WorldWideScience

Sample records for model learner outcomes

  1. Knowledge Transfer in B-O-R-N Model to Enhance Computer Learners' Learning Outcomes in Knowledge and Cognitive Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangchant, Shatchaya; Kiattikomol, Paiboon; Kaewkuekool, Sittichai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The process of knowledge transfer under the B-O-R-N Model is based on the concepts of knowledge transfer and change of knowledge patterns to create new knowledge. It stimulates learners to learn under the process of knowledge transfer during the learning with an aim to allow learners to achieve the learning outcomes.…

  2. Autonomous Learner Model Resource Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, George T.; Carey, Robin J.; Kapushion, Blanche M.

    2016-01-01

    "Autonomous Learner Model Resource Book" includes activities and strategies to support the development of autonomous learners. More than 40 activities are included, all geared to the emotional, social, cognitive, and physical development of students. Teachers may use these activities and strategies with the entire class, small groups, or…

  3. On the relationship between justice judgments, outcomes and identity orientations among Iranian EFL learners: A structural equation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ayatollah Razmjoo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One problem which can be observed in the field of EFL/ESL learning is that a number of English major BA and MA students are not highly committed to their major and decide not to continue their graduate studies. Sometimes even graduate students from English majors prefer to extend their education or work in an unrelated field. This might be attributed to the extent to which they perceive evaluation procedures and outcomes as fair. Considering this, the present study investigates first the relationships between justice judgments, outcomes and identity orientations. The study, then, uses structural equation modeling in order to examine whether identity orientation has any mediating effect on the relationship between justice judgment and outcomes. Participants were74 students in Department of Foreign Languages and Linguistics, Shiraz University selected based on convenience sampling. They filled out three questionnaires on distributive and procedural justice judgments, rule compliance and outcome satisfaction, and personal and social identity orientations. The collected data was then analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation, and structural equation modeling. Based on the obtained findings, procedural justice had significant positive correlation with rule compliance and distributive justice was significantly correlated with outcome satisfaction. The generated structural equation model also indicated that justice judgments only directly affected outcomes and identity had no mediating effect on the causal relationship between the two.

  4. Using the SAQA Critical Outcomes to Empower Learners and Transform Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spady, William

    2004-01-01

    Using his thirty years of international experience with future-focused Outcomes-Based Education designs and models as a foundation, Dr. Spady describes a five-step process for translating the familiar twelve SAQA "Critical Outcomes" into a compelling life-performance framework of "exit outcomes" that directly empowers learners and genuinely…

  5. Higher order thinking skills competencies required by outcomes-based education from learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabeli, M M

    2006-08-01

    Outcomes-Based Education (OBE) brought about a significant paradigm shift in the education and training of learners in South Africa. OBE requires a shift from focusing on the teacher input (instruction offerings or syllabuses expressed in terms of content), to focusing on learner outcomes. OBE is moving away from 'transmission' models to constructivistic, learner-centered models that put emphasis on learning as an active process (Nieburh, 1996:30). Teachers act as facilitators and mediators of learning (Norms and Standards, Government Gazette vol 415, no 20844 of 2000). Facilitators are responsible to create the environment that is conducive for learners to construct their own knowledge, skills and values through interaction (Peters, 2000). The first critical cross-field outcome accepted by the South African Qualification Framework (SAQA) is that learners should be able to identify and solve problems by using critical and creative thinking skills. This paper seeks to explore some higher order thinking skills competencies required by OBE from learners such as critical thinking, reflective thinking, creative thinking, dialogic / dialectic thinking, decision making, problem solving and emotional intelligence and their implications in facilitating teaching and learning from the theoretical perspective. The philosophical underpinning of these higher order thinking skills is described to give direction to the study. It is recommended that a study focusing on the assessment of these intellectual concepts be made. The study may be qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods in nature (Creswell 2005).

  6. Higher order thinking skills competencies required by outcomes-based education from learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Chabeli

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes-Based Education (OBE brought about a significant paradigm shift in the education and training of learners in South Africa. OBE requires a shift from focusing on the teacher input (instruction offerings or syllabuses expressed in terms of content, to focusing on learner outcomes. OBE is moving away from ‘transmission’ models to constructivistic, learner-centered models that put emphasis on learning as an active process (Nieburh, 1996:30. Teachers act as facilitators and mediators of learning (Norms and Standards, Government Gazette vol 415, no 20844 of 2000. Facilitators are responsible to create the environment that is conducive for learners to construct their own knowledge, skills and values through interaction (Peters, 2000. The first critical cross-field outcome accepted by the South African Qualification Framework (SAQA is that learners should be able to identify and solve problems by using critical and creative thinking skills. This paper seeks to explore some higher order thinking skills competencies required by OBE from learners such as critical thinking, reflective thinking, creative thinking, dialogic / dialectic thinking, decision making, problem solving and emotional intelligence and their implications in facilitating teaching and learning from the theoretical perspective. The philosophical underpinning of these higher order thinking skills is described to give direction to the study. It is recommended that a study focusing on the assessment of these intellectual concepts be made. The study may be qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods in nature (Creswell 2005.

  7. Integrating Culture into Language Teaching and Learning: Learner Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trang Thi Thuy

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the issue of learner outcomes in learning culture as part of their language learning. First, some brief discussion on the role of culture in language teaching and learning, as well as on culture contents in language lessons is presented. Based on a detailed review of previous literature related to culture in language teaching…

  8. Multidimensional Learner Model In Intelligent Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliyska, B.; Rozeva, A.

    2009-11-01

    The learner model in an intelligent learning system (ILS) has to ensure the personalization (individualization) and the adaptability of e-learning in an online learner-centered environment. ILS is a distributed e-learning system whose modules can be independent and located in different nodes (servers) on the Web. This kind of e-learning is achieved through the resources of the Semantic Web and is designed and developed around a course, group of courses or specialty. An essential part of ILS is learner model database which contains structured data about learner profile and temporal status in the learning process of one or more courses. In the paper a learner model position in ILS is considered and a relational database is designed from learner's domain ontology. Multidimensional modeling agent for the source database is designed and resultant learner data cube is presented. Agent's modules are proposed with corresponding algorithms and procedures. Multidimensional (OLAP) analysis guidelines on the resultant learner module for designing dynamic learning strategy have been highlighted.

  9. Improving Learner Outcomes in Lifelong Education: Formal Pedagogies in Non-Formal Learning Contexts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepke, Nick; Leach, Linda

    2006-01-01

    This article explores how far research findings about successful pedagogies in formal post-school education might be used in non-formal learning contexts--settings where learning may not lead to formal qualifications. It does this by examining a learner outcomes model adapted from a synthesis of research into retention. The article first…

  10. School Support, Parental Involvement, and Academic and Social-Emotional Outcomes for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Kate; Adelson, Jill L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among school support, parental school involvement, and academic and social-emotional outcomes for children who are English language learners (ELLs). The sample included 1,020 third-grade ELLs who participated in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-K). Results from structural equation modeling showed…

  11. Modelling and Managing Learner Satisfaction: Use of Learner Feedback to Enhance Blended and Online Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nai; Marsh, Vicky; Rienties, Bart

    2016-01-01

    A key concern for most institutions and instructors is whether students are satisfied with their learning experience. However, relatively few studies have unpacked what the key drivers for learner satisfaction are in blended and online courses. Using logistical regression modelling, learner satisfaction data of 62,986 learners in 401 undergraduate…

  12. Measuring Learning Outcomes. A Learner Perspective in Auditing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Steenholdt, Niels

    2000-01-01

    The ability to provide sensible measures for learning outcomes in accounting education is under increased scrutiny. In this paper we use a learner perspective in auditing education which reflects that some students taking accounting classes also are provided with on-the-job training in accounting...... firms. Hence knowledge about learning outcomes for different groups of students is essential information for educators as well as the accounting profession. Sensible measures are needed by educators in order to (1) chose teaching methods matching prerequisite skills among a heterogenous student body, (2......-order-rules. This paper presents data collected in September 1999 including 34 graduate students representing both types of schema. The study provides evidence, which confirms an interrelationship between declarative and procedural knowledge in auditing. The findings suggest that the student-mass, to some extent, is able...

  13. Measuring Learning Outcomes. A Learner Perspective in Auditing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Steenholdt, Niels

    The ability to provide sensible measures for learning outcomes in accounting education is under increased scrutiny. In this paper we use a learner perspective in auditing education which reflects that some students taking accounting classes also are provided with on-the-job training in accounting...... firms. Hence knowledge about learning outcomes for different groups of students is essential information for educators as well as the accounting profession. Sensible measures are needed by educators in order to (1) chose teaching methods matching prerequisite skills among a heterogenous student body, (2......-order-rules. This paper presents data collected in September 1999 including 34 graduate students representing both types of schema. The study provides evidence, which confirms an interrelationship between declarative and procedural knowledge in auditing. The findings suggest that the student-mass, to some extent, is able...

  14. Homeschooling Associated with Beneficial Learner and Societal Outcomes but Educators Do Not Promote It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews research on homeschool learner outcomes and evaluates opposition to homeschooling. It synthesizes research on learner outcomes related to homeschooling in areas of students' academic achievement and children's social, emotional, and psychological development and the success of adults who were home educated and finds generally…

  15. English Learners with Disabilities in High School: Population Characteristics, Transition Programs, and Postschool Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Audrey; Murray, Angela; Kim, Hye-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the characteristics, transition education, and postschool outcomes of English learners with disabilities (ELSWDs), despite that English learners are a rapidly growing group of U.S. students with consistently poor outcomes. This study examines a nationally representative sample of ELSWDs through a secondary analysis of the…

  16. Full-Time Instructional Staffing and Outcomes of Advanced Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Margaret Becker

    2016-01-01

    Two core adult education outcomes for advanced adult learners in U.S. states under the National Reporting System are learning gains in adult secondary education and entry into postsecondary education (PSE). Advanced learner outcomes are associated with key functions in an adult education programming framework, as well as with adequate…

  17. The Effect of Flipped Model of Instruction on EFL Learners' Reading Comprehension: Learners' Attitudes in Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mehrnoosh; Hamzavi, Raouf

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the effect of flipped model of instruction on EFL learners' reading comprehension ability. Moreover, this study aimed at identifying EFL students' attitudes toward flipped model of instruction. To this end, 60 EFL learners studying at an accredited private language institute in Isfahan were first…

  18. Development of affective modelling competencies in primary school learners

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    Piera Biccard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Learner affect and beliefs about mathematics are complex and multifaceted aspects of mathematical learning. Traditional teaching and learning approaches in mathematics education often result in problematic beliefs about mathematics. Since beliefs influence what learners learn and how they deal with learning mathematics, it is essential that the roles of beliefs and affect in mathematics classrooms are carefully examined. In solving modelling problems, learners and teachers take on new roles in the classroom: learners are placed in an active, self-directing situation in which they solve real-world problems. When learners engage in modelling tasks, they display and integrate cognitive, meta-cognitive and affective competencies. A modelling approach therefore allows one to detect learner beliefs in an authentic learning environment. Will this environment lead to students having more positive and productive dispositions towards mathematics? This article presents partial results of a study documenting the development of modelling competencies in learners working in groups over a period of 12 weeks. Through a design research approach, 12 learners working in groups solved three modelling problems, and transcriptions of learner interactions, questionnaires and informal interviews revealed that learner beliefs improved over this short period when exposed to modelling tasks. The results are encouraging, and may provide mathematics education with an avenue to develop more positive learner beliefs in mathematics.

  19. Predicting Learners Styles Based on Fuzzy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alian, Marwah; Shaout, Adnan

    2017-01-01

    Learners style is grouped into four types mainly; Visual, auditory, kinesthetic and Read/Write. Each type of learners learns primarily through one of the main receiving senses, visual, listening, or by doing. Learner style has an effect on the learning process and learner's achievement. It is better to select suitable learning tool for the learner…

  20. A Conceptualization of Intended Learning Outcomes Supporting Self-Regulated Learners in Indicating Learning Paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangworakitthaworn, P.; Gilbert, L.; Wills, G.B.

    2015-01-01

    Intended learning outcomes (ILOs) indicate what learners will be able to achieve after they are taught. Traditionally, ILOs are expressed as plain text or unstructured documents. What if all ILOs of a specific course of study can be conceptualized through a structured diagrammatic technique? It was hypothesized that learners can benefit from this…

  1. Development of affective modelling competencies in primary school learners

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Learner affect and beliefs about mathematics are complex and multifaceted aspects of mathematical learning. Traditional teaching and learning approaches in mathematics education often result in problematic beliefs about mathematics. Since beliefs influence what learners learn and how they deal with learning mathematics, it is essential that the roles of beliefs and affect in mathematics classrooms are carefully examined. In solving modelling problems, learners and teachers take on new roles i...

  2. Washback to the Learner: Learner and Teacher Perspectives on IELTS Preparation Course Expectations and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    The washback effect of tests on teaching has attracted considerable attention over recent years, but the critical question of how this translates into washback on learning remains under-explored. To address this issue, questionnaires relating to academic writing instruction were distributed to 108 learners from mainland China preparing for…

  3. Distance Learners in Higher Education: Institutional Responses for Quality Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Chere Campbell, Ed.

    The contributors to this book, administrators and faculty from a variety of higher education institutions in North America, reflect on current research and practices in distance higher education, and address specific facets of the distance learner. Following an introduction by Michael G. Moore, eight chapters include the following: (1) Distance…

  4. Exploring the Link among Entry Characteristics, Participation Behaviors and Course Outcomes of Online Learners: An Examination of Learner Profile Using Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukselturk, Erman; Top, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Online learner profiles have diversified such that now, they include all types of participants from a variety of backgrounds. This study analyzed online learner profiles in regard to their entry characteristics, participation behaviors and achievement of course outcomes. The sample consisted of 186 participants from an online course that required…

  5. Learning Strategies of the Arab EFL Learners: Finding Correlation with Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Ahmed Mohammed Hassan Al-Ahdal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Socio-psychological research and findings into learner differences led to the emergence of learner strategies research in the last century. With major contributions from the emerging field of Linguistics in the mid 1970s, language learning strategies began to receive considerable attention. It is worth noting that the primary concern of most of the studies on language learning strategies has been the identification of the characteristic of good language learners and what it  is that they do to learn a second language ! The focus of this study, consequently, is the teaching of language learning strategies to facilitate better learning. It aims at differentiating the strategies of good language learners from those of poor language learners. The hypothesis is this would enable language teachers to propagate the successful strategies to ensure better learning outcomes: A major factor for socio-economic development in KSA. It analyses the strategies used by Saudi students in learning English as a foreign language. Further, it  brings out the teacher's role in raising the students' awareness of different strategies, educating the teachers in the use of these strategies, and training them to assimilate these into regular classroom activities. Instruments used include a questionnaire administered to the students and interviews with the teachers. Keywords: Strategies, EFL, Saudi students, learning outcomes, learner differences

  6. Educational Outcomes and Opportunities for English Language Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Russell W. Rumberger

    2000-01-01

    There are several reasons why California needs to pay careful attention to the schooling of language minority students in their public schools. First, language minority students now constitute more than one-third of all students in California’s schools—a proportion that will grow even higher in the future. Second, English learners require a specialized curriculum and properly trained teachers to support their development of English literacy and to learn the rest of the required academic curri...

  7. English Learners in California Schools: Unequal resources, 'Unequal outcomes

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    Patricia Gándara

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Williams vs the State of California class action suit on behalf of poor children in that state argues that California provides a fundamentally inequitable education to students based on wealth and language status. This article, an earlier version of which was prepared as background to that case, reviews the conditions of schooling for English learners in the state with the largest population of such students, totaling nearly 1.6 million in 2003, and comprising about 40 percent of nation’s English learners. We argue, with evidence, that there are seven aspects of the schooling of English language learners where students receive an education that is demonstrably inferior to that of English speakers. For example, these students are assigned to less qualified teachers, are provided with inferior curriculum and less time to cover it, are housed in inferior facilities where they are often segregated from English speaking peers, and are assessed by invalid instruments that provide little, if any, information about their actual achievement. We end with suggestions for ways in which teachers, administrators, and policymakers can begin to address these inequities, even while legal remedies may remain in the distant future.

  8. Modeling the effects of multicontextual physics instruction on learner expectations and understanding of force and motion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deese Becht, Sara-Maria Francis

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold involving both practical and theoretical modeling components. The practical component, an experiential-learning phase, investigated a study population for effects that increasing levels of multicontextual physics activities have on student understanding of Newtonian systems of motion. This contextual-learning model measured learner convictions and non-response gaps and analyzed learner response trends on context, technology, challenge, growth, and success. The theoretical component, a model-building phase, designed a dynamic-knowing model for learning along a range of experiential tasks, from low to high context, monitored for indicators of learning in science and mathematics: learner academic performance and ability, learner control and academic attitude, and a learner non- response gap. This knowing model characterized a learner's process-of-knowing on a less to more expert- like learner-response continuum using performance and perspective indices associated with level of contextual- imagery referent system. Data for the contextual-learning model were collected on 180 secondary subjects: 72 middle and 108 high, with 36 physics subjects as local experts. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups differing only on context level of force and motion activities. Three levels of information were presented through context-based tasks: momentum constancy as inertia, momentum change as impulse, and momentum rate of change as force. The statistical analysis used a multi-level factorial design with repeated measures and discriminate analysis of response-conviction items. Subject grouping criteria included school level, ability level in science and mathematics, gender and race. Assessment criteria used pre/post performance scores, confidence level in physics concepts held, and attitude towards science, mathematics, and technology. Learner indices were computed from logit- transforms applied to learner outcomes

  9. Physical activity and sedentary behavior associated with learning outcomes and cognition in adult distance learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijselaers, Jérôme; De Groot, Renate; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Gijselaers, H. J. M., De Groot, R. H. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2013, 7 November). Physical activity and sedentary behavior associated with learning outcomes and cognition in adult distance learners. Paper presentation at the ICO [Interuniversity Center for Educational Research] National Fall School,

  10. Physical activity and sedentary behavior associated with learning outcomes and cognition in adult distance learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijselaers, Jérôme; De Groot, Renate; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Gijselaers, H. J. M., De Groot, R. H. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2013, 7 November). Physical activity and sedentary behavior associated with learning outcomes and cognition in adult distance learners. Paper presentation at the ICO [Interuniversity Center for Educational Research] National Fall School,

  11. Learner feedback and educational outcomes with an internet-based ambulatory curriculum: a qualitative and quantitative analysis

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    Sisson Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Online medical education curricula offer new tools to teach and evaluate learners. The effect on educational outcomes of using learner feedback to guide curricular revision for online learning is unknown. Methods In this study, qualitative analysis of learner feedback gathered from an online curriculum was used to identify themes of learner feedback, and changes to the online curriculum in response to this feedback were tracked. Learner satisfaction and knowledge gains were then compared from before and after implementation of learner feedback. Results 37,755 learners from 122 internal medicine residency training programs were studied, including 9437 postgraduate year (PGY1 residents (24.4 % of learners, 9864 PGY2 residents (25.5 %, 9653 PGY3 residents (25.0 %, and 6605 attending physicians (17.0 %. Qualitative analysis of learner feedback on how to improve the curriculum showed that learners commented most on the overall quality of the educational content, followed by specific comments on the content. When learner feedback was incorporated into curricular revision, learner satisfaction with the instructive value of the curriculum (1 = not instructive; 5 = highly instructive increased from 3.8 to 4.1 (p  Conclusions Learners give more feedback on the factual content of a curriculum than on other areas such as interactivity or website design. Incorporating learner feedback into curricular revision was associated with improved educational outcomes. Online curricula should be designed to include a mechanism for learner feedback and that feedback should be used for future curricular revision.

  12. Evaluating Learner Autonomy: A Dynamic Model with Descriptors

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    Maria Giovanna Tassinari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Every autonomous learning process should entail an evaluation of the learner’s competencies for autonomy. The dynamic model of learner autonomy described in this paper is a tool designed in order to support the self-assessment and evaluation of learning competencies and to help both learners and advisors to focus on relevant aspects of the learning process. The dynamic model accounts for cognitive, metacognitive, action-oriented and affective components of learner autonomy and provides descriptors of learners’ attitudes, competencies and behaviors. It is dynamic in order to allow learners to focus on their own needs and goals.The model (http://www.sprachenzentrum.fuberlin.de/v/autonomiemodell/index.html has been validated in several workshops with experts at the Université Nancy 2, France and at the Freie Universität Berlin, Germany and tested by students, advisors and teachers. It is currently used at the Centre for Independent Language Learning at the Freie Universität Berlin for language advising. Learners can freely choose the components they would like to assess themselves in. Their assessment is then discussed in an advising session, where the learner and the advisor can compare their perspectives, focus on single aspects of the leaning process and set goals for further learning. The students’ feedback gathered in my PhD investigation shows that they are able to benefit from this evaluation; their awareness, self-reflection and decision-making in the autonomous learning process improved.

  13. Autonomy, Affiliation, and Ability: Relative Salience of Factors that Influence Online Learner Motivation and Learning Outcomes

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    Kuan-Chung Chen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Autonomy, affiliation, and ability appear as main factors that influence online learners‟ motivation and learning outcomes, however, the relative salience of these three factors remains unclear in the online learning literature. Drawing on Deci and Ryan‟s self-determination theory, this study sought to bridge this gap by investigating the relative salience of perceived autonomy, affiliation, and ability on learner motivation and learning outcomes in two special education online programs (N = 262. This study found that the most salient predictor varied from categories of motivation and learning outcomes, and the number of significant predictors increased by participants‟ level of motivation/self-determination. Results of this study provide implications for online learner support.

  14. Literacy development of English language learners: the outcomes of an intervention programme in grade R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Anna-Mari; Anthonissen, Christine; Southwood, Frenette

    2010-12-01

    This study aims to contribute to the knowledge base on the status and development of emergent literacy skills of learners receiving formal education in their second or additional language. The focus is on young English language learners (ELLs), i.e. learners whose home language is not English but who have English as their language of teaching and learning. This article reports on a study that investigated ELLs' emergent literacy skills prior to entering grade 1 and then evaluated the effectiveness of an evidence-based stimulation programme on early literacy skills in the South African context. Using a quasi-experimental design, ELLs' emergent literacy skills were assessed with an adapted version of 8 of the subtests of the Emergent Literacy Assessment battery (Willenberg, 2004) and were compared to those of English first language (L1) and of ELL control groups, both before and after the 8-week purpose-designed programme. While learners showed significant improvement on 6 of the 8 subtests, the programme did not significantly improve ELLs' skills in comparison to those of the control groups. Possible independent variables contributing to the dearth of intervention effect include socio-economic status, learners' L1, and teacher- and classroom-specific characteristics, all of which were considered in this study. Clinical implications for speech-language therapists with regard to assessment, intervention, service delivery and outcome measures are highlighted.

  15. A Model for the Education of Gifted Learners in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarouphim, Ketty M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a model for developing a comprehensive system of education for gifted learners in Lebanon. The model consists of three phases and includes key elements for establishing gifted education in the country, such as raising community awareness, adopting valid identification measures, and developing effective…

  16. Literacy development of English language learners: The outcomes of an intervention programme in grade R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Mari Olivier

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to contribute to the knowledge base on the status and development of emergent literacy skills of learners receiving formal education in their second or additional language. The focus is on young English language learners (ELLs, i.e. learners whose home language is not English but who have English as their language of teaching and learning. This article reports on a study that investigated ELLs’ emergent literacy skills prior to entering grade 1 and then evaluated the effectiveness of an evidence-based stimulation programme on early literacy skills in the South African context. Using a quasi-experimental design, ELLs’ emergent literacy skills were assessed with an adapted version of 8 of the subtests of the Emergent Literacy Assessment battery (Willenberg, 2004 and were compared to those of English first language (L1 and of ELL control groups, both before and after the 8-week purpose-designed programme. While learners showed significant improvement on 6 of the 8 subtests, the programme did not significantly improve ELLs’ skills in comparison to those of the control groups. Possible independent variables contributing to the dearth of intervention effect include socio-economic status, learners’ L1, and teacher- and classroom-specific characteristics, all of which were considered in this study. Clinical implications for speech-language therapists with regard to assessment, intervention, service delivery and outcome measures are highlighted.

  17. Learner Open Modeling in Adaptive Mobile Learning System for Supporting Student to Learn English

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    Van Cong Pham

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents a personalized context-aware mobile learning architecture for supporting student to learn English as foreign language in order to prepare for TOEFL test. We consider how to apply open learner modeling techniques to adapt contents for different learners based on context, which includes location, amount of time to learn, the manner as well as learner's knowledge in learning progress. Through negotiation with system, the editable learner model will be updated to support adaptive engine to select adaptive contents meeting learner's demands. Empirical testing results for students who used application prototype indicate that interaction user modeling is helpful in supporting learner to learn adaptive materials.

  18. Note on learners' control of the frequency of model presentation during skill acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrisberg, Craig A; Pein, Richard L

    2002-06-01

    Learners (30 men, 15 women in three groups), given an opportunity to control the frequency with which they viewed a model during initial practice of the badminton long serve, acquired and retained a level of movement form that was equivalent to learners who viewed the model 100% of the time and significantly superior to learners who never viewed the model.

  19. Learning, Learning Analytics, Activity Visualisation and Open learner Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Susan; Kickmeier-Rust, Michael; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    This paper draws on visualisation approaches in learning analytics, considering how classroom visualisations can come together in practice. We suggest an open learner model in situations where many tools and activity visualisations produce more visual information than can be readily interpreted....

  20. Diabetes Management at School: Application of the Healthy Learner Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, Nichole; Kaup, Tara; McCarty, Patricia; Carlson, Jessie Parker

    2011-01-01

    Every child with diabetes deserves a school nurse with the capacity to effectively manage the disease at school. The school nurse needs knowledge and skills to confidently provide care and communicate with health care providers and families. The Healthy Learner Model for Chronic Condition Management provided a framework to eliminate the disjointed…

  1. Diabetes Management at School: Application of the Healthy Learner Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, Nichole; Kaup, Tara; McCarty, Patricia; Carlson, Jessie Parker

    2011-01-01

    Every child with diabetes deserves a school nurse with the capacity to effectively manage the disease at school. The school nurse needs knowledge and skills to confidently provide care and communicate with health care providers and families. The Healthy Learner Model for Chronic Condition Management provided a framework to eliminate the disjointed…

  2. The Teacher/Writer: Model, Learner, Human Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Geraldine Lee

    1984-01-01

    Describes observations of classrooms in which the teachers participated with the students in writing exercises. Discusses the three teacher/writer roles that emerged during the class--teacher/writer as model, teacher/writer as learner, and teacher/writer as human being--and the bond of understanding that developed as the teachers as students…

  3. A Program Evaluation Model: Using Bloom's Taxonomy to Identify Outcome Indicators in Outcomes-Based Program Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Rita C.

    2011-01-01

    Outcomes-based program evaluation is a systematic approach to identifying outcome indicators and measuring results against those indicators. One dimension of program evaluation is assessing the level of learner acquisition to determine if learning objectives were achieved as intended. The purpose of the proposed model is to use Bloom's Taxonomy to…

  4. A Conceptual Model for Engagement of the Online Learner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine M. Angelino

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Engagement of the online learner is one approach to reduce attrition rates. Attrition rates for classes taught through distance education are 10 – 20% higher than classes taught in a face-to-face setting. This paper introduces a Model for Engagement and provides strategies to engage the online learner. The Model depicts various opportunities where student-instructor, student-student, student-content, and student-community engagement can occur. The Model is divided into four strategic areas: (a recruitment, (b coursework, (c post coursework, and (d alumni. The theoretical framework for the model is Tinto‟s student integration model. The conceptual design of the model is based on engagement practices from an online Health Care Management (HCMT certificate program at a university in South Carolina.

  5. From Interactive Open Learner Modelling to Intelligent Mentoring: STyLE-OLM and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Vania; Brna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    STyLE-OLM (Dimitrova 2003 "International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education," 13, 35-78) presented a framework for interactive open learner modelling which entails the development of the means by which learners can "inspect," "discuss" and "alter" the learner model that has been jointly…

  6. Outcomes of Introducing Early Learners to Interprofessional Competencies in a Classroom Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockeman, Kelly S; Lanning, Sharon K; Dow, Alan W; Zorek, Joseph A; DiazGranados, Deborah; Ivey, Carole K; Soper, Shawne

    2017-03-10

    Although interprofessional practice is important for improving healthcare delivery, there is little evidence describing interprofessional education (IPE) outcomes beyond changes in attitudes and knowledge of prelicensure learners. More rigorous evaluation of early IPE is needed to determine its impact on teaching interprofessional collaborative practice and providing a solid foundation for applying collaborative skills in the clinical environment. First-year students (N = 679) in 7 health professions programs participated in a 4-session series focusing on professional roles and responsibilities, teams and teamwork, and the healthcare system. Interprofessional teams of 5-6 students, from at least 3 professions, were assembled for the duration of the series and created a team charter during their first session to guide their work. Each subsequent session included a brief lecture and interactive exercises. Faculty facilitators from the participating programs provided support to students during the sessions. As a culminating project, each team created a short video depicting a barrier to interprofessional collaboration. Students evaluated the performance of their team members using a web-based peer assessment survey. A course evaluation with an embedded validated attitudinal scale was used to assess changes in student perceptions about IPE. A sample of videos were also scored by 2 faculty using a rubric linked to course expectations. This educational offering took place on the health sciences campus of a large, mid-Atlantic research university with more than 3,200 clinical learners in schools of allied health professions, dentistry, medicine, nursing, and pharmacy. It was the first interprofessional activity for most of the learners. There were 555 students who participated in some or all of the sessions. Comments indicated that students enjoyed interacting with their peers and prefer activities allowing them to apply content to their profession over lectures. The

  7. A New Perspective of Negotiation-Based Dialog to Enhance Metacognitive Skills in the Context of Open Learner Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleman, Raja M.; Mizoguchi, Riichiro; Ikeda, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Negotiation mechanism using conversational agents (chatbots) has been used in Open Learner Models (OLM) to enhance learner model accuracy and provide opportunities for learner reflection. Using chatbots that allow for natural language discussions has shown positive learning gains in students. Traditional OLMs assume a learner to be able to manage…

  8. A New Perspective of Negotiation-Based Dialog to Enhance Metacognitive Skills in the Context of Open Learner Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleman, Raja M.; Mizoguchi, Riichiro; Ikeda, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Negotiation mechanism using conversational agents (chatbots) has been used in Open Learner Models (OLM) to enhance learner model accuracy and provide opportunities for learner reflection. Using chatbots that allow for natural language discussions has shown positive learning gains in students. Traditional OLMs assume a learner to be able to manage…

  9. An Active Reading Model for English Learners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐岩; 张琳

    2008-01-01

    Acuve reading makes a reader interact with the text.It promotes learning,Acuve reading model actually presents six reading strategies that teachers should consider when teaching English to a class of non-native speakers.That guides both teachers and students in their working and learning.

  10. The Effect of an English Language Learner Program on Student Achievement Outcomes in Language, Reading, and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the reading, math, and language proficiency outcomes of 4th-grade through 7th-grade students with limited English proficiency following nearly two years or more of instruction in the English Language Learner Program (ELL) and concurrent general education studies. The maximum accrual for this study was…

  11. A Study of the Predictive Relationships between Faculty Engagement, Learner Satisfaction and Outcomes in Multiple Learning Delivery Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Cherng-Jyh; Abdous, M'hammed

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the predictive relationships between faculty engagement, learner satisfaction, and outcomes across multiple learning delivery modes (LDMs). Participants were enrolled in courses with the options of three learning delivery modes: face-to-face, satellite broadcasting, and live video-streaming. The predictive relationship between…

  12. The Learner-Centered Instructional Design Model: A Modified Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsom, Duane Allan

    2010-01-01

    The learner-centered instructional design model redefines the standard linear instructional design model to form a circular model where the learner's needs are the first item considered in the development of instruction. The purpose of this modified Delphi study was to have a panel of experts in the instructional design field review the…

  13. A mathematical model for the two-learners problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputra Müller, Jan; Vidaurre, Carmen; Schreuder, Martijn; Meinecke, Frank C.; von Bünau, Paul; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2017-06-01

    Objective. We present the first generic theoretical formulation of the co-adaptive learning problem and give a simple example of two interacting linear learning systems, a human and a machine. Approach. After the description of the training protocol of the two learning systems, we define a simple linear model where the two learning agents are coupled by a joint loss function. The simplicity of the model allows us to find learning rules for both human and machine that permit computing theoretical simulations. Main results. As seen in simulations, an astonishingly rich structure is found for this eco-system of learners. While the co-adaptive learners are shown to easily stall or get out of sync for some parameter settings, we can find a broad sweet spot of parameters where the learning system can converge quickly. It is defined by mid-range learning rates on the side of the learning machine, quite independent of the human in the loop. Despite its simplistic assumptions the theoretical study could be confirmed by a real-world experimental study where human and machine co-adapt to perform cursor control under distortion. Also in this practical setting the mid-range learning rates yield the best performance and behavioral ratings. Significance. The results presented in this mathematical study allow the computation of simple theoretical simulations and performance of real experimental paradigms. Additionally, they are nicely in line with previous results in the BCI literature.

  14. An Intelligent Tutoring System for Learning Chinese with a Cognitive Model of the Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, Michal; Lison, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We present an intelligent tutoring system that lets students of Chinese learn words and grammatical constructions. It relies on a Bayesian, linguistically motivated cognitive model that represents the learner's knowledge. This model is dynamically updated given observations about the learner's behaviour in the exercises, and employed at runtime to…

  15. A Predictive Study of Learner Satisfaction and Outcomes in Face-to-Face, Satellite Broadcast, and Live Video-Streaming Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdous, M'hammed; Yen, Cherng-Jyh

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the predictive relationships among delivery mode (DM), self-perceived learner-to-teacher interaction, self-rated computer skill, prior distance learning experience, and learners' satisfaction and outcomes. Participants were enrolled in courses which used three different DMs: face-to-face, satellite broadcasting,…

  16. SMILI?: A Framework for Interfaces to Learning Data in Open Learner Models, Learning Analytics and Related Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Susan; Kay, Judy

    2016-01-01

    The SMILI? (Student Models that Invite the Learner In) Open Learner Model Framework was created to provide a coherent picture of the many and diverse forms of Open Learner Models (OLMs). The aim was for SMILI? to provide researchers with a systematic way to describe, compare and critique OLMs. We expected it to highlight those areas where there…

  17. A Learner-Centered Molecular Modeling Exercise for Allied Health Majors in a Biochemistry Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Terace M.; Ershler, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Learner-centered molecular modeling exercises in college science courses can be especially challenging for nonchemistry majors as students typically have a higher degree of anxiety and may not appreciate the relevance of the work. This article describes a learner-centered project given to allied health majors in a Biochemistry course. The project…

  18. Online Instructors as Thinking Advisors: A Model for Online Learner Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the characteristics and challenges of online instruction and presents a model for improving learner adaptation in an online classroom. Instruction in an online classroom presents many challenges, including learner individualization. Individual differences in learning styles and preferences are often not considered in the…

  19. Effects of a curricular revision on learner outcomes in veterinary clinical pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinger, Charlotte; Libarkin, Julie C; Stickle, Julia E; Hauptman, Joe G; Henry, Rebecca; Scott, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    A mixed-methods evaluation was conducted to study learner attitudes and knowledge about clinical pathology across a curricular change that instituted a stand-alone clinical pathology course in place of content within a previously integrated pathology course structure. Groups of pre- and post-change students were assessed three times across the two semesters leading up to graduation. At each time, rank-ordered and open-ended response items probed attitudes, and multiple-choice items assessed knowledge. Data about student clinical pathology performance were also collected from clinical pathology instructors and supervising clinicians. Student rank-ordered items were evaluated by factor analysis; resulting factor-scale scores, multiple-choice scores, and rank responses from study cohorts were statistically assessed between groups and within each group over time. Intraclass correlations were calculated for the coding of student open-ended responses, and all coded responses were compared among groups. Analysis revealed that students in the revised curriculum had greater satisfaction with their training and greater confidence in data interpretation compared to students without exposure to an independent clinical pathology course. Although differences in knowledge of clinical pathology were not detected, it was also apparent that the independent clinical pathology course filled a student-perceived curricular need without raising criticisms related to diminished integration with anatomic pathology. Secondary study outcomes included formative feedback for course improvement, evidence of clerkship efficacy, and baseline data for further studies.

  20. Modelling lymphoma therapy and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Katja; Hasenclever, Dirk; Scholz, Markus

    2014-02-01

    Dose and time intensifications of chemotherapy improved the outcome of lymphoma therapy. However, recent study results show that too intense therapies can result in inferior tumour control. We hypothesise that the immune system plays a key role in controlling residual tumour cells after treatment. More intense therapies result in a stronger depletion of immune cells allowing an early re-growth of the tumour.We propose a differential equations model of the dynamics and interactions of tumour and immune cells under chemotherapy. Major model features are an exponential tumour growth, a modulation of the production of effector cells by the presence of the tumour (immunogenicity), and mutual destruction of tumour and immune cells. Chemotherapy causes damage to both, immune and tumour cells. Growth rate, chemosensitivity, immunogenicity, and initial size of the tumour are assumed to be patient-specific, resulting in heterogeneity regarding therapy outcome. Maximum-entropy distributions of these parameters were estimated on the basis of clinical survival data. The resulting model can explain the outcome of five different chemotherapeutic regimens and corresponding hazard-ratios.We conclude that our model explains observed paradox effects in lymphoma therapy by the simple assumption of a relevant anti-tumour effect of the immune system. Heterogeneity of therapy outcomes can be explained by distributions of model parameters, which can be estimated on the basis of clinical survival data. We demonstrate how the model can be used to make predictions regarding yet untested therapy options.

  1. Learning Strategies of the Arab EFL Learners: Finding Correlation with Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahdal, Arif Ahmed Mohammed Hassan; Al-Ma'amari, Ahmed Ali Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Socio-psychological research and findings into learner differences led to the emergence of learner strategies research in the last century. With major contributions from the emerging field of Linguistics in the mid 1970s, language learning strategies began to receive considerable attention. It is worth noting that the primary concern of most of…

  2. Effect of Learner-Centered Education on the Academic Outcomes of Minority Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Moises F.; Garr, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the effect that learner-centered classrooms and schools have on the academic performance of minority and nonminority groups. A diverse sample of schools at the elementary school level were selected. Teachers were also asked to complete the Assessment of Learner Centered Practices questionnaire, an…

  3. Learner Characteristics and Learning Outcomes on a Distance Spanish Course for Beginners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, James A.; Furnborough, Concha

    2010-01-01

    Much Second Language Acquisition research focuses on young learners in the conventional classroom. Instructed adult learners, and in particular those who are learning at a distance, have attracted less attention. This group is substantial and growing: the Open University, the largest higher education language provider in the UK, alone recruits…

  4. Predictors and Outcomes of Early vs. Later English Language Proficiency Among English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, Tamara; Hair, Elizabeth; Wandner, Laura; McNamara, Michelle; Chien, Nina

    2011-01-01

    The development of English language learners (ELLs) was explored from kindergarten through eighth grade within a nationally representative sample of first-time kindergartners (N = 19,890). Growth curve analyses indicated that, compared to native English speakers, ELLs were rated by teachers more favorably on approaches to learning, self control, and externalizing behaviors in kindergarten and generally continued to grow in a positive direction on these social/behavioral outcomes at a steeper rate compared to their native English-speaking peers, holding other factors constant. Differences in reading and math achievement between ELLs and native English speakers varied based on the grade at which English proficiency is attained. Specifically, ELLs who were proficient in English by kindergarten entry kept pace with native English speakers in both reading and math initially and over time; ELLs who were proficient by first grade had modest gaps in reading and math achievement compared to native English speakers that closed narrowly or persisted over time; and ELLs who were not proficient by first grade had the largest initial gaps in reading and math achievement compared to native speakers but the gap narrowed over time in reading and grew over time in math. Among those whose home language is not English, acquiring English proficiency by kindergarten entry was associated with better cognitive and behavioral outcomes through eighth grade compared to taking longer to achieve proficiency. Multinomial regression analyses indicated that child, family, and school characteristics predict achieving English proficiency by kindergarten entry compared to achieving proficiency later. Results are discussed in terms of policies and practices that can support ELL children’s growth and development. PMID:22389551

  5. Bringing Chatbots into education: Towards Natural Language Negotiation of Open Learner Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlyl, Alice; Hall, Phil; Bull, Susan

    There is an extensive body of work on Intelligent Tutoring Systems: computer environments for education, teaching and training that adapt to the needs of the individual learner. Work on personalisation and adaptivity has included research into allowing the student user to enhance the system's adaptivity by improving the accuracy of the underlying learner model. Open Learner Modelling, where the system's model of the user's knowledge is revealed to the user, has been proposed to support student reflection on their learning. Increased accuracy of the learner model can be obtained by the student and system jointly negotiating the learner model. We present the initial investigations into a system to allow people to negotiate the model of their understanding of a topic in natural language. This paper discusses the development and capabilities of both conversational agents (or chatbots) and Intelligent Tutoring Systems, in particular Open Learner Modelling. We describe a Wizard-of-Oz experiment to investigate the feasibility of using a chatbot to support negotiation, and conclude that a fusion of the two fields can lead to developing negotiation techniques for chatbots and the enhancement of the Open Learner Model. This technology, if successful, could have widespread application in schools, universities and other training scenarios.

  6. Design and Implementation of an Intelligent Educational Model Based on Personality and Learner's Emotion

    CERN Document Server

    Fatahi, Somayeh

    2010-01-01

    The Personality and emotions are effective parameters in learning process. Thus, virtual learning environments should pay attention to these parameters. In this paper, a new e-learning model is designed and implemented according to these parameters. The Virtual learning environment that is presented here uses two agents: Virtual Tutor Agent (VTA), and Virtual Classmate Agent (VCA). During the learning process and depending on events happening in the environment, learner's emotions are changed. In this situation, learning style should be revised according to the personality traits as well as the learner's current emotions. VTA selects suitable learning style for the learners based on their personality traits. To improve the learning process, the system uses VCA in some of the learning steps. VCA is an intelligent agent and has its own personality. It is designed so that it can present an attractive and real learning environment in interaction with the learner. To recognize the learner's personality, this syste...

  7. 3-Ls: A MODEL FOR TEACHING YOUNG LEARNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuzaimah Dahlan Diem

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The fact that EFL literacy in Indonesia is still low led me to conduct this study to cultivate reading habits and increase literacy skills of young learners. Using the 3-Ls—libraries, literature, and literacy—as an instructional model, the study involved five methods: Informational Text Structures; Online Resources; Partnership with Librarians; Big6; and Literature Circles. The sample consisted of 200 fifth graders divided equally into five groups, each of which was also divided into experimental and control groups. Each of tThe experimental groups was taught for three months using one method. All the students in both groups were given English tests and a questionnaire before and after the experiment. The results showed that the experimental groups outperformed the control groups with a significant mean difference of 21.73 on literacy skills and 10.15 on reading habits. Using regression analysis, it was also found that 3-Ls as a whole had given a significant contribution to both students’ reading habits (R2 0,793 and literacy skills (R 0,943 with the highest percentage contributed by every method was reading skill. However, in spite of demonstrating significant effects on students’ literacy, these methods still did not bring the students’ literacy to an acceptable level. A factor that might contribute to the low achievement of their English literacy was that the 3-Ls model requires optimal facilities.

  8. Evaluation of E-Learners Behaviour using Different Fuzzy Clustering Models: A Comparative Study

    CERN Document Server

    Hogo, Mofreh A

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces an evaluation methodologies for the e-learners' behaviour that will be a feedback to the decision makers in e-learning system. Learner's profile plays a crucial role in the evaluation process to improve the e-learning process performance. The work focuses on the clustering of the e-learners based on their behaviour into specific categories that represent the learner's profiles. The learners' classes named as regular, workers, casual, bad, and absent. The work may answer the question of how to return bad students to be regular ones. The work presented the use of different fuzzy clustering techniques as fuzzy c-means and kernelized fuzzy c-means to find the learners' categories and predict their profiles. The paper presents the main phases as data description, preparation, features selection, and the experiments design using different fuzzy clustering models. Analysis of the obtained results and comparison with the real world behavior of those learners proved that there is a match with per...

  9. Testing a model of L2 communication among Iranian EFL learners: A Path Analysis Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Fallah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Using willingness to communicate (WTC and socio-educational models as a framework, the present study aimed at examining WTC in English and its underlying variables in a sample of 372 Iranian non-English major EFL learners. The data were collected through self-reported questionnaires. Path analysis framework using the Amos Program with maximum likelihood estimation was also utilized to examine the hypothesized model and the potential relationships between the variables. The final model showed a very good fit to the data. The results of structural equation modeling revealed that self-perceived communication competence (SPCC, international posture and motivation were significant predictors of L2WTC. The findings also showed that L2 communication anxiety (CA, motivation, personality trait of agreeableness and teacher immediacy could exert indirect effects on L2WTC. Furthermore, each of teacher immediacy and agreeableness variables predicted both international posture and CA among the EFL learners. Following these findings, potential factors affecting learners WTC should receive sufficient attention by teachers, administrators and learners alike. By adopting more immediacy behaviors, EFL teachers can also establish relaxing and supportive classroom climate and lower the learners’ affective filter. In such an atmosphere learners are more emotionally secured, suffer less communication apprehension, perceive themselves to be more proficient and motivated, obtain promoted international posture by forming realistic attitudes toward different cultures, and consequently become more willing to communicate in English.

  10. Pronunciation for the Arab Learners of EFL: Planning for Better Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan Al-Ahdal, Arif Ahmed Mohammed; Al-Hattami, Abdulghani Ali; Al-Awaid, Salmeen Abdulrahman Abdullah; Al-Mashaqba, Nisreen Juma'a Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Arabic and English belong to two different linguistic families: resultantly, some Arabic speaking learners of English in both SL and FL situations have a major obstacle to overcome to be intelligible to other users, especially in the international context. Of the various skills one needs to acquire to become "proficient" in a language…

  11. Learner Personas in CALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heift, Trude

    2007-01-01

    In examining the titles of this year's conference presentations, the author noticed quite a few papers that focus on learner-specific issues, for instance, papers that address learning styles, learner needs, personality and learning, learner modeling and, more generally, pedagogical issues that deal with individual learner differences in…

  12. Integrating Learning Styles and Personality Traits into an Affective Model to Support Learner's Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontidis, Makis; Halatsis, Constantin

    The aim of this paper is to present a model in order to integrate the learning style and the personality traits of a learner into an enhanced Affective Style which is stored in the learner’s model. This model which can deal with the cognitive abilities as well as the affective preferences of the learner is called Learner Affective Model (LAM). The LAM is used to retain learner’s knowledge and activities during his interaction with a Web-based learning environment and also to provide him with the appropriate pedagogical guidance. The proposed model makes use of an ontological approach in combination with the Bayesian Network model and contributes to the efficient management of the LAM in an Affective Module.

  13. The Design Research of Learning Outcomes Prediction Based on the Model of Personalized Behavior Analysis for Learners%基于学习者个性行为分析的学习结果预测框架设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武法提; 牟智佳

    2016-01-01

    对学习者及其所在情境中产生的数据进行记录和分析并为其提供个性化学习服务是教育大数据背景下学习分析研究在促进有效学习方面的内在旨趣,而要实现对学习状态的评估、预警和干预则需要对学习者个性化信息进行实时建模.该文通过对国内外学习分析模型的梳理分析总结存在问题,并基于个性化学习模式和相关文献构建了数字化学习环境下个性化行为分析模型.在此基础上,以教学目标分类理论、个性化学习理论和社会认知理论为指导设计了"目标—过程—结果"为思想的学习结果分类设计原理,并对各层级的学习行为类型进行分析.最后基于学习行为分析模型和学习结果分类设计了学习结果预测框架,包括学习内容分析、学习行为分析和学习预测分析三个模块,为后面个性化学习分析工具的设计提供理论指导.%It is internal purport for recording and analysis of the data that is generated by learners and their contexts and providing personalized learning service in the aspect of promoting effective learning under the educational background of big data. The real time modeling is required to achieve the assessment of learning status, early warning as well as intervention. The existing problems were summarized by combing analysis for learning analysis model at domestic and abroad in this paper. And we built a personalized behavior model applying in the digital environment based on the personalized learning patterns and related literature. In addition, we designed learning outcome classification principles with the idea of "target-process-results" in the guidance of instruction theories which included teaching target classification theory, personalized learning theory and social cognitive theory. The type of behaviors was also analyzed at all levels. Finally, the learning outcomes prediction framework was designed based on learning behavior analysis

  14. Teaching EFL Writing: An Approach Based on the Learner's Context Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine qualitatively a new approach to teaching English as a foreign language (EFL) writing based on the learner's context model. It investigates the context model-based approach in class and identifies key characteristics of the approach delivered through a four-phase teaching and learning cycle. The model collects research…

  15. Situating Power Potentials and Dynamics of Learners and Tutors within Self-Assessment Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taras, Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    Many twenty-first century educational discourses focus on including and empowering independent learners. Within the context of five self-assessment models, this article evaluates how these practices relate to the realities of student involvement, empowerment and voice. A proposed new classification of these self-assessment models is presented and…

  16. Graduation Outcomes of Students Who Entered New York City Public Schools in Grade 5 or 6 as English Learner Students. REL 2017-237

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Michael J.; Parker, Caroline E.

    2017-01-01

    This longitudinal study analyzes high school graduation outcomes of students who entered New York City public schools in grade 5 or 6 as English learner students. It extends the work of Kieffer and Parker (2016) by investigating the high school graduation rates and the types of diploma earned by the 1,734 students who entered New York City public…

  17. Modeling Learner Satisfaction in an Electronic Instrumentation and Measurement Course Using Structural Equation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toral, S. L.; Barrero, F.; Martinez-Torres, M. R.; Gallardo, S.; Duran, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    The prevailing tendency in modern university reforms is towards "how people learn," following a learner-centered approach in which the learner is the main actor of the teaching-learning process. As a consequence, one of the key indicators of the teaching-learning process is the measurement of learner satisfaction within the classroom.…

  18. Modeling Learner Satisfaction in an Electronic Instrumentation and Measurement Course Using Structural Equation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toral, S. L.; Barrero, F.; Martinez-Torres, M. R.; Gallardo, S.; Duran, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    The prevailing tendency in modern university reforms is towards "how people learn," following a learner-centered approach in which the learner is the main actor of the teaching-learning process. As a consequence, one of the key indicators of the teaching-learning process is the measurement of learner satisfaction within the classroom.…

  19. Appropriacy Planning: Speech Acts Studies and Planning Appropriate Models for ESL Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Mitsuo

    1997-01-01

    Since the emergence of the concept of communicative competence, the language teaching field has focused on teaching appropriate language use in addition to general linguistic elements. Speech act studies have contributed to providing appropriate models for second and foreign language learners. In this paper, the effort toward the creation and use…

  20. Training EFL Learners in Self-Regulation of Reading: Implementing an SRL Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshedian, Mahboobeh; Hemmati, Fatemeh; Sotoudehnama, Elaheh

    2017-01-01

    This study examined whether training English as a foreign language (EFL) learners in a self-regulated learning (SRL) model could help them develop the ability to self-regulate their reading in English and whether their proficiency level could moderate the efficacy of self-regulation training. Two experimental groups received instruction in…

  1. Innovation in Doctoral Degrees Designed for Adult Learners: A Hybrid Model in Personal Financial Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grable, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Innovation in doctoral degree program development and delivery provides an effective counterpoint to the expert-apprentice model established in the Middle Ages. The author outlines the importance of innovation in reaching adult learners and describes an innovative hybrid PhD program designed to allow aspiring doctoral adult-age students to pursue…

  2. Innovation in Doctoral Degrees Designed for Adult Learners: A Hybrid Model in Personal Financial Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grable, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Innovation in doctoral degree program development and delivery provides an effective counterpoint to the expert-apprentice model established in the Middle Ages. The author outlines the importance of innovation in reaching adult learners and describes an innovative hybrid PhD program designed to allow aspiring doctoral adult-age students to pursue…

  3. Teachers, Families, and Communities Supporting English Language Learners in Inclusive Pre-Kindergartens: An Evaluation of a Professional Development Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Belinda J.; Lower, Joanna K.; Smallwood, Gretchen Robinson; Chakravarthi, Swetha; Li, Linlin; Jordan, Carol

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the "Teachers, Families, and Communities Supporting English Language Learners" (TFC) project was to implement and evaluate a sustainable model of high-quality professional development focused on improving inclusive pre-kindergarten services for English Language Learners (ELL) and their families. The professional…

  4. Learner Outcomes in Science in South Africa: Role of the Nature of Learner Difficulties with the Language for Learning and Teaching Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyoo, Samuel Ouma

    2016-09-01

    Paul Leslie Gardner pioneered the study of student difficulties with everyday words presented in the science context (Gardner 1971); several similarly designed studies (e.g. Cassels and Johnstone 1985; Tao in Research in Science Education, 24, 322-330, 1994; Farell and Ventura in Language and Education, 12(4), 243-254, 1998; Childs and O'Farell in Chemistry Education: Research and Practice, 4(3), 233-247, 2003) have since been reported in literature. This article draws from an exploratory study of the difficulties South African High School physical science learners encounter with everyday English words when presented in the science context. The participants (1107 learners and 35 respective physical science teachers) were drawn from 35 public secondary schools in Johannesburg area of South Africa. Data were obtained through a word test to participant learners followed by group interviews but face-to-face interviews with each physical science teacher. This study has revealed that in similar ways as have been reported in each of the studies so far, South African learners also face difficulties with meanings of everyday words presented in a science context. The main source of difficulties encountered was learner inability to distinguish between the meanings of familiar everyday words as used in everyday parlance from the `new' meanings of the same everyday words when used in the science context. Interpretations of learner interview responses revealed that fewer difficulties would have been experienced by learners if science teachers generally explained the context meanings of the words as used during science teaching. The findings suggest that focusing on contextual proficiency more than on general proficiency in the language of learning and teaching (LOLT) during teaching perhaps holds more promise for enhanced learning and achievement in science. Steps necessary to raise teacher awareness of the potential impact of context on meanings of everyday words of the LOLT

  5. Learner Outcomes in Science in South Africa: Role of the Nature of Learner Difficulties with the Language for Learning and Teaching Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyoo, Samuel Ouma

    2017-08-01

    Paul Leslie Gardner pioneered the study of student difficulties with everyday words presented in the science context (Gardner 1971); several similarly designed studies (e.g. Cassels and Johnstone 1985; Tao in Research in Science Education, 24, 322-330, 1994; Farell and Ventura in Language and Education, 12(4), 243-254, 1998; Childs and O'Farell in Chemistry Education: Research and Practice, 4(3), 233-247, 2003) have since been reported in literature. This article draws from an exploratory study of the difficulties South African High School physical science learners encounter with everyday English words when presented in the science context. The participants (1107 learners and 35 respective physical science teachers) were drawn from 35 public secondary schools in Johannesburg area of South Africa. Data were obtained through a word test to participant learners followed by group interviews but face-to-face interviews with each physical science teacher. This study has revealed that in similar ways as have been reported in each of the studies so far, South African learners also face difficulties with meanings of everyday words presented in a science context. The main source of difficulties encountered was learner inability to distinguish between the meanings of familiar everyday words as used in everyday parlance from the `new' meanings of the same everyday words when used in the science context. Interpretations of learner interview responses revealed that fewer difficulties would have been experienced by learners if science teachers generally explained the context meanings of the words as used during science teaching. The findings suggest that focusing on contextual proficiency more than on general proficiency in the language of learning and teaching (LOLT) during teaching perhaps holds more promise for enhanced learning and achievement in science. Steps necessary to raise teacher awareness of the potential impact of context on meanings of everyday words of the LOLT

  6. Discounting Models for Outcomes over Continuous Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvey, Charles M.; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    Events that occur over a period of time can be described either as sequences of outcomes at discrete times or as functions of outcomes in an interval of time. This paper presents discounting models for events of the latter type. Conditions on preferences are shown to be satisfied if and only if t...

  7. Learner differences and learning outcomes in an introductory biochemistry class: attitude toward images, visual cognitive skills, and learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Rachel E

    2014-01-01

    The practice of using images in teaching is widespread, and in science education images are used so extensively that some have argued they are now the "main vehicle of communication" (C. Ferreira, A. Arroio Problems Educ. 21st Century 2009, 16, 48-53). Although this phenomenon is especially notable in the field of biochemistry, we know little about the role and importance of images in communicating concepts to students in the classroom. This study reports the development of a scale to assess students' attitude toward biochemical images, particularly their willingness and ability to use the images to support their learning. In addition, because it is argued that images are central in the communication of biochemical concepts, we investigated three "learner differences" which might impact learning outcomes in this kind of classroom environment: attitude toward images, visual cognitive skills, and learning approach. Overall, the students reported a positive attitude toward the images, the majority agreeing that they liked images and considered them useful. However, the participants also reported that verbal explanations were more important than images in helping them to understand the concepts. In keeping with this we found that there was no relationship between learning outcomes and the students' self-reported attitude toward images or visual cognitive skills. In contrast, learning outcomes were significantly correlated with the students' self-reported approach to learning. These findings suggest that images are not necessarily the main vehicle of communication in a biochemistry classroom and that verbal explanations and encouragement of a deep learning approach are important considerations in improving our pedagogical approach.

  8. Long-Term Social and Emotional Outcomes of Subject-Area Acceleration on Gifted Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dana Cantrell

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study utilizing transcendental phenomenology methods sought to understand the long-term social and emotional outcomes associated with subject-area acceleration. The participants were high school gifted juniors and seniors from one rural high school the southeastern United States. Data was collected through…

  9. U.S. dental hygiene faculty perceptions of learner outcomes in distance education courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corum, Kathrine A; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Johnson, Kerry; Strait, Tia M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine perceptions of full-time, entry-level dental hygiene educators regarding the ability to achieve interaction in their distance education courses and the impact of interaction on learning outcomes. The specific interactions explored were student-instructor, student-content, and student-student. A survey was developed, pilot tested, revised, and mailed to 287 educators across the United States, generating an overall response rate of 22.3 percent. The majority of respondents perceived interaction to be achievable in their distance courses, to increase through technology, and to positively influence learning outcomes. Nearly 90 percent reported student-instructor interaction as achievable, 95.3 percent reported student-content interaction as achievable, and 79.7 percent reported student-student interaction as achievable. Learning outcomes were defined in this study as the student's achievement of course objectives and competencies at course completion. Approximately 81 percent of the respondents reported a positive influence from student-instructor interaction, 79.7 percent from student-content interaction, and 70.3 percent from student-student interaction. This study also examined which modalities were perceived as being most influential in achieving interaction. The results demonstrated a prevalence of discussion board posting in an environment in which numerous Web 2.0 tools are available and respondents were not as positive about their ability to achieve student-student interaction in the distance learning environment. The authors conclude that faculty development is critical in achieving quality outcomes in dental hygiene distance education courses.

  10. A Learning Methodology Using Matlab/Simulink for Undergraduate Electrical Engineering Courses Attending to Learner Satisfaction Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Mario J.; Gallardo, Sergio; Toral, Sergio L.; Martinez-Torres, Rocio; Barrero, Federico J.

    2007-01-01

    Learner-centred approaches follow the prevailing tendency in modern University reforms which are primarily concerned about "how people learn". The methodologies can be learner-centred in the sense of placing the student as the main actor of the teaching-learning process by increasing his interactivity and participation, but also…

  11. A Learning Methodology Using Matlab/Simulink for Undergraduate Electrical Engineering Courses Attending to Learner Satisfaction Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Mario J.; Gallardo, Sergio; Toral, Sergio L.; Martinez-Torres, Rocio; Barrero, Federico J.

    2007-01-01

    Learner-centred approaches follow the prevailing tendency in modern University reforms which are primarily concerned about "how people learn". The methodologies can be learner-centred in the sense of placing the student as the main actor of the teaching-learning process by increasing his interactivity and participation, but also…

  12. A Learning Methodology Using Matlab/Simulink for Undergraduate Electrical Engineering Courses Attending to Learner Satisfaction Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Mario J.; Gallardo, Sergio; Toral, Sergio L.; Martinez-Torres, Rocio; Barrero, Federico J.

    2007-01-01

    Learner-centred approaches follow the prevailing tendency in modern University reforms which are primarily concerned about "how people learn". The methodologies can be learner-centred in the sense of placing the student as the main actor of the teaching-learning process by increasing his interactivity and participation, but also considering what…

  13. The Effects of Applying Betts’ Autonomous Learner Model on Iranian Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Yarahmadzehi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Classroom-based, teacher-directed language learning has been dominant in language teaching and learning for decades; however, the notion of autonomy is not novel to language teachers. Since the publication of Holec’s book, Autonomy and Foreign Language Learning (1981, autonomy in language learning has been a significant issue for discussion in relation to language learning practices and language teaching principles. Many ESL researchers have turned their attention to learner autonomy in classroom settings; however, learner autonomy in the Iranian context within self-access settings, classroom settings, and school curriculum has not been adequately addressed in the literature. To fill the research gap mentioned above, the present study aims to determine: 1. if Betts’s Autonomous Learner Model (Betts & Kercher, 1999 has any significant effect in terms of students’ self-directed learning readiness, and 2. if Betts’s Autonomous Learner Model has any significant effect on students’ English language proficiency. Adopting a quasi-experimental design, the study involved a comparison between the experimental and the control group. Two instruments were used: Gugliemino’s (1977 Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDLRS; and standardized TOEFL test. 30 students (group A were taught English based on a pedagogical model, which blended Betts’s ALM with classroom instruction and 30 students (group B were taught through a traditional teacher-directed method. Finally, after six months of treatment, TOEFL test and SDLRS test were administered as the post-test and the results were analyzed by means of SPSS software. The results showed that ALM can work with Iranian students as evidenced by generally average performance on SDLRS and TOEFL post-tests.

  14. Webquest 2.0: An Instructional Model for Digital Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Diana F. Abernathy

    2012-01-01

    Teaching and learning tools such as Moodle and Web 2.0 tools are appearing in K-12 classrooms; however, there is a lack of scholarly research to guide the implementation of these tools. The WebQuest model, a widely adopted inquiry-based model for online instruction, has instructional inadequacies and does not make the most of emerging…

  15. Privileging Bilingualism: Using Biliterate Writing Outcomes to Understand Emerging Bilingual Learners' Literacy Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopewell, Susan; Butvilofsky, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Language planning and policy with regard to bilingual education are greatly influenced by the ideologies outlined by Richard Ruiz. In this article, we demonstrate that Ruiz's language-as-resource orientation requires that we use two-language assessments to study how program models are both developing and conserving the languages that students…

  16. Effective instruction for English learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Margarita; Slavin, Robert; Sánchez, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The fastest-growing student population in U.S. schools today is children of immigrants, half of whom do not speak English fluently and are thus labeled English learners. Although the federal government requires school districts to provide services to English learners, it offers states no policies to follow in identifying, assessing, placing, or instructing them. Margarita Calderón, Robert Slavin, and Marta Sánchez identify the elements of effective instruction and review a variety of successful program models. During 2007-08, more than 5.3 million English learners made up 10.6 percent of the nation's K-12 public school enrollment. Wide and persistent achievement disparities between these English learners and English-proficient students show clearly, say the authors, that schools must address the language, literacy, and academic needs of English learners more effectively. Researchers have fiercely debated the merits of bilingual and English-only reading instruction. In elementary schools, English learners commonly receive thirty minutes of English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction but attend general education classes for the rest of the day, usually with teachers who are unprepared to teach them. Though English learners have strikingly diverse levels of skills, in high school they are typically lumped together, with one teacher to address their widely varying needs. These in-school factors contribute to the achievement disparities. Based on the studies presented here, Calderón, Slavin, and Sánchez assert that the quality of instruction is what matters most in educating English learners. They highlight comprehensive reform models, as well as individual components of these models: school structures and leadership; language and literacy instruction; integration of language, literacy, and content instruction in secondary schools; cooperative learning; professional development; parent and family support teams; tutoring; and monitoring implementation and outcomes

  17. Suggesting a General ESP Model for Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumaily, Samir

    2011-01-01

    The study suggests a general model that could guarantee the cooperation between teachers and their students to overcome the difficulties encountered in ESP learning. It tries to join together different perspectives in the research of adult education, specifically in the teaching of English for Specific Purposes. It also provides some sort of trust…

  18. Suggesting a General ESP Model for Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumaily, Samir

    2011-01-01

    The study suggests a general model that could guarantee the cooperation between teachers and their students to overcome the difficulties encountered in ESP learning. It tries to join together different perspectives in the research of adult education, specifically in the teaching of English for Specific Purposes. It also provides some sort of trust…

  19. Ontological Support in Modeling Learners' Problem Solving Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chun-Hung; Wu, Chia-Wei; Wu, Shih-Hung; Chiou, Guey-Fa; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new model for simulating procedural knowledge in the problem solving process with our ontological system, InfoMap. The method divides procedural knowledge into two parts: process control and action performer. By adopting InfoMap, we hope to help teachers construct curricula (declarative knowledge) and teaching strategies by…

  20. Course-embedded student support for online English language learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Andrade

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an embedded approach to learner support in online English language courses. The support model is based on language acquisition, transactional distance, and self-regulated learning theories. Based on these theories, courses were designed to provide the interaction necessary for academic English language gains, decrease the transactional distance between the teacher and learner, and assist learners in developing the ability to control the factors that affect their learning; in other words, to be self-regulated learners. The latter is critical for those who lack the autonomy needed for successful distance learning. In this paper, three course activities are described and analyzed to demonstrate how the embedded support model responds to the needs of diverse learners and assists them in achieving identified outcomes. The courses were designed for off-site international students enrolled in traditional English-speaking higher education institutions.http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/openpraxis.6.1.90

  1. The Relationship between Delivery Models and the Grade-Level Reading Development of Sixth-Grade English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Holly Weber

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between delivery models (the class size reduction model and the sheltered instruction model) and language development levels on the grade-level reading development of sixth-grade English learners (ELs) attending public middle schools in metro Atlanta, Georgia. The instrument used to measure grade-level mastery…

  2. Modeling Learner Situation Awareness in Collaborative Mobile Web 2.0 Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Helmi; Nordin, Norazah; Din, Rosseni; Ally, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The concept of situation awareness is essential in enhancing collaborative learning. Learners require information from different awareness aspects to deduce a learning situation for decision-making. Designing learning environments that assist learners to understand situation awareness via monitoring actions and reaction of other learners has been…

  3. Grading Exceptional Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Lee Ann; Guskey, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Teachers often grapple with the challenge of giving report card grades to students with learning disabilities and English language learners. The authors offer a five-step model that "offers a fair, accurate, and legal way to adapt the grading process for exceptional learners." The model begins with a high-quality reporting system for all students…

  4. Learner Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Xuexia

    2005-01-01

    @@ In the past, more attempts had been made to explore the ways for teachers to teach English but fewer for learners to learn the language. Learner analysis is to analyze "What the learner is", including age, attitude, motivation, intelligence,aptitude, personality , and etc, with the purpose to realize the transition from "teacher-centered" into "learner-oriented".

  5. Improving Outcomes for English Language Learners by Integrating Social Studies and Literacy with OCDE Project GLAD Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Elementary teachers are challenged to maximize instructional time to cover standards in all content areas and to meet a wide variety of student needs including students who are not proficient in English. This action research looks at how one fourth-grade teacher improved achievement for English Language Learners by integrating social studies into…

  6. A Litigation Trend Analysis of Case Law Outcomes Pertaining to the Educational Rights of English Learners: A Civil Rights Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racines, Delia Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The landmark 2001 No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act has been a step forward in federal policy for the ever-increasing population of English Learners (ELs), fostering inclusion in standards-based assessments and college and/or career-readiness efforts, yet, ELs continue to struggle academically. The current 5.4 million ELs make up the lowest…

  7. Teaching Reading Comprehension to Learners with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Predictors of Teacher Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, Amy L.; Finnegan, Elizabeth G.; Gulkus, Steven P.; Papay, Clare K.

    2017-01-01

    Learners with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often exhibit difficulty in the area of reading comprehension. Research connecting the learning needs of individuals with ASD, existing effective practices, teacher training, and teacher perceptions of their own ability to teach reading comprehension is scarce. Quantitative survey methodology and…

  8. Roles of Definitional and Assessment Models in the Identification of New or Second Language Learners of English for Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the efficacy of current definitional perspectives on learning disabilities (LD) and related assessment models to support appropriate instructional and support services for learners of English with learning-related difficulties. A revised framework for defining LD and an associated assessment model, curriculum-based dynamic…

  9. Strategies for Improving Learner Metacognition in Health Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Melissa S; Castleberry, Ashley N; Persky, Adam M

    2017-05-01

    Metacognition is an essential skill in critical thinking and self-regulated, lifelong learning. It is important for learners to have skills in metacognition because they are used to monitor and regulate reasoning, comprehension, and problem-solving, which are fundamental components/outcomes of pharmacy curricula. Instructors can help learners develop metacognitive skills within the classroom and experiential setting by carefully designing learning activities within courses and the curriculum. These skills are developed through intentional questioning, modeling techniques, and reflection. This article discusses key background literature on metacognition and identifies specific methods and strategies to develop learners' metacognitive skills in both the classroom and experiential settings.

  10. The healthy learner model for student chronic condition management--part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Cecelia DuPlessis; Splett, Patricia L; Mullett, Sara Stoltzfus; Heiman, Mary Bielski

    2006-12-01

    A significant number of children have chronic health conditions that interfere with normal activities, including school attendance and active participation in the learning process. Management of students' chronic conditions is complex and requires an integrated system. Models to improve chronic disease management have been developed for the medical system and public health. Programs that address specific chronic disease management or coordinate school health services have been implemented in schools. Lacking is a comprehensive, integrated model that links schools, students, parents, health care, and other community providers. The Healthy Learner Model for chronic condition management identifies seven elements for creating, implementing, and sustaining an efficient and effective, comprehensive community-based system for improving the management of chronic conditions for school children. It has provided the framework for successful chronic condition management in an urban school district and is proposed for replication in other districts and communities.

  11. Simulation modeling of outcomes and cost effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, S D; McIntosh, M; Etzioni, R; Urban, N

    2000-08-01

    Modeling will continue to be used to address important issues in clinical practice and health policy issues that have not been adequately studied with high-quality clinical trials. The apparent ad hoc nature of models belies the methodologic rigor that is applied to create the best models in cancer prevention and care. Models have progressed from simple decision trees to extremely complex microsimulation analyses, yet all are built using a logical process based on objective evaluation of the path between intervention and outcome. The best modelers take great care to justify both the structure and content of the model and then test their assumptions using a comprehensive process of sensitivity analysis and model validation. Like clinical trials, models sometimes produce results that are later found to be invalid as other data become available. When weighing the value of models in health care decision making, it is reasonable to consider the alternatives. In the absence of data, clinical policy decisions are often based on the recommendations of expert opinion panels or on poorly defined notions of the standard of care or medical necessity. Because such decision making rarely entails the rigorous process of data collection, synthesis, and testing that is the core of well-conducted modeling, it is usually not possible for external audiences to examine the assumptions and data that were used to derive the decisions. One of the modeler's most challenging tasks is to make the structure and content of the model transparent to the intended audience. The purpose of this article is to clarify the process of modeling, so that readers of models are more knowledgeable about their uses, strengths, and limitations.

  12. Beyond the blank slate: routes to learning new coordination patterns depend on the intrinsic dynamics of the learner-experimental evidence and theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrubiec, Viviane; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio; Fuchs, Armin; Kelso, J A Scott

    2012-01-01

    Using an approach that combines experimental studies of bimanual movements to visual stimuli and theoretical modeling, the present paper develops a dynamical account of sensorimotor learning, that is, how new skills are acquired and old ones modified. A significant aspect of our approach is the focus on the individual learner as the basic unit of analysis, in particular the quantification of predispositions and capabilities that the individual learner brings to the learning environment. Such predispositions constitute the learner's behavioral repertoire, captured here theoretically as a dynamical landscape ("intrinsic dynamics"). The learning process is demonstrated to not only lead to a relatively permanent improvement of performance in the required task-the usual outcome-but also to alter the individual's entire repertoire. Changes in the dynamical landscape due to learning are shown to result from two basic mechanisms or "routes": bifurcation and shift. Which mechanism is selected depends the initial individual repertoire before new learning begins. Both bifurcation and shift mechanisms are accommodated by a dynamical model, a relatively straightforward development of the well-established HKB model of movement coordination. Model simulations show that although environmental or task demands may be met equally well using either mechanism, the bifurcation route results in greater stabilization of the to-be-learned behavior. Thus, stability not (or not only) error is demonstrated to be the basis of selection, both of a new pattern of behavior and the path (smooth shift versus abrupt qualitative change) that learning takes. In line with these results, recent neurophysiological evidence indicates that stability is a relevant feature around which brain activity is organized while an individual performs a coordination task. Finally, we explore the consequences of the dynamical approach to learning for theories of biological change.

  13. Evolution of the social-learner-explorer strategy in an environmentally heterogeneous two-island model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kenichi

    2010-09-01

    Social-learner-explorer (SE) is a learning strategy that combines accurate social learning with exploratory individual learning in that order. Arguably, it is one of the few plausible learning strategies that can support cumulative culture. We investigate numerically the factors that affect the evolution of SE in an environmentally heterogeneous two-island model. Conditions favorable to the evolution of SE include a small exogenous cost of social learning, the occurrence of migration after social learning but before individual learning, the ability to adaptively modify the behavioral phenotype in the postmigration environment (asymmetrical individual learning), and a relatively high migration rate. The implications of our model for the evolution of SE in humans are discussed. Of particular interest is the prediction that behaviors affecting fitness would have to be socially learned in the natal environment and then subsequently modified by individual learning in the postmigration environment, suggesting a life-cycle stage dependent reliance on the two types of learning.

  14. Collaborative Language Learning in Immersive Virtual Worlds: Competence-based Formative Feedback and Open Learner Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Kickmeier-Rust

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The uptake of information and communication technologies in the classrooms is a key trend over the past years and decades. Teachers are using Moodle courses, e-Portfolios, Google Docs, perhaps learning games or virtual worlds such as OpenSim for educational purposes. A second trend pushes towards a formatively inspired assessment and feedback, often combined with attempts of educational data mining and learning analytics. In this paper we present a role model for teaching English as a second language using OpenSim and a tool that enables teachers to perform real-time learning analytics and direct formative feedback and interventions in the virtual learning session. Also we present an approach to aggregate and store the learning information into open learner models.

  15. Fostering the Development of Master Adaptive Learners: A Conceptual Model to Guide Skill Acquisition in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrer, William B; Miller, Bonnie; Pusic, Martin V; Mejicano, George; Mangrulkar, Rajesh S; Gruppen, Larry D; Hawkins, Richard E; Skochelak, Susan E; Moore, Donald E

    2017-01-01

    Change is ubiquitous in health care, making continuous adaptation necessary for clinicians to provide the best possible care to their patients. The authors propose that developing the capabilities of a Master Adaptive Learner will provide future physicians with strategies for learning in the health care environment and for managing change more effectively. The concept of a Master Adaptive Learner describes a metacognitive approach to learning based on self-regulation that can foster the development and use of adaptive expertise in practice. The authors describe a conceptual literature-based model for a Master Adaptive Learner that provides a shared language to facilitate exploration and conversation about both successes and struggles during the learning process.

  16. The Effect of Dual-Language and Transitional-Bilingual Education Instructional Models on Spanish Proficiency for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Audrey Figueroa

    2014-01-01

    The effects of "transitional-bilingual" and "dual-language" educational models on proficiency in students' home language (Spanish) were examined in a study of English language learners in the first and second grades in a large urban elementary school. In each grade, students were taught with either a transitional-bilingual…

  17. A Capstone Project: Closing the Achievement Gap of English Language Learners at Sunshine Elementary School Using the Gap Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingo-Long, Enyetta

    2013-01-01

    This project was an alternative capstone dissertation conducted by a team of three doctoral students. The project focused on systematic and long-term underachievement of the English Language Learner (ELL) population of a single school, Sunshine Elementary, using the gap analysis model (Clark and Estes, 2008). More specifically, the purpose of the…

  18. An Empirical Study on the Productive Vocabulary of Advanced Chinese EFL Learners-Based on A Contras-tive Analysis of model Compositions of Advanced Chinese EFL Learners and American university Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ai-Hua

    2013-01-01

    By contrasting the model compositions by advanced Chinese EFL learners and American university students in the cor⁃pus approach, the present study analyzes the use of productive vocabulary by Chinese EFL learners both quantitatively and qualita⁃tively. It is found that except the first 1000 most frequently used words, there is no statistically significant difference between the frequency distribution of the productive vocabulary used by both types of English learners. But in terms of the usages of the Eng⁃lish words, the Chinese EFL learners exhibit inadequacy in understanding and employing them, especially with regard to semantic prosody and collocation. These findings are significant for the teaching of vocabulary in China.

  19. A Structural Equation Modeling of EFL Learners' Goal Orientation, Metacognitive Awareness, and Self-efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Zafarmand

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out to examine the relationship between EFL learners' goal orientation, metacognitive awareness and self-efficacy in a single framework. One hundred fifteen EFL students from two universities of Mashhad, a city in north-eastern Iran took part in this study. Structural equation modeling (SEM was utilized to examine the hypothesized relations. The results of SEM demonstrated that among goal orientations, mastery goal is a positive and significant predictor of metacognitive awareness. It also positively and significantly predicts self-efficacy. Furthermore, it was found that metacognitive awareness has a positive and significant role in self-efficacy. The results of correlation between subscales of metacognitive awareness and mastery goal indicated that the highest correlations were found between mastery goal, planning and monitoring. Identical analysis for performance goal revealed that there are significant but weak correlations between performance goal and declarative and procedural knowledge.

  20. Applying the milestones in an internal medicine residency program curriculum: a foundation for outcomes-based learner assessment under the next accreditation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Becky N; Vansaghi, Lisa M; Rigler, Sally K; Stites, Steven W

    2013-11-01

    In 2010, University of Kansas Medical Center internal medicine residency program leaders concluded that their competency-based curriculum and evaluation system was not sufficient to promote accurate assessment of learners' performance and needed revision to meet the requirements of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Next Accreditation System (NAS). Evaluations of learners seldom referenced existing curricular goals and objectives and reflected an "everyone is exceptional, no one is satisfactory" view.The authors identified the American Board of Internal Medicine and ACGME's Developmental Milestones for Internal Medicine Residency Training as a published standard for resident development. They incorporated the milestones into templates, a format that could be modified for individual rotations. A milestones-based curriculum for each postgraduate year of training and every rotation was then created, with input from educational leaders within each division in the Department of Internal Medicine and with the support of the graduate medical education office.In this article, the authors share their implementation process, which took approximately one year, and discuss their current work to create a documentation system for direct observation of entrustable professional activities, with the aim of providing guidance to other programs challenged with developing an outcomes-based curriculum and assessment system within the time frame of the NAS.

  1. Outcome Modeling Using Clinical DVH Data

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, JJ

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the ability of correlation and regression analysis to extract the normal lung dose-response function from dose volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods: A local injury model is adopted, in which radiation-induced damage (functional loss) G is the integral of the DVH with function R(D). RP risk is H(G) where H() is the sigmoid cumulative distribution of functional reserve. RP incidence is a Bernoulli function of risk. A homogeneous patient cohort is assumed, allowing non-dose-related factors to be ignored. Clinically realistic DVHs are combined with the injury model to simulate RP data. Results: Correlation analysis is often used to identify predictor variables that are correlated with outcome, for inclusion in a predictive model. In the local injury model, all DVH metrics VD contribute to damage. Correlation analysis therefore has limited value. The subset of VD significantly correlated with incidence varies randomly from trial to trial due to random variations in the DVH set, and does not ne...

  2. BROA: An agent-based model to recommend relevant Learning Objects from Repository Federations adapted to learner profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Rodríguez

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Learning Objects (LOs are distinguished from traditional educational resources for their easy and quickly availability through Web-based repositories, from which they are accessed through their metadata. In addition, having a user profile allows an educational recommender system to help the learner to find the most relevant LOs based on their needs and preferences. The aim of this paper is to propose an agent-based model so-called BROA to recommend relevant LOs recovered from Repository Federations as well as LOs adapted to learner profile. The model proposed uses both role and service models of GAIA methodology, and the analysis models of the MAS-CommonKADS methodology. A prototype was built based on this model and validated to obtain some assessing results that are finally presented.

  3. Toward a Unified Modeling of Learner's Growth Process and Flow Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challco, Geiser C.; Andrade, Fernando R. H.; Borges, Simone S.; Bittencourt, Ig I.; Isotani, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Flow is the affective state in which a learner is so engaged and involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter. In this sense, to help students in the skill development and knowledge acquisition (referred to as learners' growth process) under optimal conditions, the instructional designers should create learning scenarios that favor…

  4. Words as alleles: connecting language evolution with Bayesian learners to models of genetic drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reali, Florencia; Griffiths, Thomas L

    2010-02-07

    Scientists studying how languages change over time often make an analogy between biological and cultural evolution, with words or grammars behaving like traits subject to natural selection. Recent work has exploited this analogy by using models of biological evolution to explain the properties of languages and other cultural artefacts. However, the mechanisms of biological and cultural evolution are very different: biological traits are passed between generations by genes, while languages and concepts are transmitted through learning. Here we show that these different mechanisms can have the same results, demonstrating that the transmission of frequency distributions over variants of linguistic forms by Bayesian learners is equivalent to the Wright-Fisher model of genetic drift. This simple learning mechanism thus provides a justification for the use of models of genetic drift in studying language evolution. In addition to providing an explicit connection between biological and cultural evolution, this allows us to define a 'neutral' model that indicates how languages can change in the absence of selection at the level of linguistic variants. We demonstrate that this neutral model can account for three phenomena: the s-shaped curve of language change, the distribution of word frequencies, and the relationship between word frequencies and extinction rates.

  5. A Comparative Study of the Effects of the Neurocognitive-Based Model and the Conventional Model on Learner Attention, Working Memory and Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikoon, Sanit; Bunterm, Tassanee; Nethanomsak, Teerachai; Ngang, Tang Keow

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The attention, working memory, and mood of learners are the most important abilities in the learning process. This study was concerned with the comparison of contextualized attention, working memory, and mood through a neurocognitive-based model (5P) and a conventional model (5E). It sought to examine the significant change in attention,…

  6. Systems-Oriented Workplace Learning Experiences for Early Learners: Three Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Bridget C; Bachhuber, Melissa R; Teherani, Arianne; Iker, Theresa M; Batt, Joanne; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2017-05-01

    Early workplace learning experiences may be effective for learning systems-based practice. This study explores systems-oriented workplace learning experiences (SOWLEs) for early learners to suggest a framework for their development. The authors used a two-phase qualitative case study design. In Phase 1 (spring 2014), they prepared case write-ups based on transcribed interviews from 10 SOWLE leaders at the authors' institution and, through comparative analysis of cases, identified three SOWLE models. In Phase 2 (summer 2014), studying seven 8-week SOWLE pilots, the authors used interview and observational data collected from the seven participating medical students, two pharmacy students, and site leaders to construct case write-ups of each pilot and to verify and elaborate the models. In Model 1, students performed specific patient care activities that addressed a system gap. Some site leaders helped students connect the activities to larger systems problems and potential improvements. In Model 2, students participated in predetermined systems improvement (SI) projects, gaining experience in the improvement process. Site leaders had experience in SI and often had significant roles in the projects. In Model 3, students worked with key stakeholders to develop a project and conduct a small test of change. They experienced most elements of an improvement cycle. Site leaders often had experience with SI and knew how to guide and support students' learning. Each model could offer systems-oriented learning opportunities provided that key elements are in place including site leaders facile in SI concepts and able to guide students in SOWLE activities.

  7. Addressing diverse learner preferences and intelligences with emerging technologies: Matching models to online opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Zhang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper critically reviews various learning preferences and human intelligence theories and models with a particular focus on the implications for online learning. It highlights a few key models, Gardner’s multiple intelligences, Fleming and Mills’ VARK model, Honey and Mumford’s Learning Styles, and Kolb’s Experiential Learning Model, and attempts to link them to trends and opportunities in online learning with emerging technologies. By intersecting such models with online technologies, it offers instructors and instructional designers across educational sectors and situations new ways to think about addressing diverse learner needs, backgrounds, and expectations. Learning technologies are important for effective teaching, as are theories and models and theories of learning. We argue that more immense power can be derived from connections between the theories, models and learning technologies. Résumé : Cet article passe en revue de manière critique les divers modèles et théories sur les préférences d’apprentissage et l’intelligence humaine, avec un accent particulier sur les implications qui en découlent pour l’apprentissage en ligne. L’article présente quelques-uns des principaux modèles (les intelligences multiples de Gardner, le modèle VAK de Fleming et Mills, les styles d’apprentissage de Honey et Mumford et le modèle d’apprentissage expérientiel de Kolb et tente de les relier à des tendances et occasions d’apprentissage en ligne qui utilisent les nouvelles technologies. En croisant ces modèles avec les technologies Web, les instructeurs et concepteurs pédagogiques dans les secteurs de l’éducation ou en situation éducationnelle se voient offrir de nouvelles façons de tenir compte des divers besoins, horizons et attentes des apprenants. Les technologies d’apprentissage sont importantes pour un enseignement efficace, tout comme les théories et les modèles d’apprentissage. Nous sommes d

  8. Opportunities and Outcomes: The Role of Peers in Developing the Oral Academic English Proficiency of Adolescent English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhill-Poza, Avary

    2015-01-01

    Although researchers often acknowledge the importance of linguistically rich interactions in the academic language development of emergent bilingual students, few studies have explicitly examined the role of linguistic peer support and the underlying structure of social relationships in the second language learning experiences and outcomes of…

  9. Beyond the blank slate: routes to learning new coordination patterns depend on the intrinsic dynamics of the learner —experimental evidence and theoretical model

    OpenAIRE

    Viviane eKostrubiec; pier-Giorgio eZanone; Armin eFuchs; J. A. Scott eKelso

    2012-01-01

    Using an approach that combines experimental studies of bimanual movements to visual stimuli and theoretical modeling, the present paper develops a dynamical account of sensorimotor learning, that is, how new skills are acquired and old ones modified. A significant aspect of our approach is the focus on the individual learner as the basic unit of analysis, in particular the quantification of predispositions and capabilities that the individual learner brings to the learning environment. Such ...

  10. Selection of magister learners in nursing science at the Rand Afrikaans University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Botes

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Selection of learners implies that candidates are assessed according to criteria with the purpose of selecting the most suitable learners for the course. A magister qualification is on level 8A of the National Qualifications Framework (NQF. The purpose of a magister qualification in Nursing is the development of advanced research, clinical, professional, managerial, educational, leadership and consultative abilities (knowledge, skills, values and attitudes for the promotion of individual, family, group and community health. From the above introduction it becomes clear that there is a high expectations of a person with a magister qualification. Such a person should be a specialist, scientist, leader and role model in the profession. A magister programme is human-power intensive as well as capital intensive for both the learner and higher education institutions. It is therefore important to select learners with the ability to achieve the outcomes of the programme. Limited research has been conducted on the selection of post graduate learners.

  11. Neoliberalism, the Knowledge Economy, and the Learner: Challenging the Inevitability of the Commodified Self as an Outcome of Education

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick, F

    2013-01-01

    Neoliberalism is now a globalised agenda that underpins educational strategy and policy in many nations. The evolution of the concept of the knowledge economy and of the knowledge worker has been allied to the rise of neoliberalism as an end with respect to educational processes. This review article considers the ways in which constructs of the knowledge economy within a neoliberal agenda have given rise to specific discourses and conceptualisations of educational outcomes and aims. In partic...

  12. Geodiversity, Geoheritage and Geomatics: interactions for a new learner-based geoeducational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magagna, Alessandra; Giardino, Marco; Perotti, Luigi; Ferrero, Elena

    2016-04-01

    The increasing sensitivity among the academics towards a holistic approach to Geoheritage and Geodiversity implies the involvement of society in geoscience topics. The mixture of social values and features related to Geodiversity predisposes for the design of educational projects based on experimental and cooperative activities with local communities. Moreover, the first step towards an effective geoconservation action plan is by raising public awareness of the value of Geodiversity (Carrada 2006; Gray 2011, 2013; Henriques et al. 2011). By taking awareness of the spatial and temporal scales related to landforms and geomorphical processes, as well as to Man-Nature interactions, we want help people to realize the "dynamic dimension" of Geodiversity and its role as archive of the memory of the Earth. As a consequence, people will be enabled to perceive the geomorphological environment as a system changing over time and as fragile Geoheritage, therefore worthy of protection. In this context, during four years of a PhD research, a series of actions have been designed and tested to implement innovative educational practices for spreading Geodiversity and Geoheritage awareness, by integrating geoscience knowledge, geoconservation principles, learner-based educational approaches, geomatics tools, ICTs, and geoethics. More than 300 secondary school students and their teachers have been therefore involved in monitored educational activities developed in a variety of areas in the Piemonte Region (NW Italy): the Susa and the Sangone Valleys, the Morainic Amphiteatre of Ivrea, and the Sesia Val Grande Geopark. Results based on data form analysis confirmed the use of familiar, informal, and friendly ICTs devices (smartphones, tablets and PCs) being effective in encouraging students to approach Geodiversity. For achieving successful results the use of ICTs has to be: 1. learner centered (Mayer 2009). It is fundamental to propose them within a well-designed educational project

  13. Development of a caregiver empowerment model to promote positive outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patricia S; Winslow, Betty W; Lee, Jerry W; Burns, Margaret; Zhang, Xinwei Esther

    2011-02-01

    Family members caring for aging parents experience both negative and positive outcomes from providing care. Theoretical explanations for negative outcomes have been developed. There is need for models that explain and predict positive outcomes. This article describes the evolution of the Caregiver Empowerment Model (CEM) to explain and predict positive outcomes of family caregiving. Although empirical findings support positive outcomes of family caregiving, less attention has been given to theoretical rationale for positive effects. The CEM predicts that, in the presence of filial values and certain background variables, caregiving demands are appraised as challenges instead of stressors. Appraising caregiving demands as a challenge, finding meaning, and using certain types of coping strategies are posited to be associated with growth and well-being. The CEM extends our understanding of the complexity of the caregiving experience, and can serve as a framework to guide in developing and testing theory-based interventions to promote positive outcomes.

  14. Using Growth Models to Measure School Performance: Implications for Gifted Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryser, Gail R.; Rambo-Hernandez, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    Using assessment data to determine student growth has become an integral part of the accountability movement, and researchers and educators are currently examining how new rules impact the academic assessment of gifted learners. In 2008, the Association for the Gifted's Annual Symposium at the Council for Exceptional Children Convention focused on…

  15. Integrating Scaffolding Strategies into Technology-Enhanced Assessments of English Learners: Task Types and Measurement Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Mikyung Kim; Guzman-Orth, Danielle; Lopez, Alexis; Castellano, Katherine; Himelfarb, Igor; Tsutagawa, Fred S.

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates ways to improve the assessment of English learner students' English language proficiency given the current movement of creating next-generation English language proficiency assessments in the Common Core era. In particular, this article discusses the integration of scaffolding strategies, which are prevalently utilized as…

  16. Learners' Ensemble Based Security Conceptual Model for M-Learning System in Malaysian Higher Learning Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Sheila; Abdollah, Faizal Mohd; Sahib, Shahrin

    2014-01-01

    M-Learning has a potential to improve efficiency in the education sector and has a tendency to grow advance and transform the learning environment in the future. Yet there are challenges in many areas faced when introducing and implementing m-learning. The learner centered attribute in mobile learning implies deployment in untrustworthy learning…

  17. Response to Intervention for English Learners: Examining Models for Determining Response and Nonresponse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards-Tutor, Catherine; Solari, Emily J.; Leafstedt, Jill M.; Gerber, Michael M.; Filippini, Alexis; Aceves, Terese C.

    2013-01-01

    Using extant data, the purpose of this study is to examine methods for determining response to intervention (RTI) in a sample of kindergarten English Learners (ELs). Three commonly used methods for determining RTI--(a) benchmark criteria, (b) slope discrepancy, and (c) dual discrepancy--are investigated. Participants included 117 ELs. Students…

  18. Integrating Scaffolding Strategies into Technology-Enhanced Assessments of English Learners: Task Types and Measurement Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Mikyung Kim; Guzman-Orth, Danielle; Lopez, Alexis; Castellano, Katherine; Himelfarb, Igor; Tsutagawa, Fred S.

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates ways to improve the assessment of English learner students' English language proficiency given the current movement of creating next-generation English language proficiency assessments in the Common Core era. In particular, this article discusses the integration of scaffolding strategies, which are prevalently utilized as…

  19. A Basic Hybrid Library Support Model to Distance Learners in Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Omer Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Distance learning has flourished in Sudan during the last two decades; more and more higher education institutions offer distance learning programmes to off-campus students. Like on-campus students, distance learners should have access to appropriate library and information support services. They also have specific needs for library and…

  20. Valuing the Adult Learner in E-Learning: A Conceptual Model for Corporate Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waight, Consuelo L.; Stewart, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The framework describes that e-Learning engagement, learning and transfer within corporate settings can possibly be achieved if antecedents such as needs assessment, learner analysis, for example, and moderators such as return on investment, learning theories, for example, are adhered. The realization of antecedents and moderators, however, are…

  1. Modelling Learners' Cognitive, Affective, and Social Processes through Language and Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, Nia M. M.; Graesser, Arthur C.

    2014-01-01

    An emerging trend toward computer-mediated collaborative learning environments promotes lively exchanges between learners in order to facilitate learning. Discourse can play an important role in enhancing epistemology, pedagogy, and assessments in these environments. In this paper, we highlight some of our recent work showing the advantages using…

  2. The Model of ICT-Based Career Information Services and Decision-Making Ability of Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syakir, Muhammad; Mahmud, Alimuddin; Achmad, Arifin

    2016-01-01

    One of the impacts of information technology in guidance counseling is in the implementation of the support system. Entering the world of globalization and rapid technological breadth of information requires counseling to adjust to the environment in order to meet the needs of learners. Therefore, cyber-counseling is now developing. It is one of…

  3. Technology and Student Learning: Toward a Learner-Centered Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Onchwari, Grace; Onchwari, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    There is need to reform teacher education programs through the creation of active learning environments that support and improve the depth and scope of student learning. Specifically, teachers should provide intellectually powerful, learner-centered, and technology-rich environments for students without undermining sound pedagogical practices.…

  4. Discrete event simulation: Modeling simultaneous complications and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quik, E.H.; Feenstra, T.L.; Krabbe, P.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present an effective and elegant model approach to deal with specific characteristics of complex modeling. METHODS: A discrete event simulation (DES) model with multiple complications and multiple outcomes that each can occur simultaneously was developed. In this DES model parameters,

  5. Learner Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Drachsler, H., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012). Learner Characteristics. In N. M. Seel (Ed.), Encyclopedia of the Sciences of Learning, Volume 4 (pp. 1743-1745). New York: Springer. DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4419-1428-6_347

  6. Analysis of undergraduate students' conceptual models of a complex biological system across a diverse body of learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirnbeck, Matthew R.

    Biological systems pose a challenge both for learners and teachers because they are complex systems mediated by feedback loops; networks of cause-effect relationships; and non-linear, hierarchical, and emergent properties. Teachers and scientists routinely use models to communicate ideas about complex systems. Model-based pedagogies engage students in model construction as a means of practicing higher-order reasoning skills. One such modeling paradigm describes systems in terms of their structures, behaviors, and functions (SBF). The SBF framework is a simple modeling language that has been used to teach about complex biological systems. Here, we used student-generated SBF models to assess students' causal reasoning in the context of a novel biological problem on an exam. We compared students' performance on the modeling problem, their performance on a set of knowledge/comprehension questions, and their performance on a set of scientific reasoning questions. We found that students who performed well on knowledge and understanding questions also constructed more networked, higher quality models. Previous studies have shown that learners' mental maps increase in complexity with increased expertise. We wanted to investigate if biology students with varying levels of training in biology showed a similar pattern when constructing system models. In a pilot study, we administered the same modeling problem to two additional groups of students: 1) an animal physiology course for students pursuing a major in biology (n=37) and 2) an exercise physiology course for non-majors (n=27). We found that there was no significant difference in model organization across the three student populations, but there was a significant difference in the ability to represent function between the three populations. Between the three groups the non-majors had the lowest function scores, the introductory majors had the middle function scores, and the upper division majors had the highest function

  7. Flexible provisioning for adult learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Henry; Janssen, José; Vogten, Hubert; Koper, Rob

    2014-01-01

    In adult education there is a continuous, growing demand for learning opportunities that fit the specific characteristics and preferences of particular learner groups or individual learners. This requires educational institutions to rethink their business and educational models, and develop more fle

  8. Flexible provisioning for adult learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Henry; Janssen, José; Vogten, Hubert; Koper, Rob

    2014-01-01

    In adult education there is a continuous, growing demand for learning opportunities that fit the specific characteristics and preferences of particular learner groups or individual learners. This requires educational institutions to rethink their business and educational models, and develop more fle

  9. Integral-Value Models for Outcomes over Continuous Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvey, Charles M.; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    Models of preferences between outcomes over continuous time are important for individual, corporate, and social decision making, e.g., medical treatment, infrastructure development, and environmental regulation. This paper presents a foundation for such models. It shows that conditions...... on preferences between real- or vector-valued outcomes over continuous time are satisfied if and only if the preferences are represented by a value function having an integral form...

  10. Secondary school teachers' experiences of teaching pregnant learners in Limpopo Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sogo F Matlala

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a study on the experiences of secondary school teachers on teaching pregnant learners in Limpopo Province. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual design was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten purposively selected secondary school teachers. Data analysis yielded six themes, which are: (1 identification of pregnant learners; (2 continuation of pregnant learners' school career; (3 dilemmas related to school-attending pregnant learners; (4 support of school-attending pregnant learners; (5 gender in pregnancy caretaking; and (6 communication and cooperation between teachers and parents. Teachers experienced challenges in identifying pregnant learners, and to meet their health needs as they lacked health related skills. Parents were not always cooperative towards teachers. It can be concluded that teachers face many dilemmas related to pregnant learners, and this requires a health facilitation model to enable teachers to assist pregnant learners such that they might better benefit from their schooling, and experience a positive health outcome.

  11. Using the instructional congruence model to change a science teacher's practices and English language learners' attitudes and achievement in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salame, Hania Moussa

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of adapting the instructional congruence model on the English Language Learners' (ELL) attitudes and achievement in science. Changes in teacher's views and practices were documented. The mixed-method approach was adapted. Data sources were the "Attitude Towards Science" survey, VNOS-C questionnaire, Luykx and Lee (2007) observational instrument, Gee (1997) discussion categories, video recordings, and pre- and post-tests. A science teacher and a class of 24 ELL female students in a charter school participated in this research. The results of this study indicated that student achievement increased significantly and students' attitudes improved in all contexts. At the conclusion of the study, all teacher's views on NOS were reported to be informed, teacher's practices were rated higher, and different classroom interactions increased significantly. The instructional congruence model in science education has been successful in reaching different learners, improving students' attitudes and achievement in science and enhancing teacher's views and practices. This model has significant potential for meeting the challenging goals of reformed science education.

  12. Bayesian Network Models for Local Dependence among Observable Outcome Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Russell G.; Mulder, Joris; Hemat, Lisa A.; Yan, Duanli

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian network models offer a large degree of flexibility for modeling dependence among observables (item outcome variables) from the same task, which may be dependent. This article explores four design patterns for modeling locally dependent observations: (a) no context--ignores dependence among observables; (b) compensatory context--introduces…

  13. Is different better? Models of teaching and their influence on the net financial outcome for general practice teaching posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In Australia, training for general practice (GP) occurs within private practices and their involvement in teaching can have significant financial costs. At the same time there are growing demands for clinical places for all disciplines and for GP there is concern that there are insufficient teaching practices to meet the demand at the medical student, prevocational and vocational training levels. One option to address this may be to change how teaching occurs in the practice. A question that arises in posing such an option is whether different models of teaching change the costs for a teaching practice. The aim of this study is to determine the net financial outcome of teaching models in private GP. Methods Modelling the financial implications for a range of teaching options using a costing framework developed from a survey of teaching practices in South Australia. Each option was compared with the traditional model of teaching where one GP supervisor is singularly responsible for one learner. The main outcome measure was net financial outcome per week. Decisions on the model cost parameters were made by the study's Steering Group which comprised of experienced GP supervisors. Four teaching models are presented. Model 1 investigates the gains from teaching multiple same level learners, Models 2 and 3, the benefits of vertically integrated teaching using different permutations, and Model 4 the concept of a GP teacher who undertakes all the teaching. Results There was a significant increase in net benefits of Aus$547 per week (95% confidence intervals $459, $668) to the practice when a GP taught two same level learners (Model 1) and when a senior registrar participated in teaching a prevocational doctor (Model 3, Aus$263, 95% confidence intervals $80, $570). For Model 2, a practice could significantly reduce the loss if a registrar was involved in vertically integrated teaching which included the training of a medical student (Aus$551, 95% confidence

  14. Is different better? Models of teaching and their influence on the net financial outcome for general practice teaching posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheah Carolyn

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Australia, training for general practice (GP occurs within private practices and their involvement in teaching can have significant financial costs. At the same time there are growing demands for clinical places for all disciplines and for GP there is concern that there are insufficient teaching practices to meet the demand at the medical student, prevocational and vocational training levels. One option to address this may be to change how teaching occurs in the practice. A question that arises in posing such an option is whether different models of teaching change the costs for a teaching practice. The aim of this study is to determine the net financial outcome of teaching models in private GP. Methods Modelling the financial implications for a range of teaching options using a costing framework developed from a survey of teaching practices in South Australia. Each option was compared with the traditional model of teaching where one GP supervisor is singularly responsible for one learner. The main outcome measure was net financial outcome per week. Decisions on the model cost parameters were made by the study's Steering Group which comprised of experienced GP supervisors. Four teaching models are presented. Model 1 investigates the gains from teaching multiple same level learners, Models 2 and 3, the benefits of vertically integrated teaching using different permutations, and Model 4 the concept of a GP teacher who undertakes all the teaching. Results There was a significant increase in net benefits of Aus$547 per week (95% confidence intervals $459, $668 to the practice when a GP taught two same level learners (Model 1 and when a senior registrar participated in teaching a prevocational doctor (Model 3, Aus$263, 95% confidence intervals $80, $570. For Model 2, a practice could significantly reduce the loss if a registrar was involved in vertically integrated teaching which included the training of a medical student (Aus

  15. A High School Intensive Summer Mandarin Course: Program Model and Learner Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoqiu; Padilla, Amado M.; Silva, Duarte; Masuda, Norman

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a STARTALK intensive summer high school Mandarin language and culture program that was conducted for three summers. Participants across the three years included 40 Mandarin Level II and 53 Mandarin Level III high school students. Quantitative and qualitative data are presented to show the effectiveness of the program.…

  16. Enhancing Learning Outcomes: The Internet Mirror Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    The author redesigned an undergraduate physiology course using a novel Internet mirror model: parallel lecture and Internet-based sections conducted so that students can move freely from one to the other (or choose both) during the semester. Within the constraints of this paradigm, he used technology to enhance student learning: adding…

  17. Bariatric Outcomes and Obesity Modeling: Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    from Picot et al ( HTA , 2009) BMI LOSS IS NON-LINEAR Source: Picot et al ( HTA , 2009) NATURAL HISTORY MODEL OVERVIEW Source: BOOM Research ANNUAL ESTIMATES...those above 30 BMI Source: BOOM Research ONE-WAY SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS Variables Reference values Minimum Maximum Early Mortality rate (%) 0.23 0 0.5... Early complication rate (%) 2.5 0 5 Sex F M F Age 45 18 70 BMI change at 5 years (%) 20% AGB or 30% GB -10% +10% Discount rate (%) 3 0 5 BMI at

  18. Α Markov model for longitudinal studies with incomplete dichotomous outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimiou, Orestis; Welton, Nicky; Samara, Myrto; Leucht, Stefan; Salanti, Georgia

    2017-03-01

    Missing outcome data constitute a serious threat to the validity and precision of inferences from randomized controlled trials. In this paper, we propose the use of a multistate Markov model for the analysis of incomplete individual patient data for a dichotomous outcome reported over a period of time. The model accounts for patients dropping out of the study and also for patients relapsing. The time of each observation is accounted for, and the model allows the estimation of time-dependent relative treatment effects. We apply our methods to data from a study comparing the effectiveness of 2 pharmacological treatments for schizophrenia. The model jointly estimates the relative efficacy and the dropout rate and also allows for a wide range of clinically interesting inferences to be made. Assumptions about the missingness mechanism and the unobserved outcomes of patients dropping out can be incorporated into the analysis. The presented method constitutes a viable candidate for analyzing longitudinal, incomplete binary data.

  19. Learner-oriented distance education supporting service system model and applied research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liyong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distance education is a product of social progress and an emerging way of life-long learning as well. This paper describes the construction of the distance education supporting service system and establishes the distance education supporting service system from the perspective of distance education learners. Under the premise of considering to provide six influencing factors--learning facilities, learning coaching and counseling, learning resources, education and teaching information, assessment of student learning situation and organization of practical teaching activities, this paper assesses the distance education supporting service system of Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen by using AHP.

  20. Preoperative prediction model of outcome after cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borly, L; Anderson, I B; Bardram, Linda

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstone disease 20%-30% of the patients continue to have abdominal pain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether preoperative variables could predict the symptomatic outcome after cholecystectomy. METHODS: One hundred and two patients...... and sonography evaluated gallbladder motility, gallstones, and gallbladder volume. Preoperative variables in patients with or without postcholecystectomy pain were compared statistically, and significant variables were combined in a logistic regression model to predict the postoperative outcome. RESULTS: Eighty...

  1. Integral-Value Models for Outcomes over Continuous Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvey, Charles M.; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    Models of preferences between outcomes over continuous time are important for individual, corporate, and social decision making, e.g., medical treatment, infrastructure development, and environmental regulation. This paper presents a foundation for such models. It shows that conditions on prefere...

  2. Physiotherapy and low back pain - part iii: outcomes research utilising the biosychosocial model: psychosocial outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Bardin

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of low back pain (LBPhas evolved that necessitates the use of a biopsychosocial model, focusing on illness rather than disease and incorporating the biological, psychological and social aspects that are important to understand and to study LBP in its chronic form. Traditional outcome measures that measure elements within the biological component are limited to assess the spectrum of impacts caused by chronic low back pain (CLBP and the validity, reliability and sensitivity of some of these measures has been questioned.Few physiologic tests of spine function are clinically meaningful to patients, objective physical findings can be absent, and in CLBP disability and activity intolerance are often disproportional to the original injury. Biological outcomes should be complemented by outcomes of the psychosocial aspects of back pain that measure the considerable functional and emotional impact on the quality of life of patients experiencing low back dysfunction. Outcomes research is an analysis of clinical practice as it actually occurs and can  make a valuable contribution to understanding the multidimensional impact of LBP. Psychosocial aspects of the biopsychosocial model for outcomes research are discussed in part III: functional status/disability, psychological impairment, patient satisfaction, health related quality of life

  3. Roles of definitional and assessment models in the identification of new or second language learners of English for special education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the efficacy of current definitional perspectives on learning disabilities (LD) and related assessment models to support appropriate instructional and support services for learners of English with learning-related difficulties. A revised framework for defining LD and an associated assessment model, curriculum-based dynamic assessment (CDA), are proposed. The results of a teacher assessment study are reported to exemplify how this revised framework may be studied. The study examined the following questions: (a) Can curriculum-based dynamic assessments of authentic learning tasks help educators to differentiate between the work of students with limited English proficiency and their peers identified as having LD? (b) What are the characteristics of curriculum-based work samples of limited English proficient students with LD that may predictably differentiate them from their peers without LD?

  4. The Evolving Military Learner Population: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kate; Vignare, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This literature review examines the evolving online military learner population with emphasis on current generation military learners, who are most frequently Post-9/11 veterans. The review synthesizes recent scholarly and grey literature on military learner demographics and attributes, college experiences, and academic outcomes against a backdrop…

  5. The expected-outcome model of two-player games

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The Expected-Outcome Model of Two-Player Games deals with the expected-outcome model of two-player games, in which the relative merit of game-tree nodes, rather than board positions, is considered. The ambiguity of static evaluation and the problems it generates in the search system are examined and the development of a domain-independent static evaluator is described. Comprised of eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of the rationale for the mathematical study of games, followed by a discussion on some previous artificial intelligence (AI) research efforts on game-trees. The nex

  6. Overview of cost-consequence modeling in outcomes research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergachis, A

    1995-01-01

    Outcomes research has developed in response to the need for information on costs, risks, and benefits of clinical treatments, including data regarding the effectiveness of prescription drugs. It attempts to consider more than the biologic effects of pharmaceuticals, that is, to encompass wider measures of the results of their use, issues that are not routinely addressed during clinical trials. Cost-effectiveness analysis compares the outcome of different treatment options in terms of monetary cost per unit of effectiveness. Examples of measures of effectiveness are years of life saved, number of days of hospitalization avoided, and number of treatment successes. Cost-consequence models, also referred to as cost-outcome models, deal with costs and a variety of outcomes ranging from clinical to humanistic. Direct medical costs are those for prevention, detection, treatment, and rehabilitation; they are amounts spent to treat an illness, including hospitalization, professional services, pharmaceuticals, and medical supplies. Indirect medical costs are associated with changes in productivity, such as earnings lost because of illness. Humanistic outcomes deal primarily with functional status, quality of life, and satisfaction, and may include pain, anxiety, self-esteem, ability to carry out normal activities, and overall impressions. Since it is not possible to study all effects of treatments with clinical trials, modeling techniques are useful in making therapeutic decisions.

  7. He Waka Tino Whakarawea: A Model for Evaluating the Cultural Appropriateness and Effectiveness of Programmes and Services for Maori Learners both with and without Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan-Brown, Jill

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a waka tino whakarawea model for evaluating programmes and services for Maori learners. It is based on a set of underlying principles identified in the author's PhD study (Bevan-Brown, 2002). Explanations are provided for eight principles: kaupapa Maori; importance, relevance and beneficence; participation; empowerment,…

  8. Contributions of Individual Differences and Contextual Variables to Reading Achievement of English Language Learners: An Empirical Investigation Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardasheva, Yuliya; Tretter, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    This nonexperimental study explored the relationships among individual differences, contextual variables, and reading achievement of English language learners (ELLs) in one large urban school district in the United States. The sample comprised 840 students in Grades 3-8 and 10 nested within 37 schools. Hierarchical linear modeling results indicate…

  9. A Capstone Project Using the Gap Analysis Model: Closing the College Readiness Gap for Latino English Language Learners with a Focus on College Affordability and Student Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Michael A. T.

    2013-01-01

    This capstone dissertation inquiry project focused on the underperformance of English language learners (ELLs) at a high school. The Clark and Estes' (2008) gap analysis model was the analytical framework used to conduct this inquiry. At the request of the school, the inquiry focus was on gaining a better understanding of the underachievement…

  10. Exploring Shifts in Middle School Learners' Modeling Activity While Generating Drawings, Animations, and Computational Simulations of Molecular Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson-Jerde, Michelle H.; Gravel, Brian E.; Macrander, Christopher A.

    2015-04-01

    Modeling and using technology are two practices of particular interest to K-12 science educators. These practices are inextricably linked among professionals, who engage in modeling activity with and across a variety of representational technologies. In this paper, we explore the practices of five sixth-grade girls as they generated models of smell diffusion using drawing, stop-motion animation, and computational simulation during a multi-day workshop. We analyze video, student discourse, and artifacts to address the questions: In what ways did learners' modeling practices, reasoning about mechanism, and ideas about smell shift as they worked across this variety of representational technologies? And, what supports enabled them to persist and progress in the modeling activity? We found that the girls engaged in two distinct modeling cycles that reflected persistence and deepening engagement in the task. In the first, messing about, they focused on describing and representing many ideas related to the spread of smell at once. In the second, digging in, they focused on testing and revising specific mechanisms that underlie smell diffusion. Upon deeper analysis, we found these cycles were linked to the girls' invention of "oogtom," a representational object that encapsulated many ideas from the first cycle and allowed the girls to restart modeling with the mechanistic focus required to construct simulations. We analyze the role of activity design, facilitation, and technological infrastructure in this pattern of engagement over the course of the workshop and discuss implications for future research, curriculum design, and classroom practice.

  11. Beating the Drums for Attention: Proceedings and Outcomes of the Socrates/Grundtvig Network "International Adult Learners Week in Europe" (IntALWinE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochynek, Bettina, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Beating the Drums for Attention" is the metaphorical title chosen to reflect the continuous effort carried out by adult educators to promote learning, to encourage a joyful approach to it and to motivate learners to be part of and actively influence the overall reflexive process they are involved in. What carries the whole movement is…

  12. Graphical models for inference under outcome-dependent sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Didelez, V; Kreiner, S; Keiding, N

    2010-01-01

    a node for the sampling indicator, assumptions about sampling processes can be made explicit. We demonstrate how to read off such graphs whether consistent estimation of the association between exposure and outcome is possible. Moreover, we give sufficient graphical conditions for testing and estimating......We consider situations where data have been collected such that the sampling depends on the outcome of interest and possibly further covariates, as for instance in case-control studies. Graphical models represent assumptions about the conditional independencies among the variables. By including...

  13. Developing a Visual Temporal Modeller: Applying an Extensible NLP System to Support Learners' Understanding of Tense and Aspect in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerins, John; Ramsay, Allan

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a prototype tool which shows how learners can be helped to reflect upon the accuracy of their writing. Analysis of samples of freely written texts by intermediate and advanced learners of English as a foreign language (EFL) showed evidence of weakness in the use of tense and aspect. Computational discourse…

  14. Identity and the Itinerant Online Learner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Koole

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a preliminary study of the kinds of strategies that master students draw upon for interpreting and enacting their identities in online learning environments. Based primarily on the seminal works of Goffman (1959 and Foucault (1988, the Web of Identity Model (Koole, 2009; Koole and Parchoma, 2012 is used as an underlying theoretical framework for this research study. The WoI model suggests that there are five major categories of “dramaturgical” strategies: technical, political, structural, cultural, and personal-agential. In the data collection, five online master of education students participated in semi-structured, online interviews. Phenomenography guided the data collection and analysis resulting in an outcome space for each strategy of the WoI model. The study results indicate that online learners actively employ a variety of strategies in interpreting and enacting their identities. The outcome spaces provide insights into ways in which online learners can manage their identity performances and strategies for ontological re-alignment (reconceptualization of oneself. Further study has the potential to elucidate how learning designers and online instructors might facilitate such identity-work in order to shape productive online environments.

  15. Outcome Prediction in Mathematical Models of Immune Response to Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Mai

    Full Text Available Clinicians need to predict patient outcomes with high accuracy as early as possible after disease inception. In this manuscript, we show that patient-to-patient variability sets a fundamental limit on outcome prediction accuracy for a general class of mathematical models for the immune response to infection. However, accuracy can be increased at the expense of delayed prognosis. We investigate several systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs that model the host immune response to a pathogen load. Advantages of systems of ODEs for investigating the immune response to infection include the ability to collect data on large numbers of 'virtual patients', each with a given set of model parameters, and obtain many time points during the course of the infection. We implement patient-to-patient variability v in the ODE models by randomly selecting the model parameters from distributions with coefficients of variation v that are centered on physiological values. We use logistic regression with one-versus-all classification to predict the discrete steady-state outcomes of the system. We find that the prediction algorithm achieves near 100% accuracy for v = 0, and the accuracy decreases with increasing v for all ODE models studied. The fact that multiple steady-state outcomes can be obtained for a given initial condition, i.e. the basins of attraction overlap in the space of initial conditions, limits the prediction accuracy for v > 0. Increasing the elapsed time of the variables used to train and test the classifier, increases the prediction accuracy, while adding explicit external noise to the ODE models decreases the prediction accuracy. Our results quantify the competition between early prognosis and high prediction accuracy that is frequently encountered by clinicians.

  16. The Trauma Outcome Process Assessment Model: A Structural Equation Model Examination of Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Susan E.; Callahan, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    This investigation sought to operationalize a comprehensive theoretical model, the Trauma Outcome Process Assessment, and test it empirically with structural equation modeling. The Trauma Outcome Process Assessment reflects a robust body of research and incorporates known ecological factors (e.g., family dynamics, social support) to explain…

  17. Transformation in Higher Education: A Learner-Needs Segmentation Leads to Improved Learner Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Gayla; Finley, Donna S.; Patterson, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Segmentation is a marketing concept that can be applied in a post-secondary context. This article delineates the outcome of applying a learner-needs segmentation that resulted in significantly improved learner satisfaction scores in a professional faculty at a large public university. Our original work described the purpose and value of…

  18. Andragogical Modeling and the Success of the "EMPACTS" project-based learning model in the STEM disciplines: A decade of growth and learner success in the 2Y College Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. D.; Thomason, R.; Galloway, M.; Sorey, N.; Stidham, L.; Torgerson, M.

    2014-12-01

    EMPACTS (Educationally Managed Projects Advancing Curriculum, Technology/Teamwork and Service) is a project-based, adult learning modelthat is designed to enhance learning of course content through real-world application and problem solving self directed and collaborative learning use of technology service to the community EMPACTS students are self-directed in their learning, often working in teams to develop, implement, report and present final project results. EMPACTS faculty use community based projects to increase deeper learning of course content through "real-world" service experiences. Learners develop personal and interpersonal work and communication skills as they plan, execute and complete project goals together. Technology is used as a tool to solve problems and to publish the products of their learning experiences. Courses across a broad STEM curriculum integrate the EMPACTS project experience into the overall learning outcomes as part of the learning college mission of preparing 2Y graduates for future academic and/or workforce success. Since the program began in 2005, there have been over 200 completed projects/year. Student driven successes have led to the establishment of an EMPACTS Technology Corp, which is funded through scholarship and allows EMPACTS learners the opportunity to serve and learn from one another as "peer instructors." Engineering and 3D graphic design teams have written technology proposals and received funding for 3D printing replication projects, which have benefited the college as a whole through grant opportunities tied to these small scale successes. EMPACTS students engage in a variety of outreachprojects with area schools as they share the successes and joys of self directed, inquiry, project based learning. The EMPACTS Program has successfully trained faculty and students in the implementation of the model and conduct semester to semester and once a year workshops for college and K-12 faculty, who are interested in

  19. Student Perceptions of Learner-Centered Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeDe Wohlfarth

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The learner-centered paradigm departs from traditional teaching models by focusing on students more than teachers and learning more than teaching. Thus, classes are more egalitarian; they emphasize critical thinking, active learning, and real-world assignments. Graduate students in learner-centered classrooms were surveyed about perceptions of their experiences in relation to the key dimensions of the learner-centered paradigm and noted that the approach contributed to their feeling respected as learners, developed their critical thinking skills, and encouraged their self-directedness. Based on these findings, post-secondary instructors are encouraged to experiment with learning-centered approaches to further explore this promising model.

  20. Teaching Sociology Students to Become Qualitative-Researchers Using an Internship Model of Learner-Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolich, Martin; Scarth, Bonnie; Shephard, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the experiences of final year undergraduate sociology students enrolled in an internship course where they researched a local community project, mostly in small groups, for a client. A sociology lecturer supervised their projects. Course-related outcomes were assessed using conventional university procedures but a research…

  1. Economic evaluation of newborn hearing screening: modelling costs and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Voß, Hubertus

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The prevalence of newborn hearing disorders is 1-3 per 1,000. Crucial for later outcome are correct diagnosis and effective treatment as soon as possible. With BERA and TEOAE low-risk techniques for early detection are available. Universal screening is recommended but not realised in most European health care systems.Aim of the study was to examine the scientific evidence of newborn hearing screening and a comparison of medical outcome and costs of different programmes, differentiated by type of strategy (risk screening, universal screening, no systematical screening. Methods: In an interdisciplinary health technology assessment project all studies on newborn hearing screening detected in a standardized comprehensive literature search were identified and data on medical outcome, costs, and cost-effectiveness extracted. A Markov model was designed to calculate cost-effectiveness ratios. Results: Economic data were extracted from 20 relevant publications out of 39 publications found. In the model total costs for screening of 100,000 newborns with a time horizon of ten years were calculated: 2.0 Mio.€ for universal screening (U, 1.0 Mio.€ for risk screening (R, and 0.6 Mio.€ for no screening (N. The costs per child detected: 13,395€ (U respectively 6,715€ (R, and 4,125€ (N. At 6 months of life the following percentages of cases are detected: U 72%, R 43%, N 13%. Conclusions: A remarkable small number of economic publications mainly of low methodological quality was found. In our own model we found reasonable cost-effectiveness ratios also for universal screening. Considering the outcome advantages of higher numbers of detected cases a universal newborn hearing screening is recommended.

  2. The Assessment of Patient Clinical Outcome: Advantages, Models, Features of an Ideal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mou’ath Hourani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The assessment of patient clinical outcome focuses on measuring various aspects of the health status of a patient who is under healthcare intervention. Patient clinical outcome assessment is a very significant process in the clinical field as it allows health care professionals to better understand the effectiveness of their health care programs and thus for enhancing the health care quality in general. It is thus vital that a high quality, informative review of current issues regarding the assessment of patient clinical outcome should be conducted. Aims & Objectives: 1 Summarizes the advantages of the assessment of patient clinical outcome; 2 reviews some of the existing patient clinical outcome assessment models namely: Simulation, Markov, Bayesian belief networks, Bayesian statistics and Conventional statistics, and Kaplan-Meier analysis models; and 3 demonstrates the desired features that should be fulfilled by a well-established ideal patient clinical outcome assessment model. Material & Methods: An integrative review of the literature has been performed using the Google Scholar to explore the field of patient clinical outcome assessment. Conclusion: This paper will directly support researchers, clinicians and health care professionals in their understanding of developments in the domain of the assessment of patient clinical outcome, thus enabling them to propose ideal assessment models.

  3. Applying self-regulated strategy development model of instruction to teach writing skill: Effects on writing performance and writing motivation of EFL learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the effect of self-regulated strategy development (SRSD, an instructional model to teach writing, on writing performance and writing motivation of EFL learners. To this end, 30 pre-intermediate EFL writers received a ten-session self-regulatory strategy development instruction on persuasive writing with specific focus on planning, goal-setting, monitoring, and evaluating. Several instruments including persuasive probes together with a validated Writing Motivation Questionnaire were utilized to collect data. The comparison of pretest and posttest scores on different measures revealed that SRSD instructional model resulted in improved writing performance of EFL learners. Moreover, the results of data analysis indicated an increase in the motivation of participants as regards foreign language writing.

  4. Is it adequate to model the socio-cultural dimension of e-learners by informing a fixed set of personal criteria?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanchard, Emmanuel G.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, interest has increased in proposing efficient techniques to capture and model cognitive and affective characteristics of e-learners. More recently,research has started investigating the development of culturally-aware educational technology. Indeed, cultures are known...... to strongly impact how people interpret their surrounding environment, hence generating cognitive and affective biases that could impact computer-supported educational activities. Consequently, educational technologies trying to become culturally-aware need to develop a sociocultural model of their learner....... In this regard, many previous projects have used a fixed set of socio-cultural criteria. It is the purpose of this paper to show that this approach is not necessarily good since the acceptability and relevance of many criteria may vary from one cultural context to another...

  5. Modeling Achievement in Mathematics: The Role of Learner and Learning Environment Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser-Abu Alhija, Fadia; Amasha, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined a structural model of mathematics achievement among Druze 8th graders in Israel. The model integrates 2 psychosocial theories: goal theory and social learning theory. Variables in the model included gender, father's and mother's education, classroom mastery and performance goal orientation, mathematics self-efficacy and…

  6. Modeling Achievement in Mathematics: The Role of Learner and Learning Environment Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser-Abu Alhija, Fadia; Amasha, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined a structural model of mathematics achievement among Druze 8th graders in Israel. The model integrates 2 psychosocial theories: goal theory and social learning theory. Variables in the model included gender, father's and mother's education, classroom mastery and performance goal orientation, mathematics self-efficacy and…

  7. Using the Rasch model to develop a measure of second language learners' willingness to communicate within a language classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to use Rasch measurement to study the psychometric properties of a 34 item questionnaire designed to measure second language learners' willingness to communicate (WTC) in English inside their language class. 490 Japanese university students' responses to the questionnaire were subjected to a number of different analyses. The first involved a comparison of the category threshold estimates produced by the Rating Scale and Partial Credit models. The questionnaire's items were then evaluated according to how well they defined the willingness to communicate construct. The potential dimensionality of using items that involved different speaking and writing tasks/situations in order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of students' willingness to communicate was also investigated. Next there was an examination of the questionnaire's four-point scale to ensure that it captured meaningful differences in students' WTC. Finally, the questionnaire items were compared using differential item functioning to determine if second year students were more willing than first year students in any of the different speaking and writing tasks/situations. This investigation closes with some suggestions on how the WTC questionnaire can inform second language instruction and curriculum design.

  8. Outcome modelling strategies in epidemiology: traditional methods and basic alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, Sander; Daniel, Rhian; Pearce, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Controlling for too many potential confounders can lead to or aggravate problems of data sparsity or multicollinearity, particularly when the number of covariates is large in relation to the study size. As a result, methods to reduce the number of modelled covariates are often deployed. We review several traditional modelling strategies, including stepwise regression and the 'change-in-estimate' (CIE) approach to deciding which potential confounders to include in an outcome-regression model for estimating effects of a targeted exposure. We discuss their shortcomings, and then provide some basic alternatives and refinements that do not require special macros or programming. Throughout, we assume the main goal is to derive the most accurate effect estimates obtainable from the data and commercial software. Allowing that most users must stay within standard software packages, this goal can be roughly approximated using basic methods to assess, and thereby minimize, mean squared error (MSE).

  9. Investigating follow-up outcome change using hierarchical linear modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrodniczuk, J S; Piper, W E; Joyce, A S

    2001-03-01

    Individual change in outcome during a one-year follow-up period for 98 patients who received either interpretive or supportive psychotherapy was examined using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). This followed a previous study that had investigated average (treatment condition) change during follow-up using traditional methods of data analysis (repeated measures ANOVA, chi-square tests). We also investigated whether two patient personality characteristics-quality of object relations (QOR) and psychological mindedness (PM)-predicted individual change. HLM procedures yielded findings that were not detected using traditional methods of data analysis. New findings indicated that the rate of individual change in outcome during follow-up varied significantly among the patients. QOR was directly related to favorable individual change for supportive therapy patients, but not for patients who received interpretive therapy. The findings have implications for determining which patients will show long-term benefit following short-term supportive therapy and how to enhance it. The study also found significant associations between QOR and final outcome level.

  10. Examining the Longitudinal Biliterate Trajectory of Emerging Bilingual Learners in a Paired Literacy Instructional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Wendy; Butvilofsky, Sandra; Escamilla, Kathy; Hopewell, Susan; Tolento, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the biliteracy results of Spanish-English emerging bilingual students who participated in a K-5 paired literacy model in a large school district in Oregon. Spanish and English reading and writing data show longitudinal gains in students' biliterate development, demonstrating the potential of the model in developing…

  11. Development of an Instructional Model for Online Task-Based Interactive Listening for EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xingbin; Suppasetseree, Suksan

    2013-01-01

    College English in China has shifted from cultivating reading ability to comprehensive communicative abilities with an emphasis on listening and speaking. For this reason, new teaching models should be built on modern information technology. However, little research on developing models for the online teaching of listening skills has been…

  12. TRANSLATE: New Strategic Approaches for English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Amanda P.; Jiménez, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This teaching tip shares a research-based instructional model that uses translation to improve the English reading comprehension of English Learners. Within this instruction, English learners work collaboratively in small groups and use translation to facilitate understandings of their required English language arts curriculum. Students are taught…

  13. Student Perceptions of Learner-Centered Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, DeDe; Sheras, Daniel; Bennett, Jessica L.; Simon, Bethany; Pimentel, Jody H.; Gabel, Laura E.

    2008-01-01

    The learner-centered paradigm departs from traditional teaching models by focusing on students more than teachers and learning more than teaching. Thus, classes are more egalitarian; they emphasize critical thinking, active learning, and real-world assignments. Graduate students in learner-centered classrooms were surveyed about perceptions of…

  14. Applicability of the Compensatory Encoding Model in Foreign Language Reading: An Investigation with Chinese College English Language Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Feifei

    2017-01-01

    While some first language (L1) reading models suggest that inefficient word recognition and small working memory tend to inhibit higher-level comprehension processes; the Compensatory Encoding Model maintains that slow word recognition and small working memory do not normally hinder reading comprehension, as readers are able to operate metacognitive strategies to compensate for inefficient word recognition and working memory limitation as long as readers process a reading task without time constraint. Although empirical evidence is accumulated for support of the Compensatory Encoding Model in L1 reading, there is lack of research for testing of the Compensatory Encoding Model in foreign language (FL) reading. This research empirically tested the Compensatory Encoding Model in English reading among Chinese college English language learners (ELLs). Two studies were conducted. Study one focused on testing whether reading condition varying time affects the relationship between word recognition, working memory, and reading comprehension. Students were tested on a computerized English word recognition test, a computerized Operation Span task, and reading comprehension in time constraint and non-time constraint reading. The correlation and regression analyses showed that the strength of association was much stronger between word recognition, working memory, and reading comprehension in time constraint than that in non-time constraint reading condition. Study two examined whether FL readers were able to operate metacognitive reading strategies as a compensatory way of reading comprehension for inefficient word recognition and working memory limitation in non-time constraint reading. The participants were tested on the same computerized English word recognition test and Operation Span test. They were required to think aloud while reading and to complete the comprehension questions. The think-aloud protocols were coded for concurrent use of reading strategies, classified

  15. Thresholds of Knowledge Development in Complex Problem Solving: A Multiple-Case Study of Advanced Learners' Cognitive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Treavor; Liu, Min; Chiang, Yueh-hui Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    This multiple-case study examined how advanced learners solved a complex problem, focusing on how their frequency and application of cognitive processes contributed to differences in performance outcomes, and developing a mental model of a problem. Fifteen graduate students with backgrounds related to the problem context participated in the study.…

  16. Thresholds of Knowledge Development in Complex Problem Solving: A Multiple-Case Study of Advanced Learners' Cognitive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Treavor; Liu, Min; Chiang, Yueh-hui Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    This multiple-case study examined how advanced learners solved a complex problem, focusing on how their frequency and application of cognitive processes contributed to differences in performance outcomes, and developing a mental model of a problem. Fifteen graduate students with backgrounds related to the problem context participated in the study.…

  17. Social presence – connecting pre-service teachers as learners using a blended learning model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie Garner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The national reform agenda for early childhood education and care across Australia has led to an increased demand for qualified early childhood teachers. In response, universities have developed innovative approaches in delivering early childhood teacher education courses designed to support existing diploma qualified educators to gain their teaching qualifications. One such course at a major Australian University incorporated a flexible multi-modal option of study which included community-based, on line e-learning and face-to-face intensive tutorials. This paper reports on a study examining the outcomes for students undertaking their studies using this course delivery mode. The study sought to examine the students’ perceptions of the efficacy of the teaching and learning approach in meeting their learning needs, and the factors that were most influential in informing these perceptions. The findings indicated that it was the inclusion of contact and a social presence in the online learning environment which was most influential. Normal 0 false false false EN-AU ZH-CN AR-SA Educating English Learners: What Every Classroom Teacher Needs to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutta, Joyce W.; Strebel, Carine; Mokhtari, Kouider; Mihai, Florin M.; Crevecoeur-Bryant, Edwidge

    2014-01-01

    In "Educating English Learners," Joyce W. Nutta and her colleagues offer practical tools for helping schools and teachers successfully integrate English learners into mainstream classrooms. Drawing on the One Plus model presented in their award-winning book, "Preparing Every Teacher to Reach English Learners," the authors now…

  18. Engaging the Adult Learner: Creating Effective Library Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Helene E.

    2005-01-01

    Adult learners have unique developmental and social characteristics as compared to their traditional counterparts in higher education. Library instruction models used for traditional learners are not always effective when teaching adults. The author examines adult learner characteristics and adult learning theory and also uses personal…

  19. Modeling Humans as Reinforcement Learners: How to Predict Human Behavior in Multi-Stage Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ritchie; Wolpert, David H.; Backhaus, Scott; Bent, Russell; Bono, James; Tracey, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel framework for modeling interacting humans in a multi-stage game environment by combining concepts from game theory and reinforcement learning. The proposed model has the following desirable characteristics: (1) Bounded rational players, (2) strategic (i.e., players account for one anothers reward functions), and (3) is computationally feasible even on moderately large real-world systems. To do this we extend level-K reasoning to policy space to, for the first time, be able to handle multiple time steps. This allows us to decompose the problem into a series of smaller ones where we can apply standard reinforcement learning algorithms. We investigate these ideas in a cyber-battle scenario over a smart power grid and discuss the relationship between the behavior predicted by our model and what one might expect of real human defenders and attackers.

  1. A multifaceted model for designing reading development programmes for L2 learners at tertiary level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Boakye

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Socio-affective issues are generally acknowledged as important in reading development. However, most intervention programmes focus on cognitive aspects of reading, and do not explicitly accommodate socio-affective factors such as attitude, motivation, interest, and background of students. This paper argues for the inclusion of both cognitive and socio-affective scaffolding in tertiary-level reading development programmes. Based on a number of second language teaching techniques, and grounded in Guthrie and Wigfield’s (2000 engagement model, I propose a multifaceted model on which to map reading instruction/intervention at tertiary level that combines both affective and cognitive factors.

  2. The Role of a Learner - Centred Approach in Language Teaching on the Development of Learner Autonomy: A Model Course Design = Yabancı Dil Öğretimi'nde Öğrenci - Merkezli Yaklaşımın Bağımsız Öğrenmenin Gelişimindeki Rolü : Model Bir Ders Tasarımı

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem KUCUROĞLU TİRKEŞ

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at assessing the role of a "Learner-centred" approach in language teaching on the development of learner autonomy. It is argued in this paper that a foreign language course designed with a learner-centred focus not only helps learners increase their competence in the use of the language but also allows them to develop some strategies on "learning how to learn". This, in effect, promotes the development of learner autonomy and encourages students to take responsibility for their own learning and to become independent learners, the two important requirements of university education. This is illustrated through the design of a model course, namely English -2, offered to freshman year students at Doğuş University. This course takes students through the stages of conducting academic research and presenting the findings of their research in the form of a written project which appropriately fulfills academic standards. The design of the course requires much of the work to be done outside class and by the learners themselves. Hence, this paper develops the idea that students who take this course increase their confidence in working on their own as well as learning to take the responsibility for their own learning, which are the two major demands of academic study in university education.

  3. Variable selection for propensity score models when estimating treatment effects on multiple outcomes: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Richard; Girman, Cynthia J; LoCasale, Robert J; Brookhart, Alan M; Stürmer, Til

    2013-01-01

    It is often preferable to simplify the estimation of treatment effects on multiple outcomes by using a single propensity score (PS) model. Variable selection in PS models impacts the efficiency and validity of treatment effects. However, the impact of different variable selection strategies on the estimated treatment effects in settings involving multiple outcomes is not well understood. The authors use simulations to evaluate the impact of different variable selection strategies on the bias and precision of effect estimates to provide insight into the performance of various PS models in settings with multiple outcomes. Simulated studies consisted of dichotomous treatment, two Poisson outcomes, and eight standard-normal covariates. Covariates were selected for the PS models based on their effects on treatment, a specific outcome, or both outcomes. The PSs were implemented using stratification, matching, and weighting (inverse probability treatment weighting). PS models including only covariates affecting a specific outcome (outcome-specific models) resulted in the most efficient effect estimates. The PS model that only included covariates affecting either outcome (generic-outcome model) performed best among the models that simultaneously controlled measured confounding for both outcomes. Similar patterns were observed over the range of parameter values assessed and all PS implementation methods. A single, generic-outcome model performed well compared with separate outcome-specific models in most scenarios considered. The results emphasize the benefit of using prior knowledge to identify covariates that affect the outcome when constructing PS models and support the potential to use a single, generic-outcome PS model when multiple outcomes are being examined. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. You Just Want to Be Like that Teacher: Modelling and Intercultural Competence in Young Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    Language teachers are called upon to understand both the nature of students' intercultural competence and their own role in its development. Limited research attention has been paid to the relationship between the types of behaviour that language teachers model and the intercultural competence their students acquire. This article reports on a case…

  5. Modeling the Process of Summary Writing of Chinese Learners of English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiuliang

    2016-01-01

    In language learning contexts, writing tasks that involve reading of source texts are often used to elicit more authentic integrative language use. Thus, interests in researching these read-to-write tasks in general and as assessment tasks keep growing. This study examined and modeled the process of summary writing as a read-to-write integrated…

  6. On Becoming an Educated Person: Salvadoran Adult Learners' Cultural Model of Educacion/Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: In contrast to cultural constructs that equate education with cognitive development and formal schooling, the Latin American cultural model of educacion encompasses academic knowledge and social competence. Prior scholarship has mainly investigated parental notions of educacion vis-a-vis childrearing and schooling, primarily…

  7. On Becoming an Educated Person: Salvadoran Adult Learners' Cultural Model of Educacion/Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: In contrast to cultural constructs that equate education with cognitive development and formal schooling, the Latin American cultural model of educacion encompasses academic knowledge and social competence. Prior scholarship has mainly investigated parental notions of educacion vis-a-vis childrearing and schooling, primarily…

  8. A Computational Model of Learners Achievement Emotions Using Control-Value Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Karla; Noguez, Julieta; Neri, Luis; Mc Kevitt, Paul; Lunney, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Game-based Learning (GBL) environments make instruction flexible and interactive. Positive experiences depend on personalization. Student modelling has focused on affect. Three methods are used: (1) recognizing the physiological effects of emotion, (2) reasoning about emotion from its origin and (3) an approach combining 1 and 2. These have proven…

  9. A Computational Model of Learners Achievement Emotions Using Control-Value Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Karla; Noguez, Julieta; Neri, Luis; Mc Kevitt, Paul; Lunney, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Game-based Learning (GBL) environments make instruction flexible and interactive. Positive experiences depend on personalization. Student modelling has focused on affect. Three methods are used: (1) recognizing the physiological effects of emotion, (2) reasoning about emotion from its origin and (3) an approach combining 1 and 2. These have proven…

  10. Nurturing gifted learners in Mainland China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiannong; Zhang, X.; Chen, N.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, based on the previous researches on the development of gifted learners, the authors summarized the problems in nurturing gifted learners due to lacking of the appropriate educational philosophy and educational methodology in Mainland China. The authors proposed the Bio-socio-inte......In this article, based on the previous researches on the development of gifted learners, the authors summarized the problems in nurturing gifted learners due to lacking of the appropriate educational philosophy and educational methodology in Mainland China. The authors proposed the Bio......-socio-intellectual model, illustrated the nature of human being and the nature of gifted learners. From the perspective of the BSI model, the authors suggested three aspects are very critical to curriculum design to meet the needs of gifted education: physical maturation or physical development, social maturation...

  11. A Semiparametric Bivariate Probit Model for Joint Modeling of Outcomes in STEMI Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Ieva

    2014-01-01

    parameter estimates. Secondly, covariate-outcomes relationships can exhibit nonlinear patterns. Provided that proper statistical methods for model fitting in such framework are available, it is possible to employ a simultaneous estimation approach to account for unobservable confounders. Such a framework can also provide flexible covariate structures and model the whole conditional distribution of the response.

  12. A Model for Community-based Language Teaching to Young Learners: The Impact of University Outreach

    OpenAIRE

    Martha Nyikos; Vesna Dimitrieska

    2015-01-01

    A primary challenge given to university foreign language departments and Title VI National Resource Centers is to increase interest and participation in foreign language learning, with particular emphasis on less commonly taught languages (LCTLs). Given that many LCTLs in high demand by the US government, including Arabic, Chinese, Persian and Turkish, rarely find their way into the school curricula, this article offers a successful ongoing community-based model of how one university-town par...

  13. DIAGNOSTIC FEEDBACK MODEL IN DEVELOPING SPEAKING SKILLS IN ESL LEARNERS – AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

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    V. Rajesh, J. Jaya Parveen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering classrooms often contain mixed-ability students with less interest in language study. These students come from different backgrounds and different mediums of instruction. Grammar translation method, communicative approach, or multimedia fail to entertain one or the other group of students in the same classroom. Diagnostic Feedback Model can be utilised for effective language teaching in such mixed-ability classrooms. With a descriptive research design, an evaluative study is conducted in VV College of Engineering, Tisaiyanvilai. 200 students and 10 teachers are involved in the study. Meetings are conducted periodically. Tasks for the pre-tests and criteria for evaluation are designed by the teachers. The pre-assessment contains items to check listening, body language, fluency, and accuracy of the students in speaking. The criteria provides 5 – 1 range of marks for each sub-skill in speaking. The students are made to speak and are evaluated by the teachers using the criteria. Based on the diagnostic feedback model, data consolidation is done by the teachers. The diagnostic feedback model provide the teachers with the strengths and areas of improvement of the students. According to the overall scores, the students are classified into Beginner / Intermediate / Proficient instead of Below Average / Average / Above Average. Activities for each group are defined uniquely, and training is conducted separately for each group. At the end of the course, post-assessments are conducted using the same criteria. In the post-assessments, the average scores of 'Beginners' have increased from 20 to 35, the average scores of 'Intermediate' students have increased from 30 to 43, and the average scores of 'Proficient' students have increased from 40 to 48. This implies that diagnostic feedback model works well in mixed ability classrooms in engineering colleges.

  14. Linguistic Models, Acquisition Theories, and Learner Corpora: Morphological Productivity in SLA Research Exemplified by Complex Verbs in German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdeling, Anke; Hirschmann, Hagen; Shadrova, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The present study analyzes morphological productivity for complex verbs in second language acquisition by analyzing a corpus of German as a Foreign Language (GFL). It shows that advanced learners of GFL use prefix and particle verbs relatively frequently and productively but less so than native speakers do and discusses these findings in the light…

  15. Learner Differences in Perceived Satisfaction of an Online Learning: An Extension to the Technology Acceptance Model in an Arabic Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azawei, Ahmed; Lundqvist, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Online learning constitutes the most popular distance-learning method, with flexibility, accessibility, visibility, manageability and availability as its core features. However, current research indicates that its efficacy is not consistent across all learners. This study aimed to modify and extend the factors of the Technology Acceptance Model…

  16. Whose voice matters? Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Bansilal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available International and national mathematics studies have revealed the poor mathematics skills of South African learners. An essential tool that can be used to improve learners' mathematical skills is for educators to use effective feedback. Our purpose in this study was to elicit learners' understanding and expectations of teacher assessment feedback. The study was conducted with five Grade 9 mathematics learners. Data were generated from one group interview, seven journal entries by each learner, video-taped classroom observations and researcher field notes. The study revealed that the learners have insightful perceptions of the concept of educator feedback. While some learners viewed educator feedback as a tool to probe their understanding, others viewed it as a mechanism to get the educator's point of view. A significant finding of the study was that learners viewed educator assessment feedback as instrumental in building or breaking their self-confidence.

  17. THE MOTIVATIONAL MODEL OF YOUNG JAPANESE EFL LEARNERS: AFTER GETTING LESSONS BY HOMEROOM TEACHERS

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    Rie Adachi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study focuses on Japanese pupils’ motivation with other attitudinal attitudes about learning English. The writer surveyed the 5th and 6th grade pupils’ motivation and its effect factors at an elementary school in Japan at the end of the school year 2007 and 2008. The main focus of this study is to find the relationship between motivation and effect factors using both the 2007 and 2008 data and to examine differences of the pupils’ attitudes between 2007 and 2008. Since the 2008 school year, pupils have received lessons by not only an assistant language teacher (ALT but also their home room teachers (HRTs. The finding showed that the 2008 and 2007 results were similar in most valuables, but the value of “Motivation” increased in 2008 compared to the previous year. Furthermore, “people around the learner” influenced on motivation more positively. Finally, this study presented a model which could be suggested as one of the motivational models of Japanese pupils for English activities. The writer concluded that the involvement of HRTs brought about generally good effects on pupils’ attitudes in this elementary school at this point.

  18. Care pathways models and clinical outcomes in Disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattin, Davide; Morganti, Laura; De Torres, Laura; Dolce, Giuliano; Arcuri, Francesco; Estraneo, Anna; Cardinale, Viviana; Piperno, Roberto; Zavatta, Elena; Formisano, Rita; D'Ippolito, Mariagrazia; Vassallo, Claudio; Dessi, Barbara; Lamberti, Gianfranco; Antoniono, Elena; Lanzillotti, Crocifissa; Navarro, Jorge; Bramanti, Placido; Corallo, Francesco; Zampolini, Mauro; Scarponi, Federico; Avesani, Renato; Salvi, Luca; Ferro, Salvatore; Mazza, Luigi; Fogar, Paolo; Feller, Sandro; De Nigris, Fulvio; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Buffoni, Mara; Pessina, Adriano; Corsico, Paolo; Leonardi, Matilde

    2017-08-01

    Patients with Disorders of consciousness, are persons with extremely low functioning levels and represent a challenge for health care systems due to their high needs of facilitating environmental factors. Despite a common Italian health care pathway for these patients, no studies have analyzed information on how each region have implemented it in its welfare system correlating data with patients' clinical outcomes. A multicenter observational pilot study was realized. Clinicians collected data on the care pathways of patients with Disorder of consciousness by asking 90 patients' caregivers to complete an ad hoc questionnaire through a structured phone interview. Questionnaire consisted of three sections: sociodemographic data, description of the care pathway done by the patient, and caregiver evaluation of health services and information received. Seventy-three patients were analyzed. Length of hospital stay was different across the health care models and it was associated with improvement in clinical diagnosis. In long-term care units, the diagnosis at admission and the number of caregivers available for each patient (median value = 3) showed an indirect relationship with worsening probability in clinical outcome. Caregivers reported that communication with professionals (42%) and the answer to the need of information were the most critical points in the acute phase, whereas presence of Non-Governmental Organizations (25%) and availability of psychologists for caregivers (21%) were often missing during long-term care. The 65% of caregivers reported they did not know the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. This study highlights relevant differences in analyzed models, despite a recommended national pathway of care. Future public health considerations and actions are needed to guarantee equity and standardization of the care process in all European countries.

  19. Modeling classical swine fever outbreak-related outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar eYadav

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to estimate classical swine fever (CSF outbreak-related outcomes such as epidemic duration and number of infected, vaccinated, and depopulated premises, using defined most likely CSF outbreak scenarios. Risk metrics were established using empirical data to select the most likely CSF outbreak scenarios in Indiana. The scenarios were simulated using a stochastic between-premises disease spread model to estimate outbreak-related outcomes. A total of 19 single-site (i.e., with a single-index premises at the onset of an outbreak and 15 multiple-site (i.e., with more than one index premises at the onset of an outbreak outbreak scenarios of CSF were selected using the risk metrics. The number of index premises in the multiple-site outbreak scenarios ranged from 4 to 32. The multiple-site outbreak scenarios were further classified into clustered (N=6 and non-clustered (N=9 groups. The estimated median (5th, 95th percentiles epidemic duration (days was 224 (24, 343 in the single-site and was 190 (157, 251 and 210 (167, 302 in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. The median (5th, 95th percentiles number of infected premises was 323 (0, 488 in the single-site outbreak scenarios and was 529 (395, 662 and 465 (295, 640 in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. Both the number and spatial distribution of the index premises affected the outcome estimates. The results also showed the importance of implementing vaccinations to accommodate depopulation in the CSF outbreak controls. The use of routinely collected surveillance data in the risk metrics and disease spread model allows end users to generate timely outbreak-related information based on the initial outbreak’s characteristics. Swine producers can use this information to make an informed decision on management of swine operations and continuity of business so that potential losses could be

  20. A Model for Community-based Language Teaching to Young Learners: The Impact of University Outreach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Nyikos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A primary challenge given to university foreign language departments and Title VI National Resource Centers is to increase interest and participation in foreign language learning, with particular emphasis on less commonly taught languages (LCTLs. Given that many LCTLs in high demand by the US government, including Arabic, Chinese, Persian and Turkish, rarely find their way into the school curricula, this article offers a successful ongoing community-based model of how one university-town partnership addresses advocacy with programming for pre-K-grade 9. Non-native and heritage undergraduate language students who volunteered as community language teachers found the experience invaluable to their pedagogical development. Teacher education programs or language departments can employ this approach to community-based teaching, by providing free, sustained language teaching in existing community centers. This article offers guidance for how to start and expand such a program.

  1. Language and the Learner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向可钰

    2013-01-01

    In the process of English teaching and learning, the learners come across a lot of difficulties as a second language learn-er. This article will analyze some theories which will help the teachers and learners in SLA. These theories include contras-tive analysis, monitor theory and the connections of explicit learning and implicit learning.

  2. Learner and Faculty Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Sharon; Stanford, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This chapter identifies effective ways to address learner and faculty support. It introduces methods for building a successful learner support system by providing sufficient resources and proactively addressing learner motivation. It also addresses effective faculty support through institutional policies, resources, training, and course…

  3. Designing prototype model to support language development of autistic learners in early childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Karahoca

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Los niños con autismo generalmente muestran dificultad tanto en la comunicación como en el aprendizaje de idiomas. En este estudio, las interfaces interactivas diseñadas para ayudar a los niños con autismo a satisfacerlos con la educación digital. Interfac es son utilizables y coloridos, hace una enorme contribución en las aplicaciones educativas desde el período de la primera infancia en. Función de explicación lingüística se integró a las interfaces en la plataforma móvil con la ayuda de un cuento para per mitir a los niños a aprender objetos y sus funciones. Jugará un rol activo con el desarrollo del lenguaje para los estudiantes de la primera infancia. En la transmisión audible del cuento, al poner en primer plano la presentación objetiva, el equivalente d e las imágenes del objeto se emparejaron con las voces. Mediante el uso de la correspondencia entre voz y objeto que se conoce como el método natural en la enseñanza de lenguas, la actualización del comportamiento esperado se apoya proporcionando libertad de iteración individual. La disponibilidad de la plataforma se prueba con un grupo de usuarios expertizado y el nivel de usabilidad de la plataforma se detectó con la escala de usabilidad del sistema (SUS. Muestra que la usabilidad y practicidad del model o prototipo tiene una buena eficacia, eficiencia y satisfacción basada en la evaluación de expertos.

  4. Towards a Digital Learner Identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlanga, Adriana; Sloep, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Berlanga, A. J., & Sloep, P. B. (2011). Towards a Digital Learner Identity. In F. Abel, V. Dimitrova, E. Herder, & G. J. Houben (Eds.), Augmenting User Models with Real World Experiences Workshop (AUM). In conjunction with UMAP 2011. July, 15, 2011, Girona, Spain.

  5. Faculty Development: Assessing Learner Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Barbara A.; Overfield, Karen

    This study addressed the challenges of developing a faculty professional development workshop on assessment, measurement, and evaluation of achievement in adult learners. The setting for the workshop was a system of postsecondary career colleges throughout the United States. The curriculum development model of D. Kirkpatrick (1994) was used as a…

  6. Dynamics of Learner Affective Development in Early FLL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaljevic Djigunovic, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Affective learner factors were first considered as a cause of success in language learning. This was followed by a change in approach and recently authors (e.g., Edelenbos, Johnstone, & Kubanek, 2006) have considered them an important outcome, especially in early foreign language learning (FLL). Current research into affective learner factors…

  7. Task-Based Learning: The Interaction between Tasks and Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jacky

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between tasks and learners in task-based learning. Findings suggest that manipulation of task characteristics and conditions may not achieve the intended pedagogic outcomes, and that new ways are needed to focus learners' attention of form without sacrificing the meaning-driven principles of task-based learning.…

  8. The Integrated Medical Model: Outcomes from Independent Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J.; Garcia, Y.; Griffin, D.; Arellano, J.; Boley, L.; Goodenow, D. A.; Kerstman, E.; Reyes, D.; Saile, L.; Walton, M.; hide

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) v4.0 underwent an extensive external review in preparation for transition to an operational status. In order to insure impartiality of the review process, the Exploration Medical Capabilities Element of NASA's Human Research Program convened the review through the Systems Review Office at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The review board convened by GSFC consisted of persons from both NASA and academia with expertise in the fields of statistics, epidemiology, modeling, software development, aerospace medicine, and project management (see Figure 1). The board reviewed software and code standards, as well as evidence pedigree associated with both the input and outcomes information. The board also assesses the models verification, validation, sensitivity to parameters and ability to answer operational questions. This talk will discuss the processes for designing the review, how the review progressed and the findings from the board, as well as summarize the IMM project responses to those findings. Overall, the board found that the IMM is scientifically sound, represents a necessary, comprehensive approach to identifying medical and environmental risks facing astronauts in long duration missions and is an excellent tool for communication between engineers and physicians. The board also found IMM and its customer(s) should convene an additional review of the IMM data sources and to develop a sustainable approach to augment, peer review, and maintain the information utilized in the IMM. The board found this is critically important because medical knowledge continues to evolve. Delivery of IMM v4.0 to the Crew Health and Safety (CHS) Program will occur in the 2017. Once delivered for operational decision support, IMM v4.0 will provide CHS with additional quantitative capability in to assess astronaut medical risks and required medical capabilities to help drive down overall mission risks.

  9. Engaging the learner by bridging the gap between theory and clinical competence: the impact of concept mapping and simulation as innovative strategies for nurse-sensitive outcome indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Therese; Lis, Gail A

    2014-03-01

    Concept mapping and simulation provide professional nurses in the academic and practice environment with an opportunity for experiential learning. This integral combination allows for learning to be congruent with the national clinical practice guidelines that support and promote nurse-sensitive indicators. Implications for practice are forthcoming as data are collected on the impact on health outcomes when using concept mapping and simulation.

  10. Learner-Centered Teaching: The Core of Effective Practices for Adolescent English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloud, Nancy; Lakin, Judah; Leininger, Erin

    2011-01-01

    In this piece, a teacher educator and two secondary teachers describe how they implemented the Learners' Lives as Curriculum model (Weinstein, 2004) with adolescent English language learners using a unit from a pilot secondary curriculum titled Lives Unfolding (Weinstein & Cloud, 2007). They discuss the development and adaptation of the Names unit…

  11. Learner-Centered Teaching: The Core of Effective Practices for Adolescent English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloud, Nancy; Lakin, Judah; Leininger, Erin

    2011-01-01

    In this piece, a teacher educator and two secondary teachers describe how they implemented the Learners' Lives as Curriculum model (Weinstein, 2004) with adolescent English language learners using a unit from a pilot secondary curriculum titled Lives Unfolding (Weinstein & Cloud, 2007). They discuss the development and adaptation of the Names unit…

  12. Designing Learning Networks for Lifelong Learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Koper, R. (2005). Designing Learning Networks for Lifelong Learners. In: Koper, R. & Tattersall, C., Learning Design: A Handbook on Modelling and Delivering Networked Education and Training (pp. 239-252). Berlin-Heidelberg: Springer Verlag.

  13. A cross-sectional survey to compare the competence of learners registered for the Baccalaureus Curationis programme using different learning approaches at the University of the Western Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loretta Z. le Roux

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to compare the extent to which the different teaching approaches applied in the Baccalaureus Curationis programme adequately prepare graduating learners for professional competence. The research methodology was a quantitative approach, based on descriptive research, with a clinical competence development model to guide the data collection procedure. The target population of the study included a sample of 250 learners in the four-year B.Cur programme, that extended from first-to-fourth-year. Stratified random sampling was applied to select the sample learners for this research and data were collected by means of a five-point Likert scale questionnaire. Data were organised and managed using the SAS statistical software package. Descriptive statistics were gathered with measures of central tendency and dispersion included, and their findings were illustrated on descriptive tables. A correlation technique was applied to determine the effects of the independent variable on the dependent variable.The results of the study indicated that progression in competence did not occur as learners progressed through higher levels of their training, except during the third-year of study. However, the study’s results confirmed the strengths of the Case-based clinical reasoning approach to teaching and learning. This approach is able to combine the strengths of the traditional methods, which dealt with large class sizes and that had a focus on learner centred learning, with a focus on clinical practice. This approach provides realistic opportunities for learners to experiment with solutions to dilemmas encountered in real life situations, from the protected and safe environment of the classroom. The first-year learners who were observed in this study, who although novices, were exposed to Case-based teaching approaches and showed more self-perceived competence than learners in later years. This occurred in spite of the limited

  14. Evaluation of a learner-designed course for teaching health research skills in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbenyega Tsiri

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developing countries the ability to conduct locally-relevant health research and high quality education are key tools in the fight against poverty. The objective of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel UK accredited, learner-designed research skills course delivered in a teaching hospital in Ghana. Methods Study participants were 15 mixed speciality health professionals from Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. Effectiveness measures included process, content and outcome indicators to evaluate changes in learners' confidence and competence in research, and assessment of the impact of the course on changing research-related thinking and behaviour. Results were verified using two independent methods. Results 14/15 learners gained research competence assessed against UK Quality Assurance Agency criteria. After the course there was a 36% increase in the groups' positive responses to statements concerning confidence in research-related attitudes, intentions and actions. The greatest improvement (45% increase was in learners' actions, which focused on strengthening institutional research capacity. 79% of paired before/after responses indicated positive changes in individual learners' research-related attitudes (n = 53, 81% in intention (n = 52 and 85% in action (n = 52. The course had increased learners' confidence to start and manage research, and enhanced life-long skills such as reflective practice and self-confidence. Doing their own research within the work environment, reflecting on personal research experiences and utilising peer support and pooled knowledge were critical elements that promoted learning. Conclusion Learners in Ghana were able to design and undertake a novel course that developed individual and institutional research capacity and met international standards. Learning by doing and a supportive peer community at work were critical elements in promoting learning in this environment

  15. Outcome Inelasticity and Outcome Variability in Behaviour-Incidence Models: An Example from an SEIR Infection on a Dynamic Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce Morsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavior-incidence models have been used to model phenomena such as free-riding vaccinating behavior, where nonvaccinators free ride on herd immunity generated by vaccinators. Here, we develop and analyze a simulation model of voluntary ring vaccination on an evolving social contact network. Individuals make vaccination decisions by examining their expected payoffs, which are influenced by the infection status of their neighbors. We find that stochasticity can make outcomes extremely variable (near critical thresholds and thus unpredictable: some stochastic realizations result in rapid control through ring vaccination while others result in widespread transmission. We also explore the phenomenon of outcome inelasticity, wherein behavioral responses result in certain outcome measures remaining relatively unchanged. Finally, we explore examples where ineffective or risky vaccines are more widely adopted than safe, effective vaccines. This occurs when such a vaccine is unattractive to a sufficient number of contacts of an index case to cause failure of ring vaccination. As a result, the infection percolates through the entire network, causing the final epidemic size and vaccine coverage to be higher than would otherwise occur. Effects such as extreme outcome variability and outcome inelasticity have implications for vaccination policies that depend on individual choice for their success and predictability.

  16. Factors Associated With Rehabilitation Outcomes After Traumatic Brain Injury: Comparing Functional Outcomes Between TBIMS Centers Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdah, Marie N; Hofmann, Melissa; Pretz, Christopher; An, Viktoriya; Barnes, Sunni A; Bennett, Monica; Dreer, Laura E; Bergquist, Thomas; Shafi, Shahid

    To examine differences in patient outcomes across Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) rehabilitation centers and factors that influence these differences using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). Sixteen TBIMS centers. A total of 2056 individuals 16 years or older with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) who received inpatient rehabilitation. Multicenter observational cohort study using HLM to analyze prospectively collected data. Functional Independence Measure and Disability Rating Scale total scores at discharge and 1 year post-TBI. Duration of posttraumatic amnesia (PTA) demonstrated a significant inverse relationship with functional outcomes. However, the magnitude of this relationship (change in functional status for each additional day in PTA) varied among centers. Functional status at discharge from rehabilitation and at 1 year post-TBI could be predicted using the slope and intercept of each TBIMS center for the duration of PTA, by comparing it against the average slope and intercept. HLM demonstrated center effect due to variability in the relationship between PTA and functional outcomes of patients. This variability is not accounted for in traditional linear regression modeling. Future studies examining variations in patient outcomes between centers should utilize HLM to measure the impact of additional factors that influence patient rehabilitation functional outcomes.

  17. Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Models: Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Fetal Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Damasceno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose homeostasis is controlled by endocrine pancreatic cells, and any pancreatic disturbance can result in diabetes. Because 8% to 12% of diabetic pregnant women present with malformed fetuses, there is great interest in understanding the etiology, pathophysiological mechanisms, and treatment of gestational diabetes. Hyperglycemia enhances the production of reactive oxygen species, leading to oxidative stress, which is involved in diabetic teratogenesis. It has also been suggested that maternal diabetes alters embryonic gene expression, which might cause malformations. Due to ethical issues involving human studies that sometimes have invasive aspects and the multiplicity of uncontrolled variables that can alter the uterine environment during clinical studies, it is necessary to use animal models to better understand diabetic pathophysiology. This review aimed to gather information about pathophysiological mechanisms and fetal outcomes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms and factors involved in diabetes, the use of pancreatic regeneration studies is increasing in an attempt to understand the behavior of pancreatic beta cells. In addition, these studies suggest a new preventive concept as a treatment basis for diabetes, introducing therapeutic efforts to minimize or prevent diabetes-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage, and teratogenesis.

  18. Modelling droplet collision outcomes for different substances and viscosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfeld, Martin; Kuschel, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    The main objective of the present study is the derivation of models describing the outcome of binary droplet collisions for a wide range of dynamic viscosities in the well-known collision maps (i.e. normalised lateral droplet displacement at collision, called impact parameter, versus collision Weber number). Previous studies by Kuschel and Sommerfeld (Exp Fluids 54:1440, 2013) for different solution droplets having a range of solids contents and hence dynamic viscosities (here between 1 and 60 mPa s) revealed that the locations of the triple point (i.e. coincidence of bouncing, stretching separation and coalescence) and the critical Weber number (i.e. condition for the transition from coalescence to separation for head-on collisions) show a clear dependence on dynamic viscosity. In order to extend these findings also to pure liquids and to provide a broader data basis for modelling the viscosity effect, additional binary collision experiments were conducted for different alcohols (viscosity range 1.2-15.9 mPa s) and the FVA1 reference oil at different temperatures (viscosity range 3.0-28.2 mPa s). The droplet size for the series of alcohols was around 365 and 385 µm for the FVA1 reference oil, in each case with fixed diameter ratio at Δ= 1. The relative velocity between the droplets was varied in the range 0.5-3.5 m/s, yielding maximum Weber numbers of around 180. Individual binary droplet collisions with defined conditions were generated by two droplet chains each produced by vibrating orifice droplet generators. For recording droplet motion and the binary collision process with good spatial and temporal resolution high-speed shadow imaging was employed. The results for varied relative velocity and impact angle were assembled in impact parameter-Weber number maps. With increasing dynamic viscosity a characteristic displacement of the regimes for the different collision scenarios was also observed for pure liquids similar to that observed for solutions. This

  19. Learner Reading Problems: A Case of Khoe Learners at Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Learner Reading Problems: A Case of Khoe Learners at Junior Secondary School. ... learners' reading ability of English at junior secondary school in Botswana. ... teachers' schemes and records of work to explore the subjects' reading skills.

  20. Sex, ADHD symptoms, and smoking outcomes: an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voorhees, Elizabeth E; Mitchell, John T; McClernon, F Joseph; Beckham, Jean C; Kollins, Scott H

    2012-05-01

    Both females and individuals with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have been found to be at increased risk for a range of smoking outcomes, and recent empirical findings have suggested that women with ADHD may be particularly vulnerable to nicotine dependence. On a neurobiological level, the dopamine reward processing system may be implicated in the potentially unique interaction of nicotine with sex and with ADHD status. Specifically, nicotine appears to mitigate core ADHD symptoms through interaction with the dopamine reward processing system, and ovarian hormones have been found to interact with nicotine within the dopamine reward processing system to affect neurotransmitter release and functioning. This article synthesizes data from research examining smoking in women and in individuals with ADHD to build an integrative model through which unique risk for cigarette smoking in women with ADHD can be systematically explored. Based upon this model, the following hypotheses are proposed at the intersection of each of the three variables of sex, ADHD, and smoking: (1) individuals with ADHD have altered functioning of the dopamine reward system, which diminishes their ability to efficiently form conditioned associations based on environmental contingencies; these deficits are partially ameliorated by nicotine; (2) nicotine interacts with estrogen and the dopamine reward system to increase the positive and negative reinforcement value of smoking in female smokers; (3) in adult females with ADHD, ovarian hormones interact with the dopamine reward system to exacerbate ADHD-related deficits in the capacity to form conditioned associations; and (4) during different phases of the menstrual cycle, nicotine and ovarian hormones may interact differentially with the dopamine reward processing system to affect the type and value of reinforcement smoking provides for women with ADHD. Understanding the bio-behavioral mechanisms underlying cigarette addiction in

  1. Engaging stakeholders in review and recommendations for models of outcome monitoring for substance abuse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Brian; Martin, Garth; Corea, Larry; Rotondi, Nooshin Khobzi

    2012-10-01

    We present an example of a collaborative process designed to review models of outcome monitoring for substance abuse services, with a view to assessing the feasibility of different approaches in Ontario, Canada. A conceptual framework that describes the parameters of an outcome monitoring system and four models of outcome monitoring were identified. Consultations were held with stakeholders (managers, directors, researchers, clinicians, and governmental representatives) about the types of information they would like to obtain from an outcome monitoring system. Our process is useful as a model for collaborative research with respect to performance measurement. The study's implications and limitations are noted.

  2. A model for overview of student learning: a matrix of educational outcomes versus methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, David C; Marshall, Teresa A; Finkelstein, Michael W; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Straub-Morarend, Cheryl L; Holmes, David C; Armstrong, Steven R; Aquilino, Steven A; Sharp, Helen M; Solow, Catherine M; McQuistan, Michelle R

    2011-02-01

    A concise overview of an institution's aspirations for its students becomes increasingly elusive because dental education has evolving emphases on priorities like critical thinking and adapting to new technology. The purpose of this article is to offer a learner-oriented matrix that gives a focus for discussion and an overview of an institution's educational outcomes. On one axis of the matrix, common educational outcomes are listed: knowledge, technical skills, critical thinking, ethical and professional values, patient and practice management, and social responsibility awareness. On the other axis, methodologies are listed: definition, cultivation strategies, measures (summative/formative, objective/subjective), institutional coordination, and competency determination. By completing the matrix, an overview of the process by which students reach these outcomes emerges. Each institution would likely complete the matrix differently and, ideally, with active discussion. While the matrix can first be used to establish "Where are we now?" for an institution, it can also be a starting point for more extensive matrices and further discussion. Vertical and horizontal analyses of the matrix provide a unique lens for viewing the institution's learning environment.

  3. Issues in Learner Strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘剑英

    2004-01-01

    There is an urgent need in China that learning strategy and strategy training be given the attenion and status that it deserves.Strategy training can help students make effcetive use of multiple strategies.Studying good language learners has proved a useful way of investigating how strategies affect language learning.The first approach to strategy training suggested by Cohen is targets isolated strategies by including explicit modeling and explanation of the benefits of applying a specific strategy,extensive functional practice with the strategy.The second approach outlined by Oxford is to raise students' awareness as to the purpose and rationale of strategy use.The third approach by Cohen is to help students to complete language learning tasks through planning,monitoring,problem solving and evaluation.Teachers play an important part in strategy training.

  4. Motivation Monitoring and Assessment Extension for Input-Process-Outcome Game Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergulescu, Ioana; Muntean, Cristina Hava

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a Motivation Assessment-oriented Input-Process-Outcome Game Model (MotIPO), which extends the Input-Process-Outcome game model with game-centred and player-centred motivation assessments performed right from the beginning of the game-play. A feasibility case-study involving 67 participants playing an educational game and…

  5. Positive Outcomes Increase over Time with the Implementation of a Semiflipped Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorres-Martens, Brittany K.; Segovia, Angela R.; Pfefer, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    The flipped teaching model can engage students in the learning process and improve learning outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to assess the outcomes of a semiflipped teaching model over time. Neurophysiology students spent the majority of class time listening to traditional didactic lectures, but they also listened to 5 online…

  6. An evolution of trauma care evaluation: A thesis on trauma registry and outcome prediction models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, P.

    2013-01-01

    Outcome prediction models play an invaluable role in the evaluation and improvement of modern trauma care. Trauma registries underlying these outcome prediction models need to be accurate, complete and consistent. This thesis focused on the opportunities and limitations of trauma registries and

  7. Motivation Monitoring and Assessment Extension for Input-Process-Outcome Game Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergulescu, Ioana; Muntean, Cristina Hava

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a Motivation Assessment-oriented Input-Process-Outcome Game Model (MotIPO), which extends the Input-Process-Outcome game model with game-centred and player-centred motivation assessments performed right from the beginning of the game-play. A feasibility case-study involving 67 participants playing an educational game and…

  8. An evolution of trauma care evaluation: A thesis on trauma registry and outcome prediction models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, P.

    2013-01-01

    Outcome prediction models play an invaluable role in the evaluation and improvement of modern trauma care. Trauma registries underlying these outcome prediction models need to be accurate, complete and consistent. This thesis focused on the opportunities and limitations of trauma registries and outc

  9. An evolution of trauma care evaluation: A thesis on trauma registry and outcome prediction models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, P.

    2013-01-01

    Outcome prediction models play an invaluable role in the evaluation and improvement of modern trauma care. Trauma registries underlying these outcome prediction models need to be accurate, complete and consistent. This thesis focused on the opportunities and limitations of trauma registries and outc

  10. Prediction for Major Adverse Outcomes in Cardiac Surgery: Comparison of Three Prediction Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hung Hsieh

    2007-09-01

    Conclusion: The Parsonnet score performed as well as the logistic regression models in predicting major adverse outcomes. The Parsonnet score appears to be a very suitable model for clinicians to use in risk stratification of cardiac surgery.

  11. Beyond the blank slate: routes to learning new coordination patterns depend on the intrinsic dynamics of the learner —experimental evidence and theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane eKostrubiec

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Using an approach that combines experimental studies of bimanual movements to visual stimuli and theoretical modeling, the present paper develops a dynamical account of sensorimotor learning, that is, how new skills are acquired and old ones modified. A significant aspect of our approach is the focus on the individual learner as the basic unit of analysis, in particular the quantification of predispositions and capabilities that the individual learner brings to the learning environment. Such predispositions constitute the learner’s behavioral repertoire, captured here theoretically as a dynamical landscape (‘intrinsic dynamics’. The learning process is demonstrated to not only lead to a relatively permanent improvement of performance in the required task —the usual outcome— but also to alter the individual’s entire repertoire. Changes in the dynamical landscape due to learning are shown to result from two basic mechanisms or routes: bifurcation and shift. Which mechanism is selected depends both on the initial individual repertoire before new learning begins and the task to be learned. Both bifurcation and shift mechanisms are accommodated by a dynamical model, a relatively straightforward development of the well-established HKB model of movement coordination. Model simulations show that although environmental or task demands may be met equally well using either mechanism, the bifurcation route results in greater stabilization of the to-be-learned behavior. Thus stability not (or not only error is demonstrated to be the basis of selection, both of a new pattern of behavior and the path (smooth shift versus abrupt qualitative change that learning takes. In line with these results, recent neurophysiological evidence indicates that stability is a relevant feature around which brain activity is organized while an individual performs a coordination task. Finally, we explore the consequences of the dynamical approach to learning for

  12. An Outcome-Weighted Network Model for Characterizing Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtens, Denise M.; Frailey, Conor N.; Gravenor, Stephanie J.; Kricke, Gayle E.; Soulakis, Nicholas D.

    2016-01-01

    Shared patient encounters form the basis of collaborative relationships, which are crucial to the success of complex and interdisciplinary teamwork in healthcare. Quantifying the strength of these relationships using shared risk-adjusted patient outcomes provides insight into interactions that occur between healthcare providers. We developed the Shared Positive Outcome Ratio (SPOR), a novel parameter that quantifies the concentration of positive outcomes between a pair of healthcare providers over a set of shared patient encounters. We constructed a collaboration network using hospital emergency department patient data from electronic health records (EHRs) over a three-year period. Based on an outcome indicating patient satisfaction, we used this network to assess pairwise collaboration and evaluate the SPOR. By comparing this network of 574 providers and 5,615 relationships to a set of networks based on randomized outcomes, we identified 295 (5.2%) pairwise collaborations having significantly higher patient satisfaction rates. Our results show extreme high- and low-scoring relationships over a set of shared patient encounters and quantify high variability in collaboration between providers. We identified 29 top performers in terms of patient satisfaction. Providers in the high-scoring group had both a greater average number of associated encounters and a higher percentage of total encounters with positive outcomes than those in the low-scoring group, implying that more experienced individuals may be able to collaborate more successfully. Our study shows that a healthcare collaboration network can be structurally evaluated to characterize the collaborative interactions that occur between healthcare providers in a hospital setting. PMID:27706199

  13. A written language intervention for at-risk second grade students: a randomized controlled trial of the process assessment of the learner lesson plans in a tier 2 response-to-intervention (RtI) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Stephen R; Costa, Lara-Jeane C; McBee, Matthew; Anderson, Kathleen L; Yerby, Donna Carlson; Childress, Amy; Knuth, Sean B

    2013-04-01

    In a randomized controlled trial, 205 students were followed from grades 1 to 3 with a focus on changes in their writing trajectories following an evidence-based intervention during the spring of second grade. Students were identified as being at-risk (n=138), and then randomized into treatment (n=68) versus business-as-usual conditions (n=70). A typical group also was included (n=67). The writing intervention comprised Lesson Sets 4 and 7 from the Process Assessment of the Learner (PAL), and was conducted via small groups (three to six students) twice a week for 12 weeks in accordance with a response-to-intervention Tier 2 model. The primary outcome was the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-II Written Expression Scale. Results indicated modest support for the PAL lesson plans, with an accelerated rate of growth in writing skills following treatment. There were no significant moderator effects, although there was evidence that the most globally impaired students demonstrated a more rapid rate of growth following treatment. These findings suggest the need for ongoing examination of evidence-based treatments in writing for young elementary students.

  14. Computational EEG modelling of decision making under ambiguity reveals spatio-temporal dynamics of outcome evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jollans, Lee; Whelan, Robert; Venables, Louise; Turnbull, Oliver H; Cella, Matteo; Dymond, Simon

    2017-03-15

    Complex human cognition, such as decision-making under ambiguity, is reflected in dynamic spatio-temporal activity in the brain. Here, we combined event-related potentials with computational modelling of the time course of decision-making and outcome evaluation during the Iowa Gambling Task. Measures of choice probability generated using the Prospect Valence Learning Delta (PVL-Delta) model, in addition to objective trial outcomes (outcome magnitude and valence), were applied as regressors in a general linear model of the EEG signal. The resulting three-dimensional spatio-temporal characterization of task-related neural dynamics demonstrated that outcome valence, outcome magnitude, and PVL-Delta choice probability were expressed in distinctly separate event related potentials. Our findings showed that the P3 component was associated with an experience-based measure of outcome expectancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Developing Vocabulary and Speaking Skills for EFL Learners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽波

    2013-01-01

    [Introduction]A great number of researchers have investigated how to improve EFL learners’sub-skills through various classroom activities. Within this,some research has been specifically conducted on why teachers should help learners enlarge their vocabulary knowledge and to develop their speaking skills through diverse tasks(Thurston,1997;Marco,1998;Nation,2004;Demo,2001). One common outcome from the above research indicates that the most productive way for learners to develop speaking and vocabulary learning skills is through different activities rather than for example repeating words;memorizing grammatical rules or simply talking to native speakers whenever learners have the chance. It can be concluded from the previous research that it is essential for teachers to investigate what activities/tasks are appropriate to be utilised in order to help learners develop their sub-skills and vocabulary. This article aims to shed light on two activities which are designed to help EFL learners develop their vocabulary knowledge and speaking skills. These activities are specifically organised for EFL learners to gradually develop their discourse skills. The targeted EFL learners are intermediate learners who are year 12 learners in China. The ultimate goal of the article is to share opinions with EFL teachers about what kinds of activities are efficient and should be adopted in the EFL classroom teaching.

  16. Preoperative prediction model of outcome after cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borly, L; Anderson, I B; Bardram, Linda

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstone disease 20%-30% of the patients continue to have abdominal pain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether preoperative variables could predict the symptomatic outcome after cholecystectomy. METHODS: One hundred and two patients w...

  17. A stratified model for health outcomes in ankylosing spondylitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Machado; R. Landewé; J. Braun; K.G.A. Hermann; X. Baraliakos; D. Baker; B. Hsu; D. van der Heijde

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the relationships between several health outcomes in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Baseline pretreatment data from 214 patients with AS participating in the AS Study for the Evaluation of Recombinant Infliximab Therapy were analysed. Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) a

  18. DESIGNING INSTRUCTION FOR THE TRADITIONAL, ADULT, AND DISTANCE LEARNER: A New Engine for Technology-Based Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence A. Tomei

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Adult students demand a wider variety of instructional strategies that encompass real-world, interactive, cooperative, and discovery learning experiences.Designing Instruction for the Traditional, Adult, and Distance Learner: A New Engine for Technology-Based Teaching explores how technology impacts the process of devising instructional plans as well as learning itself in adult students. Containing research from leading international experts, this publication proposes realistic and accurate archetypes to assist educators in incorporating state-of-the-art technologies into online instruction.This text proposes a new paradigm for designing, developing, implementing, and assessed technology-based instruction. It addresses three target populations of today's learner: traditional, adult, and distance education. The text proposes a new model of instructional system design (ISD for developing effective technology-based education that involves a five-step process focusing on the learner, learning theories, resources, delivery modalities, and outcomes.

  19. The Audacious Learner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Ekoko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Audacious Learner is a risk taker. She approaches learning boldly, overcoming fear because she is driven by the will to know. In this paper, I utilize ideas from “Blogging with Audacity” (Skellie, 2008 whose work analyzes what makes a successful blogger and blog. I draw parallels between the successful, unconventional blogger and the unconventional, self directed learner.

  20. Examining the Effects of Field Dependence-Independence on Learners' Problem-Solving Performance and Interaction with a Computer Modeling Tool: Implications for the Design of Joint Cognitive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Charoula

    2013-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the effects of cognitive style on learners' performance and interaction during complex problem solving with a computer modeling tool. One hundred and nineteen undergraduates volunteered to participate in the study. Participants were first administered a test, and based on their test scores they were…

  1. Examining the Effects of Text-Only and Text-and-Visual Instructional Materials on the Achievement of Field-Dependent and Field-Independent Learner During Problem-Solving with Modeling Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Charoula; Valanides, Nicos

    2004-01-01

    Sixty-five undergraduates were classified into field-dependent, field-mixed, and field-independent learners, and were randomly assigned to two groups: text-only and text-and-visual. Participants in the text-only group received a description of a model in textual format, whereas participants in the other group received the same description in…

  2. Deepening Content Knowledge, Finding Meaning in Complex Text, and Using Games to Engage 21st Century High School Learners: Is It Possible to Kill Three Birds with One Design Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Priscilla; Hathaway, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the CLICK ("C"omputer Games and "L"iteracy "I"ntegrated with "C"ontent "K"nowledge) design model for high school education is proposed and developed as an instructional response to concerns about content coverage versus deeper content knowledge, learners' inability to grasp the meanings embedded in complex text, and disregard for…

  3. Children, computer exposure and musculoskeletal outcomes: the development of pathway models for school and home computer-related musculoskeletal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Courtenay; Straker, Leon; Pollock, Clare; Smith, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Children's computer use is rapidly growing, together with reports of related musculoskeletal outcomes. Models and theories of adult-related risk factors demonstrate multivariate risk factors associated with computer use. Children's use of computers is different from adult's computer use at work. This study developed and tested a child-specific model demonstrating multivariate relationships between musculoskeletal outcomes, computer exposure and child factors. Using pathway modelling, factors such as gender, age, television exposure, computer anxiety, sustained attention (flow), socio-economic status and somatic complaints (headache and stomach pain) were found to have effects on children's reports of musculoskeletal symptoms. The potential for children's computer exposure to follow a dose-response relationship was also evident. Developing a child-related model can assist in understanding risk factors for children's computer use and support the development of recommendations to encourage children to use this valuable resource in educational, recreational and communication environments in a safe and productive manner. Computer use is an important part of children's school and home life. Application of this developed model, that encapsulates related risk factors, enables practitioners, researchers, teachers and parents to develop strategies that assist young people to use information technology for school, home and leisure in a safe and productive manner.

  4. Dynamics of learner affective development in early FLL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Mihaljević Djigunović

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Affective learner factors were first considered as a cause of success in language learning. This was followed by a change in approach and recently authors (e.g., Edelenbos, Johnstone, & Kubanek, 2006 have considered them an important outcome, especially in early foreign language learning (FLL. Current research into affective learner factors in early FLL tries to catch the developmental aspects too, and studies are emerging that take a contextual view as well. This paper describes a study on affective characteristics of young FL learners that combines the developmental and contextual perspectives. Using the case study methodology the author analyses the affective profiles of three young learners of English as a foreign language who were followed for 4 years. The analyses are done taking into account their immediate language learning environment, home support, out-of-school exposure to English and language achievement. The findings suggest that affective learner factors contribute to the dynamic complexity of early FLL.

  5. Literacy-Related School Readiness Skills of English Language Learners in Head Start: An Analysis of the School Readiness Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yujeong; Gurel, Sungur; Oh, Jihyun; Bettini, Elizabeth A; Leite, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of Head Start on early literacy skills relevant to school readiness of English language learners compared to their peers. The comparisons of literacy outcomes were conducted between English language learners and non-English language learners when both groups participated and were not in Head…

  6. Literacy-Related School Readiness Skills of English Language Learners in Head Start: An Analysis of the School Readiness Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yujeong; Gurel, Sungur; Oh, Jihyun; Bettini, Elizabeth A; Leite, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of Head Start on early literacy skills relevant to school readiness of English language learners compared to their peers. The comparisons of literacy outcomes were conducted between English language learners and non-English language learners when both groups participated and were not in Head…

  7. Evaluating the Quality of the Learning Outcome in Healthcare Sector: The Expero4care Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervai, Sara; Polo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present the Expero4care model. Considering the growing need for a training evaluation model that does not simply fix processes, the Expero4care model represents the first attempt of a "quality model" dedicated to the learning outcomes of healthcare trainings. Design/Methodology/Approach: Created as development…

  8. Determinants of Students' Outcome: A Full-Fledged Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musah, Mohammed Borhandden; Ali, Hairuddin Bin Mohd; Al-Hudawi, Shafeeq Hussain Vazhathodi; Tahir, Lokman Mohd; Daud, Khadijah Binti; Hamdan, Abdul Rahim

    2015-01-01

    The vibrant demand for academic excellence in the twenty-first century has brought diverse determinants of students' outcome into play. However, few studies have validated the instruments and examined the mediating effect between exogenous and endogenous variables of the student outcome model. This study, therefore, investigates the psychometric…

  9. Determinants of Students' Outcome: A Full-Fledged Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musah, Mohammed Borhandden; Ali, Hairuddin Bin Mohd; Al-Hudawi, Shafeeq Hussain Vazhathodi; Tahir, Lokman Mohd; Daud, Khadijah Binti; Hamdan, Abdul Rahim

    2015-01-01

    The vibrant demand for academic excellence in the twenty-first century has brought diverse determinants of students' outcome into play. However, few studies have validated the instruments and examined the mediating effect between exogenous and endogenous variables of the student outcome model. This study, therefore, investigates the psychometric…

  10. Comparison of models for predicting outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease focusing on microsimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Amiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physicians have difficulty to subjectively estimate the cardiovascular risk of their patients. Using an estimate of global cardiovascular risk could be more relevant to guide decisions than using binary representation (presence or absence of risk factors data. The main aim of the paper is to compare different models of predicting the progress of a coronary artery diseases (CAD to help the decision making of physician. Methods: There are different standard models for predicting risk factors such as models based on logistic regression model, Cox regression model, dynamic logistic regression model, and simulation models such as Markov model and microsimulation model. Each model has its own application which can or cannot use by physicians to make a decision on treatment of each patient. Results: There are five main common models for predicting of outcomes, including models based on logistic regression model (for short-term outcomes, Cox regression model (for intermediate-term outcomes, dynamic logistic regression model, and simulation models such as Markov and microsimulation models (for long-term outcomes. The advantages and disadvantages of these models have been discussed and summarized. Conclusion: Given the complex medical decisions that physicians face in everyday practice, the multiple interrelated factors that play a role in choosing the optimal treatment, and the continuously accumulating new evidence on determinants of outcome and treatment options for CAD, physicians may potentially benefit from a clinical decision support system that accounts for all these considerations. The microsimulation model could provide cardiologists, researchers, and medical students a user-friendly software, which can be used as an intelligent interventional simulator.

  11. A model of global citizenship: antecedents and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reysen, Stephen; Katzarska-Miller, Iva

    2013-01-01

    As the world becomes increasingly interconnected, exposure to global cultures affords individuals opportunities to develop global identities. In two studies, we examine the antecedents and outcomes of identifying with a superordinate identity--global citizen. Global citizenship is defined as awareness, caring, and embracing cultural diversity while promoting social justice and sustainability, coupled with a sense of responsibility to act. Prior theory and research suggest that being aware of one's connection with others in the world (global awareness) and embedded in settings that value global citizenship (normative environment) lead to greater identification with global citizens. Furthermore, theory and research suggest that when global citizen identity is salient, greater identification is related to adherence to the group's content (i.e., prosocial values and behaviors). Results of the present set of studies showed that global awareness (knowledge and interconnectedness with others) and one's normative environment (friends and family support global citizenship) predicted identification with global citizens, and global citizenship predicted prosocial values of intergroup empathy, valuing diversity, social justice, environmental sustainability, intergroup helping, and a felt responsibility to act for the betterment of the world. The relationship between antecedents (normative environment and global awareness) and outcomes (prosocial values) was mediated by identification with global citizens. We discuss the relationship between the present results and other research findings in psychology, the implications of global citizenship for other academic domains, and future avenues of research. Global citizenship highlights the unique effect of taking a global perspective on a multitude of topics relevant to the psychology of everyday actions, environments, and identity.

  12. Semiparametric Bayesian joint modeling of a binary and continuous outcome with applications in toxicological risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Beom Seuk; Pennell, Michael L

    2014-03-30

    Many dose-response studies collect data on correlated outcomes. For example, in developmental toxicity studies, uterine weight and presence of malformed pups are measured on the same dam. Joint modeling can result in more efficient inferences than independent models for each outcome. Most methods for joint modeling assume standard parametric response distributions. However, in toxicity studies, it is possible that response distributions vary in location and shape with dose, which may not be easily captured by standard models. To address this issue, we propose a semiparametric Bayesian joint model for a binary and continuous response. In our model, a kernel stick-breaking process prior is assigned to the distribution of a random effect shared across outcomes, which allows flexible changes in distribution shape with dose shared across outcomes. The model also includes outcome-specific fixed effects to allow different location effects. In simulation studies, we found that the proposed model provides accurate estimates of toxicological risk when the data do not satisfy assumptions of standard parametric models. We apply our method to data from a developmental toxicity study of ethylene glycol diethyl ether.

  13. Beyond Beginning Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongsma, Kathy

    2003-01-01

    Discusses materials for middle grade and high school learners. Explains useful resources for teaching struggling writers. Details a publishing tool, a reading comprehension assessment, and a Scholastic Assessment Tests (SAT) preparation text. (PM)

  14. Learner motivation and interest

    OpenAIRE

    Daskalovska, Nina; Koleva Gudeva, Liljana; Ivanovska, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    There are a lot of factors which influence success in learning. However, one of the most important factors is the learner’s motivation to reach the desired goals. Research and experience show that learners with strong motivation can achieve a lot regardless of circumstances. Studies of motivation in second language learning have led to several distinctions, one of which is the distinction between integrative and instrumental motivation. According to this distinction, some learners are motivat...

  15. Learner motivation and interest

    OpenAIRE

    Daskalovska, Nina; Koleva Gudeva, Liljana; Ivanovska, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    There are a lot of factors which influence success in learning. However, one of the most important factors is the learner’s motivation to reach the desired goals. Research and experience show that learners with strong motivation can achieve a lot regardless of circumstances. Studies of motivation in second language learning have led to several distinctions, one of which is the distinction between integrative and instrumental motivation. According to this distinction, some learners are motivat...

  16. Rodent models of cardiopulmonary bypass: utility in improving perioperative outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, F.

    2008-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical and anesthesia techniques, subtle neurologic injury still remains an important complication after cardiac surgery. Because the causes are multifactorial and complex, research in an appropriate small animal model for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is warranted. This thesis

  17. Human experts' and a fuzzy model's predictions of outcomes of scoliosis treatment: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Eric; Pedrycz, Witold; Lou, Edmond

    2015-03-01

    Brace treatment is the most commonly used nonsurgical treatment for adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. However, brace treatment is not always successful and the factors influencing its success are not completely clear. This makes treatment outcome difficult to predict. A computer model which can accurately predict treatment outcomes could potentially provide valuable treatment recommendations. This paper describes a fuzzy system that includes a prediction model and a decision support engine. The model was constructed using conditional fuzzy c-means clustering to discover patterns in retrospective patient data. The model's ability to predict treatment outcome was compared to the ability of eight Scoliosis experts. The model and experts each predicted treatment outcome retrospectively for 28 braced patients, and these predictions were compared to the actual outcomes. The model outperformed all but one expert individually and performed similarly to the experts as a group. These results suggest that the fuzzy model is capable of providing meaningful treatment recommendations. This study offers the first model for this application whose performance has been shown to be at or above the human expert level.

  18. iPad Acceptance by English Learners in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Barry A. M.

    2016-01-01

    This study used the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT; Venkatesh, Morris, Davis, & Davis, 2003) model to investigate factors predicting the acceptance of iPad tablets by learners of English as a foreign language (EFL) at a technical vocational college in Saudi Arabia. An online survey was conducted on 199 male learners,…

  19. Predictors of reading literacy for first and second language learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, A.R.; Droop, Mienke; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2011-01-01

    In this study an attempt was made to construct a multi-factor model predicting the development of reading literacy in the upper grades of primary school in the Netherlands for subgroups of 729 first language (L1) learners and 93 second language (L2) learners. Following a longitudinal design, it was

  20. Predictors of reading literacy for first and second language learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, A.R.; Droop, Mienke; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2011-01-01

    In this study an attempt was made to construct a multi-factor model predicting the development of reading literacy in the upper grades of primary school in the Netherlands for subgroups of 729 first language (L1) learners and 93 second language (L2) learners. Following a longitudinal design, it was

  1. Lack of blinding of outcome assessors in animal model experiments implies risk of observer bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bello, Segun; Krogsbøll, Lasse T; Gruber, Jan

    2014-01-01

    and caused by three pesticides experiments with very large observer bias, pooled ROR was 0.20 (95% CI, 0.07, 0.59) in contrast to the pooled ROR in the other seven experiments, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.57, 1.17). CONCLUSION: Lack of blinding of outcome assessors in animal model experiments with subjective outcomes......OBJECTIVES: To examine the impact of not blinding outcome assessors on estimates of intervention effects in animal experiments modeling human clinical conditions. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We searched PubMed, Biosis, Google Scholar, and HighWire Press and included animal model experiments with both...... blinded and nonblinded outcome assessors. For each experiment, we calculated the ratio of odds ratios (ROR), that is, the odds ratio (OR) from nonblinded assessments relative to the corresponding OR from blinded assessments. We standardized the ORs according to the experimental hypothesis...

  2. Modeling Employee Social Responsibility as an Antecedent to Competitiveness Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kimeli Cheruiyot

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The study explained a model of employee social responsibility (ESR as an antecedent to corporate competitiveness. It hypothesizes that ESR has significant effect on employee competitiveness (EC. Questionnaires were administered to a sample of 700 employees selected from a population of 5,595 from 20 classified hotels in the coastal region of Kenya using proportionate and systematic random sampling methods. Structural equation model was used for model specification and hypotheses testing. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed on six and four constructs representing ESR and EC, respectively. Overall, a negative effect of ESR on EC was found with un-standardized β estimates = −.516; SE = .071, p = .000. Accordingly, increase in employee corporate social responsibility (CSR is associated with decline in EC. This was potentially paradoxical because employees demonstrated job and organization commitment and retention intention despite poor ESR practices.

  3. Issues of promoting learner autonomy in EFL context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichugova Inna L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focuded on investigating the phenomenon of learner autonomy, which has mostly been explored in Europe and the USA and is now attracting attention of researchers and academics in many other countries including Russia. Learner autonomy through a focus on learner reflection and taking responsibility for one’s own learning processes has become a central concern in the recent history of language teaching. However, many language teachers, who are committed to concepts of learnercentredness and autonomy, struggle with the ways to foster learner autonomy or at least to encourage the idea of learner autonomy in language classroom. The study aims at investigating what the most important issues which have a great impact on developing learner autonomy are. Having given special attention to conditions which can insure development of learner autonomy, a model covering seven issues relating to the subject matter has been designed. The authors state that such aspects as choice, goals and needs, support, emotional climate, learning strategies, learner attitude and motivation, and self-esteem should be considered as the goal to promote learner autonomy in EFL context.

  4. Moderators of Language Acquisition Models and Reading Achievement for English Language Learners: The Role of Emotional Warmth and Instructional Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Francesca A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cumulatively, research indicates that teachers who are emotionally supportive and create positive classroom climates influence the outcomes of at-risk students in nontrivial ways. Prior research has also established that teacher behaviors that support autonomy, provide higher level thinking opportunities, and value students' social and…

  5. Exploring Social Quality and Community Health Outcomes: An Ecological Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    Quality of life is widely used as a measure of individual well-being in developed countries. Social quality (SQ), however, describes how favorable the socioenvironmental components are that impact the life chance of an individual. Despite the associations between SQ, including institutional capacity and citizen capacity, and other community indicators, the impact of SQ on community health status has not been fully examined. This study investigated the interrelationships among institutional capacity, citizen capacity, and their associations with community-level health indicators such as mortality and suicide among 230 local governments in South Korea. Under the principles of conceptual suitability, clarity, reliability, consistency, changeability, and comparability, a total of 81 SQ indicators were collected, and 19 indicators of the 81 indicators were selected. The 19 indicators were transformed by the imputation of missing values, standardization, and geographic information system transformation. It was found that the health outcome of local government was superior as social welfare, political participation, and education were higher. According to the result of the regression analysis based on the regional type, social welfare had the most influence on the health level of local government in both metropolises and small-/medium-sized cities. In addition, education and political participation had a positive effect on the health indicator of local metropolis government. However, SQ indicators did not have any meaningful influence at the county level. Therefore, small- and medium-sized cities need to promote the collective health of the local government through improving social welfare, and metropolises need to consider the complex relationship among other indicators while increasing the level of social welfare and education. Meanwhile, counties need to develop health indicators that reflect aged population characteristics and social environment of rural areas

  6. Management outcome of acute urinary retention: model of prediction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, Padraig

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVES: To assess for predictors of outcome in patients presenting with acute urinary retention (AUR). METHODS: A study was performed in our unit to evaluate trial without catheter (TWOC) and successive management. We assessed for predictors of surgical or medical management, which included: age, volume drained at time of catheterisation, cause of retention, serum creatinine, success of trial of voiding, co-morbidities, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate size on digital rectal examination (DRE). RESULTS: 72 men were entered into the study over an 18-month period: 27 had a successful first TWOC, 20 patients had a second TWOC, and 6 were successful. In total, 31 of the 33 patients with a successful TWOC remained on alpha-blockers without a further episode of AUR within a minimum of 6 months\\' follow-up. Patients failing TWOC were managed by transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 22), long-term catheterisation (n = 15) or prostatic stents (n = 3), and 1 patient died prior to intervention. Three predictors were significant on multivariate analysis: PSA (>2.9 ng\\/ml), prostate size on DRE (large) and volume drained at time of catheterisation (>or=1,000 ml). CONCLUSION: Patients with elevated PSA (>2.9 ng\\/ml), a large prostate size on DRE and a volume drained at time of catheterisation >1,000 ml are best managed by surgical intervention, while those with volumes drained at time of catheterisation of <1,000 ml, a PSA

  7. Investigating the outcomes of SPH models of catastrophic destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Oro, A.; Cellino, A.; Paolicchi, P.; Tanga, P.

    Smooth particle hydro-dynamics (SPH) codes have proved able to simulate satisfactorily the shattering processes in high-energy collisions among asteroids, reproducing the major observational evidences. In particular, SPH models reproduce fairly well the size distributions of the members of some asteroid families. A considerable difference between SPH models and Semi-Empirical Models (SEM) is that in the former the asteroids are ground up into very small fragments, the size of which is limited by the resolution of the code. Moreover, the subsequent ballistic dynamical evolution, driven by their mutual gravitational attraction, would result in a significant re-accumulation into many bodies. On the contrary, ejection velocity fields predicted by SEM allow the reaccumulation into very few bodies, sometimes only the largest remnant. This difference is a critical issue for the interpretation of the observational data in order to understand the physics of the catastrophic destruction process, and the physical characteristics of the asteroids themselves. We present a new analysis of some SPH velocity fields aiming to shed light on the intrinsic differences between SPH models and SEMs.

  8. Reformulating the Depression Model of Learned Hopelessness for Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Raymond C. P.; Watkins, David; Hattie, John; Alexander, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This review explores developments in the construct of learned hopelessness, which originated in the clinical literature dealing with depression. In that context, the model developed by Abramson, Metalsky, and Alloy [Abramson, L. Y., Metalsky, G. I., & Alloy, L. B. (1989). "Hopelessness depression: A theory-based subtype of depression."…

  9. The impact of role models on health outcomes for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Jason D P; Kuhns, Lisa; Garofalo, Robert

    2012-04-01

    There is little research on the impact of role models on health outcomes for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. This exploratory study describes the presence and availability of LGBT-affirming role models, and examines the relationship between the accessibility of role models and health outcomes among a community-based sample of LGBT youth. A convenience sample of 496 ethnically diverse, 16-24-year-old LGBT youth was recruited to complete a computer-assisted interview, using standardized instruments validated with adolescents. The prevalence and characteristics of role models were described. Differences in subgroup distribution were assessed using Pearson χ(2) test (p youth from negative outcomes, and formal mechanisms for connecting LGBT youth with caring adults who can serve as role models, such as mentoring programs, are critical. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Markov Model for Analyzing Polytomous Outcome Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ataharul Islam

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} This paper highlights the estimation and test procedures for multi-state Markov models with covariate dependences in higher orders. Logistic link functions are used to analyze the transition probabilities of three or more states of a Markov model emerging from a longitudinal study. For illustration purpose the models are used for analysis of panel data on Health and Retirement Study conducted in USA during 1992-2002. The applications use self reported data on perceived emotional health at each round of the nationwide survey conducted among the elderly people. Useful and detailed results on the change in the perceived emotional health status among the elderly people are obtained.

  11. Increasing Self-Efficacy Expectations and Outcome Expectations: A Model to Facilitate Transfer of Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Jean M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Without organizationwide commitment to training programs, educators may be able to increase learners' self-efficacy to acquire desired skills or behavior. But behavior and skills will not be transferred to the job if learners have low expectations about their use or if positive reinforcement is lacking. (SK)

  12. How to Promote Learner-Learner Scaffolding in ESL Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yue

    2016-01-01

    The current study attempts to investigate learner-learner scaffolding in ESL classroom. Analyzing how learners provid-ing scaffolding with each other, and presenting methods how to promote learner-learner scaffolding. In this paper, discourse anal-ysis methodology utilized to carry out the research. In the study, the data collected from the transcripts of audio and video-re-corded interaction during lessons in ESL classrooms at advanced level. The finding indicated that effective scaffolding among learners can promote their metacognition. It is hoped that the present study can serve to raise teachers’awareness of the impor-tance of learner-learner scaffolding in English language teaching and learning.

  13. Investigating the efficacy of a balanced model of phonics and whole language approach for the development of young learners' early reading skills in English

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katerina Damianou

    2016-01-01

      The present study is concerned with the skill of reading and young learners. It aims at exploring the ways in which beginner readers of English in the Greek primary school context access the print...

  14. When Lanchester met Richardson, the outcome was stalemate: A parable for mathematical models of insurgency

    OpenAIRE

    Niall J MacKay

    2015-01-01

    Many authors have used dynamical systems to model asymmetric war. We explore this approach more broadly, first returning to the prototypical models such as Richardson’s arms race, Lanchester’s attrition models and Deitchman’s guerrilla model. We investigate combinations of these and their generalizations, understanding how they relate to assumptions about asymmetric conflict. Our main result is that the typical long-term outcome is neither annihilation nor escalation but a stable fixed point,...

  15. The outcome competency framework for practitioners in infection prevention and control: use of the outcome logic model for evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, E; Loveday, HP; Kiernan, MA; Tannahill, M

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare is delivered in a dynamic environment with frequent changes in populations, methods, equipment and settings. Infection prevention and control practitioners (IPCPs) must ensure that they are competent in addressing the challenges they face and are equipped to develop infection prevention and control (IPC) services in line with a changing world of healthcare provision. A multifaceted Framework was developed to assist IPCPs to enhance competence at an individual, team and organisational level to enable quality performance and improved quality of care. However, if these aspirations are to be met, it is vital that competency frameworks are fit for purpose or they risk being ignored. The aim of this unique study was to evaluate short and medium term outcomes as set out in the Outcome Logic Model to assist with the evaluation of the impact and success of the Framework. This study found that while the Framework is being used effectively in some areas, it is not being used as much or in the ways that were anticipated. The findings will enable future work on revision, communication and dissemination, and will provide intelligence to those initiating education and training in the utilisation of the competences.

  16. The Balanced Scorecard: A Systemic Model for Evaluation and Assessment of Learning Outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Bielavitz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The goal of this paper is to explore using Kaplan and Norton’s balanced scorecard methodology as a systemic model for outcomes assessment. The expectations of academic accrediting agencies have shifted from measurement of inputs and outputs to that of the library’s impact on learning and demonstrating accountability. Recent literature has presented methods for performing specific aspects of outcomes assessment. However, the scorecard methodology may provide a systemic advantage beneficial to library administrators and managers.Methods – This paper provides a selective review of outcomes assessment in academic libraries and a description of the balanced scorecard methodology, focusing on its relevance to assessment and demonstration of accountability.Results – A theoretical scenario is outlined, including examples of a scorecard used for outcomes assessment. For each example, the benefits of using a systemic approach are examined.Conclusions – Using a systems‐thinking approach to outcomes assessment may provide significant advantages to library administrators and managers. As the model includes traditional methods of outcomes assessment, the scorecard approach adds elements of process improvement, identification of the inputs and outputs that create outcomes, and a tool for communicating accountability for resources.

  17. Clinical outcomes of HIV care delivery models in the US: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, April D; Martin, Erika G; Galadima, Hadiza; Bono, Rose S; Tehrani, Ali Bonakdar; Cyrus, John W; Henderson, Margaret; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Krist, Alexander H

    2016-10-01

    With over 1 million people living with HIV, the US faces national challenges in HIV care delivery due to an inadequate HIV specialist workforce and the increasing role of non-communicable chronic diseases in driving morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. Alternative HIV care delivery models, which include substantial roles for advanced practitioners and/or coordination between specialty and primary care settings in managing HIV-infected patients, may address these needs. We aimed to systematically review the evidence on patient-level HIV-specific and primary care health outcomes for HIV-infected adults receiving outpatient care across HIV care delivery models. We identified randomized trials and observational studies from bibliographic and other databases through March 2016. Eligible studies met pre-specified eligibility criteria including on care delivery models and patient-level health outcomes. We considered all available evidence, including non-experimental studies, and evaluated studies for risk of bias. We identified 3605 studies, of which 13 met eligibility criteria. Of the 13 eligible studies, the majority evaluated specialty-based care (9 studies). Across all studies and care delivery models, eligible studies primarily reported mortality and antiretroviral use, with specialty-based care associated with mortality reductions at the clinician and practice levels and with increased antiretroviral initiation or use at the clinician level but not the practice level. Limited and heterogeneous outcomes were reported for other patient-level HIV-specific outcomes (e.g., viral suppression) as well as for primary care health outcomes across all care delivery models. No studies addressed chronic care outcomes related to aging. Limited evidence was available across geographic settings and key populations. As re-design of care delivery in the US continues to evolve, better understanding of patient-level HIV-related and primary care health outcomes, especially

  18. Overview of data-synthesis in systematic reviews of studies on outcome prediction models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van den Berg (Tobias); M.W. Heymans (Martijn); O. Leone; D. Vergouw (David); J. Hayden (Jill); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); H.C. de Vet (Henrica C)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Many prognostic models have been developed. Different types of models, i.e. prognostic factor and outcome prediction studies, serve different purposes, which should be reflected in how the results are summarized in reviews. Therefore we set out to investigate how authors of

  19. Overview of data-synthesis in systematic reviews of studies on outcome prediction models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, T. van den; Heymans, M.W.; Leone, S.S.; Vergouw, D.; Hayden, J.A.; Verhagen, A.P.; Vet, H.C.W. de

    2013-01-01

    Background: Many prognostic models have been developed. Different types of models, i.e. prognostic factor and outcome prediction studies, serve different purposes, which should be reflected in how the results are summarized in reviews. Therefore we set out to investigate how authors of reviews

  20. Student Identification with Business Education Models: Measurement and Relationship to Educational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbesleben, Jonathon R. B.; Wheeler, Anthony R.

    2009-01-01

    Although management scholars have provided a variety of metaphors to describe the role of students in management courses, researchers have yet to explore students' identification with the models and how they are linked to educational outcomes. This article develops a measurement tool for students' identification with business education models and…

  1. The Effect of Integrated Learning Model and Critical Thinking Skill of Science Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazriyah, N.; Supriyati, Y.; Rahayu, W.

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of integrated learning model and critical thinking skill toward science learning outcomes. The study was conducted in SDN Kemiri Muka 1 Depok in fifth grade school year 2014/2015 using cluster random sampling was done to 80 students. Retrieval of data obtained through tests and analysis by Variance (ANOVA) and two lines with the design treatment by level 2x2. The results showed that: (1) science learning outcomes students that given thematic integrated learning model is higher than in the group of students given fragmented learning model, (2) there is an interaction effect between critical thinking skills with integrated learning model, (3) for students who have high critical thinking skills, science learning outcomes students who given by thematic integrated learning model higher than fragmented learning model and (4) for students who have the ability to think critically low yield higher learning science fragmented model. The results of this study indicate that thematic learning model with critical thinking skills can improve science learning outcomes of students.

  2. Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need scored on plaster and digital models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenema, A.C.; Katsaros, C.; Boxum, S.C.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare standard plaster models with their digital counterparts for the applicability of the Index of Complexity, Outcome, and Need (ICON). Generated study models of 30 randomly selected patients: 30 pre- (T(0)) and 30 post- (T(1)) treatment. Two examiners, calibrated in

  3. Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need scored on plaster and digital models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenema, A. C.; Katsaros, C.; Boxum, S. C.; Bronkhorst, E. M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare standard plaster models with their digital counterparts for the applicability of the Index of Complexity, Outcome, and Need (ICON). Generated study models of 30 randomly selected patients: 30 pre- (T-0) and 30 post- (T-1) treatment. Two examiners, calibrated in t

  4. Fitting Multilevel Models with Ordinal Outcomes: Performance of Alternative Specifications and Methods of Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Daniel J.; Sterba, Sonya K.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has compared methods of estimation for fitting multilevel models to binary data, but there are reasons to believe that the results will not always generalize to the ordinal case. This article thus evaluates (a) whether and when fitting multilevel linear models to ordinal outcome data is justified and (b) which estimator to employ…

  5. Evidencing Learning Outcomes: A Multi-Level, Multi-Dimensional Course Alignment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Bhavani; Leitch, Shona; Watty, Kim

    2015-01-01

    This conceptual framework proposes a multi-level, multi-dimensional course alignment model to implement a contextualised constructive alignment of rubric design that authentically evidences and assesses learning outcomes. By embedding quality control mechanisms at each level for each dimension, this model facilitates the development of an aligned…

  6. Models of Instruction Used in Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Amy Jean; Fulcomer, Mark C.

    2010-01-01

    To meet the needs of a diverse student population while addressing the knowledge and skills outcomes of the curriculum, faculty should develop a repertoire of instructional models. Research-based instructional models from the fields of education and health care have been developed to support various learner outcomes. Emphasis on evidence-based…

  7. BENCHMARKING LEARNER EDUCATION USING ONLINE BUSINESS SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred H. Miller

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For programmatic accreditation by the Accreditation Council of Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP, business programs are required to meet STANDARD #4, Measurement and Analysis of Student Learning and Performance. Business units must demonstrate that outcome assessment systems are in place using documented evidence that shows how the results are being used to further develop or improve the academic business program. The Higher Colleges of Technology, a 17 campus federal university in the United Arab Emirates, differentiates its applied degree programs through a ‘learning by doing ethos,’ which permeates the entire curricula. This paper documents benchmarking of education for managing innovation. Using business simulation for Bachelors of Business, Year 3 learners, in a business strategy class; learners explored through a simulated environment the following functional areas; research and development, production, and marketing of a technology product. Student teams were required to use finite resources and compete against other student teams in the same universe. The study employed an instrument developed in a 60-sample pilot study of business simulation learners against which subsequent learners participating in online business simulation could be benchmarked. The results showed incremental improvement in the program due to changes made in assessment strategies, including the oral defense.

  8. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Medical Learners and Practicing Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Mueller

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement, good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional. Furthermore, professionalism is associated with better clinical outcomes. Hence, medical learners and practicing physicians should be taught and assessed for professionalism. A number of methods can be used to teach professionalism (e.g. didactic lectures, web-based modules, role modeling, reflection, interactive methods, etc.. Because of the nature of professionalism, no single tool for assessing it among medical learners and practicing physicians exists. Instead, multiple assessment tools must be used (e.g. multi-source feedback using 360-degree reviews, patient feedback, critical incident reports, etc.. Data should be gathered continuously throughout an individual’s career. For the individual learner or practicing physician, data generated by these tools can be used to create a “professionalism portfolio,” the totality of which represents a picture of the individual’s professionalism. This portfolio in turn can be used for formative and summative feedback. Data from professionalism assessments can also be used for developing professionalism curricula and generating research hypotheses. Health care leaders should support teaching and assessing professionalism at all levels of learning and practice and promote learning environments and institutional cultures that are consistent with professionalism precepts.

  9. Predictive Modeling for End-of-Life Pain Outcome using Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Muhammad K.; Stifter, Janet; Yao, Yingwei; Ansari, Rashid; Kee-nan, Gail M.; Wilkie, Diana J.; Khokhar, Ashfaq A.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) systems are being widely used in the healthcare industry nowadays, mostly for monitoring the progress of the patients. EHR data analysis has become a big data problem as data is growing rapidly. Using a nursing EHR system, we built predictive models for determining what factors influence pain in end-of-life (EOL) patients. Utilizing different modeling techniques, we developed coarse-grained and fine-grained models to predict patient pain outcomes. The coarse-grained models help predict the outcome at the end of each hospitalization, whereas fine-grained models help predict the outcome at the end of each shift, thus providing a trajectory of predicted outcomes over the entire hospitalization. These models can help in determining effective treatments for individuals and groups of patients and support standardization of care where appropriate. Using these models may also lower the cost and increase the quality of end-of-life care. Results from these techniques show significantly accurate predictions. PMID:27500287

  10. Learners, teachers and curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2008-01-01

    of virtual e-learning, interviews with teachers and 10 learner participants in a virtual classroom setting, and discourse analysis of curriculum developed for the particular e-learning course The research has taken place in the context of a study of e-learning and virtual teaching of Danish as a Second...... language for adults. The research results indicate that teachers seem to compensate by trying to create virtual communities of learning. Learners, however, experience disembedded relations. Conversely, curriculum development, on tends to ‘exploit’ the conditions of disembedding social relations in e-learning......, locationally distant”. The aim of the paper is to analyse and discuss how different positions in e-learning settings result in different answers to modernity. These settings can be applied to either teacher, learner or curriculum positions. The research was based on a qualitative longitudinal case study...

  11. Optimizing literacy in English language learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Maria Adelaida; Gray, Shelley

    2007-02-01

    Children in the United States who are English language learners characteristically do not exhibit the same levels of reading achievement as their peers. The article describes the development of English literacy in English language learners and the relationship between a child's second language (L2) and his or her native language (L1) in literacy development. It is organized first to consider the issue of language of instruction and language transfer, specifically the aspects of L1 literacy that appear to transfer to the second language (L2), English. It then discusses general principles for professionals working to optimize English literacy development in different models of literacy instruction for English language learners. We conclude that using the child's L1 provides the children with strong language and literacy skills in both languages.

  12. Hypermedia Design as Learner Scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Amy M.

    2008-01-01

    A number of available resources offer guidance about hypermedia design strategies, many of which rely on principles of user-centered design. Many recent efforts, however, have focused more on developing "learner-centered" hypermedia. Learner-centered hypermedia is designed to help learners achieve their educational goals, rather than offer mere…

  13. A theoretical model of health-related outcomes of resilience in middle adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoloveno, Robert

    2015-03-01

    There is a dearth of knowledge about the health outcomes of resilience during adolescence, making the study of health-related outcomes of resilience important. The purpose of this study was to develop a theory-based just-identified model and to test the direct and indirect effects of resilience on hope, well-being, and health-promoting lifestyle in middle adolescents. The study used a correlational design. The final sample consisted of 311 middle adolescents, aged 15 to 17, who were recruited from a public high school. Participants responded to instrument packets in classroom settings. The structural equation model was tested with the LISREL 8.80 software program. All seven hypotheses were supported at a statistically significant level (p resilience. Alternate models of outcomes of resilience need to be tested on adolescents.

  14. Insight, psychopathology, explanatory models and outcome of schizophrenia in India: a prospective 5-year cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Shanthi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sole focus of models of insight on bio-medical perspectives to the complete exclusion of local, non-medical and cultural constructs mandates review. This study attempted to investigate the impact of insight, psychopathology, explanatory models of illness on outcome of first episode schizophrenia. Method Patients diagnosed to have DSM IV schizophrenia (n = 131 were assessed prospectively for insight, psychopathology, explanatory models of illness at baseline, 6, 12 and 60 months using standard instruments. Multiple linear and logistic regression and generalized estimating equations (GEE were employed to assess predictors of outcome. Results We could follow up 95 (72.5% patients. Sixty-five of these patients (68.4% achieved remission. There was a negative relationship between psychosis rating and insight scores. Urban residence, fluctuating course of the initial illness, and improvement in global functioning at 6 months and lower psychosis rating at 12 months were significantly related to remission at 5 years. Insight scores, number of non-medical explanatory models and individual explanatory models held during the later course of the illness were significantly associated with outcome. Analysis of longitudinal data using GEE showed that women, rural residence, insight scores and number of non-medical explanatory models of illness held were significantly associated with BPRS scores during the study period. Conclusions Insight, the disease model and the number of non-medical model positively correlated with improvement in psychosis arguing for a complex interaction between the culture, context and illness variables. These finding argue that insight and explanatory models are secondary to psychopathology, course and outcome of the illness. The awareness of mental illness is a narrative act in which people make personal sense of the many challenges they face. The course and outcome of the illness, cultural context

  15. Prediction of an outcome using trajectories estimated from a linear mixed model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Nami; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Takeuchi, Masahiro

    2009-09-01

    In longitudinal data, interest is usually focused on the repeatedly measured variable itself. In some situations, however, the pattern of variation of the variable over time may contain information about a separate outcome variable. In such situations, longitudinal data provide an opportunity to develop predictive models for future observations of the separate outcome variable given the current data for an individual. In particular, longitudinally changing patterns of repeated measurements of a variable measured up to time t, or trajectories, can be used to predict an outcome measure or event that occurs after time t. In this article, we propose a method for predicting an outcome variable based on a generalized linear model, specifically, a logistic regression model, the covariates of which are variables that characterize the trajectory of an individual. Since the trajectory of an individual contains estimation error, the proposed logistic regression model constitutes a measurement error model. The model is fitted in two steps. First, a linear mixed model is fitted to the longitudinal data to estimate the random effect that characterizes the trajectory for each individual while adjusting for other covariates. In the second step, a conditional likelihood approach is applied to account for the estimation error in the trajectory. Prediction of an outcome variable is based on the logistic regression model in the second step. The receiver operating characteristic curve is used to compare the discrimination ability of a model with trajectories to one without trajectories as covariates. A simulation study is used to assess the performance of the proposed method, and the method is applied to clinical trial data.

  16. A model to advance nursing science in trauma practice and injury outcomes research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Therese S; Aitken, Leanne M

    2011-12-01

    This discussion paper reports development of a model to advance nursing science and practice in trauma care based on an analysis of the literature and expert opinion. The continuum of clinical care provided to trauma patients extends from the time of injury through to long-term recovery and final outcomes. Nurses bring a unique expertise to meet the complex physical and psychosocial needs of trauma patients and their families to influence outcomes across this entire continuum. Literature was obtained by searching CINAHL, PubMed and OvidMedline databases for 1990-2010. Search terms included trauma, nursing, scope of practice and role, with results restricted to those published in English. Manual searches of relevant journals and websites were undertaken. Core concepts in this trauma outcomes model include environment, person/family, structured care settings, long-term outcomes and nursing interventions. The relationships between each of these concepts extend across all phases of care. Intermediate outcomes are achieved in each phase of care and influence and have congruence with long-term outcomes. Implications for policy and practice.  This model is intended to provide a framework to assist trauma nurses and researchers to consider the injured person in the context of the social, economic, cultural and physical environment from which they come and the long-term goals that each person has during recovery. The entire model requires testing in research and assessment of its practical contribution to practice. Planning and integrating care across the trauma continuum and recognition of the role of the injured person's background, family and resources will lead to improved long-term outcomes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Implementing Outcome Measures Within an Enhanced Palliative Care Day Care Model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kilonzo, Isae

    2015-04-23

    Specialist palliative care day care (SPDC) units provide an array of services to patients and their families and can increase continuity of care between inpatient and homecare settings. A multidisciplinary teamwork approach is emphasized, and different models of day care exist. Depending on the emphasis of care, the models can be social, medical, therapeutic, or mixed. We describe our experience of introducing an enhanced therapeutic specialist day care model and using both patient- and carer-rated tools to monitor patient outcomes.

  18. From Creatures of Habit to Goal-Directed Learners: Tracking the Developmental Emergence of Model-Based Reinforcement Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Johannes H; Otto, A Ross; Daw, Nathaniel D; Hartley, Catherine A

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical models distinguish two decision-making strategies that have been formalized in reinforcement-learning theory. A model-based strategy leverages a cognitive model of potential actions and their consequences to make goal-directed choices, whereas a model-free strategy evaluates actions based solely on their reward history. Research in adults has begun to elucidate the psychological mechanisms and neural substrates underlying these learning processes and factors that influence their relative recruitment. However, the developmental trajectory of these evaluative strategies has not been well characterized. In this study, children, adolescents, and adults performed a sequential reinforcement-learning task that enabled estimation of model-based and model-free contributions to choice. Whereas a model-free strategy was apparent in choice behavior across all age groups, a model-based strategy was absent in children, became evident in adolescents, and strengthened in adults. These results suggest that recruitment of model-based valuation systems represents a critical cognitive component underlying the gradual maturation of goal-directed behavior.

  19. Discrimination of Arabic Contrasts by American Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mahmoud, Mahmoud S.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on second language perception of non-native contrasts. The study specifically tests the perceptual assimilation model (PAM) by examining American learners' ability to discriminate Arabic contrasts. Twenty two native American speakers enrolled in a university level Arabic language program took part in a forced choice AXB…

  20. Constructions of Language and Learner Identity in the Classroom: Confessions of a Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Teachers and learners can hold differing ideas about language and goals for language learning which are then played out in classroom interactions. Constructions of what counts as language and learning impact on learner engagement and identity and the outcomes of language learning. This study analyses a researcher's account of the learning of…

  1. Constructions of Language and Learner Identity in the Classroom: Confessions of a Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Teachers and learners can hold differing ideas about language and goals for language learning which are then played out in classroom interactions. Constructions of what counts as language and learning impact on learner engagement and identity and the outcomes of language learning. This study analyses a researcher's account of the learning of…

  2. Practice Makes Better? A Study of Meditation Learners in a Classroom Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Yen; Kuo, Tsung-Hsien; Kuo, Yen-Ku; Kuo, Yen-Lin; Ho, Li-An; Lin, Chien-Ting

    2007-01-01

    The study investigates the effect of length of meditation history on various factors, namely learning motivation, learning outcome and classroom climate. Data were collected from working adult learners (n = 450) attending meditation classes in two large cities in Taiwan. The investigation categorized learners based on meditation experience, namely…

  3. Fragile Identities: Exploring Learner Identity, Learner Autonomy and Motivation through Young Learners' Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Terry Eric

    2011-01-01

    Recent research in the fields of motivation and learner autonomy in language learning has begun to explore their relationships to the construct of identity. This article builds on this through the voices of a group of six learners of French or German in a secondary school in England, over a two-year period. These young learners initially reveal a…

  4. Performance of models for estimating absolute risk difference in multicenter trials with binary outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pedroza

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reporting of absolute risk difference (RD is recommended for clinical and epidemiological prospective studies. In analyses of multicenter studies, adjustment for center is necessary when randomization is stratified by center or when there is large variation in patients outcomes across centers. While regression methods are used to estimate RD adjusted for baseline predictors and clustering, no formal evaluation of their performance has been previously conducted. Methods We performed a simulation study to evaluate 6 regression methods fitted under a generalized estimating equation framework: binomial identity, Poisson identity, Normal identity, log binomial, log Poisson, and logistic regression model. We compared the model estimates to unadjusted estimates. We varied the true response function (identity or log, number of subjects per center, true risk difference, control outcome rate, effect of baseline predictor, and intracenter correlation. We compared the models in terms of convergence, absolute bias and coverage of 95 % confidence intervals for RD. Results The 6 models performed very similar to each other for the majority of scenarios. However, the log binomial model did not converge for a large portion of the scenarios including a baseline predictor. In scenarios with outcome rate close to the parameter boundary, the binomial and Poisson identity models had the best performance, but differences from other models were negligible. The unadjusted method introduced little bias to the RD estimates, but its coverage was larger than the nominal value in some scenarios with an identity response. Under the log response, coverage from the unadjusted method was well below the nominal value (<80 % for some scenarios. Conclusions We recommend the use of a binomial or Poisson GEE model with identity link to estimate RD for correlated binary outcome data. If these models fail to run, then either a logistic regression, log Poisson

  5. California's English Learner Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    English Learner (EL) students in California's schools are numerous and diverse, and they lag behind their native-English-speaking peers. Closing the achievement gap for EL students has been a long-standing goal for California educators, and there are some signs of success. Now that EL funding and curriculum issues are receiving a fresh level of…

  6. Learner Autonomy Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Eva

    2012-01-01

    This article explores whether the perception of learner autonomy that is promoted in language pedagogy is suitable for preparing students to perform successfully in the changed circumstances of the use of English. Recent developments, which include the growing role of English as a lingua franca and computer-mediated communication (CMC), give rise…

  7. Curriculum for Today's Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura; McDaniel, Larry; Wright, Ottley; Watt, Don

    2009-01-01

    For the 21st century learner, the foundational principles of information development have grown exponentially. In many fields, the life of knowledge can be measured in months or years, with learning occurring in vastly different ways than in previous decades. Education as a continual process, can last a lifetime, and can be greatly facilitated by…

  8. WORK AND LEARNER IDENTITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Sissel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to suggest a theoretical framework than can assess to how people’s engagement in specific historical and social work practices are significant to their development, maintenance or transformation of a learner identity. Such a framework is crucial in order to grasp how...

  9. Combining the Performance Strengths of the Logistic Regression and Neural Network Models: A Medical Outcomes Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wun Wong

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of medical outcomes is important in the effort to contain costs, streamline patient management, and codify medical practices. As such, it is necessary to develop predictive models that will make accurate predictions of these outcomes. The neural network methodology has often been shown to perform as well, if not better, than the logistic regression methodology in terms of sample predictive performance. However, the logistic regression method is capable of providing an explanation regarding the relationship(s between variables. This explanation is often crucial to understanding the clinical underpinnings of the disease process. Given the respective strengths of the methodologies in question, the combined use of a statistical (i.e., logistic regression and machine learning (i.e., neural network technology in the classification of medical outcomes is warranted under appropriate conditions. The study discusses these conditions and describes an approach for combining the strengths of the models.

  10. Joint modeling of longitudinal data and discrete-time survival outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feiyou; Stein, Catherine M; Elston, Robert C

    2016-08-01

    A predictive joint shared parameter model is proposed for discrete time-to-event and longitudinal data. A discrete survival model with frailty and a generalized linear mixed model for the longitudinal data are joined to predict the probability of events. This joint model focuses on predicting discrete time-to-event outcome, taking advantage of repeated measurements. We show that the probability of an event in a time window can be more precisely predicted by incorporating the longitudinal measurements. The model was investigated by comparison with a two-step model and a discrete-time survival model. Results from both a study on the occurrence of tuberculosis and simulated data show that the joint model is superior to the other models in discrimination ability, especially as the latent variables related to both survival times and the longitudinal measurements depart from 0.

  11. High Performance Education. Porsche Shares Outcomes-Based Model with Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Vernon

    1994-01-01

    The Porsche model of outcome-based education in its auto technician training program was adapted by vocational instructors in Nevada. Its effectiveness derives from pretesting, teaching with demonstrations, student practice with peer coaching, performance measurement, and reteaching and retesting. (SK)

  12. Predicting major outcomes in type 1 diabetes: a model development and validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Vergouwe, Y.; Costacou, T.; Miller, R.G.; Zgibor, J.; Chaturvedi, N.; Snell-Bergeon, J.K.; Maahs, D.M.; Rewers, M.; Forsblom, C.; Harjutsalo, V.; Groop, P.H.; Fuller, J.H.; Moons, K.G.M.; Orchard, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Type 1 diabetes is associated with a higher risk of major vascular complications and death. A reliable method that predicted these outcomes early in the disease process would help in risk classification. We therefore developed such a prognostic model and quantified its performance in

  13. The assessment of learning outcomes of computer modeling in secondary science education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borkulo, van Sylvia Patricia

    2009-01-01

    The computer modeling of dynamic systems is a topic that aligns well with the current trend in secondary science education to actively involve students in their knowledge construction, give room for inquiry, and offer realistic tasks. In this dissertation the specific learning outcomes that can be e

  14. Linking HR strategy, e-HR goals, architectures, and outcomes: a model and case study evidence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddington, Martin; Martin, Graeme; Bondarouk, T.V.; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Ruel, H.; Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria; Looise, J.C.; Looise, Jan C.

    2011-01-01

    Building on our earlier model of the links between HR strategy, e-HR goals, architectures, and outcomes, we illustrate the relationship between some of these elements with data from three global organizations. In doing so, we aim to help academics and practitioners understand this increasingly

  15. Developing Reflective Thinking Instructional Model for Enhancing Students' Desirable Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porntaweekul, Satjatam; Raksasataya, Sarintip; Nethanomsak, Teerachai

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the reflective thinking instructional model for enhancing empowerment of pre-service and in-service educational students in Roi-Et Rajabhat University, Thailand. In this research, qualitative methods, observation, interview, short note, and group discussion were used to indicate students' desirable learning outcomes,…

  16. School Factors Explaining Achievement on Cognitive and Affective Outcomes : Establishing a Dynamic Model of Educational Effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic model of educational effectiveness defines school level factors associated with student outcomes. Emphasis is given to the two main aspects of policy, evaluation, and improvement in schools which affect quality of teaching and learning at both the level of teachers and students: a) teach

  17. School Factors Explaining Achievement on Cognitive and Affective Outcomes: Establishing a Dynamic Model of Educational Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creemers, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic model of educational effectiveness defines school level factors associated with student outcomes. Emphasis is given to the two main aspects of policy, evaluation, and improvement in schools which affect quality of teaching and learning at both the level of teachers and students: a) teaching and b) school learning environment. Five…

  18. Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation Treatment of Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Prognostic Model for Its Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, van der Marije; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M.R.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Karin G.M.; Hermens, Hermie J.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To determine if treatment outcome in chronic low back pain can be predicted by a predefined multivariate prognostic model based on consistent predictors from the literature and (2) to explore the value of potentially prognostic factors further. Methods: Data were derived from a rand

  19. A Model of Stress and Coping and Their Influence on Individual and Organizational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Nancy G.; Lewin, Jeffrey E.; Sager, Jeffrey K.

    2009-01-01

    A model of coping with stress is proposed in which coping mediates the relationship among organizational stressors and personal characteristics, and job-related strains and organizational outcomes. Study results, based on a sample of professional salespeople, provide overall support for most of the hypothesized relationships among work-related…

  20. Disease Progression/Clinical Outcome Model for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Patients Treated with Eribulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hasselt, J. G C; Gupta, A.; Hussein, Z.; Beijnen, J. H.; Schellens, J. H M; Huitema, A. D R

    2015-01-01

    Frameworks that associate cancer dynamic disease progression models with parametric survival models for clinical outcome have recently been proposed to support decision making in early clinical development. Here we developed such a disease progression clinical outcome model for castration-resistant

  1. Disease Progression/Clinical Outcome Model for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Patients Treated with Eribulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hasselt, J. G C; Gupta, A.; Hussein, Z.; Beijnen, J. H.; Schellens, J. H M; Huitema, A. D R

    2015-01-01

    Frameworks that associate cancer dynamic disease progression models with parametric survival models for clinical outcome have recently been proposed to support decision making in early clinical development. Here we developed such a disease progression clinical outcome model for castration-resistant

  2. Corruption and population health outcomes: an analysis of data from 133 countries using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Roni; Kang, Minah

    2015-09-01

    The current study aims to develop a theoretical framework for understanding the antecedents of corruption and the effects of corruption on various health indicators. Using structural equation models, we analyzed a multinational dataset of 133 countries that included three main groups of variables--antecedents of corruption, corruption measures, and health indicators. Controlling for various factors, our results suggest that corruption rises as GDP per capita falls and as the regime becomes more autocratic. Higher corruption is associated with lower levels of health expenditure as a percentage of GDP per capita, and with poorer health outcomes. Countries with higher GDP per capita and better education for women have better health outcomes regardless of health expenditures and regime type. Our results suggest that there is no direct relationship between health expenditures and health outcomes after controlling for the other factors in the model. Our study enhances our understanding of the conceptual and theoretical links between corruption and health outcomes in a population, including factors that may mediate how corruption can affect health outcomes.

  3. Semiparametric analysis of incomplete current status outcome data under transformation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chi-Chung; Chen, Yi-Hau

    2014-06-01

    This work, motivated by an osteoporosis survey study, considers regression analysis with incompletely observed current status data. Here the current status data, including an examination time and an indicator for whether or not the event of interest has occurred by the examination time, is not observed for all subjects. Instead, a surrogate outcome subject to misclassification of the current status is available for all subjects. We focus on semiparametric regression under transformation models, including the proportional hazards and proportional odds models as special cases. Under the missing at random mechanism where the missingness of the current status outcome can depend only on the observed surrogate outcome and covariates, we propose an approach of validation likelihood based on the likelihood from the validation subsample where the data are fully observed, with adjustments of the probability of observing the current status outcome, as well as the distribution of the surrogate outcome in the validation subsample. We propose an efficient computation algorithm for implementation, and derive consistency and asymptotic normality for inference with the proposed estimator. The application to the osteoporosis survey data and simulations reveal that the validation likelihood performs well; it removes the bias from the "complete case" analysis discarding subjects with missing data, and achieves higher efficiency than the inverse probability weighting analysis.

  4. Estimation of a partially linear additive model for data from an outcome-dependent sampling design with a continuous outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ziwen; Qin, Guoyou; Zhou, Haibo

    2016-10-01

    Outcome-dependent sampling (ODS) designs have been well recognized as a cost-effective way to enhance study efficiency in both statistical literature and biomedical and epidemiologic studies. A partially linear additive model (PLAM) is widely applied in real problems because it allows for a flexible specification of the dependence of the response on some covariates in a linear fashion and other covariates in a nonlinear non-parametric fashion. Motivated by an epidemiological study investigating the effect of prenatal polychlorinated biphenyls exposure on children's intelligence quotient (IQ) at age 7 years, we propose a PLAM in this article to investigate a more flexible non-parametric inference on the relationships among the response and covariates under the ODS scheme. We propose the estimation method and establish the asymptotic properties of the proposed estimator. Simulation studies are conducted to show the improved efficiency of the proposed ODS estimator for PLAM compared with that from a traditional simple random sampling design with the same sample size. The data of the above-mentioned study is analyzed to illustrate the proposed method. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Flexible Learning in a Workplace Model: Blended a Motivation to a Lifelong Learner in a Social Network Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na-songkhla, Jaitip

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model of learning in a workplace, in which an online course provides flexibility for staff to learn at their convenient hours. A motivation was brought into an account of the success of learning in a workplace program, based upon Behaviorist learning approach--an online mentor and an accumulated learning activities score was…

  6. Demotivation: Affective States and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falout, Joseph; Elwood, James; Hood, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Demotivation can negatively influence the learner's attitudes and behaviors, degrade classroom group dynamics and teacher's motivation, and result in long-term and widespread negative learning outcomes. 900 university EFL learners were surveyed to investigate the demotivating factors in learning English as a foreign language (EFL) in Japan, and…

  7. Demotivation: Affective States and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falout, Joseph; Elwood, James; Hood, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Demotivation can negatively influence the learner's attitudes and behaviors, degrade classroom group dynamics and teacher's motivation, and result in long-term and widespread negative learning outcomes. 900 university EFL learners were surveyed to investigate the demotivating factors in learning English as a foreign language (EFL) in Japan, and…

  8. Meta-analysis of studies with bivariate binary outcomes: a marginal beta-binomial model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Hong, Chuan; Ning, Yang; Su, Xiao

    2016-01-15

    When conducting a meta-analysis of studies with bivariate binary outcomes, challenges arise when the within-study correlation and between-study heterogeneity should be taken into account. In this paper, we propose a marginal beta-binomial model for the meta-analysis of studies with binary outcomes. This model is based on the composite likelihood approach and has several attractive features compared with the existing models such as bivariate generalized linear mixed model (Chu and Cole, 2006) and Sarmanov beta-binomial model (Chen et al., 2012). The advantages of the proposed marginal model include modeling the probabilities in the original scale, not requiring any transformation of probabilities or any link function, having closed-form expression of likelihood function, and no constraints on the correlation parameter. More importantly, because the marginal beta-binomial model is only based on the marginal distributions, it does not suffer from potential misspecification of the joint distribution of bivariate study-specific probabilities. Such misspecification is difficult to detect and can lead to biased inference using currents methods. We compare the performance of the marginal beta-binomial model with the bivariate generalized linear mixed model and the Sarmanov beta-binomial model by simulation studies. Interestingly, the results show that the marginal beta-binomial model performs better than the Sarmanov beta-binomial model, whether or not the true model is Sarmanov beta-binomial, and the marginal beta-binomial model is more robust than the bivariate generalized linear mixed model under model misspecifications. Two meta-analyses of diagnostic accuracy studies and a meta-analysis of case-control studies are conducted for illustration.

  9. Non-linear mixed models in the analysis of mediated longitudinal data with binary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Emily A; Cheng, Debbie M

    2012-01-24

    Structural equation models (SEMs) provide a general framework for analyzing mediated longitudinal data. However when interest is in the total effect (i.e. direct plus indirect) of a predictor on the binary outcome, alternative statistical techniques such as non-linear mixed models (NLMM) may be preferable, particularly if specific causal pathways are not hypothesized or specialized SEM software is not readily available. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the performance of the NLMM in a setting where the SEM is presumed optimal. We performed a simulation study to assess the performance of NLMMs relative to SEMs with respect to bias, coverage probability, and power in the analysis of mediated binary longitudinal outcomes. Both logistic and probit models were evaluated. Models were also applied to data from a longitudinal study assessing the impact of alcohol consumption on HIV disease progression. For the logistic model, the NLMM adequately estimated the total effect of a repeated predictor on the repeated binary outcome and were similar to the SEM across a variety of scenarios evaluating sample size, effect size, and distributions of direct vs. indirect effects. For the probit model, the NLMM adequately estimated the total effect of the repeated predictor, however, the probit SEM overestimated effects. Both logistic and probit NLMMs performed well relative to corresponding SEMs with respect to bias, coverage probability and power. In addition, in the probit setting, the NLMM may produce better estimates of the total effect than the probit SEM, which appeared to overestimate effects.

  10. Why Do Students Use Mobile Technology for Social Purposes during Class? Modeling Teacher Credibility, Learner Empowerment, and Online Communication Attitude as Predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Andrew M.; Finn, Amber N.

    2016-01-01

    Following research indicating prevalent and deleterious use of social communication technology in college classrooms, this study investigated teacher credibility, learner empowerment, and online communication attitude as predictors of such use. The sample included 379 participants who completed an online survey about a college course. Results…

  11. Developing and Testing a Model to Predict Outcomes of Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, David H; Sainfort, François; Eichler, Mary; Adams, Laura; Bisognano, Maureen; Steudel, Harold

    2003-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of a Bayesian model employing subjective probability estimates for predicting success and failure of health care improvement projects. Data Sources Experts' subjective assessment data for model development and independent retrospective data on 221 healthcare improvement projects in the United States, Canada, and the Netherlands collected between 1996 and 2000 for validation. Methods A panel of theoretical and practical experts and literature in organizational change were used to identify factors predicting the outcome of improvement efforts. A Bayesian model was developed to estimate probability of successful change using subjective estimates of likelihood ratios and prior odds elicited from the panel of experts. A subsequent retrospective empirical analysis of change efforts in 198 health care organizations was performed to validate the model. Logistic regression and ROC analysis were used to evaluate the model's performance using three alternative definitions of success. Data Collection For the model development, experts' subjective assessments were elicited using an integrative group process. For the validation study, a staff person intimately involved in each improvement project responded to a written survey asking questions about model factors and project outcomes. Results Logistic regression chi-square statistics and areas under the ROC curve demonstrated a high level of model performance in predicting success. Chi-square statistics were significant at the 0.001 level and areas under the ROC curve were greater than 0.84. Conclusions A subjective Bayesian model was effective in predicting the outcome of actual improvement projects. Additional prospective evaluations as well as testing the impact of this model as an intervention are warranted. PMID:12785571

  12. Organization as Information Processing Systems. Toward a Model of the Research Factors Associated with Significant Research Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    and %- , during research projects that were related to research outcomes. The Ambidextrous model, which includes both organic and mechanistic research...to make choices with greater li4kelihood for innovative outcomes. p A potential side benefit from better knowledge of the research process * maY...aspect of the research process. The models are referred to respectively as the Davis model, the Antecedents model, and the Ambidextrous model. These

  13. Dynamic Profiling: Modeling the Dynamics of Inflammation and Predicting Outcomes in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Constantine

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation induced by traumatic brain injury (TBI is complex, individual-specific, and associated with morbidity and mortality. We sought to develop dynamic, data-driven, predictive computational models of TBI-induced inflammation based on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers. Thirteen inflammatory mediators were determined in serial CSF samples from 27 severe TBI patients. The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score quantifies the initial severity of the neurological status of the patient on a numerical scale from 3 to 15. The 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS score, the outcome variable, was taken as the variable to express and predict as a function of the other input variables. Data on each subject consisting of ten clinical (one-dimensional variables, such as age, gender, and presence of infection, along with inflammatory biomarker time series were used to generate both multinomial logistic as well as probit models that predict low (poor outcome or high (favorable outcome levels of the GOS score. To determine if CSF inflammation biomarkers could predict TBI outcome, a logistic model for low (≤3; poor neurological outcome or high levels (≥4; favorable neurological outcome of the GOS score involving a full effect of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor- and both linear and quadratic effects of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 was obtained. To better stratify patients as their pathology progresses over time, a technique called Dynamic Profiling was developed in which patients were clustered, using the spectral Laplacian and Hartigan's k-means method, into disjoint groups at different stages. Initial clustering was based on GCS score; subsequent clustering was performed based on clinical and demographic information and then further, sequential clustering based on the levels of individual inflammatory mediators over time. These clusters assess the risk of mortality of a new patient after each inflammatory mediator

  14. IS CHC student surface learner A cross-cultural perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佩绮

    2008-01-01

    In the past decades, the "CH"(Confucian Heritage Culture)learner phenomenon had aroused the interest of sociologists, educators and psychologists. Examination orientation, achievement orientation, use of repetitive learning, synthesis of memorization and understanding, and the use of recitation to bring about sharp focus for better understanding were some of the themes of these researches. This paper will explain what the general paradox of CHC learners is and how cultural difference can affect students' motivation for learning according to Chen and Stevenson's model of cultural influence, and discuss the major misconception of CHC learners' study approach.

  15. Admission Laboratory Results to Enhance Prediction Models of Postdischarge Outcomes in Cardiac Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Michael; Fry, Donald E; Hannan, Edward L; Naessens, James M; Whitman, Kay; Reband, Agnes; Qian, Feng; Schindler, Joseph; Sonneborn, Mark; Roland, Jaclyn; Hyde, Linda; Dennison, Barbara A

    Predictive modeling for postdischarge outcomes of inpatient care has been suboptimal. This study evaluated whether admission numerical laboratory data added to administrative models from New York and Minnesota hospitals would enhance the prediction accuracy for 90-day postdischarge deaths without readmission (PD-90) and 90-day readmissions (RA-90) following inpatient care for cardiac patients. Risk-adjustment models for the prediction of PD-90 and RA-90 were designed for acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous cardiac intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, and congestive heart failure. Models were derived from hospital claims data and were then enhanced with admission laboratory predictive results. Case-level discrimination, goodness of fit, and calibration were used to compare administrative models (ADM) and laboratory predictive models (LAB). LAB models for the prediction of PD-90 were modestly enhanced over ADM, but negligible benefit was seen for RA-90. A consistent predictor of PD-90 and RA-90 was prolonged length of stay outliers from the index hospitalization.

  16. Mediation Analysis with Survival Outcomes: Accelerated Failure Time Versus Proportional Hazards Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lois A Gelfand

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Survival time is an important type of outcome variable in treatment research. Currently, limited guidance is available regarding performing mediation analyses with survival outcomes, which generally do not have normally distributed errors, and contain unobserved (censored events. We present considerations for choosing an approach, using a comparison of semi-parametric proportional hazards (PH and fully parametric accelerated failure time (AFT approaches for illustration.Method: We compare PH and AFT models and procedures in their integration into mediation models and review their ability to produce coefficients that estimate causal effects. Using simulation studies modeling Weibull-distributed survival times, we compare statistical properties of mediation analyses incorporating PH and AFT approaches (employing SAS procedures PHREG and LIFEREG, respectively under varied data conditions, some including censoring. A simulated data set illustrates the findings.Results: AFT models integrate more easily than PH models into mediation models. Furthermore, mediation analyses incorporating LIFEREG produce coefficients that can estimate causal effects, and demonstrate superior statistical properties. Censoring introduces bias in the coefficient estimate representing the treatment effect on outcome – underestimation in LIFEREG, and overestimation in PHREG. With LIFEREG, this bias can be addressed using an alternative estimate obtained from combining other coefficients, whereas this is not possible with PHREG.Conclusions: When Weibull assumptions are not violated, there are compelling advantages to using LIFEREG over PHREG for mediation analyses involving survival-time outcomes. Irrespective of the procedures used, the interpretation of coefficients, effects of censoring on coefficient estimates, and statistical properties should be taken into account when reporting results.

  17. Treatment effects model for assessing disease management: measuring outcomes and strengthening program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Jeanne; Dumitras, Diana

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes an analytical methodology for obtaining statistically unbiased outcomes estimates for programs in which participation decisions may be correlated with variables that impact outcomes. This methodology is particularly useful for intraorganizational program evaluations conducted for business purposes. In this situation, data is likely to be available for a population of managed care members who are eligible to participate in a disease management (DM) program, with some electing to participate while others eschew the opportunity. The most pragmatic analytical strategy for in-house evaluation of such programs is likely to be the pre-intervention/post-intervention design in which the control group consists of people who were invited to participate in the DM program, but declined the invitation. Regression estimates of program impacts may be statistically biased if factors that impact participation decisions are correlated with outcomes measures. This paper describes an econometric procedure, the Treatment Effects model, developed to produce statistically unbiased estimates of program impacts in this type of situation. Two equations are estimated to (a) estimate the impacts of patient characteristics on decisions to participate in the program, and then (b) use this information to produce a statistically unbiased estimate of the impact of program participation on outcomes. This methodology is well-established in economics and econometrics, but has not been widely applied in the DM outcomes measurement literature; hence, this paper focuses on one illustrative application.

  18. Focus on the Learner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CuiMin

    2004-01-01

    Language teaching is often discussed from the point of view of the teacher. Some of the ways in which teachers beliefs, goals, attitudes, and decisions influence how theyapproach of teaching have already been examined by many people. However, while learning is the goal of teaching, it is not necessarily the mirror image of teaching. Learners, too,bring to learning their own beliefs, goals, attitudes, and

  19. Reclassification of English Learners

    OpenAIRE

    James B. Grissom

    2004-01-01

    Ron Unz, originator of Proposition 227, claimed, prior to the passage of Prop. 227, that the five percent annual reclassification rate of English learners to fluent English proficient indicated bilingual education was a failure. Critics of Prop. 227 have countered that the annual reclassification rate has changed little since the passage of Prop. 227, indicating the new legislation had no effect on reclassification rates. Unfortunately, the annual reclassification rate does not provide a clea...

  20. Does Training Learners on Simulators Benefit Real Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teteris, Elise; Fraser, Kristin; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Despite limited data on patient outcomes, simulation training has already been adopted and embraced by a large number of medical schools. Yet widespread acceptance of simulation should not relieve us of the duty to demonstrate if, and under which circumstances, training learners on simulation benefits real patients. Here we review the data on…

  1. Developing an Educational Performance Indicator for New Millennium Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myunghee; Heo, Heeok; Jo, Il-Hyun; Shin, Jongho; Seo, Jeonghee

    2012-01-01

    Educational performance based on the learning outcomes of formal schooling in a future knowledge society could be significantly different from that of today. This study investigates the possibilities of developing an educational performance indicator for new-millennium learners (NMLs). The researchers conducted literature reviews, a meeting of…

  2. The Impact of Learning Styles on Learner's Performance in E-Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Abdullah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available due to growing popularity of E-Learning, personalization has emerged as important need. Differences of learners' abilities and their learning styles have affected the learning outcomes significantly. Meanwhile, with the development of E-Learning technologies, learners can be provided more effective learning environment to optimize their performance. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of learning styles on learner’s performance in e-learning environment, and use this learning style data to make recommendations for learners, instructors, and contents of online courses. Data analysis in this research represented by user performance gathered from an E-learning platform (Blackboard, where this user performance data is represented by actions performed by platform's users. A 10-fold cross validation was used to create and test the model, and the data was analyzed by the WEKA software. Classification accuracy, MAE, and the ROC area have been observed. The results show that the accuracy of classification by means of NBTree technique had the highest correct value at 69.697% and it could be applied to develop Felder Silverman's learning style while taking into consideration students’ preference. Moreover, students’ performance increased by more than 12%.

  3. Development and validation of a dynamic outcome prediction model for paracetamol-induced acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal, William; Wang, Yanzhong; Maggs, James

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early, accurate prediction of survival is central to management of patients with paracetamol-induced acute liver failure to identify those needing emergency liver transplantation. Current prognostic tools are confounded by recent improvements in outcome independent of emergency liver ...... in paracetamol-induced acute liver failure require re-evaluation. FUNDING: Foundation for Liver Research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....... normalised ratio (INR), and cardiovascular failure were used to derive an initial predictive model, with a second (day 2) model including additional changes in INR and lactate. FINDINGS: We developed and validated new high-performance statistical models to support decision making in patients with paracetamol...

  4. Learning outcomes from participatory modelling: A case study in the Tamar catchment, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Tobias; Inman, Alex; Chilvers, Jason

    2014-05-01

    Strong arguments for participatory modelling in hydrology can be made on substantive, instrumental and normative grounds. These arguments have led to increasingly diverse groups of stakeholders (here anyone affecting or affected by an issue) getting involved in hydrological research and the management of water resources. In fact, participation has become a requirement of many research grants, programmes, plans and policies. However, evidence of beneficial outcomes of participation as suggested by the arguments is difficult to generate and therefore rare. This is because outcomes are diverse, distributed, often tacit, and take time to emerge. In this paper we present results from applying an evaluation framework focussed on learning outcomes (Krueger et al., 2012) to a participatory modelling process within the Tamar catchment pilot of the UK government's new Catchment Based Approach of managing water resources. The process was run as a series of workshops with email and telephone conversations in between. The outputs were models of sediment and Faecal Coliform transfers from land to water and down to the catchment outlet, mitigated by sewage treatment options, land use, livestock densities and farm management practices. The learning outcomes were assessed through semi-structured interviews with the participants. The results indicate a lack of fairness and some competence issues of the participatory modelling process. Nevertheless, salience, credibility and legitimacy of the models were judged positively by the majority of participants, and some substantive and instrumental benefits of participatory modelling theory could be confirmed, specifically input of better data and increased buy-in and ownership from the participants, respectively. Instrumental learning by the participants was high and facilitated through the models as well as the group setting. Communicative learning by the participants was mixed, with people increasingly appreciating the views of others

  5. Motivation, Gender, and Learner Performance of English as an L3 in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahåt, Rayhangül

    2013-01-01

    Gender is considered as one of the important variables that effects learner motivation in second or foreign language acquisition. It is also believed that learner motivation has an impact on learner performance as well. Using the expectancy-value theory model of achievement motivation, this study aimed at exploring (1) the impact of gender…

  6. A Reflection on Learner Autonomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡建平

    2016-01-01

    With the reform in College English teaching in the past 10 years in China, more and more attention have been paid to learner autonomy, which is aimed at improving students' language communicative competence by replacing the traditional grammar-translation method and advocating learner-centered strategies. This literature makes a comprehensive study of learner autonomy in English teaching home and abroad, which helps English teachers home and abroad know more about autonomy.

  7. The effect of learning models and emotional intelligence toward students learning outcomes on reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutiani, Ani; Silitonga, Mei Y.

    2017-08-01

    This research focused on the effect of learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes on reaction rate teaching topic. In order to achieve the objectives of the research, with 2x2 factorial research design was used. There were two factors tested, namely: the learning models (factor A), and emotional intelligence (factor B) factors. Then, two learning models were used; problem-based learning/PBL (A1), and project-based learning/PjBL (A2). While, the emotional intelligence was divided into higher and lower types. The number of population was six classes containing 243 grade X students of SMAN 10 Medan, Indonesia. There were 15 students of each class were chosen as the sample of the research by applying purposive sampling technique. The data were analyzed by applying two-ways analysis of variance (2X2) at the level of significant α = 0.05. Based on hypothesis testing, there was the interaction between learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes. Then, the finding of the research showed that students' learning outcomes in reaction rate taught by using PBL with higher emotional intelligence is higher than those who were taught by using PjBL. There was no significant effect between students with lower emotional intelligence taught by using both PBL and PjBL in reaction rate topic. Based on the finding, the students with lower emotional intelligence were quite hard to get in touch with other students in group discussion.

  8. Modeling Outcomes with Floor or Ceiling Effects: An Introduction to the Tobit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    In gifted education research, it is common for outcome variables to exhibit strong floor or ceiling effects due to insufficient range of measurement of many instruments when used with gifted populations. Common statistical methods (e.g., analysis of variance, linear regression) produce biased estimates when such effects are present. In practice,…

  9. Descriptive modeling of longitudinal outcome measures in traumatic brain injury: a National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretz, Christopher R; Kozlowski, Allan J; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Kreider, Scott; Cuthbert, Jeffery P; Corrigan, John D; Heinemann, Allen W; Whiteneck, Gale

    2013-03-01

    Establishing accurate mathematical models of outcome measures is essential in understanding change throughout the rehabilitation process. The goal of this study is to identify the best-fitting descriptive models for a set of commonly adopted outcome measures found within the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database where the modeling is based on data submission through 2011 and the complete range of recorded time points since injury for each individual, where time points range from admission to rehabilitation to 20 years postinjury. The statistical methodology and the application of the methodology contained herein may be used to assist researchers and clinicians in (1) modeling the outcome measures considered, (2) modeling various portions of these outcomes by stratification and/or truncating time periods, (3) modeling longitudinal outcome measures not considered, and (4) establishing models as a necessary precursor in conducting individual growth curve analysis.

  10. Fertility intentions and outcomes: Implementing the Theory of Planned Behavior with graphical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencarini, Letizia; Vignoli, Daniele; Gottard, Anna

    2015-03-01

    This paper studies fertility intentions and their outcomes, analyzing the complete path leading to fertility behavior according to the social psychological model of Theory Planned Behavior (TPB). We move beyond existing research using graphical models to have a precise understanding, and a formal description, of the developmental fertility decision-making process. Our findings yield new results for the Italian case which are empirically robust and theoretically coherent, adding important insights to the effectiveness of the TPB for fertility research. In line with TPB, all intentions' primary antecedents are found to be determinants of the level of fertility intentions, but do not affect fertility outcomes, being pre-filtered by fertility intentions. Nevertheless, in contrast with TPB, background factors are not fully mediated by intentions' primary antecedents, influencing directly fertility intentions and even fertility behaviors.

  11. Effects of Risk Aversion on Market Outcomes: A Stochastic Two-Stage Equilibrium Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazempour, Jalal; Pinson, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates how different risk preferences of electricity producers alter the market-clearing outcomes. Toward this goal, we propose a stochastic equilibrium model for electricity markets with two settlements, i.e., day-ahead and balancing, in which a number of conventional and stochastic...... by its optimality conditions, resulting in a mixed complementarity problem. Numerical results from a case study based on the IEEE one-area reliability test system are derived and discussed....

  12. Validation of a model of family caregiver communication types and related caregiver outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Kravits, Kate; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty; Fujinami, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    Caring for the family is included as one of the eight domains of quality palliative care, calling attention to the importance of the family system and family communications about cancer during care and treatment of the disease. Previously, a model of family caregiver communication defined four caregiver communication types-Manager, Carrier, Partner, Lone-each with a unique communication pattern. The purpose of the present study was to extend the model of family caregiver communication in cancer care to further understand the impact of family communication burden on caregiving outcomes. This mixed-method study employed fieldnotes from a family caregiver intervention focused on quality of life and self-reported caregiver communication items to identify a specific family caregiver type. Caregiver types were then analyzed using outcome measures on psychological distress, skills preparedness, family inventory of needs, and quality-of-life domains. Corroboration between fieldnotes and self-reported communication for caregivers (n = 21, 16 women, mean age of 53 years) revealed a definitive classification of the four caregiver types (Manager = 6, Carrier = 5, Partner = 6, Lone = 4). Mean scores on self-reported communication items documented different communication patterns congruent with the theoretical framework of the model. Variation in caregiver outcomes measures confirmed the model of family caregiver communication types. Partner and Lone caregivers reported the lowest psychological distress, with Carrier caregivers feeling least prepared and Manager caregivers reporting the lowest physical quality of life. This study illustrates the impact of family communication on caregiving and increases our knowledge and understanding about the role of communication in caregiver burden. The research provides the first evidence-based validation for a family caregiver communication typology and its relationship to caregiver outcomes. Future research is needed to develop and test

  13. Using the Outcome-Driven Innovation Approach to Develop a Customer Value Model for Lighting

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, Nonie

    2012-01-01

    LED technology is on the cusp of disrupting the entire lighting industry if the industry can develop new lighting products that customers will want to use and purchase. Understanding what customers value from their lighting products is an open question for the industry. To answer this question and to provide a deeper understanding of customer’s needs, I have applied the outcome driven innovation approach. Through this approach the customer value model was developed, which identifies customers...

  14. A Bayesian mathematical model of motor and cognitive outcomes in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayete, Boris; Wuest, Diane; Laramie, Jason; McDonagh, Paul; Church, Bruce; Eberly, Shirley; Lang, Anthony; Marek, Kenneth; Runge, Karl; Shoulson, Ira; Singleton, Andrew; Tanner, Caroline; Khalil, Iya; Verma, Ajay; Ravina, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    There are few established predictors of the clinical course of PD. Prognostic markers would be useful for clinical care and research. To identify predictors of long-term motor and cognitive outcomes and rate of progression in PD. Newly diagnosed PD participants were followed for 7 years in a prospective study, conducted at 55 centers in the United States and Canada. Analyses were conducted in 244 participants with complete demographic, clinical, genetic, and dopamine transporter imaging data. Machine learning dynamic Bayesian graphical models were used to identify and simulate predictors and outcomes. The outcomes rate of cognition changes are assessed by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores, and rate of motor changes are assessed by UPDRS part-III. The most robust and consistent longitudinal predictors of cognitive function included older age, baseline Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts I and II, Schwab and England activities of daily living scale, striatal dopamine transporter binding, and SNP rs11724635 in the gene BST1. The most consistent predictor of UPDRS part III was baseline level of activities of daily living (part II). Key findings were replicated using long-term data from an independent cohort study. Baseline function near the time of Parkinson's disease diagnosis, as measured by activities of daily living, is a consistent predictor of long-term motor and cognitive outcomes. Additional predictors identified may further characterize the expected course of Parkinson's disease and suggest mechanisms underlying disease progression. The prognostic model developed in this study can be used to simulate the effects of the prognostic variables on motor and cognitive outcomes, and can be replicated and refined with data from independent longitudinal studies.

  15. A Bayesian mathematical model of motor and cognitive outcomes in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayete, Boris; Wuest, Diane; Laramie, Jason; McDonagh, Paul; Church, Bruce; Eberly, Shirley; Lang, Anthony; Marek, Kenneth; Runge, Karl; Shoulson, Ira; Singleton, Andrew; Tanner, Caroline; Khalil, Iya; Verma, Ajay; Ravina, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Background There are few established predictors of the clinical course of PD. Prognostic markers would be useful for clinical care and research. Objective To identify predictors of long-term motor and cognitive outcomes and rate of progression in PD. Methods Newly diagnosed PD participants were followed for 7 years in a prospective study, conducted at 55 centers in the United States and Canada. Analyses were conducted in 244 participants with complete demographic, clinical, genetic, and dopamine transporter imaging data. Machine learning dynamic Bayesian graphical models were used to identify and simulate predictors and outcomes. The outcomes rate of cognition changes are assessed by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores, and rate of motor changes are assessed by UPDRS part-III. Results The most robust and consistent longitudinal predictors of cognitive function included older age, baseline Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts I and II, Schwab and England activities of daily living scale, striatal dopamine transporter binding, and SNP rs11724635 in the gene BST1. The most consistent predictor of UPDRS part III was baseline level of activities of daily living (part II). Key findings were replicated using long-term data from an independent cohort study. Conclusions Baseline function near the time of Parkinson’s disease diagnosis, as measured by activities of daily living, is a consistent predictor of long-term motor and cognitive outcomes. Additional predictors identified may further characterize the expected course of Parkinson’s disease and suggest mechanisms underlying disease progression. The prognostic model developed in this study can be used to simulate the effects of the prognostic variables on motor and cognitive outcomes, and can be replicated and refined with data from independent longitudinal studies. PMID:28604798

  16. Orbital and Maxillofacial Computer Aided Surgery: Patient-Specific Finite Element Models To Predict Surgical Outcomes

    CERN Document Server

    Luboz, V; Swider, P; Payan, Y; Luboz, Vincent; Chabanas, Matthieu; Swider, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses an important issue raised for the clinical relevance of Computer-Assisted Surgical applications, namely the methodology used to automatically build patient-specific Finite Element (FE) models of anatomical structures. From this perspective, a method is proposed, based on a technique called the Mesh-Matching method, followed by a process that corrects mesh irregularities. The Mesh-Matching algorithm generates patient-specific volume meshes from an existing generic model. The mesh regularization process is based on the Jacobian matrix transform related to the FE reference element and the current element. This method for generating patient-specific FE models is first applied to Computer-Assisted maxillofacial surgery, and more precisely to the FE elastic modelling of patient facial soft tissues. For each patient, the planned bone osteotomies (mandible, maxilla, chin) are used as boundary conditions to deform the FE face model, in order to predict the aesthetic outcome of the surgery. Seven F...

  17. Non-linear mixed models in the analysis of mediated longitudinal data with binary outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blood Emily A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural equation models (SEMs provide a general framework for analyzing mediated longitudinal data. However when interest is in the total effect (i.e. direct plus indirect of a predictor on the binary outcome, alternative statistical techniques such as non-linear mixed models (NLMM may be preferable, particularly if specific causal pathways are not hypothesized or specialized SEM software is not readily available. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the performance of the NLMM in a setting where the SEM is presumed optimal. Methods We performed a simulation study to assess the performance of NLMMs relative to SEMs with respect to bias, coverage probability, and power in the analysis of mediated binary longitudinal outcomes. Both logistic and probit models were evaluated. Models were also applied to data from a longitudinal study assessing the impact of alcohol consumption on HIV disease progression. Results For the logistic model, the NLMM adequately estimated the total effect of a repeated predictor on the repeated binary outcome and were similar to the SEM across a variety of scenarios evaluating sample size, effect size, and distributions of direct vs. indirect effects. For the probit model, the NLMM adequately estimated the total effect of the repeated predictor, however, the probit SEM overestimated effects. Conclusions Both logistic and probit NLMMs performed well relative to corresponding SEMs with respect to bias, coverage probability and power. In addition, in the probit setting, the NLMM may produce better estimates of the total effect than the probit SEM, which appeared to overestimate effects.

  18. Synchrony-desynchrony in the tripartite model of fear: Predicting treatment outcome in clinically phobic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit Allen, Kristy; Allen, Ben; Austin, Kristin E; Waldron, Jonathan C; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2015-08-01

    The tripartite model of fear posits that the fear response entails three loosely coupled components: subjective distress, behavioral avoidance, and physiological arousal. The concept of synchrony vs. desynchrony describes the degree to which changes in the activation of these components vary together (synchrony), independently, or inversely (both forms of desynchrony) over time. The present study assessed synchrony-desynchrony and its relationship to treatment outcome in a sample of 98 children with specific phobias both prior to and 1 week after receiving one-session treatment, a 3 h cognitive-behavioral intervention. The results suggest an overall pattern of desynchronous change whereby youth improved on behavioral avoidance and subjective distress following treatment, but their level of cardiovascular reactivity remained stable. However, we found evidence that synchronous change on the behavioral avoidance and subjective distress components was related to better treatment outcome, whereas desynchronous change on these components was related to poorer treatment outcome. These findings suggest that a fuller understanding of the three response systems and their interrelations in phobic youth may assist us in the assessment and treatment of these disorders, potentially leading to a more person-centered approach and eventually to enhanced treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characteristics of Young Learners and Implications for Teaching Young Learners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈佳燕

    2016-01-01

    Teaching young learners is much more difficult for teachers because learners at this age have their own characteristics and needs and are difficult to manage.For example,they are more easily distracted,they may suffer from more peer pressure and they have less knowledge about the world,which results in their great curiosity about this world and anything new.In order to get along well with young learners and teach them effectively,it is necessary to explore these characteristics and draw implications from them.Therefore,this paper intends to explore the three most important factors which make teaching young learners different from teaching adults and gives suggestion to the teacher of young learners.

  20. Insight, self-stigma and psychosocial outcomes in Schizophrenia: a structural equation modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Y-J; Chang, H-A; Kao, Y-C; Tzeng, N-S; Lu, C-W; Loh, C-H

    2016-12-15

    Poor insight is prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and has been associated with acute illness severity, medication non-adherence and poor treatment outcomes. Paradoxically, high insight has been associated with various undesirable outcomes, including low self-esteem, depression and low subjective quality of life (QoL) in patients with schizophrenia. Despite the growing body of studies conducted in Western countries supporting the pernicious effects of improved insight in psychosis, which bases on the level of self-stigma, the effects are unclear in non-Western societies. The current study examined the role of self-stigma in the relationship between insight and psychosocial outcomes in a Chinese population. A total of 170 outpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were recruited from two general university hospitals. Sociodemographic data and clinical variables were recorded and self-report scales were employed to measure self-stigma, depression, insight, self-esteem and subjective QoL. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to analyse the cross-sectional data. High levels of self-stigma were reported by 39% of the participants (n = 67). The influences of insight, self-stigma, self-esteem and depression on subjective QoL were confirmed by the SEM results. Our model with the closest fit to the data (χ 2 = 33.28; df = 20; p = 0.03; χ 2/df = 1.66; CFI = 0.98; TLI = 0.97; RMSEA = 0.06) demonstrated that self-stigma might fully mediate the association of insight with low self-esteem, depression and poor subjective QoL. High insight into illness contributed to self-stigma, which caused low self-esteem and depression and, consequently, low QoL. Notably, insight did not directly affect self-esteem, depression or QoL. Furthermore, the association of insight with poor psychosocial outcomes was not moderated by self-stigma. Our findings support the mediating model of insight relevant to the poor psychosocial outcomes of individuals diagnosed with

  1. The Context, Process, and Outcome Evaluation Model for Organisational Health Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridrich, Annemarie; Jenny, Gregor J; Bauer, Georg F

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate evaluation of complex, organisational health interventions (OHIs), this paper aims at developing a context, process, and outcome (CPO) evaluation model. It builds on previous model developments in the field and advances them by clearly defining and relating generic evaluation categories for OHIs. Context is defined as the underlying frame that influences and is influenced by an OHI. It is further differentiated into the omnibus and discrete contexts. Process is differentiated into the implementation process, as the time-limited enactment of the original intervention plan, and the change process of individual and collective dynamics triggered by the implementation process. These processes lead to proximate, intermediate, and distal outcomes, as all results of the change process that are meaningful for various stakeholders. Research questions that might guide the evaluation of an OHI according to the CPO categories and a list of concrete themes/indicators and methods/sources applied within the evaluation of an OHI project at a hospital in Switzerland illustrate the model's applicability in structuring evaluations of complex OHIs. In conclusion, the model supplies a common language and a shared mental model for improving communication between researchers and company members and will improve the comparability and aggregation of evaluation study results.

  2. The Context, Process, and Outcome Evaluation Model for Organisational Health Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridrich, Annemarie; Jenny, Gregor J.; Bauer, Georg F.

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate evaluation of complex, organisational health interventions (OHIs), this paper aims at developing a context, process, and outcome (CPO) evaluation model. It builds on previous model developments in the field and advances them by clearly defining and relating generic evaluation categories for OHIs. Context is defined as the underlying frame that influences and is influenced by an OHI. It is further differentiated into the omnibus and discrete contexts. Process is differentiated into the implementation process, as the time-limited enactment of the original intervention plan, and the change process of individual and collective dynamics triggered by the implementation process. These processes lead to proximate, intermediate, and distal outcomes, as all results of the change process that are meaningful for various stakeholders. Research questions that might guide the evaluation of an OHI according to the CPO categories and a list of concrete themes/indicators and methods/sources applied within the evaluation of an OHI project at a hospital in Switzerland illustrate the model's applicability in structuring evaluations of complex OHIs. In conclusion, the model supplies a common language and a shared mental model for improving communication between researchers and company members and will improve the comparability and aggregation of evaluation study results. PMID:26557665

  3. Does the Kushida morphometric model predict outcomes following maxillomandibular advancement surgery for obstructive sleep apnoea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Shofiq; Aleem, Fahd; Ormiston, Ian W

    2014-12-01

    The primary aim of this study was to explore the predictive potential of the preoperative Kushida index score and subsequent outcome following maxillomandibular advancement surgery (MMA). Secondarily we looked at how well the Kushida values of our OSA patients matched the morphometric models diagnostic thresholds. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent MMA for OSA at our institution. Kushida morphometric scores were calculated using the described formula: P + (Mx - Mn) + 3 × OJ + 3 × [Max (BMI - 25)] × (NC ÷ BMI). Regression analysis was performed to explore the possible association between Kushida index score and outcome variables of postoperative apnoea/hypopnea indices (AHI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scores (ESS). We identified 28 patients with complete data available for analysis. The mean age was 45 years (SD 6) with mean BMI of 28 (SD 3). All, but one patient underwent bi-maxillary procedure with or without genioplasty, with a mean advancement of 8.5 mm (SD 2). The mean Kushida index score in our sample was 79 (SD 14). 89% of patients had postoperative AHI <15 in keeping with surgical success. We found no statistically significant relationship with Kushida morphometric model variables and overall score with either of our outcome variables. The mean Kushida index score in our patients was in the range consistent with the morphometric models diagnostic cut-off for OSA. Kushida's morphometric model does not appear to be a good predictor of postoperative success in individuals following MMA. The morphometric model represents a clinical adjunct in the initial diagnostic work-up of OSA patients referred for surgery. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Demonized Learners in Sociocultural Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Within the frameworks of Sociocultural theory, particularly Vygotskian sociocultural theory and ZPD, Lave and Wenger's CoP, and contemporary sociocultural theory, this paper seeks to examine the unfavourable scholarly portrayal of learners and their identities based on learners' behaviours, attitudes, and beliefs about the social element of…

  5. Chinese English Learners' Strategic Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dianjian; Lai, Hongling; Leslie, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate Chinese English learners' ability to use communication strategies (CSs). The subjects are put in a relatively real English referential communication setting and the analyses of the research data show that Chinese English learners, when encountering problems in foreign language (FL) communication, are…

  6. Teachers of adults as learners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Larsen, Lea

    This poster is a part of an on-going qualitative empirical research project: “Teachers of adults as learners. A study on teachers’ experiences in practice”. Adult learners have particular needs and characteristics that their teachers must be able to address. Some of the competencies that teachers...

  7. Chinese English Learners' Strategic Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dianjian; Lai, Hongling; Leslie, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate Chinese English learners' ability to use communication strategies (CSs). The subjects are put in a relatively real English referential communication setting and the analyses of the research data show that Chinese English learners, when encountering problems in foreign language (FL) communication, are…

  8. High Ability and Learner Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindal, Huda; Reid, Norman; Whitehead, Rex

    2013-01-01

    The outstandingly able learner has been conceptualised, in terms of test and examination performance, as the learner showing superior academic performance which is markedly better than that of peers and in ways regarded as of value by wider society. In Kuwait, such superior examination performance leads to a classification regarded as being…

  9. Learner Autonomy and New Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, Manuel Jimenez; Fernandez, Jose Maria Perez

    2002-01-01

    Presents paths for theoretical research and practical procedures that may help teachers make new technology pedagogically relevant. Discusses the need to develop learner autonomy to help students process information in meaningful ways and become independent learners by developing effective learning strategies, transfer skills, and a greater sense…

  10. Profiling Mobile English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Jason; Diem, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an app-embedded survey to profile language learner demographics. A total of 3,759 EFL language learners from primarily eight L1 backgrounds (French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Spanish and Thai) responded to the survey embedded within a popular English grammar app. This app has over 500,000…

  11. Neuroprotective pentapeptide CN-105 improves functional and histological outcomes in a murine model of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Beilei; James, Michael L; Liu, Ji; Zhou, Guanen; Venkatraman, Talaignair N; Lascola, Christopher D; Acheson, Shawn K; Dubois, Laura G; Laskowitz, Daniel T; Wang, Haichen

    2016-10-07

    Presently, no pharmacological treatments have been demonstrated to improve long-term functional outcomes following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Clinical evidence associates apolipoprotein E (apoE) genotype with ICH incidence and outcome. While apoE modifies neuroinflammatory responses through its adaptive role in glial downregulation, intact apoE holoprotein is too large to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Therefore, we developed a 5-amino acid peptide - CN-105 - that mimics the polar face of the apoE helical domain involved in receptor interactions. In the current study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of CN-105 in a mouse model of ICH. Three doses of CN-105 (0.05 mg/kg) was administered by tail vein injection within 24 hours after ICH induction. Functional assessment showed durable improvement in vestibulomotor performance after CN-105 treatment, as quantified by increased Rotarod latencies on Days 1-5 post-ICH, and long-term improvement in neurocognitive performance, as quantified by reduced Morris water maze latencies on Days 29-32 post-ICH. Further, brain water content was significantly reduced, neuroinflammation was decreased and hippocampal CA3 neuronal survival was increased, although hemorrhage volume was not affected by CN-105. We concluded, therefore, that pentapeptide CN-105 improved short- and long-term neurobehavioral outcomes in a murine model of ICH, suggesting therapeutic potential for patients with acute ICH.

  12. k-Nearest neighbor models for microarray gene expression analysis and clinical outcome prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, R M; Jones, W; Stokes, T H; Phan, J H; Moffitt, R A; Fang, H; Shi, L; Oberthuer, A; Fischer, M; Tong, W; Wang, M D

    2010-08-01

    In the clinical application of genomic data analysis and modeling, a number of factors contribute to the performance of disease classification and clinical outcome prediction. This study focuses on the k-nearest neighbor (KNN) modeling strategy and its clinical use. Although KNN is simple and clinically appealing, large performance variations were found among experienced data analysis teams in the MicroArray Quality Control Phase II (MAQC-II) project. For clinical end points and controls from breast cancer, neuroblastoma and multiple myeloma, we systematically generated 463,320 KNN models by varying feature ranking method, number of features, distance metric, number of neighbors, vote weighting and decision threshold. We identified factors that contribute to the MAQC-II project performance variation, and validated a KNN data analysis protocol using a newly generated clinical data set with 478 neuroblastoma patients. We interpreted the biological and practical significance of the derived KNN models, and compared their performance with existing clinical factors.

  13. Bayesian Treatment Effects Models with Variable Selection for Panel Outcomes with an Application to Earnings Effects of Maternity Leave

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobi, Liana; Wagner, Helga; Frühwirth-Schnatter, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Child birth leads to a break in a woman's employment history and is considered one reason for the relatively poor labor market outcomes observed for women compared to men. However, the time spent at home after child birth varies significantly across mothers and is likely driven by observed and, more importantly, unobserved factors that also affect labor market outcomes directly. In this paper we propose two alternative Bayesian treatment modeling and inferential frameworks for panel outcomes ...

  14. Goals, Motivation for, and Outcomes of Personal Learning through Networks: Results of a Tweetstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sie, Rory L. L.; Pataraia, Nino; Boursinou, Eleni; Rajagopal, Kamakshi; Margaryan, Anoush; Falconer, Isobel; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Littlejohn, Allison; Sloep, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of social media for learning have posed serious challenges for learners. The information overload that these online social tools create has changed the way learners learn and from whom they learn. An investigation of learners' goals, motivations and expected outcomes when using a personal learning network is…

  15. Goals, Motivation for, and Outcomes of Personal Learning through Networks: Results of a Tweetstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sie, Rory L. L.; Pataraia, Nino; Boursinou, Eleni; Rajagopal, Kamakshi; Margaryan, Anoush; Falconer, Isobel; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Littlejohn, Allison; Sloep, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of social media for learning have posed serious challenges for learners. The information overload that these online social tools create has changed the way learners learn and from whom they learn. An investigation of learners' goals, motivations and expected outcomes when using a personal learning network is…

  16. Product versus additive threshold models for analysis of reproduction outcomes in animal genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, I; Bodin, L; Gianola, D; Legarra, A; Manfredi, E; Robert-Granié, C

    2009-08-01

    The phenotypic observation of some reproduction traits (e.g., insemination success, interval from lambing to insemination) is the result of environmental and genetic factors acting on 2 individuals: the male and female involved in a mating couple. In animal genetics, the main approach (called additive model) proposed for studying such traits assumes that the phenotype is linked to a purely additive combination, either on the observed scale for continuous traits or on some underlying scale for discrete traits, of environmental and genetic effects affecting the 2 individuals. Statistical models proposed for studying human fecundability generally consider reproduction outcomes as the product of hypothetical unobservable variables. Taking inspiration from these works, we propose a model (product threshold model) for studying a binary reproduction trait that supposes that the observed phenotype is the product of 2 unobserved phenotypes, 1 for each individual. We developed a Gibbs sampling algorithm for fitting a Bayesian product threshold model including additive genetic effects and showed by simulation that it is feasible and that it provides good estimates of the parameters. We showed that fitting an additive threshold model to data that are simulated under a product threshold model provides biased estimates, especially for individuals with high breeding values. A main advantage of the product threshold model is that, in contrast to the additive model, it provides distinct estimates of fixed effects affecting each of the 2 unobserved phenotypes.

  17. Early neural disruption and auditory processing outcomes in rodent models: Implications for developmental language disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslyn Holly Fitch

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Most researchers in the field of neural plasticity are familiar with the Kennard Principle," which purports a positive relationship between age at brain injury and severity of subsequent deficits (plateauing in adulthood. As an example, a child with left hemispherectomy can recover seemingly normal language, while an adult with focal injury to sub-regions of left temporal and/or frontal cortex can suffer dramatic and permanent language loss. Here we present data regarding the impact of early brain injury in rat models as a function of type and timing, measuring long-term behavioral outcomes via auditory discrimination tasks varying in temporal demand. These tasks were created to model (in rodents aspects of human sensory processing that may correlate – both developmentally and functionally – with typical and atypical language. We found that bilateral focal lesions to the cortical plate in rats during active neuronal migration led to worse auditory outcomes than comparable lesions induced after cortical migration was complete. Conversely, unilateral hypoxic-ischemic injuries (similar to those seen in premature infants and term infants with birth complications led to permanent auditory processing deficits when induced at a neurodevelopmental point comparable to human "term," but only transient deficits (undetectable in adulthood when induced in a "preterm" window. Convergent evidence suggests that regardless of when or how disruption of early neural development occurs, the consequences may be particularly deleterious to rapid auditory processing outcomes when they trigger developmental alterations that extend into subcortical structures (i.e., lower sensory processing stations. Collective findings hold implications for the study of behavioral outcomes following early brain injury as well as genetic/environmental disruption, and are relevant to our understanding of the neurologic risk factors underlying developmental language disability in

  18. Differential cytokine gene expression according to outcome in a hamster model of leptospirosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédérique Vernel-Pauillac

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parameters predicting the evolution of leptospirosis would be useful for clinicians, as well as to better understand severe leptospirosis, but are scarce and rarely validated. Because severe leptospirosis includes septic shock, similarities with predictors evidenced for sepsis and septic shock were studied in a hamster model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an LD50 model of leptospirosis in hamsters, we first determined that 3 days post-infection was a time-point that allowed studying the regulation of immune gene expression and represented the onset of the clinical signs of the disease. In the absence of tools to assess serum concentrations of immune effectors in hamsters, we determined mRNA levels of various immune genes, especially cytokines, together with leptospiraemia at this particular time-point. We found differential expression of both pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, with significantly higher expression levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1alpha, cyclo-oxygenase 2 and interleukin 10 genes in nonsurvivors compared to survivors. Higher leptospiraemia was also observed in nonsurvivors. Lastly, we demonstrated the relevance of these results by comparing their respective expression levels using a LD100 model or an isogenic high-passage nonvirulent variant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Up-regulated gene expression of both pro- and anti-inflammatory immune effectors in hamsters with fatal outcome in an LD50 model of leptospirosis, together with a higher Leptospira burden, suggest that these gene expression levels could be predictors of adverse outcome in leptospirosis.

  19. Multiscale modeling and distributed computing to predict cosmesis outcome after a lumpectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbey, M.; Salmon, R.; Thanoon, D.; Bass, B. L.

    2013-07-01

    Surgery for early stage breast carcinoma is either total mastectomy (complete breast removal) or surgical lumpectomy (only tumor removal). The lumpectomy or partial mastectomy is intended to preserve a breast that satisfies the woman's cosmetic, emotional and physical needs. But in a fairly large number of cases the cosmetic outcome is not satisfactory. Today, predicting that surgery outcome is essentially based on heuristic. Modeling such a complex process must encompass multiple scales, in space from cells to tissue, as well as in time, from minutes for the tissue mechanics to months for healing. The goal of this paper is to present a first step in multiscale modeling of the long time scale prediction of breast shape after tumor resection. This task requires coupling very different mechanical and biological models with very different computing needs. We provide a simple illustration of the application of heterogeneous distributed computing and modular software design to speed up the model development. Our computational framework serves currently to test hypothesis on breast tissue healing in a pilot study with women who have been elected to undergo BCT and are being treated at the Methodist Hospital in Houston, TX.

  20. Cultivating Learner Autonomy in College English learning based on the Double-dominating Teaching Model%“双主”模式下大学英语自主学习能力培养探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈娜

    2016-01-01

    目前,“终身教育”理念已经被社会大众广泛关注和采纳,因此,对于大学生终身发展而言,培养其具备良好的英语自主学习能力是适应未来世界发展的需要。“双主”模式,是以“教师为主导,学生为主体”的新型教学模式,教与学相互融合,为大学生英语自主学习能力的培养提供了保障。本文在分析大学生英语自主学习现状基础上,从“双主”视角出发,提出了重新定位师生角色、加强学习策略培训、创建网络自主学习环境、完善评价机制几个方面培养途径。%With the development of “Life-long learning” concept, the importance of cultivating learner autonomy in college English learning has become more and more significant. Double -dominating Teaching Model, which means “Teacher as the guide and students as the subject”, embodies a form of further integration of teaching and learning and meets the demand of college English reform. Besides, it provides a necessary condition for cultivating college students' ability of learning English autonomously. This article describes the definition of Learner Autonomy and the situation of college students' autonomous English learning, analyzes the features and meaning of“Double-dominating Teaching Model”, and discusses the ways on cultivating Learner Autonomy in college English learning from the perspective of“Double -dominating Teaching Model”.

  1. Improving Information Technology Curriculum Learning Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick L Anderson

    2017-06-01

    The case study research methodology has been selected to conduct the inquiry into this phenomenon. This empirical inquiry facilitates exploration of a contemporary phenomenon in depth within its real-life context using a variety of data sources. The subject of analysis will be two Information Technology classes composed of a combination of second year and third year students; both classes have six students, the same six students. Contribution It is the purpose of this research to show that the use of improved approaches to learning will produce more desirable learning outcomes. Findings The results of this inquiry clearly show that the use of the traditional behaviorist based pedagogic model to achieve college and university IT program learning outcomes is not as effective as a more constructivist based andragogic model. Recommendations Instruction based purely on either of these does a disservice to the typical college and university level learner. The correct approach lies somewhere in between them; the most successful outcome attainment would be the product of incorporating the best of both. Impact on Society Instructional strategies produce learning outcomes; learning outcomes demonstrate what knowledge has been acquired. Acquired knowledge is used by students as they pursue professional careers and other ventures in life. Future Research Learning and teaching approaches are not “one-size-fits-all” propositions; different strategies are appropriate for different circumstances and situations. Additional research should seek to introduce vehicles that will move learners away from one the traditional methodology that has been used throughout much of their educational careers to an approach that is better suited to equip them with the skills necessary to meet the challenges awaiting them in the professional world.

  2. Examination of outcome after mild traumatic brain injury: the contribution of injury beliefs and Leventhal's common sense model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Deborah L; Hay-Smith, E Jean C; Surgenor, Lois J; Siegert, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Associations between components of Leventhal's common sense model of health behaviour (injury beliefs, coping, distress) and outcome after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) were examined. Participants (n = 147) were recruited within three months following MTBI and assessed six months later, completing study questionnaires at both visits (Illness Perceptions Questionnaire Revised, Brief COPE, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Outcome measures included the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire and Rivermead Head Injury Follow-Up Questionnaire. Univariate and multivariate (logistic regression) analyses examined associations between injury beliefs, coping and distress at baseline, and later outcome. Participants endorsing stronger injury identity beliefs (p model. Consistent with Leventhal's model, participant beliefs about their injury and recovery had significant associations with outcome over time. Coping also appeared to have important associations with outcome but more research is required to examine these. Current reassurance-based interventions may be improved by targeting variables such as injury beliefs, coping and adjustment soon after injury.

  3. Reclassification of English Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B. Grissom

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Ron Unz, originator of Proposition 227, claimed, prior to the passage of Prop. 227, that the five percent annual reclassification rate of English learners to fluent English proficient indicated bilingual education was a failure. Critics of Prop. 227 have countered that the annual reclassification rate has changed little since the passage of Prop. 227, indicating the new legislation had no effect on reclassification rates. Unfortunately, the annual reclassification rate does not provide a clear indicator of how long it takes students to be reclassified after entering the school system. To better estimate reclassification rates for English learners in California, cohorts were created to track the same groups of students over time. Ron Unz also claimed that test scores for immigrant students improved dramatically after the passage of Prop. 227. To evaluate his claim, average test scores were calculated by language fluency. Based on statewide data from three different cohorts tracked across four years, Prop. 227 has had no effect on reclassification rates or test scores.

  4. Language Learner Strategies and Linguistic Competence as Factors Affecting Achievement Test Scores in English for Specific Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkovic, Violeta

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the effect of two factors on achievement test scores in English as a foreign language for specific purposes in higher education: preexisting linguistic competence and frequency of use of language learner strategies. The rationale for the analysis of language learner strategies as a factor affecting achievement test outcomes is…

  5. Structuring a life support program using evidence-based practice and the Magnet model for successful patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Mary; Paston, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Integrating life support activities into an acute care academic hospital structure using evidence-based practice and the Magnet Model framework provides program operations and outcomes that are cost effective, link quality to life support professional development, and demonstrate excellence patient safety outcomes.

  6. Application and performance of two stroke outcome prediction models in a chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Juan; Gao, Zhi-Yu; He, Yang; Liu, Guang-Zhi; Gao, Xu-Guang

    2012-02-01

    To apply and examine the performance of 2 acute stroke outcome prediction models, the Six Simple Variable Model (SSV model) and the One-Year Mortality Model (OYM model), in patients in China who had either a cerebral infarction or a cerebral hemorrhage. An observational study that used both retrospective and prospective study methods. A regional acute care facility in China. Two hundred and forty-eight consecutive patients who had an acute stroke who were admitted to the hospital between October 2007 and March 2009. Not applicable. Survival and daily activity independence 6 months after a stroke and 1-year mortality. The study sample had a mean age of 68.6 years (standard deviation, 11.1); 52.8% of the subjects were men, 66.5% had a cerebral infarction, and 33.5% had a cerebral hemorrhage. In the cohort, 107 patients (43.1%) achieved daily activity independence at 6-month follow-up, and 52 patients (21.0%) had died within 1 year. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) was 0.966 (0.935-0.998) for patients who had a cerebral infarction and 0.859 (0.766-0.952) for patients who had a cerebral hemorrhage in the prediction of 6-month survival and daily activity independence with use of the SSV model. The area under the ROC curve was 0.894 (0.846-0.965) for patients who had a cerebral infarction and 0.937 (0.904-0.988) for patients who had a cerebral hemorrhage in the prediction of 1-year mortality when the OYM model was used. Both the SSV and OYM prognostic models can be used for function and mortality outcome prediction for patients in China who have had a stroke. Variation existed in the precision of prediction between patients who had a cerebral infarction and those who had a cerebral hemorrhage. Other potential factors influencing functional recovery and mortality after stroke must be considered in outcome prediction. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving the Rank Precision of Population Health Measures for Small Areas with Longitudinal and Joint Outcome Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K Athens

    Full Text Available The University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute has published the County Health Rankings since 2010. These rankings use population-based data to highlight health outcomes and the multiple determinants of these outcomes and to encourage in-depth health assessment for all United States counties. A significant methodological limitation, however, is the uncertainty of rank estimates, particularly for small counties. To address this challenge, we explore the use of longitudinal and pooled outcome data in hierarchical Bayesian models to generate county ranks with greater precision.In our models we used pooled outcome data for three measure groups: (1 Poor physical and poor mental health days; (2 percent of births with low birth weight and fair or poor health prevalence; and (3 age-specific mortality rates for nine age groups. We used the fixed and random effects components of these models to generate posterior samples of rates for each measure. We also used time-series data in longitudinal random effects models for age-specific mortality. Based on the posterior samples from these models, we estimate ranks and rank quartiles for each measure, as well as the probability of a county ranking in its assigned quartile. Rank quartile probabilities for univariate, joint outcome, and/or longitudinal models were compared to assess improvements in rank precision.The joint outcome model for poor physical and poor mental health days resulted in improved rank precision, as did the longitudinal model for age-specific mortality rates. Rank precision for low birth weight births and fair/poor health prevalence based on the univariate and joint outcome models were equivalent.Incorporating longitudinal or pooled outcome data may improve rank certainty, depending on characteristics of the measures selected. For measures with different determinants, joint modeling neither improved nor degraded rank precision. This approach suggests a simple way to use existing

  8. Self-regulation across time of first-generation online learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Barnard-Brak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-regulatory skills have been associated with positive outcomes for learners. In the current study, we examined the self-regulatory skills of students who are firstgeneration online learners over the course of their first semester of online instruction. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the online selfregulatory skills of learners changed across time as associated with being immersed in their first online learning environment. The results of the current study indicate no significant differences in the online self-regulatory skills of learners across time. Results suggest that environmental factors such as being immersed in an online learning environment for the first time is not, in and of itself, associated with the development of self-regulatory skills of online learners. We conclude that the design of online courses needs to consider ways of developing self-regulatory skills as these skills are not automatically developed with students' online learning experiences.

  9. Deconstructing Constructivism: Modeling Causal Relationships Among Constructivist Learning Environment Factors and Student Outcomes in Introductory Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komperda, Regis

    The purpose of this dissertation is to test a model of relationships among factors characterizing aspects of a student-centered constructivist learning environment and student outcomes of satisfaction and academic achievement in introductory undergraduate chemistry courses. Constructivism was chosen as the theoretical foundation for this research because of its widespread use in chemical education research and practice. In a constructivist learning environment the role of the teacher shifts from delivering content towards facilitating active student engagement in activities that encourage individual knowledge construction through discussion and application of content. Constructivist approaches to teaching introductory chemistry courses have been adopted by some instructors as a way to improve student outcomes, but little research has been done on the causal relationships among particular aspects of the learning environment and student outcomes. This makes it difficult for classroom teachers to know which aspects of a constructivist teaching approach are critical to adopt and which may be modified to better suit a particular learning environment while still improving student outcomes. To investigate a model of these relationships, a survey designed to measure student perceptions of three factors characterizing a constructivist learning environment in online courses was adapted for use in face-to-face chemistry courses. These three factors, teaching presence, social presence, and cognitive presence, were measured using a slightly modified version of the Community of Inquiry (CoI) instrument. The student outcomes investigated in this research were satisfaction and academic achievement, as measured by standardized American Chemical Society (ACS) exam scores and course grades. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to statistically model relationships among the three presence factors and student outcome variables for 391 students enrolled in six sections of a

  10. Learning Difficulties in English for Rural Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaravelu, G.

    2010-01-01

    The present study illuminates and diagnoses the learning problems of the rural learners in English Grammar at standard VI. Present study may be useful to ameliorate the rural learners for acquiring competencies in English and eliminates the problems of the learners. It paves way to the teachers to diagnose the learning hurdles of the learners and…

  11. Cancer outcomes research in a rural area: a multi-institution partnership model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael; Almon, Lyn; Bayakly, Rana; Butler, Susan; Crosby, Carol; DiIorio, Colleen; Ekwueme, Donatus; Fletcher, Diane; Fowler, John; Gillespie, Theresa; Glanz, Karen; Hall, Ingrid; Lee, Judith; Liff, Jonathan; Lipscomb, Joseph; Pollack, Lori A; Richardson, Lisa C; Roberts, Phillip; Steenland, Kyle; Ward, Kevin

    2009-02-01

    Whereas, most cancer research data come from high-profile academic centers, little is known about the outcomes of cancer care in rural communities. We summarize the experience of building a multi-institution partnership to develop a cancer outcomes research infrastructure in Southwest Georgia (SWGA), a primarily rural 33-county area with over 700,000 residents. The partnership includes eight institutions: the Emory University in Atlanta, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Georgia Comprehensive Center Registry (the Registry), the Southwest Georgia Cancer Coalition (the Coalition), and the four community cancer centers located within the SWGA region. The practical application of the partnership model, its organizational structure, and lessons learned are presented using two specific examples: a study evaluating treatment decisions and quality of life among prostate cancer patients, and a study of treatment discontinuation among prostate, breast, lung, and colorectal cancer patients. Our partnership model allowed us to (1) use the Coalition as a link between Atlanta-based researchers and local community; (2) collaborate with the area cancer centers on day-to-day study activities; (3) involve the Registry personnel and resources to identify eligible cancer cases and to perform data collection; and (4) raise community awareness and sense of study ownership through media announcements organized by the Coalition. All of the above activities were performed in consultation with the funding institution (CDC) and its project directors who oversee several other studies addressing similar research questions throughout the country. Our partnership model may provide a useful framework for cancer outcomes research projects in rural communities.

  12. Modeling Verdict Outcomes Using Social Network Measures: The Watergate and Caviar Network Cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Hugo Masías

    Full Text Available Modelling criminal trial verdict outcomes using social network measures is an emerging research area in quantitative criminology. Few studies have yet analyzed which of these measures are the most important for verdict modelling or which data classification techniques perform best for this application. To compare the performance of different techniques in classifying members of a criminal network, this article applies three different machine learning classifiers-Logistic Regression, Naïve Bayes and Random Forest-with a range of social network measures and the necessary databases to model the verdicts in two real-world cases: the U.S. Watergate Conspiracy of the 1970's and the now-defunct Canada-based international drug trafficking ring known as the Caviar Network. In both cases it was found that the Random Forest classifier did better than either Logistic Regression or Naïve Bayes, and its superior performance was statistically significant. This being so, Random Forest was used not only for classification but also to assess the importance of the measures. For the Watergate case, the most important one proved to be betweenness centrality while for the Caviar Network, it was the effective size of the network. These results are significant because they show that an approach combining machine learning with social network analysis not only can generate accurate classification models but also helps quantify the importance social network variables in modelling verdict outcomes. We conclude our analysis with a discussion and some suggestions for future work in verdict modelling using social network measures.

  13. Study of the relationship between organizational culture and organizational outcomes using hierarchical linear modeling methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platonova, Elena A; Hernandez, S Robert; Shewchuk, Richard M; Leddy, Kelly M

    2006-01-01

    This study examines how perceptions of organizational culture influence organizational outcomes, specially, individual employee job satisfaction. The study was conducted in the health care industry in the United States. It examined the data on employee perceptions of job attributes, organizational culture, and job satisfaction, collected by Press Ganey Associates from 88 hospitals across the country in 2002-2003. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to test how organizational culture affects individual employee job satisfaction. Results indicated that some dimensions of organizational culture, specifically, job security and performance recognition, play a role in improving employee job satisfaction.

  14. The emancipation of the language learner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Larsen-Freeman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The general trend in language education over the years has been to ascribe to language learners increasing power and responsibility for their own learning. While this is commendable, the autonomy of learners is still constrained by views of language that see learners as being mere “hosts” of another’s language. Such views restrict learners to roles as language learners who make errors not language users who innovate. This article argues for a more enlightened view of language and of learners, one inspired by a complexity theory perspective. It also proposes that such a perspective is respectful of learner agency.

  15. Comparative study analysing women's childbirth satisfaction and obstetric outcomes across two different models of maternity care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conesa Ferrer, Ma Belén; Canteras Jordana, Manuel; Ballesteros Meseguer, Carmen; Carrillo García, César; Martínez Roche, M Emilia

    2016-08-26

    To describe the differences in obstetrical results and women's childbirth satisfaction across 2 different models of maternity care (biomedical model and humanised birth). 2 university hospitals in south-eastern Spain from April to October 2013. A correlational descriptive study. A convenience sample of 406 women participated in the study, 204 of the biomedical model and 202 of the humanised model. The differences in obstetrical results were (biomedical model/humanised model): onset of labour (spontaneous 66/137, augmentation 70/1, p=0.0005), pain relief (epidural 172/132, no pain relief 9/40, p=0.0005), mode of delivery (normal vaginal 140/165, instrumental 48/23, p=0.004), length of labour (0-4 hours 69/93, >4 hours 133/108, p=0.011), condition of perineum (intact perineum or tear 94/178, episiotomy 100/24, p=0.0005). The total questionnaire score (100) gave a mean (M) of 78.33 and SD of 8.46 in the biomedical model of care and an M of 82.01 and SD of 7.97 in the humanised model of care (p=0.0005). In the analysis of the results per items, statistical differences were found in 8 of the 9 subscales. The highest scores were reached in the humanised model of maternity care. The humanised model of maternity care offers better obstetrical outcomes and women's satisfaction scores during the labour, birth and immediate postnatal period than does the biomedical model. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Comparative study analysing women's childbirth satisfaction and obstetric outcomes across two different models of maternity care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conesa Ferrer, Ma Belén; Canteras Jordana, Manuel; Ballesteros Meseguer, Carmen; Carrillo García, César; Martínez Roche, M Emilia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the differences in obstetrical results and women's childbirth satisfaction across 2 different models of maternity care (biomedical model and humanised birth). Setting 2 university hospitals in south-eastern Spain from April to October 2013. Design A correlational descriptive study. Participants A convenience sample of 406 women participated in the study, 204 of the biomedical model and 202 of the humanised model. Results The differences in obstetrical results were (biomedical model/humanised model): onset of labour (spontaneous 66/137, augmentation 70/1, p=0.0005), pain relief (epidural 172/132, no pain relief 9/40, p=0.0005), mode of delivery (normal vaginal 140/165, instrumental 48/23, p=0.004), length of labour (0–4 hours 69/93, >4 hours 133/108, p=0.011), condition of perineum (intact perineum or tear 94/178, episiotomy 100/24, p=0.0005). The total questionnaire score (100) gave a mean (M) of 78.33 and SD of 8.46 in the biomedical model of care and an M of 82.01 and SD of 7.97 in the humanised model of care (p=0.0005). In the analysis of the results per items, statistical differences were found in 8 of the 9 subscales. The highest scores were reached in the humanised model of maternity care. Conclusions The humanised model of maternity care offers better obstetrical outcomes and women's satisfaction scores during the labour, birth and immediate postnatal period than does the biomedical model. PMID:27566632

  17. Associations of patient safety outcomes with models of nursing care organization at unit level in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Carl-Ardy; D'amour, Danielle; Tchouaket, Eric; Clarke, Sean; Rivard, Michèle; Blais, Régis

    2013-04-01

    To examine the associations of four distinct nursing care organizational models with patient safety outcomes. Cross-sectional correlational study. Using a standardized protocol, patients' records were screened retrospectively to detect occurrences of patient safety-related events. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the associations of those events with four nursing care organizational models. Twenty-two medical units in 11 hospitals in Quebec, Canada, were clustered into 4 nursing care organizational models: 2 professional models and 2 functional models. Two thousand six hundred and ninety-nine were patients hospitalized for at least 48 h on the selected units. Composite of six safety-related events widely-considered sensitive to nursing care: medication administration errors, falls, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, unjustified restraints and pressure ulcers. Events were ultimately sorted into two categories: events 'without major' consequences for patients and events 'with' consequences. After controlling for patient characteristics, patient risk of experiencing one or more events (of any severity) and of experiencing an event with consequences was significantly lower, by factors of 25-52%, in both professional models than in the functional models. Event rates for both functional models were statistically indistinguishable from each other. Data suggest that nursing care organizational models characterized by contrasting staffing, work environment and innovation characteristics may be associated with differential risk for hospitalized patients. The two professional models, which draw mainly on registered nurses (RNs) to deliver nursing services and reflect stronger support for nurses' professional practice, were associated with lower risks than are the two functional models.

  18. Dose response explorer: an integrated open-source tool for exploring and modelling radiotherapy dose-volume outcome relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqa, I El [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Suneja, G [Brown Medical School, Providence, RI (United States); Lindsay, P E [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hope, A J [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Alaly, J R [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Vicic, M [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Bradley, J D [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Apte, A [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Deasy, J O [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2006-11-21

    Radiotherapy treatment outcome models are a complicated function of treatment, clinical and biological factors. Our objective is to provide clinicians and scientists with an accurate, flexible and user-friendly software tool to explore radiotherapy outcomes data and build statistical tumour control or normal tissue complications models. The software tool, called the dose response explorer system (DREES), is based on Matlab, and uses a named-field structure array data type. DREES/Matlab in combination with another open-source tool (CERR) provides an environment for analysing treatment outcomes. DREES provides many radiotherapy outcome modelling features, including (1) fitting of analytical normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumour control probability (TCP) models, (2) combined modelling of multiple dose-volume variables (e.g., mean dose, max dose, etc) and clinical factors (age, gender, stage, etc) using multi-term regression modelling, (3) manual or automated selection of logistic or actuarial model variables using bootstrap statistical resampling, (4) estimation of uncertainty in model parameters, (5) performance assessment of univariate and multivariate analyses using Spearman's rank correlation and chi-square statistics, boxplots, nomograms, Kaplan-Meier survival plots, and receiver operating characteristics curves, and (6) graphical capabilities to visualize NTCP or TCP prediction versus selected variable models using various plots. DREES provides clinical researchers with a tool customized for radiotherapy outcome modelling. DREES is freely distributed. We expect to continue developing DREES based on user feedback.

  19. Dose response explorer: an integrated open-source tool for exploring and modelling radiotherapy dose volume outcome relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, I.; Suneja, G.; Lindsay, P. E.; Hope, A. J.; Alaly, J. R.; Vicic, M.; Bradley, J. D.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2006-11-01

    Radiotherapy treatment outcome models are a complicated function of treatment, clinical and biological factors. Our objective is to provide clinicians and scientists with an accurate, flexible and user-friendly software tool to explore radiotherapy outcomes data and build statistical tumour control or normal tissue complications models. The software tool, called the dose response explorer system (DREES), is based on Matlab, and uses a named-field structure array data type. DREES/Matlab in combination with another open-source tool (CERR) provides an environment for analysing treatment outcomes. DREES provides many radiotherapy outcome modelling features, including (1) fitting of analytical normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumour control probability (TCP) models, (2) combined modelling of multiple dose-volume variables (e.g., mean dose, max dose, etc) and clinical factors (age, gender, stage, etc) using multi-term regression modelling, (3) manual or automated selection of logistic or actuarial model variables using bootstrap statistical resampling, (4) estimation of uncertainty in model parameters, (5) performance assessment of univariate and multivariate analyses using Spearman's rank correlation and chi-square statistics, boxplots, nomograms, Kaplan-Meier survival plots, and receiver operating characteristics curves, and (6) graphical capabilities to visualize NTCP or TCP prediction versus selected variable models using various plots. DREES provides clinical researchers with a tool customized for radiotherapy outcome modelling. DREES is freely distributed. We expect to continue developing DREES based on user feedback.

  20. Motivation Classification and Grade Prediction for MOOCs Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Yang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    While MOOCs offer educational data on a new scale, many educators find great potential of the big data including detailed activity records of every learner. A learner's behavior such as if a learner will drop out from the course can be predicted. How to provide an effective, economical, and scalable method to detect cheating on tests such as surrogate exam-taker is a challenging problem. In this paper, we present a grade predicting method that uses student activity features to predict whether a learner may get a certification if he/she takes a test. The method consists of two-step classifications: motivation classification (MC) and grade classification (GC). The MC divides all learners into three groups including certification earning, video watching, and course sampling. The GC then predicts a certification earning learner may or may not obtain a certification. Our experiment shows that the proposed method can fit the classification model at a fine scale and it is possible to find a surrogate exam-taker.

  1. Characteristics of older adult learners: a guide for dietetics practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicklighter, J R

    1991-11-01

    Characteristics of older adult learners are described and related to program development, implementation, and evaluation. The framework for designing learning experiences consists of four steps: assessment of the needs of the learner; development of learning objectives and determination of content; selection and implementation of appropriate learning activities; and evaluation of the results of learning. Four major assumptions about older adult learners are discussed based on a model designed specifically for adult learners. Active involvement through self-administered questionnaires, interviews, or focus groups helps ensure that nutrition education programs are responsive to the older adult's needs. Age-related changes (ie, in senses of sight and hearing, reaction time, and memory) and psychologic and social changes (ie, loneliness, depression, illness, financial difficulties, or loss of a loved one) may occur in many older learners and need to be considered when selecting appropriate learning activities. A single approach to nutrition education is unlikely to meet the needs and preferences of all older adults. To maximize their effect as educators, dietetics practitioners need to adjust their teaching styles and program development strategies to better fit the characteristics of older adult learners.

  2. Perception of vowels by learners of Spanish and English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bayonas, Mariche

    2005-04-01

    This study investigates the perception of English vowels /i I/, /u U/, and /e EI/ and Spanish /i u e/ by native-speakers (NS) and learners (L) and compares these two sets of vowels cross-linguistically. Research on the acquisition of vowels indicates that learners can improve their perception with exposure to the second language [Bohn and Flege (1990)]. Johnson, Flemming, and Wright (1993) investigated the hyperspace effect and how listeners tended to choose extreme vowel qualities in a method of adjustment (MOA) task. The theoretical framework of this study is Fleges (1995) Speech Learning Model. The research question is: Are vowels selected differently by NS and L using synthesized data? Spanish learners (n=54) and English learners (n=17) completed MOA tasks in which they were exposed to 330 synthetically produced vowels to analyze spectral differences in the acquisition of both sound systems, and how the learners vowel system may vary from that of the NS. In the MOA tasks they were asked to select which synthesized vowel sounds resembled the most the ones whose spelling was presented to them. The results include an overview of the vowel formant analysis performed, and which vowels are the most challenging ones to learners.

  3. Learners' independent records of vocabulary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Philip; Leeke, Philip

    1999-01-01

    Handbooks recommend a variety of quite complicated procedures for learning and remembering vocabulary, but most learners only engage in very simple procedures. The aim of this project was to establish a basis for identifying optimal vocabulary recording procedures by finding out what learners...... currently do. We administered a questionnaire, interviewed learners who said that they kept vocabulary records of some kind and examined their records. Two-thirds had given up making vocabulary lists on entering the L2 environment and/or starting to read extensively, but several made interesting lists...

  4. LEARNER REFLECTION IN PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The traditional English teaching method makes students feeltoo serious,nervous and formal.Learner reflection in portfolioassessment can increase opportunities for dialogues betweenteachers and students about curriculum goals and learnerprogress,which is very important to provide a healthy,harmonious and democratic situation in English teaching forstudents.This paper analyses some benefits of learner reflectionin portfolios and focuses on how to design reflective tasks for theportfolio.It is obvious that learner reflection is good for bothteachers and students to improve their teaching and studyingmethods as well as to enhance the teaching quality.

  5. ENHANCING LEARNER AUTONOMY BY INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY AMONG ENGINEERING LEARNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhimathi, S.N.S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century learners strive to be autonomous and seek more responsibility. They expect and demand too much and too soon from the world. Since they are technologically savvy, they rely absolutely on technology for communicating, watching movies, listening to music, playing, etc. The learners are pleased if the teacher guides them in using their laptops, i-pads or mobile phones, to practice English when they are commuting or in their spare time. This study was intended to find out whether there was any improvement in the acquisition of L2 among first year engineering learners, when learning was integrated with technology. The sample for the study comprised 60 learners of VIT University, Vellore. A Pretest was conducted in the entry level of the course and posttest was conducted to check their progress in the posttest. The learners were exposed to a range of activities after the pretest and the analysis was done through SPSS version19. The result of the study revealed that the learners show a significant progress in the acquisition of L2, when blended-learning approach (Driscoll, 2002 was adopted by the teacher than traditional method.

  6. Learner-centred medical education: Improved learning or increased stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Michelle; Gibbs, Trevor J

    2009-12-01

    Globally, as medical education undergoes significant reform towards more "learner-centred" approaches, specific implications arise for medical educators and learners. Although this learner-centredness is grounded in educational theory, a point of discussion would be whether the application and practice of these new curricula alleviate or exacerbate student difficulties and levels of stress. This commentary will argue that while this reform in medical education is laudable, with positive implications for learning, medical educators may not have understood or perhaps not embraced "learner-centredness" in its entirety. During their training, medical students are expected to be "patient-centred". They are asked to apply a biopsychosocial model, which takes cognisance of all aspects of a patient's well-being. While many medical schools profess that their curricula reflect these principles, in reality, many may not always practice what they preach. Medical training all too often remains grounded in the biomedical model, with the cognitive domain overshadowing the psychosocial development and needs of learners. Entrusted by parents and society with the education and training of future healthcare professionals, medical education needs to move to a "learner-centred philosophy", in which the "whole" student is acknowledged. As undergraduate and post-graduate students increasingly apply their skills in an international arena, this learner-centredness should equally encapsulate the gender, cultural and religious diversity of both patients and students. Appropriate support structures, role models and faculty development are required to develop skills, attitudes and professional behaviour that will allow our graduates to become caring and sensitive healthcare providers.

  7. A Multilevel Model for Comorbid Outcomes: Obesity and Diabetes in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Congdon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilevel models are overwhelmingly applied to single health outcomes, but when two or more health conditions are closely related, it is important that contextual variation in their joint prevalence (e.g., variations over different geographic settings is considered. A multinomial multilevel logit regression approach for analysing joint prevalence is proposed here that includes subject level risk factors (e.g., age, race, education while also taking account of geographic context. Data from a US population health survey (the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System or BRFSS are used to illustrate the method, with a six category multinomial outcome defined by diabetic status and weight category (obese, overweight, normal. The influence of geographic context is partly represented by known geographic variables (e.g., county poverty, and partly by a model for latent area influences. In particular, a shared latent variable (common factor approach is proposed to measure the impact of unobserved area influences on joint weight and diabetes status, with the latent variable being spatially structured to reflect geographic clustering in risk.

  8. Spatial Environmental Modeling of Autoantibody Outcomes among an African American Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Carroll

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study of autoimmunity among a population of Gullah African Americans in South Carolina, the links between environmental exposures and autoimmunity (presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA have been assessed. The study population included patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 10, their first degree relatives (n = 61, and unrelated controls (n = 9 where 47.5% (n = 38 were ANA positive. This paper presents the methodology used to model ANA status as a function of individual environmental influences, both self-reported and measured, while controlling for known autoimmunity risk factors. We have examined variable dimension reduction and selection methods in our approach. Following the dimension reduction and selection methods, we fit logistic spatial Bayesian models to explore the relationship between our outcome of interest and environmental exposures adjusting for personal variables. Our analysis also includes a validation “strip” where we have interpolated information from a specific geographic area for a subset of the study population that lives in that vicinity. Our results demonstrate that residential proximity to exposure site is important in this form of analysis. The use of a validation strip network demonstrated that even with small sample numbers some significant exposure-outcome relationships can be detected.

  9. Modeling strategy to identify patients with primary immunodeficiency utilizing risk management and outcome measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Vicki; Quinn, Jessica; Ginsberg, Grant; Gladue, Ron; Orange, Jordan; Modell, Fred

    2017-06-01

    This study seeks to generate analytic insights into risk management and probability of an identifiable primary immunodeficiency defect. The Jeffrey Modell Centers Network database, Jeffrey Modell Foundation's 10 Warning Signs, the 4 Stages of Testing Algorithm, physician-reported clinical outcomes, programs of physician education and public awareness, the SPIRIT® Analyzer, and newborn screening, taken together, generates P values of less than 0.05%. This indicates that the data results do not occur by chance, and that there is a better than 95% probability that the data are valid. The objectives are to improve patients' quality of life, while generating significant reduction of costs. The advances of the world's experts aligned with these JMF programs can generate analytic insights as to risk management and probability of an identifiable primary immunodeficiency defect. This strategy reduces the uncertainties related to primary immunodeficiency risks, as we can screen, test, identify, and treat undiagnosed patients. We can also address regional differences and prevalence, age, gender, treatment modalities, and sites of care, as well as economic benefits. These tools support high net benefits, substantial financial savings, and significant reduction of costs. All stakeholders, including patients, clinicians, pharmaceutical companies, third party payers, and government healthcare agencies, must address the earliest possible precise diagnosis, appropriate intervention and treatment, as well as stringent control of healthcare costs through risk assessment and outcome measurement. An affected patient is entitled to nothing less, and stakeholders are responsible to utilize tools currently available. Implementation offers a significant challenge to the entire primary immunodeficiency community.

  10. Models of Workplace Incivility: The Relationships to Instigated Incivility and Negative Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Holm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate workplace incivility as a social process, examining its components and relationships to both instigated incivility and negative outcomes in the form of well-being, job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and sleeping problems. The different components of incivility that were examined were experienced and witnessed incivility from coworkers as well as supervisors. In addition, the organizational factors, social support, control, and job demands, were included in the models. A total of 2871 (2058 women and 813 men employees who were connected to the Swedish Hotel and Restaurant Workers Union completed an online questionnaire. Overall, the results from structural equation modelling indicate that whereas instigated incivility to a large extent was explained by witnessing coworker incivility, negative outcomes were to a high degree explained by experienced supervisor incivility via mediation through perceived low social support, low control, and high job demands. Unexpectedly, the relationships between incivility (experienced coworker and supervisor incivility, as well as witnessed supervisor incivility and instigated incivility were moderated by perceived high control and high social support. The results highlight the importance of including different components of workplace incivility and organizational factors in future studies of the area.

  11. Models of Workplace Incivility: The Relationships to Instigated Incivility and Negative Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Kristoffer; Torkelson, Eva; Bäckström, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate workplace incivility as a social process, examining its components and relationships to both instigated incivility and negative outcomes in the form of well-being, job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and sleeping problems. The different components of incivility that were examined were experienced and witnessed incivility from coworkers as well as supervisors. In addition, the organizational factors, social support, control, and job demands, were included in the models. A total of 2871 (2058 women and 813 men) employees who were connected to the Swedish Hotel and Restaurant Workers Union completed an online questionnaire. Overall, the results from structural equation modelling indicate that whereas instigated incivility to a large extent was explained by witnessing coworker incivility, negative outcomes were to a high degree explained by experienced supervisor incivility via mediation through perceived low social support, low control, and high job demands. Unexpectedly, the relationships between incivility (experienced coworker and supervisor incivility, as well as witnessed supervisor incivility) and instigated incivility were moderated by perceived high control and high social support. The results highlight the importance of including different components of workplace incivility and organizational factors in future studies of the area.

  12. Gene panel model predictive of outcome in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiau, Nadège; Dantal, Yann; Guy, Laurent; Ngollo, Marjolaine; Dagdemir, Aslihan; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Terris, Benoît; Vieillefond, Annick; Boiteux, Jean-Paul; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique

    2013-08-01

    In men at high risk for prostate cancer, established clinical and pathological parameters provide only limited prognostic information. Here we analyzed a French cohort of 103 prostate cancer patients and developed a gene panel model predictive of outcome in this group of patients. The model comprised of a 15-gene TaqMan Low-Density Array (TLDA) card, with gene expressions compared to a standardized reference. The RQ value for each gene was calculated, and a scoring system was developed. Summing all the binary scores (0 or 1) corresponding to the 15 genes, a global score is obtained between 0 and 15. This global score can be compared to Gleason score (0 to 10) by recalculating it into a 0-10 scaled score. A scaled score ≥2 suggested that the patient is suffering from a prostate cancer, and a scaled score ≥7 flagged aggressive cancer. Statistical analyses demonstrated a strongly significant linear correlation (p=3.50E-08) between scaled score and Gleason score for this prostate cancer cohort (N=103). These results support the capacity of this designed 15 target gene TLDA card approach to predict outcome in prostate cancer, opening up a new avenue for personalized medicine through future independent replication and applications for rapid identification of aggressive prostate cancer phenotypes for early intervention.

  13. Adverse Geriatric Outcomes Secondary to Polypharmacy in a Mouse Model: The Influence of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizer-Pajkos, Aniko; Kane, Alice E; Howlett, Susan E; Mach, John; Mitchell, Sarah J; de Cabo, Rafael; Le Couteur, David G; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to develop a mouse model of polypharmacy, primarily to establish whether short-term exposure to polypharmacy causes adverse geriatric outcomes. We also investigated whether old age increased susceptibility to any adverse geriatric outcomes of polypharmacy. Young (n= 10) and old (n= 21) male C57BL/6 mice were administered control diet or polypharmacy diet containing therapeutic doses of five commonly used medicines (simvastatin, metoprolol, omeprazole, acetaminophen, and citalopram). Mice were assessed before and after the 2- to 4-week intervention. Over the intervention period, we observed no mortality and no change in food intake, body weight, or serum biochemistry in any age or treatment group. In old mice, polypharmacy caused significant declines in locomotor activity (pre minus postintervention values in control 2 ± 13 counts, polypharmacy 32 ± 7 counts,ppolypharmacy +1.99 ± 1.19 N s,ppolypharmacy -1.7 ± 17 s,ppolypharmacy 11 ± 4 mmHg,ppolypharmacy groups. This novel model of polypharmacy is feasible. Even short-term polypharmacy impairs mobility, balance, and strength in old male mice. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Bayesian Network Models for Local Dependence among Observable Outcome Variables. Research Report. ETS RR-06-36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Russell G.; Mulder, Joris; Hemat, Lisa A.; Yan, Duanli

    2006-01-01

    Bayesian network models offer a large degree of flexibility for modeling dependence among observables (item outcome variables) from the same task that may be dependent. This paper explores four design patterns for modeling locally dependent observations from the same task: (1) No context--Ignore dependence among observables; (2) Compensatory…

  15. The Effect of Cooperative Learning Model of Teams Games Tournament (TGT) and Students' Motivation toward Physics Learning Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadrah; Tolla, Ismail; Ali, Muhammad Sidin; Muris

    2017-01-01

    This research aims at describing the effect of cooperative learning model of Teams Games Tournament (TGT) and motivation toward physics learning outcome. This research was a quasi-experimental research with a factorial design conducted at SMAN 2 Makassar. Independent variables were learning models. They were cooperative learning model of TGT and…

  16. Intrauterine Zika virus infection of pregnant immunocompetent mice models transplacental transmission and adverse perinatal outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermillion, Meghan S.; Lei, Jun; Shabi, Yahya; Baxter, Victoria K.; Crilly, Nathan P.; McLane, Michael; Griffin, Diane E.; Pekosz, Andrew; Klein, Sabra L.; Burd, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) crosses the placenta and causes congenital disease. Here we develop an animal model utilizing direct ZIKV inoculation into the uterine wall of pregnant, immunocompetent mice to evaluate transplacental transmission. Intrauterine inoculation at embryonic day (E) 10, but not E14, with African, Asian or American strains of ZIKV reduces fetal viability and increases infection of placental and fetal tissues. ZIKV inoculation at E10 causes placental inflammation, placental dysfunction and reduces neonatal brain cortical thickness, which is associated with increased activation of microglia. Viral antigen localizes in trophoblast and endothelial cells in the placenta, and endothelial, microglial and neural progenitor cells in the fetal brain. ZIKV infection of the placenta increases production of IFNβ and expression of IFN-stimulated genes 48 h after infection. This mouse model provides a platform for identifying factors at the maternal–fetal interface that contribute to adverse perinatal outcomes in a host with an intact immune system. PMID:28220786

  17. Examining Teacher Outcomes of the School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Model in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari-Anne Sørlie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Research on teacher outcomes of the School-Wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS model has been scarce. The present study adds to the knowledge base by examining the effects of the Norwegian version of SWPBS (N-PALS on school staffs’ behavior management practices and on their individual and collective efficacy. Questionnaire data were collected from staff and students (Grades 4-7 at four measurement points across four successive school years in 28 intervention schools and 20 comparison schools. Using longitudinal multilevel analyses, indications of positive 3-year main effects of the N-PALS model were observed for staff-reported collective efficacy, self-efficacy, and positive behavior support practices. The intervention effects as measured by Cohen’s d ranged from .14 to .91. The effects on student perceptions of teachers’ behavior management strategies were, however, not consistent with the positive staff ratings. Results are discussed in relation to prior research, future research, and study limitations.

  18. Physical aggression, compromised social support, and 10-year marital outcomes: Testing a relational spillover model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kieran T; Pasch, Lauri A; Lawrence, Erika; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test a relational spillover model of physical aggression whereby physical aggression affects marital outcomes due to its effects on how spouses ask for and provide support to one another. Newlywed couples (n = 172) reported levels of physical aggression over the past year and engaged in interactions designed to elicit social support; marital adjustment, and stability were assessed periodically over the first 10 years of marriage. Multilevel modeling revealed that negative support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and 10-year marital adjustment levels whereas positive support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and divorce status. These findings emphasize the need to look beyond conflict when explaining how aggression affects relationships and when working with couples with a history of physical aggression who are seeking to improve their relationships.

  19. Logistic random effects regression models: a comparison of statistical packages for binary and ordinal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steyerberg Ewout W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Logistic random effects models are a popular tool to analyze multilevel also called hierarchical data with a binary or ordinal outcome. Here, we aim to compare different statistical software implementations of these models. Methods We used individual patient data from 8509 patients in 231 centers with moderate and severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI enrolled in eight Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs and three observational studies. We fitted logistic random effects regression models with the 5-point Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS as outcome, both dichotomized as well as ordinal, with center and/or trial as random effects, and as covariates age, motor score, pupil reactivity or trial. We then compared the implementations of frequentist and Bayesian methods to estimate the fixed and random effects. Frequentist approaches included R (lme4, Stata (GLLAMM, SAS (GLIMMIX and NLMIXED, MLwiN ([R]IGLS and MIXOR, Bayesian approaches included WinBUGS, MLwiN (MCMC, R package MCMCglmm and SAS experimental procedure MCMC. Three data sets (the full data set and two sub-datasets were analysed using basically two logistic random effects models with either one random effect for the center or two random effects for center and trial. For the ordinal outcome in the full data set also a proportional odds model with a random center effect was fitted. Results The packages gave similar parameter estimates for both the fixed and random effects and for the binary (and ordinal models for the main study and when based on a relatively large number of level-1 (patient level data compared to the number of level-2 (hospital level data. However, when based on relatively sparse data set, i.e. when the numbers of level-1 and level-2 data units were about the same, the frequentist and Bayesian approaches showed somewhat different results. The software implementations differ considerably in flexibility, computation time, and usability. There are also differences in

  20. How Do Novice and Expert Learners Represent, Understand, and Discuss Geologic Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layow, Erica Amanda

    This dissertation examined the representations novice and expert learners constructed for the geologic timescale. Learners engaged in a three-part activity. The purpose was to compare novice learners' representations to those of expert learners. This provided insight into the similarities and differences between their strategies for event ordering, assigning values and scale to the geologic timescale model, as well as their language and practices to complete the model. With a qualitative approach to data analysis informed by an expert-novice theoretical framework grounded in phenomenography, learner responses comprised the data analyzed. These data highlighted learners' metacognitive thoughts that might not otherwise be shared through lectures or laboratory activities. Learners' responses were analyzed using a discourse framework that positioned learners as knowers. Novice and expert learners both excelled at ordering and discussing events before the Phanerozoic, but were challenged with events during the Phanerozoic. Novice learners had difficulty assigning values to events and establishing a scale for their models. Expert learners expressed difficulty with determining a scale because of the size of the model, yet eventually used anchor points and unitized the model to establish a scale. Despite challenges constructing their models, novice learners spoke confidently using claims and few hedging phrases indicating their confidence in statements made. Experts used more hedges than novices, however the hedging comments were made about more complex conceptions. Using both phenomenographic and discourse analysis approaches for analysis foregrounded learners' discussions of how they perceived geologic time and their ways of knowing and doing. This research is intended to enhance the geoscience community's understanding of the ways novice and expert learners think and discuss conceptions of geologic time, including the events and values of time, and the strategies used

  1. Learners' independent records of vocabulary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Philip; Leeke, Philip

    1999-01-01

    Handbooks recommend a variety of quite complicated procedures for learning and remembering vocabulary, but most learners only engage in very simple procedures. The aim of this project was to establish a basis for identifying optimal vocabulary recording procedures by finding out what learners...... currently do. We administered a questionnaire, interviewed learners who said that they kept vocabulary records of some kind and examined their records. Two-thirds had given up making vocabulary lists on entering the L2 environment and/or starting to read extensively, but several made interesting lists...... to be bilingual and single-word focused. The optimal listing procedures are those which represent a compromise between linguistically and psychologically effective practices and the amount of investment learners are actually prepared to put in. It is important to distinguish records made in class, which should...

  2. Teachers of adults as learners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Larsen, Lea

    need can be taught in formal settings, but in most teaching settings, the teachers act alone and develop their pedagogical approaches/-teaching strategies with no synchronous sparring from a colleague. Adult learners have particular needs and characteristics that their teachers must be able to address......This poster is a part of an on-going qualitative empirical research project: “Teachers of adults as learners. A study on teachers’ experiences in practice”. Adult learners have particular needs and characteristics that their teachers must be able to address. Some of the competencies that teachers...... (cf. Knowles, Brookfield, Illeris, Lawler, King, Wahlgreen). If we study adult teachers as learners in practice, we may be able to identify what the teachers’ practice requires, and thereby qualify the efforts of teacher educators....

  3. Mathematical modeling of herpes simplex virus-2 suppression with pritelivir predicts trial outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Joshua T.; Swan, David A.; Magaret, Amalia; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Ossig, Joachim; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Stoelben, Susanne; Timmler, Burkhard; Zimmermann, Holger; Melhem, Murad R.; Van Wart, Scott A.; Rubino, Christopher M.; Birkmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models estimate the potency of antiviral agents but do not capture viral and immunologic factors that drive the natural dynamics of infection. We designed a mathematical model that synthesizes pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and viral pathogenesis concepts to simulate the activity of pritelivir, a DNA helicase-primase inhibitor that targets herpes simplex virus. Our simulations recapitulate detailed viral kinetic shedding features in five dosage arms of a phase 2 clinical trial. We identify that in vitro estimates of EC50 are lower than in vivo values for the drug. Nevertheless, pritelivir potently decreases shedding at appropriate doses based on its mode of action and long half-life. While pritelivir directly inhibits replication in epithelial cells, our model indicates that pritelivir also indirectly limits downstream viral spread from neurons to genital keratinocytes, within genital ulcers, and from ulcer to new mucosal sites of infection. We validate our model based on its ability to predict outcomes in a subsequent trial with a higher dose. The model can therefore be employed to optimize dose selection in clinical practice. PMID:26843190

  4. Outcomes and opportunities: a nurse-led model of chronic disease management in Australian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Diann S; Patterson, Elizabeth; Young, Jacqui; Fahey, Paul P; Del Mar, Chris B; Hegney, Desley G; Synnott, Robyn L; Mahomed, Rosemary; Baker, Peter G; Scuffham, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The Australian government's commitment to health service reform has placed general practice at the centre of its agenda to manage chronic disease. Concerns about the capacity of GPs to meet the growing chronic disease burden has stimulated the implementation and testing of new models of care that better utilise practice nurses (PN). This paper reports on a mixed-methods study nested within a larger study that trialled the feasibility and acceptability of a new model of nurse-led chronic disease management in three general practices. Patients over 18 years of age with type 2 diabetes, hypertension or stable ischaemic heart disease were randomised into PN-led or usual GP-led care. Primary outcomes were self-reported quality of life and perceptions of the model's feasibility and acceptability from the perspective of patients and GPs. Over the 12-month study quality of life decreased but the trend between groups was not statistically different. Qualitative data indicate that the PN-led model was acceptable and feasible to GPs and patients. It is possible to extend the scope of PN care to lead the routine clinical management of patients' stable chronic diseases. All GPs identified significant advantages to the model and elected to continue with the PN-led care after our study concluded.

  5. Modelling the results of health promotion activities in Switzerland: development of the Swiss Model for Outcome Classification in Health Promotion and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Brenda; Broesskamp-Stone, Ursel; Ruckstuhl, Brigitte; Ackermann, Günter; Spoerri, Adrian; Cloetta, Bernhard

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes the Model for Outcome Classification in Health Promotion and Prevention adopted by Health Promotion Switzerland (SMOC, Swiss Model for Outcome Classification) and the process of its development. The context and method of model development, and the aim and objectives of the model are outlined. Preliminary experience with application of the model in evaluation planning and situation analysis is reported. On the basis of an extensive literature search, the model is situated within the wider international context of similar efforts to meet the challenge of developing tools to assess systematically the activities of health promotion and prevention.

  6. Evoking the power of learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotelling, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    Our mandate, as Lamaze International childbirth educators, is to assist women in making healthy pregnancy, birth, and parenting choices. Being mindful of health promotion theory and using learning tasks and dialogue education to provide information creates a collaborative Lamaze class where the teacher is the facilitator and the learners are accountable for their learning. This column offers Lamaze educators a deeper understanding of adult learners and our roles in their birth education.

  7. Outcome Prediction after Traumatic Brain Injury: Comparison of the Performance of Routinely Used Severity Scores and Multivariable Prognostic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdan, Marek; Brazinova, Alexandra; Rusnak, Martin; Leitgeb, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Prognosis of outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is important in the assessment of quality of care and can help improve treatment and outcome. The aim of this study was to compare the prognostic value of relatively simple injury severity scores between each other and against a gold standard model – the IMPACT-extended (IMP-E) multivariable prognostic model. Materials and Methods: For this study, 866 patients with moderate/severe TBI from Austria were analyzed. The prognostic performances of the Glasgow coma scale (GCS), GCS motor (GCSM) score, abbreviated injury scale for the head region, Marshall computed tomographic (CT) classification, and Rotterdam CT score were compared side-by-side and against the IMP-E score. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) and Nagelkerke's R2 were used to assess the prognostic performance. Outcomes at the Intensive Care Unit, at hospital discharge, and at 6 months (mortality and unfavorable outcome) were used as end-points. Results: Comparing AUCs and R2s of the same model across four outcomes, only little variation was apparent. A similar pattern is observed when comparing the models between each other: Variation of AUCs 0.83 and R2 > 0.42 for all outcomes): AUCs were worse by 0.10–0.22 (P prognosis. However, it is confirmed that well-developed multivariable prognostic models outperform these scores significantly and should be used for prognosis in patients after TBI wherever possible.

  8. Chinese English Learners' Strategic Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dianjian; Lai, Hongling; Leslie, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The present study aims to investigate Chinese English learners' ability to use communication strategies (CSs). The subjects are put in a relatively real English referential communication setting and the analyses of the research data show that Chinese English learners, when encountering problems in foreign language (FL) communication, are characterized by the frequent use of substitution, approximation, circumlocution, literal translation, exemplification, word-coinage, repetition, and the infrequent use of cultural-knowledge and paralinguistic CSs. The rare use of paralinguistic strategies is found to be typical of Chinese English learners. The high frequency of literal translation, one first language (L1)-based strategy in our study sample, suggests that FL learners' use of L1-based CSs may depend more upon the developmental stage of their target language than the typology distance between L1 and the target language. The frequency of repetition reveals one fact that the Chinese English learners lack variety and flexibility in their use of CSs. Based on these findings, it was indicated that learners' use of CSs is influenced by a variety of factors, among which the development stage of their interlanguage and their cultural background are identified as two important factors. Some implications are finally suggested for the English foreign language teaching practice in China.

  9. Developing a Learner-Centered Curriculum for a Rural Public Health Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoku, Anuli; Wakeel, Fathima; Reger, Michael; Jadhav, Emmanuel; Rowan, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Rural communities, compared with their urban counterparts, have higher rates of disease and adverse health conditions, fueling disparities in health outcomes. This encourages the need for effective curricula to engage students and enable them to address such disparate health outcomes as imminent health professionals. Incorporating learner-centered…

  10. Dose dependency of outcomes of intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy in new rabbit empyema models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komissarov, Andrey A; Florova, Galina; Azghani, Ali O; Buchanan, Ann; Boren, Jake; Allen, Timothy; Rahman, Najib M; Koenig, Kathleen; Chamiso, Mignote; Karandashova, Sophia; Henry, James; Idell, Steven

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of empyema (EMP) is increasing worldwide; EMP generally occurs with pleural loculation and impaired drainage is often treated with intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy (IPFT) or surgery. A number of IPFT options are used clinically with empiric dosing and variable outcomes in adults. To evaluate mechanisms governing intrapleural fibrinolysis and disease outcomes, models of Pasteurella multocida and Streptococcus pneumoniae were generated in rabbits and the animals were treated with either human tissue (tPA) plasminogen activator or prourokinase (scuPA). Rabbit EMP was characterized by the development of pleural adhesions detectable by chest ultrasonography and fibrinous coating of the pleura. Similar to human EMP, rabbits with EMP accumulated sizable, 20- to 40-ml fibrinopurulent pleural effusions associated with extensive intrapleural organization, significantly increased pleural thickness, suppression of fibrinolytic and plasminogen-activating activities, and accumulation of high levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, plasminogen, and extracellular DNA. IPFT with tPA (0.145 mg/kg) or scuPA (0.5 mg/kg) was ineffective in rabbit EMP (n = 9 and 3 for P. multocida and S. pneumoniae, respectively); 2 mg/kg tPA or scuPA IPFT (n = 5) effectively cleared S. pneumoniae-induced EMP collections in 24 h with no bleeding observed. Although intrapleural fibrinolytic activity for up to 40 min after IPFT was similar for effective and ineffective doses of fibrinolysin, it was lower for tPA than for scuPA treatments. These results demonstrate similarities between rabbit and human EMP, the importance of pleural fluid PAI-1 activity, and levels of plasminogen in the regulation of intrapleural fibrinolysis and illustrate the dose dependency of IPFT outcomes in EMP.

  11. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure affects fertilization outcome in swine animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabò, N; Tettamanti, E; Russo, V; Martelli, A; Turriani, M; Mattoli, M; Barboni, B

    2010-06-01

    Modern society continuously exposes the population to electromagnetic radiation, the effects of which on human health, in particular reproduction, are still unknown. The aim of this research was to assess the effect of acute (1h) exposure of boar spermatozoa to a 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on early fertility outcome. The effect of intensities ranging from 0 to 2 mT on morpho-functional integrity of capacitated spermatozoa was examined in vitro. The oviducts containing or without spermatozoa were then exposed to the minimum in vivo, TD(50,) and maximum intensities determined in vitro, 4h before ovulation. The effects of ELF-EMF on spermatozoa in terms of early embryo development were evaluated after 12h and 6 days. It was found that in vitro ELF-EMF > 0.5 mT induced a progressive acrosome damage, thus compromising the ability of spermatozoa to undergo acrosomal reaction after zona pellucida stimulation and reducing the in vitro fertilization outcome. These effects became evident at 0.75 mT and reached the plateau at 1 mT. Under in vivo conditions, the ELF-EMF intensity of 1 mT was able to compromise sperm function, significantly reducing the fertilization rate. In addition, the exposure of oviducts to fields > or = 0.75 mT in the absence of spermatozoa was able to negatively affect early embryo development. In fact, it was found to cause a slowdown in the embryo cleavage. In conclusion, it was demonstrated how and at which intensities ELF-EMF negatively affect early fertility outcome in a highly predictive animal model.

  12. Architecture for an Adaptive and Intelligent Tutoring System That Considers the Learner's Multiple Intelligences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafidi, Mohamed; Bensebaa, Taher

    2015-01-01

    The majority of adaptive and intelligent tutoring systems (AITS) are dedicated to a specific domain, allowing them to offer accurate models of the domain and the learner. The analysis produced from traces left by the users is didactically very precise and specific to the domain in question. It allows one to guide the learner in case of difficulty…

  13. Successful Strategies for Teaching Reading to Middle Grades English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolos, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews exemplary strategies for teaching reading to middle grades English language learners (ELLs) derived from 21 peer-reviewed journal articles and professional books. The author presents an in-depth look at three successful categories of reading strategies: interactive read-alouds to model fluent reading and engage learners, the…

  14. Investigating Learner Attitudes toward E-Books as Learning Tools: Based on the Activity Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of e-books as learning tools in terms of learner satisfaction, usefulness, behavioral intention, and learning effectiveness. Based on the activity theory approach, this research develops a research model to understand learner attitudes toward e-books in two physical sizes: 10? and 7?. Results suggest that screen…

  15. Investigating Learner Attitudes toward E-Books as Learning Tools: Based on the Activity Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of e-books as learning tools in terms of learner satisfaction, usefulness, behavioral intention, and learning effectiveness. Based on the activity theory approach, this research develops a research model to understand learner attitudes toward e-books in two physical sizes: 10? and 7?. Results suggest that screen…

  16. Developing Accuracy and Fluency in Spoken English of Chinese EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqin

    2014-01-01

    Chinese EFL learners may have difficulty in speaking fluent and accurate English, for their speaking competence are likely to be influenced by cognitive, linguistic and affective factors. With the aim to enhance those learners' oral proficiency, this paper first discusses three effective models of teaching English speaking, and then proposes a…

  17. Does Multimedia Support Individual Differences?--EFL Learners' Listening Comprehension and Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines how display model, English proficiency and cognitive preference affect English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners' listening comprehension of authentic videos and cognitive load degree. EFL learners were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The control group received single coding and the experimental group received…

  18. Learner Centric in M-Learning: Integration of Security, Dependability and Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Sheila; Abdollah, Faizal Mohd; Sahib, Shahrin

    2014-01-01

    The paper focus on learner centric attributes in a m-learning environment encounters the security measurements. In order to build up a systematic threat and countermeasure for protecting the learners as well as providing awareness and satisfaction in utilizing the mobile learning system, a security model need to be overhauled. The brief literature…

  19. Empowering the Language Learner: Language Learning Strategy Training and Self-Regulation in an EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how an understanding of the Good Language Learner models described in the SLA literature can be used to tailor and implement a program of learning strategy training and self-regulatory practices in the classroom to empower L2 learners in an EFL context. The paper begins by reviewing the various…

  20. A Study of Arizona's Teachers of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Gonzalez Canche, Manuel S.; Moll, Luis C.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: In September 2007, the Arizona State Board of Education adopted the Structured English Immersion (SEI) model proposed by the Arizona English Language Learner (ELL) Task Force.During the 2008-2009 academic year, it required all school districts to implement the SEI model.The SEI program, best known as the 4-hour English Language…

  1. Teachers' Roles in Promoting Students' Learner Autonomy in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumin, Fang; Li, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Since 2007, the Ministry of Education of China has been promoting a shift from traditional teaching models to a new teaching model where students' autonomous learning skills can be enhanced. In particular, college students are encouraged to learn English free from the constraints of time or place. While learner autonomy has been perceived as…

  2. Animal models for clinical and gestational diabetes: maternal and fetal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss Ana CI

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes in pregnant women is associated with an increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and remains a significant medical challenge. Diabetes during pregnancy may be divided into clinical diabetes and gestational diabetes. Experimental models are developed with the purpose of enhancing understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases that affect humans. With regard to diabetes in pregnancy, experimental findings from models will lead to the development of treatment strategies to maintain a normal metabolic intrauterine milieu, improving perinatal development by preventing fetal growth restriction or macrosomia. Based on animal models of diabetes during pregnancy previously reported in the medical literature, the present study aimed to compare the impact of streptozotocin-induced severe (glycemia >300 mg/dl and mild diabetes (glycemia between 120 and 300 mg/dl on glycemia and maternal reproductive and fetal outcomes of Wistar rats to evaluate whether the animal model reproduces the maternal and perinatal results of clinical and gestational diabetes in humans. Methods On day 5 of life, 96 female Wistar rats were assigned to three experimental groups: control (n = 16, severe (n = 50 and mild diabetes (n = 30. At day 90 of life, rats were mated. On day 21 of pregnancy, rats were killed and their uterine horns were exposed to count implantation and fetus numbers to determine pre- and post-implantation loss rates. The fetuses were classified according to their birth weight. Results Severe and mild diabetic dams showed different glycemic responses during pregnancy, impairing fetal glycemia and weight, confirming that maternal glycemia is directly associated with fetal development. Newborns from severe diabetic mothers presented growth restriction, but mild diabetic mothers were not associated with an increased rate of macrosomic fetuses. Conclusion Experimental models of severe diabetes during pregnancy

  3. Investigation of Super Learner Methodology on HIV-1 Small Sample: Application on Jaguar Trial Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allal Houssaïni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many statistical models have been tested to predict phenotypic or virological response from genotypic data. A statistical framework called Super Learner has been introduced either to compare different methods/learners (discrete Super Learner or to combine them in a Super Learner prediction method. Methods. The Jaguar trial is used to apply the Super Learner framework. The Jaguar study is an “add-on” trial comparing the efficacy of adding didanosine to an on-going failing regimen. Our aim was also to investigate the impact on the use of different cross-validation strategies and different loss functions. Four different repartitions between training set and validations set were tested through two loss functions. Six statistical methods were compared. We assess performance by evaluating R2 values and accuracy by calculating the rates of patients being correctly classified. Results. Our results indicated that the more recent Super Learner methodology of building a new predictor based on a weighted combination of different methods/learners provided good performance. A simple linear model provided similar results to those of this new predictor. Slight discrepancy arises between the two loss functions investigated, and slight difference arises also between results based on cross-validated risks and results from full dataset. The Super Learner methodology and linear model provided around 80% of patients correctly classified. The difference between the lower and higher rates is around 10 percent. The number of mutations retained in different learners also varys from one to 41. Conclusions. The more recent Super Learner methodology combining the prediction of many learners provided good performance on our small dataset.

  4. The Prime Diabetes Model: Novel Methods for Estimating Long-Term Clinical and Cost Outcomes in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, William J; Pollock, Richard F; Saunders, Rhodri; Bae, Jay; Norrbacka, Kirsi; Boye, Kristina

    Recent publications describing long-term follow-up from landmark trials and diabetes registries represent an opportunity to revisit modeling options in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). To develop a new product-independent model capable of predicting long-term clinical and cost outcomes. After a systematic literature review to identify clinical trial and registry data, a model was developed (the PRIME Diabetes Model) to simulate T1DM progression and complication onset. The model runs as a patient-level simulation, making use of covariance matrices for cohort generation and risk factor progression, and simulating myocardial infarction, stroke, angina, heart failure, nephropathy, retinopathy, macular edema, neuropathy, amputation, hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis, mortality, and risk factor evolution. Several approaches novel to T1DM modeling were used, including patient characteristics and risk factor covariance, a glycated hemoglobin progression model derived from patient-level data, and model averaging approaches to evaluate complication risk. Validation analyses comparing modeled outcomes with published studies demonstrated that the PRIME Diabetes Model projects long-term patient outcomes consistent with those reported for a number of long-term studies. Macrovascular end points were reliably reproduced across five different populations and microvascular complication risk was accurately predicted on the basis of comparisons with landmark studies and published registry data. The PRIME Diabetes Model is product-independent, available online, and has been developed in line with good practice guidelines. Validation has indicated that outcomes from long-term studies can be reliably reproduced. The model offers new approaches to long-standing challenges in diabetes modeling and may become a valuable tool for informing health care policy. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparing different approach and avoidance models of learning and personality in the prediction of work, university, and leadership outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Chris J; Hobman, Elizabeth V; Jimmieson, Nerina L; Martin, Robin

    2009-05-01

    Jackson (2005) developed a hybrid model of personality and learning, known as the learning styles profiler (LSP) which was designed to span biological, socio-cognitive, and experiential research foci of personality and learning research. The hybrid model argues that functional and dysfunctional learning outcomes can be best understood in terms of how cognitions and experiences control, discipline, and re-express the biologically based scale of sensation-seeking. In two studies with part-time workers undertaking tertiary education (N = 137 and 58), established models of approach and avoidance from each of the three different research foci were compared with Jackson's hybrid model in their predictiveness of leadership, work, and university outcomes using self-report and supervisor ratings. Results showed that the hybrid model was generally optimal and, as hypothesized, that goal orientation was a mediator of sensation-seeking on outcomes (work performance, university performance, leader behaviours, and counterproductive work behaviour). Our studies suggest that the hybrid model has considerable promise as a predictor of work and educational outcomes as well as dysfunctional outcomes.

  6. From scientific discovery to health outcomes: A synergistic model of doctoral nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Melanie J; Clochesy, John M

    2016-05-01

    Across the globe, health system leaders and stakeholder are calling for system-level reforms in education, research, and practice to accelerate the uptake and application of new knowledge in practice and to improve health care delivery and health outcomes. An evolving bi-dimensional research-practice focused model of doctoral nursing education in the U.S. is creating unprecedented opportunities for collaborative translational and investigative efforts for nurse researchers and practitioners. The nursing academy must commit to a shared goal of preparing future generations of nurse scientists and practitioners with the capacity and motivation to work together to accelerate the translation of evidence into practice in order to place nursing at the forefront of health system improvement efforts and advance the profession.

  7. Multivariate t nonlinear mixed-effects models for multi-outcome longitudinal data with missing values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wan-Lun; Lin, Tsung-I

    2014-07-30

    The multivariate nonlinear mixed-effects model (MNLMM) has emerged as an effective tool for modeling multi-outcome longitudinal data following nonlinear growth patterns. In the framework of MNLMM, the random effects and within-subject errors are assumed to be normally distributed for mathematical tractability and computational simplicity. However, a serious departure from normality may cause lack of robustness and subsequently make invalid inference. This paper presents a robust extension of the MNLMM by considering a joint multivariate t distribution for the random effects and within-subject errors, called the multivariate t nonlinear mixed-effects model. Moreover, a damped exponential correlation structure is employed to capture the extra serial correlation among irregularly observed multiple repeated measures. An efficient expectation conditional maximization algorithm coupled with the first-order Taylor approximation is developed for maximizing the complete pseudo-data likelihood function. The techniques for the estimation of random effects, imputation of missing responses and identification of potential outliers are also investigated. The methodology is motivated by a real data example on 161 pregnant women coming from a study in a private fertilization obstetrics clinic in Santiago, Chile and used to analyze these data.

  8. Assessing correlation of clustered mixed outcomes from a multivariate generalized linear mixed model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiang-Chun; Wehrly, Thomas E

    2015-02-20

    The classic concordance correlation coefficient measures the agreement between two variables. In recent studies, concordance correlation coefficients have been generalized to deal with responses from a distribution from the exponential family using the univariate generalized linear mixed model. Multivariate data arise when responses on the same unit are measured repeatedly by several methods. The relationship among these responses is often of interest. In clustered mixed data, the correlation could be present between repeated measurements either within the same observer or between different methods on the same subjects. Indices for measuring such association are needed. This study proposes a series of indices, namely, intra-correlation, inter-correlation, and total correlation coefficients to measure the correlation under various circumstances in a multivariate generalized linear model, especially for joint modeling of clustered count and continuous outcomes. The proposed indices are natural extensions of the concordance correlation coefficient. We demonstrate the methodology with simulation studies. A case example of osteoarthritis study is provided to illustrate the use of these proposed indices. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The Impact of the Solution Based Casework (SBC) Practice Model on Federal Outcomes in Public Child Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antle, Becky F.; Christensen, Dana N.; van Zyl, Michiel A.; Barbee, Anita P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To test the effects of the Solution-Based Casework practice model on federal outcomes of safety, permanency and well-being. The Solution-Based Casework model combines family development theory, solution-focused skills and relapse prevention for the casework process in child protection. Method: 4,559 public child welfare cases were…

  10. Extending the Technology Acceptance Model to Explore the Intention to Use Second Life for Enhancing Healthcare Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Meyrick; Herold, David Kurt; Choo, Tat-Ming; Chan, Kitty

    2012-01-01

    Learners need to have good reasons to engage and accept e-learning. They need to understand that unless they do, the outcomes will be less favourable. The technology acceptance model (TAM) is the most widely recognized model addressing why users accept or reject technology. This study describes the development and evaluation of a virtual…

  11. Interaction of African American Learners Online: An Adult Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Haijun; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how various life factors and personal attributes affect African American adult learners' use of the three types of learning interaction-learner-content, learner-instructor, and learner-learner. Multivariate multiple regression analyses were used. The aggregate effect of life factors on African American adult learners' use of…

  12. Time-based partitioning model for predicting neurologically favorable outcome among adults with witnessed bystander out-of-hospital CPA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Abe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optimal acceptable time intervals from collapse to bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR for neurologically favorable outcome among adults with witnessed out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA have been unclear. Our aim was to assess the optimal acceptable thresholds of the time intervals of CPR for neurologically favorable outcome and survival using a recursive partitioning model. METHODS AND FINDINGS: From January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2009, we conducted a prospective population-based observational study across Japan involving consecutive out-of-hospital CPA patients (N = 69,648 who received a witnessed bystander CPR. Of 69,648 patients, 34,605 were assigned to the derivation data set and 35,043 to the validation data set. Time factors associated with better outcomes: the better outcomes were survival and neurologically favorable outcome at one month, defined as category one (good cerebral performance or two (moderate cerebral disability of the cerebral performance categories. Based on the recursive partitioning model from the derivation dataset (n = 34,605 to predict the neurologically favorable outcome at one month, 5 min threshold was the acceptable time interval from collapse to CPR initiation; 11 min from collapse to ambulance arrival; 18 min from collapse to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC; and 19 min from collapse to hospital arrival. Among the validation dataset (n = 35,043, 209/2,292 (9.1% in all patients with the acceptable time intervals and 1,388/2,706 (52.1% in the subgroup with the acceptable time intervals and pre-hospital ROSC showed neurologically favorable outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Initiation of CPR should be within 5 min for obtaining neurologically favorable outcome among adults with witnessed out-of-hospital CPA. Patients with the acceptable time intervals of bystander CPR and pre-hospital ROSC within 18 min could have 50% chance of neurologically favorable outcome.

  13. 41 CFR 50-202.3 - Learners, student learners, apprentices, and handicapped workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Learners, student learners, apprentices, and handicapped workers. 50-202.3 Section 50-202.3 Public Contracts and Property... handicapped workers. Learners, student learners, apprentices, and handicapped workers may be employed at...

  14. Assessing Learner Satisfaction by Simultaneously Measuring Learner Attitude, Motivation, Loyalty and Service Quality in English Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huong, Vu Thi; Casadesus, Marti; Marimon, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study are threefold in their approach to English academy teaching: (i) to assess learner satisfaction, (ii) to assess the impact of satisfaction on loyalty and (iii) to assess the three constructs that we considered to be the antecedents of learner satisfaction: learner motivation, learner attitude and service quality. To collect…

  15. Discussing College English Learners' Attitude and Motivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜自凤

    2009-01-01

    Many English learners claim that they have trouble in communicating with foreigners.Therefore,this paper isto discuss college English learners' attitude and motivation toward English learning by analyzing the obstacles of English learning.

  16. "BLACK GOLD" GRADE12-LEARNERS: RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SK

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and ... cultural backgrounds), refers to black Grade 12 learners from a diverse group of ..... learners in the community, community cohesion or a sense of community pride, and.

  17. Turning university professors into competent learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefanova, Eliza; Ilieva, Miroslava; Nikolova, Nikolina; Stefanov, Krassen

    2008-01-01

    Stefanova, E., Ilieva, M., Nikolova, N, & Stefanov, K. (2008). Turning university professors into competent learners. In H. W. Sligte & R. Koper (Eds.), Proceedings of the 4th TENCompetence Open Workshop. Empowering Learners for Lifelong Competence Development: pedagogical, organisational and techno

  18. Motivation Classification and Grade Prediction for MOOCs Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While MOOCs offer educational data on a new scale, many educators find great potential of the big data including detailed activity records of every learner. A learner’s behavior such as if a learner will drop out from the course can be predicted. How to provide an effective, economical, and scalable method to detect cheating on tests such as surrogate exam-taker is a challenging problem. In this paper, we present a grade predicting method that uses student activity features to predict whether a learner may get a certification if he/she takes a test. The method consists of two-step classifications: motivation classification (MC and grade classification (GC. The MC divides all learners into three groups including certification earning, video watching, and course sampling. The GC then predicts a certification earning learner may or may not obtain a certification. Our experiment shows that the proposed method can fit the classification model at a fine scale and it is possible to find a surrogate exam-taker.

  19. Study Partners Recommendation for xMOOCs learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Yang, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) provide an opportunity for people to access free courses offered by top universities in the world and therefore attracted great attention and engagement from college teachers and students. However, with contrast to large scale enrollment, the completion rate of these courses is really low. One of the reasons for students to quit learning process is problems which they face that could not be solved by discussing them with classmates. In order to keep them staying in the course, thereby further improving the completion rate, we address the task of study partner recommendation for students based on both content information and social network information. By analyzing the content of messages posted by learners in course discussion forum, we investigated the learners' behavior features to classify the learners into three groups. Then we proposed a topic model to measure learners' course knowledge awareness. Finally, a social network was constructed based on their activities in the course forum, and the relationship in the network was then employed to recommend study partners for target learner combined with their behavior features and course knowledge awareness. The experiment results show that our method achieves better performance than recommending method only based on content information.

  20. Transforming Healthcare Delivery: Integrating Dynamic Simulation Modelling and Big Data in Health Economics and Outcomes Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Burgos-Liz, Lina; Pasupathy, Kalyan S; Padula, William V; IJzerman, Maarten J; Wong, Peter K; Higashi, Mitchell K; Engbers, Jordan; Wiebe, Samuel; Crown, William; Osgood, Nathaniel D

    2016-02-01

    In the era of the Information Age and personalized medicine, healthcare delivery systems need to be efficient and patient-centred. The health system must be responsive to individual patient choices and preferences about their care, while considering the system consequences. While dynamic simulation modelling (DSM) and big data share characteristics, they present distinct and complementary value in healthcare. Big data and DSM are synergistic-big data offer support to enhance the application of dynamic models, but DSM also can greatly enhance the value conferred by big data. Big data can inform patient-centred care with its high velocity, volume, and variety (the three Vs) over traditional data analytics; however, big data are not sufficient to extract meaningful insights to inform approaches to improve healthcare delivery. DSM can serve as a natural bridge between the wealth of evidence offered by big data and informed decision making as a means of faster, deeper, more consistent learning from that evidence. We discuss the synergies between big data and DSM, practical considerations and challenges, and how integrating big data and DSM can be useful to decision makers to address complex, systemic health economics and outcomes questions and to transform healthcare delivery.

  1. Boolean Network Model for Cancer Pathways: Predicting Carcinogenesis and Targeted Therapy Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumiã, Herman F.; Martins, Marcelo L.

    2013-01-01

    A Boolean dynamical system integrating the main signaling pathways involved in cancer is constructed based on the currently known protein-protein interaction network. This system exhibits stationary protein activation patterns – attractors – dependent on the cell's microenvironment. These dynamical attractors were determined through simulations and their stabilities against mutations were tested. In a higher hierarchical level, it was possible to group the network attractors into distinct cell phenotypes and determine driver mutations that promote phenotypic transitions. We find that driver nodes are not necessarily central in the network topology, but at least they are direct regulators of central components towards which converge or through which crosstalk distinct cancer signaling pathways. The predicted drivers are in agreement with those pointed out by diverse census of cancer genes recently performed for several human cancers. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that cell phenotypes can evolve towards full malignancy through distinct sequences of accumulated mutations. In particular, the network model supports routes of carcinogenesis known for some tumor types. Finally, the Boolean network model is employed to evaluate the outcome of molecularly targeted cancer therapies. The major find is that monotherapies were additive in their effects and that the association of targeted drugs is necessary for cancer eradication. PMID:23922675

  2. A new non-randomized model for analysing sensitive questions with binary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guo-Liang; Yu, Jun-Wu; Tang, Man-Lai; Geng, Zhi

    2007-10-15

    We propose a new non-randomized model for assessing the association of two sensitive questions with binary outcomes. Under the new model, respondents only need to answer a non-sensitive question instead of the original two sensitive questions. As a result, it can protect a respondent's privacy, avoid the usage of any randomizing device, and be applied to both the face-to-face interview and mail questionnaire. We derive the constrained maximum likelihood estimates of the cell probabilities and the odds ratio for two binary variables associated with the sensitive questions via the EM algorithm. The corresponding standard error estimates are then obtained by bootstrap approach. A likelihood ratio test and a chi-squared test are developed for testing association between the two binary variables. We discuss the loss of information due to the introduction of the non-sensitive question, and the design of the co-operative parameters. Simulations are performed to evaluate the empirical type I error rates and powers for the two tests. In addition, a simulation is conducted to study the relationship between the probability of obtaining valid estimates and the sample size for any given cell probability vector. A real data set from an AIDS study is used to illustrate the proposed methodologies.

  3. 基于需求分析打造医学类成人大学英语课程教学新模式%A New College English Teaching Model Catering to Adult Learners in Medical Universities Based on the Needs Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢凤香; 汪涓; 刘良翠

    2014-01-01

    The paper is to analyze the adult learners in medical universities about their motivation, habits, and effectiveness in English learning based on the survey to 310 adult learners. Catering to the needs from the adult learners, the paper discusses the problems existing in the adult learners’ English teaching model, teaching process and evaluation procedure. A new English teaching model catering to adult learners in medical universities is put forward on the basis of its effectiveness in the plot program done in Capital Medical University.%根据首都医科大学2013级310名成人学生的大学英语课程访谈和问卷调查结果,分析、讨论了医学类成人学生在学习动机、学习习惯、学习效果以及大学英语课程教学模式、教学环节、课程考核等方面的现状和存在的问题,提出了针对当前医学类成人学生自身特点的大学英语课程教学改革建议,并在实际应用过程中取得了初步的效果。

  4. Warming the nursing education climate for traditional-age learners who are male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell-Scriber, Marietta J

    2008-01-01

    For nurse educators to facilitate student learning and the achievement of desired cognitive, affective, and psychomotor outcomes, they need to be competent in recognizing the influence of gender, experience, and other factors on teaching and learning. A study was conducted in one academic institution to describe how traditional-age male learners' perceptions of the nursing education climate compare to perceptions of female learners. Interviews were conducted with a sample of four male and four female learners. Additional data from interviews with nurse educators, classroom observations, and a review of textbooks provided breadth and depth to their perceptions. Findings support a nursing education climate that is cooler to traditional-age male learners and warmer to traditional-age female learners. The main cooling factor for men was caused by nurse educators' characteristics and unsupportive behaviors. Additional factors inside and outside the education environment contributed to a cooler climate for the male learners. Based on these findings, strategies for nurse educators to warm the education climate for traditional-age male learners are presented.

  5. Learner intuitions about energy degradation

    CERN Document Server

    Daane, Abigail R; Vokos, Stamatis

    2013-01-01

    A primary learning goal for energy in K-12 science instruction is that energy cannot be created or destroyed. However, learners' everyday ideas about energy often involve energy being "used up" or "wasted." In physics, the concept of energy degradation can connect those everyday ideas to the principle of energy conservation. Learners' spontaneous discussions of aspects of energy degradation and the second law of thermodynamics include ideas concerning the inaccessibility, usefulness and dispersion of energy. These ideas have motivated us to introduce new learning goals into our K-12 teacher professional development courses. We identify alignments between these learning goals and learners' informal ideas and discuss instructional implications created by these alignments. Our aim is to create stronger ties between formal physics knowledge and sociopolitical issues by making these learning goals a priority in our professional development.

  6. Unskilled Work and Learner Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Sissel

    2014-01-01

    . The main argument is that participation research must abandon the notion of motivation as an individual attribute and apply a dialectic concept of learner identity acknowledging work-life as a pivotal space for learning and formation of identity. I outline how a work-life-historical approach combining...... a critical theoretical approach inspired by Salling-Olesen’s and Archer’s concepts of identity and concerns can contribute to an understanding of the relationship between work and learner identity. Through narrative work-life interviews I examine how engagement in unskilled work in small and medium sized...... Danish enterprises causes a multitude of different and ambiguous immediate experiences and concerns pivotal for the workers’ learner identities....

  7. Application of a source-to-outcome model for the assessment of health impacts from dietary exposures to insecticide residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Paul S; Schnelle, Karl D; Cleveland, Cheryl B; Bartels, Michael J; Hinderliter, Paul M; Timchalk, Charles; Poet, Torka S

    2011-10-01

    The paper presents a case study of the application of a "source-to-outcome" model for the evaluation of the health outcomes from dietary exposures to an insecticide, chlorpyrifos, in populations of adults (age 30) and children (age 3). The model is based on publically-available software programs that characterize the longitudinal dietary exposure and anthropometry of exposed individuals. These predictions are applied to a validated PBPK/PD model to estimate interindividual and longitudinal variation in brain and RBC AChE inhibition (key events) and chlorpyrifos concentrations in blood and TCPy in urine (biomarkers of exposure). The predicted levels of chlorpyrifos and TCPy are compared to published measurements of the biomarkers. Predictions of RBC AChE are compared to levels of inhibition associated with reported exposure-related effects in humans to determine the potential for the occurrence of adverse cholinergic effects. The predicted distributions of chlorpyrifos in blood and TCPy in urine were found to be reasonably consistent with published values, supporting the predictive value of the exposure and PBPK portions of the source-to-outcome model. Key sources of uncertainty in predictions of dietary exposures were investigated and found to have a modest impact on the model predictions. Future versions of this source-to-outcome model can be developed that consider advances in our understanding of metabolism, to extend the approach to other age groups (infants), and address intakes from other routes of exposure.

  8. What Is This Thing Called Learner's Lexicography?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    Learner lexicography as a research area has attracted increased attention during the past decades, but what is actually the true nature of learner lexicography? This question calls for a complex answer. Learner lexicography has as its objective to develop principles that help practitioners to pro...

  9. The Design of Young Learner's English Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑茂园

    2016-01-01

    As is known to all,more and more people are taking care of the younger learner's English lessons.But how to attract the younger learner's attention and how to arouse their interests in learning English are big problems at present.Looking for a more effective teaching method to develop the younger learner's English learning ability is very important.

  10. Communicative Language Teaching: The Learner's View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    Several studies of the differences in teacher and learner perceptions of the usefulness of certain teaching techniques and activities reveal clear mismatches between learners' and teachers' views of language learning. The differences seem to be due to the sociocultural background and previous learning experiences of the learners and the influence…

  11. TEACHER TALK AND LEARNER OPPORTUNITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LanWeidong

    2004-01-01

    Adopting the position that maximizing learner involvement is conducive to second language acquisition, this paper aims to explore the relationship between teacher talk and learner opportunities in language classrooms in senior schools through classroom observation techniques. Four excellent high school teachers from Zhejiang province in China are involved in this research. The results reveal that such features as minimal teacher talking time, referential questions, extended wait time,discoursal feedback can increase potential of learning opportunities through classroom interaction in language classrooms in high schools.

  12. Modelling multiple hospital outcomes: the impact of small area and primary care practice variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congdon Peter

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Appropriate management of care – for example, avoiding unnecessary attendances at, or admissions to, hospital emergency units when they could be handled in primary care – is an important part of health strategy. However, some variations in these outcomes could be due to genuine variations in health need. This paper proposes a new method of explaining variations in hospital utilisation across small areas and the general practices (GPs responsible for patient primary care. By controlling for the influence of true need on such variations, one may identify remaining sources of excess emergency attendances and admissions, both at area and practice level, that may be related to the quality, resourcing or organisation of care. The present paper accordingly develops a methodology that recognises the interplay between population mix factors (health need and primary care factors (e.g. referral thresholds, that allows for unobserved influences on hospitalisation usage, and that also reflects interdependence between hospital outcomes. A case study considers relativities in attendance and admission rates at a North London hospital involving 149 small areas and 53 GP practices. Results: A fixed effects model shows variations in attendances and admissions are significantly related (positively to area and practice need, and nursing home patients, and related (negatively to primary care access and distance of patient homes from the hospital. Modelling the impact of known factors alone is not sufficient to produce a satisfactory fit to the observations, and random effects at area and practice level are needed to improve fit and account for overdispersion. Conclusion: The case study finds variation in attendance and admission rates across areas and practices after controlling for need, and remaining differences between practices may be attributable to referral behaviour unrelated to need, or to staffing, resourcing, and access issues. In

  13. Outcome prediction after traumatic brain injury: Comparison of the performance of routinely used severity scores and multivariable prognostic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Majdan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Prognosis of outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI is important in the assessment of quality of care and can help improve treatment and outcome. The aim of this study was to compare the prognostic value of relatively simple injury severity scores between each other and against a gold standard model – the IMPACT-extended (IMP-E multivariable prognostic model. Materials and Methods: For this study, 866 patients with moderate/severe TBI from Austria were analyzed. The prognostic performances of the Glasgow coma scale (GCS, GCS motor (GCSM score, abbreviated injury scale for the head region, Marshall computed tomographic (CT classification, and Rotterdam CT score were compared side-by-side and against the IMP-E score. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC and Nagelkerke's R2 were used to assess the prognostic performance. Outcomes at the Intensive Care Unit, at hospital discharge, and at 6 months (mortality and unfavorable outcome were used as end-points. Results: Comparing AUCs and R2s of the same model across four outcomes, only little variation was apparent. A similar pattern is observed when comparing the models between each other: Variation of AUCs 0.83 and R2 > 0.42 for all outcomes: AUCs were worse by 0.10–0.22 (P < 0.05 and R2s were worse by 0.22–0.39 points. Conclusions: All tested simple scores can provide reasonably valid prognosis. However, it is confirmed that well-developed multivariable prognostic models outperform these scores significantly and should be used for prognosis in patients after TBI wherever possible.

  14. Teacher and learner beliefs and expectations about English language teaching and learning at a Mozambican university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nhapulo, Marcos Abilio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that teacher and learner beliefs about second language instruction have a significant influence on language teaching and learning process and, consequently, on students’ achievements. However, in the Mozambican context, we still do not have studies focusing on learner and teacher beliefs about students and language proficiency, about teaching materials, about individual and cultural variations and beliefs about the learning process itself. Using questionnaires and a focus group report, we look at the Mozambican linguistic profile, the learner and teacher beliefs and their influence in tertiary English Language Teaching (ELT and learning. The results show that there is a need for creating an environment in which teachers’ and learners’ cultural background, beliefs and needs are considered so as to enable teachers to teach effectively, as well as enabling learners to achieve positive learning outcomes.

  15. Younger and Older learners'Advantages on Language Acquisition in Different Learning Settings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖信含

    2015-01-01

    The question of whether, and how, age affects L2 outcomes has been a major issue in SLA for several decades, and a number of recent publications provide reviews from different points of view. The author has made a comprehensive survey on the researches on the relationship between age and attainment in second language acquisition. Based on age differences theory, the author agrees the opinion that younger learners are more successful in informal and naturalistic L2 learning contexts, and older learners are more successful in formal instructional settings. Then, the younger learners' and older learners' advantages are discussed and put into contrastive analysis. Therefore, in second language teaching and learning, it is necessary to exert the learning advantages of different age groups, have a specific focus on listening, speaking, reading and writing, select teaching strategies suitable for different ages, and make a scientific teaching and learning plan.

  16. Swahili Learners' Reference Grammar. African Language Learners' Reference Grammar Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Katrina Daly; Schleicher, Antonia Folarin

    This reference grammar is written for speakers of English who are learning Swahili. Because many language learners are not familiar with the grammatical terminology, this book explains the basic terminology and concepts of English grammar that are necessary for understanding the grammar of Swahili. It assumes no formal knowledge of English grammar…

  17. Course-Embedded Student Support for Online English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Maureen Snow

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an embedded approach to learner support in online English language courses. The support model is based on language acquisition, transactional distance, and self-regulated learning theories. Based on these theories, courses were designed to provide the interaction necessary for academic English language gains, decrease the…

  18. Differentiated Instruction to Support High-Risk Preschool Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBaryshe, Barbara D.; Gorecki, Dana M.; Mishima-Young, Lori N.

    2009-01-01

    Differentiated instruction is a strategy for meeting the needs of diverse learners. In this article, we describe a differentiated instruction model and examine the effects on high-risk children. One hundred twenty-eight children and their teachers from 8 Head Start classrooms participated in the project. Teachers provided developmentally…

  19. Building English Language Learners' Academic Vocabulary: Strategies and Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibold, Claire

    2011-01-01

    According to Beck, McKeown, and Kucan's Three Tier Model (2002), when it comes to language instruction the distinction between academic vocabulary words and content specific words has a significant bearing on the language success of English language learners (ELLs). In this article, the author describes strategies that give teachers and parents…

  20. The Language Growth of Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Raul; Iglesias, Aquiles

    2013-01-01

    Although the research literature regarding language growth trajectories is burgeoning, the shape and direction of English Language Learners' (ELLs) language growth trajectories are largely not known. This study used growth curve modeling to determine the shape of ELLs' language growth trajectories across 12,248 oral narrative language samples…