membrane, forming organelle-like compartments called symbiosomes. Symbiosomes remain as individual units and avoid fusion with lytic vacuoles of host cells. We observed changes in the vacuole volume of infected cells and thus hypothesized that microsymbionts may cause modifications in vacuole formation or function. To examine this, we quantified the volumes and surface areas of plant cells, vacuoles, and symbiosomes in root nodules of Medicago truncatula and analyzed the expression and localization of VPS11 and VPS39, members of the HOPS vacuole-tethering complex. During the maturation of symbiosomes to become N2-fixing organelles, a developmental switch occurs and changes in vacuole features are induced. For example, we found that expression of VPS11 and VPS39 in infected cells is suppressed and host cell vacuoles contract, permitting the expansion of symbiosomes. Trafficking of tonoplast-targeted proteins in infected symbiotic cells is also altered, as shown by retargeting of the aquaporin TIP1g from the tonoplast membrane to the symbiosome membrane. This retargeting appears to be essential for the maturation of symbiosomes. We propose that these alterations in the function of the vacuole are key events in the adaptation of the plant cell to host intracellular symbiotic bacteria. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  2. Involvement of abscisic acid in the response of Medicago sativa plants in symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, F; López-Gómez, M; Tejera, N A; Lluch, C

    2014-06-01

    Legumes are classified as salt-sensitive crops with their productivity particularly affected by salinity. Abcisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in the response to environmental stresses as signal molecule which led us to study its role in the response of nitrogen fixation and antioxidant metabolism in root nodules of Medicago sativa under salt stress conditions. Adult plants inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti were treated with 1 μM and 10 μM ABA two days before 200 mM salt addition. Exogenous ABA together with the salt treatment provoked a strong induction of the ABA content in the nodular tissue which alleviated the inhibition induced by salinity in the plant growth and nitrogen fixation. Antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) were induced by ABA pre-treatments under salt stress conditions which together with the reduction of the lipid peroxidation, suggest a role for ABA as signal molecule in the activation of the nodular antioxidant metabolism. Interaction between ABA and polyamines (PAs), described as anti-stress molecules, was studied being detected an induction of the common polyamines spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) levels by ABA under salt stress conditions. In conclusion, ABA pre-treatment improved the nitrogen fixation capacity under salt stress conditions by the induction of the nodular antioxidant defenses which may be mediated by the common PAs Spd and Spm that seems to be involved in the anti-stress response induced by ABA.

  3. Characterization of the plant growth promoting bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae MSR1, isolated from roots of non-nodulating Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Ashraf Y Z; Alsyeeh, Abdel-Moneium; Almalki, Mohammed A; Saleh, Farag A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the endophytic bacterial strain designated MSR1 that was isolated from inside the non-nodulating roots of Medicago sativa after surface-sterilization. MSR1 was identified as Enterobacter cloacae using both 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis and API20E biochemical identification system (Biomerieux, France). Furthermore, this bacterium was characterized using API50CH kit (Biomerieux, France) and tested for antibacterial activities against some food borne pathogens. The results showed that E. cloacae consumed certain carbohydrates such as glycerol, d-xylose, d-maltose and esculin melibiose as a sole carbon source and certain amino acids such as arginine, tryptophan ornithine as nitrogen source. Furthermore, MSR1 possessed multiple plant-growth promoting characteristics; phosphate solubility, production of phytohormones acetoin and bioactive compounds. Inoculation of Pisum sativum with MSR1 significantly improved the growth parameters (the length and dry weight) of this economically important grain legume compared to the non-treated plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report addressing E. cloacae which exist in roots of alfalfa growing in Al-Ahsaa region. The results confirmed that E. cloacae exhibited traits for plant growth promoting and could be developed as an eco-friendly biofertilizer for P. sativum and probably for other important plant species in future.

  4. The Medicago truncatula lysin [corrected] motif-receptor-like kinase gene family includes NFP and new nodule-expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Barre, Annick; Ben Amor, Besma; Bersoult, Anne; Soriano, Lidia Campos; Mirabella, Rossana; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Journet, Etienne-Pascal; Ghérardi, Michèle; Huguet, Thierry; Geurts, René; Dénarié, Jean; Rougé, Pierre; Gough, Clare

    2006-09-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are key symbiotic signals responsible for starting the nodulation process in host legume plants. Of the six Medicago truncatula genes controlling a Nod factor signaling pathway, Nod Factor Perception (NFP) was reported as a candidate Nod factor receptor gene. Here, we provide further evidence for this by showing that NFP is a lysin [corrected] motif (LysM)-receptor-like kinase (RLK). NFP was shown both to be expressed in association with infection thread development and to be involved in the infection process. Consistent with deviations from conserved kinase domain sequences, NFP did not show autophosphorylation activity, suggesting that NFP needs to associate with an active kinase or has unusual functional characteristics different from classical kinases. Identification of nine new M. truncatula LysM-RLK genes revealed a larger family than in the nonlegumes Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) or rice (Oryza sativa) of at least 17 members that can be divided into three subfamilies. Three LysM domains could be structurally predicted for all M. truncatula LysM-RLK proteins, whereas one subfamily, which includes NFP, was characterized by deviations from conserved kinase sequences. Most of the newly identified genes were found to be expressed in roots and nodules, suggesting this class of receptors may be more extensively involved in nodulation than was previously known.

  5. Deep-sequencing transcriptome analysis of field-grown Medicago sativa L. crown buds acclimated to freezing stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lili; Jiang, Lin; Chen, Yue; Shu, Yongjun; Bai, Yan; Guo, Changhong

    2016-09-01

    Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) 'Zhaodong' is an important forage legume that can safely survive in northern China where winter temperatures reach as low as -30 °C. Survival of alfalfa following freezing stress depends on the amount and revival ability of crown buds. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms of frost tolerance in alfalfa, we used transcriptome sequencing technology and bioinformatics strategies to analyze crown buds of field-grown alfalfa during winter. We statistically identified a total of 5605 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) involved in freezing stress including 1900 upregulated and 3705 downregulated DEGs. We validated 36 candidate DEGs using qPCR to confirm the accuracy of the RNA-seq data. Unlike other recent studies, this study employed alfalfa plants grown in the natural environment. Our results indicate that not only the CBF orthologs but also membrane proteins, hormone signal transduction pathways, and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathways indicate the presence of a special freezing adaptation mechanism in alfalfa. The antioxidant defense system may rapidly confer freezing tolerance to alfalfa. Importantly, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and phenylalanine metabolism, which is of potential importance in coordinating freezing tolerance with growth and development, were downregulated in subzero temperatures. The adaptive mechanism for frost tolerance is a complex multigenic process that is not well understood. This systematic analysis provided an in-depth view of stress tolerance mechanisms in alfalfa.

  6. Relationship between photosynthetic capacity, nitrogen assimilation and nodule metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) grown with sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolín, M Carmen; Fiasconaro, M Laura; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel

    2010-10-15

    Sewage sludge has been used as N fertilizer because it contains some of inorganic N, principally as nitrate and ammonium ions. However, sewage sludge addition to legumes could result in impaired nodule metabolism due to the presence of inorganic N from sludge. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to examine the effects of sewage sludge on growth, photosynthesis, nitrogen assimilation and nodule metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Aragón). Plants were grown in pots with a mixture of perlite and vermiculite (2:1, v/v). The experiment included three treatments: (1) plants inoculated with rhizobia and amended with sewage sludge at rate of 10% (w/w) (RS); (2) plants inoculated with rhizobia without any amendment (R); and (3) non-inoculated plants fed with ammonium nitrate (N). N(2)-fixing plants had lower growth and sucrose phosphate synthase activity but higher photosynthesis than nitrate-fed plants because they compensated the carbon cost of the rhizobia. However, sewage sludge-treated plants evidenced a loss of carbon sink strength due to N(2) fixation by means of decreased photosynthetic capacity, leaf chlorophylls and N concentration in comparison to untreated plants. Sewage sludge did no affect nodulation but decreased nodule enzyme activities involved in carbon and N metabolisms that may lead to accumulation of toxic N-compounds.

  7. Multiple Autoregulation of Nodulation (AON Signals Identified through Split Root Analysis of Medicago truncatula sunn and rdn1 Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessema Kassaw

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nodulation is energetically costly to the host: legumes balance the nitrogen demand with the energy expense by limiting the number of nodules through long-distance signaling. A split root system was used to investigate systemic autoregulation of nodulation (AON in Medicago truncatula and the role of the AON genes RDN1 and SUNN in the regulatory circuit. Developing nodule primordia did not trigger AON in plants carrying mutations in RDN1 and SUNN genes, while wild type plants had fully induced AON within three days. However, despite lacking an early suppression response, AON mutants suppressed nodulation when roots were inoculated 10 days or more apart, correlated with the maturation of nitrogen fixing nodules. In addition to correlation between nitrogen fixation and suppression of nodulation, suppression by extreme nutrient stress was also observed in all genotypes and may be a component of the observed response due to the conditions of the assay. These results suggest there is more than one systemic regulatory circuit controlling nodulation in M. truncatula. While both signals are present in wild type plants, the second signal can only be observed in plants lacking the early repression (AON mutants. RDN1 and SUNN are not essential for response to the later signal.

  8. The NIN Transcription Factor Coordinates Diverse Nodulation Programs in Different Tissues of the Medicago truncatula Root[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Frances, Lisa; Ding, Yiliang; Sun, Jongho; Guan, Dian; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Oldroyd, Giles E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation in legumes occurs in nodules that are initiated in the root cortex following Nod factor recognition at the root surface, and this requires coordination of diverse developmental programs in these different tissues. We show that while early Nod factor signaling associated with calcium oscillations is limited to the root surface, the resultant activation of Nodule Inception (NIN) in the root epidermis is sufficient to promote cytokinin signaling and nodule organogenesis in the inner root cortex. NIN or a product of its action must be associated with the transmission of a signal between the root surface and the cortical cells where nodule organogenesis is initiated. NIN appears to have distinct functions in the root epidermis and the root cortex. In the epidermis, NIN restricts the extent of Early Nodulin 11 (ENOD11) expression and does so through competitive inhibition of ERF Required for Nodulation (ERN1). In contrast, NIN is sufficient to promote the expression of the cytokinin receptor Cytokinin Response 1 (CRE1), which is restricted to the root cortex. Our work in Medicago truncatula highlights the complexity of NIN action and places NIN as a central player in the coordination of the symbiotic developmental programs occurring in differing tissues of the root that combined are necessary for a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. PMID:26672071

  9. Multiple Autoregulation of Nodulation (AON) Signals Identified through Split Root Analysis of Medicago truncatula sunn and rdn1 Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassaw, Tessema; Jr, William Bridges; Frugoli, Julia

    2015-04-27

    Nodulation is energetically costly to the host: legumes balance the nitrogen demand with the energy expense by limiting the number of nodules through long-distance signaling. A split root system was used to investigate systemic autoregulation of nodulation (AON) in Medicago truncatula and the role of the AON genes RDN1 and SUNN in the regulatory circuit. Developing nodule primordia did not trigger AON in plants carrying mutations in RDN1 and SUNN genes, while wild type plants had fully induced AON within three days. However, despite lacking an early suppression response, AON mutants suppressed nodulation when roots were inoculated 10 days or more apart, correlated with the maturation of nitrogen fixing nodules. In addition to correlation between nitrogen fixation and suppression of nodulation, suppression by extreme nutrient stress was also observed in all genotypes and may be a component of the observed response due to the conditions of the assay. These results suggest there is more than one systemic regulatory circuit controlling nodulation in M. truncatula. While both signals are present in wild type plants, the second signal can only be observed in plants lacking the early repression (AON mutants). RDN1 and SUNN are not essential for response to the later signal.

  10. Elevated CO(2 modifies N acquisition of Medicago truncatula by enhancing N fixation and reducing nitrate uptake from soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Guo

    Full Text Available The effects of elevated CO2 (750 ppm vs. 390 ppm were evaluated on nitrogen (N acquisition and assimilation by three Medicago truncatula genotypes, including two N-fixing-deficient mutants (dnf1-1 and dnf1-2 and their wild-type (Jemalong. The proportion of N acquisition from atmosphere and soil were quantified by (15N stable isotope, and N transportation and assimilation-related genes and enzymes were determined by qPCR and biochemical analysis. Elevated CO2 decreased nitrate uptake from soil in all three plant genotypes by down-regulating nitrate reductase (NR, nitrate transporter NRT1.1 and NR activity. Jemalong plant, however, produced more nodules, up-regulated N-fixation-related genes and enhanced percentage of N derived from fixation (%Ndf to increase foliar N concentration and N content in whole plant (Ntotal Yield to satisfy the requirement of larger biomass under elevated CO2. In contrast, both dnf1 mutants deficient in N fixation consequently decreased activity of glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT and N concentration under elevated CO2. Our results suggest that elevated CO2 is likely to modify N acquisition of M. truncatula by simultaneously increasing N fixation and reducing nitrate uptake from soil. We propose that elevated CO2 causes legumes to rely more on N fixation than on N uptake from soil to satisfy N requirements.

  11. DASH transcription factor impacts Medicago truncatula seed size by its action on embryo morphogenesis and auxin homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguero, Mélanie; Le Signor, Christine; Vernoud, Vanessa; Bandyopadhyay, Kaustav; Sanchez, Myriam; Fu, Chunxiang; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Gallardo, Karine; Udvardi, Michael; Thompson, Richard; Verdier, Jerome

    2015-02-01

    The endosperm plays a pivotal role in the integration between component tissues of molecular signals controlling seed development. It has been shown to participate in the regulation of embryo morphogenesis and ultimately seed size determination. However, the molecular mechanisms that modulate seed size are still poorly understood especially in legumes. DASH (DOF Acting in Seed embryogenesis and Hormone accumulation) is a DOF transcription factor (TF) expressed during embryogenesis in the chalazal endosperm of the Medicago truncatula seed. Phenotypic characterization of three independent dash mutant alleles revealed a role for this TF in the prevention of early seed abortion and the determination of final seed size. Strong loss-of-function alleles cause severe defects in endosperm development and lead to embryo growth arrest at the globular stage. Transcriptomic analysis of dash pods versus wild-type (WT) pods revealed major transcriptional changes and highlighted genes that are involved in auxin transport and perception as mainly under-expressed in dash mutant pods. Interestingly, the exogenous application of auxin alleviated the seed-lethal phenotype, whereas hormonal dosage revealed a much higher auxin content in dash pods compared with WT. Together these results suggested that auxin transport/signaling may be affected in the dash mutant and that aberrant auxin distribution may contribute to the defect in embryogenesis resulting in the final seed size phenotype.

  12. Legumes are different: Leaf nitrogen, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark Andrew; Turnbull, Tarryn L; Sprent, Janet I; Buchmann, Nina

    2016-04-12

    Using robust, pairwise comparisons and a global dataset, we show that nitrogen concentration per unit leaf mass for nitrogen-fixing plants (N2FP; mainly legumes plus some actinorhizal species) in nonagricultural ecosystems is universally greater (43-100%) than that for other plants (OP). This difference is maintained across Koppen climate zones and growth forms and strongest in the wet tropics and within deciduous angiosperms. N2FP mostly show a similar advantage over OP in nitrogen per leaf area (Narea), even in arid climates, despite diazotrophy being sensitive to drought. We also show that, for most N2FP, carbon fixation by photosynthesis (Asat) and stomatal conductance (gs) are not related to Narea-in distinct challenge to current theories that place the leaf nitrogen-Asat relationship at the center of explanations of plant fitness and competitive ability. Among N2FP, only forbs displayed an Narea-gs relationship similar to that for OP, whereas intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi; Asat/gs) was positively related to Narea for woody N2FP. Enhanced foliar nitrogen (relative to OP) contributes strongly to other evolutionarily advantageous attributes of legumes, such as seed nitrogen and herbivore defense. These alternate explanations of clear differences in leaf N between N2FP and OP have significant implications (e.g., for global models of carbon fluxes based on relationships between leaf N and Asat). Combined, greater WUE and leaf nitrogen-in a variety of forms-enhance fitness and survival of genomes of N2FP, particularly in arid and semiarid climates.

  13. Mimosoid legume plastome evolution: IR expansion, tandem repeat expansions, and accelerated rate of evolution in clpP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Diana V.; Hernandez, David; Koenen, Erik J.M.; Schwarz, Erika; Straub, Shannon; Hughes, Colin E.; Jansen, Robert K.; Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Staats, Martijn; Trujillo, Joshua T.; Hajrah, Nahid H.; Alharbi, Njud S.; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Bailey, C. Donovan

    2015-01-01

    The Leguminosae has emerged as a model for studying angiosperm plastome evolution because of its striking diversity of structural rearrangements and sequence variation. However, most of what is known about legume plastomes comes from few genera representing a subset of lineages in subfamily Papilionoideae. We investigate plastome evolution in subfamily Mimosoideae based on two newly sequenced plastomes (Inga and Leucaena) and two recently published plastomes (Acacia and Prosopis), and discuss the results in the context of other legume and rosid plastid genomes. Mimosoid plastomes have a typical angiosperm gene content and general organization as well as a generally slow rate of protein coding gene evolution, but they are the largest known among legumes. The increased length results from tandem repeat expansions and an unusual 13 kb IR-SSC boundary shift in Acacia and Inga. Mimosoid plastomes harbor additional interesting features, including loss of clpP intron1 in Inga, accelerated rates of evolution in clpP for Acacia and Inga, and dN/dS ratios consistent with neutral and positive selection for several genes. These new plastomes and results provide important resources for legume comparative genomics, plant breeding, and plastid genetic engineering, while shedding further light on the complexity of plastome evolution in legumes and angiosperms. PMID:26592928

  14. Legumes are valuable sources of tocopherols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschin, Giovanna; Arnoldi, Anna

    2011-08-01

    Grain legumes contain numerous phytochemicals useful for their nutritional or nutraceutical properties, such as tocopherols, involved in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and eye pathologies. In this work, tocopherols were quantified in soybean, chickpea, lentil, pea, common bean, broad bean, and three lupin species. In all samples, the gamma congener was the most abundant tocopherol, followed by minor quantities of alpha-tocopherol (with the exception of common bean lacking in this congener) and delta-tocopherol (with the exception of Lupinus angustifolius and Lupinus mutabilis). Beta-tocopherol and tocotrienols were never detected. Some samples of soybean, pea, white lupin and chickpea contained over 10mg/100g seeds of total tocopherols. In order to estimate the nutritional value, the vitamin E activity was calculated. Chickpea, soybean and, to a lesser extent, lupin, broad bean and pea may contribute in a relevant way to the daily intake of this vitamin.

  15. Energy use in legume cultivation in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertekin, C.; Canakci, M.; Yaldiz, O. [Akdeniz Univ., Antalya (Turkey). Faculty of Agriculture, Dept. of Farm Machinery; Kulcu, R. [Suleyman Demirel Univ., Isparta (Turkey). Faculty of Agriculture, Dept. of Farm Machinery

    2010-07-01

    A study was conducted to analyze the energy required to produce different legumes in 11 different regions of Turkey. The objective was to improve energy efficiency. Data was collected for the production of dry bean, chickpea and soybean under rainfed and irrigated conditions, as well as for the production of lentil under rainfed conditions. The data was evaluated in terms of energy use efficiency, energy productivity and specific energy for different regions of Turkey. The main energy sources are human, diesel, fertilizer, seed, machine, chemicals and water. The main agricultural operations are seedbed preparation, seeding, fertilization, hoeing, irrigation, spraying, harvesting, threshing and transporting. The total energy input ranged between 3361.5 and 25229.7 MJ/ha. Based on product yields, the energy use efficiency varied between 0.96 and 4.32.

  16. Sinorhizobium meliloti can protect Medicago truncatula against Phoma medicaginis attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moncef MRABET

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Sinorhizobium meliloti microsymbiont of Medicago spp. was used in an antibiosis test against Phoma medicaginis and in bioprotection assays of Medicago truncatula JA17 from the pathogen. Among 17 S. meliloti strains isolated from root nodules of M. truncatula and Medicago laciniata grown in Tunisian soils, six showed up to 60% growth inhibition of five P. medicaginis strains isolated from infected field-grown M. truncatula. Two S. meliloti strains with differing in vitro effects on P. medicaginis, 10.16/R6 antagonist and 5M6 non antagonist, were used in a bioprotection assay of M. truncatula JA17 from the pathogen. The inoculation of P. medicaginis caused complete root and stem rotting, and the mortality of all treated plantlets. Inoculation of the antagonist S. meliloti strain 10.16/R6 to M. truncatula JA17 infected with P. medicaginis was associated with a significant 65% decrease of vegetative rotting length, an 80% decrease of plant mortality, an increase of root length, and enhancement of root and shoot biomass comparatively to control plantlets treated with P. medicaginis. The inoculation of the non antagonistic S. meliloti strain 5M6 slightly decreased disease and slightly increased plant growth parameters.

  17. Legumes or nitrification inhibitors to reduce N2O emissions in subtropical cereal cropping systems? A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DAYCENT biogeochemical model was used to investigate how the use of fertilisers coated with nitrification inhibitors and the introduction of legumes in the crop rotation can affect subtropical cereal production and N2O emissions. The model was validated using comprehensive multi-seasonal, high-f...

  18. Modulation of legume defense signaling pathways by native and non-native pea aphid clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Sanchez-Arcos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum is a complex of at least 15 genetically different host races that are native to specific legume plants, but can all develop on the universal host plant Vicia faba. Despite much research it is still unclear why pea aphid host races (biotypes are able to colonize their native hosts while other host races are not. All aphids penetrate the plant and salivate into plant cells when they test plant suitability. Thus plants might react differently to the various pea aphid host races. To find out whether legume species vary in their defense responses to different pea aphid host races, we measured the amounts of salicylic acid (SA, the jasmonic acid-isoleucine conjugate (JA-Ile, other jasmonate precursors and derivatives, and abscisic acid (ABA in four different species (Medicago sativa, Trifolium pratense, Pisum sativum, V. faba after infestation by native and non-native pea aphid clones of various host races. Additionally, we assessed the performance of the clones on the four plant species. On M. sativa and T. pratense, non-native clones that were barely able to survive or reproduce, triggered a strong SA and JA-Ile response, whereas infestation with native clones led to lower levels of both phytohormones. On P. sativum, non-native clones, which survived or reproduced to a certain extent, induced fluctuating SA and JA-Ile levels, whereas the native clone triggered only a weak SA and JA-Ile response. On the universal host V. faba all aphid clones triggered only low SA levels initially, but induced clone-specific patterns of SA and JA-Ile later on. The levels of the active JA-Ile conjugate and of the other JA-pathway metabolites measured showed in many cases similar patterns, suggesting that the reduction in JA signaling was due to an effect upstream of OPDA. ABA levels were downregulated in all aphid clone-plant combinations and were therefore probably not decisive factors for aphid-plant compatibility. Our results

  19. Performances of legume-grass mixtures under different cutting managements in mediterranean environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Martiniello

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Annual forage crops have great importance for sustaining animal production in southern Italy. Knowledge of the performance of legume-grass associations under management similar to systems encountered in farm practice is essential for their effective exploitation of the available environmental resources. The purpose of this investigation was to estimate the effects of five cutting managements on the productivity and botanical composition of ten annual fodder crop mixtures in two Mediterranean environments. Ten ternary combinations of one grass (Avena sativa L., oat and Lolium multiflorum Lam., Italian ryegrass, one clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L., berseem; Trifolium incarnatum L., crimson and Trifolium squarrosum L., squarrosum or burr medic (Medicago polymorpha L. and common vetch (Vicia sativa L. were compared in a field trial (split-plot design, 3 replicates in two locations (Cagliari and Foggia, Italy during the 2000-2001 growing season. The cutting treatments included a winter grazing simulation (G, a cutting only regime at early (EF or late flowering (F of legumes and a combination of treatments (GEF and GF. Plant density (no. m-2 prior to cutting, dry matter yield (g m-2 and botanical composition (% were evaluated. Considerable differences were observed in the harvestable dry matter yields of mixtures among cutting treatments in both localities, with treatment F showing the higher values (787.1 and 415.7 g m-2 for Cagliari and Foggia, respectively. The forage species were able to compete and establish good growth during their initial phase in both localities. However, the botanical composition between the two sites differed considerably after the winter period. Particularly, at Foggia, grass dominance was a permanent feature of all treatments, and all the mixtures contained about 84% of grass. Italian ryegrass was the most representative species under all treatments in both sites. Mixtures with Italian ryegrass, crimson or berseem

  20. A field study on heavy metals phytoattenuation potential of monocropping and intercropping of maize and/or legumes in weakly alkaline soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Saiyong; Ma, Xinwang; Guo, Rui; Ai, Shiwei; Liu, Bailin; Zhang, Wenya; Zhang, Yingmei

    2016-10-02

    The study focused on the phytoattenuation effects of monocropping and intercropping of maize (Zea mays) and/or legumes on Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd in weakly alkaline soils. Nine growth stages of monocropping maize were chosen to study the dynamic process of extraction of heavy metals. The total content of heavy metals extracted by the aerial part of monocropped maize increased in a sigmoidal pattern over the effective accumulative temperature. The biggest biomass, highest extraction content, and lowest heavy metals bioaccumulation level occurred at physiological maturity. Among the different planting patterns, including monocropping and intercropping of maize and/or soybean (Glycine max), pea (Pisum sativum), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa), the extraction efficiency of Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd varied greatly. Only intercropping of maize and soybean yielded relatively higher extraction efficiency for the four metals with no significant difference in the total biomass. Moreover, the heavy metals concentrations in dry biomass from all the planting patterns in the present study were within China's national legal thresholds for fodder use. Therefore, slightly polluted alkaline soils can be safely used through monocropping and intercropping of maize and/or legumes for a range of purposes. In particular, this study indicated that intercropping improves soil ecosystems polluted by heavy metals compared with monocropping.

  1. Ensuring sustainable grain legume-cereal cropping systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bedoussac, Laurent; Journet, E-P; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    health makes them a key rotation crop in the sustainable intensification and diversification of smallholder farming. This makes grain legumes a key food security crop. However, yields in developing countries are low as a result of such factors as the need for improved varieties of seed, poor seed......Grain legumes are widely cultivated, particularly for their dry seeds (known as pulses). Grain legumes are an important crop for a number of reasons. They are a rich source of protein and fibre, minerals and vitamins. In addition, their rapid growth and ability to fix nitrogen and improve soil...... as in Denmark using spring and winter cereal-grain legume intercrops. Intercropping involves simultaneously growing two or more crops in the same field for a significant period of time. The practice is ancient as early records from many human societies all over the world have shown. Intercropping systems...

  2. mechanisms of drought resistance in grain legumes i: osmotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    in grain legumes, namely Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) faba bean (Vicia faba), pea (Pisum sativum), and chickpea (Cicer ... accumulated as a response to water loss and ... At harvesting, fresh weight was determined and ... The whole.

  3. Radioactive isotope uptake in a grass-legume association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douka, C.E.; Xenoulis, A.C. (National Centre for Scientific Research, Demokritos (Greece))

    1991-01-01

    The radioactive uptake of Medicago sativa and Rye grass in a pasture exposed to the fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident, was determined in four consecutive harvests covering a period of one year after the accident. In plants of Medicago sativa, inoculated with an effective Rhizobia meliloti strain isolated from Greek soils, a high degree of biological nitrogen fixation was observed at all harvests using N-15 techniques. At the second and third harvests, the percentage nitrogen derived from fixation (%NdfF), the percentage nitrogen derived from soil (%NdfS), as well as the radioactive uptake from the soil remained stable. At the fourth harvest, however, the %NdfF decreased while the %NdfS and the radioactive uptake from soil significantly increased. At the first harvest the radioactivity in both plants, caused mainly by direct fallout contamination, was considerably higher than that observed at the later harvests. Medicago sativa contained significantly less radioactivity than the grass at all harvests, although both plants were grown under the same environmental conditions. Even at the fourth harvest, almost one year after the initial contamination, the radioactivity of grass remained at high levels (20 Bq g{sup -1} of protein) while in Medicago sativa it assumed considerably lower values (3.6 Bq g{sup -1} of protein). A possible involvement of biological nitrogen fixation in the reduction of radioactive uptake is discussed. Finally, certain practical conclusions are drawn with respect to a safer management of pastures exposed to radioactivity. (author).

  4. A Comparative Nitrogen Balance and Productivity Analysis of Legume and Non-legume Supported Cropping Systems: The Potential Role of Biological Nitrogen Fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iannetta, Pietro P M; Young, Mark; Bachinger, Johann

    2016-01-01

    studies have systematically evaluated the effect of optimizing the balance between legumes and non N-fixing crops to optimize production. In addition, the shortage, or even absence in some regions, of measurements of BNF in crops and forages severely limits the ability to design and evaluate new legume......–based agroecosystems. To provide an indication of the magnitude of BNF in European agriculture, a soil-surface N-balance approach was applied to historical data from 8 experimental cropping systems that compared legume and non-legume crop types (e.g., grains, forages and intercrops) across pedoclimatic regions...... of Europe. Mean BNF for different legume types ranged from 32 to 115 kg ha−1 annually. Output in terms of total biomass (grain, forage, etc.) was 30% greater in non-legumes, which used N to produce dry matter more efficiently than legumes, whereas output of N was greater from legumes. When examined over...

  5. Conditions Affecting Shelf-Life of Inoculated Legume Seed

    OpenAIRE

    Greg Gemell; Elizabeth Hartley; Rosalind Deaker

    2012-01-01

    Microbial inoculants are becoming more available as sustainable alternatives to fertilizers and other agrichemicals in broad-acre cropping. However, with the exception of legume inoculants little is understood about effective delivery and survival of the inoculum. Legume inoculants are applied to both seed and soil but seed inoculation is the most economical technique. Large quantities of pasture seed in Australia are inoculated by commercial seed coating companies, but the long-term survival...

  6. Legume root symbioses: Natural history and prospects for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shtark Oksana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Legumes develop different mutually beneficial microbial-root symbioses such as arbuscular mysorrhiza (AM, rhizobium-legume symbiosis (RLS and epiphytic or endophytic associations with plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB which are distinguished in level of integration of the partners. Evidences of the role of AM as ancestral form of symbiosis which might be a source of the legume pre-adaptation to form some RLS are demonstrated. The RLS is supposed to evolve for a few times in ancient legumes in parallel ways based on the universal organization and regulatory mechanisms of the plant genetic material. Associations of plant roots with PGPB probably are the vestige of the early stages of evolution in morphologically differentiated RLS. Also, it is quite possible that 'first' rhizobia have originated from bacterial endosymbionts of AM fungi; then AM fungi might operate as effective vectors for introducing bacteria into the plants. Thus, the legume root symbioses may be considered as a single 'evolutionary plant-microbial continuum'. The acquired knowledge about evolution of plantmicrobe symbioses would contribute to the creation of new commercial varieties of plants with the use of both bio-engineered methods and traditional plant breeding. An original conception of legume breeding to improve their symbiotic effectiveness is proposed.

  7. Legumes can increase cadmium contamination in neighboring crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling; Zhang, Qian; Hu, Liangliang; Tang, Jianjun; Xu, Ligen; Yang, Xiantian; Yong, Jean W H; Chen, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Legumes are widely used in many cropping systems because they share their nitrogen fixation products and phosphorus mobilization activities with their neighbors. In the current study, however, we showed that co-cultivation with legumes increased cadmium (Cd) contamination in the adjacent crops. Both field and mesocosm experiments indicated that legumes increased Cd levels in edible parts and shoots of four neighboring crops and five maize varieties tested, regardless of the Cd levels in the soil. This enhanced Cd accumulation in crops was attributed to root interactions that alter the rhizosphere environment. Co-cultivation with legumes reduced soil pH, which somewhat increased the exchangeable forms of Cd. Our results have demonstrated the inevitable increases in Cd levels of crops as a direct result of co-cultivation with legumes even under situations when these levels are below the permissible threshold. With this new revelation, we need to consider carefully the current cropping systems involving legumes and perhaps to re-design the current and future cropping systems in view of avoiding food contamination by Cd.

  8. Growing tropical forage legumes in full sun and silvopastoral systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Alberto do Carmo Araújo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Growth was evaluated three tropical forage legumes in two cropping systems: silvopastoral system (SSP and full sun. A completely randomized design was adopted in factorial three legumes (estilosanthes cv. Campo Grande (Stylozanthes macrocephala x Stylozanthes capitata, tropical kudzu (Pueraria phaseoloides (Roxb. Benth and macrotiloma (Macrotyloma axillare cv. Java x two farming systems, with 4 repetitions. A eucalyptus SSP already deployed, with spatial arrangement of 12 x 2 m between trees was used. Legumes were planted in January 2014 a uniform cut being made in May 2014. The court assessment was carried out 125 days after the uniformity cut. There was difference for mass production of dry legumes (PMMSL between cultivation systems, evidencing increased productivity in the farming full sun. The macrotiloma showed higher PMSL (5.29 kg DM ha-1 cut-1, while the kudzu obtained the lowest yield (3.42 kg DM ha-1 cut-1 in the sun growing full. The cultivation of legumes in SSP increased the levels of mineral matter, crude protein and neutral detergent fiber. The shade provided by the SSP caused a reduction in the mass of dry matter production, but also altered the chemical composition of the studied legumes.

  9. A global experimental dataset for assessing grain legume production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernay, Charles; Pelzer, Elise; Makowski, David

    2016-09-01

    Grain legume crops are a significant component of the human diet and animal feed and have an important role in the environment, but the global diversity of agricultural legume species is currently underexploited. Experimental assessments of grain legume performances are required, to identify potential species with high yields. Here, we introduce a dataset including results of field experiments published in 173 articles. The selected experiments were carried out over five continents on 39 grain legume species. The dataset includes measurements of grain yield, aerial biomass, crop nitrogen content, residual soil nitrogen content and water use. When available, yields for cereals and oilseeds grown after grain legumes in the crop sequence are also included. The dataset is arranged into a relational database with nine structured tables and 198 standardized attributes. Tillage, fertilization, pest and irrigation management are systematically recorded for each of the 8,581 crop*field site*growing season*treatment combinations. The dataset is freely reusable and easy to update. We anticipate that it will provide valuable information for assessing grain legume production worldwide.

  10. Nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium-legume symbiosis: Are polyploidy and host peptide-governed symbiont differentiation general principles of endosymbiosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely eMaróti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The symbiosis between rhizobia soil bacteria and legumes is facultative and initiated by nitrogen starvation of the host plant. Exchange of signal molecules between the partners leads to the formation of root nodules where bacteria are converted to nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. In this mutualistic symbiosis, the bacteria provide nitrogen sources for plant growth in return for photosynthates from the host. Depending on the host plant the symbiotic fate of bacteria can either be reversible or irreversible. In Medicago plants the bacteria undergo a host-directed multistep differentiation process culminating in the formation of elongated and branched polyploid bacteria with definitive loss of cell division ability. The plant factors are nodule-specific symbiotic peptides. About 500 of them are cysteine-rich NCR peptides produced in the infected plant cells. NCRs are targeted to the endosymbionts and the concerted action of different sets of peptides governs different stages of endosymbiont maturation. This review focuses on symbiotic plant cell development and terminal bacteroid differentiation and demonstrates the crucial roles of symbiotic peptides by showing an example of multi-target mechanism exerted by one of these symbiotic peptides.

  11. Identification of lipoxygenase (LOX) genes from legumes and their responses in wild type and cultivated peanut upon Aspergillus flavus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Changsheng; Han, Suoyi; Lopez-Baltazar, Javier; Zhang, Xinyou; Wang, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    Lipoxygenase (LOX) genes are widely distributed in plants and play crucial roles in resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. Although they have been characterized in various plants, little is known about the evolution of legume LOX genes. In this study, we identified 122 full-length LOX genes in Arachis duranensis, Arachis ipaënsis, Cajanus cajan, Cicer arietinum, Glycine max, Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula. In total, 64 orthologous and 36 paralogous genes were identified. The full-length, polycystin-1, lipoxygenase, alpha-toxin (PLAT) and lipoxygenase domain sequences from orthologous and paralogous genes exhibited a signature of purifying selection. However, purifying selection influenced orthologues more than paralogues, indicating greater functional conservation of orthologues than paralogues. Neutrality and effective number of codons plot results showed that natural selection primarily shapes codon usage, except for C. arietinum, L. japonicas and M. truncatula LOX genes. GCG, ACG, UCG, CGG and CCG codons exhibited low relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) values, while CCA, GGA, GCU, CUU and GUU had high RSCU values, indicating that the latter codons are strongly preferred. LOX expression patterns differed significantly between wild-type peanut and cultivated peanut infected with Aspergillus flavus, which could explain the divergent disease resistance of wild progenitor and cultivars. PMID:27731413

  12. A transient decrease in reactive oxygen species in roots leads to root hair deformation in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohar, Dasharath Prasad; Haridas, Sajeet; Gantt, J Stephen; VandenBosch, Kathryn A

    2007-01-01

    * A possible role for reactive oxygen species (ROS) in root hair deformation in response to Nod factor (NF) was investigated using Medicago truncatula nodulation mutants, and an inhibitor and precursors of ROS. * In wild-type roots, ROS efflux transiently decreased approximately 1 h after NF treatment. Transcript accumulation of two NADPH oxidase homologs, respiratory burst oxidase homolog 2 (MtRBOH2) and MtRBOH3, also transiently decreased at 1 h. However, in the nonnodulating mutant Nod factor perception (nfp), transcript accumulation did not change. * Exogenous application of ROS prevented root hair swelling and branching induced by NF. When accumulation of ROS was prevented by diphenylene iodonium (DPI), NF did not induce root hair branching. Root treatment with DPI alone reduced ROS efflux and induced root hair tip swelling. Transient treatment of roots with DPI mimicked NF treatment and resulted in root hair branching in the absence of NF. A transient DPI treatment did not induce root hair branching in the nonlegumes Arabidopsis thaliana and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). * The results suggest a role for the transient reduction of ROS accumulation in governing NF-induced root hair deformation in legumes.

  13. Genome-wide identification of different dormant Medicago sativa L. MicroRNAs in response to fall dormancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenna Fan

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs that regulate gene post-transcriptional expression in plants and animals. High-throughput sequencing technology is capable of identifying small RNAs in plant species. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. is one of the most widely cultivated perennial forage legumes worldwide, and fall dormancy is an adaptive characteristic related to the biomass production and winter survival in alfalfa. Here, we applied high-throughput sRNA sequencing to identify some miRNAs that were responsive to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101 of alfalfa.Four sRNA libraries were generated and sequenced from alfalfa leaves in two typical varieties at distinct seasons. Through integrative analysis, we identified 51 novel miRNA candidates of 206 families. Additionally, we identified 28 miRNAs associated with fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101, including 20 known miRNAs and eight novel miRNAs. Both high-throughput sequencing and RT-qPCR confirmed that eight known miRNA members were up-regulated and six known miRNA members were down-regulated in response to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101. Among the 51 novel miRNA candidates, five miRNAs were up-regulated and three miRNAs were down-regulated in response to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101, and five of them were confirmed by Northern blot analysis.We identified 20 known miRNAs and eight new miRNA candidates that were responsive to fall dormancy in standard variety (Maverick and CUF101 by high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs from Medicago sativa. Our data provide a useful resource for investigating miRNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms of fall dormancy in alfalfa, and these findings are important for our understanding of the roles played by miRNAs in the response of plants to abiotic stress in general and fall dormancy in alfalfa.

  14. Proteolytic modification of selected legume flours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Baraniak

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of pepsin (EC 3.4.1.1 and trypsin (EC 3.4.4.4 action on the chemical composition of legume flours was the aim of this study. The level of proteins and lipids in hydrolysed flours was changed significantly. In comparison to the raw flours also fatty acid composition in treated flours was altered. In the lentil flours both trypsin and pepsin digestion conditions have decreased the level of unsaturated fatty acid. It is noteworthy that in all investigated, hydrolysed flours ratio linoleic: oleic fatty acid was significantly decreased in comparison to unhydrolysed flours (about 40%-pea; 60%- -lentil. Our investigations were also focused on the potential implementations of IMAC method in the separation and purification of peptides. Generally, peptides separation profiles, performed on immobilized Zn (II, were dependent on the kind of flour and enzyme used in the hydrolysis process. In the lights of our results is clearly visible that investigated peptides had a weak affinity to the chelated metal ions. It is noteworthy, that in some cases the influences of chelating factor on separation profiles were noticeable.

  15. Biological Potential of Sixteen Legumes in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixing Ren

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic acids have been identified in a variety of legumes including lima bean, broad bean, common bean, pea, jack bean, goa bean, adzuki bean, hyacinth bean, chicking vetch, garbanzo bean, dral, cow bean, rice bean, mung bean and soybean. The present study was carried out with the following aims: (1 to identify and quantify the individual phenolic acid and determine the total phenolic content (TPC; (2 to assess their antioxidant activity, inhibition activities of α-glucosidase, tyrosinase, and formation of advanced glycation endproducts; and (3 to investigate correlations among the phytochemicals and biological activity. Common bean possesses the highest antioxidant activity and advanced glycation endproducts formation inhibition activity. Adzuki bean has the highest α-glucosidase inhibition activity, and mung bean has the highest tyrosinase inhibition activity. There are significant differences in phytochemical content and functional activities among the bean species investigated. Selecting beans can help treat diseases such as dermatological hyperpigmentation illness, type 2 diabetes and associated cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Immunosuppression during Rhizobium-legume symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li; Lu, Dawei

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobium infects host legumes to elicit new plant organs, nodules where dinitrogen is fixed as ammonia that can be directly utilized by plants. The nodulation factor (NF) produced by Rhizobium is one of the determinant signals for rhizobial infection and nodule development. Recently, it was found to suppress the innate immunity on host and nonhost plants as well as its analogs, chitins. Therefore, NF can be recognized as a microbe/pathogen-associated molecular pattern (M/PAMP) like chitin to induce the M/PAMP triggered susceptibility (M/PTS) of host plants to rhizobia. Whether the NF signaling pathway is directly associated with the innate immunity is not clear till now. In fact, other MAMPs such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), exopolysaccharide (EPS) and cyclic-β-glucan, together with type III secretion system (T3SS) effectors are also required for rhizobial infection or survival in leguminous nodule cells. Interestingly, most of them play similarly negative roles in the innate immunity of host plants, though their signaling is not completely elucidated. Taken together, we believe that the local immunosuppression on host plants induced by Rhizobium is essential for the establishment of their symbiosis.

  17. Pollen structure and function in caesalpinioid legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Hannah; Rudall, Paula J

    2016-03-01

    A diverse range of pollen morphologies occurs within the large, paraphyletic legume subfamily Caesalpinioideae, especially among early-branching lineages. Previous studies have hypothesized an association between surface ornamentation and pollination syndrome or other aspects of pollen function such as desiccation tolerance and adaptations to accommodate volume changes. We reviewed caesalpinioid pollen morphology using light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, in combination with a literature survey of pollination vectors. Pollen structural diversity is greatest in the early-branching tribes Cercideae and Detarieae, whereas Cassieae and Caesalpinieae are relatively low in pollen diversity. Functional structures to counter desiccation include opercula (lids) covering apertures and reduced aperture size. Structures preventing wall rupture during dehydration and rehydration include different forms of colpi (syncolpi, parasyncolpi, pseudocolpi), striate supratectal ornamentation, and columellate or granular wall structures that resist tensile or compressive forces respectively. Specialized aperture structures (Zwischenkörper) may be advantageous for efficient germination of the pollen tube. In Detarieae and Cercideae in particular, there is potential to utilize pollen characters to estimate pollination systems where these are unknown. Supratectal verrucae and gemmae have apparently evolved iteratively in Cercideae and Detarieae. At the species level, there is a potential correlation between striate/verrucate patterns and vertebrate pollination. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  18. Estimating variability in grain legume yields across Europe and the Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernay, Charles; Ben-Ari, Tamara; Pelzer, Elise; Meynard, Jean-Marc; Makowski, David

    2015-01-01

    Grain legume production in Europe has recently come under scrutiny. Although legume crops are often promoted to provide environmental services, European farmers tend to turn to non-legume crops. It is assumed that high variability in legume yields explains this aversion, but so far this hypothesis has not been tested. Here, we estimate the variability of major grain legume and non-legume yields in Europe and the Americas from yield time series over 1961–2013. Results show that grain legume yields are significantly more variable than non-legume yields in Europe. These differences are smaller in the Americas. Our results are robust at the level of the statistical methods. In all regions, crops with high yield variability are allocated to less than 1% of cultivated areas. Although the expansion of grain legumes in Europe may be hindered by high yield variability, some species display risk levels compatible with the development of specialized supply chains. PMID:26054055

  19. Evaluation of ensilage potential of alfalfa cultivars (Medicago sativa L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, ALG; Costa,Ciniro; Arrigoni, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this trial was to study the ensilage potential of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L,.). The material used in the evaluation was harvested from an experiment in a complete randomized blocks design with three replicates, with seventeen alfalfa cultivars, Criouil, Florida 77, P555, P581, Moapa, Gilboa, 34 Linea, C/W 8754, C/W 4468, C/W 86, C/W 8746, Hunter Field, Trifecta, Sequel, CUF 101, Aurora e Siriver, during three years. The harvest used for the determinations was collected at 30...

  20. Policing the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis: a critical test of partner choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoek, Annet; Field, Elsa; Rehling, Finn; Mulley, Geraldine; Webb, Isabel; Poole, Philip S; Turnbull, Lindsay A

    2017-05-03

    In legume-Rhizobium symbioses, specialised soil bacteria fix atmospheric nitrogen in return for carbon. However, ineffective strains can arise, making discrimination essential. Discrimination can occur via partner choice, where legumes prevent ineffective strains from entering, or via sanctioning, where plants provide fewer resources. Several studies have inferred that legumes exercise partner choice, but the rhizobia compared were not otherwise isogenic. To test when and how plants discriminate ineffective strains we developed sets of fixing and non-fixing strains that differed only in the expression of nifH - essential for nitrogen fixation - and could be visualised using marker genes. We show that the plant is unable to select against the non-fixing strain at the point of entry, but that non-fixing nodules are sanctioned. We also used the technique to characterise mixed nodules (containing both a fixing and a non-fixing strain), whose frequency could be predicted using a simple diffusion model. We discuss that sanctioning is likely to evolve in preference to partner choice in any symbiosis where partner quality cannot be adequately assessed until goods or services are actively exchanged.

  1. Flavonoid glycosides isolated from unique legume plant extracts as novel inhibitors of xanthine oxidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysoula Spanou

    Full Text Available Legumes and the polyphenolic compounds present in them have gained a lot of interest due to their beneficial health implications. Dietary polyphenolic compounds, especially flavonoids, exert antioxidant properties and are potent inhibitors of xanthine oxidase (XO activity. XO is the main contributor of free radicals during exercise but it is also involved in pathogenesis of several diseases such as vascular disorders, cancer and gout. In order to discover new natural, dietary XO inhibitors, some polyphenolic fractions and pure compounds isolated from two legume plant extracts were tested for their effects on XO activity. The fractions isolated from both Vicia faba and Lotus edulis plant extracts were potent inhibitors of XO with IC(50 values range from 40-135 µg/mL and 55-260 µg/mL, respectively. All the pure polyphenolic compounds inhibited XO and their K(i values ranged from 13-767 µM. Ten of the compounds followed the non competitive inhibitory model whereas one of them was a competitive inhibitor. These findings indicate that flavonoid isolates from legume plant extracts are novel, natural XO inhibitors. Their mode of action is under investigation in order to examine their potential in drug design for diseases related to overwhelming XO action.

  2. Call for papers--Legume Genomics and Genetics (ISSN 1925-1580)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Legume Genomics and Genetics (LGG) (IS SN 1925-1580 online, http://lgg, sophiapublisher.com) propscd by legume geneticist Dr. Da Luo from Sun Yat-Sen University in China, is an open access and peer-reviewed journal publishing original research papers relevant to genomics and genetics in legume plants. It is committed to serving for legume genomics and genetics, especially featuring innovative research findings in the basic and applied fields of structural genomics, functional genomics, proteomics, epigenomics within the field of Legume sciences, as well as legume genetics from the molecular level to whole plant level.

  3. Transport processes of the legume symbiosome membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria C Clarke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The symbiosome membrane (SM is a physical barrier between the host plant and nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis, and represents a regulated interface for the movement of solutes between the symbionts that is under plant control. The primary nutrient exchange across the SM is the transport of a carbon energy source from plant to bacteroid in exchange for fixed nitrogen. At a biochemical level two channels have been implicated in movement of fixed nitrogen across the SM and a uniporter that transports monovalent dicarboxylate ions has been characterized that would transport fixed carbon. The aquaporin NOD26 may provide a channel for ammonia, but the genes encoding the other transporters have not been identified. Transport of several other solutes, including calcium and potassium, have been demonstrated in isolated symbiosomes, and genes encoding transport systems for the movement of iron, nitrate, sulfate and zinc in nodules have been identified. However, definitively matching transport activities with these genes has proved difficult and many further transport processes are expected on the SM to facilitate the movement of nutrients between the symbionts. Recently, work detailing the SM proteome in soybean has been completed, contributing significantly to the database of known SM proteins. This represents a valuable resource for the identification of transporter protein candidates, some of which may correspond to transport processes previously described, or to novel transport systems in the symbiosis. Putative transporters identified from the proteome include homologues of transporters of sulfate, calcium, peptides and various metal ions. Here we review current knowledge of transport processes of the SM and discuss the requirements for additional transport routes of other nutrients exchanged in the symbiosis, with a focus on transport systems identified through the soybean SM proteome.

  4. Production and transcriptional regulation of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in forage legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meiliang; Wei, Li; Sun, Zhanmin; Gao, Lihua; Meng, Yu; Tang, Yixiong; Wu, Yanmin

    2015-05-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PA), also known as condensed tannins, contribute to important forage legumes traits including disease resistance and forage quality. PA in forage plants has both positive and negative effects on feed digestibility and animal performance. The analytical methods and their applicability in measuring the contents of PA in forage plants are essential to studies on their nutritional effects. In spite of important breakthroughs in our understanding of the PA biosynthesis, important questions still remain to be answered such as the PA polymerization and transport. Recent advances in the understanding of transcription factor-mediated gene regulation mechanisms in anthocyanin and PA biosynthetic pathway in model plants suggest new approaches for the metabolic engineering of PA in forage plants. The present review will attempt to present the state-of-the-art of research in these areas and provide an update on the production and metabolic engineering of PA in forage plants. We hope that this will contribute to a better understanding of the ways in which PA production to manipulate the content of PA for beneficial effects in forage plants.

  5. Are Vicilins Another Major Class of Legume Lectins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Ribeiro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Legume lectins comprise a structurally related, Ca/Mn-dependent, widespread, abundant and well characterized lectin family when compared to the large number of lectins from other sources described in the literature. Strangely enough, no specific function has been assigned to them aside from a possible role in storage and/or defense. Using a recent and fine-tuned methodology capable of specific lectin identification, β-conglutin, Vicia faba vicilin and β-lathyrin, the vicilin storage globulins from Lupinus albus, V. faba and Lathyrus sativus, respectively, were shown to be capable of affinity binding to thoroughly washed erythrocyte membranes and of specific elution with appropriate sugars. Based on this evidence and on sparse data published in the literature, a second family of legume lectins is proposed: the 7S family of storage proteins from leguminous seeds, or family II of legume lectins. These lectins are also structurally related, widespread and well characterized. In addition, they self-aggregate in a Ca/Mg, electrostatic dependent manner and are even more abundant than the family I of legume lectins. Using the same evidence, reserve and defense roles may be attributed to family II of legume lectins.

  6. Enzymatic hydrolysis: a method in alleviating legume allergenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasera, Ramkrashan; Singh, A B; Lavasa, S; Prasad, Komarla Nagendra; Arora, Naveen

    2015-02-01

    Legumes are involved in IgE mediated food allergy in many countries. Avoidance of allergenic food is the only way to avoid symptomatic reaction. The present study investigated the effect of enzymatic hydrolysis on the allergenicity of three legumes - kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), black gram (Vigna mungo) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea). Soluble protein extracts of the study legumes were sequentially treated by Alcalase(®) and Flavourzyme(®). Allergenicity of hydrolysates was then determined by ELISA, immunoblot, stripped basophil histamine release and skin prick test (SPT). Hydrolysis resulted in the loss of all IgE binding fractions determined by immunoblot in the three legumes. Specific IgE binding in ELISA was reduced by 62.2 ± 7.7%, 87.1 ± 9.6% and 91.8 ± 7.2% in the hydrolysates of kidney bean, black gram and peanut, respectively (p release of histamine was decreased significantly when sensitized basophils were challenged with hydrolysates as compared to raw extracts. Significant reduction in the biopotency of hydrolysates was also observed in SPT where only 1/10 kidney bean-sensitive individuals, 2/6 black gram-sensitive individuals and 1/7 peanut-sensitive individuals were found positive to their respective hydrolysates. In conclusion, enzymatic hydrolysis is effective in attenuating allergenicity of legume proteins and may be employed for preparing hypoallergenic food extracts.

  7. Biogenic amines in rhizobia and legume root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Shinsuke

    2009-01-01

    Root-nodule bacteria (rhizobia) are of great importance for nitrogen acquisition through symbiotic nitrogen fixation in a wide variety of leguminous plants. These bacteria differ from most other soil microorganisms by taking dual forms, i.e. a free-living form in soils and a symbiotic form inside of host legumes. Therefore, they should have a versatile strategy for survival, whether inhabiting soils or root nodules formed through rhizobia-legume interactions. Rhizobia generally contain large amounts of the biogenic amine homospermidine, an analog of spermidine which is an essential cellular component in most living systems. The external pH, salinity and a rapid change in osmolarity are thought to be significant environmental factors affecting the persistence of rhizobia. The present review describes the regulation of homospermidine biosynthesis in response to environmental stress and its possible functional role in rhizobia. Legume root nodules, an alternative habitat of rhizobia, usually contain a variety of biogenic amines besides homospermidine and the occurrence of some of these amines is closely associated with rhizobial infections. In the second half of this review, novel biogenic amines found in certain legume root nodules and the mechanism of their synthesis involving cooperation between the rhizobia and host legume cells are also described.

  8. Priority regions for research on dryland cereals and legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Glenn; Barona, Elizabeth; Biradar, Chandrashekhar; Guevara, Edward; Dixon, John; Beebe, Steve; Castano, Silvia Elena; Alabi, Tunrayo; Gumma, Murali Krishna; Sivasankar, Shoba; Rivera, Ovidio; Espinosa, Herlin; Cardona, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Dryland cereals and legumes  are important crops in farming systems across the world.  Yet they are frequently neglected among the priorities for international agricultural research and development, often due to lack of information on their magnitude and extent. Given what we know about the global distribution of dryland cereals and legumes, what regions should be high priority for research and development to improve livelihoods and food security? This research evaluated the geographic dimensions of these crops and the farming systems where they are found worldwide. The study employed geographic information science and data to assess the key farming systems and regions for these crops. Dryland cereal and legume crops should be given high priority in 18 farming systems worldwide, where their cultivated area comprises more than 160 million ha. These regions include the dryer areas of South Asia, West and East Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, Central America and other parts of Asia. These regions are prone to drought and heat stress, have limiting soil constraints, make up half of the global population and account for 60 percent of the global poor and malnourished. The dryland cereal and legume crops and farming systems merit more research and development attention to improve productivity and address development problems. This project developed an open access dataset and information resource that provides the basis for future analysis of the geographic dimensions of dryland cereals and legumes. PMID:27303632

  9. A new approach to direct somatic embryogenesis in Medicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denchev, P; Velcheva, M; Atanassov, A

    1991-09-01

    A highly efficient system for direct somatic embryogenesis is described. Leaf sections originating from young trifoliate leaves of Medicago falcata line 47/1-5 and Medicago sativa line No2/9R, directly produced embryos after cultivation in liquid B5IV induction medium. In comparison with indirect somatic embryogenesis the system omits the callus stage and thus allows shortening of the process of somatic embryogenesis in alfalfa by 35-40 days. It permits the avoidance of secondary changes occurring during the process of dedifferentiation. A modified B5/3H medium containing Polyethylene Glycol 6000 promoted embryo development from globular up to torpedo stage. It was clearly shown that 2.5% Polyethylene Glycol stimulated this process for both H. falcata 47/1-5 and M. sativa No 2/9R. Maturation of torpedo stage embryos was carried out on solidified or liquid abscisic acidcontaining medium. A 30μM abscisic acid concentration was optimal in allowing one embryo to yield one plant. Somatic embryo conversion to plants and plant regeneration was performed on Murashige and Skoog medium. Regenerated plants showed a normal morphology.

  10. MsZEP, a novel zeaxanthin epoxidase gene from alfalfa (Medicago sativa), confers drought and salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yafang; Chang, Leqin; Zhang, Tong; An, Jie; Liu, Yushi; Cao, Yuman; Zhao, Xia; Sha, Xuyang; Hu, Tianming; Yang, Peizhi

    2016-02-01

    The zeaxanthin epoxidase gene ( MsZEP ) was cloned and characterized from alfalfa and validated for its function of tolerance toward drought and salt stresses by heterologous expression in Nicotiana tabacum. Zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP) plays important roles in plant response to various environment stresses due to its functions in ABA biosynthetic and the xanthophyll cycle. To understand the expression characteristics and the biological functions of ZEP in alfalfa (Medicago sativa), a novel gene, designated as MsZEP (KM044311), was cloned, characterized and overexpressed in Nicotiana tabacum. The open reading frame of MsZEP contains 1992 bp nucleotides and encodes a 663-amino acid polypeptide. Amino acid sequence alignment indicated that deduced MsZEP protein was highly homologous to other plant ZEP sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MsZEP was grouped into a branch with other legume plants. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed that MsZEP gene expression was clearly tissue-specific, and the expression levels were higher in green tissues (leaves and stems) than in roots. MsZEP expression decreased in shoots under drought, cold, heat and ABA treatment, while the expression levels in roots showed different trends. Besides, the results showed that nodules could up-regulate the MsZEP expression under non-stressful conditions and in the earlier stage of different abiotic stress. Heterologous expression of the MsZEP gene in N. tabacum could confer tolerance to drought and salt stress by affecting various physiological pathways, ABA levels and stress-responsive genes expression. Taken together, these results suggested that the MsZEP gene may be involved in alfalfa responses to different abiotic stresses and nodules, and could enhance drought and salt tolerance of transgenic tobacco by heterologous expression.

  11. Identification and Analysis of Medicago truncatula Auxin Transporter Gene Families Uncover their Roles in Responses to Sinorhizobium meliloti Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chenjia; Yue, Runqing; Bai, Youhuang; Feng, Rong; Sun, Tao; Wang, Xiaofei; Yang, Yanjun; Tie, Shuanggui; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-10-01

    Auxin transport plays a pivotal role in the interaction between legume species and nitrogen-fixing bacteria to form symbioses. Auxin influx carriers auxin resistant 1/like aux 1 (AUX/LAX), efflux carriers pin-formed (PIN) and efflux/conditional P-glycoprotein (PGP/ABCB) are three major protein families participating in auxin polar transport. We used the latest Medicago truncatula genome sequence to characterize and analyze the M. truncatula LAX (MtLAX), M. truncatula PIN (MtPIN) and M. truncatula ABCB (MtABCB) families. Transient expression experiments indicated that three representative auxin transporters (MtLAX3, MtPIN7 and MtABCB1) showed cell plasma membrane localizations. The expression of most MtLAX, MtPIN and MtABCB genes was up-regulated in the roots and was down-regulated in the shoots by Sinorhizobium meliloti infection in the wild type (WT). However, the expression of these genes was down-regulated in both the roots and shoots of an infection-resistant mutant, dmi3. The different expression patterns between the WT and the mutant roots indicated that auxin relocation may be involved in rhizobial infection responses. Furthermore, IAA contents were significantly up-regulated in the shoots and down-regulated in the roots after Sinorhizobium meliloti infection in the WT. Inoculation of roots with rhizobia may reduce the auxin loading from shoots to roots by inhibiting the expression of most auxin transporter genes. However, the rate of change of gene expression and IAA contents in the dmi3 mutant were obviously lower than in the WT. The identification and expression analysis of auxin transporter genes helps us to understand the roles of auxin in the regulation of nodule formation in M. truncatula.

  12. Ectopic expression of GsPPCK3 and SCMRP in Medicago sativa enhances plant alkaline stress tolerance and methionine content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhe Sun

    Full Text Available So far, it has been suggested that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases (PEPCs and PEPC kinases (PPCKs fulfill several important non-photosynthetic functions. However, the biological functions of soybean PPCKs, especially in alkali stress response, are not yet well known. In previous studies, we constructed a Glycine soja transcriptional profile, and identified three PPCK genes (GsPPCK1, GsPPCK2 and GsPPCK3 as potential alkali stress responsive genes. In this study, we confirmed the induced expression of GsPPCK3 under alkali stress and investigated its tissue expression specificity by using quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Then we ectopically expressed GsPPCK3 in Medicago sativa and found that GsPPCK3 overexpression improved plant alkali tolerance, as evidenced by lower levels of relative ion leakage and MDA content and higher levels of chlorophyll content and root activity. In this respect, we further co-transformed the GsPPCK3 and SCMRP genes into alfalfa, and demonstrated the increased alkali tolerance of GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic lines. Further investigation revealed that GsPPCK3-SCMRP co-overexpression promoted the PEPC activity, net photosynthetic rate and citric acid content of transgenic alfalfa under alkali stress. Moreover, we also observed the up-regulated expression of PEPC, CS (citrate synthase, H(+-ATPase and NADP-ME genes in GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic alfalfa under alkali stress. As expected, we demonstrated that GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic lines displayed higher methionine content than wild type alfalfa. Taken together, results presented in this study supported the positive role of GsPPCK3 in plant response to alkali stress, and provided an effective way to simultaneously improve plant alkaline tolerance and methionine content, at least in legume crops.

  13. Ectopic expression of GsPPCK3 and SCMRP in Medicago sativa enhances plant alkaline stress tolerance and methionine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingzhe; Sun, Xiaoli; Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Chaoyue; Duanmu, Huizi; Yu, Yang; Ji, Wei; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-01-01

    So far, it has been suggested that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases (PEPCs) and PEPC kinases (PPCKs) fulfill several important non-photosynthetic functions. However, the biological functions of soybean PPCKs, especially in alkali stress response, are not yet well known. In previous studies, we constructed a Glycine soja transcriptional profile, and identified three PPCK genes (GsPPCK1, GsPPCK2 and GsPPCK3) as potential alkali stress responsive genes. In this study, we confirmed the induced expression of GsPPCK3 under alkali stress and investigated its tissue expression specificity by using quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Then we ectopically expressed GsPPCK3 in Medicago sativa and found that GsPPCK3 overexpression improved plant alkali tolerance, as evidenced by lower levels of relative ion leakage and MDA content and higher levels of chlorophyll content and root activity. In this respect, we further co-transformed the GsPPCK3 and SCMRP genes into alfalfa, and demonstrated the increased alkali tolerance of GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic lines. Further investigation revealed that GsPPCK3-SCMRP co-overexpression promoted the PEPC activity, net photosynthetic rate and citric acid content of transgenic alfalfa under alkali stress. Moreover, we also observed the up-regulated expression of PEPC, CS (citrate synthase), H(+)-ATPase and NADP-ME genes in GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic alfalfa under alkali stress. As expected, we demonstrated that GsPPCK3-SCMRP transgenic lines displayed higher methionine content than wild type alfalfa. Taken together, results presented in this study supported the positive role of GsPPCK3 in plant response to alkali stress, and provided an effective way to simultaneously improve plant alkaline tolerance and methionine content, at least in legume crops.

  14. Contribution of NFP LysM domains to the recognition of Nod factors during the Medicago truncatula/Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensmihen, Sandra; de Billy, Françoise; Gough, Clare

    2011-01-01

    The root nodule nitrogen fixing symbiosis between legume plants and soil bacteria called rhizobia is of great agronomical and ecological interest since it provides the plant with fixed atmospheric nitrogen. The establishment of this symbiosis is mediated by the recognition by the host plant of lipo-chitooligosaccharides called Nod Factors (NFs), produced by the rhizobia. This recognition is highly specific, as precise NF structures are required depending on the host plant. Here, we study the importance of different LysM domains of a LysM-Receptor Like Kinase (LysM-RLK) from Medicago truncatula called Nod factor perception (NFP) in the recognition of different substitutions of NFs produced by its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. These substitutions are a sulphate group at the reducing end, which is essential for host specificity, and a specific acyl chain at the non-reducing end, that is critical for the infection process. The NFP extracellular domain (ECD) contains 3 LysM domains that are predicted to bind NFs. By swapping the whole ECD or individual LysM domains of NFP for those of its orthologous gene from pea, SYM10 (a legume plant that interacts with another strain of rhizobium producing NFs with different substitutions), we showed that NFP is not directly responsible for specific recognition of the sulphate substitution of S. meliloti NFs, but probably interacts with the acyl substitution. Moreover, we have demonstrated the importance of the NFP LysM2 domain for rhizobial infection and we have pinpointed the importance of a single leucine residue of LysM2 in that step of the symbiosis. Together, our data put into new perspective the recognition of NFs in the different steps of symbiosis in M. truncatula, emphasising the probable existence of a missing component for early NF recognition and reinforcing the important role of NFP for NF recognition during rhizobial infection.

  15. Contribution of NFP LysM domains to the recognition of Nod factors during the Medicago truncatula/Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Bensmihen

    Full Text Available The root nodule nitrogen fixing symbiosis between legume plants and soil bacteria called rhizobia is of great agronomical and ecological interest since it provides the plant with fixed atmospheric nitrogen. The establishment of this symbiosis is mediated by the recognition by the host plant of lipo-chitooligosaccharides called Nod Factors (NFs, produced by the rhizobia. This recognition is highly specific, as precise NF structures are required depending on the host plant. Here, we study the importance of different LysM domains of a LysM-Receptor Like Kinase (LysM-RLK from Medicago truncatula called Nod factor perception (NFP in the recognition of different substitutions of NFs produced by its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. These substitutions are a sulphate group at the reducing end, which is essential for host specificity, and a specific acyl chain at the non-reducing end, that is critical for the infection process. The NFP extracellular domain (ECD contains 3 LysM domains that are predicted to bind NFs. By swapping the whole ECD or individual LysM domains of NFP for those of its orthologous gene from pea, SYM10 (a legume plant that interacts with another strain of rhizobium producing NFs with different substitutions, we showed that NFP is not directly responsible for specific recognition of the sulphate substitution of S. meliloti NFs, but probably interacts with the acyl substitution. Moreover, we have demonstrated the importance of the NFP LysM2 domain for rhizobial infection and we have pinpointed the importance of a single leucine residue of LysM2 in that step of the symbiosis. Together, our data put into new perspective the recognition of NFs in the different steps of symbiosis in M. truncatula, emphasising the probable existence of a missing component for early NF recognition and reinforcing the important role of NFP for NF recognition during rhizobial infection.

  16. Physiological role of calcium in legume-rhizobium symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasil’eva G.G.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Literature data on the physiological role of calcium (Ca2+ in legume-rhizobium symbiosis development on initial stages - the infection and symbiotic structures formation, are generalized. The questions about the Ca2+ function in plants, special feature the formation of legume-rhizobium symbiosis and role of calcium in the interaction of two organisms are considered. Data on the interaction of ROS and Ca2+ in the development of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis and the relationship of NADPH-oxidase activity with the calcium signaling system are analyzed. The special attention is given to the role of Ca22+-spiking and calcium and calmodulin-like kinase in the initiation of plant symbiotic ways operation leads to infection and the formation of symbiotic structures.

  17. Transport and metabolism in legume-rhizobia symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udvardi, Michael; Poole, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation by rhizobia in legume root nodules injects approximately 40 million tonnes of nitrogen into agricultural systems each year. In exchange for reduced nitrogen from the bacteria, the plant provides rhizobia with reduced carbon and all the essential nutrients required for bacterial metabolism. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation requires exquisite integration of plant and bacterial metabolism. Central to this integration are transporters of both the plant and the rhizobia, which transfer elements and compounds across various plant membranes and the two bacterial membranes. Here we review current knowledge of legume and rhizobial transport and metabolism as they relate to symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Although all legume-rhizobia symbioses have many metabolic features in common, there are also interesting differences between them, which show that evolution has solved metabolic problems in different ways to achieve effective symbiosis in different systems.

  18. Linking Biomarker and Comparative Omics to Pathogens in Legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diapari, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    It is envisioned that a more precise study of the association between the traits and biomarkers will dramatically decrease the time and costs required to bring new improved disease resistance lines to market. The field of omics has an enormous potential to assess diseases more precise, including the identification and understanding of pathogenic mechanisms in legume crops, and have been exemplified by a relatively large number of studies. Recently, molecular genetic studies have accumulated a huge amount of genotypic data, through a more affordable next generation sequencing (NGS) technology, causing the omics approaches to fall behind. In this paper I provide an overview of genomics and proteomics and their use in legume crops, including the use of comparative genomics to identify homologous markers within legume crops.

  19. Peanut cross-reacting allergens in seeds and sprouts of a range of legumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L.B.; Pedersen, M.H.; Skov, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, peanut-allergic patients have reported symptoms upon ingestion of bean sprouts produced from various legumes.......Recently, peanut-allergic patients have reported symptoms upon ingestion of bean sprouts produced from various legumes....

  20. Isolation and functional characterization of salt-stress induced RCI2-like genes from Medicago sativa and Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Ruicai; Zhang, Fan; Li, Zhenyi; Li, Mingna; Cong, Lili; Kang, Junmei; Zhang, Tiejun; Zhao, Zhongxiang; Sun, Yan; Yang, Qingchuan

    2015-07-01

    Salt stress is one of the most significant adverse abiotic factors, causing crop failure worldwide. So far, a number of salt stress-induced genes, and genes improving salt tolerance have been characterized in a range of plants. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a salt stress-induced Medicago sativa (alfalfa) gene (MsRCI2A), which showed a high similarity to the yeast plasma membrane protein 3 gene (PMP3) and Arabidopsis RCI2A. The sequence comparisons revealed that five genes of MtRCI2(A-E) showed a high similarity to MsRCI2A in the Medicago truncatula genome. MsRCI2A and MtRCI2(A-E) encode small, highly hydrophobic proteins containing two putative transmembrane domains, predominantly localized in the plasma membrane. The transcript analysis results suggest that MsRCI2A and MtRCI2(A-D) genes are highly induced by salt stress. The expression of MsRCI2A and MtRCI2(A-C) in yeast mutants lacking the PMP3 gene can functionally complement the salt sensitivity phenotype resulting from PMP3 deletion. Overexpression of MsRCI2A in Arabidopsis plants showed improved salt tolerance suggesting the important role of MsRCI2A in salt stress tolerance in alfalfa.

  1. The First Attested Extraction of Ancient DNA in Legumes (Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikić, Aleksandar M

    2015-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) is any DNA extracted from ancient specimens, important for diverse evolutionary researches. The major obstacles in aDNA studies are mutations, contamination and fragmentation. Its studies may be crucial for crop history if integrated with human aDNA research and historical linguistics, both general and relating to agriculture. Legumes (Fabaceae) are one of the richest end economically most important plant families, not only from Neolithic onwards, since they were used as food by Neanderthals and Paleolithic modern man. The idea of extracting and analyzing legume aDNA was considered beneficial for both basic science and applied research, with an emphasis on genetic resources and plant breeding. The first reported successful and attested extraction of the legume aDNA was done from the sample of charred seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) and bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) from Hissar, southeast Serbia, dated to 1,350-1,000 Before Christ. A modified version of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method and the commercial kit for DNA extraction QIAGEN DNAesy yielded several ng μl(-1) of aDNA of both species and, after the whole genome amplification and with a fragment of nuclear ribosomal DNA gene 26S rDNA, resulted in the detection of the aDNA among the PCR products. A comparative analysis of four informative chloroplast DNA regions (trnSG, trnK, matK, and rbcL) among the modern wild and cultivated pea taxa demonstrated not only that the extracted aDNA was genuine, on the basis of mutation rate, but also that the ancient Hissar pea was most likely an early domesticated crop, related to the modern wild pea of a neighboring region. It is anticipated that this premier extraction of legume aDNA may provide taxonomists with the answers to diverse questions, such as leaf development in legumes, as well as with novel data on the single steps in domesticating legume crops worldwide.

  2. Impact of global climate change and fire on the occurrence and function of understorey legumes in forest ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reverchon, Frederique; Xu, Zhihong; Blumfield, Timothy J.; Chen, Chengrong; Abdullah, Kadum M. [Griffith Univ., Nathan, QLD (Australia). Environmental Futures Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences

    2012-02-15

    The objective of this review was to provide a better understanding of how global climate change and fire influence the occurrence of understorey legumes and thereby biological nitrogen (N) fixation rates in forest ecosystems. Legumes are interesting models since they represent an interface between the soil, plant, and microbial compartments, and are directly linked to nutrient cycles through their ability to fix N. As such, they are likely to be affected by environmental changes. Biological N fixation has been shown to increase under enriched CO{sub 2} conditions, but is constrained by the availability of phosphorus and water. Climate change can also influence the species composition of legumes and their symbionts through warming, altered rainfall patterns, or changes in soil physicochemistry, which could modify the effectiveness of the symbiosis. Additionally, global climate change may increase the occurrence and intensity of forest wildfires thereby further influencing the distribution of legumes. The establishment of leguminous species is generally favored by fire, as is N{sub 2} fixation. This fixed N could therefore replenish the N lost through volatilization during the fire. However, fire may also generate shifts in the associated microbial community which could affect the outcome of the symbiosis. Understorey legumes are important functional species, and even when they cannot reasonably be expected to reestablish the nutrient balance in forest soils, they may be used as indicators to monitor nutrient fluxes and the response of forest ecosystems to changing environmental conditions. This would be helpful to accurately model ecosystem N budgets, and since N is often a limiting factor to plant growth and a major constraint on C storage in ecosystems, would allow us to assess more precisely the potential of these forests for C sequestration. (orig.)

  3. [LEGUME-RHIZOBIUM SYMBIOSIS PROTEOMICS: ACHIEVEMENTS AND PERSPECTIVES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratiuk, Iu Iu; Mamenko, P M; Kots, S Ya

    2015-01-01

    The present review contains results of proteomic researches of legume-rhizobium symbiosis. The technical difficulties associated with the methods of obtaining protein extracts from symbiotic structures and ways of overcoming them were discussed. The changes of protein synthesis under formation and functioning of symbiotic structures were shown. Special attention has been given to the importance of proteomic studies of plant-microbe structures in the formation of adaptation strategies under adverse environmental conditions. The technical and conceptual perspectives of legume-rhizobium symbiosis proteomics were shown.

  4. Rhizobium-legume symbioses: the crucial role of plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourion, Benjamin; Berrabah, Fathi; Ratet, Pascal; Stacey, Gary

    2015-03-01

    New research results have significantly revised our understanding of the rhizobium-legume infection process. For example, Nod factors (NFs), previously thought to be absolutely essential for this symbiosis, were shown to be dispensable under particular conditions. Similarly, an NF receptor, previously considered to be solely involved in symbiosis, was shown to function during plant pathogen infections. Indeed, there is a growing realization that plant innate immunity is a crucial component in the establishment and maintenance of symbiosis. We review here the factors involved in the suppression of plant immunity during rhizobium-legume symbiosis, and we attempt to place this information into context with the most recent and sometimes surprising research results.

  5. Legume Seed Production Meeting Market Requirements and Economic Impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelt, Birte; Julier, Bernadette; Karagić, Đura

    2015-01-01

    L.), crop management techniques are applied to stimulate reproductive development in order to obtain high seed yields. These include a low plant density, manipulation of canopy size to avoid lodging and shading of fruiting organs, synchronization of flowering with pollinating insects as well...... to be an increasing emphasis on the role of forage legumes in producing high-quality meat and milk, combined with the requirement to reduce the environmental footprint of grassland agriculture. A high forage legume seed yield is a prerequisite to meet market requirements for new, improved cultivars and hence achieve...

  6. Effects of alternative legume seeds on Barbaresca lamb meat quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pennisi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a renewed interest towards the use of local legume seeds in animal nutrition was raising in Mediterranean areas. Conventional feedstuffs such as maize and soybean and animal by-products, the former widely diffused as genetically modified organisms (GMO and the latter related to “mad cow disease” produced significative changes in public perceptions, justifying a dramatic increase of the use of alternative protein and energy sources such as legume seeds (peas, faba beans, chickpeas (Hanbury et al., 2000...

  7. Three way interactions between Thymus vulgaris, Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti

    OpenAIRE

    Grøndahl, Eva; Ehlers, Bodil Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    Thymus vulgaris is a dominating component of the Mediterranean garrigue vegetation. It produces aromatic oil, containing monoterpenes, which affects the performance (growth, survival) of other plants, and microorganisms. Annual plant species of the genus Medicago are commonly found in Mediterranean thyme communities; in fact they often grow very close to thyme plants (within 1 square meter). Medicago has a symbiosis with the nitrogen fixing bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti – which is essential...

  8. Evolutionary dynamics of nitrogen fixation in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hironori; Aoki, Seishiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    The stabilization of host-symbiont mutualism against the emergence of parasitic individuals is pivotal to the evolution of cooperation. One of the most famous symbioses occurs between legumes and their colonizing rhizobia, in which rhizobia extract nutrients (or benefits) from legume plants while supplying them with nitrogen resources produced by nitrogen fixation (or costs). Natural environments, however, are widely populated by ineffective rhizobia that extract benefits without paying costs and thus proliferate more efficiently than nitrogen-fixing cooperators. How and why this mutualism becomes stabilized and evolutionarily persists has been extensively discussed. To better understand the evolutionary dynamics of this symbiosis system, we construct a simple model based on the continuous snowdrift game with multiple interacting players. We investigate the model using adaptive dynamics and numerical simulations. We find that symbiotic evolution depends on the cost-benefit balance, and that cheaters widely emerge when the cost and benefit are similar in strength. In this scenario, the persistence of the symbiotic system is compatible with the presence of cheaters. This result suggests that the symbiotic relationship is robust to the emergence of cheaters, and may explain the prevalence of cheating rhizobia in nature. In addition, various stabilizing mechanisms, such as partner fidelity feedback, partner choice, and host sanction, can reinforce the symbiotic relationship by affecting the fitness of symbionts in various ways. This result suggests that the symbiotic relationship is cooperatively stabilized by various mechanisms. In addition, mixed nodule populations are thought to encourage cheater emergence, but our model predicts that, in certain situations, cheaters can disappear from such populations. These findings provide a theoretical basis of the evolutionary dynamics of legume-rhizobia symbioses, which is extendable to other single-host, multiple

  9. [Quality standard of uygur medicine Medicago sativa seeds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wen-Huan; Xu, Hai-Yan; Wang, Dong-Dong; Li, Jie; Tian, Shu-Ge

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, microscopic identification method was adopted to observe the microscopic characters of ten batches of Medicago sativa seeds. And M. sativa seeds were identificated by TLC method in contrast to trigonelline and stachydrine hydrochloride. The impurities, moisture, ash, sour insoluble ash were detected based on Chinese Pharmacopoeia 2010 version (Vol I ). An HPLC method was also established for determination of trigonelline in the M. sativa seeds. The contents of impurities, moisture, ash, sour insoluble ash should not exceed 5%, 10%, 6%, and 2%, respectively. The content of trigonelline should be not less than 0.795 6 mg x g(-1). The experimental methods were accurate and reliable, and can be used as the quality control of the seeds of M. sativa.

  10. The identification of novel loci required for appropriate nodule development in Medicago truncatula

    OpenAIRE

    Domonkos, Agota; Horvath, Beatrix; Marsh, John F.; Halasz, Gabor; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Oldroyd, Giles ED; Kalo, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background The formation of functional symbiotic nodules is the result of a coordinated developmental program between legumes and rhizobial bacteria. Genetic analyses in legumes have been used to dissect the signaling processes required for establishing the legume-rhizobial endosymbiotic association. Compared to the early events of the symbiotic interaction, less attention has been paid to plant loci required for rhizobial colonization and the functioning of the nodule. Here we describe the i...

  11. Do jasmonates play a role in arbuscular mycorrhiza-induced local bioprotection of Medicago truncatula against root rot disease caused by Aphanomyces euteiches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilou, Adama; Zhang, Haoqiang; Franken, Philipp; Hause, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Bioprotective effects of mycorrhization with two different arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus irregularis, against Aphanomyces euteiches, the causal agent of root rot in legumes, were studied in Medicago truncatula using phenotypic and molecular markers. Previous inoculation with an AM-fungus reduced disease symptoms as well as the amount of pathogen within roots, as determined by the levels of A. euteiches rRNA or transcripts of the gene sterol C24 reductase. Inoculation with R. irregularis was as efficient as that with F. mosseae. To study whether jasmonates play a regulatory role in bioprotection of M. truncatula by the AM fungi, composite plants harboring transgenic roots were used to modulate the expression level of the gene encoding M. truncatula allene oxide cyclase 1, a key enzyme in jasmonic acid biosynthesis. Neither an increase nor a reduction in allene oxide cyclase levels resulted in altered bioprotection by the AM fungi against root infection by A. euteiches. These data suggest that jasmonates do not play a major role in the local bioprotective effect of AM fungi against the pathogen A. euteiches in M. truncatula roots.

  12. Nodulation by Sinorhizobium meliloti originated from a mining soil alleviates Cd toxicity and increases Cd-phytoextraction in Medicago sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahar eGhnaya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Besides their role in nitrogen supply to the host plants by the process of symbiotic N fixation, the association between legumes and Rhizobium could be interesting also for the rehabilitation of metal contaminated soils by phytoextraction. A major limitation is however the metal sensitivity of the bacterial strains. The aim of this work was to explore the usefulness of Sinorhizobium meliloti originated from a mining site in phytoextraction of Cd by Medicago sativa. Inoculated and non-inoculated plants were cultivated for 60 d on soils containing 50 or 100 mg Cd kg-1 soil. The inoculation hindered the occurrence of Cd- induced toxicity symptoms that appeared in the shoots of non-inoculated plants. This positive effect of S.meliloti colonization was accompanied by an increase in biomass production and improved nutrient acquisition as compared to non-inoculated plants. Moreover, nodulation enhanced both Cd absorption by the roots and Cd transloaction to the shoots. The amelioration of plant biomass concomitantly with the increase in Cd shoot concentration in inoculated plants led to higher potential of Cd-phytoextraction in these plants. Hence, in the presence of 50 mg Cd kg-1 in the soil, the quantities of Cd extracted in the shoots were 58 and 178 µg plant-1 in non-inoculated and inoculated plants, respectively. Thus we suggest that this association M. sativa-S. meliloti is an efficient biological system to extract Cd.

  13. Involvement of peroxidase activity in developing somatic embryos of Medicago arborea L. Identification of an isozyme peroxidase as biochemical marker of somatic embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Piedad; Martin, Luisa; Blazquez, Antonio; Guerra, Hilario; Villalobos, Nieves

    2014-01-15

    The legume Medicago arborea L. is very interesting as regards the regeneration of marginal arid soils. The problem is that it does not have a good germinative yield. It was therefore decided to regenerate via somatic embryogenesis and find a marker of embryogenic potential. In this study, peroxidase activity was evaluated in non-embryogenic and embryogenic calli from M. arborea L. A decrease in soluble peroxidase activity is observed in its embryonic calli at the time at which the somatic embryos begin to appear. This activity is always lower in embryonic calli than in non-embryonic ones (unlike what happens in the case of wall-bound peroxidases). These results suggest that peroxidases can be considered to be enzymes involved in somatic embryogenesis in M. arborea. In addition, isozyme analyses were carried out on protein extracts using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The band called P5 was detected only in embryogenic cultures at very early stages of development. This band was digested with trypsin and analyzed using linear ion trap (LTQ) mass spectrometer. In P5 isoform a peroxidase-L-ascorbate peroxidase was identified. It can be used as a marker that allows the identification of embryological potential.

  14. STUDY ON PHYTOEXTRACTION BALANCE OF ZN, CD, PB FROM MINE-WASTE POLLUTED SOILS BY USING MEDICAGO SATIVA AND TRIFOLIUM PRATENSE SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. LIXANDRU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available For a term of two years was studied phytoextractive potential of Zn, Cd and Pb using successive culture of alfalfa (Medicago sativa and red clover (Trifolium pratense. In the experimental plot was incorporated a quantity of 20 kg mine waste per square meter, providing in soil 1209 mg Zn/kg d.s., 4.70 mg Cd/kg d.s. and 188.2 mg Pb/kg d.s. The metals content accumulated in plants was determined at the two moments of biomass harvesting, and through balance calculations we could establish the phytoextraction efficiency of the two forage-grasses species. The obtained results indicate that both perennial forage-legumes species have a good phytoextractive capacity and tolerance for Zn and Pb, especially Trifolium pratense specie. By using this species as phytoextractors on soil polluted with 3.76 times more Pb and 4.03 times more Zn, is provided the reduction of metallic ions concentration in soil to limits admitted by laws in a period of 3, respectively, 4 years.

  15. Overexpression of Medicago sativa TMT elevates the α-tocopherol content in Arabidopsis seeds, alfalfa leaves, and delays dark-induced leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jishan; Jia, Huili; Feng, Guangyan; Wang, Zan; Li, Jun; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Xuemin

    2016-08-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a major forage legume for livestock and a target for improving their dietary quality. Vitamin E is an essential vitamin that animals must obtain from their diet for proper growth and development. γ-tocopherol methyltransferase (γ-TMT), which catalyzes the conversion of δ- and γ-tocopherols (or tocotrienols) to β- and α-tocopherols (or tocotrienols), respectively, is the final enzyme involved in the vitamin E biosynthetic pathway. The overexpression of M. sativa L.'s γ-TMT (MsTMT) increased the α-tocopherol content 10-15 fold above that of wild type Arabidopsis seeds without altering the total content of vitamin E. Additionally, in response to osmotic stress, the biomass and the expression levels of several osmotic marker genes were significantly higher in the transgenic lines compared with wild type. Overexpression of MsTMT in alfalfa led to a modest, albeit significant, increase in α-tocopherol in leaves and was also responsible for a delayed leaf senescence phenotype. Additionally, the crude protein content was increased, while the acid and neutral detergent fiber contents were unchanged in these transgenic lines. Thus, increased α-tocopherol content occurred in transgenic alfalfa without compromising the nutritional qualities. The targeted metabolic engineering of vitamin E biosynthesis through MsTMT overexpression provides a promising approach to improve the α-tocopherol content of forage crops.

  16. Effect of application rate of commercial lignite-derived amendments on early-stage growth of Medicago sativa and soil health, in acidic soil conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Antonio; Little, Karen; Rose, Michael; Jackson, Roy; Cavagnaro, Tim

    2013-04-01

    Commercially available lignite-derived amendments, sold mainly as humate preparations, have been promoted as plant growth stimulants leading to higher crop yields. These products are also claimed to improve soil properties such as pH. This study investigated the effect of application rate of three lignite-derived amendments on the early-stage growth of a pasture legume, lucerne (Medicago sativa), and soil health in a soil type common to south eastern Australia, in a glasshouse setting. An organic-mineral humate product and 'run of mine' lignite coal did not improve shoot or root growth despite application at a range of rates at, and in excess of, the manufacturers recommendation. Application of soluble K-humate product at 20 kg/ha (9.5 kg/ha C equivalent) produced an observable positive effect in shoot growth. At this application rate, a significant delay in the appearance of chlorotic symptoms was observed along with an increase in soil pH concurrent with decreased availability of soil Mn and Al. Higher root dry weight was associated with lower microbial biomass carbon which may indicate an effect on allocation of resources between the microbial community and the plant. An assessment of the effectiveness of lignite-derived amendments on plant growth, as well as their potential to improve the health of an acidic soil will assist farmers in making decisions regarding the use of these products.

  17. Nodulation by Sinorhizobium meliloti originated from a mining soil alleviates Cd toxicity and increases Cd-phytoextraction in Medicago sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghnaya, Tahar; Mnassri, Majda; Ghabriche, Rim; Wali, Mariem; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Lutts, Stanley; Abdelly, Chedly

    2015-01-01

    Besides their role in nitrogen supply to the host plants as a result of symbiotic N fixation, the association between legumes and Rhizobium could be useful for the rehabilitation of metal-contaminated soils by phytoextraction. A major limitation presents the metal-sensitivity of the bacterial strains. The aim of this work was to explore the usefulness of Sinorhizobium meliloti originated from a mining site for Cd phytoextraction by Medicago sativa. Inoculated and non-inoculated plants were cultivated for 60 d on soils containing 50 and/or 100 mg Cd kg−1 soil. The inoculation hindered the occurrence of Cd- induced toxicity symptoms that appeared in the shoots of non-inoculated plants. This positive effect of S. meliloti colonization was accompanied by an increase in biomass production and improved nutrient acquisition comparatively to non-inoculated plants. Nodulation enhanced Cd absorption by the roots and Cd translocation to the shoots. The increase of plant biomass concomitantly with the increase of Cd shoot concentration in inoculated plants led to higher potential of Cd-phytoextraction in these plants. In the presence of 50 mg Cd kg−1 in the soil, the amounts of Cd extracted in the shoots were 58 and 178 μg plant−1 in non-inoculated and inoculated plants, respectively. This study demonstrates that this association M. sativa-S. meliloti may be an efficient biological system to extract Cd from contaminated soils. PMID:26528320

  18. Uses of tree legumes in semi-arid regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.

    1980-01-01

    Uses of tree legumes in semi-arid and arid regions are reviewed. This review is divided into sections according to the following general use categories: fuels; human food; livestock food; to increase yields of crops grown beneath their canopies;and control of desertification. (MHR)

  19. Nutritive evaluation of legume seeds for ruminant feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Morales, E; Sanz-Sampelayo, M R; Molina-Alcaide, E

    2010-02-01

    Chemical composition, rumen degradability and the effect of particle losses, and intestinal digestibility of protein by using in situ-in vitro and in vitro techniques were stated for beans (Vicia faba), lupin (Lupinus albus), vetch (Vicia sativa) and bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) and four diets including those legume seeds. In addition, the apparent digestibility of experimental diets was determined in goats. The legume seeds showed high protein content (206-319 g/kg dry matter). Effective degradability of protein for legumes and diets varied from 0.80 to 0.87 and 0.76 to 0.82, respectively, decreasing to 0.53-0.76 and 0.61-0.67, respectively, when particle loss was taken into account. Different intestinal digestibility values were obtained with both methodologies without significant relationship between them (y = 1.058-0.463x; R(2)=0.068; RSD = 0.140; p = 0.53). There were no differences in the apparent nutrients and energy digestibility among diets (p > 0.05). These legumes can supply rapidly degradable protein for microbial protein synthesis and contribute to the pool of amino acids available for the synthesis of milk protein and for retention in the body.

  20. Antinutritional effects of legume seeds in piglets, rats and chickens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.

    1990-01-01

    There is a growing interest in Europe to be self-supporting with regard to the protein supply for animal diets. Peas and beans growing well under European climatic conditions could provide alternatives to soya. However, these legume seeds contain the same classes of antinutritional factors (ANFs) as

  1. Ensilage of tropical grasses mixed with legumes and molasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjandraatmadja, M; Norton, B W; Mac Rae, I C

    1994-01-01

    The effects of adding two legumes, Gliricidia sepium and Leucaena leucocephala, cv. Cunningham, and molasses on the fermentation characteristics of silages made from two tropical grasses (Pangola grass, Digitaria decumbens, and Setaria sphacelata cv. Kazungula) were investigated. Pangola grass silages contained significantly higher contents of water-soluble carbohydrates and lactic acid than did setaria silages after 100 days fermentation, but there were no significant differences between the two silages in populations of lactic acid bacteria and contents of total N and NH3-N. Addition of either species of legume had no significant effect on fermentation acids and NH3-N contents, and numbers of lactic acid bacteria. Addition of both legumes reduced NH3-N production in the silages by 59% after 5 days' fermentation. Numbers of lactic acid bacteria were not significantly affected by the different treatments. Enterococcus faecalis represented 60% of the lactic acid bacteria isolated from the treated herbages prior to ensiling. By 100 days of fermentation, only lactobacilli were isolated: 82% homo-fermenters and 18% hetero-fermenters. Lactobacillus mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum was found only in the silage supplemented with 33% (w/w) legume. It was concluded that the low quality of tropical grasses used as feeds for ruminants may be significantly improved by ensiling these grasses with small amounts of molasses and with high-protein tree leaves.

  2. Biological nitrogen fixation in non-legume plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Carole; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine

    2013-05-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient in plant growth. The ability of a plant to supply all or part of its requirements from biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) thanks to interactions with endosymbiotic, associative and endophytic symbionts, confers a great competitive advantage over non-nitrogen-fixing plants. Because BNF in legumes is well documented, this review focuses on BNF in non-legume plants. Despite the phylogenic and ecological diversity among diazotrophic bacteria and their hosts, tightly regulated communication is always necessary between the microorganisms and the host plant to achieve a successful interaction. Ongoing research efforts to improve knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying these original relationships and some common strategies leading to a successful relationship between the nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and their hosts are presented. Understanding the molecular mechanism of BNF outside the legume-rhizobium symbiosis could have important agronomic implications and enable the use of N-fertilizers to be reduced or even avoided. Indeed, in the short term, improved understanding could lead to more sustainable exploitation of the biodiversity of nitrogen-fixing organisms and, in the longer term, to the transfer of endosymbiotic nitrogen-fixation capacities to major non-legume crops.

  3. Quality of buffalo meat burger containing legume flours as binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, V K; Mahendrakar, N S; Narasimha Rao, D; Sachindra, N M

    2004-01-01

    The effect of addition of different decorticated legume flours, viz., soya bean, bengal gram, green gram and black gram, on the quality of buffalo meat burger was studied. The burgers consisted of optimized quantities of roasted or unroasted legume flour, spices and common salt. Inclusion of roasted black gram flour registered the highest yield of 95.7%, lowest shrinkage of 5% and lowest fat absorption of 26.6% on frying. Protein content of 18-20% was highest in the soya flour formulation. Free fatty acid (FFA) values (as% oleic) increased from 14.3 to 17.3 in freshly prepared samples (before frying) to 16.0-19.4 in 4 m frozen (-16±2 °C) stored samples and fried samples had about 25% lower FFA values. Formulations with roasted flours registered lower thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values (mg malonaldehyde/kg sample) of 0.6-1.5 as against 0.6-2.1 for unroasted flours before frying. The burgers prepared with any of these binders were organoleptically acceptable even after storage at -16±2 °C for 4 months., However, the burger with black gram dhal (dehulled split legume) flour had better sensory quality attributes compared to other legumes.

  4. Symbiotic specificity of tropical tree rhizobia for host legumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bala, A.; Giller, K.E.

    2001-01-01

    The host range and specificity is reported of a genetically diverse group of rhizobia isolated from nodules of Calliandra calothyrsus, Gliricidia sepium, Leucaena leucocephala and Sesbania sesban. Nodule number and nitrogen content was measured in seedlings of herbaceous and woody legume species aft

  5. Contribution of Legume Rotations to the Nitrogen Requirements of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of legumes rotation in meeting the N fertilizer requirements of maize. The experimental site ... This study was carried out on a Rhodic Ferralsol at. Mlingano Agricultural .... different according to Duncan's New Multiple Range Test. *, ** and *** indicate .... and 16 kg N ha-1 in the case of the cowpea, pigeonpea and greengram ...

  6. Nod factor signal transduction in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpens, E.H.M.; Bisseling, T.

    2008-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between Rhizobium bacteria and most legume plants is initiated by the perception of bacterial signal molecules, the nodulation (Nod) factors, at the root hairs of the plant. This induces responses both in the root hairs, leading to infection by the bacteria, as well as at a

  7. Genetic considerations in developing germplasm sources of native legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a great need for biological diversity in reseeding efforts on western rangelands. Legumes provide a crucial component of reseedings, by allowing for higher forage quality, soil nitrogen fixation, pollinator sustenance, and wildlife and wild-fowl feed. In efforts to collect and produce see...

  8. Converting perennial legumes to organic cropland without tillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic producers are interested in developing a no-till system for crop production. In this study, we examined management tactics to convert perennial legumes to annual crops without tillage. Our hypothesis was that reducing carbohydrate production in the fall by mowing would favor winterkill. M...

  9. CLE peptide-encoding gene families in Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, compared with those of soybean, common bean and Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastwell, April H; de Bang, Thomas C; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    these complete CLE peptide-encoding gene families with those of fellow legumes, Glycine max and Phaseolus vulgaris, in addition to the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This approach provided insight into the evolution of CLE peptide families and enabled us to establish putative M. truncatula and L. japonicus...

  10. Evaluation of microbial biomass C and N content of the soils cultivated with vetch (Vicia sativa L. and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlyas Bolat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Legume forage crops have the ability of retaining free nitrogen in the air through symbiotic Rhizobium bacteria found in their roots. Additionally, microbial biomass (MB–an essential living component of soil and a significant factor influencing plant nutrient dynamics–is considered to be accurate indicator of soil’s biological condition. Given the aforementioned aspects, soil MB C (Cmic and MB N (Nmic of different legume forage crops were investigated in this study. Soil samples were taken in order to identify certain physical and chemical characteristics of the soil using volume cylinders (0 – 6.5 cm depth from Vicia sativa L. (VSP and Medicago sativa L. planted (MSP areas. To determine the Cmic and Nmic contents, topsoil samples were also taken from 0 – 6.5 cm depth. Cmic and Nmic contents were identified using chloroform – fumigation – extraction method. There was no statistical significance for particle density, bulk density, electrical conductivity, CaCO3 %, and decomposition ratio (Corg/Ntotal of the VSP and MSP soil (P > 0.05. However, some other soil characteristics such as temperature, porosity, sand, silt and clay contents, pH, organic C and total N differed significantly (P < 0.05. Compared to VSP soil, the Cmic contents were determined to be 27 % higher (P < 0.05 in MSP soil. In VSP soil, the soil Nmic content ranged from 83.38 µg g-1 to 124.67 µg g-1, while it ranged from 91.62 µg g-1 to 187.07 µg g-1 in MSP soil. The Nmic content of the MSP soil was observed to be approximately 35 % higher than VSP soil, and a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05 was noticed between the two. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found not only between the Cmic and organic C contents (r = 0.667; P < 0.05 but also between the Nmic and total N contents of MSP and VSP soil (r = 0.881; P < 0.01. The results of the study revealed that soil Cmic and Nmic values differ as the types of planted legume forage crops

  11. [Determination of Hard Rate of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Seeds with Near Infrared Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-xun; Chen, Ling-ling; Zhang, Yun-wei; Mao, Pei-sheng

    2016-03-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is the most commonly grown forage crop due to its better quality characteristics and high adaptability in China. However, there was 20%-80% hard seeds in alfalfa which could not be identified easily from non hard seeds which would cause the loss of seed utilization value and plant production. This experiment was designed for 121 samples of alfalfa. Seeds were collected according to different regions, harvested year and varieties. 31 samples were artificial matched as hard rates ranging from 20% to 80% to establish a model for hard seed rate by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with Partial Least Square (PLS). The objective of this study was to establish a model and to estimate the efficiency of NIRS for determining hard rate of alfalfa seeds. The results showed that the correlation coefficient (R2(cal)) of calibration model was 0.981 6, root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) was 5.32, and the ratio of prediction to deviation (RPD) was 3.58. The forecast model in this experiment presented the satisfied precision. The proposed method using NIRS technology is feasible for identification and classification of hard seed in alfalfa. A new method, as nondestructive testing of hard seed rate, was provided to theoretical basis for fast nondestructive detection of hard seed rates in alfalfa.

  12. Traits affecting early season nitrogen uptake in nine legume species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elana Dayoub

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Legume crops are known to have low soil N uptake early in their life cycle, which can weaken their ability to compete with other species, such as weeds or other crops in intercropping systems. However, there is limited knowledge on the main traits involved in soil N uptake during early growth and for a range of species. The objective of this research was to identify the main traits explaining the variability among legume species in soil N uptake and to study the effect of the soil mineral N supply on the legume strategy for the use of available N sources during early growth. Nine legume species were grown in rhizotrons with or without N supply. Root expansion, shoot and root biomass, nodule establishment, N2 fixation and mineral soil N uptake were measured. A large interspecific variability was observed for all traits affecting soil N uptake. Root lateral expansion and early biomass in relation to seed mass were the major traits influencing soil N uptake regardless of the level of soil N availability. Fenugreek, lentil, alfalfa, and common vetch could be considered weak competitors for soil N due to their low plant biomass and low lateral root expansion. Conversely, peanut, pea, chickpea and soybean had a greater soil N uptake. Faba bean was separated from other species having a higher nodule biomass, a higher N2 fixation and a lower seed reserve depletion. Faba bean was able to simultaneously fix N2 and take up soil N. This work has identified traits of seed mass, shoot and root biomass, root lateral expansion, N2 fixation and seed reserve depletion that allowing classification of legume species regarding their soil N uptake ability during early growth.

  13. Legumes in Finnish agriculture: history, present status and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. L. STODDARD

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Legumes are important in world agriculture, providing biologically fixed nitrogen, breaking cereal disease cycles and contributing locally grown food and feed, including forage. Pea and faba bean were grown by early farmers in Finland, with remains dated to 500 BC. Landraces of pea and faba bean were gradually replaced by better adapted, higher quality materials for food use. While grain legumes have been restricted by their long growing seasons to the south of the country, red, white and alsike clovers are native throughout and have long been used in leys for grazing, hay and silage. Breeding programmes released many cultivars of these crops during the 1900s, particularly pea and red clover. A.I. Virtanen earned the 1945 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on both nitrogen fixation and silage preservation. Use of crop mixtures may appear modern, but farmers used them already in the early 1800s, when oat was used to support pea, and much effort has been devoted to improving the system and establishing its other benefits. Although international cultivars have been easily accessible since Finland’s 1995 entry into the European Union, the combination of feed quality and appropriate earliness is still needed, as < 1% of arable land is sown to grain legumes and an increase to 9–10% would allow replacement of imported protein feeds. Climate change will alter the stresses on legume crops, and investment in agronomy, physiology and breeding is needed so that farmers can gain from the many advantages of a legume-supported rotation.;

  14. Contribution of legumes to the soil N pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustec, Joëlle; Malagoli, Philippe; Mahieu, Stéphanie

    2010-05-01

    Grain legumes can be used for nitrogen acquisition in different ways in sustainable agriculture (Fustec et al., 2009). They are seen as a tool to reduce mineral N fertilizers in cropping systems. However, estimates of biological N fixation, N balance and N benefit either for the following crop or in mixed crops, remain unclear. The contribution of legumes to the soil N pool is difficult to measure, especially N rhizodeposition, since it is a critical point for assessing N benefits for other crops and for soil biological activity, and for reducing water pollution (Mayer et al., 2003). We adapted and refined the cotton-wick 15N stem labeling method for measuring the amount of soil N derived from rhizodeposition by field peas (Mahieu et al., 2007, 2009). The method was tested in different conditions in the field and in the greenhouse with various pea varieties and isolines. In addition, we used the cotton-wick method for assessing N transfers from pea to neighbouring durum wheat. In the greenhouse, a positive relationship was found between the amount of N rhizodeposits and the legume N content. N rhizodeposition was about 15% of the plant N and 30% in the field. In field pea / durum wheat intercrops, plant-plant N transfers were quantified and found to be bidirectional. Such results should be taken into account when estimating N benefits from biological N fixation by a grain legume crop and for the prediction of N economies in legume-based cropping systems. More studies dealing with rhizodeposit compounds and soil biological activity would now be necessary. Fustec et al. 2009. Agron. Sustain. Dev., DOI 10.1051/agro/2009003, in press. Mahieu et al. 2007. Plant Soil 295, 193-205. Mahieu et al. 2009. Soil Biol. Biochem. 41, 2236-2243. Mayer et al. 2003. Soil Biol. Biochem. 35, 21-28.

  15. A comparative nitrogen balance and productivity analysis of legume and non-legume supported cropping systems: the potential role of biological nitrogen fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro P M Iannetta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF to provide sufficient N for production have encouraged re-appraisal of cropping systems that deploy legumes. It has been argued that legume-derived N can maintain productivity as an alternative to the application of mineral fertiliser, although few studies have systematically evaluated the effect of optimising the balance between legumes and non N-fixing crops to optimise production. In addition, the shortage, or even absence in some regions, of measurements of BNF in crops and forages severely limits the ability to design and evaluate new, legume–based agroecosystems. To provide an indication of the magnitude of BNF in European agriculture, a soil-surface N-balance approach was applied to historical data from 8 experimental cropping systems that compared legume and non-legume crop types (e.g. grains, forages and intercrops across pedoclimatic regions of Europe. Mean BNF for different legume types ranged from 32-115 kg ha-1 annually. Output in terms of total biomass (grain, forage, etc. was 30% greater in non-legumes, which used N to produce dry matter more efficiently than legumes, whereas output of N was greater from legumes. When examined over the crop sequence, the contribution of BNF to the N-balance increased to reach a maximum when the legume fraction was around 0.5 (legume crops were present in half the years. BNF was lower when the legume fraction increased to 0.6-0.8, not because of any feature of the legume, but because the cropping systems in this range were dominated by mixtures of legume and non-legume forages to which inorganic N as fertiliser was normally applied. Forage (e.g. grass and clover, as opposed to grain crops in this range maintained high outputs of biomass and N. In conclusion, BNF through grain and forage legumes have the potential to generate major benefit in terms of reducing or dispensing with the need for mineral N without loss of total output.

  16. A Comparative Nitrogen Balance and Productivity Analysis of Legume and Non-legume Supported Cropping Systems: The Potential Role of Biological Nitrogen Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetta, Pietro P. M.; Young, Mark; Bachinger, Johann; Bergkvist, Göran; Doltra, Jordi; Lopez-Bellido, Rafael J.; Monti, Michele; Pappa, Valentini A.; Reckling, Moritz; Topp, Cairistiona F. E.; Walker, Robin L.; Rees, Robert M.; Watson, Christine A.; James, Euan K.; Squire, Geoffrey R.; Begg, Graham S.

    2016-01-01

    The potential of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) to provide sufficient N for production has encouraged re-appraisal of cropping systems that deploy legumes. It has been argued that legume-derived N can maintain productivity as an alternative to the application of mineral fertilizer, although few studies have systematically evaluated the effect of optimizing the balance between legumes and non N-fixing crops to optimize production. In addition, the shortage, or even absence in some regions, of measurements of BNF in crops and forages severely limits the ability to design and evaluate new legume–based agroecosystems. To provide an indication of the magnitude of BNF in European agriculture, a soil-surface N-balance approach was applied to historical data from 8 experimental cropping systems that compared legume and non-legume crop types (e.g., grains, forages and intercrops) across pedoclimatic regions of Europe. Mean BNF for different legume types ranged from 32 to 115 kg ha−1 annually. Output in terms of total biomass (grain, forage, etc.) was 30% greater in non-legumes, which used N to produce dry matter more efficiently than legumes, whereas output of N was greater from legumes. When examined over the crop sequence, the contribution of BNF to the N-balance increased to reach a maximum when the legume fraction was around 0.5 (legume crops were present in half the years). BNF was lower when the legume fraction increased to 0.6–0.8, not because of any feature of the legume, but because the cropping systems in this range were dominated by mixtures of legume and non-legume forages to which inorganic N as fertilizer was normally applied. Forage (e.g., grass and clover), as opposed to grain crops in this range maintained high outputs of biomass and N. In conclusion, BNF through grain and forage legumes has the potential to generate major benefit in terms of reducing or dispensing with the need for mineral N without loss of total output. PMID:27917178

  17. Phytoremediation of heavy and transition metals aided by legume-rhizobia symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, X.; Taghavi, S.; Xie, P.

    2014-01-01

    nitrogen fixation, phosphorus solubilization, phytohormone synthesis, siderophore release, and production of ACC deaminase and the volatile compounds of acetoin and 2, 3-butanediol may facilitate legume growth while lessening metal toxicity. The benefits of using legumes inoculated with naturally resistant...... rhizobia or recombinant rhizobia with enhanced resistance, as well as co-inoculation with other plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) are discussed. However, the legume-rhizobia symbiosis appears to be sensitive to metals, and the effect of metal toxicity on the interaction between legumes and rhizobia......Legumes are important for nitrogen cycling in the environment and agriculture due to the ability of nitrogen fixation by rhizobia. In this review, we introduce an important and potential role of legume-rhizobia symbiosis in aiding phytoremediation of some metal contaminated soils as various legumes...

  18. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, Maël; Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Rípodas, Carolina; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Crespi, Martin; Gamas, Pascal; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Zanetti, Maria Eugenia; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Niebel, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants.

  19. The first attested extraction of ancient DNA in legumes (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar M. Mikić

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ancient DNA (aDNA is any DNA extracted from ancient specimens, important for diverse evolutionary researches. The major obstacles in aDNA studies are mutations, contamination and fragmentation. Its studies may be crucial for crop history if integrated with human aDNA research and historical linguistics, both general and relating to agriculture. Legumes (Fabaceae are one of the richest end economically most important plant families, not only from Neolithic onwards, since they were used as food by Neanderthals and Paleolithic modern man. The idea of extracting and analysing legume aDNA was considered beneficial for both basic science and applied research, with an emphasis on genetic resources and plant breeding. The first reported successful and attested extraction of the legume aDNA was done from the sample of charred seeds of pea (Pisum sativum and bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia from Hissar, southeast Serbia, dated to 1,350 - 1,000 Before Christ. A modified version of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB method and the commercial kit for DNA extraction QIAGEN DNAesy yielded several ng μl-1 of aDNA of both species and, after the whole genome amplification and with a fragment of nuclear ribosomal DNA gene 26S rDNA, resulted in the detection of the aDNA among the PCR products. A comparative analysis of four informative chloroplast DNA regions (trnSG, trnK, matK and rbcL among the modern wild and cultivated pea taxa demonstrated not only that the extracted aDNA was genuine, on the basis of mutation rate, but also that the ancient Hissar pea was most likely an early domesticated crop, related to the modern wild pea of a neighbouring region. It is anticipated that this premier extraction of legume aDNA may provide taxonomists with the answers to diverse questions, such as leaf development in legumes, as well as with novel data on the single steps in domesticating legume crops worldwide.

  20. The effects of legumes on metabolic features, insulin resistance and hepatic function tests in women with central obesity: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Mohammad; Gharaaghaji, Rasool; Gargari, Bahram Pourghassem

    2014-06-01

    The effect of high-legume hypocaloric diet on metabolic features in women is unclear. This study provided an opportunity to find effects of high-legume diet on metabolic features in women who consumed high legumes at pre-study period. In this randomized controlled trial after 2 weeks of a run-in period on an isocaloric diet, 42 premenopausal women with central obesity were randomly assigned into two groups: (1) Hypocaloric diet enriched in legumes (HDEL) and (2) hypocaloric diet without legumes (HDWL) for 6 weeks. The following variables were assessed before intervention and 3 and 6 weeks after its beginning: Waist circumference (WC), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), fasting serum concentrations of triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting blood sugar (FBS), insulin, homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). We used multifactor model of nested multivariate analysis of variance repeated measurements and t-test for statistical analysis. HDEL and HDWL significantly reduced the WC. HDEL significantly reduced the SBP and TG. Both HDEL and HDWL significantly increased fasting concentration of insulin and HOMA-IR after 3 weeks, but their significant effects on insulin disappeared after 6 weeks and HDEL returned HOMA-IR to basal levels in the subsequent 3 weeks. In HDEL group percent of decrease in AST and ALT between 3(rd) and 6(th) weeks was significant. In HDWL group percent of increase in SBP, DBP, FBS and TG between 3(rd) and 6(th) weeks was significant. The study indicated beneficial effects of hypocaloric legumes on metabolic features.

  1. Genome sequence of the Medicago-nodulating Ensifer meliloti commercial inoculant strain RRI128.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Wayne; Ballard, Ross; Drew, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Tatiparthi, Reddy; Chen, Amy; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2014-06-15

    Ensifer meliloti strain RRI128 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod. RRI128 was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) grown in the greenhouse and inoculated with soil collected from Victoria, Australia. The strain is used in commercial inoculants in Australia. RRI128 nodulates and forms an effective symbiosis with a diverse range of lucerne cultivars (Medicago sativa) and several species of annual medic (M. truncatula, Medicago littoralis and Medicago tornata), but forms an ineffective symbiosis with Medicago polymorpha. Here we describe the features of E. meliloti strain RRI128, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 6,900,273 bp draft genome is arranged into 156 scaffolds of 157 contigs, contains 6,683 protein-coding genes and 87 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  2. Legume LysM receptors mediate symbiotic and pathogenic signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Simon; Radutoiu, Simona; Stougaard, Jens

    2017-10-01

    Legume-rhizobia symbiosis is coordinated through the production and perception of signal molecules by both partners with legume LysM receptor kinases performing a central role in this process. Receptor complex formation and signalling outputs derived from these are regulated through ligand binding and further modulated by a diverse variety of interactors. The challenge now is to understand the molecular mechanisms of these reported interactors. Recently attributed roles of LysM receptors in the perception of rhizobial exopolysaccharide, distinguishing between pathogens and symbionts, and assembly of root and rhizosphere communities expand on the importance of these receptors. These studies also highlight challenges, such as identification of cognate ligands, formation of responsive receptor complexes and separation of downstream signal transduction pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. UAV-based high-throughput phenotyping in legume crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Khot, Lav R.; Quirós, Juan; Vandemark, George J.; McGee, Rebecca J.

    2016-05-01

    In plant breeding, one of the biggest obstacles in genetic improvement is the lack of proven rapid methods for measuring plant responses in field conditions. Therefore, the major objective of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing high-throughput remote sensing technology for rapid measurement of phenotyping traits in legume crops. The plant responses of several chickpea and peas varieties to the environment were assessed with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) integrated with multispectral imaging sensors. Our preliminary assessment showed that the vegetation indices are strongly correlated (p<0.05) with seed yield of legume crops. Results endorse the potential of UAS-based sensing technology to rapidly measure those phenotyping traits.

  4. Resistance of cool season food legumes to Ascochyta blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubiales Diego

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Legume cultivation is strongly hampered by the occurrence of Ascochyta blights. Strategies of control have been developed but only marginal successes have been achieved. In the present paper we present and re-evaluate some recent developments in control in the light of recent developments in crop breeding and molecular genetics. The current focus in applied breeding is leveraging biotechnological tools to develop more and better markers to speed up the delivery of improved cultivars to the farmer. To date, however, progress in marker development and delivery of useful markers has been slow. The application of knowledge gained from basic genomic research and genetic engineering will contribute to more rapid crop legume improvement for resistance against Ascochyta blight.

  5. Soil macrofauna in wooded pasture with legume trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusimar Lamarte Gonzaga Galindo da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Grasslands afforestation aims at adding different soil uses in a way they become profitable for their owners. As such handling aims at minimizing impacts, the current study had as its goal the use of soil macrofauna in order to evaluate legume afforestation effects on the soil, regardless the depth. Thus, nitrogen fixing species were inserted onto grassland areas and the macrofauna collection was performed 6 years after their planting in the 0-10cm, 10-20cm and 20.30cm layers, in winter and summer. Leguminous influence was different between depths and times of the year. It mostly favors communities under "Mimosa" Genus treetops. Besides, the effects from climatic seasonal variations on invertebrates were mitigated by the implementation of such legume trees

  6. Symbiosis within Symbiosis: Evolving Nitrogen-Fixing Legume Symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remigi, Philippe; Zhu, Jun; Young, J Peter W; Masson-Boivin, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial accessory genes are genomic symbionts with an evolutionary history and future that is different from that of their hosts. Packages of accessory genes move from strain to strain and confer important adaptations, such as interaction with eukaryotes. The ability to fix nitrogen with legumes is a remarkable example of a complex trait spread by horizontal transfer of a few key symbiotic genes, converting soil bacteria into legume symbionts. Rhizobia belong to hundreds of species restricted to a dozen genera of the Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, suggesting infrequent successful transfer between genera but frequent successful transfer within genera. Here we review the genetic and environmental conditions and selective forces that have shaped evolution of this complex symbiotic trait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Physicochemical and organoleptic properties of cookies incorporated with legume flours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Thongram

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries like India, with increasing urbanization, the demand for processed food and bakery products particularly cookies command wide popularity in both urban and rural mass. Hence, an attempt was made to develop functionally and nutritionally improved cookies and the influence of the partial replacement of the wheat flour by legume on the quality characteristic of cookies was analyzed. Six blends were prepared by homogenously mixing chickpea flour, pigeon pea, moong bean flour, and cowpea flour with wheat flour in the percentage proportions: 100, 25:75, 25:75, 25:75, 25:75, and 10:10:10:10:60 (CPF:WWF, PF:WWF, MF:WWF, CF:WWF, and CPF:PF:MF:CF:WWF and later used to make cookies. Chemical and functional properties of the composite flours and chemical as well as sensory characteristics of cookies made from the above combinations were determined. The incorporation of legume flour significantly affected the physical, chemical, and phytonutrient parameters of the cookies. The results revealed that functional properties, viz. water absorption capacity, oil absorption capacity, and swelling property, increased with addition of legume flours. The physical analysis revealed that the diameter and height increased with the incorporation of legume flour. The results of the proximate composition showed that the A6 possesses highest percentage of proteins (13.42% and crude fat (22.90%, A5 contains maximum value of crude fiber (2.10% and DPPH radical scavenging activity (55.47%, A1 showed maximum moisture (10.60%, A2 total phenolic content (6.14 TAE mg/100 g, and A3 showed maximum ash (3.66%. Statistical results revealed that the addition of selected pulse flours and a combination of these whole flours do not have a significant effect (p > 0.05 on the sensory characteristics of cookies.

  8. Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Legume Nodules: Metabolism and Regulatory Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Saad Sulieman; Lam-Son Phan Tran

    2014-01-01

    The special issue “Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Legume Nodules: Metabolism and Regulatory Mechanisms” aims to investigate the physiological and biochemical advances in the symbiotic process with an emphasis on nodule establishment, development and functioning. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of nodule metabolism and various regulatory pathways, which could have important future implications. This issue also included...

  9. Caractérisation écophysiologique de différents génotypes de medicago truncatula au cours des phases de germination et de croissance hétérotrophe

    OpenAIRE

    Brunel, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    Germination and growth of heterotrophic stages are crucial steps for crop establishment. They highly depend on environmental conditions. The analytical framework provided by the emergence model SIMPLE (SImulation of PLant Emergence) has been used for the characterization of Medicago truncatula (M.tr.) during the early stages of its cycle in response to seedbeds physical factors with major impacts on emergence: temperature, water potential, mechanical obstacles. M.tr. is a model species. It wa...

  10. The recent evolution of a symbiotic ion channel in the legume family altered ion conductance and improved functionality in calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Cosme, Ana; Han, Lu; Banba, Mari; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Schleiff, Enrico; Parniske, Martin; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2012-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza and the rhizobia-legume symbiosis are two major root endosymbioses that facilitate plant nutrition. In Lotus japonicus, two symbiotic cation channels, CASTOR and POLLUX, are indispensable for the induction of nuclear calcium spiking, one of the earliest plant responses to symbiotic partner recognition. During recent evolution, a single amino acid substitution in DOES NOT MAKE INFECTIONS1 (DMI1), the POLLUX putative ortholog in the closely related Medicago truncatula, rendered the channel solo sufficient for symbiosis; castor, pollux, and castor pollux double mutants of L. japonicus were rescued by DMI1 alone, while both Lj-CASTOR and Lj-POLLUX were required for rescuing a dmi1 mutant of M. truncatula. Experimental replacement of the critical serine by an alanine in the selectivity filter of Lj-POLLUX conferred a symbiotic performance indistinguishable from DMI1. Electrophysiological characterization of DMI1 and Lj-CASTOR (wild-type and mutants) by planar lipid bilayer experiments combined with calcium imaging in Human Embryonic Kidney-293 cells expressing DMI1 (the wild type and mutants) suggest that the serine-to-alanine substitution conferred reduced conductance with a long open state to DMI1 and improved its efficiency in mediating calcium oscillations. We propose that this single amino acid replacement in the selectivity filter made DMI1 solo sufficient for symbiosis, thus explaining the selective advantage of this allele at the mechanistic level.

  11. Beneficial Effects of Temperate Forage Legumes that Contain Condensed Tannins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer W. MacAdam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The two temperate forage legumes containing condensed tannins (CT that promote ruminant production are birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.; BFT and sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.; SF. Both are well-adapted to the cool-temperate climate and alkaline soils of the Mountain West USA. Condensed tannins comprise a diverse family of bioactive chemicals with multiple beneficial functions for ruminants, including suppression of internal parasites and enteric methane. Birdsfoot trefoil contains 10 to 40 g·CT·kg−1 dry matter (DM, while SF contains 30 to 80 g·CT·kg−1 DM. Our studies have focused on these two plant species and have demonstrated consistently elevated rates of gain for beef calves grazing both BFT and SF. Novel results from our BFT research include carcass dressing percentages and consumer sensory evaluations equivalent to feedlot-finished steers and significantly greater than grass-finished steers, but with omega-3 fatty acid concentrations equal to grass-finished beef. We have further demonstrated that ruminants fed BFT or SF will consume more endophyte-infected tall fescue (Schedonorus arundinaceus (Schreb. Dumort. forage or seed than ruminants fed a non-CT forage legume. There is great potential value for sustainable livestock production in the use of highly digestible, nitrogen-fixing legumes containing tannins demonstrated to improve ruminant productivity.

  12. Conditions Affecting Shelf-Life of Inoculated Legume Seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Gemell

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial inoculants are becoming more available as sustainable alternatives to fertilizers and other agrichemicals in broad-acre cropping. However, with the exception of legume inoculants little is understood about effective delivery and survival of the inoculum. Legume inoculants are applied to both seed and soil but seed inoculation is the most economical technique. Large quantities of pasture seed in Australia are inoculated by commercial seed coating companies, but the long-term survival of seed-applied inoculum is variable and monitoring of viability requires specialist microbiology skills and facilities. The aim of our research was to define optimum storage conditions for survival of rhizobia on legume seed and evaluate water activity as a means of monitoring shelf-life. The relationship between survival and water activity varied according to seed species, inoculum preparation, coating ingredients, initial water activity and time suggesting that storage conditions would need to be defined for each different combination. Although drying seeds after coating significantly reduced viable numbers of rhizobia, survival of rhizobia on dried commercially coated lucerne seed after 11 weeks was less variable than seeds that had not been dried. The highest numbers were maintained when seeds remained dry with water activities of between 0.47 and 0.38. The quality of inoculated seed could be improved by reducing the death rate of inoculum during preparation and providing optimum storage conditions for long-term survival.

  13. Geochemical Characterization of Copper Tailings after Legume Revegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine Perry T. Domingo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on the geochemistry of mine tailings is important in understanding the challenges in establishing vegetation cover on tailings dumps and mined out areas. In this study, the mineralogy and trace element composition of copper tailings were examined. Two legume species, Calopogonium mucunoides and Centrosema molle, were utilized to investigate the possible effects of these plants in the geochemical development of mine tailings into soil-like material. The initial mineralogical and chemical analysis of the tailings samples indicated poor conditions for plant growth—minimal levels of major nutrients and organic matter as well as elevated copper concentrations. Despite these conditions, the two legume species exhibited good growth rates. Both legumes have likewise signif icantly reduced heavy metal concentrations in the tailings, indicating the possibility of metal hyperaccumulation in the plant tissue. The mineral composition has been retained even after revegetation; nevertheless, breakdown of primary minerals and subsequent formation of clay minerals were detected. These results provide insights on the transformation of toxic materials into habitable substrates for sustained plant growth.

  14. Antidiabetic potential of commonly consumed legumes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Poonam; Kaushik, Geetanjali; Mathur, Pulkit

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, lifestyle changes have resulted in a drastic increase in the incidence of diabetes all over the world, especially in the developing countries. Oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin form the mainstay in controlling diabetes, but they have prominent side effects and fail to significantly alter the course of diabetic complications. Appropriate diet and exercise programs that form a part of lifestyle modifications have proven to be greatly effective in the management of this disease. Dietary therapy is showing a bright future in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. Legumes, owing to their high nutritive value, are increasingly being used in dietetic formulations in the treatment and prevention of diabetes on account of their antidiabetic potential. Given this background, this paper reviews the glucose- and lipid-lowering action possessed by various commonly consumed legumes through several animal and human studies. It is concluded that the various legumes not only have varying degrees of antidiabetic potential but are also beneficial in decreasing the risk factors for cardiovascular and renal disease.

  15. A Proteomic View on the Role of Legume Symbiotic Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estíbaliz Larrainzar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Legume plants are key elements in sustainable agriculture and represent a significant source of plant-based protein for humans and animal feed worldwide. One specific feature of the family is the ability to establish nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with Rhizobium bacteria. Additionally, like most vascular flowering plants, legumes are able to form a mutualistic endosymbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi. These beneficial associations can enhance the plant resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Understanding how symbiotic interactions influence and increase plant stress tolerance are relevant questions toward maintaining crop yield and food safety in the scope of climate change. Proteomics offers numerous tools for the identification of proteins involved in such responses, allowing the study of sub-cellular localization and turnover regulation, as well as the discovery of post-translational modifications (PTMs. The current work reviews the progress made during the last decades in the field of proteomics applied to the study of the legume-Rhizobium and -AM symbioses, and highlights their influence on the plant responses to pathogens and abiotic stresses. We further discuss future perspectives and new experimental approaches that are likely to have a significant impact on the field including peptidomics, mass spectrometric imaging, and quantitative proteomics.

  16. Biological nitrogen fixation in non-legume plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Carole; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine

    2013-01-01

    Background Nitrogen is an essential nutrient in plant growth. The ability of a plant to supply all or part of its requirements from biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) thanks to interactions with endosymbiotic, associative and endophytic symbionts, confers a great competitive advantage over non-nitrogen-fixing plants. Scope Because BNF in legumes is well documented, this review focuses on BNF in non-legume plants. Despite the phylogenic and ecological diversity among diazotrophic bacteria and their hosts, tightly regulated communication is always necessary between the microorganisms and the host plant to achieve a successful interaction. Ongoing research efforts to improve knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying these original relationships and some common strategies leading to a successful relationship between the nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and their hosts are presented. Conclusions Understanding the molecular mechanism of BNF outside the legume–rhizobium symbiosis could have important agronomic implications and enable the use of N-fertilizers to be reduced or even avoided. Indeed, in the short term, improved understanding could lead to more sustainable exploitation of the biodiversity of nitrogen-fixing organisms and, in the longer term, to the transfer of endosymbiotic nitrogen-fixation capacities to major non-legume crops. PMID:23478942

  17. Characterization of green-tissue protein extract from alfalfa (Medicago sativa) exploiting a 3-D technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Oscar; Glatz, Charles E; Rito-Palomares, Marco

    2009-09-01

    There is a growing interest of pharmaceutical companies for plant-based production systems. To facilitate the general acceptance of plants as bioreactors, the establishment of efficient downstream operations is critical. It has been proposed that a better understanding of the properties of the contaminant proteins can benefit downstream processing design and operation. The coupled application of 2-DE with aqueous two-phase partitioning has been suggested as a practical 3-D method to characterize potential contaminant proteins from plant extracts. The application of this novel 3-D approach to a complex protein extract from alfalfa (Medicago sativa) containing a model recombinant protein (human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF)) resulted in the quantification of 55 protein spots. The 3-D properties (M(r), pI, and K(p)) obtained for 17 proteins comprising 69% of the alfalfa proteins, allowed the proposal of a prefractionation step as well as the identification of the target molecule (rG-CSF) from bulk of alfalfa proteins. The information obtained from this experimental approach was useful for the identification of the potential contaminant proteins that will occur in alfalfa when this plant is used as a host for recombinant proteins. Additionally, this method will assist in the design of adequate purification strategies for recombinant proteins expressed in alfalfa green tissue.

  18. Transcriptional responses of Medicago truncatula upon sulfur deficiency stress and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbios

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    Daniel eWipf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur plays an essential role in plants’ growth and development and in their response to various abiotic and biotic stresses despite its leachability and its very low abundance in the only form that plant roots can uptake (sulfate. It is part of amino acids, glutathione (GSH, thiols of proteins and peptides, membrane sulfolipids, cell walls and secondary products, so reduced availability can drastically alter plant growth and development. The nutritional benefits of symbiotic interactions can help the plant in case of S deficiency. In particular the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM interaction improves N, P and S plant nutrition, but the mechanisms behind these exchanges are not fully known yet. Although the transcriptional changes in the leguminous model plant Medicago truncatula have been already assessed in several biotic and/or abiotic conditions, S deficiency has not been considered so far. The aim of this work is to get a first overview on S-deficiency responses in the leaf and root tissues of plants interacting with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis.Several hundred genes displayed significantly different transcript accumulation levels. Annotation and GO ID association were used to identify biological processes and molecular functions affected by sulfur starvation. Beside the beneficial effects of AM interaction, plants were greatly affected by the nutritional status, showing various differences in their transcriptomic footprints. Several pathways in which S plays an important role appeared to be differentially affected according to mycorrhizal status, with a generally reduced responsiveness to S deficiency in mycorrhized plants.

  19. The Effects of Clinorotation on the Host Plant, Medicago truncatula, and Its Microbial Symbionts

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    Ariel J.C. Dauzart

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the outcome of the plant-microbe symbiosis in altered gravity is vital to developing life support systems for long-distance space travel and colonization of other planets. Thus, the aim of this research was to understand mutualistic relationships between plants and endophytic microbes under the influence of altered gravity. This project utilized the model tripartite relationship among Medicago truncatula ¬– Sinorhizobium meliloti – Rhizophagus irregularis. Plants were inoculated with rhizobial bacteria (S. meliloti, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (R. irregularis, or both microbes, and placed on a rotating clinostat. Vertical and horizontal static controls were also performed. Clinorotation significantly reduced M. truncatula dry mass and fresh mass compared to the static controls. The addition of rhizobia treatments under clinorotation also altered total root length and root-to-shoot fresh mass ratio. Nodule size decreased under rhizobia + clinorotation treatment, and nodule density was significantly decreased compared to the vertical treatment. However, inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was shown to increase biomass accumulation and nodule size. Thus, clinorotation significantly affected M. truncatula and its symbiotic relationships with S. meliloti and R. irregularis. In the long term, the results observed in this clinostat study on the changes of plant-microbe mutualism need to be investigated in spaceflight experiments. Thus, careful consideration of the symbiotic microbes of plants should be included in the design of bioregenerative life support systems needed for space travel.

  20. The Effects of Clinorotation on the Host Plant, Medicago truncatula, and Its Microbial Symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauzart, Ariel; Vandenbrink, Joshua; Kiss, John

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the outcome of the plant-microbe symbiosis in altered gravity is vital to developing life support systems for long-distance space travel and colonization of other planets. Thus, the aim of this research was to understand mutualistic relationships between plants and endophytic microbes under the influence of altered gravity. This project utilized the model tripartite relationship among Medicago truncatula ¬- Sinorhizobium meliloti - Rhizophagus irregularis. Plants were inoculated with rhizobial bacteria (S. meliloti), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (R. irregularis), or both microbes, and placed on a rotating clinostat. Vertical and horizontal static controls were also performed. Clinorotation significantly reduced M. truncatula dry mass and fresh mass compared to the static controls. The addition of rhizobia treatments under clinorotation also altered total root length and root-to-shoot fresh mass ratio. Nodule size decreased under rhizobia + clinorotation treatment, and nodule density was significantly decreased compared to the vertical treatment. However, inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was shown to increase biomass accumulation and nodule size. Thus, clinorotation significantly affected M. truncatula and its symbiotic relationships with S. meliloti and R. irregularis. In the long term, the results observed in this clinostat study on the changes of plant-microbe mutualism need to be investigated in spaceflight experiments. Thus, careful consideration of the symbiotic microbes of plants should be included in the design of bioregenerative life support systems needed for space travel.

  1. Chemical modification and degradation of atrazine in Medicago sativa through multiple pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing Jing; Lu, Yi Chen; Yang, Hong

    2014-10-08

    Atrazine is a member of the triazine herbicide family intensively used to control weeds for crop production. In this study, atrazine residues and its degraded products in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) were characterized using UPLC-TOF-MS/MS. Most of atrazine absorbed in plants was found as chemically modified derivatives like deisopropylated atrazine (DIA), dehydrogenated atrazine (DHA), or methylated atrazine (MEA), and some atrazine derivatives were conjugated through different functional groups such as sugar, glutathione, and amino acids. Interestingly, the specific conjugates DHA+hGSH (homoglutathione) and MEA-HCl+hGSH in alfalfa were detected. These results suggest that atrazine in alfalfa can be degraded through different pathways. The increased activities of glycosyltransferase and glutathione S-transferase were determined to support the atrazine degradation models. The outcome of the work uncovered the detailed mechanism for the residual atrazine accumulation and degradation in alfalfa and will help to evaluate whether the crop is suitable to be cultivated in the atrazine-polluted soil.

  2. Bioinformatics Analysis of MAPKKK Family Genes in Medicago truncatula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Xu, Hanyun; Liu, Ying; Song, Lili; Guo, Changhong; Shu, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) is a component of the MAPK cascade pathway that plays an important role in plant growth, development, and response to abiotic stress, the functions of which have been well characterized in several plant species, such as Arabidopsis, rice, and maize. In this study, we performed genome-wide and systemic bioinformatics analysis of MAPKKK family genes in Medicago truncatula. In total, there were 73 MAPKKK family members identified by search of homologs, and they were classified into three subfamilies, MEKK, ZIK, and RAF. Based on the genomic duplication function, 72 MtMAPKKK genes were located throughout all chromosomes, but they cluster in different chromosomes. Using microarray data and high-throughput sequencing-data, we assessed their expression profiles in growth and development processes; these results provided evidence for exploring their important functions in developmental regulation, especially in the nodulation process. Furthermore, we investigated their expression in abiotic stresses by RNA-seq, which confirmed their critical roles in signal transduction and regulation processes under stress. In summary, our genome-wide, systemic characterization and expressional analysis of MtMAPKKK genes will provide insights that will be useful for characterizing the molecular functions of these genes in M. truncatula. PMID:27049397

  3. Host and nonhost resistance in Medicago-Colletotrichum interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaulneau, Valérie; Cazaux, Marc; Wong Sak Hoi, Joanne; Fournier, Sylvie; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Jacquet, Christophe; Dumas, Bernard

    2010-09-01

    Medicago truncatula lines resistant (A17) or susceptible (F83005.5) to the alfalfa pathogen Colletotrichum trifolii were used to compare defense reactions induced upon inoculation with C. trifolii or with the nonadapted pathogens C. lindemuthianum and C. higginsianum. Nonadapted Colletotrichum spp. induced a hypersensitive response (HR)-like reaction similar to the one induced during the host-incompatible interaction. Molecular analyses indicated an induction of PR10 and chalcone synthase genes in host and nonhost interactions but delayed responses were observed in the F83005.5 line. The clste12 penetration-deficient C. lindemuthianum mutant induced an HR and defense gene expression, showing that perception of nonadapted strains occurs before penetration of epidermal cells. Cytological and transcriptomic analyses performed upon inoculation of near-isogenic M. truncatula lines, differing only at the C. trifolii resistance locus, Ct1, with the nonadapted Colletotrichum strain, showed that nonhost responses are similar in the two lines. These included a localized oxidative burst, accumulation of fluorescent compounds, and transient expression of a small number of genes. Host interactions were characterized by a group of defense and signaling-related genes induced at 3 days postinoculation, associated with an accumulation of salicylic acid. Together, these results show that M. truncatula displays a rapid and transient response to nonadapted Colletotrichum strains and that this response is not linked to the C. trifolii resistance locus.

  4. Bioinformatics Analysis of MAPKKK Family Genes in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen‐activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK is a component of the MAPK cascade pathway that plays an important role in plant growth, development, and response to abiotic stress, the functions of which have been well characterized in several plant species, such as Arabidopsis, rice, and maize. In this study, we performed genome‐wide and systemic bioinformatics analysis of MAPKKK family genes in Medicago truncatula. In total, there were 73 MAPKKK family members identified by search of homologs, and they were classified into three subfamilies, MEKK, ZIK, and RAF. Based on the genomic duplication function, 72 MtMAPKKK genes were located throughout all chromosomes, but they cluster in different chromosomes. Using microarray data and high‐throughput sequencing‐data, we assessed their expression profiles in growth and development processes; these results provided evidence for exploring their important functions in developmental regulation, especially in the nodulation process. Furthermore, we investigated their expression in abiotic stresses by RNA‐seq, which confirmed their critical roles in signal transduction and regulation processes under stress. In summary, our genome‐wide, systemic characterization and expressional analysis of MtMAPKKK genes will provide insights that will be useful for characterizing the molecular functions of these genes in M. truncatula.

  5. Embryogenesis and plant regeneration of Medicago spp. in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, P; McKenzie, J S; Walton, P D

    1986-02-01

    Ten cultivars and breeding lines from two species of alfalfa (Medicago media and M. sativa) were screened for their ability to produce embryos and plantlets from the root and hypocotyl under three different tissue culture protocols. The three protocols differed in basal salt composition, vitamins, hormones and cytokinin additions. That protocol having a high 2-4,D low cytokinin induction step gave the highest percentage of embryogenic calli in some cultivars and lines. M. media cultivars and breeding lines had a high percentage of embryoid formation. M. sativa cultivars gave no embryoid formation. Two M. media breeding lines (Br1 and Le1), which were intermediate in the percentage of embryogenic calli formed from explants, had the highest number of regenerated plants established in soil. The creeping rooted M. media cultivar Heinrichs produced the highest percentage of embryogenic calli from explants but most of these embryoids were abnormal and failed to grow in soil or vermiculite. Accordingly, successful regeneration is directly related to the quality and quantity of the embryoids produced.

  6. Biofertilizer in the nutritional quality of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.

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    Rodrigo Luis Lemes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the response of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. in the nutritional composition to the application of biofertilizers. The experiment was conducted with increasing doses of biofertilizers in a greenhouse at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine / UNESP, Araçatuba - Sao Paulo, Brazil, from April to October 2010. The experimental design was completely randomized with six biofertilizer doses from cattle manure (0, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 m3 ha-1 and five replications. Cuts were performed, on average, every 27 days, 10 cm above the ground when 10% of the plants were flowering. Biofertilization had a positive significant impact on foliar nitrogen, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, and shoot iron concentrations. The values of crude protein, acid detergent fiber, and neutral detergent fiber did not differ between doses of biofertilizers. Biofertilization is a viable alternative for nutrition of this species, showing positive results in the nutritional composition of alfalfa. However, but long-term studies are necessary to assess the environmental impact of these fertilizers.

  7. ACE-inhibitory activity of enzymatic protein hydrolysates from lupin and other legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschin, Giovanna; Scigliuolo, Graziana Maria; Resta, Donatella; Arnoldi, Anna

    2014-02-15

    The objective of this investigation was to compare the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity of the hydrolysates obtained by pepsin digestion of proteins of some legumes, such as chickpea, common bean, lentil, lupin, pea, and soybean, by using the same experimental procedure. The ACE-inhibitory activity was measured by using the tripeptide hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (HHL), as model peptide, and HPLC-DAD, as analytical method. The peptide mixtures of all legumes were active, with soybean and lupin the most efficient, with IC50 values of 224 and 226 μg/ml, respectively. Considering the promising results obtained with lupin, and aiming to identify the protein(s) that release(s) the peptides responsible for the activity, the peptides obtained from the pepsin digestion of some industrial lupin protein isolates and purified protein fractions were tested. The most active mixture, showing an IC50 value of 138 μg/ml, was obtained hydrolysing a mixture of lupin α+β conglutin.

  8. Legume Diversity Patterns in West Central Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estrella, de la M.; Mateo, M.A.; Wieringa, J.J.; Mackinder, B.; Munoz, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives - Species Distribution Models (SDMs) are used to produce predictions of potential Leguminosae diversity in West Central Africa. Those predictions are evaluated subsequently using expert opinion. The established methodology of combining all SDMs is refined to assess species diversity withi

  9. Solubilisation of inorganic phosphates by inoculant strains from tropical legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Marciano Marra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial solubilisation of low soluble inorganic phosphates is an important process contributing for the phosphorus available to plants in tropical soils. This study evaluates the ability of inoculant strains for tropical legumes to solubilise inorganic phosphates of low solubility that are found in tropical soils. Seven strains of Leguminosae nodulating bacteria (LNB were compared with one another and with a non-nodulating positive control, Burkholderia cepacia (LMG 1222T. Four of the strains are used as inoculants for cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata (Bradyrhizobium sp. UFLA 03-84; Bradyrhizobium elkani INPA 03-11B and Bradyrhizobium japonicum BR3267 or for common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris (Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899T. Rhizobium etli UFLA 02-100 and Rhizobium leguminosarum 316C10a are also efficient nodulators of beans and Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG 19424T nodulates on Mimosa pudica. Two experiments, with solid and liquid media, were performed to determine whether the strains were able to solubilise CaHPO4, Al(H2PO43 or FePO4.2H2O. On solid GELP medium none of the strains dissolved FePO4.2H2O, but LMG 1222, UFLA 03-84 and CIAT 899 solubilised CaHPO4 particularly well. These strains, along with LMG 19424 and BR 3267, were also able to increase the solubility of Al(H2PO43. In liquid GELP medium, LMG 1222 solubilised all phosphate sources, but no legume nodulating strain could increase the solubility of Al(H2PO43. The strains CIAT 899 and UFLA 02-100 were the only legume nodulating bacteria able to solubilise the other phosphate sources in liquid media, dissolving both CaHPO4 and FePO4.2H2O. There was a negative correlation between the pH of the culture medium and the concentration of soluble phosphate when the phosphorus source was CaHPO4 or FePO4.2H2O. The contribution of these strains to increasing the phosphorus nutrition of legumes and non-legume plant species should be investigated further by in vivo experiments.

  10. Objectives and approaches in the breeding of perennial legumes for use in temporary pasturelands

    OpenAIRE

    Naydenova G.; Hristova Ts.; Aleksiev Y.

    2013-01-01

    Legumes are the major element of grassland ecosystem, on which the forage quality depends. Breeding of pasture varieties in perennial legumes firstly aims at achieving tolerance and persistence of the legume component in the pasture. In species having low natural grazing tolerance (lucerne and red clover) it is necessary to conduct breeding for biological, morphological and physiological characteristics, directly related to grazing tolerance. In the species...

  11. Differentiation of symbiotic cells and endosymbionts in Medicago truncatula nodulation are coupled to two transcriptome-switches.

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    Nicolas Maunoury

    Full Text Available The legume plant Medicago truncatula establishes a symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti which takes place in root nodules. The formation of nodules employs a complex developmental program involving organogenesis, specific cellular differentiation of the host cells and the endosymbiotic bacteria, called bacteroids, as well as the specific activation of a large number of plant genes. By using a collection of plant and bacterial mutants inducing non-functional, Fix(- nodules, we studied the differentiation processes of the symbiotic partners together with the nodule transcriptome, with the aim of unravelling links between cell differentiation and transcriptome activation. Two waves of transcriptional reprogramming involving the repression and the massive induction of hundreds of genes were observed during wild-type nodule formation. The dominant features of this "nodule-specific transcriptome" were the repression of plant defense-related genes, the transient activation of cell cycle and protein synthesis genes at the early stage of nodule development and the activation of the secretory pathway along with a large number of transmembrane and secretory proteins or peptides throughout organogenesis. The fifteen plant and bacterial mutants that were analyzed fell into four major categories. Members of the first category of mutants formed non-functional nodules although they had differentiated nodule cells and bacteroids. This group passed the two transcriptome switch-points similarly to the wild type. The second category, which formed nodules in which the plant cells were differentiated and infected but the bacteroids did not differentiate, passed the first transcriptome switch but not the second one. Nodules in the third category contained infection threads but were devoid of differentiated symbiotic cells and displayed a root-like transcriptome. Nodules in the fourth category were free of bacteria, devoid of

  12. Potential of legume-based grassland-livestock systems in Europe: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüscher, A; Mueller-Harvey, I; Soussana, J F; Rees, R M; Peyraud, J L

    2014-06-01

    European grassland-based livestock production systems face the challenge of producing more meat and milk to meet increasing world demands and to achieve this using fewer resources. Legumes offer great potential for achieving these objectives. They have numerous features that can act together at different stages in the soil-plant-animal-atmosphere system, and these are most effective in mixed swards with a legume proportion of 30-50%. The resulting benefits include reduced dependence on fossil energy and industrial N-fertilizer, lower quantities of harmful emissions to the environment (greenhouse gases and nitrate), lower production costs, higher productivity and increased protein self-sufficiency. Some legume species offer opportunities for improving animal health with less medication, due to the presence of bioactive secondary metabolites. In addition, legumes may offer an adaptation option to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate change. Legumes generate these benefits at the level of the managed land-area unit and also at the level of the final product unit. However, legumes suffer from some limitations, and suggestions are made for future research to exploit more fully the opportunities that legumes can offer. In conclusion, the development of legume-based grassland-livestock systems undoubtedly constitutes one of the pillars for more sustainable and competitive ruminant production systems, and it can be expected that forage legumes will become more important in the future.

  13. Queuosine biosynthesis is required for sinorhizobium meliloti-induced cytoskeletal modifications on HeLa Cells and symbiosis with Medicago truncatula

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Marchetti; Delphine Capela; Renaud Poincloux; Nacer Benmeradi; Marie-Christine Auriac; Aurélie Le Ru; Isabelle Maridonneau-Parini; Jacques Batut; Catherine Masson-Boivin

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobia are symbiotic soil bacteria able to intracellularly colonize legume nodule cells and form nitrogen-fixing symbiosomes therein. How the plant cell cytoskeleton reorganizes in response to rhizobium colonization has remained poorly understood especially because of the lack of an in vitro infection assay. Here, we report on the use of the heterologous HeLa cell model to experimentally tackle this question. We observed that the model rhizobium Sinorhizobium meliloti, and other rhizobia as...

  14. Unexpectedly Diverse Mesorhizobium Strains and Rhizobium leguminosarum Nodulate Native Legume Genera of New Zealand, while Introduced Legume Weeds Are Nodulated by Bradyrhizobium Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Bevan S.; Turner, Susan J.; Silvester, Warwick B.; Park, Duck-Chul; Young, John M.

    2004-01-01

    The New Zealand native legume flora are represented by four genera, Sophora, Carmichaelia, Clianthus, and Montigena. The adventive flora of New Zealand contains several legume species introduced in the 19th century and now established as serious invasive weeds. Until now, nothing has been reported on the identification of the associated rhizobia of native or introduced legumes in New Zealand. The success of the introduced species may be due, at least in part, to the nature of their rhizobial symbioses. This study set out to address this issue by identifying rhizobial strains isolated from species of the four native legume genera and from the introduced weeds: Acacia spp. (wattles), Cytisus scoparius (broom), and Ulex europaeus (gorse). The identities of the isolates and their relationship to known rhizobia were established by comparative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA, atpD, glnII, and recA gene sequences. Maximum-likelihood analysis of the resultant data partitioned the bacteria into three genera. Most isolates from native legumes aligned with the genus Mesorhizobium, either as members of named species or as putative novel species. The widespread distribution of strains from individual native legume genera across Mesorhizobium spp. contrasts with previous reports implying that bacterial species are specific to limited numbers of legume genera. In addition, four isolates were identified as Rhizobium leguminosarum. In contrast, all sequences from isolates from introduced weeds aligned with Bradyrhizobium species but formed clusters distinct from existing named species. These results show that native legume genera and these introduced legume genera do not have the same rhizobial populations. PMID:15466541

  15. Bioaccumulation and degradation of pentachloronitrobenzene in Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying Ying; Yang, Hong

    2013-04-15

    Pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) is a fungicide belonging to the organochlorine family and used extensively in agriculture for crop production. Many studies have implied that PCNB has become an environmental concern due to its widespread contamination in eco-systems. However, whether PCNB is bioaccumulated, degraded and phytotoxic in plants is poorly understood. In this study, several alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cultivars were grown in soil with PCNB to investigate their absorption and catabolism, including PCNB residues in the soil and PCNB-induced toxic responses in plants. Alfalfa plants varied widely in their ability to accumulate and degrade PCNB. The degradation rate of PCNB was 66.26-77.68% after alfalfa growth in the soils for 20 d, while the rates in the control (soil without alfalfa) were only 48.42%. Moreover, concentrations of PCNB residues in the rhizosphere soil were significantly higher than those in the non-rhizosphere soils. Alfalfa exposed to 10 mg kg(-1) PCNB showed inhibited growth and oxidative damage, but the effects of PCNB on the cultivars differed significantly, indicating that the alfalfa cultivars have different tolerance to PCNB. Activities of invertase (INV), urease (URE), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and acid phosphatase (ACP) were assayed in the treated soils and showed that the enzyme activities were altered after PCNB exposure. The URE, PPO, ALP and ACP activities wer