WorldWideScience

Sample records for model laboratory combustor

  1. Numerical Modelling of Scramjet Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Deepu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modelling of turbulent-reacting flow field of supersonic combustion ramjet(scramjet combustors are presented. The developed numerical procedure is based on the implicittreatment of chemical source terms by preconditioning and solved along with unstedy turbulentNavier-Stokes equations explicitly. Reaction is modelled using an eight-step hydrogen-airchemistry. Code is validated against a standard wall jet experimental data and is successfullyused to model the turbulent-reacting flow field resulting due to the combustion of hydrogeninjected from diamond-shaped strut and also in the wake region of wedge-shaped strut placedin the heated supersonic airstream. The analysis could demonstrate the effect of interaction ofoblique shock wave with a supersonic stream of hydrogen  in its (fuel-air mixing and reactionfor strut-based scramjet combustors.

  2. Chaos in an imperfectly premixed model combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabiraj, Lipika, E-mail: lipika.kabiraj@tu-berlin.de; Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian O. [Hermann Föttinger Institut, Technische Universität Berlin (Germany); Karimi, Nader [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Sailor, Anna [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States); Mastorakos, Epaminondas; Dowling, Ann P. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    This article reports nonlinear bifurcations observed in a laboratory scale, turbulent combustor operating under imperfectly premixed mode with global equivalence ratio as the control parameter. The results indicate that the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability correspond to quasi-periodic bifurcation to low-dimensional, deterministic chaos, a route that is common to a variety of dissipative nonlinear systems. The results support the recent identification of bifurcation scenarios in a laminar premixed flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Chaos: Interdiscip. J. Nonlinear Sci. 22, 023129 (2012)) and extend the observation to a practically relevant combustor configuration.

  3. Combustion modeling in a model combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Y.Jiang; I.Campbell; K.Su

    2007-01-01

    The flow-field of a propane-air diffusion flame combustor with interior and exterior conjugate heat transfers was numerically studied.Results obtained from four combustion models,combined with the re-normalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulence model,discrete ordinates radiation model and enhanced wall treatment are presented and discussed.The results are compared with a comprehensive database obtained from a series of experimental measurements.The flow patterns and the recirculation zone length in the combustion chamber are accurately predicted,and the mean axial velocities are in fairly good agreement with the experimental data,particularly at downstream sections for all four combustion models.The mean temperature profiles are captured fairly well by the eddy dissipation (EDS),probability density function (PDF),and laminar flamelet combustion models.However,the EDS-finite-rate combustion model fails to provide an acceptable temperature field.In general,the flamelet model illustrates little superiority over the PDF model,and to some extent the PDF model shows better performance than the EDS model.

  4. Assumed PDF modeling in rocket combustor simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempke, M.; Gerlinger, P.; Aigner, M.

    2013-03-01

    In order to account for the interaction between turbulence and chemistry, a multivariate assumed PDF (Probability Density Function) approach is used to simulate a model rocket combustor with finite-rate chemistry. The reported test case is the PennState preburner combustor with a single shear coaxial injector. Experimental data for the wall heat flux is available for this configuration. Unsteady RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) simulation results with and without the assumed PDF approach are analyzed and compared with the experimental data. Both calculations show a good agreement with the experimental wall heat flux data. Significant changes due to the utilization of the assumed PDF approach can be observed in the radicals, e. g., the OH mass fraction distribution, while the effect on the wall heat flux is insignificant.

  5. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz Pitsch

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high-fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation, a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet tranformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  6. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitsch, Heinz

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation; a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet transformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  7. Prediction of soot and thermal radiation in a model gas turbine combustor burning kerosene fuel spray at different swirl levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Prakash; Patra, Jitendra; Datta, Amitava; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya

    2016-05-01

    Combustion of kerosene fuel spray has been numerically simulated in a laboratory scale combustor geometry to predict soot and the effects of thermal radiation at different swirl levels of primary air flow. The two-phase motion in the combustor is simulated using an Eulerian-Lagragian formulation considering the stochastic separated flow model. The Favre-averaged governing equations are solved for the gas phase with the turbulent quantities simulated by realisable k-ɛ model. The injection of the fuel is considered through a pressure swirl atomiser and the combustion is simulated by a laminar flamelet model with detailed kinetics of kerosene combustion. Soot formation in the flame is predicted using an empirical model with the model parameters adjusted for kerosene fuel. Contributions of gas phase and soot towards thermal radiation have been considered to predict the incident heat flux on the combustor wall and fuel injector. Swirl in the primary flow significantly influences the flow and flame structures in the combustor. The stronger recirculation at high swirl draws more air into the flame region, reduces the flame length and peak flame temperature and also brings the soot laden zone closer to the inlet plane. As a result, the radiative heat flux on the peripheral wall decreases at high swirl and also shifts closer to the inlet plane. However, increased swirl increases the combustor wall temperature due to radial spreading of the flame. The high incident radiative heat flux and the high surface temperature make the fuel injector a critical item in the combustor. The injector peak temperature increases with the increase in swirl flow mainly because the flame is located closer to the inlet plane. On the other hand, a more uniform temperature distribution in the exhaust gas can be attained at the combustor exit at high swirl condition.

  8. Modeling of Sulfur Retention in Circulating Fluidized Bed Coal Combustors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔锐; 吕俊复; 刘青; 吴学安; 岳光溪

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive model for predicting the sulfur retention performance in circulating fluidized bedcombustors was developed which involves the different residence times, the wide particle size distribution andthe different forms of sulfur in the coal. In addition, the reductive decomposition of CaSO4 is highlighted. Thesimulation results from the model show that the sulfur contents, the bed temperature, the sorbent particle sizedistribution and the sorbent activity or the maximum conversion rate can significantly influence the sulfuretention performance in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors.``

  9. Thermoacoustic analysis of the dynamic pressure inside a model combustor during limit cycle oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alemela, Panduranga Reddy; Roman Casado, Juan; Tarband Veeraraghavan, Santos Kumar; Kok, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In this work comprehensive experimental and numerical studies incorporating the most relevant physical mechanisms causing limit cycle pressure and combustion rate oscillations (LCO) in a laboratory scale combustor will be discussed. The strong interaction between the aerodynamics-combustion-acoustic

  10. Dynamic analysis of a flameless combustion model combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Flameless combustion is a new technology with the following advantages:1)Ultra-low emissions of both NOX and CO;2)fuel flexibility,from liquid fuels,natural gas to hydrogen-rich syngas;3)lower possibility of flashback and thermoacoustic oscillations.In this paper,we focus on the dynamic characteristics of a flameless model combustor.Experimental results show that flameless combustion can lower emissions while maintaining combustion stability.However,combining a pilot flame with flameless combustion may excite thermoacoustic instability.

  11. A Simplified Model for Detonation Based Pressure-Gain Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    A time-dependent model is presented which simulates the essential physics of a detonative or otherwise constant volume, pressure-gain combustor for gas turbine applications. The model utilizes simple, global thermodynamic relations to determine an assumed instantaneous and uniform post-combustion state in one of many envisioned tubes comprising the device. A simple, second order, non-upwinding computational fluid dynamic algorithm is then used to compute the (continuous) flowfield properties during the blowdown and refill stages of the periodic cycle which each tube undergoes. The exhausted flow is averaged to provide mixed total pressure and enthalpy which may be used as a cycle performance metric for benefits analysis. The simplicity of the model allows for nearly instantaneous results when implemented on a personal computer. The results compare favorably with higher resolution numerical codes which are more difficult to configure, and more time consuming to operate.

  12. Turbulent transport measurements in a model of GT-combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikishev, L. M.; Gobyzov, O. A.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Lobasov, A. S.; Dulin, V. M.; Markovich, D. M.; Tsatiashvili, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    To reduce NOx formation modern industrial power gas-turbines utilizes lean premixed combustion of natural gas. The uniform distribution of local fuel/air ratio in the combustion chamber plays one of the key roles in the field of lean combustion to prevent thermo-acoustic pulsations. Present paper reports on simultaneous Particle Image Velocimetry and acetone Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence measurements in a cold model of GT-combustor to investigate mixing processes which are relevant to the organization of lean premixed combustion. Velocity and passive admixture pulsations correlations were measured to verify gradient closer model, which is often used in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of turbulent mixing.

  13. Combustion Characteristics of Lignite Char in a Laboratory-scale Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takahiro; Suzuki, Yoshizo

    In a dual fluidized bed gasifier, the residual char after steam gasification is burnt in riser. The objectives of this work are to clarify the effect of parameters (temperature, pressure, and particle size of lignite char) of char combustion using a laboratory-scale pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC). As a result, the burnout time of lignite char can be improved with increasing operating pressure, and temperature. In addition, the decrease in the particle size of char enhanced the effect on burnout time. The initial combustion rate of the char can be increased with increasing operating pressure. The effect was decreased with increasing operating temperature. However, the effect of operating pressure was slightly changed in small particle size, such as 0.5-1.0 mm. It takes about 20 sec to burn 50% of char in the operating pressure of 0.5 MPa and the particle size of 0.5-1.0 mm.

  14. CFD Study of NOx Emissions in a Model Commercial Aircraft Engine Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Man; FU Zhenbo; LIN Yuzhen; LI Jibao

    2012-01-01

    Air worthiness requirements of the aircraft engine emission bring new challenges to the combustor research and design.With the motivation to design high performance and clean combustor,computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is utilized as the powerful design approach.In this paper,Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations of reactive two-phase flow in an experimental low emission combustor is performed.The numerical approach uses an implicit compressible gas solver together with a Lagrangian liquid-phase tracking method and the extended coherent flamelet model for turbulence-combustion interaction.The NOx formation is modeled by the concept of post-processing,which resolves the NOx transport equation with the assumption of frozen temperature distribution.Both turbulence-combustion interaction model and NOx formation model are firstly evaluated by the comparison of experimental data published in open literature of a lean direct injection (LDI) combustor.The test rig studied in this paper is called low emission stirred swirl (LESS) combustor,which is a two-stage model combustor,fueled with liquid kerosene (RP-3) and designed by Beihang University (BUAA).The main stage of LESS combustor employs the principle of lean prevaporized and premixed (LPP) concept to reduce pollutant,and the pilot stage depends on a diffusion flame for flame stabilization.Detailed numerical results including species distribution,turbulence performance and burning performance are qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated.Numerical prediction of NOx emission shows a good agreement with test data at both idle condition and full power condition of LESS combustor.Preliminary results of the flame structure are shown in this paper.The flame stabilization mechanism and NOx reduction effort are also discussed with in-depth analysis.

  15. Flame quenching process in cavity based on model scramjet combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Pan; Jing Lei; Jian-Han Liang; Wei-Dong Liu; Zhen-Guo Wang

    2012-01-01

    The flame quenching process in combustors was observed by high speed camera and Schlieren system,at the inflow conditions of Ma =2.64,To =1 483 K,P0 =1.65 MPa,T =724 K and P =76.3 kPa.Changing process of the flame and shock structure in the combustor was clearly observed.The results revealed that the precombustion shock disappeared accompanied with the process in which the flame was blown out and withdrawed from the mainflow into the cavity and vanished after a short while.The rime of quenching process was extended by the cavity flame holder,and the ability of flame holding was enhanced by arranging more cavities in the downstream as well.The flame was blown from the upstream to the downstream,so the flame in the downstream of the cavity was quenched out later than that in the upstream.

  16. Investigation of swirling flow mixing for application in an MHD pulverized coal combustor using isothermal modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, W. H.

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate combustor reactant mixing with swirling oxidizer flow. The combustor configuration that was considered was designed to simulate a 4 lbm/sec mas flow pulverized coal combustor being tested in The University of Tennessee Space Institute MHD Facility. A one-fourth dimensionally scaled combustor model was developed for isothermal flow testing. A comparison was made of cold flow tests using 3 swirler designs with a base case oxidizer injector design of perforated plated which demonstrated acceptable performance in the 4 lbm/sec MHD combustor. The three swirlers that were evaluated were designed to allow a wide range of swirl intensity to be investigated. The design criterion of the swirler was the swirl number which has been related to swirler geometry. The results of the study showed that the swirlers that were tested fell short of the mixing characteristics displayed with the perforated plate base case oxidizer injector. Test data obtained with the cold flow model established that the actual swirl numbers of two of the swirlers were much lower than the design swirl numbers. Recirculation zones were defined for all configurations that were tested, and a comparison of velocity profiles was made for the configurations.

  17. Measurement and Modeling of the Acoustic Response in a High Pressure Combustor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapucu, M.; Kapucu, Mehmet; Alemela, P.R.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.; Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a one dimensional acoustic network model is presented which can be used as a design tool to predict the limit cycle pressure oscillations in a gas turbine combustor. Analytically represented models are combined with measured flame transfer functions and well defined boundary condition

  18. Comprehensive Mathematical Model for Coal Combustion in a Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金晓钟; 吕俊复; 杨海瑞; 刘青; 岳光溪; 冯俊凯

    2001-01-01

    Char combustion is on a special reducing condition in the dense bed of a circulating fluidized bedcombustor. Experimental findings were used to develop a comprehensive mathematical model to simulate thehydrodynamic and combustion processes in a circulating fluidized bed combustor. In the model, gas-solidinteraction was used to account for the mass transfer between the bubble phase and the emulsion phase in thedense bed, which contributes to the reducing atmosphere in the dense bed. A core-annular structure wasassumed in the dilute area rather than a one-dimensional model. The submodels were combined to build thecomprehensive model to analyze the combustion in a circulating fluidized bed combustor and the effect ofoperating parameters on the coal combustion. The model predictions agree well with experimental results.

  19. Experimental results showing the internal three-component velocity field and outlet temperature contours for a model gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ,2]. These inconsistencies are especially great when combustion is simulated when there are already flow inconsistencies after modeling the flow in cold flow simulations. To enable the improvement of CFD modeling and techniques, a CFD test case has been created to aid.... [7], attempts have to be made to ensure that as many of the factors that influence the combustor flow should be included in the tests. The combustor in which these experiments were performed is a full, non-premixed, cylindrical, can-type combustor...

  20. Performance of a Model Rich Burn-quick Mix-lean Burn Combustor at Elevated Temperature and Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher O.; Sowa, William A.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    2002-01-01

    As interest in pollutant emission from stationary and aero-engine gas turbines increases, combustor engineers must consider various configurations. One configuration of increasing interest is the staged, rich burn - quick mix - lean burn (RQL) combustor. This report summarizes an investigation conducted in a recently developed high pressure gas turbine combustor facility. The model RQL combustor was plenum fed and modular in design. The fuel used for this study is Jet-A which was injected from a simplex atomizer. Emission (CO2, CO, O2, UHC, NOx) measurements were obtained using a stationary exit plane water-cooled probe and a traversing water-cooled probe which sampled from the rich zone exit and the lean zone entrance. The RQL combustor was operated at inlet temperatures ranging from 367 to 700 K, pressures ranging from 200 to 1000 kPa, and combustor reference velocities ranging from 10 to 20 m/s. Variations were also made in the rich zone and lean zone equivalence ratios. Several significant trends were observed. NOx production increased with reaction temperature, lean zone equivalence ratio and residence time and decreased with increased rich zone equivalence ratio. NOx production in the model RQL combustor increased to the 0.4 power with increased pressure. This correlation, compared to those obtained for non-staged combustors (0.5 to 0.7), suggests a reduced dependence on NOx on pressure for staged combustors. Emissions profiles suggest that rich zone mixing is not uniform and that the rich zone contributes on the order of 16 percent to the total NOx produced.

  1. Modeling of NO and N{sub 2}O emissions from biomass circulating fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.; Gibbs, B.M. [Leeds Univ., Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Fuel and Energy

    2002-07-01

    In order to correctly model biomass combustion in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor, it is necessary to examine the four main stages in the combustion of biomass particles. These include drying, devolatilization, volatile combustion and char combustion in a CFB combustor. This paper presents a newly developed model for nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from biomass-fired CFB combustors. A typical woody biomass of pinewood chips was selected for the model parameters. The drying and devolatilization of biomass particles was modeled with limited rates according to woody biomass fuels. The partition of fuel nitrogen between volatiles and char was chosen for pinewood based on available data from literature. It was assumed that the volatile nitrogen was composed of ammonia (NH{sub 3}), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}). The model included 25 chemical reactions, of which 20 belonged to global fuel-nitrogen reaction kinetics. A 12 MW CFB boiler was used to apply the model. Results were compared with experimental values as well as data from literature. The reaction between NO and char was found to be the key reaction that determines NO emissions. The catalytic effect of bed materials on the oxidation of NH{sub 3} and the the homogeneous reaction of NH{sub 3} with nitric oxide was also significant. 25 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  2. Spectral analysis of CFB data: Predictive models of Circulating Fluidized Bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamwo, I.K.; Miller, A.; Gidaspow, D.

    1992-04-01

    The overall objective of this investigation is to develop experimentally verified models for circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors. Spectral analysis of CFB data obtained at Illinois Institute of Technology shows that the frequencies of pressure oscillations are less than 0.1 Hertz and that they increase with solids volume fraction to the usual value of one Hertz obtained in bubbling beds. These data are consistent with the kinetic theory interpretation of density wave propagation.

  3. Laboratory of Biological Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Biological Modeling is defined by both its methodologies and its areas of application. We use mathematical modeling in many forms and apply it to...

  4. Laboratory of Biological Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Biological Modeling is defined by both its methodologies and its areas of application. We use mathematical modeling in many forms and apply it to a...

  5. Combustion Characteristics of Liquid Normal Alkane Fuels in a Model Combustor of Supersonic Combustion Ramjet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    今村, 宰; 石川, 雄太; 鈴木, 俊介; 福本, 皓士郎; 西田, 俊介; 氏家, 康成; 津江, 光洋

    Effect of kinds of one-component n-alkane liquid fuels on combustion characteristics was investigated experimentally using a model combustor of scramjet engine. The inlet condition of a model combustor is 2.0 of Mach number, up to 2400K of total temperature, and 0.38MPa of total pressure. Five kinds of n-alkane are tested, of which carbon numbers are 7, 8, 10, 13, and 16. They are more chemically active and less volatile with an increase of alkane carbon number. Fuels are injected to the combustor in the upstream of cavity with barbotage nitrogen gas and self-ignition performance was investigated. The result shows that self-ignition occurs with less equivalence ratio when alkane carbon number is smaller. This indicates that physical characteristic of fuel, namely volatile of fuel, is dominant for self-ignition behavior. Effect on flame-holding performance is also examined with adding pilot hydrogen and combustion is kept after cutting off pilot hydrogen with the least equivalence ratio where alkane carbon number is from 8 to 10. These points are discussed qualitatively from the conflict effect of chemical and physical properties on alkane carbon number.

  6. Dynamic behavior of thermoacoustic combustion oscillations in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor with and without active control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Ryosuke; Domen, Shohei; Okuno, Yuta; Nakagaki, Yoshitake; Gotoda, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    We experimentally study the dynamic behavior of thermoacoustic combustion oscillations in a laboratory-scale lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor with and without active control. We adopt the delayed feedback control method based on the concept of chaos control to suppress thermoacoustic combustion oscillations. The unstable periodic orbits in the attractor of uncontrolled thermoacoustic combustion oscillations are led to the desired orbits with a small diameter of the attractor when the perturbation is switched on, resulting in the notable suppression of thermoacoustic combustion oscillations. Color-recurrence plots (Gotoda et al., Phys. Rev. E 89, 022910 (2014)) are used for characterizing the complexity of the combustion state with and without delayed feedback control.

  7. NOx abatement by fuel-lean reburning: Laboratory combustor and pilot-scale package boiler results. Report for June 1995--December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.A.; Touati, A.D.; Becker, J.; Wendt, J.O.L.

    1997-12-31

    The paper discusses two experimental studies related to the abatement of nitrogen oxides (NOx) by fuel-lean reburning. First, systematic tests in a 17-kW down-flow laboratory combustor, in which nitric oxide (NO) in the oxidant was destroyed in long, axial, methane/air diffusion flames, showed that substantial reduction of NO was possible under overall fuel-lean conditions.

  8. A nonlinear dynamical system for combustion instability in a pulse model combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Kazushi; Gotoda, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically and numerically study the bifurcation phenomena of nonlinear dynamical system describing combustion instability in a pulse model combustor on the basis of dynamical system theory and complex network theory. The dynamical behavior of pressure fluctuations undergoes a significant transition from steady-state to deterministic chaos via the period-doubling cascade process known as Feigenbaum scenario with decreasing the characteristic flow time. Recurrence plots and recurrence networks analysis we adopted in this study can quantify the significant changes in dynamic behavior of combustion instability that cannot be captured in the bifurcation diagram.

  9. Characterization of complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Amano, Masahito; Miyano, Takaya; Ikawa, Takuya; Maki, Koshiro; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2012-12-01

    We characterize complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor by nonlinear time series analysis to evaluate permutation entropy, fractal dimensions, and short-term predictability. The dynamic behavior in combustion instability near lean blowout exhibits a self-affine structure and is ascribed to fractional Brownian motion. It undergoes chaos by the onset of combustion oscillations with slow amplitude modulation. Our results indicate that nonlinear time series analysis is capable of characterizing complexities in combustion instability close to lean blowout.

  10. Modeling and analysis of thermoacoustic instabilities in an annular combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Sandeep; Sayadi, Taraneh; Le Chenadec, Vincent; Schmid, Peter

    2015-11-01

    A simplified model is introduced to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in axisymmetric combustion chambers. Such instabilities can be triggered when correlations between heat-release and pressure oscillations exist, leading to undesirable effects. Gas turbine designs typically consist of a periodic assembly of N identical units; as evidenced by documented studies, the coupling across sectors may give rise to unstable modes, which are the highlight of this study. In the proposed model, the governing equations are linearized in the acoustic limit, with each burner modeled as a one-dimensional system, featuring acoustic damping and a compact heat source. The coupling between the burners is accounted for by solving the two-dimensional wave equation over an annular region, perpendicular to the burners, representing the chamber's geometry. The discretization of these equations results in a set of coupled delay-differential equations, that depends on a finite set of parameters. The system's periodicity is leveraged using a recently developed root-of-unity formalism (Schmid et al., 2015). This results in a linear system, which is then subjected to modal and non-modal analysis to explore the influence of the coupled behavior of the burners on the system's stability and receptivity.

  11. Status of Superheated Spray and Post Combustor Particulate Modeling for NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Raju, Suri; Wey, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    At supersonic cruise conditions, high fuel temperatures, coupled with low pressures in the combustor, create potential for superheated fuel injection leading to shorter fuel jet break-up time and reduced spray penetration. Another issue particularly important to the supersonic cruise is the aircraft emissions contributing to the climate change in the atmosphere. Needless to say, aircraft emissions in general also contribute to the air pollution in the neighborhood of airports. The objectives of the present efforts are to establish baseline for prediction methods and experimental data for (a) liquid fuel atomization and vaporization at superheated conditions and (b) particle sampling systems and laboratory or engine testing environments, as well as to document current capabilities and identify gaps for future research.

  12. Characterization of air toxics from a laboratory coal-fired combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-03

    Emissions of hazardous air pollutants from coal combustion were studied in a laboratory-scale combustion facility, with emphasis on fine particles in three size ranges of less than 7.5 {mu}m diameter. Vapors were also measured. Substances under study included organic compounds, anions, elements, and radionuclides. Fly ash was generated by firing a bituminous coal in a combuster for 40 h at each of two coal feed rates. Flue gas was sampled under two conditions. Results for organic compounds, anions, and elements show a dependence on particle size consistent with published power plant data. Accumulation of material onto surface layers was inferred from differences in chemical composition between the plume simulating dilution sampler and hot flue samples. Extracts of organic particulate material were fractionated into different polarity fractions and analyzed by GC/MS. In Phase II, these laboratory results will be compared to emissions from a full-scale power plant burning the same coal.

  13. Concentration Measurements in a Cold Flow Model Annular Combustor Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Douglas C.

    1996-01-01

    A nonintrusive concentration measurement method is developed for determining the concentration distribution in a complex flow field. The measurement method consists of marking a liquid flow with a water soluble fluorescent dye. The dye is excited by a two dimensional sheet of laser light. The fluorescent intensity is shown to be proportional to the relative concentration level. The fluorescent field is recorded on a video cassette recorder through a video camera. The recorded images are analyzed with image processing hardware and software to obtain intensity levels. Mean and root mean square (rms) values are calculated from these intensity levels. The method is tested on a single round turbulent jet because previous concentration measurements have been made on this configuration by other investigators. The previous results were used to comparison to qualify the current method. These comparisons showed that this method provides satisfactory results. 'Me concentration measurement system was used to measure the concentrations in the complex flow field of a model gas turbine annular combustor. The model annular combustor consists of opposing primary jets and an annular jet which discharges perpendicular to the primary jets. The mixing between the different jet flows can be visualized from the calculated mean and rms profiles. Concentration field visualization images obtained from the processing provide further qualitative information about the flow field.

  14. LES study of intermittency in soot formation in a model aircraft combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Heeseok; Raman, Venkat; Mueller, Michael; Geigle, Klaus Peter

    2015-11-01

    Intermittent soot formation is one of the modeling challenges that prevent accurate predictions of soot concentration in a turbulent reacting flow. Due to the highly unsteady and irregular sooting behavior, formation of soot is acutely sensitive to the flow and gas phase history. Therefore, we need to accurately capture interactions between soot chemistry, particle dynamics, and turbulent flame as well as the turbulent reacting flow. In this study, large eddy simulation (LES) is used to understand the model sensitivity to the soot prediction. Hybrid method of moment (HMOM) soot model is used that accommodates detailed process of soot particle and soot precursor evolution. Gas phase chemistry uses flamelet progress variable approach with an additional enthalpy dimension to include soot radiation effect. The developed numerical model is tested on the DLR swirl combustor that emulates the rich-quench-lean (RQL) configuration using secondary oxidation air injection.

  15. Effect of fuel properties on the bottom ash generation rate by a laboratory fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozelle, P.L.; Pisupati, S.V.; Scaroni, A.W. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Energy & Geoenvironmental Engineering

    2007-06-15

    The range of fuels that can be accommodated by an FBC boiler system is affected by the ability of the fuel, sorbent, and ash-handling equipment to move the required solids through the boiler. Of specific interest is the bottom ash handling equipment, which must have sufficient capacity to remove ash from the system in order to maintain a constant bed inventory level, and must have sufficient capability to cool the ash well below the bed temperature. Quantification of a fuel's bottom ash removal requirements can be useful for plant design. The effect of fuel properties on the rate of bottom ash production in a laboratory FBC test system was examined. The work used coal products ranging in ash content from 20 to 40+ wt. %. The system's classification of solids by particle size into flyash and bottom ash was characterized using a partition curve. Fuel fractions in the size range characteristic of bottom ash were further analyzed for distributions of ash content with respect to specific gravity, using float sink tests. The fuel fractions were then ashed in a fixed bed. In each case, the highest ash content fraction produced ash with the coarsest size consist (characteristic of bottom ash). The lower ash content fractions were found to produce ash in the size range characteristic of flyash, suggesting that the high ash content fractions were largely responsible for the production of bottom ash. The contributions of the specific gravity fractions to the composite ash in the fuels were quantified. The fuels were fired in the laboratory test system. Fuels with higher amounts of high specific gravity particles, in the size ranges characteristic of bottom ash, were found to produce more bottom ash, indicating the potential utility of float sink methods in the prediction of bottom ash removal requirements.

  16. Combustor Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    Diagnostics in Gas Phase Combustion Systems", Progress in Astrona.utics and Aeronautics, ed. B.T. Zinn, vol. 53, pp. 421, 1977. 21. Tipler , W. "The...obtained on the disc-in-duct (Fig. 1C ) flameholder (negligible together: the result is shown in Fig. 5 with the universal fueopertrtinaefecs) stc 1

  17. Laser Doppler velocimeter measurements and laser sheet imaging in an annular combustor model. M.S. Thesis, Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwenger, Richard Dale

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in annular combustor model to provide a better understanding of the flowfield. Combustor model configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets were investigated. The purpose of this research was to provide a better understanding of combustor flows and to provide a data base for comparison with computational models. The first part of this research used a laser Doppler velocimeter to measure mean velocity and statistically calculate root-mean-square velocity in two coordinate directions. From this data, one Reynolds shear stress component and a two-dimensional turbulent kinetic energy term was determined. Major features of the flowfield included recirculating flow, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. The most pronounced result from this data was the effect the primary jets had on the flowfield. The primary jets were seen to reduce flow asymmetries, create larger recirculation zones, and higher turbulence levels. The second part of this research used a technique called marker nephelometry to provide mean concentration values in the combustor. Results showed the flow to be very turbulent and unsteady. All configurations investigated were highly sensitive to alignment of the primary and annular jets in the model and inlet conditions. Any imbalance between primary jets or misalignment of the annular jets caused severe flow asymmetries.

  18. Numerical Analysis of Turbulent Combustion in a Model Swirl Gas Turbine Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Cemal Benim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent reacting flows in a generic swirl gas turbine combustor are investigated numerically. Turbulence is modelled by a URANS formulation in combination with the SST turbulence model, as the basic modelling approach. For comparison, URANS is applied also in combination with the RSM turbulence model to one of the investigated cases. For this case, LES is also used for turbulence modelling. For modelling turbulence-chemistry interaction, a laminar flamelet model is used, which is based on the mixture fraction and the reaction progress variable. This model is implemented in the open source CFD code OpenFOAM, which has been used as the basis for the present investigation. For validation purposes, predictions are compared with the measurements for a natural gas flame with external flue gas recirculation. A good agreement with the experimental data is observed. Subsequently, the numerical study is extended to syngas, for comparing its combustion behavior with that of natural gas. Here, the analysis is carried out for cases without external flue gas recirculation. The computational model is observed to provide a fair prediction of the experimental data and predict the increased flashback propensity of syngas.

  19. Computational Simulation of Acoustic Modes in Rocket Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Merkle, C. L.; Sankaran, V.; Ellis, M.

    2004-01-01

    A combination of computational fluid dynamic analysis and analytical solutions is being used to characterize the dominant modes in liquid rocket engines in conjunction with laboratory experiments. The analytical solutions are based on simplified geometries and flow conditions and are used for careful validation of the numerical formulation. The validated computational model is then extended to realistic geometries and flow conditions to test the effects of various parameters on chamber modes, to guide and interpret companion laboratory experiments in simplified combustors, and to scale the measurements to engine operating conditions. In turn, the experiments are used to validate and improve the model. The present paper gives an overview of the numerical and analytical techniques along with comparisons illustrating the accuracy of the computations as a function of grid resolution. A representative parametric study of the effect of combustor mean flow Mach number and combustor aspect ratio on the chamber modes is then presented for both transverse and longitudinal modes. The results show that higher mean flow Mach numbers drive the modes to lower frequencies. Estimates of transverse wave mechanics in a high aspect ratio combustor are then contrasted with longitudinal modes in a long and narrow combustor to provide understanding of potential experimental simulations.

  20. Clocked combustor can array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won-Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Srinivasan, Shiva Kumar

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a clocked combustor can array for coherence reduction in a gas turbine engine. The clocked combustor can array may include a number of combustor cans positioned in a circumferential array. A first set of the combustor cans may have a first orientation and a second set of the combustor cans may have a second orientation.

  1. Clocked combustor can array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Srinivasan, Shiva Kumar

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a clocked combustor can array for coherence reduction in a gas turbine engine. The clocked combustor can array may include a number of combustor cans positioned in a circumferential array. A first set of the combustor cans may have a first orientation and a second set of the combustor cans may have a second orientation.

  2. Spectral analysis of CFB data: Predictive models of Circulating Fluidized Bed combustors. 11th technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamwo, I.K.; Miller, A.; Gidaspow, D.

    1992-04-01

    The overall objective of this investigation is to develop experimentally verified models for circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors. Spectral analysis of CFB data obtained at Illinois Institute of Technology shows that the frequencies of pressure oscillations are less than 0.1 Hertz and that they increase with solids volume fraction to the usual value of one Hertz obtained in bubbling beds. These data are consistent with the kinetic theory interpretation of density wave propagation.

  3. Determination of an acoustic reflection coefficient at the inlet of a model gas turbine combustor for power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W. J.; Cha, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    A phenomenon that potentially influences the reliability of power generation systems is the presence of thermo-acoustic oscillations in the combustion chamber of a land- based gas turbine. To develop specific measures that prevent the instability, it is essential to predict and/or evaluate the underlying physics of the thermo-acoustics, which requires the acoustic boundary condition at the exit of the burner, that is, at the inlet of the combustor. Here we report a procedure for calculating acoustic reflection coefficients at the burner exit by utilizing two microphone method (TMM) for dynamic pressure signals. The procedure has been verified by comparing its results with reported ones and further successfully employed to determine the acoustic boundary condition of the burner of a partially-premixed model gas turbine combustor.

  4. Multi-Ducted Inlet Combustor Research and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    of a reactor or combustor as defined in equation (1) is the combustor volume divided by the fluid flow rate through the combustor. Therefore, for a...Development Laboratories, Inc., Costa Mesa, California, March, 1983. 3. 0. Levenspiel , Chemical Reaction Engineering, John Wiley and Sons, 1962. 59 •rac v £98 kg3-ඃ-,162-;8b

  5. Experimental investigation on combustion performance of cavity-strut injection of supercritical kerosene in supersonic model combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-bo; Zhong, Zhan; Liang, Jian-han; Wang, Hong-bo

    2016-10-01

    Supersonic combustion with cavity-strut injection of supercritical kerosene in a model scramjet engine was experimentally investigated in Mach 2.92 facility with the stagnation temperatures of approximately 1430 K. Static pressure distribution in the axial direction was determined using pressure transducers installed along the centerline of the model combustor top walls. High speed imaging camera was used to capture flame luminosity and combustion region distribution. Multi-cavities were used to and stabilize the combustion in the supersonic combustor. Intrusive injection by thin struts was used to enhance the fuel-air mixing. Supercritical kerosene at temperatures of approximately 780 K and various pressures was prepared using a heat exchanger driven by the hot gas from a pre-burner and injected at equivalence ratios of approximately 1.0. In the experiments, combustor performances with different strut injection schemes were investigated and compared to direct wall injection scheme based on the measured static pressure distributions, the specific thrust increments and the images obtained by high-speed imaging camera. The experimental results showed that the injection by thin struts could obtain an enhanced mixing in the field but could not acquire a steady flame when mixing field cannot well match cavity separation region. There is no significant difference on performance between different schemes since the unsteady intermittent and oscillating flame leads to no actual combustion efficiency improvement.

  6. A Priori Analysis of a Compressible Flamelet Model using RANS Data for a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; McDaniel, James C.; Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to make large eddy simulation of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustors more computationally accessible using realistic chemical reaction mechanisms, a compressible flamelet/progress variable (FPV) model was proposed that extends current FPV model formulations to high-speed, compressible flows. Development of this model relied on observations garnered from an a priori analysis of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) data obtained for the Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation (HI-FiRE) dual-mode scramjet combustor. The RANS data were obtained using a reduced chemical mechanism for the combustion of a JP-7 surrogate and were validated using avail- able experimental data. These RANS data were then post-processed to obtain, in an a priori fashion, the scalar fields corresponding to an FPV-based modeling approach. In the current work, in addition to the proposed compressible flamelet model, a standard incompressible FPV model was also considered. Several candidate progress variables were investigated for their ability to recover static temperature and major and minor product species. The effects of pressure and temperature on the tabulated progress variable source term were characterized, and model coupling terms embedded in the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations were studied. Finally, results for the novel compressible flamelet/progress variable model were presented to demonstrate the improvement attained by modeling the effects of pressure and flamelet boundary conditions on the combustion.

  7. NONEQUILIBRIUM SULFUR CAPTURE & RETENTION IN AN AIR COOLED SLAGGING COAL COMBUSTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bert Zauderer

    2003-04-21

    Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor reacts with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur-bearing particles. The reacted particles impact and melt in the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall by the centrifugal force of the swirling combustion gases. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, it must be rapidly drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Prior analyses and laboratory scale data indicated that for Coal Tech's 20 MMBtu/hour, air-cooled, slagging coal combustor slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 42-month project was to validate this sulfur-in-slag model in a group of combustor tests. A total of 36 days of testing on the combustor were completed during the period of performance of this project. This was more that double the 16 test days that were required in the original work statement. The extra tests were made possible by cost saving innovations that were made in the operation of the combustor test facility and in additional investment of Coal Tech resources in the test effort. The original project plan called for two groups of tests. The first group of tests involved the injection of calcium sulfate particles in the form of gypsum or plaster of Paris with the coal into the 20 MMBtu/hour-combustor. The second group of tests consisted of the entire two-step process, in which lime or limestone is co-injected with coal and reacts with the sulfur gas released during combustion to form calcium sulfate particles that impact and dissolve in the slag layer. Since this sulfur capture process has been validated in numerous prior tests in this combustor, the primary effort in the present project was on achieving the high slag flow rates needed to retain the sulfur in the slag.

  8. Modeling of complex physics & combustion dynamics in a combustor with a partially premixed turbulent flame

    OpenAIRE

    Shahi, Mina

    2014-01-01

    To avoid the formation of the high temperature stoichiometric regions in flames in a gas turbine combustor, and hence the formation of nitric oxides, an alternative concept of combustion technology was introduced by means of lean premixed combustion. However, the low emission of nitric oxides and carbon monoxide of the lean premixed combustion of natural gas comes at the cost of increased sensitivity to thermoacoustic instabilities. These are driven by the feedback loop between heat release, ...

  9. On the Role of Chemical Kinetics Modeling in the LES of Premixed Bluff Body and Backward-Facing Step Combustors

    KAUST Repository

    Chakroun, Nadim W.

    2017-01-05

    Recirculating flows in the wake of a bluff body, behind a sudden expansion or down-stream of a swirler, are pivotal for anchoring a flame and expanding the stability range. The size and structure of these recirculation zones and the accurate prediction of the length of these zones is a very important characteristic that computational simulations should have. Large eddy simulation (LES) techniques with an appropriate combustion model and reaction mechanism afford a balance between computational complexity and predictive accuracy. In this study, propane/air mixtures were simulated in a bluff-body stabilized combustor based on the Volvo test case and also in a backward-facing step combustor. The main goal is to investigate the role of the chemical mechanism and the accuracy of estimating the extinction strain rate on the prediction of important ow features such as recirculation zones. Two 2-step mechanisms were employed, one which gave reasonable extinction strain rates and another modi ed 2-step mechanism where it grossly over-predicted the values. This modified mechanism under-predicted recirculation zone lengths compared to the original mechanism and had worse agreement with experiments in both geometries. While the recirculation zone lengths predicted by both reduced mechanisms in the step combustor scale linearly with the extinction strain rate, the scaling curves do not match experimental results as none of the simpli ed mechanisms produce extinction strain rates that are consistent with those predicted by the comprehensive mechanisms. We conclude that it is very important that a chemical mechanism is able to correctly predict extinction strain rates if it is to be used in CFD simulations.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON SWIRLING ANDRECIRCULATING TWO-PHASE FLOW FIELD IN A COLD MODEL OF DUAL-INLET SUDDEN-EXPANSION COMBUSTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The dual-inlet liquid-spray-fuelled sudden-expansion combustors are frequently adopted in ramjet engines. The original combustors with swirlers in the inlet tubes frequently suffer from poor ignition, low flame stabilization and poor combustion performance due to insufficient sizes of recirculation zones in the head part of the combustor. There are only very small recirculation zones behind the swirlers. To improve the performance of the combustors, a new configuration is proposed by the authors, in which a small central tube instead of the original swirler is mounted in the inlet tube of the combustor with a tangential angle for creating swirling flows and enlarging the recirculation zones. So, it is expected to know the gas-droplet flow behavior after mounting the central tube. The turbulent swirling and recirculating gas-droplet flows in a dual-inlet sudden-expansion combustor are very complex. In the head part of the combustor there are recirculating flows. In the whole combustor there are swirling flows with a Rankine-vortex structure (solid-body rotation plus free vortex) of tangential velocity profiles. There should be obvious velocity slip between the gas and droplet phases due to the differences in inertia and centrifugal forces. The recirculating and swirling gas-particle flows were previously measured using LDV or PDPA[1~3]. In this paper the experimental studies on two-phase flows were carried out in a cold model of the combustor, and the motion of solid particles is used to simulate that of liquid droplets. The gas and particle (simulating the droplets) velocities were measured using a 2-D LDV system and the particle (simulating the droplet) concentration distribution is measured using a laser optic fiber system and a sampling probe. The purpose of this experimental study is not to simulate the real combustion regime, but to understand the features of the improved two-phase flow field using a central tube in the inlet tube and to provide the data

  11. One dimensional numerical simulation of small scale CFB combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gungor, Afsin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Nigde University, 51100 Nigde (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    In this study, a one-dimensional model which includes volatilization, attrition and combustion of char particles for a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor has been developed. In the modeling, the CFB combustor is analyzed in two regions: bottom zone considering as a bubbling fluidized bed in turbulent fluidization regime and upper zone core-annulus solids flow structure is established. In the bottom zone, a single-phase back-flow cell model is used to represent the solid mixing. Solids exchange, between the bubble phase and emulsion phase is a function of the bubble diameter and varies along the axis of the combustor. In the upper zone, particles move upward in the core and downward in the annulus. Thickness of the annulus varies according to the combustor height. Using the developed simulation program, the effects of operational parameters which are the particle diameter, superficial velocity and air-to-fuel ratio on net solids flux, oxygen and carbon dioxide mole ratios along the bed height and carbon content and bed temperature on the top of the riser are investigated. Simulation results are compared with test results obtained from the 50 kW Gazi University Heat Power Laboratory pilot scale unit and good agreement is observed. (author)

  12. Experimental and numerical analysis of natural bio and syngas swirl flames in a model gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, S.; Benim, A. C.; Fischer, S.; Joos, F.; Kluβ, D.; Wiedermann, A.

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent reacting flows in a generic swirl gas turbine combustor model are investigated both numerically and experimentally. In the investigation, an emphasis is placed upon the external flue gas recirculation, which is a promising technology for increasing the efficiency of the carbon capture and storage process, which, however, can change the combustion behaviour significantly. A further emphasis is placed upon the investigation of alternative fuels such as biogas and syngas in comparison to the conventional natural gas. Flames are also investigated numerically using the open source CFD software OpenFOAM. In the numerical simulations, a laminar flamelet model based on mixture fraction and reaction progress variable is adopted. As turbulence model, the SST model is used within a URANS concept. Computational results are compared with the experimental data, where a fair agreement is observed.

  13. 5 kHz thermometry in a swirl-stabilized gas turbine model combustor using chirped probe pulse femtosecond CARS. Part 1: Temporally resolved swirl-flame thermometry

    KAUST Repository

    Dennis, Claresta N.

    2016-06-20

    Single-laser-shot temperature measurements at 5 kHz were performed in a gas turbine model combustor using femtosecond (fs) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). The combustor was operated at two conditions; one exhibiting a low level of thermoacoustic instability and the other a high level of instability. Measurements were performed at 73 locations within each flame in order to resolve the spatial flame structure and compare to previously published studies. The measurement procedures, including the procedure for calibrating the laser system parameters, are discussed in detail. Despite the high turbulence levels in the combustor, signals were obtained on virtually every laser shot, and these signals were strong enough for spectral fitting analysis for determination of flames temperatures. The spatial resolution of the single-laser shot temperature measurements was approximately 600 µm, the precision was approximately ±2%, and the estimated accuracy was approximately ±3%. The dynamic range was sufficient for temperature measurements ranging from 300 K to 2200 K, although some detector saturation was observed for low temperature spectra. These results demonstrate the usefulness of fs-CARS for the investigation of highly turbulent combustion phenomena. In a companion paper, the time-resolved fs CARS data are analyzed to provide insight into the temporal dynamics of the gas turbine model combustor flow field.

  14. Flow-flame interactions causing acoustically coupled heat release fluctuations in a thermo-acoustically unstable gas turbine model combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, A.M.; Boxx, I.; Stoehr, M.; Meier, W. [Institute for Combustion Technology, German Aerospace Centre (DLR), 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Carter, C.D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)

    2010-12-15

    A detailed analysis of the flow-flame interactions associated with acoustically coupled heat-release rate fluctuations was performed for a 10 kW, CH{sub 4}/air, swirl stabilized flame in a gas turbine model combustor exhibiting self-excited thermo-acoustic oscillations at 308 Hz. High-speed stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, OH planar laser induced fluorescence, and OH* chemiluminescence measurements were performed at a sustained repetition rate of 5 kHz, which was sufficient to resolve the relevant combustor dynamics. Using spatio-temporal proper orthogonal decomposition, it was found that the flow-field contained several simultaneous periodic motions: the reactant flux into the combustion chamber periodically oscillated at the thermo-acoustic frequency (308 Hz), a helical precessing vortex core (PVC) circumscribed the burner nozzle at 515 Hz, and the PVC underwent axial contraction and extension at the thermo-acoustic frequency. The global heat release rate fluctuated at the thermo-acoustic frequency, while the heat release centroid circumscribed the combustor at the difference between the thermo-acoustic and PVC frequencies. Hence, the three-dimensional location of the heat release fluctuations depended on the interaction of the PVC with the flame surface. This motivated the compilation of doubly phase resolved statistics based on the phase of both the acoustic and PVC cycles, which showed highly repeatable periodic flow-flame configurations. These include flames stabilized between the inflow and inner recirculation zone, large-scale flame wrap-up by the PVC, radial deflection of the inflow by the PVC, and combustion in the outer recirculation zones. Large oscillations in the flame surface area were observed at the thermo-accoustic frequency that significantly affected the total heat-release oscillations. By filtering the instantaneous reaction layers at different scales, the importance of the various flow-flame interactions affecting the flame area was

  15. In-situ laser spectroscopy of CO, Ch4, and H2O in a particle laden laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lackner Maximilian

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolysis, devolatilization and char combustion of bituminous coal and biomass (beechwood, firwood were investigated in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor by tunable diode laser spectroscopy. Individual fuel particles were suspended in the freeboard of the unit. The bed temperature was 800 °C, the oxygen partial pressure 0 to 20 kPa (0-10 vol.%. Two Fabry Perot type tunable near infrared diode lasers were deployed for quantitative in-situ species concentration measurements. CH4 and CO were measured simultaneously during devolatilization and char combustion in-situ 10 mm above the surface of the fuel particles as well as H2O using laser spectroscopy. Sand particles were passing the probing laser beam path. Besides the resonant absorption of the laser light by CO, CH4 and H2O severe and strongly transient non-resonant attenuation by partial blocking of the beam and beam steering effects occurred. By wavelength tuning the two laser sources, species concentrations could be determined. The measured absorbances had to be corrected for the real temperature measured at the position of the probing laser beam. In addition, CO, CO2 and O2 were determined ex-situ by con ventional methods. A spatial profile inside the FBC of major species (CH4, CO, CO2, O, H, OH was calculated using a chemical kinetics program for a single fuel particle in a plug flow reactor geometry. The results were compared to the experimental findings. Good agreement was found. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy was found to be an apt method of determining quantitative species concentrations of multiple gases in a high temperature multi phase environment.

  16. Turbulent Recirculating Flows in Isothermal Combustor Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, D.; Rhode, D.

    1985-01-01

    Computer program developed that provides mathematical solution to design and construction of combustion chambers for jet engines. Improved results in areas of combustor flow fields accomplished by this computerprogram solution, cheaper and quicker than experiments involving real systems for models.

  17. Assessment of Combustor Working Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiyong Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the remaining life of gas turbine critical components, it is vital to accurately define the aerothermodynamic working environments and service histories. As a part of a major multidisciplinary collaboration program, a benchmark modeling on a practical gas turbine combustor is successfully carried out, and the two-phase, steady, turbulent, compressible, reacting flow fields at both cruise and takeoff are obtained. The results show the complicated flow features inside the combustor. The airflow over each flow element of the combustor can or liner is not evenly distributed, and considerable variations, ±25%, around the average values, are observed. It is more important to note that the temperatures at the combustor can and cooling wiggle strips vary significantly, which can significantly affect fatigue life of engine critical components. The present study suggests that to develop an adequate aerothermodynamics tool, it is necessary to carry out a further systematic study, including validation of numerical results, simulations at typical engine operating conditions, and development of simple correlations between engine operating conditions and component working environments. As an ultimate goal, the cost and time of gas turbine engine fleet management must be significantly reduced.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON SWIRLING AND RECIRCULATING TWO-PHASE FLOW FIELD IN A COLD MODEL OF DUAL-INLET SUDDEN-EXPANSION COMBUSTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The axial and tangential velocities of gas and particle phases and particle concentration for turbulent swirling and recirculating gas-particle (simulating gas-droplet) flows in a cold model of a dual-inlet sudden-expansion combustor with partially tangential central tubes, proposed by the present authors, were measured by using a 2-D LDV system and a laser optic fiber system combined with a sampling probe. The results show that there are both gas and particle strongly reverse flows and swirling flows in the head part of the combustor. The velocity slip between gas and particle phases is remarkable. The particle concentration is higher near the wall and lower near the axis. There are two peaks in the concentration profiles near the inlet tubes. The above-obtained flow characteristics are favorable to ignition, flame stabilization and combustion. The results can also be used to validate the numerical modeling.

  19. Variable volume combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a linear actuator so as to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles axially along the liner.

  20. Design and Numerical Simulation of Two Dimensional Ultra Compact Combustor Model Sections for Experimental Observation of Cavity-Vane Flow Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    component UHC Unburned hydrocarbons xviii Symbol V Cavity volume y* Wall unit yυ Viscous sub-layer thickness YM Term for contribution of...Emissions. Pollutant species of interest at the combustor exhaust plane include CO, CO2, NOx, and unburned hydrocarbons ( UHC ), while the exhaust level...fraction, and are reported in the form of part-per-million (ppm) for CO, NOx, UHC or percentage of total for CO2, O2. The combustion modeling in FLUENT

  1. Gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Steven W. (Inventor); Cheung, Albert K. (Inventor); Dempsey, Dae K. (Inventor); Hoke, James B. (Inventor); Kramer, Stephen K. (Inventor); Ols, John T. (Inventor); Smith, Reid Dyer Curtis (Inventor); Sowa, William A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has a combustor module including an annular combustor having a liner assembly that defines an annular combustion chamber having a length, L. The liner assembly includes a radially inner liner, a radially outer liner that circumscribes the inner liner, and a bulkhead, having a height, H1, which extends between the respective forward ends of the inner liner and the outer liner. The combustor has an exit height, H3, at the respective aft ends of the inner liner and the outer liner interior. The annular combustor has a ratio H1/H3 having a value less than or equal to 1.7. The annular combustor may also have a ration L/H3 having a value less than or equal to 6.0.

  2. Laboratory Tests of Chameleon Models

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    We present a cursory overview of chameleon models of dark energy and their laboratory tests with an emphasis on optical and Casimir experiments. Optical experiments measuring the ellipticity of an initially polarised laser beam are sensitive to the coupling of chameleons to photons. The next generation of Casimir experiments may be able to unravel the nature of the scalar force mediated by the chameleon between parallel plates.

  3. Calculations of magnetohydrodynamic swirl combustor flowfields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A.K.; Beer, J.H.; Khan, H.; Lilley, D.G.

    1982-09-01

    The objectives of the paper were to theoretically calculate and experimentally verify the fluid mechanics in the second stage of a model MHD swirl combustor with special emphasis on avoidance of the boundary-layer separation as the flow turns in to the MHD disk generator; to find the most suitable seed injection point at the entrance to the second stage which will yield uniform seed concentration at the combustor exit prior to entry into the disk generator. The model combustor is a multiannular swirl burner that is placed at the exit of the first-stage swirl combustor, which in turn can be used to vary the turbulent shear that arises between the individual swirling concentric annuli. This design permits ultrahigh swirl in the second stage with swirl vanes (if any) to be placed outside the very high temperature regions of the combustor in the clean preheated air. The gas burns completely in the second-stage combustor and turns 90 deg into the disk generator along a trumpet-shaped exit module. In this synoptic results are presented of the fluid mechanics in the trumpet-shaped second-stage exit module, with water as the working fluid.

  4. Assessment of Combustor Working Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Leiyong Jiang; Andrew Corber

    2012-01-01

    In order to assess the remaining life of gas turbine critical components, it is vital to accurately define the aerothermodynamic working environments and service histories. As a part of a major multidisciplinary collaboration program, a benchmark modeling on a practical gas turbine combustor is successfully carried out, and the two-phase, steady, turbulent, compressible, reacting flow fields at both cruise and takeoff are obtained. The results show the complicated flow features inside the com...

  5. A Very Large Eddy Simulation of the Nonreacting Flow in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection Combustor Using PRNS with a Nonlinear Subscale Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2009-01-01

    Very large eddy simulation (VLES) of the nonreacting turbulent flow in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor has been successfully performed via the approach known as the partially resolved numerical simulation (PRNS/VLES) using a nonlinear subscale model. The grid is the same as the one used in a previous RANS simulation, which was considered as too coarse for a traditional LES simulation. In this study, we first carry out a steady RANS simulation to provide the initial flow field for the subsequent PRNS/VLES simulation. We have also carried out an unsteady RANS (URANS) simulation for the purpose of comparing its results with that of the PRNS/VLES simulation. In addition, these calculated results are compared with the experimental data. The present effort has demonstrated that the PRNS/VLES approach, while using a RANS type of grid, is able to reveal the dynamically important, unsteady large-scale turbulent structures occurring in the flow field of a single-element LDI combustor. The interactions of these coherent structures play a critical role in the dispersion of the fuel, hence, the mixing between the fuel and the oxidizer in a combustor.

  6. LABORATORY MODELS FOR SCREENING ANALGESICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parle Milind

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a complex unpleasant phenomenon composed of sensory experiences that include time, space, intensity, emotion, cognition and motivation. Analgesics are the agents, which selectively relieve pain by acting in the CNS or by peripheral pain mechanisms without significantly altering consciousness. Analgesics may be narcotic or non-narcotic. The study of pain in animals raises ethical, philosophical and technical problems. Philosophically, there is a problem that pain cannot be monitored directly in animals but can only be measured by examining their responses to nociceptive stimuli. The observed reactions are almost always motor responses ranging from spinal reflexes to complex behavior. The animal models employed for screening of analgesic agents, include Pain-state models based on the use of thermal stimuli, mechanical stimuli, electrical stimuli and chemical stimuli. The neuronal basis of most of the above laboratory models is poorly understood, however their application is profitable in predicting analgesic activity of newly discovered substances.

  7. Geoacoustic Physical Model Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Fabricates three-dimensional rough surfaces (e.g., fractals, ripples) out of materials such as PVC or wax to simulate the roughness properties associated...

  8. Demonstration of an advanced circulation fludized bed coal combustor phase 1: Cold model study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govind, R. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1993-03-20

    It was found that there was a strong dependence of the density profile on the secondary air injection location and that there was a pronounced solid separation from the conveying gas, due to the swirl motion. Furthermore, the swirl motion generated strong internal circulation patterns and higher slip velocities than in the case of nonswirl motion as in an ordinary circulating fluidized bed. Radial solids flux profiles were measured at different axial locations. The general radial profile in a swirling circulating fluidized bed indicated an increased downward flow of solids near the bed walls, and strong variations in radial profiles along the axial height. For swirl numbers less than 0.9, which is typical for swirling circulating fluidized beds, there is no significant increase in erosion due to swirl motion inside the bed. Pending further investigation of swirl motion with combustion, at least from our cold model studies, no disadvantages due to the introduction of swirl motion were discovered.

  9. Investigation of different modeling approaches for computational fluid dynamics simulation of high-pressure rocket combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, B.; Riedmann, H.; Frey, M.; Knab, O.; Karl, S.; Hannemann, K.

    2016-07-01

    The paper summarizes technical results and first highlights of the cooperation between DLR and Airbus Defence and Space (DS) within the work package "CFD Modeling of Combustion Chamber Processes" conducted in the frame of the Propulsion 2020 Project. Within the addressed work package, DLR Göttingen and Airbus DS Ottobrunn have identified several test cases where adequate test data are available and which can be used for proper validation of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. In this paper, the first test case, the Penn State chamber (RCM1), is discussed. Presenting the simulation results from three different tools, it is shown that the test case can be computed properly with steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approaches. The achieved simulation results reproduce the measured wall heat flux as an important validation parameter very well but also reveal some inconsistencies in the test data which are addressed in this paper.

  10. Dilution jet experiments in compact combustor configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, I.; Zizelman, J.

    1984-01-01

    This project concerns the effects of cooling jets on the velocity and temperature fields in a compact reverse flow combustor. The work is motivated by the need to limit the temperatures of post combustion gases in jet engines to values within the endurance capabilities of turbine blades. The application requires not only that the temperature be kept sufficiently low but also that a suitably tailored temperature profile be provided at the combustor exit, with higher temperatures generally permissible at the blade tip than at the blade root because of higher centrifugal loads at the root. Flows in reverse flow combustor accelerate both longitudinally because of area changes and transversely because of flow turning. The current project started with flow visualization experiments in water, using aqueous solutions of zinc bromide to model the relatively higher density of cooling jets.

  11. Combustor liner construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, H. M.; Wagner, W. B.; Strock, W. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A combustor liner is fabricated from a plurality of individual segments each containing counter/parallel Finwall material and are arranged circumferentially and axially to define the combustion zone. Each segment is supported by a hook and ring construction to an opened lattice frame with sufficient tolerance between the hook and ring to permit thermal expansion with a minimum of induced stresses.

  12. Catalytic combustor for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercea, J.; Grecu, E.; Fodor, T.; Kreibik, S.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of catalytic combustors for hydrogen using platinum-supported catalysts is described. Catalytic plates of different sizes were constructed using fibrous and ceramic supports. The temperature distribution as well as the reaction efficiency as a function of the fuel input rate was determined, and a comparison between the performances of different plates is discussed.

  13. LABORATORY MODEL OF CHRONIC STAPHYLOCOCCAL TONSILLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkodovska NYu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigation and development of new preparations for chronic tonsillitis (CT treatment and prevention requires application of appropriate laboratory model. For the development of CT laboratory model chronic pyoinflammatory process was reproduced in chinchilla rabbits using Staphylococcus aureus 209 Р (АТСС 6538-Р reference-strain. Preliminary sensitizing of animals with inactivated causative agent and repeated infection with the reference-strain made it possible to work out reproducible model of chronic tonsillitis. Adequacy of chronic tonsillitis development was confirmed by the results of microbiological and pathomorphological researchers. The proposed laboratory model can be used for solving of theoretical and practical medicine and pharmacology topical problems.

  14. Idealized gas turbine combustor for performance research and validation of large eddy simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Timothy C; Schefer, Robert W; Oefelein, Joseph C; Shaddix, Christopher R

    2007-03-01

    This paper details the design of a premixed, swirl-stabilized combustor that was designed and built for the express purpose of obtaining validation-quality data for the development of large eddy simulations (LES) of gas turbine combustors. The combustor features nonambiguous boundary conditions, a geometrically simple design that retains the essential fluid dynamics and thermochemical processes that occur in actual gas turbine combustors, and unrestrictive access for laser and optical diagnostic measurements. After discussing the design detail, a preliminary investigation of the performance and operating envelope of the combustor is presented. With the combustor operating on premixed methane/air, both the equivalence ratio and the inlet velocity were systematically varied and the flame structure was recorded via digital photography. Interesting lean flame blowout and resonance characteristics were observed. In addition, the combustor exhibited a large region of stable, acoustically clean combustion that is suitable for preliminary validation of LES models.

  15. Combustion of biomass-derived, low caloric value, fuel gas in a gasturbine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andries, J.; Hoppesteyn, P.D.J.; Hein, K.R.G. [Technische Univ. Delf (Netherlands)

    1998-09-01

    The use of biomass and biomass/coal mixtures to produce electricity and heat reduces the net emissions of CO{sub 2}, contributes to the restructuring of the agricultural sector, helps to reduce the waste problem and saves finite fossil fuel reserves. Pressurised fluidised bed gasification followed by an adequate gas cleaning system, a gas turbine and a steam turbine, is a potential attractive way to convert biomass and biomass/coal mixtures. To develop and validate mathematical models, which can be used to design and operate Biomass-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (BIGCC) systems, a Process Development Unit (PPDU) with a maximum thermal capacity of 1.5 MW{sub th}, located at the Laboratory for Thermal Power Engineering of the Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands is being used. The combustor forms an integral part of this facility. Recirculated flue gas is used to cool the wall of the combustor. (orig.)

  16. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  17. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  18. Application of numerical analysis to jet engine combustor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    To, H. (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-04-01

    The design and development process of jet engine combustors in Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. was presented which is featured by iterated numerical analyses in earlier stages of design. The analytical methods used, models applied and features were given together with verification results of numerical analyses of a velocity profile in a dump diffuser, flow and temperature distribution in a combustion liner, and liner skin temperature distribution. As examples in design and development of an airblast fuel injector type high temperature combustor, analytical results of the followings were given: flows through a diffuser, flows through a combustion liner, flows through liner cooling slots and liner skin temperature distribution. In addition, results of three-dimensional flow analysis were given in terms of optimization of design parameters for a jet-swirl combustor and calculation of a centrifugal force for a jet-swirl combustor liner as examples. 6 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A model for laboratory tech transfer investment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otey, G.R.; Carson, C.C.; Bomber, T.M.; Rogers, J.D.

    1994-06-01

    A simple model has been developed to address a pragmatic question: What fraction of its research and development budget should a national laboratory devote to enhancing technology in the private sector? In dealing with lab-wide budgets in an aggregate sense, the model uses three parameters - fraction of lab R&D transferable to industry, transfer efficiency and payback to laboratory missions - to partition fixed R&D resources between technology transfer and core missions. It is a steady-state model in that the transfer process is assumed to work in equilibrium with technology generation. The results presented should be of use to those engaged in managing and overseeing federal laboratory technology transfer activities.

  20. A comprehensive evaluation of different radiation models in a gas turbine combustor under conditions of oxy-fuel combustion with dry recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kez, V.; Liu, F.; Consalvi, J. L.; Ströhle, J.; Epple, B.

    2016-03-01

    The oxy-fuel combustion is a promising CO2 capture technology from combustion systems. This process is characterized by much higher CO2 concentrations in the combustion system compared to that of the conventional air-fuel combustion. To accurately predict the enhanced thermal radiation in oxy-fuel combustion, it is essential to take into account the non-gray nature of gas radiation. In this study, radiation heat transfer in a 3D model gas turbine combustor under two test cases at 20 atm total pressure was calculated by various non-gray gas radiation models, including the statistical narrow-band (SNB) model, the statistical narrow-band correlated-k (SNBCK) model, the wide-band correlated-k (WBCK) model, the full spectrum correlated-k (FSCK) model, and several weighted sum of gray gases (WSGG) models. Calculations of SNB, SNBCK, and FSCK were conducted using the updated EM2C SNB model parameters. Results of the SNB model are considered as the benchmark solution to evaluate the accuracy of the other models considered. Results of SNBCK and FSCK are in good agreement with the benchmark solution. The WBCK model is less accurate than SNBCK or FSCK. Considering the three formulations of the WBCK model, the multiple gases formulation is the best choice regarding the accuracy and computational cost. The WSGG model with the parameters of Bordbar et al. (2014) [20] is the most accurate of the three investigated WSGG models. Use of the gray WSSG formulation leads to significant deviations from the benchmark data and should not be applied to predict radiation heat transfer in oxy-fuel combustion systems. A best practice to incorporate the state-of-the-art gas radiation models for high accuracy of radiation heat transfer calculations at minimal increase in computational cost in CFD simulation of oxy-fuel combustion systems for pressure path lengths up to about 10 bar m is suggested.

  1. Laboratory Modeling of Aspects of Large Fires,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-30

    7 -7 g~L AD-A153 152 DNA-TR- 84-18 LABORATORY MODELING OF ASPECTS OF LARGE FIRES G.F. Carrier "URARY F.E. Fendell b DVSO R.D. Fleeter N. Got L.M...I1I TITLE (include Socurty Olassihicarion) LABORATORY MODELING OF ASPECTS OF LARGE FIRES 12. PERSONAL AUrHoR(S G.F. Carrier F.E. Fendell R.D. Fleeter N...Motorbuch Verlag.___ Caidin, M. (1960). A Torch to the Enemy: the Fire Raid on Tokyo. New York, NY: Ballantine. Carrier, G. F., Fendell , F. E., and

  2. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines-Experimental Results for an Advanced, Low-Emissions Combustor Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.; Kopasakis, George; Saus, Joseph R.; Chang, Clarence T.; Wey, Changlie

    2012-01-01

    Lean combustion concepts for aircraft engine combustors are prone to combustion instabilities. Mitigation of instabilities is an enabling technology for these low-emissions combustors. NASA Glenn Research Center s prior activity has demonstrated active control to suppress a high-frequency combustion instability in a combustor rig designed to emulate an actual aircraft engine instability experience with a conventional, rich-front-end combustor. The current effort is developing further understanding of the problem specifically as applied to future lean-burning, very low-emissions combustors. A prototype advanced, low-emissions aircraft engine combustor with a combustion instability has been identified and previous work has characterized the dynamic behavior of that combustor prototype. The combustor exhibits thermoacoustic instabilities that are related to increasing fuel flow and that potentially prevent full-power operation. A simplified, non-linear oscillator model and a more physics-based sectored 1-D dynamic model have been developed to capture the combustor prototype s instability behavior. Utilizing these models, the NASA Adaptive Sliding Phasor Average Control (ASPAC) instability control method has been updated for the low-emissions combustor prototype. Active combustion instability suppression using the ASPAC control method has been demonstrated experimentally with this combustor prototype in a NASA combustion test cell operating at engine pressures, temperatures, and flows. A high-frequency fuel valve was utilized to perturb the combustor fuel flow. Successful instability suppression was shown using a dynamic pressure sensor in the combustor for controller feedback. Instability control was also shown with a pressure feedback sensor in the lower temperature region upstream of the combustor. It was also demonstrated that the controller can prevent the instability from occurring while combustor operation was transitioning from a stable, low-power condition to

  3. Computer simulation of an advanced combustor for clean coal technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation is a clean coal technology because of its higher thermal efficiency and lower pollutant emission. Argonne National Laboratory used a comprehensive integral combustion computer code to aid the development of a TRW's second stage combustor for MHD power generation. The integral combustion code is a computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, steady state, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for multiple gas species and solid particles of variable sizes. In the MHD second stage combustor, opposed jets of oxidizer are injected into a confined cross-stream coal gas flow laden with seed particles. The performance of the downstream MHD power generation channel depends mainly on the degree and the uniformity of gas ionization, which, in turn, depends on the uniformity of temperature and seed vapor distributions leaving the combustor. The simulation provides in-depth information of flow, combustion, and heat transfer patterns in the combustor, which is used to predict ranges of combustor operating conditions for optimum performance of the MHD system.

  4. Computer simulation of an advanced combustor for clean coal technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.

    1992-09-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation is a clean coal technology because of its higher thermal efficiency and lower pollutant emission. Argonne National Laboratory used a comprehensive integral combustion computer code to aid the development of a TRW`s second stage combustor for MHD power generation. The integral combustion code is a computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, steady state, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for multiple gas species and solid particles of variable sizes. In the MHD second stage combustor, opposed jets of oxidizer are injected into a confined cross-stream coal gas flow laden with seed particles. The performance of the downstream MHD power generation channel depends mainly on the degree and the uniformity of gas ionization, which, in turn, depends on the uniformity of temperature and seed vapor distributions leaving the combustor. The simulation provides in-depth information of flow, combustion, and heat transfer patterns in the combustor, which is used to predict ranges of combustor operating conditions for optimum performance of the MHD system.

  5. Laboratory constraints on models of earthquake recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Nicholas M.; Tullis, Terry; Junger, Jenni; Kilgore, Brian D.; Goldsby, David L.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, rock friction ‘stick-slip’ experiments are used to develop constraints on models of earthquake recurrence. Constant-rate loading of bare rock surfaces in high quality experiments produces stick-slip recurrence that is periodic at least to second order. When the loading rate is varied, recurrence is approximately inversely proportional to loading rate. These laboratory events initiate due to a slip rate-dependent process that also determines the size of the stress drop [Dieterich, 1979; Ruina, 1983] and as a consequence, stress drop varies weakly but systematically with loading rate [e.g., Gu and Wong, 1991; Karner and Marone, 2000; McLaskey et al., 2012]. This is especially evident in experiments where the loading rate is changed by orders of magnitude, as is thought to be the loading condition of naturally occurring, small repeating earthquakes driven by afterslip, or low-frequency earthquakes loaded by episodic slip. As follows from the previous studies referred to above, experimentally observed stress drops are well described by a logarithmic dependence on recurrence interval that can be cast as a non-linear slip-predictable model. The fault’s rate dependence of strength is the key physical parameter. Additionally, even at constant loading rate the most reproducible laboratory recurrence is not exactly periodic, unlike existing friction recurrence models. We present example laboratory catalogs that document the variance and show that in large catalogs, even at constant loading rate, stress drop and recurrence co-vary systematically. The origin of this covariance is largely consistent with variability of the dependence of fault strength on slip rate. Laboratory catalogs show aspects of both slip and time predictability and successive stress drops are strongly correlated indicating a ‘memory’ of prior slip history that extends over at least one recurrence cycle.

  6. Laboratory animal models for esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya Venugopalan Nair

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of esophageal cancer is rapidly increasing especially in developing countries. The major risk factors include unhealthy lifestyle practices such as alcohol consumption, smoking, and chewing tobacco to name a few. Diagnosis at an advanced stage and poor prognosis make esophageal cancer one of the most lethal diseases. These factors have urged further research in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. Animal models not only aid in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of esophageal cancer but also help in developing therapeutic interventions for the disease. This review throws light on the various recent laboratory animal models for esophageal cancer.

  7. Analysis of combustion efficiency in CFB coal combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afsin Gungor [Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey). Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture

    2008-06-15

    Fluidized bed technology is well known for its high combustion efficiency and is widely used in coal combustion. In this study, the combustor efficiency has been defined and investigated for CFB coal combustor based on the losses using a dynamic 2D model. The model is shown to agree well with the published data. The effect of operating parameters such as excess air ratio, bed operational velocity, coal particle diameter and combustor load and the effect of design variables such as bed height and bed diameter on the mean bed temperature, the overall CO emission and the combustion efficiency are analyzed for the small-scale of CFBC in the presently developed model. As a result of this analysis, it is observed that the combustion efficiency decreases with increasing excess air value. The combustion efficiency increases with the bed operational velocity. Increasing coal particle size results in higher combustion efficiency values. The coal feed rate has negative effect on the combustion efficiency. The combustor efficiency considerably increases with increasing combustor height and diameter if other parameters are kept unchanged. 46 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Micro-mixer/combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad Ahmad

    2014-09-18

    A micro-mixer/combustor to mix fuel and oxidant streams into combustible mixtures where flames resulting from combustion of the mixture can be sustained inside its combustion chamber is provided. The present design is particularly suitable for diffusion flames. In various aspects the present design mixes the fuel and oxidant streams prior to entering a combustion chamber. The combustion chamber is designed to prevent excess pressure to build up within the combustion chamber, which build up can cause instabilities in the flame. A restriction in the inlet to the combustion chamber from the mixing chamber forces the incoming streams to converge while introducing minor pressure drop. In one or more aspects, heat from combustion products exhausted from the combustion chamber may be used to provide heat to at least one of fuel passing through the fuel inlet channel, oxidant passing through the oxidant inlet channel, the mixing chamber, or the combustion chamber. In one or more aspects, an ignition strip may be positioned in the combustion chamber to sustain a flame without preheating.

  9. CFD Evaluation of a 3rd Generation LDI Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Mongia, Hukam; Lee, Phil

    2017-01-01

    An effort was undertaken to perform CFD analysis of fluid flow in Lean-Direct Injection (LDI) combustors with axial swirl-venturi elements for next-generation LDI-3 combustor design. The National Combustion Code (NCC) was used to perform non-reacting and two-phase reacting flow computations for a nineteen-element injector array arranged in a three-module, 7-5-7 element configuration. All computations were performed with a consistent approach of mesh-optimization, spray-modeling, ignition and kinetics-modeling with the NCC. Computational predictions of the aerodynamics of the injector were used to arrive at an optimal injector design that meets effective area and fuel-air mixing criteria. LDI-3 emissions (EINOx, EICO and UHC) were compared with the previous generation LDI-2 combustor experimental data at representative engine cycle conditions.

  10. Methanol tailgas combustor control method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart-Predmore, David J.; Pettit, William H.

    2002-01-01

    A method for controlling the power and temperature and fuel source of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to supply heat to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual fuel inlet streams including a first fuel stream, and a second fuel stream of anode effluent from the fuel cell and reformate from the fuel processor. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is determined by regulating the amount of the first and/or second fuel streams and the quantity of the first air flow stream to support fuel processor power requirements.

  11. Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) cleanroom process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Scott; Basili, Victor; Godfrey, Sally; Mcgarry, Frank; Pajerski, Rose; Waligora, Sharon

    1991-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) cleanroom process model is described. The term 'cleanroom' originates in the integrated circuit (IC) production process, where IC's are assembled in dust free 'clean rooms' to prevent the destructive effects of dust. When applying the clean room methodology to the development of software systems, the primary focus is on software defect prevention rather than defect removal. The model is based on data and analysis from previous cleanroom efforts within the SEL and is tailored to serve as a guideline in applying the methodology to future production software efforts. The phases that are part of the process model life cycle from the delivery of requirements to the start of acceptance testing are described. For each defined phase, a set of specific activities is discussed, and the appropriate data flow is described. Pertinent managerial issues, key similarities and differences between the SEL's cleanroom process model and the standard development approach used on SEL projects, and significant lessons learned from prior cleanroom projects are presented. It is intended that the process model described here will be further tailored as additional SEL cleanroom projects are analyzed.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Static Tested Ramjet Dump Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Afroz; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-06-01

    The flow field of a Liquid Fuel Ram Jet engine side dump combustor with kerosene fuel is numerically simulated using commercial CFD code CFX-11. Reynolds Averaged 3-D Navier-Stokes equations are solved alongwith SST turbulence model. Single step infinitely fast reaction is assumed for kerosene combustion. The combustion efficiency is evaluated in terms of the unburnt kerosene vapour leaving the combustor. The comparison of measured pressures with computed values show that the computation underpredicts (~5 %) pressures for non reacting cases but overpredicts (9-7 %) for reacting cases.

  13. Development of a new method for improving load turndown in fluidized bed combustors: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.

    1988-12-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate a new concept in fluidized bed design that improves load turndown capability. This improvement is accomplished by independently controlling heat transfer and combustion in the combustor. The design consists of two fluidized beds, one central and one annular. The central bed serves as the combustion bed. The annular bed is fluidized separately from the combustion bed and its level of fluidization determine the overall heat transfer rate from the combustion bed to the surrounding water jacket. Early theoretical considerations suggested a load turndown exceeding ten was possible for this design. This research consisted of three major phases: development of a computational model to predict heat transfer in the two-bed combustor, heat transfer measurements in hot-and-cold flow models of the combustor, and combustion tests in an optimally designed combustor. The computation model was useful in selecting the design of the combustor. Annular bed width and particle sizes were chosen with the aid of the model. The heat transfer tests were performed to determine if the existing correlations for fluidized bed heat transfer coefficients were sufficiently accurate for high aspect ratio fluidized beds (such as the annular bed in the combustor). Combustion tests were performed in an optimally designed combustor. Three fuel forms were used: double screened, crushed coal, coal-water-limestone mixtures (CWLM), and coal-limestone briquettes. 18 refs., 30 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Rotating, hydromagnetic laboratory experiment modelling planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Douglas H.

    2009-10-01

    This dissertation describes a series of laboratory experiments motivated by planetary cores and the dynamo effect, the mechanism by which the flow of an electrically conductive fluid can give rise to a spontaneous magnetic field. Our experimental apparatus, meant to be a laboratory model of Earth's core, contains liquid sodium between an inner, solid sphere and an outer, spherical shell. The fluid is driven by the differential rotation of these two boundaries, each of which is connected to a motor. Applying an axial, DC magnetic field, we use a collection of Hall probes to measure the magnetic induction that results from interactions between the applied field and the flowing, conductive fluid. We have observed and identified inertial modes, which are bulk oscillations of the fluid restored by the Coriolis force. Over-reflection at a shear layer is one mechanism capable of exciting such modes, and we have developed predictions of both onset boundaries and mode selection from over-reflection theory which are consistent with our observations. Also, motivated by previous experimental devices that used ferromagnetic boundaries to achieve dynamo action, we have studied the effects of a soft iron (ferromagnetic) inner sphere on our apparatus, again finding inertial waves. We also find that all behaviors are more broadband and generally more nonlinear in the presence of a ferromagnetic boundary. Our results with a soft iron inner sphere have implications for other hydromagnetic experiments with ferromagnetic boundaries, and are appropriate for comparison to numerical simulations as well. From our observations we conclude that inertial modes almost certainly occur in planetary cores and will occur in future rotating experiments. In fact, the predominance of inertial modes in our experiments and in other recent work leads to a new paradigm for rotating turbulence, starkly different from turbulence theories based on assumptions of isotropy and homogeneity, starting instead

  15. Aviation Shipboard Operations Modeling and Simulation (ASOMS) Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:It is the mission of the Aviation Shipboard Operations Modeling and Simulation (ASOMS) Laboratory to provide a means by which to virtually duplicate products...

  16. A professional development model for medical laboratory scientists working in the microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerson, Megan H; Pulido, Lila; Garza, Melinda N; Ali, Faheem A; Greenhill, Brandy; Einspahr, Christopher L; Yarsa, Joseph; Sood, Pramilla K; Hu, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine is committed to providing the best pathology and medicine through: state-of-the art techniques, progressive ground-breaking research, education and training for the clinical diagnosis and research of cancer and related diseases. After surveying the laboratory staff and other hospital professionals, the Department administrators and Human Resource generalists developed a professional development model for Microbiology to support laboratory skills, behavior, certification, and continual education within its staff. This model sets high standards for the laboratory professionals to allow the labs to work at their fullest potential; it provides organization to training technologists based on complete laboratory needs instead of training technologists in individual areas in which more training is required if the laboratory needs them to work in other areas. This model is a working example for all microbiology based laboratories who want to set high standards and want their staff to be acknowledged for demonstrated excellence and professional development in the laboratory. The PDM model is designed to focus on the needs of the laboratory as well as the laboratory professionals.

  17. The total laboratory solution: a new laboratory E-business model based on a vertical laboratory meta-network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B A

    2001-08-01

    Major forces are now reshaping all businesses on a global basis, including the healthcare and clinical laboratory industries. One of the major forces at work is information technology (IT), which now provides the opportunity to create a new economic and business model for the clinical laboratory industry based on the creation of an integrated vertical meta-network, referred to here as the "total laboratory solution" (TLS). Participants at the most basic level of such a network would include a hospital-based laboratory, a reference laboratory, a laboratory information system/application service provider/laboratory portal vendor, an in vitro diagnostic manufacturer, and a pharmaceutical/biotechnology manufacturer. It is suggested that each of these participants would add value to the network primarily in its area of core competency. Subvariants of such a network have evolved over recent years, but a TLS comprising all or most of these participants does not exist at this time. Although the TLS, enabled by IT and closely akin to the various e-businesses that are now taking shape, offers many advantages from a theoretical perspective over the current laboratory business model, its success will depend largely on (a) market forces, (b) how the collaborative networks are organized and managed, and (c) whether the network can offer healthcare organizations higher quality testing services at lower cost. If the concept is successful, new demands will be placed on hospital-based laboratory professionals to shift the range of professional services that they offer toward clinical consulting, integration of laboratory information from multiple sources, and laboratory information management. These information management and integration tasks can only increase in complexity in the future as new genomic and proteomics testing modalities are developed and come on-line in clinical laboratories.

  18. A professional development model for medical laboratory scientists working in the immunohematology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Melinda N; Pulido, Lila A; Amerson, Megan; Ali, Faheem A; Greenhill, Brandy A; Griffin, Gary; Alvarez, Enrique; Whatley, Marsha; Hu, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion medicine, a section of the Department of Laboratory Medicine at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is committed to the education and advancement of its health care professionals. It is our belief that giving medical laboratory professionals a path for advancement leads to excellence and increases overall professionalism in the Immunohematology Laboratory. As a result of this strong commitment to excellence and professionalism, the Immunohematology laboratory has instituted a Professional Development Model (PDM) that aims to create Medical Laboratory Scientists (MLS) that are not only more knowledgeable, but are continually striving for excellence. In addition, these MLS are poised for advancement in their careers. The professional development model consists of four levels: Discovery, Application, Maturation, and Expert. The model was formulated to serve as a detailed path to the mastery of all process and methods in the Immunohematology Laboratory. Each level in the professional development model consists of tasks that optimize the laboratory workflow and allow for concurrent training. Completion of a level in the PDM is rewarded with financial incentive and further advancement in the field. The PDM for Medical Laboratory Scientists in the Immunohematology Laboratory fosters personal development, rewards growth and competency, and sets high standards for all services and skills provided. This model is a vital component of the Immunohematology Laboratory and aims to ensure the highest quality of care and standards in their testing. It is because of the success of this model and the robustness of its content that we hope other medical laboratories aim to reach the same level of excellence and professionalism, and adapt this model into their own environment.

  19. Ignition and Flame Stabilization of a Strut-Jet RBCC Combustor with Small Rocket Exhaust

    OpenAIRE

    Jichao Hu; Juntao Chang; Wen Bao

    2014-01-01

    A Rocket Based Combined Cycle combustor model is tested at a ground direct connected rig to investigate the flame holding characteristics with a small rocket exhaust using liquid kerosene. The total temperature and the Mach number of the vitiated air flow, at exit of the nozzle are 1505 K and 2.6, respectively. The rocket base is embedded in a fuel injecting strut and mounted in the center of the combustor. The wall of the combustor is flush, without any reward step or cavity, so the strut-je...

  20. CFD predictions of LBO limits for aero-engine combustors using fuel iterative approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Bin; Huang Yong; Wang Fang; Xie Fa

    2013-01-01

    Lean blow-out (LBO) is critical to operational performance of combustion systems in propulsion and power generation.Current predictive tools for LBO limits are based on decadesold empirical correlations that have limited applicability for modern combustor designs.According to the Lefebvre's model for LBO and classical perfect stirred reactor (PSR) concept,a load parameter (LP) is proposed for LBO analysis of aero-engine combustors in this paper.The parameters contained in load parameter are all estimated from the non-reacting flow field of a combustor that is obtained by numerical simulation.Additionally,based on the load parameter,a method of fuel iterative approximation (FIA) is proposed to predict the LBO limit of the combustor.Compared with experimental data for 19 combustors,it is found that load parameter can represent the actual combustion load of the combustor near LBO and have good relativity with LBO fuel/air ratio (FAR).The LBO FAR obtained by FIA shows good agreement with experimental data,the maximum prediction uncertainty of FIA is about ± 17.5%.Because only the non-reacting flow is simulated,the time cost of the LBO limit prediction using FIA is relatively low (about 6 h for one combustor with computer equipment of CPU 2.66 GHz × 4 and 4 GB memory),showing that FIA is reliable and efficient to be used for practical applications.

  1. Alternate-Fueled Combustor-Sector Performance: Part A: Combustor Performance Part B: Combustor Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouse, D. T.; Neuroth, C.; Henricks, R. C.; Lynch, A.; Frayne, C.; Stutrud, J. S.; Corporan, E.; Hankins, T.

    2010-01-01

    Alternate aviation fuels for military or commercial use are required to satisfy MIL-DTL-83133F(2008) or ASTM D 7566 (2010) standards, respectively, and are classified as drop-in fuel replacements. To satisfy legacy issues, blends to 50% alternate fuel with petroleum fuels are certified individually on the basis of feedstock. Adherence to alternate fuels and fuel blends requires smart fueling systems or advanced fuel-flexible systems, including combustors and engines without significant sacrifice in performance or emissions requirements. This paper provides preliminary performance (Part A) and emissions and particulates (Part B) combustor sector data for synthetic-parafinic-kerosene- (SPK-) type fuel and blends with JP-8+100 relative to JP-8+100 as baseline fueling.

  2. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  3. Combustion analysis for flame stability predictions at ground level and altitude in aviation gas turbine engines with low emissions combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, Tomas

    Low emissions combustors operating with low fuel/air ratios may have challenges with flame stability. As combustion is made leaner in the primary zone, the flame can lose its stability, resulting in operability problems such as relight, flameout or cold starting. This thesis analyzes combustion processes for the prediction of flame stability in low emissions combustors. A detailed review of the literature on flame stability was conducted and main approaches in flame stability modelling were indicated. Three flame stability models were proposed (Characteristic Time, Loading Parameter, and Combustion Efficiency models) and developed into a unique Preliminary Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization (PMDO) tool. Results were validated with a database of experimental combustor test data and showed that flame stability can be predicted for an arbitrary shape of combustors running at any operational conditions including ground and altitude situations with various jet fuels and nozzles. In conclusion, flame stability can be predicted for newly designed low emission combustors.

  4. 湍流燃烧模型对某燃气轮机燃烧室性能计算的影响%Effects of Turbulence Combustion Models on Performance of the Gas Turbine Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张智博; 郑洪涛; 赵煜

    2013-01-01

    针对某型燃气轮机环形燃烧室,通过数值模拟,对比分析了Standard k ε、RNG k ε、Realizable k ε、Standard k ω、雷诺应力五种湍流模型以及简单概率密度模型(PDF)、有限速率模型、涡耗散模型(ED)、涡耗散概念模型( EDC)四种燃烧模型对环形燃烧室性能计算的影响。结果表明:Realizable k ε模型模拟的冷态流场与PIV试验测量结果最符合;EDC模型最能合理的模拟燃烧效果,但在预测NOx排放时不如有限速率模型精确。以上结论为后续该型号燃气轮机环形燃烧室的数值计算和设计提供了参考。%For a certain annular combustor of gas turbine , numerical simulation method was used to investigate the effects of different turbulence combustion models such as Standard k-ε、RNG k-ε、Realizable k-ε、Standard k-ω、RSM models and PDF、finite-rate、ED and EDC models .The results show that cold flow field used realize k-ε model is in agreement with corresponding PIV experimental data . And EDC model can obtain the most reasonable combustion effect .The conclusions of this paper can provide a theory guide for combus-tor design and performance prediction .

  5. Flow Through a Laboratory Sediment Sample by Computer Simulation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-07

    Flow through a laboratory sediment sample by computer simulation modeling R.B. Pandeya’b*, Allen H. Reeda, Edward Braithwaitea, Ray Seyfarth0, J.F...through a laboratory sediment sample by computer simulation modeling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  6. Experimental investigation and mathematical modelling of the combustion of brown coal, refuse and mixed fuels in a circulating fluidized bed combustor; Experimentelle Untersuchung und mathematische Modellierung der Verbrennung von Braunkohle, Abfallstoffen und Mischbrennstoffen in einer zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtfeuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, W.; Brunne, T.; Hiller, A. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik; Albrecht, J. [Lurgi Umwelt GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Quang, N. [Polytechnic Inst., Danang (Viet Nam)

    1998-09-01

    Extensive experiments on combustion of biological materials and residues in fluidized bed combustors and dust combustors have been carried out at the Department of Power Plant Engineering of Dresden University since the early nineties. Particular interest was taken in mixing brown coal with sewage sludge, sugar pulp and waste wood. The experiments were supplemented by modelling in a research project funded jointly by the BMBF and Messrs. Lurgi since early 1997. A combustion cell model designed by Siegen University is being modified for the new mixed fuels, and preliminary investigations were carried out on a batch reactor while the modelling work was continued. (orig.) [Deutsch] An dem Lehrstuhl fuer Kraftwerkstechnik der TU Dresden werden seit Anfang der 90-iger Jahre umfangreiche experimentelle Untersuchungen zur Verbrennung von Bio- und Reststoffen in Wirbelschicht- und Staubfeuerungen durchgefuehrt. Dabei war vor allem die Zufeuerung dieser Stoffe in Waermeerzeugeranlagen auf Braunkohlenbasis von besonderem Interesse. Experimentell konnte nachgewiesen werden, dass sowohl Biobrennstoffe als auch Abfaelle in zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtfeuerungen umweltschonend zur Waermeerzeugung eingesetzt werden koennen. Als Beispiel wird das an Hand von Braunkohle-Klaerschlammgemischen sowie Bagasse- und Holz-Braunkohlegemischen gezeigt. Neben den experimentellen Untersuchungen bietet die Modellierung der Verbrennungsvorgaenge ein geeignetes Mittel um Voraussagen zu anderen Mischungsanteilen sowie anderen geometrischen Abmessungen machen zu koennen. Seit Anfang 1997 wird dazu ein vom BMBF und der Firma Lurgi gefoerdertes Forschungsvorhaben bearbeitet. Ein von der Universitaet Gesamthochschule Siegen fuer die Braunkohleverbrennung konzipiertes Zellenmodell wird auf die neuen Brennstoffgemische erweitert. Da grundsaetzlich andere Stoffzusammensetzungen vorliegen, wurden an einem Batch-Reaktor Voruntersuchungen zum Pyrolyseverhalten der Brennstoffe durchgefuehrt. Erste

  7. Induction time effects in pulse combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J B; Marcus, D L; Pember, R B

    1999-04-09

    Combustion systems that take advantage of a periodic combustion process have many advantages over conventional systems. Their rate of heat transfer is greatly enhanced and their pollutant emissions are lower. They draw in their own supply of fuel and air and they are self-venting. They have few moving parts. The most common type of pulse combustor is based on a Helmholtz resonator - a burning cycle drives a resonant pressure wave, which in turn enhances the rate of combustion, resulting in a self-sustaining, large-scale oscillation. Although the basic physical mechanisms controlling such a process were explained by Rayleigh over a century ago, a full understanding of the operation of a pulse combustor still does not exist. The dominant processes in such a system--combustion, turbulent fluid dynamics, acoustics--are highly coupled and interact nonlinearly, which has reduced the design process to a costly and inefficient trial-and-error procedure. Several recent numerical and experimental studies, however, have been focused towards a better understanding of the basic underlying physics. Barr et al. [l] have elucidated the relative roles of the time scales governing the energy release, the turbulent mixing, and the acoustics. Keller et al. [5] have demonstrated the importance of the phase relation between the resonant pressure field in the tailpipe and the periodic energy release. Marcus et al. [6] have developed the capability for a fully three-dimensional simulation of the reacting flow in a pulse combustor. This paper is an application of that methodology to a detailed investigation of the frequency response of the model to changes in the chemical kinetics. The methodology consists of a fully conservative second-order Godunov algorithm for the inviscid, reacting gas dynamics equations coupled to an adaptive mesh refinement procedure[2]. The axisymmetric and three-dimensional simulations allow us to explore in detail the interaction between the transient fluid

  8. Non-reacting Flow Analysis from Combustor Inlet to Outlet using Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ananda Reddy

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes non-reacting flow analysis of a gas turbine combustion system. The method is based on the solution of Navier-Strokes equations using generalised non-orthogonal coordinate system. The turbulence effects are modelled through the renormalisation group k-E model. The method has been applied to a practical gas turbine combustor. The combustionsystem includes swirler vane passages, fuel nozzles, rotor bleed, customer bleed, air-blast atomiser, swirl cone, and all holes in primary , dilution , dome, flare, and cooling ring. Thetotal geometry has been created using the pre-processors GAMBIT and CATIA, and the meshing has been done using GAMBIT, and the analysis carried out in a FLUENT solver. The interaction between the diffuser and the combustor external flows plays a key role in controlling the pressure loss, air flow distribution around the combustor liner, durability, and stability. The aero gas turbine combustor designs are generally guided by experimental methods and past experience; however, experimental methods are inherently slow, costly, especially at hightemperature engine-operating conditions. These drawbacks and the growing need to understand the complex flow-field phenomenon involved, have led to the development of a numericalmodel for predicting flow in the gas turbine combustor. These models are used to optimise the design of the combustor and its subcomponents, and reduce cost, time, and the number ofexperiments.

  9. A chemical reactor network for oxides of nitrogen emission prediction in gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nguyen Thanh

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the use of a new chemical reactor network (CRN) model and non-uniform injectors to predict the NOx emission pollutant in gas turbine combustor. The CRN uses information from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) combustion analysis with two injectors of CH4-air mixture. The injectors of CH4-air mixture have different lean equivalence ratio, and they control fuel flow to stabilize combustion and adjust combustor's equivalence ratio. Non-uniform injector is applied to improve the burning process of the turbine combustor. The results of the new CRN for NOx prediction in the gas turbine combustor show very good agreement with the experimental data from Korea Electric Power Research Institute.

  10. Heat transport and parametric simulation of a porous ceramic combustor in a gas turbine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei David

    2002-09-01

    This study is to generate basic knowledge of heat transport inside a porous ceramic combustor in a gas turbine combustion environment. This work predicts the peak temperature inside the porous ceramic combustor, which directly affects the combustor life cycle and flame stability characteristics within the ceramic media. The results will help to generate an operating window for the stable operation of the porous ceramic combustor under the operating conditions of a gas turbine. A theoretical model is developed to study the operational characteristics of the combustor. The model used here accounts for both radiative and convective thermal transport between the solid and gas phases. The solid is assumed to absorb, emit, and scatter radiative energy. A one-step global reaction mechanism is used to model the released energy due to combustion. The effects of the properties of the porous material on gas and solid phase temperature distribution, radiative flux distribution, and flame location (as indicated by local temperature) were investigated. The results confirm that radiative heat transfer is a key mechanism in the stable operation of the combustor. For proper functioning of the combustor, the temperature of the porous material (the solid temperature) must be lowered in order to maintain material and structural integrity. Yet, the gas phase temperature has to be high enough so that a stable combustion process can be maintained. A lower value for the porous material temperature of the combustor can be obtained by enhancing the radiative output from the combustor to the downstream sections. This can be achieved by choosing optimized values of porosity and other properties of the porous ceramic matrix. Higher solid phase thermal conductivity enhances the radiative output from the combustor and helps to reduce the porous material's temperature. It is also desirable that the porous layer has an optimized optical thickness so that the radiative output of the combustor is

  11. An Early Childhood Movement Laboratory Model: Kindergym

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Rip

    2004-01-01

    Early childhood motor activity programs at institutions of higher learning can operate within the tripartite mission of the university while serving a vital function in providing leadership and guidance to educators. This article describes the University of Northern Iowa's Kindergym model. Within this model, curricular areas of games/sports,…

  12. Evaluation of Durable Metallic Supports for Catalytic Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, BA

    2003-10-08

    In 2000, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Catalytica Energy Systems Incorporated (CESI) to determine the properties of current metallic catalyst supports and examine new candidate alloys for this application. A team was established at ORNL to examine oxidation-limited lifetime of these thin-walled metallic components using standard lifetime models and to measure the mechanical properties of the foils (40-200:m in thickness) which can differ substantially from bulk properties. Oxidation experiments were conducted on foil specimens at 700-1100 C in laboratory air and in air with 10 vol.% water vapor to better simulate the combustor environment. At the higher test temperatures, time to oxidation-induced (i.e. breakaway oxidation) failure was determined in 1h cycles in order to verify predictions from a standard reservoir-type oxidation lifetime model. Selected specimens were run for >10,000h in 100 or 500h cycles at lower test temperatures in order to determine the oxidation kinetics for the model. The creep properties of selected foils were measured for 4,000-8,000h at operation-relevant stresses and temperatures. None of the new candidate alloys significantly out-performed currently used alloys in laboratory testing, particularly in oxidation lifetime testing. Therefore, engine testing was not performed on any of the new candidate alloys. Both the oxidation- and creep-resistance of FeCrAl alloys was greater than expected and the results of the CRADA allowed CESI to extend life or increase operating temperatures for these lower cost substrate alloys in the next generation of catalyst modules. Three work areas were defined for the CRADA. The first area was investigating the oxidation behavior of current and candidate alloy foils. The goal was to obtain data such as the oxidation rate as a function of temperature and environment, the time to breakaway oxidation at high test

  13. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: LABORATORY MODELS OF THE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Orlovskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The  establishment and  application of animal  models  represent effective  tools  for  research  in rheumatoid arthritis (RA pathogenesis. Animal models that replicate various mechanisms reflecting all aspects of RA, including early RA pathology, have provided important insights into studying etiology and pathogenetic mechanisms of RA in humans. This review article was compiled in order to give an introduction to the current state of RA models.  Application of these  experimental disorders  for testing  potential therapeutic approaches will help to make better predictions for drug efficiency in human RA

  14. Laboratory models of Hawaiian and Strombolian eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaupart, Claude; Vergniolle, Sylvie

    1988-01-01

    Basaltic eruptions are often characterized by cyclic changes of activity. At Hawaii, periods of continuous fountaining alternate with much longer periods of effusive outflow1,2. In Strombolian eruptions, activity proceeds through intermittent discrete bursts2-5. We report laboratory experiments that simulate the degassing process in basaltic eruptions. Gas bubbles are generated at the bottom of a tank filled with viscous liquid and topped by a small open conduit. The bubbles rise and accumulate at the roof in a foam layer whose thickness increases. At a critical thickness the bubbles coalesce and the foam collapses, generating gas pockets whose size depends on liquid viscosity and surface tension. At low viscosity a single large gas pocket is formed, which flows into the conduit. This erupts in an annular flow configuration where a central jet expels the liquid films that wet the conduit walls6. At higher viscosity many smaller pockets are formed, which rise as slugs and burst out intermittently at the vent. The experiments imply that the presence of constrictions in the chamber and conduits plays a major role in determining eruption behaviour.

  15. Modeling human influenza infection in the laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radigan KA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn A Radigan,1 Alexander V Misharin,2 Monica Chi,1 GR Scott Budinger11Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, 2Division of Rheumatology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Influenza is the leading cause of death from an infectious cause. Because of its clinical importance, many investigators use animal models to understand the biologic mechanisms of influenza A virus replication, the immune response to the virus, and the efficacy of novel therapies. This review will focus on the biosafety, biosecurity, and ethical concerns that must be considered in pursuing influenza research, in addition to focusing on the two animal models – mice and ferrets – most frequently used by researchers as models of human influenza infection.Keywords: mice, ferret, influenza, animal model, biosafety

  16. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thy, P.; Jenkins, B.M.; Williams, R.B.; Lesher, C.E.; Bakker, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run durations

  17. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thy, Peter; Jenkins, Brian; Williams, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run...

  18. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thy, P.; Jenkins, B.M.; Williams, R.B.; Lesher, C.E.; Bakker, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run durations

  19. Alternate-Fueled Combustor-Sector Performance. Parts A and B; (A) Combustor Performance; (B) Combustor Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouse, D. T.; Hendricks, R. C.; Lynch, A.; Frayne, C. W.; Stutrud, J. S.; Corporan, E.; Hankins, T.

    2012-01-01

    Alternate aviation fuels for military or commercial use are required to satisfy MIL-DTL-83133F(2008) or ASTM D 7566 (2010) standards, respectively, and are classified as "drop-in" fuel replacements. To satisfy legacy issues, blends to 50% alternate fuel with petroleum fuels are certified individually on the basis of processing and assumed to be feedstock agnostic. Adherence to alternate fuels and fuel blends requires "smart fueling systems" or advanced fuel-flexible systems, including combustors and engines, without significant sacrifice in performance or emissions requirements. This paper provides preliminary performance (Part A) and emissions and particulates (Part B) combustor sector data. The data are for nominal inlet conditions at 225 psia and 800 F (1.551 MPa and 700 K), for synthetic-paraffinic-kerosene- (SPK-) type (Fisher-Tropsch (FT)) fuel and blends with JP-8+100 relative to JP-8+100 as baseline fueling. Assessments are made of the change in combustor efficiency, wall temperatures, emissions, and luminosity with SPK of 0%, 50%, and 100% fueling composition at 3% combustor pressure drop. The performance results (Part A) indicate no quantifiable differences in combustor efficiency, a general trend to lower liner and higher core flow temperatures with increased FT fuel blends. In general, emissions data (Part B) show little differences, but with percent increase in FT-SPK-type fueling, particulate emissions and wall temperatures are less than with baseline JP-8. High-speed photography illustrates both luminosity and combustor dynamic flame characteristics.

  20. TRW Advanced Slagging Coal Combustor Utility Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The TRW Advanced Slagging Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O R) Utility Corporation's Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/ou desip unit to fire 2.5 sulfur coal. The slogging combustor process will provide NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Envirommental Standards. TRW-CBU scope of work includes the engineering, design and supply of the slogging combustors, coal and limestone feed systems and a control system for these components. During this report period, the design activities for all systems progressed to permit the release of specifications and requests for proposals. Award of contracts for long-delivery items and major equipment are being placed to meet the revised program schedule.

  1. Clinical laboratory as an economic model for business performance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljanović, Vikica; Patajac, Hrvoje; Petrovecki, Mladen

    2011-08-15

    To perform SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of a clinical laboratory as an economic model that may be used to improve business performance of laboratories by removing weaknesses, minimizing threats, and using external opportunities and internal strengths. Impact of possible threats to and weaknesses of the Clinical Laboratory at Našice General County Hospital business performance and use of strengths and opportunities to improve operating profit were simulated using models created on the basis of SWOT analysis results. The operating profit as a measure of profitability of the clinical laboratory was defined as total revenue minus total expenses and presented using a profit and loss account. Changes in the input parameters in the profit and loss account for 2008 were determined using opportunities and potential threats, and economic sensitivity analysis was made by using changes in the key parameters. The profit and loss account and economic sensitivity analysis were tools for quantifying the impact of changes in the revenues and expenses on the business operations of clinical laboratory. Results of simulation models showed that operational profit of €470 723 in 2008 could be reduced to only €21 542 if all possible threats became a reality and current weaknesses remained the same. Also, operational gain could be increased to €535 804 if laboratory strengths and opportunities were utilized. If both the opportunities and threats became a reality, the operational profit would decrease by €384 465. The operational profit of the clinical laboratory could be significantly reduced if all threats became a reality and the current weaknesses remained the same. The operational profit could be increased by utilizing strengths and opportunities as much as possible. This type of modeling may be used to monitor business operations of any clinical laboratory and improve its financial situation by implementing changes in the next fiscal

  2. Clinical laboratory as an economic model for business performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljanović, Vikica; Patajac, Hrvoje; Petrovečki, Mladen

    2011-01-01

    Aim To perform SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of a clinical laboratory as an economic model that may be used to improve business performance of laboratories by removing weaknesses, minimizing threats, and using external opportunities and internal strengths. Methods Impact of possible threats to and weaknesses of the Clinical Laboratory at Našice General County Hospital business performance and use of strengths and opportunities to improve operating profit were simulated using models created on the basis of SWOT analysis results. The operating profit as a measure of profitability of the clinical laboratory was defined as total revenue minus total expenses and presented using a profit and loss account. Changes in the input parameters in the profit and loss account for 2008 were determined using opportunities and potential threats, and economic sensitivity analysis was made by using changes in the key parameters. The profit and loss account and economic sensitivity analysis were tools for quantifying the impact of changes in the revenues and expenses on the business operations of clinical laboratory. Results Results of simulation models showed that operational profit of €470 723 in 2008 could be reduced to only €21 542 if all possible threats became a reality and current weaknesses remained the same. Also, operational gain could be increased to €535 804 if laboratory strengths and opportunities were utilized. If both the opportunities and threats became a reality, the operational profit would decrease by €384 465. Conclusion The operational profit of the clinical laboratory could be significantly reduced if all threats became a reality and the current weaknesses remained the same. The operational profit could be increased by utilizing strengths and opportunities as much as possible. This type of modeling may be used to monitor business operations of any clinical laboratory and improve its financial situation by

  3. Experimental study of entrainment phenomenon in a trapped vortex combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Rongchun; Fan Weijun

    2013-01-01

    Trapped vortex combustor (TVC) is an advanced low-pollution gas turbine combustor,with the adoption of staged combustion technique.To achieve low-pollutant emission and better combustion performance,the proportion of the air flow in each combustion zone should be precisely determined in the design of the combustor.Due to the presence of entrainment phenomenon,the total air flow in the cavity zone is difficult to estimate.To overcome the measurement difficulty,this study adopts the indirect measurement approach in the experimental research of entrainment phenomenon in the cavity.In accordance with the measurement principle,a TVC model fueled by methane is designed.Under two experimental conditions,i.e.with and without direct air intake in the cavity,the influence of the mainstream air flow velocity,the air intake velocity in the cavity,the height of inlet channel,the structure of holder and the structural proportion of the cavity on entrainment in the cavity is studied,respectively,through experiment at atmospheric temperature and pressure.The results suggest that the air flow velocity of mainstream,the air intake velocity of the cavity and the structure of the holder exert significant influence on the air entrainment,while the influence of structural proportion of the cavity is comparatively insignificant.The square root of momentum ratio of cavity air to mainstream air could be used to analyze the correlation of the entrainment data.

  4. Large eddy simulation of soot evolution in an aircraft combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael E.; Pitsch, Heinz

    2013-11-01

    An integrated kinetics-based Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach for soot evolution in turbulent reacting flows is applied to the simulation of a Pratt & Whitney aircraft gas turbine combustor, and the results are analyzed to provide insights into the complex interactions of the hydrodynamics, mixing, chemistry, and soot. The integrated approach includes detailed models for soot, combustion, and the unresolved interactions between soot, chemistry, and turbulence. The soot model is based on the Hybrid Method of Moments and detailed descriptions of soot aggregates and the various physical and chemical processes governing their evolution. The detailed kinetics of jet fuel oxidation and soot precursor formation is described with the Radiation Flamelet/Progress Variable model, which has been modified to account for the removal of soot precursors from the gas-phase. The unclosed filtered quantities in the soot and combustion models, such as source terms, are closed with a novel presumed subfilter PDF approach that accounts for the high subfilter spatial intermittency of soot. For the combustor simulation, the integrated approach is combined with a Lagrangian parcel method for the liquid spray and state-of-the-art unstructured LES technology for complex geometries. Two overall fuel-to-air ratios are simulated to evaluate the ability of the model to make not only absolute predictions but also quantitative predictions of trends. The Pratt & Whitney combustor is a Rich-Quench-Lean combustor in which combustion first occurs in a fuel-rich primary zone characterized by a large recirculation zone. Dilution air is then added downstream of the recirculation zone, and combustion continues in a fuel-lean secondary zone. The simulations show that large quantities of soot are formed in the fuel-rich recirculation zone, and, furthermore, the overall fuel-to-air ratio dictates both the dominant soot growth process and the location of maximum soot volume fraction. At the higher fuel

  5. PROCESS MODELLING OF ROCK SAMPLE HANDLING IN PETROPHYSICAL LABORATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adaleta Perković

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Everyday procedures carried out in petrophysical laboratory can be defined as a complete cycle of business processes. Sample handling process is one of the most significant and demanding procedures. It starts with sample receiving in laboratory and then subsequently, series of analyses and measurements are carrying out resulting in petrophysical parameters. Sample handling process ends with sample storage and archiving of obtained measurement data. Process model is used for description of repeating activities. Sample handling process is presented by graphical method and use of eEPC diagram (extended Event-Driven Process Chain which describe process based on events. Created process model jointly binds static laboratory resources (measuring instruments, computers and data, speeds up process with increasing the user’s efficiency and with improvements of data and information exchange. Besides flow of activity, model of data sample handling includes information about system components (laboratory equipment and software applications that carry out activities. Described model, with minor modifications and adaptations, can be used in any laboratory that is dealing with samples (the paper is published in Croatian.

  6. Realistic modeling of clinical laboratory operation by computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, W; Braun, S L; Hanssmann, F; Liebl, F; Berchtold, G; Blaschke, H; Eckert, M; Hoffmann, G E; Klose, S

    1994-06-01

    An important objective of laboratory management is to adjust the laboratory's capability to the needs of patients' care as well as economy. The consequences of management may be changes in laboratory organization, equipment, or personnel planning. At present only one's individual experience can be used for making such decisions. We have investigated whether the techniques of operations research could be transferred to a clinical laboratory and whether an adequate simulation model of the laboratory could be realized. First we listed and documented the system design and the process flow for each single laboratory request. These input data were linked by the simulation model (programming language SIMSCRIPT II.5). The output data (turnaround times, utilization rates, and analysis of queue length) were validated by comparison with the current performance data obtained by tracking specimen flow. Congruence of the data was excellent (within +/- 4%). In planning experiments we could study the consequences of changes in order entry, staffing, and equipment on turnaround times, utilization, and queue lengths. We conclude that simulation can be a valuable tool for better management decisions.

  7. Dental Biofilm and Laboratory Microbial Culture Models for Cariology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollie Yiru Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries form through a complex interaction over time among dental plaque, fermentable carbohydrate, and host factors (including teeth and saliva. As a key factor, dental plaque or biofilm substantially influence the characteristic of the carious lesions. Laboratory microbial culture models are often used because they provide a controllable and constant environment for cariology research. Moreover, they do not have ethical problems associated with clinical studies. The design of the microbial culture model varies from simple to sophisticated according to the purpose of the investigation. Each model is a compromise between the reality of the oral cavity and the simplification of the model. Researchers, however, can still obtain meaningful and useful results from the models they select. Laboratory microbial culture models can be categorized into a closed system and an open system. Models in the closed system have a finite supply of nutrients, and are also simple and cost-effective. Models in the open system enabled the supply of a fresh culture medium and the removal of metabolites and spent culture liquid simultaneously. They provide better regulation of the biofilm growth rate than the models in the closed system. This review paper gives an overview of the dental plaque biofilm and laboratory microbial culture models used for cariology research.

  8. Model Testing - Bringing the Ocean into the Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Hydrodynamic model testing, the principle of bringing the ocean into the laboratory to study the behaviour of the ocean itself and the response of man-made structures in the ocean in reduced scale, has been known for centuries. Due to an insufficient understanding of the physics involved, however......, the early model tests often gave incomplete or directly misleading results.This keynote lecture deals with some of the possibilities and problems within the field of hydrodynamic and hydraulic model testing....

  9. An Experimental Study on Axial Temperature Distribution of Combustion of Dewatered Poultry Sludge in Fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory scale bubbling fluidized bed combustor was designed and fabricated to study the combustion of dewatered poultry sludge at different operational parameters. This paper present a study on the influence of equivalent ratio, secondary to primary air ratio and the fuel feed rate on the temperature distribution along the combustor. The equivalent ratio has been changed between 0.8 to 1.4% under poultry sludge feed rate of 10 kg/h and from 0.8 to 1 under poultry sludge feed rate of 15 kg/h. The secondary to primary air ratio was varied from 0.1 to 0.5 at 0.65 m injection height and 1.25 equivalent ratio. The results showed that these factors had a significant influence on the combustion characteristics of poultry sludge. The temperature distribution along the combustor was found to be strongly dependent on the fuel feed rate and the equivalent ratio and it increased when these two factors increased. However, the secondary air ratio increased the temperature in the lower region of the combustor while no significant effect was observed at the upper region of the combustor. The results suggested that the poultry sludge can be used as a fuel with high thermal combustor efficiency.

  10. Low emissions combustor test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.J.; Hadley, M.S.; Norton, T.S.

    1993-12-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is in the process of constructing a low emissions combustor test and research (LECTR) facility designed to support the development of low emissions gas turbine combustion systems fired on natural gas and coal derived gaseous fuels containing fuel bound nitrogen. The LECTR facility is a major test station located within METC`s new combustion facility. The heart of this test station is a 60 centimeter (24 inch) diameter, refractory lined pressure vessel made up of a series of flanged modules. The facility design offers the flexibility to test a variety of low emissions combustion concepts at pressures up to 3 MPa (30 atm). Upon completion of fabrication and shake-down testing in January of 1994, the facility will be available for use by industrial and university partners through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) or through other cooperative arrangements. This paper is intended to describe the LECTR facility and associated operating parameter ranges and to inform interested parties of the facility availability.

  11. Dish stirling solar receiver combustor test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankston, C. P.; Back, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    The operational and energy transfer characteristics of the Dish Stirling Solar Receiver (DSSR) combustor/heat exchanger system was evaluated. The DSSR is designed to operate with fossil fuel augmentation utilizing a swirl combustor and cross flow heat exchanger consisting of a single row of 4 closely spaced tubes that are curved into a conical shape. The performance of the combustor/heat exchanger system without a Stirling engine was studied over a range of operating conditions and output levels using water as the working fluid. Results show that the combustor may be started under cold conditions, controlled safety, and operated at a constant air/fuel ratio (10 percent excess air) over the required range of firing rates. Furthermore, nondimensional heat transfer coefficients based on total heat transfer are plotted versus Reynolds number and compared with literature data taken for single rows of closely spaced tubes perpendicular to cross flow. The data show enhanced heat transfer for the present geometry and test conditions. Analysis of the results shows that the present system meets specified thermal requirements, thus verifying the feasibility of the DSSR combustor design for final prototype fabrication.

  12. Alternate-Fueled Combustor-Sector Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Anna E.; Saxena, Nikita T.; Shouse, Dale T.; Neuroth, Craig; Hendricks, Robert C.; Lynch, Amy; Frayne, Charles W.; Stutrud, Jeffrey S.; Corporan, Edwin; Hankins, Terry

    2013-01-01

    In order to realize alternative fueling for military and commercial use, the industry has set forth guidelines that must be met by each fuel. These aviation fueling requirements are outlined in MIL-DTL-83133F(2008) or ASTM D 7566 Annex (2011) standards, and are classified as "drop-in" fuel replacements. This report provides combustor performance data for synthetic-paraffinic-kerosene- (SPK-) type (Fischer-Tropsch (FT)) fuel and blends with JP-8+100, relative to JP-8+100 as baseline fueling. Data were taken at various nominal inlet conditions: 75 psia (0.52 MPa) at 500 degF (533 K), 125 psia (0.86 MPa) at 625 degF (603 K), 175 psia (1.21 MPa) at 725 degF (658 K), and 225 psia (1.55 MPa) at 790 degF (694 K). Combustor performance analysis assessments were made for the change in flame temperatures, combustor efficiency, wall temperatures, and exhaust plane temperatures at 3, 4, and 5 percent combustor pressure drop (DP) for fuel:air ratios (F/A) ranging from 0.010 to 0.025. Significant general trends show lower liner temperatures and higher flame and combustor outlet temperatures with increases in FT fueling relative to JP-8+100 fueling. The latter affects both turbine efficiency and blade and vane lives.

  13. Analysis of Regen Cooling in Rocket Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Merkle, C. L.; Li, D.; Sankaran, V.

    2004-01-01

    The use of detailed CFD modeling for the description of cooling in rocket chambers is discussed. The overall analysis includes a complete three-dimensional analysis of the flow in the regenerative cooling passages, conjugate heat transfer in the combustor walls, and the effects of film cooling on the inside chamber. The results in the present paper omit the effects of film cooling and include only regen cooling and the companion conjugate heat transfer. The hot combustion gases are replaced by a constant temperature wall boundary condition. Load balancing for parallel cluster computations is ensured by using single-block unstructured grids for both fluids and solids, and by using a 'multiple physical zones' to account for differences in the number of equations. Validation of the method is achieved by comparing simple two-dimensional solutions with analytical results. Representative results for cooling passages are presents showing the effects of heat conduction in the copper walls with tube aspect ratios of 1.5:l.

  14. E-laboratories : agent-based modeling of electricity markets.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    North, M.; Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Macal, C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Veselka, T.

    2002-05-03

    Electricity markets are complex adaptive systems that operate under a wide range of rules that span a variety of time scales. These rules are imposed both from above by society and below by physics. Many electricity markets are undergoing or are about to undergo a transition from centrally regulated systems to decentralized markets. Furthermore, several electricity markets have recently undergone this transition with extremely unsatisfactory results, most notably in California. These high stakes transitions require the introduction of largely untested regulatory structures. Suitable laboratories that can be used to test regulatory structures before they are applied to real systems are needed. Agent-based models can provide such electronic laboratories or ''e-laboratories.'' To better understand the requirements of an electricity market e-laboratory, a live electricity market simulation was created. This experience helped to shape the development of the Electricity Market Complex Adaptive Systems (EMCAS) model. To explore EMCAS' potential as an e-laboratory, several variations of the live simulation were created. These variations probed the possible effects of changing power plant outages and price setting rules on electricity market prices.

  15. Reducing Fear of the Laboratory Rat: A Participant Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Nigel

    1994-01-01

    Reports on the use of participant modeling in a study of 56 college-level students to reduce fear of laboratory rats. Discovers that even mild exposure reduced fear significantly. Finds that women were more fearful initially but that their fear reduction was equal to that of men. (CFR)

  16. Flow structure in a can-type model gas turbine combustor. 1st report. ; Flow field in a primary zone. Kangata gas turbine nensho ki nai no nagare kozo. dai ippo. ; Mizu model jikken ni yoru nagare moyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Y.; Hosokawa, S. (Kobe Univ., Kobe (Japan). Graduate School); Nakajima, T. (Kobe Univ., Kobe (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1991-03-25

    Recirculating vortex is composed of a strong swirl flow from the swirler and a jet flow from the liner wall, and plays the roles of fuel-air mixing, combustion, and flame stabilization. Optimum recirculating vortex for the load range is desired to be formed to decrease NO {sub x} production. The flow structure of the recirculating vortex in the primary zone and the flow near the combustor inlet measured using developed 2 types of small fiber LDV {prime} s are reported. The recirculating vortex formed in the primary zone becomes less with the increase in the momentum ratio, and moves to upstream and liner wall side. In addition, the velocity in the direction of swirl is accelerated. The liner jet is bent to the swirling direction when it comes out of the exit, and has a large velocity in the swirling direction. A toroidal vortex with a strong velocity in the swirling direction is formed near the center of the combustor. This blockades the flow from the swirler. The recirculating vortex has its effect as far as up to the upstream of the combustor inlet. 13 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Computational simulation of multi-strut central lobed injection of hydrogen in a scramjet combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Choubey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-strut injection is an approach to increase the overall performance of Scramjet while reducing the risk of thermal choking in a supersonic combustor. Hence computational simulation of Scramjet combustor at Mach 2.5 through multiple central lobed struts (three struts have been presented and discussed in the present research article. The geometry and model used here is slight modification of the DLR (German Aerospace Center scramjet model. Present results show that the presence of three struts injector improves the performance of scramjet combustor as compared to single strut injector. The combustion efficiency is also found to be highest in case of three strut fuel injection system. In order to validate the results, the numerical data for single strut injection is compared with experimental result which is taken from the literature.

  18. Evaluation of Water Injection Effect on NO(x) Formation for a Staged Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, L.; Yang, S. L.; Kundu, K. P.

    1996-01-01

    NO(x) emission control by water injection on a staged turbine combustor (STC) was modeled using the KIVA-2 code with modification. Water is injected into the rich-burn combustion zone of the combustor by a single nozzle. Parametric study for different water injection patterns was performed. Results show NO(x) emission will decrease after water being injected. Water nozzle location also has significant effect for NO formation and fuel ignition. The chemical kinetic model is also sensitive to the excess water. Through this study, a better understanding of the physics and chemical kinetics is obtained, this will enhance the STC design process.

  19. Numerical Study of an Annular Gas Turbine Combustor with Dump Diffuser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.X.Zhao; Y.B.Lai

    1999-01-01

    A general numerical method is presented for calculating steady three-dimensional and two-phase turbulent reactive flows with a nonstaggered body-fitted coordinate system in an annular gas turbine combustor with the dump diffuser.The modified two-equation model and the EDC turbulent combustion model are used for the gas phase.The liquid phase equations are solved in a Lagrangian frame of reference by PSIC algorithm.The effect of different velocity profiles at the entry of the prediffuser on combustor flow characteristics is calculated.

  20. Combustion oscillation study in a kerosene fueled rocket-based combined-cycle engine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Wei; He, Guo-Qiang; Qin, Fei; Xue, Rui; Wei, Xiang-Geng; Shi, Lei

    2016-12-01

    This study reports the combustion oscillation features in a three-dimensional (3D) rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) engine combustor under flight Mach number (Mflight) 3.0 conditions both experimentally and numerically. Experiment is performed on a direct-connect ground test facility, which measures the wall pressure along the flow-path. High-speed imaging of the flame luminosity and schlieren is carried out at exit of the primary rocket. Compressible reactive large eddy simulation (LES) with reduced chemical kinetics of a surrogate model for kerosene is performed to further understand the combustion oscillation mechanisms in the combustor. LES results are validated with experimental data by the time-averaged and root mean square (RMS) pressure values, and show acceptable agreement. Effects of the primary rocket jet on pressure oscillation in the combustor are analyzed. Relation of the high speed rocket jet oscillation, which is thought to among the most probable sources of combustion oscillation, with the RBCC combustor is recognized. Results reveal that the unsteady over-expanded rocket jet has significant impacts on the combustion oscillation feature of the RBCC combustor, which is different from a thermo-acoustics type oscillation. The rocket jet/air inflow physical interactions under different rocket jet expansion degrees are experimentally studied.

  1. The Mechanisms of Flame Stabilization and Low NOx Emission in an Eccentric Jet Pulverized Coal Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunWenchao; SunYezhu; 等

    1992-01-01

    The mechanisms of flame stabilization and low NOx emission features of an accentric jet pulverzed coal combustor were studied through numerical modelling and experimental investigation.The results show that the formation of the unique flowfield structure is closely related to the interaction among combustor configuration.the primary jet and the control Jet.and that certain rules should be follwed in orber to obtain the optimum condition for flame stabilization.The distributions of temperature and concentration of NO,O2,CO and CO2 inside the combustor were experimentally measured.The effects of strustural and operational parameters on combustion and NO formation were studied.It was found that reduction of primary air,suitable use of control jet and reasonable uptilt angle of the primary jet all contributed to the reduction of NOx at the combustor exit.A new hypothesis,that reasonable separation of oxygen and fuel within the fuel-rich zone is beneficial to further reduction of NOx emission,is given,The study showed that good compatibility existed between the capability of flame stabilization and low NOX emission for this type of combustor.

  2. Effects of Cavity Configurations on Flameholding and Performances of Kerosene Fueled Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Deyong; Song, Wenyan; Wang, Yuhang; Wang, Yanhua

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the effects of cavity flameholder configurations on flameholding and performances of kerosene fueled scramjet combustor were studied experimentally and numerically. For experiments, a directly connected ground facility was used and clean high enthalpy air, with a total temperature of 800 K and a total pressure of 800 Kpa, was provided by an electricity resistance heater. To investigate the effects of cavity configurations on flameholding capacity and reacting-flow characteristics, three different flameholders, one single cavity flameholder and two tandem cavity flameholders, were used in experiments. For the two combustors with tandem cavity flameholders, the location and configurations of its up-stream cavity were same with the single cavity flameholder, and the length-to-depth ratios for down-stream cavities were 9 and 11 respectively. The experimental results showed that stabilize kerosene combustion were achieved for combustor with tandem cavity flameholders mounted, and none for that with single cavity flameholder. The none-reacting and reacting flows of combustor models with tandem cavity flameholders were compared and studied with numerical and experimental results. The results showed that higher combustion efficiencies and pressure recovery ratios were achieved for the combustor with down-stream cavity length-to-depth ratio of 9.

  3. Forced and self-excited oscillations in a natural gas fired lean premixed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daesik; Park, Sung Wook

    2010-11-15

    An experimental study of the flame response in a premixed gas turbine combustor has been conducted at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure inlet conditions using natural gas. The fuel is premixed with the air upstream of a choked inlet to avoid equivalence ratio fluctuations. Therefore the observed flame response is only the result of the imposed velocity fluctuations, which are produced using a variable-speed siren. Also, a variable length combustor is designed for investigating characteristics of self-excited instabilities. Measurements are made of the velocity fluctuation in the mixing section using hot wire anemometry and of the heat release fluctuation in the combustor using chemiluminescence emission. The results are analyzed to determine the phase and gain of the flame transfer function. The results show that the gain of flame transfer function is closely associated both with inlet flow forcing conditions such as frequency and amplitude of modulation as well as the operating conditions such as equivalence ratio. In order to predict the operating conditions where the combustor goes stable or unstable at given combustor and nozzle designs, time-lag analysis was tried using convection time delay measured from the phase information of the transfer function. The model prediction was in very good agreement with the self-excited instability measurement. However, spatial heat release distribution became more significant in long flames than in short flames and also had an important influence on the system damping procedure. (author)

  4. Micro-combustor for gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Scott M.

    2010-11-30

    An improved gas turbine combustor (20) including a basket (26) and a multiplicity of micro openings (29) arrayed across an inlet wall (27) for passage of a fuel/air mixture for ignition within the combustor. The openings preferably have a diameter on the order of the quenching diameter; i.e. the port diameter for which the flame is self-extinguishing, which is a function of the fuel mixture, temperature and pressure. The basket may have a curved rectangular shape that approximates the shape of the curved rectangular shape of the intake manifolds of the turbine.

  5. Variable volume combustor with aerodynamic support struts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stewart, Jason Thurman; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-03-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a number of support struts supporting the fuel nozzles and providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The support struts may include an aerodynamic contoured shape so as to distribute evenly a flow of air to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  6. Laboratory evaluation of a walleye (Sander vitreus) bioenergetics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, C.P.; Wang, C.; O'Brien, T. P.; Holuszko, M.J.; Ogilvie, L.M.; Stickel, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    Walleye (Sander vitreus) is an important game fish throughout much of North America. We evaluated the performance of the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for walleye in the laboratory. Walleyes were fed rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) in four laboratory tanks during a 126-day experiment. Based on a statistical comparison of bioenergetics model predictions of monthly consumption with the observed monthly consumption, we concluded that the bioenergetics model significantly underestimated food consumption by walleye in the laboratory. The degree of underestimation appeared to depend on the feeding rate. For the tank with the lowest feeding rate (1.4% of walleye body weight per day), the agreement between the bioenergetics model prediction of cumulative consumption over the entire 126-day experiment and the observed cumulative consumption was remarkably close, as the prediction was within 0.1% of the observed cumulative consumption. Feeding rates in the other three tanks ranged from 1.6% to 1.7% of walleye body weight per day, and bioenergetics model predictions of cumulative consumption over the 126-day experiment ranged between 11 and 15% less than the observed cumulative consumption. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  7. Investigations on the Influence of the In-Stream Pylon and Strut on the Performance of a Scramjet Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ouyang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the in-stream pylon and strut on the performance of scramjet combustor was experimentally and numerically investigated. The experiments were conducted with a direct-connect supersonic model combustor equipped with multiple cavities. The entrance parameter of combustor corresponds to scramjet flight Mach number 4.0 with a total temperature of 947 K. The research results show that, compared with the scramjet combustor without pylon and strut, the wall pressure and the thrust of the scramjet increase due to the improvement of mixing and combustion effect due to the pylon and strut. The total pressure loss caused by the strut is considerable whereas pylon influence is slight.

  8. Improved Robust Adaptive Control of a Fluidized Bed Combustor for Sewage Sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENGHong-Xia; JIAYing-Min

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a robust model reference adaptive control scheme to deal with uncertain time delay in the dynamical model of a fluidized bed combustor for sewage sludge. The theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the proposed scheme can guarantee not only stability and robustness, but also the adaptive decoupling performance of the system.

  9. Large eddy simulation of a high aspect ratio combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtas, Mehmet

    structure, from its beginning to its eventual decay after the scavenging period is over. In addition, LES is able to predict the interaction between the bulk flow at top dead center (TDC) and the turbulent flame propagation. The success of this depends on the ability of the model in predicting turbulent flow structure including its length and velocity scales. Another contribution of the LES analysis of this engine has been to determine the operating conditions (such as mass flow rate, trapping efficiency etc.) with as little uncertainty as possible. This aspect is perhaps one of the major strengths of the present methodology since determining these parameters in the experimental work proved to be a problem because of the limitations in accessing the flow. Furthermore, LES findings were compared to k - epsilon model predictions to assess the advantages of the proposed methodology in periodic flows. For example, in direct contrast to LES, k - epsilon model predicted a highly smeared mean flow at all phases of the combustor, hence completely masking the unsteady character of the flow. It also proved to be more grid dependent than LES in predicting the combustion rate. In addition, the known deficiency of k - epsilon model in predicting cycle-by-cycle variations has been shown for this particular engine. These observations regarding the quality and the nature of numerical predictions confirmed the expectations that LES may be the only option as a truly realistic tool for the analysis of this type of small-scale engine.

  10. Computational investigation of film cooling from cylindrical and row trenched cooling holes near the combustor endwall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Kianpour

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the effects of cylindrical and row trenched cooling holes with alignment angles of 0° and 90° at blowing ratio of 3.18 on the film cooling performance adjacent to the endwall surface of a combustor simulator. In this research a three-dimensional representation of Pratt and Whitney gas turbine engine was simulated and analyzed with a commercial finite volume package FLUENT 6.2. The analysis has been carried out with Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes turbulence model (RANS on internal cooling passages. This combustor simulator was combined with the interaction of two rows of dilution jets, which were staggered in the streamwise direction and aligned in the spanwise direction. Film cooling was placed along the combustor liner walls. In comparison with the baseline case of cooling holes, the application of a row trenched hole near the endwall surface doubled the performance of film cooling effectiveness.

  11. The Laboratory Rat as an Animal Model for Osteoporosis Research

    OpenAIRE

    Lelovas, Pavlos P; Xanthos, Theodoros T.; Thoma, Sofia E; Lyritis, George P; Dontas, Ismene A

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is an important systemic disorder, affecting mainly Caucasian women, with a diverse and multifactorial etiology. A large variety of animal species, including rodents, rabbits, dogs, and primates, have been used as animal models in osteoporosis research. Among these, the laboratory rat is the preferred animal for most researchers. Its skeleton has been studied extensively, and although there are several limitations to its similarity to the human condition, these can be overcome th...

  12. Modeller subjectivity in estimating pesticide parameters for leaching models using the same laboratory data set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2000-01-01

    User-dependent subjectivity in the process of testing pesticide leaching models is relevant because it may result in wrong interpretation of model tests. About 20 modellers used the same data set to test pesticide leaching models (one or two models per modeller). The data set included laboratory stu

  13. Modeller subjectivity in estimating pesticide parameters for leaching models using the same laboratory data set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2000-01-01

    User-dependent subjectivity in the process of testing pesticide leaching models is relevant because it may result in wrong interpretation of model tests. About 20 modellers used the same data set to test pesticide leaching models (one or two models per modeller). The data set included laboratory

  14. Syngas combustor for fluidized bed applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brushwood, J.

    1999-07-01

    The Siemens Westinghouse Multi-Annular Swirl Burner (MASB) is a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use primarily on synthetic fuel gases made by gasifying solid fuels (coal or biomass). These fuels contain high amounts of fuel bound nitrogen, primarily as ammonia, which are converted to molecular nitrogen rather than to nitrogen oxides in the rich zone of this combustor. The combustor can operate in many modes. In second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) applications, the fuel gas is burned in a hot, depleted oxygen air stream generated in a fluid bed coal combustor. In 1-1/2 generation PFBC applications, natural gas is burned in this vitiated air stream. In an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) application, the synthetic fuel gas is burned in turbine compressor air. In this paper, the MASB technology is described. Recent results of tests at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) for these various operation modes on a full scale basket are summarized. The start-up and simple cycle operating experience on propane at the Wilsonville Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) are also described. In addition, the design issues related to the integration of the MASB in the City of Lakeland PCFB Clean Coal Demonstration Project is summarized.

  15. Thermal Imaging Control of Furnaces and Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David M. Rue; Serguei Zelepouga; Ishwar K. Puri

    2003-02-28

    The object if this project is to demonstrate and bring to commercial readiness a near-infrared thermal imaging control system for high temperature furnaces and combustors. The thermal imaging control system, including hardware, signal processing, and control software, is designed to be rugged, self-calibrating, easy to install, and relatively transparent to the furnace operator.

  16. Computation of Three-Dimensional Combustor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsa, S.

    1985-01-01

    Existing steady-state 3-D computer program for calculating gasturbine flow fields modified to include computation of soot and nitrogen oxide emission. In addition, radiation calculation corrected for soot particles. These advanced tools offer potential of reducing design and development time required for gas-turbine combustors.

  17. Core/Combustor Noise - Research Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2017-01-01

    Contributions from the combustor to the overall propulsion noise of civilian transport aircraft are starting to become important due to turbofan design trends and advances in mitigation of other noise sources. Future propulsion systems for ultra-efficient commercial air vehicles are projected to be of increasingly higher bypass ratio from larger fans combined with much smaller cores, with ultra-clean burning fuel-flexible combustors. Unless effective noise-reduction strategies are developed, combustor noise is likely to become a prominent contributor to overall airport community noise in the future. This presentation gives a brief overview of the NASA outlook on pertinent issues and far-term research needs as well as current and planned research in the core/combustor-noise area. The research described herein is aligned with the NASA Ultra-Efficient Commercial Transport strategic thrust and is supported by the NASA Advanced Air Vehicle Program, Advanced Air Transport Technology Project, under the Aircraft Noise Reduction Subproject. The overarching goal of the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is to explore and develop technologies and concepts to revolutionize the energy efficiency and environmental compatibility of fixed wing transport aircrafts. These technological solutions are critical in reducing the impact of aviation on the environment even as this industry and the corresponding global transportation system continue to grow.

  18. Three Dimensional CFD Analysis of the GTX Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, C. J., Jr.; Bond, R. B.; Edwards, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    The annular combustor geometry of a combined-cycle engine has been analyzed with three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics. Both subsonic combustion and supersonic combustion flowfields have been simulated. The subsonic combustion analysis was executed in conjunction with a direct-connect test rig. Two cold-flow and one hot-flow results are presented. The simulations compare favorably with the test data for the two cold flow calculations; the hot-flow data was not yet available. The hot-flow simulation indicates that the conventional ejector-ramjet cycle would not provide adequate mixing at the conditions tested. The supersonic combustion ramjet flowfield was simulated with frozen chemistry model. A five-parameter test matrix was specified, according to statistical design-of-experiments theory. Twenty-seven separate simulations were used to assemble surrogate models for combustor mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery. ScramJet injector design parameters (injector angle, location, and fuel split) as well as mission variables (total fuel massflow and freestream Mach number) were included in the analysis. A promising injector design has been identified that provides good mixing characteristics with low total pressure losses. The surrogate models can be used to develop performance maps of different injector designs. Several complex three-way variable interactions appear within the dataset that are not adequately resolved with the current statistical analysis.

  19. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thy, Peter; Jenkins, Brian; Williams, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run...... straw ash particles appear to have mostly been passively incorporated into the adhesive melt without melting or reaction....

  20. Flood Water Crossing: Laboratory Model Investigations for Water Velocity Reductions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasnon N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of floods may give a negative impact towards road traffic in terms of difficulties in mobilizing traffic as well as causing damage to the vehicles, which later cause them to be stuck in the traffic and trigger traffic problems. The high velocity of water flows occur when there is no existence of objects capable of diffusing the water velocity on the road surface. The shape, orientation and size of the object to be placed beside the road as a diffuser are important for the effective flow attenuation of water. In order to investigate the water flow, a laboratory experiment was set up and models were constructed to study the flow velocity reduction. The velocity of water before and after passing through the diffuser objects was investigated. This paper focuses on laboratory experiments to determine the flow velocity of the water using sensors before and after passing through two best diffuser objects chosen from a previous flow pattern experiment.

  1. Studies of pressure oscillations in a research dump combustor. [low frequency vibration effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadow, K. C.; Crump, J. E.; Derr, R. L.; Heaser, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial research dump combustor was used to investigate the acoustic modes structure and its effect on the inlet shock system. Acoustic wave structure was determined including the amplitude, frequency, and phase as a function of position. Inlet shock position, shock displacement, shock displacement frequency, and phase relative to acoustic wave structure were also defined. All results were compared to with one dimensional modeling.

  2. Overview of experimental measurements in a generic can-type gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to CFD Shortfalls, experimental data on gas turbine combustors is required to obtain insight into the combustion and flow mechanisms as well as for simulation and model validation and evaluation. The temperature and velocity fields of a generic...

  3. The Marine Virtual Laboratory: enabling efficient ocean model configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Oke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The technical steps involved in configuring a regional ocean model are analogous for all community models. All require the generation of a model grid, preparation and interpolation of topography, initial conditions, and forcing fields. Each task in configuring a regional ocean model is straight-forward – but the process of downloading and reformatting data can be time-consuming. For an experienced modeller, the configuration of a new model domain can take as little as a few hours – but for an inexperienced modeller, it can take much longer. In pursuit of technical efficiency, the Australian ocean modelling community has developed the Web-based MARine Virtual Laboratory (WebMARVL. WebMARVL allows a user to quickly and easily configure an ocean general circulation or wave model through a simple interface, reducing the time to configure a regional model to a few minutes. Through WebMARVL, a user is prompted to define the basic options needed for a model configuration, including the: model, run duration, spatial extent, and input data. Once all aspects of the configuration are selected, a series of data extraction, reprocessing, and repackaging services are run, and a "take-away bundle" is prepared for download. Building on the capabilities developed under Australia's Integrated Marine Observing System, WebMARVL also extracts all of the available observations for the chosen time-space domain. The user is able to download the take-away bundle, and use it to run the model of their choice. Models supported by WebMARVL include three community ocean general circulation models, and two community wave models. The model configuration from the take-away bundle is intended to be a starting point for scientific research. The user may subsequently refine the details of the model set-up to improve the model performance for the given application. In this study, WebMARVL is described along with a series of results from test cases comparing Web

  4. Evaluation of Durable Metallic Supports for Catalytic Combustors, CRADA Final Report ORNL 00-0570

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, B. A. [ORNL; Wright, I. G. [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, E. [ORNL; McCarty, J. [Catalytica Energy Systems, Inc.; Barnes, J. [Catalytica Energy Systems, Inc.

    2003-10-01

    In 2000, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Catalytica Energy Systems Incorporated (CESI) to determine the properties of current metallic catalyst supports and examine new candidate alloys for this application. A team was established at ORNL to examine oxidation-limited lifetime of these thin-walled metallic components using standard lifetime models and to measure the mechanical properties of the foils (40-200:m in thickness) which can differ substantially from bulk properties. Oxidation experiments were conducted on foil specimens at 700/-1100/C in laboratory air and in air with 10 vol.% water vapor to better simulate the combustor environment. At the higher test temperatures, time to oxidation-induced (i.e. breakaway oxidation) failure was determined in 1h cycles in order to verify predictions from a standard reservoir-type oxidation lifetime model. Selected specimens were run for >10,000h in 100 or 500h cycles at lower test temperatures in order to determine the oxidation kinetics for the model. The creep properties of selected foils were measured for 4,000-8,000h at operation-relevant stresses and temperatures. None of the new candidate alloys significantly out-performed currently used alloys in laboratory testing, particularly in oxidation lifetime testing. Therefore, engine testing was not performed on any of the new candidate alloys. Both the oxidation- and creep-resistance of FeCrAl alloys was greater than expected and the results of the CRADA allowed CESI to extend life or increase operating temperatures for these lower cost substrate alloys in the next generation of catalyst modules.

  5. Design and implementation of a generalized laboratory data model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nhan Mike

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigators in the biological sciences continue to exploit laboratory automation methods and have dramatically increased the rates at which they can generate data. In many environments, the methods themselves also evolve in a rapid and fluid manner. These observations point to the importance of robust information management systems in the modern laboratory. Designing and implementing such systems is non-trivial and it appears that in many cases a database project ultimately proves unserviceable. Results We describe a general modeling framework for laboratory data and its implementation as an information management system. The model utilizes several abstraction techniques, focusing especially on the concepts of inheritance and meta-data. Traditional approaches commingle event-oriented data with regular entity data in ad hoc ways. Instead, we define distinct regular entity and event schemas, but fully integrate these via a standardized interface. The design allows straightforward definition of a "processing pipeline" as a sequence of events, obviating the need for separate workflow management systems. A layer above the event-oriented schema integrates events into a workflow by defining "processing directives", which act as automated project managers of items in the system. Directives can be added or modified in an almost trivial fashion, i.e., without the need for schema modification or re-certification of applications. Association between regular entities and events is managed via simple "many-to-many" relationships. We describe the programming interface, as well as techniques for handling input/output, process control, and state transitions. Conclusion The implementation described here has served as the Washington University Genome Sequencing Center's primary information system for several years. It handles all transactions underlying a throughput rate of about 9 million sequencing reactions of various kinds per month and

  6. Laboratory Plasma Source as an MHD Model for Astrophysical Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    The significance of the work described herein lies in the demonstration of Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun (MCG) devices like CPS-1 to produce energetic laboratory magneto-flows with embedded magnetic fields that can be used as a simulation tool to study flow interaction dynamic of jet flows, to demonstrate the magnetic acceleration and collimation of flows with primarily toroidal fields, and study cross field transport in turbulent accreting flows. Since plasma produced in MCG devices have magnetic topology and MHD flow regime similarity to stellar and extragalactic jets, we expect that careful investigation of these flows in the laboratory will reveal fundamental physical mechanisms influencing astrophysical flows. Discussion in the next section (sec.2) focuses on recent results describing collimation, leading flow surface interaction layers, and turbulent accretion. The primary objectives for a new three year effort would involve the development and deployment of novel electrostatic, magnetic, and visible plasma diagnostic techniques to measure plasma and flow parameters of the CPS-1 device in the flow chamber downstream of the plasma source to study, (1) mass ejection, morphology, and collimation and stability of energetic outflows, (2) the effects of external magnetization on collimation and stability, (3) the interaction of such flows with background neutral gas, the generation of visible emission in such interaction, and effect of neutral clouds on jet flow dynamics, and (4) the cross magnetic field transport of turbulent accreting flows. The applicability of existing laboratory plasma facilities to the study of stellar and extragalactic plasma should be exploited to elucidate underlying physical mechanisms that cannot be ascertained though astrophysical observation, and provide baseline to a wide variety of proposed models, MHD and otherwise. The work proposed herin represents a continued effort on a novel approach in relating laboratory experiments to

  7. Evaluation of a laboratory model of human head impact biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Fidel; Shull, Peter B; Camarillo, David B

    2015-09-18

    This work describes methodology for evaluating laboratory models of head impact biomechanics. Using this methodology, we investigated: how closely does twin-wire drop testing model head rotation in American football impacts? Head rotation is believed to cause mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) but helmet safety standards only model head translations believed to cause severe TBI. It is unknown whether laboratory head impact models in safety standards, like twin-wire drop testing, reproduce six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) head impact biomechanics that may cause mTBI. We compared 6DOF measurements of 421 American football head impacts to twin-wire drop tests at impact sites and velocities weighted to represent typical field exposure. The highest rotational velocities produced by drop testing were the 74th percentile of non-injury field impacts. For a given translational acceleration level, drop testing underestimated field rotational acceleration by 46% and rotational velocity by 72%. Primary rotational acceleration frequencies were much larger in drop tests (~100 Hz) than field impacts (~10 Hz). Drop testing was physically unable to produce acceleration directions common in field impacts. Initial conditions of a single field impact were highly resolved in stereo high-speed video and reconstructed in a drop test. Reconstruction results reflected aggregate trends of lower amplitude rotational velocity and higher frequency rotational acceleration in drop testing, apparently due to twin-wire constraints and the absence of a neck. These results suggest twin-wire drop testing is limited in modeling head rotation during impact, and motivate continued evaluation of head impact models to ensure helmets are tested under conditions that may cause mTBI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Numerical modelling of channel migration with application to laboratory rivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian SUN; Bin-liang LIN; Hong-wei KUANG

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the development of a morphological model and its application to experimental model rivers. The model takes into account the key processes of channel migration, including bed deformation, bank failure and wetting and drying. Secondary flows in bends play an important role in lateral sediment transport, which further affects channel migration. A new formula has been derived to predict the near-bed secondary flow speed, in which the magnitude of the speed is linked to the lateral water level gradient. Since only non-cohesive sediment is considered in the current study, the bank failure is modelled based on the concept of submerged angle of repose. The wetting and drying process is modelled using an existing method. Comparisons between the numerical model predictions and experimental observations for various discharges have been made. It is found that the model predicted channel planform and cross-sectional shapes agree generally well with the laboratory observations. A scenario analysis is also carried out to investigate the impact of secondary flow on the channel migration process. It shows that if the effect of secondary flow is ignored, the channel size in the lateral direction will be seriously underestimated.

  9. 40 CFR 60.53b - Standards for municipal waste combustor operating practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Modular excess air 50 4 Refuse-derived fuel stoker 150 24 Bubbling fluidized bed combustor 100 4 Circulating fluidized bed combustor 100 4 Pulverized coal/refuse-derived fuel mixed fuel-fired combustor 150...

  10. Effect of Spray Cone Angle on Flame Stability in an Annular Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, R. K.; Kumar, S. Kishore; Chandel, Sunil

    2016-04-01

    Effect of fuel spray cone angle in an aerogas turbine combustor has been studied using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and full-scale combustor testing. For CFD analysis, a 22.5° sector of an annular combustor is modeled and the governing equations are solved using the eddy dissipation combustion model in ANSYS CFX computational package. The analysis has been carried out at 125 kPa and 303 K inlet conditions for spray cone angles from 60° to 140°. The lean blowout limits are established by studying the behavior of combustion zone during transient engine operation from an initial steady-state condition. The computational study has been followed by testing the practical full-scale annular combustor in an aerothermal test facility. The experimental result is in a good agreement with the computational predictions. The lean blowout fuel-air ratio increases as the spray cone angle is decreased at constant operating pressure and temperature. At higher spray cone angle, the flame and high-temperature zone moves upstream close to atomizer face and a uniform flame is sustained over a wide region causing better flame stability.

  11. Modeling of secondary organic aerosol yields from laboratory chamber data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Chan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A product-specific model for secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation and composition based on equilibrium gas-particle partitioning is evaluated. The model is applied to represent laboratory data on the ozonolysis of α-pinene under dry, dark, and low-NOx conditions in the presence of ammonium sulfate seed aerosol. Using five major identified products, the model is fit to the chamber data. From the optimal fitting, SOA oxygen-to-carbon (O/C and hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C ratios are modeled. The discrepancy between measured H/C ratios and those based on the oxidation products used in the model fitting suggests the potential importance of particle-phase reactions. Data fitting is also carried out using the volatility basis set, wherein oxidation products are parsed into volatility bins. The product-specific model is best used for an SOA precursor for which a substantial fraction of the aerosol-phase oxidation products has been identified.

  12. Radon transport in fractured soil. Laboratory experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, A.

    1997-10-01

    Radon (Rn-222) transport in fractured soil has been investigated by laboratory experiments and by modelling. Radon transport experiments have been performed with two sand columns (homogeneous and inhomogeneous) and one undisturbed clayey till column containing a net of preferential flow paths (root holes). A numerical model (the finite-element model FRACTRAN) and an analytic model (a pinhole model) have been applied in simulations if soil gas and radon transport in fractured soil. Experiments and model calculations are included in a discussion of radon entry rates into houses placed on fractured soil. The main conclusion is, that fractures does not in general alter transport of internally generated radon out of soil, when the pressure and flow conditions in the soil is comparable to the conditions prevailing under a house. This indicates the important result, that fractures in soil have no impact on radon entry into a house beyond that of an increased gas permeability, but a more thorough investigation of this subject is needed. Only in the case where the soil is exposed to large pressure gradients, relative to gradients induced by a house, may it be possible to observe effects of radon exchange between fractures and matrix. (au) 52 tabs., 60 ill., 5 refs.

  13. Operational Characteristics of an Ultra Compact Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Combustion simulator generated temperature profiles and b) commercial engine combustor temperature profiles [30]. Samuelson [31] describes why...better suited to handle the elevated heat flux. Thus, the desired temperature profile is skewed towards the OD. Samuelson [31] further defines both...backward facing step (Figure 2.30b) delivered the most desirable exit profile per Samuelson [31] and was utilized by 53 Zelina [10]. The downward angled

  14. Laboratory model of inner ear mechano-transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ibrahim; Prodanovic, Srdjan; Laiacona, Danielle; Nam, Jong-Hoon; Kelley, Douglas

    2016-11-01

    A sound wave entering the mammalian ear displaces cochlear fluid, which in turn displaces hair-like organelles called stereocilia that act as acoustic sensors. Their incredible sensitivity is poorly understood, and probably depends on pre-amplification via fluid-structure interaction. In this talk, I will show how our lab uses a laboratory model to simulate this biological system to study the viscous coupling between the vibrating structures, cochlear fluid, and stereocilia. I will present measurements of modeled stereocilia gain and phase difference over a range of frequencies. Recent numerical simulations show that the sensor behaves as a high-pass filter with a gain plateau. However, our results show a peak in the gain. Further, I will show how the length of stereocilia affects gain. This project was supported by NIH NIDCD R01 DC014685.

  15. Assessment of Rich-Burn, Quick-Mix, Lean-Burn Trapped Vortex Combustor for Stationary Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas L. Straub; Kent H. Casleton; Robie E. Lewis; Todd G. Sidwell; Daniel J. Maloney; George A. Richards

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of an alternative combustion approach to achieve low emissions for a wide range of fuel types. This approach combines the potential advantages of a staged rich-burn, quick-mix, lean-burn (RQL) combustor with the revolutionary trapped vortex combustor (TVC) concept. Although RQL combustors have been proposed for low-Btu fuels, this paper considers the application of an RQL combustor for high-Btu natural gas applications. This paper will describe the RQL/TVC concept and experimental results conducted at 10 atm (1013 kPa or 147 psia) and an inlet-air temperature of 644 K (700°F). The results from a simple network reactor model using detailed kinetics are compared to the experimental observations. Neglecting mixing limitations, the simplified model suggests that NOx and CO performance below 10 parts per million could be achieved in an RQL approach. The CO levels predicted by the model are reasonably close to the experimental results over a wide range of operating conditions. The predicted NOx levels are reasonably close for some operating conditions; however, as the rich-stage equivalence ratio increases, the discrepancy between the experiment and the model increases. Mixing limitations are critical in any RQL combustor, and the mixing limitations for this RQL/TVC design are discussed.

  16. Apparatus and method for cooling a combustor cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Baifang; Washam, Roy Marshall; Wu, Chunyang

    2014-04-29

    A combustor includes an end cap having a perforated downstream plate and a combustion chamber downstream of the downstream plate. A plenum is in fluid communication with the downstream plate and supplies a cooling medium to the combustion chamber through the perforations in the downstream plate. A method for cooling a combustor includes flowing a cooling medium into a combustor end cap and impinging the cooling medium on a downstream plate in the combustor end cap. The method further includes flowing the cooling medium into a combustion chamber through perforations in the downstream plate.

  17. A simple landslide model at a laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmajati, Elisabeth Dian; Yuliza, Elfi; Habil, Husni; Sadisun, Imam Ahmad; Munir, Muhammad Miftahul; Khairurrijal

    2017-07-01

    Landslide, which is one of the natural disasters that occurs frequently, often causes very adverse effects. Landslide early warning systems, which are installed at prone areas, measure physical parameters closely related to landslides and give warning signals indicating that landslides would occur. To determine the critical values of the measured physical parameters or test the early warning system itself, a laboratory scale model of a rotational landslide was developed. This rotational landslide model had a size of 250×45×40 cm3 and was equipped with soil moisture sensors, accelerometers, and automated measurement system. The soil moisture sensors were used to determine the water content in soil sample. The accelerometers were employed to detect movements in x-, y-, and z-direction. Therefore, the flow and rotational landslides were expected to be modeled and characterized. The developed landslide model could be used to evaluate the effects of slope, soil type, and water seepage on the incidence of landslides. The present experiment showed that the model can show the occurrence of landslides. The presence of water seepage made the slope crack. As the time went by, the crack became bigger. After evaluating the obtained characteristics, the occurred landslide was the flow type. This landslide occurred when the soil sample was in a saturated condition with water. The soil movements in x-, y-, and z-direction were also observed. Further experiments should be performed to realize the rotational landslide.

  18. Verification of the karst flow model under laboratory controlled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Andric, Ivo; Malenica, Luka; Srzic, Veljko

    2016-04-01

    Karst aquifers are very important groundwater resources around the world as well as in coastal part of Croatia. They consist of extremely complex structure defining by slow and laminar porous medium and small fissures and usually fast turbulent conduits/karst channels. Except simple lumped hydrological models that ignore high karst heterogeneity, full hydraulic (distributive) models have been developed exclusively by conventional finite element and finite volume elements considering complete karst heterogeneity structure that improves our understanding of complex processes in karst. Groundwater flow modeling in complex karst aquifers are faced by many difficulties such as a lack of heterogeneity knowledge (especially conduits), resolution of different spatial/temporal scales, connectivity between matrix and conduits, setting of appropriate boundary conditions and many others. Particular problem of karst flow modeling is verification of distributive models under real aquifer conditions due to lack of above-mentioned information. Therefore, we will show here possibility to verify karst flow models under the laboratory controlled conditions. Special 3-D karst flow model (5.6*2.6*2 m) consists of concrete construction, rainfall platform, 74 piezometers, 2 reservoirs and other supply equipment. Model is filled by fine sand (3-D porous matrix) and drainage plastic pipes (1-D conduits). This model enables knowledge of full heterogeneity structure including position of different sand layers as well as conduits location and geometry. Moreover, we know geometry of conduits perforation that enable analysis of interaction between matrix and conduits. In addition, pressure and precipitation distribution and discharge flow rates from both phases can be measured very accurately. These possibilities are not present in real sites what this model makes much more useful for karst flow modeling. Many experiments were performed under different controlled conditions such as different

  19. Large Eddy Simulations of a Premixed Jet Combustor Using Flamelet-Generated Manifolds: Effects of Heat Loss and Subgrid-Scale Models

    KAUST Repository

    Hernandez Perez, Francisco E.

    2017-01-05

    Large eddy simulations of a turbulent premixed jet flame in a confined chamber were conducted using the flamelet-generated manifold technique for chemistry tabulation. The configuration is characterized by an off-center nozzle having an inner diameter of 10 mm, supplying a lean methane-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.71 and a mean velocity of 90 m/s, at 573 K and atmospheric pressure. Conductive heat loss is accounted for in the manifold via burner-stabilized flamelets and the subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulencechemistry interaction is modeled via presumed probability density functions. Comparisons between numerical results and measured data show that a considerable improvement in the prediction of temperature is achieved when heat losses are included in the manifold, as compared to the adiabatic one. Additional improvement in the temperature predictions is obtained by incorporating radiative heat losses. Moreover, further enhancements in the LES predictions are achieved by employing SGS models based on transport equations, such as the SGS turbulence kinetic energy equation with dynamic coefficients. While the numerical results display good agreement up to a distance of 4 nozzle diameters downstream of the nozzle exit, the results become less satisfactory along the downstream, suggesting that further improvements in the modeling are required, among which a more accurate model for the SGS variance of progress variable can be relevant.

  20. Effects of Heat Loss and Subgrid-Scale Models on Large Eddy Simulations of a Premixed Jet Combustor Using Flamelet-Generated Manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Perez, Francisco E.; Lee, Bok Jik; Im, Hong G.; Fancello, Alessio; Donini, Andrea; van Oijen, Jeroen A.; de Goey, L. Philip H.

    2016-11-01

    Large eddy simulations (LES) of a turbulent premixed jet flame in a confined chamber are performed using the flamelet-generated manifold technique for tabulation of chemical kinetics and the OpenFOAM framework for computational fluid dynamics. The configuration is characterized by an off-center nozzle having an inner diameter of 10 mm, feeding a lean methane-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.71 and mean velocity of 90 m/s, at 573 K and atmospheric pressure. Conductive heat loss is accounted for in the manifold via burner-stabilized flamelets and the subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence-chemistry interaction is modeled via presumed filtered density functions. The effects of heat loss inclusion as well as SGS modeling for both the SGS stresses and SGS variance of progress variable on the numerical predictions are all systematically investigated. Comparisons between numerical results and measured data show a considerable improvement in the prediction of temperature when heat losses are incorporated into the manifold, as compared to the adiabatic one. In addition, further improvements in the LES predictions are achieved by employing SGS models based on transport equations.

  1. Near-zero emissions combustor system for syngas and biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongho, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rosocha, Louis [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A multi-institutional plasma combustion team was awarded a research project from the DOE/NNSA GIPP (Global Initiative for Prolifereation Prevention) office. The Institute of High Current Electronics (Tomsk, Russia); Leonardo Technologies, Inc. (an American-based industrial partner), in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory are participating in the project to develop novel plasma assisted combustion technologies. The purpose of this project is to develop prototypes of marketable systems for more stable and cleaner combustion of syngas/biofuels and to demonstrate that this technology can be used for a variety of combustion applications - with a major focus on contemporary gas turbines. In this paper, an overview of the project, along with descriptions of the plasma-based combustors and associated power supplies will be presented. Worldwide, it is recognized that a variety of combustion fuels will be required to meet the needs for supplying gas-turbine engines (electricity generation, propulsion), internal combustion engines (propulsion, transportation), and burners (heat and electricity generation) in the 21st Century. Biofuels and biofuel blends have already been applied to these needs, but experience difficulties in modifications to combustion processes and combustor design and the need for flame stabilization techniques to address current and future environmental and energy-efficiency challenges. In addition, municipal solid waste (MSW) has shown promise as a feedstock for heat and/or electricity-generating plants. However, current combustion techniques that use such fuels have problems with achieving environmentally-acceptable air/exhaust emissions and can also benefit from increased combustion efficiency. This project involves a novel technology (a form of plasma-assisted combustion) that can address the above issues. Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a growing field that is receiving worldwide attention at present. The project is focused on

  2. Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahsan Choudhuri

    2011-03-31

    Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards

  3. Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahsan Choudhuri

    2011-03-31

    Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards

  4. Variable volume combustor with nested fuel manifold system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Keener, Christopher Paul; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2016-09-13

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles, a fuel manifold system in communication with the micro-mixer fuel nozzles to deliver a flow of fuel thereto, and a linear actuator to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles and the fuel manifold system.

  5. Variable volume combustor with pre-nozzle fuel injection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keener, Christopher Paul; Johnson, Thomas Edward; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2016-09-06

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of fuel nozzles, a pre-nozzle fuel injection system supporting the fuel nozzles, and a linear actuator to maneuver the fuel nozzles and the pre-nozzle fuel injection system.

  6. Gas turbine combustor insensitive to compressor outlet distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humenik, F.; Norgren, C. T.

    1970-01-01

    Short-length annular combustor for turbojet engines eliminates change of exit temperature profile. Individual scoops of full annular height control air distribution so that shifts in the radial velocity profile of air entering the combustor will not affect combustion process or alter exit temperature profile.

  7. Combustor nozzle for a fuel-flexible combustion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Joel Meier [Niskayuna, NY; Mosbacher, David Matthew [Cohoes, NY; Janssen, Jonathan Sebastian [Troy, NY; Iyer, Venkatraman Ananthakrishnan [Mason, OH

    2011-03-22

    A combustor nozzle is provided. The combustor nozzle includes a first fuel system configured to introduce a syngas fuel into a combustion chamber to enable lean premixed combustion within the combustion chamber and a second fuel system configured to introduce the syngas fuel, or a hydrocarbon fuel, or diluents, or combinations thereof into the combustion chamber to enable diffusion combustion within the combustion chamber.

  8. Coupling between hydrodynamics, acoustics, and heat release in a self-excited unstable combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvazinski, Matthew E.; Huang, Cheng; Sankaran, Venkateswaran; Feldman, Thomas W.; Anderson, William E.; Merkle, Charles L.; Talley, Douglas G.

    2015-04-01

    The unsteady gas dynamic field in a closed combustor is determined by the nonlinear interactions between chamber acoustics, hydrodynamics, and turbulent combustion that can energize these modes. These interactions are studied in detail using hybrid RANS/large eddy simulations (RANS = Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) of a non-premixed, high-pressure laboratory combustor that produces self-excited longitudinal instabilities. The main variable in the study is the relative acoustic length between the combustion chamber and the tube that injects oxidizer into the combustor. Assuming a half-wave (closed-closed) combustion chamber, the tube lengths approximately correspond to quarter-, 3/8-, and half-wave resonators that serve to vary the phasing between the acoustic modes in the tube and the combustion chamber. The simulation correctly predicts the relatively stable behavior measured with the shortest tube and the very unstable behavior measured with the intermediate tube. Unstable behavior is also predicted for the longest tube, a case for which bifurcated stability behavior was measured in the experiment. In the first (stable) configuration, fuel flows into the combustor uninterrupted, and heat release is spatially continuous with a flame that remains attached to the back step. In the second (unstable) configuration, a cyclic process is apparent comprising a disruption in the fuel flow, subsequent detachment of the flame from the back step, and accumulation of fuel in the recirculation zone that ignites upon arrival of a compression wave reflected from the downstream boundary of the combustion chamber. The third case (mixed stable/unstable) shares features with both of the other cases. The major difference between the two cases predicted to be unstable is that, in the intermediate length tube, a pressure wave reflection inside the tube pushes unburnt fuel behind the back step radially outward, leading to a post-coupled reignition mechanism, while in the case of the

  9. Comparison of Laboratory Experimental Data to XBeach Numerical Model Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Ebru; Baykal, Cuneyt; Guler, Isikhan; Sogut, Erdinc

    2016-04-01

    Coastal zones are living and constantly changing environments where both the natural events and the human-interaction results come into picture regarding to the shoreline behavior. Both the nature of the coastal zone and the human activities shape together the resultants of the interaction with oceans and coasts. Natural extreme events may result in the need of human interference, such as building coastal structures in order to prevent from disasters or any man-made structure throughout a coastline may affect the hydrodynamics and morphology in the nearshore. In order to understand and cope with this cycle of cause and effect relationship, the numerical models developed. XBeach is an open-source, 2DH, depth average numerical model including the hydrodynamic processes of short wave transformation (refraction, shoaling and breaking), long wave (infragravity wave) transformation (generation, propagation and dissipation), wave-induced setup and unsteady currents, as well as overwash and inundation and morphodynamic processes of bed load and suspended sediment transport, dune face avalanching, bed update and breaching (Roelvink et al., 2010). Together with XBeach numerical model, it is possible to both verify and visualize the resultant external effects to the initial shorelines in coastal zones. Recently, Baykal et al. (2015) modelled the long term morphology changes with XBeach near Kızılırmak river mouth consisting of one I-shaped and one Y-shaped groins. In order to investigate the nature of the shoreline and near shore hydrodynamic conditions and morphology, the five laboratory experiments are conducted in the Largescale Sediment Transport Facility at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center in order to be used to improve longshore sand transport relationships under the combined influence of waves and currents and the enhancement of predictive numerical models of beach morphology evolution. The first series of the experiments were aimed at

  10. Subduction and exhumation of continental crust: insights from laboratory models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialas, Robert W.; Funiciello, Francesca; Faccenna, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    When slivers of continental crust and sediment overlying oceanic lithosphere enter a subduction zone, they may be scraped off at shallow levels, subducted to depths of up to 100-200 km and then exhumed as high pressure (HP) and ultra-high pressure (UHP) rocks, or subducted and recycled in the mantle. To investigate the factors that influence the behaviour of subducting slivers of continental material, we use 3-D dynamically consistent laboratory models. A laboratory analogue of a slab-upper mantle system is set up with two linearly viscous layers of silicone putty and glucose syrup in a tank. A sliver of continental material, also composed of silicone putty, overlies the subducting lithosphere, separated by a syrup detachment. The density of the sliver, viscosity of the detachment, geometry of the subducting system (attached plate versus free ridge) and dimensions of the sliver are varied in 34 experiments. By varying the density of the sliver and viscosity of the detachment, we can reproduce a range of sliver behaviour, including subduction, subduction and exhumation from various depths and offscraping. Sliver subduction and exhumation requires sufficient sliver buoyancy and a detachment that is strong enough to hold the sliver during initial subduction, but weak enough to allow adequate sliver displacement or detachment for exhumation. Changes to the system geometry alter the slab dip, subduction velocity, pattern of mantle flow and amount of rollback. Shallower slab dips with more trench rollback produce a mantle flow pattern that aids exhumation. Steeper slab dips allow more buoyancy force to be directed in the up-dip direction of the plane of the plate, and aide exhumation of subducted slivers. Slower subduction can also aide exhumation, but if slab dip is too steep or subduction too slow, the sliver will subduct to only shallow levels and not exhume. Smaller slivers are most easily subducted and exhumed and influenced by the mantle flow.

  11. System and method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Srinivasan, Shiva; York, William David

    2016-11-29

    A system for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes an end cap that extends radially across the combustor and includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A combustion chamber is downstream of the end cap, and tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface. Each tube provides fluid communication through the end cap to the combustion chamber. The system further includes means for reducing combustion dynamics in the combustor. A method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes flowing a working fluid through tubes that extend axially through an end cap that extends radially across the combustor and obstructing at least a portion of the working fluid flowing through a first set of the tubes.

  12. Numerical investigation of recirculation in the UTSI MHD combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, R.J.; Lee, J.J.; Giel, T.V. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    Numerical studies were carried out to investigate the gross structure of flow in cylindrical combustors. The combustor configurations studied are variations of a working design used at the University of Tennessee Space Institute to burn pulverized coal at temperatures in excess of 3000K for generation of a plasma feeding a magnetohydrodynamic channel. The numerical studies were conducted for an isothermal fluid; the main objective of the calculations was to study the effect of the oxidant injection pattern on the gross structure of recirculating flows within the combustor. The calculations illustrate the basic features of the flow in combustors of this type and suggest implications for the injection of coal and oxidizer in this type of combustor.

  13. System and method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Srinivasan, Shiva; York, William David

    2016-11-29

    A system for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes an end cap that extends radially across the combustor and includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A combustion chamber is downstream of the end cap, and tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface. Each tube provides fluid communication through the end cap to the combustion chamber. The system further includes means for reducing combustion dynamics in the combustor. A method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes flowing a working fluid through tubes that extend axially through an end cap that extends radially across the combustor and obstructing at least a portion of the working fluid flowing through a first set of the tubes.

  14. Ground Contact Model for Mars Science Laboratory Mission Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Way, David

    2012-01-01

    The Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST 2) has been successful in simulating the flight of launch vehicles and entry bodies on earth and other planets. POST 2 has been the primary simulation tool for the Entry Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of numerous Mars lander missions such as Mars Pathfinder in 1997, the twin Mars Exploration Rovers (MER-A and MER-B) in 2004, Mars Phoenix lander in 2007, and it is now the main trajectory simulation tool for Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) in 2012. In all previous missions, the POST 2 simulation ended before ground impact, and a tool other than POST 2 simulated landing dynamics. It would be ideal for one tool to simulate the entire EDL sequence, thus avoiding errors that could be introduced by handing off position, velocity, or other fight parameters from one simulation to the other. The desire to have one continuous end-to-end simulation was the motivation for developing the ground interaction model in POST 2. Rover landing, including the detection of the postlanding state, is a very critical part of the MSL mission, as the EDL landing sequence continues for a few seconds after landing. The method explained in this paper illustrates how a simple ground force interaction model has been added to POST 2, which allows simulation of the entire EDL from atmospheric entry through touchdown.

  15. Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high

  16. Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.

    1992-09-11

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the combustion of coal and coal wastes in a rotary kiln reactor with limestone addition for sulfur control. The rationale for the project was the perception that rotary systems could bring several advantages to combustion of these fuels, and may thus offer an alternative to fluid-bed boilers. Towards this end, an existing wood pyrolysis kiln (the Humphrey Charcoal kiln) was to be suitably refurbished and retrofitted with a specially designed version of a patented air distributor provided by Universal Energy, Inc. (UEI). As the project progressed beyond the initial stages, a number of issues were raised regarding the feasibility and the possible advantages of burning coals in a rotary kiln combustor and, in particular, the suitability of the Humphrey Charcoal kiln as a combustor. Instead, an opportunity arose to conduct combustion tests in the PEDCO Rotary Cascading-Bed Boiler (RCBB) commercial demonstration unit at the North American Rayon CO. (NARCO) in Elizabethton, TN. The tests focused on anthracite culm and had two objectives: (a) determine the feasibility of burning anthracite culms in a rotary kiln boiler and (b) obtain input for any further work involving the Humphrey Charcoal kiln combustor. A number of tests were conducted at the PEDCO unit. The last one was conducted on anthracite culm procured directly from the feed bin of a commercial circulating fluid-bed boiler. The results were disappointing; it was difficult to maintain sustained combustion even when large quantities of supplemental fuel were used. Combustion efficiency was poor, around 60 percent. The results suggest that the rotary kiln boiler, as designed, is ill-suited with respect to low-grade, hard to burn solid fuels, such as anthracite culm. Indeed, data from combustion of bituminous coal in the PEDCO unit suggest that with respect to coal in general, the rotary kiln boiler appears inferior to the circulating fluid bed boiler.

  17. Pulse Combustor Design, A DOE Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2003-07-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Pulse Combustor Design Qualification Test, as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1992). Pulse combustion is a method intended to increase the heat-transfer rate in a fired heater. The desire to demonstrate the use of pulse combustion as a source of heat for the gasification of coal, thus avoiding the need for an oxygen plant, prompted ThermoChem, Inc. (TCI), to submit a proposal for this project. In October 1992, TCI entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. In 1998, the project was restructured and scaled down, and in September 1998, a new cooperative agreement was signed. The site of the revised project was TCI's facilities in Baltimore, Maryland. The original purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate a unit that would employ ten identical 253-resonance tube combustors in a coal gasification unit. The objective of the scaled-down project was to test a single 253-resonance-tube combustor in a fluidized sand bed, with gasification being studied in a process development unit (PDU). DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding of $8.6 million. The design for the demonstration unit was completed in February 1999, and construction was completed in November 2000. Operations were conducted in March 2001.

  18. Single particle behaviour in circulating fluidized bed combustors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus

    1994-01-01

    of fuel particles in a boiler. A cold pilot scale model of a circulating fluidized bed combustor was used. Here sand was recirculated by means of air. Pressure measurements along the riser determined suspension density. A radioactive tracking facility to determined the dynamic picture of the particle....... The tracer particles moved between the zones with a mean frequency of ca. 1 Hz. The upwards particle velocity in the upper dilute transport zone decreased with particle size and density, resulting in a decreased number of particle observations for the larger particles with the riser height. The particles...... kept their axial course within relatively short ranges but this pattern was wiped out at larger distances. The mean particle residence time in the zone above and below the secondary air inlet was almost independent of particle characteristics, but was proportional to the magnitude of the internal...

  19. Parametric Design of Injectors for LDI-3 Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Mongia, Hukam; Lee, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Application of a partially calibrated National Combustion Code (NCC) for providing guidance in the design of the 3rd generation of the Lean-Direct Injection (LDI) multi-element combustion configuration (LDI-3) is summarized. NCC was used to perform non-reacting and two-phase reacting flow computations on several LDI-3 injector configurations in a single-element and a five-element injector array. All computations were performed with a consistent approach for mesh-generation, turbulence, spray simulations, ignition and chemical kinetics-modeling. Both qualitative and quantitative assessment of the computed flowfield characteristics of the several design options led to selection of an optimal injector LDI- 3 design that met all the requirements including effective area, aerodynamics and fuel-air mixing criteria. Computed LDI-3 emissions (namely, NOx, CO and UHC) will be compared with the prior generation LDI- 2 combustor experimental data at relevant engine cycle conditions.

  20. Combustor nozzles in gas turbine engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul; Stewart, Jason Thurman; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2017-09-12

    A micro-mixer nozzle for use in a combustor of a combustion turbine engine, the micro-mixer nozzle including: a fuel plenum defined by a shroud wall connecting a periphery of a forward tube sheet to a periphery of an aft tubesheet; a plurality of mixing tubes extending across the fuel plenum for mixing a supply of compressed air and fuel, each of the mixing tubes forming a passageway between an inlet formed through the forward tubesheet and an outlet formed through the aft tubesheet; and a wall mixing tube formed in the shroud wall.

  1. Flame dynamics in a micro-channeled combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Taaha; Markides, Christos N.; Balachandran, Ramanarayanan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) has generated a significant interest in combustion-based power generation technologies, as a replacement of traditional electrochemical batteries which are plagued by low energy densities, short operational lives and low power-to-size and power-to-weight ratios. Moreover, the versatility of integrated combustion-based systems provides added scope for combined heat and power generation. This paper describes a study into the dynamics of premixed flames in a micro-channeled combustor. The details of the design and the geometry of the combustor are presented in the work by Kariuki and Balachandran [1]. This work showed that there were different modes of operation (periodic, a-periodic and stable), and that in the periodic mode the flame accelerated towards the injection manifold after entering the channels. The current study investigates these flames further. We will show that the flame enters the channel and propagates towards the injection manifold as a planar flame for a short distance, after which the flame shape and propagation is found to be chaotic in the middle section of the channel. Finally, the flame quenches when it reaches the injector slots. The glow plug position in the exhaust side ignites another flame, and the process repeats. It is found that an increase in air flow rate results in a considerable increase in the length (and associated time) over which the planar flame travels once it has entered a micro-channel, and a significant decrease in the time between its conversion into a chaotic flame and its extinction. It is well known from the literature that inside small channels the flame propagation is strongly influenced by the flow conditions and thermal management. An increase of the combustor block temperature at high flow rates has little effect on the flame lengths and times, whereas at low flow rates the time over which the planar flame front can be observed decreases and the time of

  2. Unraveling topography around subduction zones from laboratory models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husson, Laurent; Guillaume, Benjamin; Funiciello, Francesca; Faccenna, Claudio; Royden, Leigh H.

    2012-03-01

    The relief around subduction zones results from the interplay of dynamic processes that may locally exceed the (iso)static contributions. The viscous dissipation of the energy in and around subduction zones is capable of generating kilometer scale vertical ground movements. In order to evaluate dynamic topography in a self-consistent subduction system, we carried out a set of laboratory experiments, wherein the lithosphere and mantle are simulated by means of Newtonian viscous materials, namely silicone putty and glucose syrup. Models are kept in their most simple form and are made of negative buoyancy plates, of variable width and thickness, freely plunging into the syrup. The surface of the model and the top of the slab are scanned in three dimensions. A forebulge systematically emerges from the bending of the viscous plate, adjacent to the trench. With a large wavelength, dynamic pressure offsets the foreside and backside of the slab by ~ 500 m on average. The suction, that accompanies the vertical descent of the slab depresses the surface on both sides. At a distance equal to the half-width of the slab, the topographic depression amounts to ~ 500 m on average and becomes negligible at a distance that equals the width of the slab. In order to explore the impact of slab rollback on the topography, the trailing edge of the plates is alternatively fixed to (fixed mode) and freed from (free mode) the end wall of the tank. Both the pressure and suction components of the topography are ~ 30% lower in the free mode, indicating that slab rollback fosters the dynamic subsidence of upper plates. Our models are compatible with first order observations of the topography around the East Scotia, Tonga, Kermadec and Banda subduction zones, which exhibit anomalous depths of nearly 1 km as compared to adjacent sea floor of comparable age.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Combustion and Rotor-Stator Interaction in a Turbine Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos D. Isvoranu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the development of a numerical algorithm for the computation of flow and combustion in a turbine combustor. The flow and combustion are modeled by the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the species-conservation equations. The chemistry model used herein is a two-step, global, finite-rate combustion model for methane and combustion gases. The governing equations are written in the strong conservation form and solved using a fully implicit, finite-difference approximation. The gas dynamics and chemistry equations are fully decoupled. A correction technique has been developed to enforce the conservation of mass fractions. The numerical algorithm developed herein has been used to investigate the flow and combustion in a one-stage turbine combustor.

  4. Laboratory and Numerical Modeling of Smoke Characteristics for Superfog Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, C.; Lu, V.; Tsui, K.; Princevac, M.; Venkatram, A.; Mahalingam, S.; Achtemeier, G.; Weise, D.

    2011-12-01

    Land management techniques in wildland areas include prescribed fires to promote biodiversity and reduce risk of severe wildfires across the United States. Several fatal car pileups have been associated with smoke-related visibility reduction from prescribed burns. Such events have occurred in year 2000 on the interstate highways I-10 and I-95, 2001 on the I-4, 2006 on the I-95, and 2008 on the I-4 causing numerous fatalities, injuries, and damage to property. In some of the cases visibility reduction caused by smoke and fog combinations traveling over roadways have been reported to be less than 3 meters, defined as superfog. Our research focuses on delineating the conditions that lead to formation of the rare phenomena of superfog and creating a tool to enable land managers to effectively plan prescribed burns and prevent tragic events. It is hypothesized that the water vapor from combustion, live fuels, soil moisture, and ambient air condense onto the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) particles emitted from low intensity smoldering fires. Physical and numerical modeling has been used to investigate these interactions. A physical model in the laboratory has been developed to characterize the properties of smoke resulting from smoldering pine needle litters at the PSW Forest Service in Riverside, CA. Temporal measurements of temperature, relative humidity, sensible heat flux, radiation heat flux, convective heat flux, particulate matter concentrations and visibilities have been measured for specific cases. The size distribution and number concentrations of the fog droplets formed inside the chamber by mixing cool dry and moist warm air masses to produce near superfog visibilities were measured by a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer. Thermodynamic modeling of smoke and ambient air was conducted to estimate liquid water contents (LWC) available to condense into droplets and form significant reductions in visibility. The results show that LWC of less than 2 g m-3 can be

  5. A model for Bioinformatics training: the marine biological laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Grant; Miller, Holly; Goddard, Anthony; Norton, Cathy

    2010-11-01

    Many areas of science such as biology, medicine and oceanography are becoming increasingly data-rich and most programs that train scientists do not address informatics techniques or technologies that are necessary for managing and analysing large amounts of data. Educational resources for scientists in informatics are scarce, yet scientists need the skills and knowledge to work with informaticians and manage graduate students and post-docs in informatics projects. The Marine Biological Laboratory houses a world-renowned library and is involved in a number of informatics projects in the sciences. The MBL has been home to the National Library of Medicine's BioMedical Informatics Course for nearly two decades and is committed to educating scientists and other scholars in informatics. In an innovative, immersive learning experience, G.Y., a biologist and post-doc at Arizona State University, visited the Science Informatics Group at the MBL to learn first hand how informatics is done and how informatics teams work. Hands-on work with developers, systems administrators, librarians and other scientists provided an invaluable education in informatics and is a model for future science informatics training.

  6. Dose profile modeling of Idaho National Laboratory's active neutron interrogation laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichester, D L; Seabury, E H; Zabriskie, J M; Wharton, J; Caffrey, A J

    2009-06-01

    A new laboratory has been commissioned at Idaho National Laboratory for performing active neutron interrogation research and development. The facility is designed to provide radiation shielding for deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion (14.1 MeV) neutron generators (2 x 10(8) n/s), deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion (2.5 MeV) neutron generators (1 x 10(7) n/s), and (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron sources (6.96 x 10(7) n/s, 30 microg). Shielding at the laboratory is comprised of modular concrete shield blocks 0.76 m thick with tongue-in-groove features to prevent radiation streaming, arranged into one small and one large test vault. The larger vault is designed to allow operation of the DT generator and has walls 3.8m tall, an entrance maze, and a fully integrated electrical interlock system; the smaller test vault is designed for (252)Cf and DD neutron sources and has walls 1.9 m tall and a simple entrance maze. Both analytical calculations and numerical simulations were used in the design process for the building to assess the performance of the shielding walls and to ensure external dose rates are within required facility limits. Dose rate contour plots have been generated for the facility to visualize the effectiveness of the shield walls and entrance mazes and to illustrate the spatial profile of the radiation dose field above the facility and the effects of skyshine around the vaults.

  7. Computational Analysis of Mixing and Transport of Air and Fuel in Co-Fired Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational analysis for air fuel mixing and transport in a combustor used for co fired burner has been done by RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier?Stokes model comparing with 3D (Three Dimensional LES (Large Eddy Simulation. To investigate the better turbulence level and mixing within co fired combustor using the solid fuel biomass with coal is main purpose of this research work. The results show the difference in flow predicted by the two models, LES give better results than the RANS. For compressible flow the LES results show more swirling effect, The velocity decays along axial and radial distance for both swirling and non-swirling jet. Because of no slip condition near boundary the near the wall velocity is about zero

  8. CFD prediction of the reacting flow field inside a subscale scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitsomboon, T.; Northam, G. B.; Rogers, R. C.; Diskin, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD code has been used to calculate the reacting flowfield inside a hydrogen-fueled, subscale scramjet combustor. Pilot fuel was injected transversely upstream of the combustor and the primary fuel was injected transversely downstream of a backward facing step. A finite rate combustion model with two-step kinetics was used. The CFD code used the explicit MacCormack algorithm with point-implicit treatment of the chemistry source terms. Turbulent mixing of the jets with the airstream was simulated by a simple mixing length scheme, whereas near wall turbulence was accounted for by the Baldwin-Lomax model. Computed results were compared with experimental wall pressure measurements.

  9. Lava-substrate heat transfer: Laboratory experiments and thermodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C. W.; Wright, R.; Crawford, I.

    2012-12-01

    We have performed laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to investigate the heat transfer from a lava flow into various substrate materials, focusing on the effects of the differing thermophysical properties of substrate materials. Initial motivation for this project developed from the desire to understand the loss of solar wind volatiles embedded in lunar regolith deposits that were subsequently covered by a lava flow. The Moon lacks a significant atmosphere and magnetosphere, leaving the surface regolith exposed to bombardment by solar flare and solar wind particles, and by the cosmogenic products of galactic cosmic rays. Preservation of particle-rich regolith deposits may have occurred by the emplacement of an active lava flow on top of the regolith layer, provided the embedded particles survive heating by the lava. During future expeditions to the lunar surface, ancient regolith deposits could be sampled through surface drilling to extract the extra-lunar particles, revealing a history of the solar activity and galactic events not available on the Earth. This project also has important implications for terrestrial lava flows, particularly in the prediction of lava flow hazards. Lava erupted on Earth may be emplaced on various substrates, including solid lava rock, volcanic tephra, sands, soils, etc. The composition, grain size, consolidation, moisture content, etc. of these materials will vary greatly and have different effects on the cooling of the flow. Accounting for specific properties of the substrate could be an important improvement in lava flow models We have performed laboratory experiments in collaboration with the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in which ~5-6 kg of basalt, collected at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is melted to ~1200 °C. The lava is poured into a device constructed of calcium silicate sheeting that has been filled with a solid or particulate substrate material and embedded with thermocouples

  10. A Model for Designing Adaptive Laboratory Evolution Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaCroix, Ryan A.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Feist, Adam M.

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of mutations is a cornerstone of the evolutionary theory of adaptation, capitalizing on the rare chance that a mutation confers a fitness benefit. Natural selection is increasingly being leveraged in laboratory settings for industrial and basic science applications. Despite...... increasing deployment, there are no standardized procedures available for designing and performing adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) experiments. Thus, there is a need to optimize the experimental design, specifically for determining when to consider an experiment complete and for balancing outcomes...... adaptive laboratory evolution can achieve....

  11. Flame Interactions and Thermoacoustics in Multiple-Nozzle Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Brian

    The first major chapter of original research (Chapter 3) examines thermoacoustic oscillations in a low-emission staged multiple-nozzle lean direct injection (MLDI) combustor. This experimental program investigated a relatively practical combustor sector that was designed and built as part of a commercial development program. The research questions are both practical, such as under what conditions the combustor can be safely operated, and fundamental, including what is most significant to driving the combustion oscillations in this system. A comprehensive survey of operating conditions finds that the low-emission (and low-stability) intermediate and outer stages are necessary to drive significant thermoacoustics. Phase-averaged and time-resolved OH* imaging show that dramatic periodic strengthening and weakening of the reaction zone downstream of the low-emission combustion stages. An acoustic modal analysis shows the pressure wave shapes and identifies the dominant thermoacoustic behavior as the first longitudinal mode for this combustor geometry. Finally, a discussion of the likely significant coupling mechanisms is given. Periodic reaction zone behavior in the low-emission fuel stages is the primary contributor to unsteady heat release. Differences between the fuel stages in the air swirler design, the fuel number of the injectors, the lean blowout point, and the nominal operating conditions all likely contribute to the limit cycle behavior of the low-emission stages. Chapter 4 investigates the effects of interaction between two adjacent swirl-stabilized nozzles using experimental and numerical tools. These studies are more fundamental; while the nozzle hardware is the same as the lean direct injection nozzles used in the MLDI combustion concept, the findings are generally applicable to other swirl-stabilized combustion systems as well. Much of the work utilizes a new experiment where the distance between nozzles was varied to change the level of interaction

  12. Hydrodynamics in atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustors. Fluodinamica en combustores atmosfericos de carbon en lecho fluidizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adanez, J.; Abanades, J.C.; Fernandez, I. (Instituto de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain))

    1990-01-01

    The different flow regimes present in an atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustor have been analyzed depending on working conditions (u, {rho}{sub s}, h{sub bed}). The minimum fluidizing velocity u{sub mf} is a basic parameter for these analyses. Also, there is a great discrepancy between the equations proposed by different workers, for calculating u{sub mf} in the usual conditions of operation in combustors of this kind. By this, the experimental u{sub mf} of limestone and partially sulphated lime has been determined at ambient temperature and 850{degree}C. In plots u vs d{sub p}, maps of flow have been constructed recognizing the different regions and flow regimes. Also, the effect of {rho} {sub s} and bed height over these maps of flow has been analyzed. 16 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Process for Operating a Dual-Mode Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefny, Charles J. (Inventor); Dippold, Vance F. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A new dual-mode ramjet combustor used for operation over a wide flight Mach number range is described. Subsonic combustion mode is usable to lower flight Mach numbers than current dual-mode scramjets. High speed mode is characterized by supersonic combustion in a free-jet that traverses the subsonic combustion chamber to a variable nozzle throat. Although a variable combustor exit aperture is required, the need for fuel staging to accommodate the combustion process is eliminated. Local heating from shock-boundary-layer interactions on combustor walls is also eliminated.

  14. Non-linear dynamics in pulse combustor: A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sirshendu Mondal; Achintya Kukhopadhyay; Swarnendu Sen

    2015-03-01

    The state of the art of non-linear dynamics applied to pulse combustor theoretically and experimentally is reviewed. Pulse combustors are a class of air-breathing engines in which pulsations in combustion are utilized to improve the performance. As no analytical solution can be obtained for most of the nonlinear systems, the whole set of solutions can be investigated with the help of dynamical system theory. Many studies have been carried out on pulse combustors whose dynamics include limit cycle behaviour, Hopf bifurcation and period-doubling bifurcation. The dynamic signature has also been used for early prediction of extinction.

  15. Plasma assisted NO{sub x} reduction in existing coal combustors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, S.C.; Russell, T.

    1991-12-31

    The feasibility of NO{sub x} reduction using plasma injection has been investigated. Both numerical and experimental methods were used in the development of this new NO{sub x}reduction technique. The numerical analysis was used to investigate various flow mechanisms in order to provide fundamental support in the development of this new NO{sub x} control technique. The calculations using this approach can give the information of the particle trajectories and distributions which are important for the design of the in-flame plasma injection configuration. The group model also established the necessary ground for further complete modeling of the whole process including the chemical kinetics. Numerical calculations were also performed for a turbulent gas flow field with variable properties. The results provided fundamental understanding of mixing effects encountered in the experiments at Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. A small scale experiment facility was designed and constructed at the heterogeneous combustion laboratory at Carnegie Mellon University. A series of tests were conducted in this setup to investigate the potential of the ammonia plasma injection for NO{sub x} reduction and parametric effects of this process. The experimental results are very promising. About 86% NO{sub x} reduction was achieved using ammonia radicals produced by argon plasma within the present test range. The total percentage of NO{sub x} reduction increases when ammonia flowrate, argon flow rate and initial NO concentration increase and when plasma power and the amount of excess air in the combustor decrease. A combined transport and reaction model was postulated for understanding the mechanism of NO{sub x} reduction using the plasma injection.

  16. Augmentation of Stagnation Region Heat Transfer Due to Turbulence from a DLN Can Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanFossen, G. James; Bunker, Ronald S.

    2001-01-01

    Heat transfer measurements have been made in the stagnation region of a flat plate with a circular leading edge. Electrically heated aluminum strips placed symmetrically about the leading edge stagnation region were used to measure spanwise-averaged heat transfer coefficients. The maximum Reynolds number obtained, based on leading edge diameter, was about 100,000. The model was immersed in the flow field downstream of an approximately half-scale model of a can-type combustor from a low NO(x), ground-based power-generating turbine. The tests were conducted with room temperature air; no fuel was added. Room air flowed into the combustor through six vane-type fuel/air swirlers. The combustor can contained no dilution holes. The fuel/air swirlers all swirled the incoming airflow in a counterclockwise direction (facing downstream). A five-hole probe flow field survey in the plane of the model stagnation point showed the flow was one big vortex with flow angles up to 36 deg at the outer edges of the rectangular test section. Hot-wire measurements showed test section flow had very high levels of turbulence, around 28.5%, and had a relatively large axial-length scale-to-leading edge diameter ratio of 0.5. X-wire measurements showed the turbulence to be nearly isotropic. Stagnation heat transfer augmentation over laminar levels was around 77% and was about 14% higher than predicted by a previously developed correlation for isotropic grid-generated turbulence.

  17. Verification of a laboratory-based dilation model for in situ conditions using continuum models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Walton; M.S. Diederichs; L.R. Alejano; J. Arzúa

    2014-01-01

    With respect to constitutive models for continuum modeling applications, the post-yield domain re-mains the area of greatest uncertainty. Recent studies based on laboratory testing have led to the development of a number of models for brittle rock dilation, which account for both the plastic shear strain and confining stress dependencies of this phenomenon. Although these models are useful in providing an improved understanding of how dilatancy evolves during a compression test, there has been relatively little work performed examining their validity for modeling brittle rock yield in situ. In this study, different constitutive models for rock dilation are reviewed and then tested, in the context of a number of case studies, using a continuum finite-difference approach (FLAC). The uncertainty associated with the modeling of brittle fracture localization is addressed, and the overall ability of mobilized dilation models to replicate in situ deformation measurements and yield patterns is evaluated.

  18. A controllable laboratory stock market for modeling real stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Kenan; Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Guang; Huang, Jiping

    2013-10-01

    Based on the different research approaches, econophysics can be divided into three directions: empirical econophysics, computational econophysics, and experimental econophysics. Because empirical econophysics lacks controllability that is needed to study the impacts of different external conditions and computational econophysics has to adopt artificial decision-making processes that are often deviated from those of real humans, experimental econophysics tends to overcome these problems by offering controllability and using real humans in laboratory experiments. However, to our knowledge, the existing laboratory experiments have not convincingly reappeared the stylized facts (say, scaling) that have been revealed for real economic/financial markets by econophysicists. A most important reason is that in these experiments, discrete trading time makes these laboratory markets deviated from real markets where trading time is naturally continuous. Here we attempt to overcome this problem by designing a continuous double-auction stock-trading market and conducting several human experiments in laboratory. As an initial work, the present artificial financial market can reproduce some stylized facts related to clustering and scaling. Also, it predicts some other scaling in human behavior dynamics that is hard to achieve in real markets due to the difficulty in getting the data. Thus, it becomes possible to study real stock markets by conducting controlled experiments on such laboratory stock markets producing high frequency data.

  19. Large Eddy Simulations and Experimental Investigation of Flow in a Swirl Stabilized Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Kewlani, Gaurav

    2012-01-09

    Swirling flows are the preferred mode of flame stabilization in lean premixed gas turbine engine combustors. Developing a fundamental understanding of combustion dynamics and flame stability in such systems requires a detailed investigation of the complex interactions between fluid mechanics and combustion. The turbulent reacting flow in a sudden expansion swirl combustor is studied using compressible large eddy simulations (LES) and compared with experimental data measured using PIV. Different vortex breakdown structures are observed, as the mixture equivalence ratio is reduced, that progressively diminish the stability of the flame. Sub-grid scale combustion models such as the artificially thickened flame method and the partially stirred reactor approach, along with appropriate chemical schemes, are implemented to describe the flame. The numerical predictions for average velocity correspond well with experimental results, and higher accuracy is obtained using the more detailed reaction mechanism. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.

  20. CFD Analysis of Fuel Atomization, Secondary Droplet Breakup and Spray Dispersion in the Premix Duct of a LPP Combustor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmehl, R.; Maier, G.; Wittig, S.

    2000-01-01

    The two phase flow in the premix duct of a LPP combustor is computed using a Lagrangian droplet tracking method. To reproduce the characteristic spray structure of an air-assisted pressure-swirl atomizer, a sheet spray model is de-rived from measured sheet parameters and combined with an advanced co

  1. Thermodynamic optimisation and computational analysis of irreversibilities in a small-scale wood-fired circulating fluidised bed adiabatic combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of irreversibilities generated due to combustion in an adiabatic combustor burning wood was conducted. This was done for a reactant mixture varying from a rich to a lean mixture. A non-adiabatic non-premixed combustion model of a...

  2. Oxy-combustor operable with supercritical fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Klaus; McClung, Aaron M.; Owston, Rebecca A.

    2017-04-04

    An oxy-combustor is provided which comprises a combustion vessel including at least one solid fuel slurry inlet port, at least one oxygen inlet port and at least one supercritical fluid inlet port, wherein the combustion vessel is operable at an operating pressure of at least 1,100 psi; an interior of the combustion vessel comprises a combustion chamber and a supercritical fluid infusion chamber surrounding at least a part of the combustion chamber, the supercritical fluid infusion chamber and the combustion chamber are separated by a porous liner surrounding the combustion chamber, and the supercritical infusion chamber is located between the porous liner and an outer casing of the combustion vessel.

  3. A laboratory scale model of abrupt ice-shelf disintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macayeal, D. R.; Boghosian, A.; Styron, D. D.; Burton, J. C.; Amundson, J. M.; Cathles, L. M.; Abbot, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    An important mode of Earth’s disappearing cryosphere is the abrupt disintegration of ice shelves along the Peninsula of Antarctica. This disintegration process may be triggered by climate change, however the work needed to produce the spectacular, explosive results witnessed with the Larsen B and Wilkins ice-shelf events of the last decade comes from the large potential energy release associated with iceberg capsize and fragmentation. To gain further insight into the underlying exchanges of energy involved in massed iceberg movements, we have constructed a laboratory-scale model designed to explore the physical and hydrodynamic interactions between icebergs in a confined channel of water. The experimental apparatus consists of a 2-meter water tank that is 30 cm wide. Within the tank, we introduce fresh water and approximately 20-100 rectangular plastic ‘icebergs’ having the appropriate density contrast with water to mimic ice. The blocks are initially deployed in a tight pack, with all blocks arranged in a manner to represent the initial state of an integrated ice shelf or ice tongue. The system is allowed to evolve through time under the driving forces associated with iceberg hydrodynamics. Digitized videography is used to quantify how the system of plastic icebergs evolves between states of quiescence to states of mobilization. Initial experiments show that, after a single ‘agitator’ iceberg begins to capsize, an ‘avalanche’ of capsizing icebergs ensues which drives horizontal expansion of the massed icebergs across the water surface, and which stimulates other icebergs to capsize. A surprise initially evident in the experiments is the fact that the kinetic energy of the expanding mass of icebergs is only a small fraction of the net potential energy released by the rearrangement of mass via capsize. Approximately 85 - 90 % of the energy released by the system goes into water motion modes, including a pervasive, easily observed seich mode of the tank

  4. Variable volume combustor with an air bypass system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Ostebee, Heath Michael; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-02-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with flow of fuel and a flow of air in a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within a liner and an air bypass system position about the liner. The air bypass system variably allows a bypass portion of the flow of air to bypass the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  5. Aerotrace. Measurement of particulates from an engine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, C.D. [DRA, Farnborough (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The effect of gas turbine operating conditions, inlet temperature, pressure and overall air fuel ratio, on particulate number density has been measured. Particulate number density was found to be proportional to combustor inlet pressure and decrease with increasing combustor inlet temperature. The relationship with air fuel ratio is more complex. The mechanism of particulate loss down sample lines has been elucidated and equations are presented to predict particulate losses for stainless steel and PTFE sample lines. (author) 3 refs.

  6. Transient heat transfer properties in a pulse detonation combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Fontenot, Dion G.

    2011-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The heat transfer along the axis of a pulse detonation combustor has been characterized for various frequencies and fill fractions at 2.5 atmospheres of pressure for chamber refresh conditions. In a pulse detonation combustor, a supersonic detonation wave is the method for transforming chemical energy into mechanical energy and the wave propagates much faster than the subsonic flames in devices such as rockets and ramjets. The flow...

  7. The TriLab, a Novel ICT Based Triple Access Mode Laboratory Education Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulwahed, Mahmoud; Nagy, Zoltan K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel model of laboratory education, namely the TriLab. The model is based on recent advances in ICT and implements a three access modes to the laboratory experience (virtual, hands-on and remote) in one software package. A review of the three modes is provided with highlights of advantages and disadvantages of each mode.…

  8. Interview: partnering with the industry: the Olympic laboratory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, David A; Barker, Campbell P

    2012-07-01

    David A Cowan and Campbell P Barker speak to Ryan De Vooght-Johnson at Bioanalysis in May 2012 about the partnership between industry and academia for the setup and running of the doping-control laboratory for the London 2012 Olympic Games. David A Cowan is Director of the London 2012 anti-doping laboratory as well as Director of the King's College London Drug Control Centre, the UK's only WADA-accredited anti-doping laboratory, and Head of the Department of Forensic Science and Drug Monitoring. Cowan co-founded the Drug Control Centre in 1978 and became its Director in 1990. He has published extensively in the field of pharmaceutical analysis, especially as it relates to detecting drug administration in sport, and was awarded a personal chair in pharmaceutical toxicology in 1996. Cowan became Head of the Department of Forensic Science and Drug Monitoring at King's College London in 2002. He has served on a number of national and international committees, including the Council of Europe Working Party Investigating Drug Abuse in Sport that led to the first World Anti-Doping Convention, the Laboratory Representative on the International Olympic Committee's Medical Commission, and WADA's Laboratory Accreditation Subcommittee. He is a member of the Crippen Club for Distinguished Toxicologists. In 1998 he was awarded the IOC Trophy for Sport Ethics by the BOA. He was a founding member of the World Association of Anti-Doping Scientists and became its first President serving on its Executive Board between 2001 and 2004. He was a Visiting Laboratory Director at the Salt Lake City Winter Olympic Games 2002, where the first novel erythropoiesis-stimulating protein (NESP) positive was discovered. He was also a senior advisory scientist at both the Turin Winter Olympic Games in 2006 and the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008. He was also a member of the IOC Medical Commission for the Sydney Olympic Games in 2000 and the Vancouver Winter Olympic Games in 2010. The Drug Control

  9. NASA One-Dimensional Combustor Simulation--User Manual for S1D_ML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The work presented in this paper is to promote research leading to a closed-loop control system to actively suppress thermo-acoustic instabilities. To serve as a model for such a closed-loop control system, a one-dimensional combustor simulation composed using MATLAB software tools has been written. This MATLAB based process is similar to a precursor one-dimensional combustor simulation that was formatted as FORTRAN 77 source code. The previous simulation process requires modification to the FORTRAN 77 source code, compiling, and linking when creating a new combustor simulation executable file. The MATLAB based simulation does not require making changes to the source code, recompiling, or linking. Furthermore, the MATLAB based simulation can be run from script files within the MATLAB environment or with a compiled copy of the executable file running in the Command Prompt window without requiring a licensed copy of MATLAB. This report presents a general simulation overview. Details regarding how to setup and initiate a simulation are also presented. Finally, the post-processing section describes the two types of files created while running the simulation and it also includes simulation results for a default simulation included with the source code.

  10. Ignition and Flame Stabilization of a Strut-Jet RBCC Combustor with Small Rocket Exhaust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichao Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A Rocket Based Combined Cycle combustor model is tested at a ground direct connected rig to investigate the flame holding characteristics with a small rocket exhaust using liquid kerosene. The total temperature and the Mach number of the vitiated air flow, at exit of the nozzle are 1505 K and 2.6, respectively. The rocket base is embedded in a fuel injecting strut and mounted in the center of the combustor. The wall of the combustor is flush, without any reward step or cavity, so the strut-jet is used to make sure of the flame stabilization of the second combustion. Mass flow rate of the kerosene and oxygen injected into the rocket is set to be a small value, below 10% of the total fuel when the equivalence ratio of the second combustion is 1. The experiment has generated two different kinds of rocket exhaust: fuel rich and pure oxygen. Experiment result has shown that, with a relative small total mass flow rate of the rocket, the fuel rich rocket plume is not suitable for ignition and flame stabilization, while an oxygen plume condition is suitable. Then the paper conducts a series of experiments to investigate the combustion characteristics under this oxygen pilot method and found that the flame stabilization characteristics are different at different combustion modes.

  11. Ignition and flame stabilization of a strut-jet RBCC combustor with small rocket exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jichao; Chang, Juntao; Bao, Wen

    2014-01-01

    A Rocket Based Combined Cycle combustor model is tested at a ground direct connected rig to investigate the flame holding characteristics with a small rocket exhaust using liquid kerosene. The total temperature and the Mach number of the vitiated air flow, at exit of the nozzle are 1505 K and 2.6, respectively. The rocket base is embedded in a fuel injecting strut and mounted in the center of the combustor. The wall of the combustor is flush, without any reward step or cavity, so the strut-jet is used to make sure of the flame stabilization of the second combustion. Mass flow rate of the kerosene and oxygen injected into the rocket is set to be a small value, below 10% of the total fuel when the equivalence ratio of the second combustion is 1. The experiment has generated two different kinds of rocket exhaust: fuel rich and pure oxygen. Experiment result has shown that, with a relative small total mass flow rate of the rocket, the fuel rich rocket plume is not suitable for ignition and flame stabilization, while an oxygen plume condition is suitable. Then the paper conducts a series of experiments to investigate the combustion characteristics under this oxygen pilot method and found that the flame stabilization characteristics are different at different combustion modes.

  12. A Model for Designing Adaptive Laboratory Evolution Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCroix, Ryan A; Palsson, Bernhard O; Feist, Adam M

    2017-04-15

    The occurrence of mutations is a cornerstone of the evolutionary theory of adaptation, capitalizing on the rare chance that a mutation confers a fitness benefit. Natural selection is increasingly being leveraged in laboratory settings for industrial and basic science applications. Despite increasing deployment, there are no standardized procedures available for designing and performing adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) experiments. Thus, there is a need to optimize the experimental design, specifically for determining when to consider an experiment complete and for balancing outcomes with available resources (i.e., laboratory supplies, personnel, and time). To design and to better understand ALE experiments, a simulator, ALEsim, was developed, validated, and applied to the optimization of ALE experiments. The effects of various passage sizes were experimentally determined and subsequently evaluated with ALEsim, to explain differences in experimental outcomes. Furthermore, a beneficial mutation rate of 10(-6.9) to 10(-8.4) mutations per cell division was derived. A retrospective analysis of ALE experiments revealed that passage sizes typically employed in serial passage batch culture ALE experiments led to inefficient production and fixation of beneficial mutations. ALEsim and the results described here will aid in the design of ALE experiments to fit the exact needs of a project while taking into account the resources required and will lower the barriers to entry for this experimental technique.IMPORTANCE ALE is a widely used scientific technique to increase scientific understanding, as well as to create industrially relevant organisms. The manner in which ALE experiments are conducted is highly manual and uniform, with little optimization for efficiency. Such inefficiencies result in suboptimal experiments that can take multiple months to complete. With the availability of automation and computer simulations, we can now perform these experiments in an optimized

  13. Development of New, Low-Head Hydropower Turbine - Modeling & Laboratory Test DE-EE0005426

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krouse, Wayne [Hydro Green Energy, Westmont, IL (United States)

    2014-12-05

    Hydro Green Energy, LLC (HGE) will complete the design, fabrication and laboratory testing of a scaled, vertically stackable, low-head hydropower turbine called the Modular Bulb Turbine (MBT). HGE will also complete a summary report that includes the laboratory testing results and analysis of the tests. Project Goals: Design, model and test modular bulb turbine for installation in numerous HGE low-head hydropower projects at non-powered USACE dams. Project Results: The sub-scale prototype was tested successfully at a leading US hydraulic laboratory. Laboratory data results agreed well with predicted results from numerical modeling.

  14. Interstellar dust modelling: Interfacing laboratory, theoretical and observational studies (The THEMIS model)

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Ant

    2015-01-01

    The construction of viable and physically-realistic interstellar dust models is only possible if the constraints imposed by laboratory data on interstellar dust analogue materials are respected and used within a meaningful theoretical framework. These physical dust models can then be directly compared to observations without the need for any tuning to fit the observations. Such models will generally fail to achieve the excellent fits to observations that empirical models are able to achieve. However, the physically-realistic approach will necessarily lead to a deeper insight and a fuller understanding of the nature and evolution of interstellar dust. The THEMIS modelling approach, based on (hydrogenated) amorphous carbons and amorphous silicates with metallic Fe and/or FeS nano-inclusions appears to be a promising move in this direction.

  15. Development of animal model for Chandipura virus in laboratory mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raut; CG; Jadi; RS; Chinchwale; AS; Daware; MM

    2005-01-01

    In recent years there was a outbreak of Chandipura virus(CHPV)in Sothern part of India causing encephalitis and acutedeathin children of age group of2.5months to15years withthe mortality rate of55.6%.As this disease is of acutedeath nature in humans no data available on pathogenesis.To understandthe pathogenesis of the disease caused by CHPV,experimental infection in laboratory swiss albino micewas conducted.Animals of age upto one weekfound highlysusceptible to all the routes of inoculation.For further stu...

  16. Strategic mobility modeling at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, R.G.; Yow, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in strategic mobility planning and analysis for the Department of Defense (DOD) for approximately six years. This work is conducted under four interagency agreements between DOD and the Department of Energy (DOE): Air Force/MAC -- Airlift Deployment Analysis System (ADANS), Army/MTMC -- Strategic Deployment System (STRADS) and Integrated Booking System (IBS), Navy/MSC -- Scheduling Algorithm for Improving Lift (SAIL), and USTRANSCOM -- Deployment Analysis Prototype (DAP) and Flow and Analysis System for TRANSCOM (FAST).

  17. In-situ measurement of residence time distributions in a turbulent oxy-fuel gas-flame combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürkle, Sebastian; Becker, Lukas G.; Agizza, Maria Angela; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker; Wagner, Steven

    2017-07-01

    For improving the design of combustors, the knowledge of residence-time distributions (RTD) is important as they influence exhaust gas compositions. Measuring RTDs in combustors is challenging, due to high temperatures, chemical reactions, the presence of particles or corrosive species as well as high turbulence levels. This paper presents a technique for the in situ measurement of RTDs in combustors. Based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), the temporal evolution of the concentration of tracers is tracked simultaneously at the combustion chamber inlet and outlet. Using either air or mixtures of oxygen and carbon dioxide (oxy-fuel atmosphere) as oxidants, the method is applied to reacting and non-reacting operating conditions in a 20-kWth methane combustor. For reacting conditions, hydrogen chloride is used as a tracer, whereas for non-reacting conditions methane was chosen. Depending on the tracer, for a repetition rate of approximately 2 kHz detection limits of 16-40 ppmV are achieved. For deriving RTDs, low-pass filtering is compared to reactor network modeling. Different RTDs observed for varying operating conditions are discussed.

  18. Mars Science Laboratory; A Model for Event-Based EPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Louis; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.; Stephenson, B.; Erickson, K.; Ng, C.

    2012-10-01

    The NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and its Curiosity Rover, a part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program, represent the most ambitious undertaking to date to explore the red planet. MSL/Curiosity was designed primarily to determine whether Mars ever had an environment capable of supporting microbial life. NASA's MSL education program was designed to take advantage of existing, highly successful event based education programs to communicate Mars science and education themes to worldwide audiences through live webcasts, video interviews with scientists, TV broadcasts, professional development for teachers, and the latest social media frameworks. We report here on the success of the MSL education program and discuss how this methodological framework can be used to enhance other event based education programs.

  19. Precessional states in a laboratory model of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, S. A.; Zimmerman, D. S.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2012-04-01

    A water-filled three-meter diameter spherical shell, geometrically similar to the Earth's core, shows precessionally forced flows. The precessional torque is supplied by the daily rotation of the laboratory by the Earth. We identify the precessionally forced flow to be primarily the spin-over inertial mode, i.e., a uniform vorticity flow whose rotation axis is not aligned with the sphere's rotation axis. A systematic study of the spin-over mode is carried out, showing that the amplitude depends on the ratio of precession to rotation rates (the Poincaré number), in marginal qualitative agreement with Busse's (1968) laminar theory. We find its phase differs significantly though, likely due to topographic effects. At high rotation rates, free shear layers are observed. Comparison with previous computational studies and implications for the Earth's core are discussed.

  20. Developing a Laboratory Model for the Professional Preparation of Future Science Teachers: A Situated Cognition Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Aldrin E.; Paradis, Jeffrey A.

    2004-04-01

    Although laboratory activities are widely acknowledged as being fundamental to the teaching of science, many secondary science school teachers have limited knowledge of how to design and run effective teaching laboratories. Utilising a situated cognition theoretical framework, we discuss our collaborative efforts to develop a laboratory based model for the professional preparation of secondary level science teachers. Findings from the study suggest that the learning which occurs in the laboratory context may be transferred (with appropriate modifications) to the secondary science classroom. Implications also are presented for science teacher preparation, ongoing professional development, and further study.

  1. Model-Based Reasoning in the Physics Laboratory: Framework and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Hu, Dehui; Finkelstein, Noah; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    We review and extend existing frameworks on modeling to develop a new framework that describes model-based reasoning in introductory and upper-division physics laboratories. Constructing and using models are core scientific practices that have gained significant attention within K-12 and higher education. Although modeling is a broadly applicable…

  2. Modeling and Testing of EVs - Preliminary Study and Laboratory Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Guang-Ya; Marra, Francesco; Nielsen, Arne Hejde

    2010-01-01

    impact at different geographical areas, as well as driving and charging patterns. Electric circuit model is deployed in this work to represent the electrical properties of a lithium-ion battery. This paper reports the preliminary modeling and validation work based on manufacturer data sheet and realistic......Electric vehicles (EVs) are expected to play a key role in the future energy management system to stabilize both supply and consumption with the presence of high penetration of renewable generation. A reasonably accurate model of battery is a key element for the study of EVs behavior and the grid...... tests, followed by the suggestions towards a feasible battery model for further studies....

  3. Modeling and Testing of EVs - Preliminary Study and Laboratory Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Guang-Ya; Marra, Francesco; Nielsen, Arne Hejde;

    2010-01-01

    Electric vehicles (EVs) are expected to play a key role in the future energy management system to stabilize both supply and consumption with the presence of high penetration of renewable generation. A reasonably accurate model of battery is a key element for the study of EVs behavior and the grid...... tests, followed by the suggestions towards a feasible battery model for further studies....

  4. Admission Laboratory Results to Enhance Prediction Models of Postdischarge Outcomes in Cardiac Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Michael; Fry, Donald E; Hannan, Edward L; Naessens, James M; Whitman, Kay; Reband, Agnes; Qian, Feng; Schindler, Joseph; Sonneborn, Mark; Roland, Jaclyn; Hyde, Linda; Dennison, Barbara A

    Predictive modeling for postdischarge outcomes of inpatient care has been suboptimal. This study evaluated whether admission numerical laboratory data added to administrative models from New York and Minnesota hospitals would enhance the prediction accuracy for 90-day postdischarge deaths without readmission (PD-90) and 90-day readmissions (RA-90) following inpatient care for cardiac patients. Risk-adjustment models for the prediction of PD-90 and RA-90 were designed for acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous cardiac intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, and congestive heart failure. Models were derived from hospital claims data and were then enhanced with admission laboratory predictive results. Case-level discrimination, goodness of fit, and calibration were used to compare administrative models (ADM) and laboratory predictive models (LAB). LAB models for the prediction of PD-90 were modestly enhanced over ADM, but negligible benefit was seen for RA-90. A consistent predictor of PD-90 and RA-90 was prolonged length of stay outliers from the index hospitalization.

  5. Models for Estimating Research and Development Manpower in Navy Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    Mathematics Policy Research, Inc. under subcontract to Mathtech, Inc. of Falls Church, Virginia, under contract N00123-83- D-0520. The contracting officer’s...primary objective of forecasting staffing requirements for the SPAWAR R&D Centers. Besides changing policy variables and projecting the effects on...known values. For NOSC, NSWC, DTNSRDC, NUSC, and NCSC, the models were used to backcast FY83. For NADC, the model was used to backcast FY84. For

  6. Two-phase flow in a swirling circulating fluidized bed (SCFB) coal combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilias, S.; Govind, R. (Cincinnati Univ., OH (USA). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1988-01-01

    Coal combustors are difficult to model accurately due to their inherent complexities of coal devolatization, char combustion and volatile combustion with simultaneous momentum, heat and mass transfer effects. A fluidized bed which takes the advantages of tangential injection of secondary air, termed as Swirling Circulating Fluidized Bed is being developed at the University of Cincinnati. Preliminary experimental studies on coal combustion using the pilot plant and hydrodynamics using a cold model have been conducted. The system has also been simulated. Results of these studies are presented in this paper. Results on three dimensional behavior of the fluid-particle system in the SCFB are presented.

  7. THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. WILLIAMS [and others

    1999-08-01

    The LANL atmospheric transport and diffusion models are composed of two state-of-the-art computer codes. The first is an atmospheric wind model called HOThlAC, Higher Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric circulations. HOTMAC generates wind and turbulence fields by solving a set of atmospheric dynamic equations. The second is an atmospheric diffusion model called RAPTAD, Random Particle Transport And Diffusion. RAPTAD uses the wind and turbulence output from HOTMAC to compute particle trajectories and concentration at any location downwind from a source. Both of these models, originally developed as research codes on supercomputers, have been modified to run on microcomputers. Because the capability of microcomputers is advancing so rapidly, the expectation is that they will eventually become as good as today's supercomputers. Now both models are run on desktop or deskside computers, such as an IBM PC/AT with an Opus Pm 350-32 bit coprocessor board and a SUN workstation. Codes have also been modified so that high level graphics, NCAR Graphics, of the output from both models are displayed on the desktop computer monitors and plotted on a laser printer. Two programs, HOTPLT and RAPLOT, produce wind vector plots of the output from HOTMAC and particle trajectory plots of the output from RAPTAD, respectively. A third CONPLT provides concentration contour plots. Section II describes step-by-step operational procedures, specifically for a SUN-4 desk side computer, on how to run main programs HOTMAC and RAPTAD, and graphics programs to display the results. Governing equations, boundary conditions and initial values of HOTMAC and RAPTAD are discussed in Section III. Finite-difference representations of the governing equations, numerical solution procedures, and a grid system are given in Section IV.

  8. Experimental Study of Ethylene Combustion in a Scramjet Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yin-li; SONG Wen-yan; LE Jia-ling

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the ignition characteristics of gaseous ethylene hydrocarbon fuel is investigated in the supersonic clean airstreams experimental facility with a resistance heater. The generic cavity flame holder is used to create recirculation and promote the fuel/air mixing at the lower wall of the combustor. Three different injection concepts are considered in this research: (1) ethylene injection upstream of the cavity; (2) ethylene and hydrogen injection upstream of the cavity simultaneously; (3) ethylene injection preceded by pilot hydrogen injection. The pilot injection showed to be a supportive tool for holding the flame of the main normal ethylene fuel injection. Therefore, using pilot hydrogen injection and cavity configuration necessitates optimizing the combustor length to ensure the complete combustion and the full liberation of the chemical energy stored in the fuel before exiting the combustor. The present study proved the possibility of igniting the ethylene and maintaining its flame in the supersonic airstreams.

  9. Taenia solium: current understanding of laboratory animal models of taeniosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flisser, A; Avila, G; Maravilla, P; Mendlovic, F; León-Cabrera, S; Cruz-Rivera, M; Garza, A; Gómez, B; Aguilar, L; Terán, N; Velasco, S; Benítez, M; Jimenez-Gonzalez, D E

    2010-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a public health problem in many developing countries and is the most frequent parasitic disease of the brain. The human tapeworm carrier is the main risk factor for acquiring neurocysticercosis. Since the parasite lodges only in the human intestine, experimental models of Taenia solium taeniosis have been explored. Macaques, pigs, dogs, cats and rabbits are unsuccessful hosts even in immunodepressed status. By contrast, rodents are adequate hosts since tapeworms with mature, pregravid and, in some cases, gravid proglottids develop after infection. In this review, information that has been generated with experimental models of taeniosis due to T. solium is discussed. Initially, the use of the model for immunodiagnosis of human taeniosis and evaluation of intervention measures is summarized. Next, descriptions of tapeworms and comparison of hamsters, gerbils and other mammals as experimental models are discussed, as well as data on the humoral immune response, the inflammatory reaction and the production of cytokines associated to Th1 and Th2 responses in the intestinal mucosa. Finally, evaluation of protection induced against the development of tapeworms by recombinant T. solium calreticulin in hamsters is summarized and compared to other studies.

  10. Amphibians as animal models for laboratory research in physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggren, Warren W; Warburton, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The concept of animal models is well honored, and amphibians have played a prominent part in the success of using key species to discover new information about all animals. As animal models, amphibians offer several advantages that include a well-understood basic physiology, a taxonomic diversity well suited to comparative studies, tolerance to temperature and oxygen variation, and a greater similarity to humans than many other currently popular animal models. Amphibians now account for approximately 1/4 to 1/3 of lower vertebrate and invertebrate research, and this proportion is especially true in physiological research, as evident from the high profile of amphibians as animal models in Nobel Prize research. Currently, amphibians play prominent roles in research in the physiology of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, reproductive, and sensory systems. Amphibians are also used extensively in physiological studies aimed at generating new insights in evolutionary biology, especially in the investigation of the evolution of air breathing and terrestriality. Environmental physiology also utilizes amphibians, ranging from studies of cryoprotectants for tissue preservation to physiological reactions to hypergravity and space exploration. Amphibians are also playing a key role in studies of environmental endocrine disruptors that are having disproportionately large effects on amphibian populations and where specific species can serve as sentinel species for environmental pollution. Finally, amphibian genera such as Xenopus, a genus relatively well understood metabolically and physiologically, will continue to contribute increasingly in this new era of systems biology and "X-omics."

  11. Laboratory Models of Thermal Convection in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C. A.; Breitmeyer, R.; Schumer, R.; Voepel, H.; Decker, D.

    2011-12-01

    Experiments have been conducted to measure the length and times scales of thermal plumes in laboratory porous media. A polycarbonate cell 1 m high x 75 cm wide x 2.54 cm deep filled with 3 mm glass beads is heated uniformly from the bottom using electrical heat tape. The heat tape is in direct contact with an aluminum alloy heat exchanger sandwiched between the two vertical plates, and a digital controller is used to maintain constant temperature. The upper boundary is kept at constant temperature by circulating cold water from a constant-temperature refrigerating bath through copper tubes in contact with the upper part of the cell. Flow is visualized by mixing a neutrally buoyant thermochromic liquid tracer in the working fluid (water and glycerin). TLCs are liquid crystals manufactured to change color as a function of temperature. Color change is repeatable and reversible with a response time to temperature change is less than 0.01 s. Image acquisition is done using a CCD camera, and three images are captured nearly simultaneously, each with a red, blue, or green filter over the camera lens. The three images are then combined to make a true color image. At each pixel in the image, hue is extracted and a calibration curve is developed to relate hue to temperature. In one experiment with a 10 degree C temperature difference between the upper and lower boundaries, the onset of convection began within 26 minutes, which is about half the time predicted by a scale analysis. The initial velocity of all plumes is on the order of 15 cm/hr, although some plumes stop moving before reaching the upper boundary of the cell. There are several reasons for plume deceleration: (1) As plumes travel vertically, they alter the initial temperature profile of the fluid such that the temperature field makes constant adjustments, which affects the dimensions, velocities, and interactions of the plumes; (2) adjacent plumes merge, resulting in a single larger plume; and (3) interactions

  12. Laboratory animals as surrogate models of human obesity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cecilia NILSSON; Kirsten RAUN; Fei-fei YAN; Marianne O LARSEN; Mads TANG-CHRISTENSEN

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and obesity-related metabolic diseases represent a growing socioeconomic problem throughout the world.Great emphasis has been put on establishing treatments for this condition,including pharmacological intervention.However,there are many obstacles and pitfalls in the development process from pre-clinical research to the pharmacy counter,and there is no certainty that what has been observed pre-clinically will translate into an improvement in human health.Hence,it is important to test potential new drugs in a valid translational model early in their development.In the current mini-review,a number of monogenetic and polygenic models of obesity will be discussed in view of their translational character.

  13. Variable volume combustor with aerodynamic fuel flanges for nozzle mounting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Keener, Christopher Paul; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2016-09-20

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a number of support struts supporting the fuel nozzles and for providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The fuel injection system also may include a number of aerodynamic fuel flanges connecting the micro-mixer fuel nozzles and the support struts.

  14. Nonluminous Spray Combustion in a Jet-Mixing-Type Combustor

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A new combustion system called a jet-mixing-type combustor was designed to obtain a nonluminous blue flame of a kerosene spray. A spray was injected by a conventional-type swirl atomizer into the combustor, and combustion air was introduced through a baffle plate with 16 inlet holes. The principle of this combustion method was revealed as a prompt mixing of the air and spray, which was achieved by high-speed air jets. The combustion characteristics such as combustion stability, temperature di...

  15. Variable volume combustor with center hub fuel staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Stewart, Jason Thurman; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2016-08-23

    The present application and the resultant patent provide a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a center hub for providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The center hub may include a first supply circuit for a first micro-mixer fuel nozzle and a second supply circuit for a second micro-mixer fuel nozzle.

  16. Development of a laboratory animal model for infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, R L; Turfrey, B A; Smith, K

    1982-01-01

    Guinea pigs, gerbils, voles, golden hamsters and Chinese hamsters exposed to experimental infection with Moraxella bovis by ocular instillation or associated routes showed transient infections only and no clinical signs. Five strains of mice were of similarly low susceptibility but another, the C57 Bl strain, was relatively susceptible and treatment with corticosteroid before infection regularly produced keratoconjunctivitis. This system therefore offers a promising model for studies on infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

  17. High temperature degradation by erosion-corrosion in bubbling fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Peggy Y.; MacAdam, S.; Niu, Y.; Stringer, J.

    2003-04-22

    Heat-exchanger tubes in fluidized bed combustors (FBCs) often suffer material loss due to combined corrosion and erosion. Most severe damage is believed to be caused by the impact of dense packets of bed material on the lower parts of the tubes. In order to understand this phenomenon, a unique laboratory test rig at Berkeley was designed to simulate the particle hammering interactions between in-bed particles and tubes in bubbling fluidized bed combustors. In this design, a rod shaped specimen is actuated a short distance within a partially fluidized bed. The downward specimen motion is controlled to produce similar frequencies, velocities and impact forces as those experienced by the impacting particle aggregates in practical systems. Room temperature studies have shown that the degradation mechanism is a three-body abrasion process. This paper describes the characteristics of this test rig, reviews results at elevated temperatures and compares them to field experience. At higher temperatures, deposits of the bed material on tube surfaces can act as a protective layer. The deposition depended strongly on the type of bed material, the degree of tube surface oxidation and the tube and bed temperatures. With HCl present in the bed, wastage was increased due to enhanced oxidation and reduced oxide scale adherence.

  18. Prediction of hydrodynamics and chemistry of confined turbulent methane-air frames in a two concentric tube combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markatos, N. C.; Spalding, D. B.; Srivatsa, S. K.

    1978-01-01

    A formulation of the governing partial differential equations for fluid flow and reacting chemical species in a two-concentric-tube combustor is presented. A numerical procedure for the solution of the governing differential equations is described and models for chemical-equilibrium and chemical-kinetics calculations are presented. The chemical-equilibrium model is used to characterize the hydrocarbon reactions. The chemical-kinetics model is used to predict the concentrations of the oxides of nitrogen. The combustor considered consists of two coaxial ducts. Concentric streams of gaseous fuel and air enter the inlet duct at one end; the flow then reverses and flows out through the outer duct. Two sample cases with specified inlet and boundary conditions are considered and the results are discussed.

  19. Elastic laboratory measurements and modeling of saturated basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Ludmila; Otheim, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the elastic behavior of basalt is important to seismically monitor volcanoes, subsea basalts, and carbon sequestration in basalt. We estimate the elastic properties of basalt samples from the Snake River Plain, Idaho, at ultrasonic (0.8 MHz) and seismic (2-300 Hz) frequencies. To test the sensitivity of seismic waves to the fluid content in the pore structure, measurements are performed at three saturation conditions: saturated with liquid CO2, water, and dry. When CO2 replaces water, the P-wave velocity drops, on average, by 10%. Vesicles and cracks, observed in the rock microstructure, control the relaxation of pore-fluid pressures in the rock as a wave propagates. The bulk and shear moduli of basalts saturated with liquid CO2 are not frequency dependent, suggesting that fluid pore pressures are in equilibrium between 2 Hz and 0.8 MHz. However, when samples are water saturated, the bulk modulus of the rock is frequency dependent. Modeling with Gassmann's equations predicts the measured saturated rock bulk modulus for all fluids for frequencies below 20 Hz but underpredicts the water-saturated basalt bulk modulus for frequencies greater than 20 Hz. The most likely reason is that the pore-fluid pressures are unrelaxed. Instead, the ultrasonic frequency rock moduli are modeled with high-frequency elastic theories of squirt flow and Kuster-Toksöz (KT). Although KT's model is based on idealized pore shapes, a combination of spheres (vesicles) and penny-shaped cracks (fractures) interpreted and quantified from petrographical data predicts the ultrasonic dry and saturated rock moduli for the measured basalts.

  20. Solid modeling research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: 1982-1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalibjian, J.R.

    1985-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has sponsored solid modeling research for the past four years to assess this new technology and to determine its potential benefits to the Nuclear Weapons Complex. We summarize here the results of five projects implemented during our effort. First, we have installed two solid modeler codes, TIPS-1 (Technical Information Processing System-1) and PADL-2 (Part and Assembly Description Language), on the Laboratory's CRAY-1 computers. Further, we have extended the geometric coverage and have enhanced the graphics capabilities of the TIPS-1 modeler. To enhance solid modeler performance on our OCTOPUS computer system, we have also developed a method to permit future use of the Laboratory's network video system to provide high-resolution, shaded images at users' locations. Finally, we have begun to implement code that will link solid-modeler data bases to finite-element meshing codes.

  1. Turbine combustor with fuel nozzles having inner and outer fuel circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo

    2013-12-24

    A combustor cap assembly for a turbine engine includes a combustor cap and a plurality of fuel nozzles mounted on the combustor cap. One or more of the fuel nozzles would include two separate fuel circuits which are individually controllable. The combustor cap assembly would be controlled so that individual fuel circuits of the fuel nozzles are operated or deliberately shut off to provide for physical separation between the flow of fuel delivered by adjacent fuel nozzles and/or so that adjacent fuel nozzles operate at different pressure differentials. Operating a combustor cap assembly in this fashion helps to reduce or eliminate the generation of undesirable and potentially harmful noise.

  2. Testing of DLR C/C-SiC and C/C for HIFiRE 8 Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Reimer, Thomas; Kutemeyer, Marius; Smart, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) have been proposed for use as lightweight hot structures in scramjet combustors. Previous studies have calculated significant weight savings by utilizing CMCs (active and passive) versus actively cooled metallic scramjet structures. Both a carbon/carbon (C/C) and a carbon/carbon-silicon carbide (C/C-SiC) material fabricated by DLR (Stuttgart, Germany) are being considered for use in a passively cooled combustor design for Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) 8, a joint Australia / Air Force Research Laboratory hypersonic flight program, expected to fly at Mach 7 for approximately 30 sec, at a dynamic pressure of 55 kilopascals. Flat panels of the DLR C/C and C/C-SiC materials were installed downstream of a hydrogen-fueled, dual-mode scramjet combustor and tested for several minutes at conditions simulating flight at Mach 5 and Mach 6. Gaseous hydrogen fuel was used to fuel the scramjet combustor. The test panels were instrumented with embedded Type K and Type S thermocouples. Zirconia felt insulation was used during some of the tests to reduce heat loss from the back surface and thus increase the heated surface temperature of the C/C-SiC panel approximately 177 C (350 F). The final C/C-SiC panel was tested for three cycles totaling over 135 sec at Mach 6 enthalpy. Slightly more erosion was observed on the C/C panel than the C/C-SiC panels, but both material systems demonstrated acceptable recession performance for the HIFiRE 8 flight.

  3. Making animals alcoholic: shifting laboratory models of addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    The use of animals as experimental organisms has been critical to the development of addiction research from the nineteenth century. They have been used as a means of generating reliable data regarding the processes of addiction that was not available from the study of human subjects. Their use, however, has been far from straightforward. Through focusing on the study of alcoholism, where the nonhuman animal proved a most reluctant collaborator, this paper will analyze the ways in which scientists attempted to deal with its determined sobriety and account for their consistent failure to replicate the volitional consumption of ethanol to the point of physical dependency. In doing so, we will see how the animal model not only served as a means of interrogating a complex pathology, but also came to embody competing definitions of alcoholism as a disease process, and alternative visions for the very structure and purpose of a research field.

  4. Live streaming video for medical education: a laboratory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandsas, Alejandro; McIntire, Katherine; Palli, Guillermo; Park, Adrian

    2002-10-01

    At the University of Kentucky (UK), we applied streaming video technology to develop a webcast model that will allow institutions to broadcast live and prerecorded surgeries, conferences, and courses in real time over networks (the Internet or an intranet). We successfully broadcast a prerecorded laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair to domestic and international clients by using desktop computers equipped with off-the-shelf, streaming-enabled software and standard hardware and operating systems. A web-based user interface made accessing the educational material as simple as a mouse click and allowed clients to participate in the broadcast event via an embedded e-mail/chat module. Three client computers (two connected to the Internet and a third connected to the UK intranet) requested and displayed the surgical film by means of seven common network connection configurations. Significantly, no difference in image resolution was detected with the use of a connection speed faster than 128 kilobytes per second (kbps). At this connection speed, an average bandwidth of 32.7 kbps was used, and although a 15-second delay was experienced from the time of data request to data display, the surgical film streamed continuously from beginning to end at a mean rate of 14.4 frames per second (fps). The clients easily identified all anatomic structures in full color motion, clearly followed all steps of the surgical procedure, and successfully asked questions and made comments by using the e-mail/chat module while viewing the surgery. With minimal financial investment, we have created an interactive virtual classroom with the potential to attract a global audience. Our webcast model represents a simple and practical method for institutions to supplement undergraduate and graduate surgical education and offer continuing medical education credits in a way that is convenient for clients (surgeons, students, residents, others). In the future, physicians may access streaming webcast

  5. Spatially-resolved measurements of soot size and population in a swirl-stabilized combustor

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Isooctane, and mixtures of isooctane with various ring and aromatic compounds blended to yield the same smoke point were separately injected through a twin-fluid atomizer into a turbulent, swirl-stabilized model combustor. A nonintrusive optical probe based on larege angle (60°, 20°) intensity ratio scattering was used to yield a point measurement of soot particulate in the size range of 0.08 to 0.38 μm. The velocity and temperature fields were characterized by a two-color laser anemometer an...

  6. Thermo-hydrodynamic design of fluidized bed combustors estimating metal wastage

    CERN Document Server

    Lyczkowski, Robert W; Bouillard, Jacques X; Folga, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Thermo-Hydrodynamic Design of Fluidized Bed Combustors: Estimating Metal Wastage is a unique volume that finds that the most sensitive parameters affecting metal wastage are superficial fluidizing velocity, particle diameter, and particle sphericity.  Gross consistencies between disparate data sources using different techniques were found when the erosion rates are compared on the same basis using the concept of renormalization.  The simplified mechanistic models and correlations, when validated, can be used to renormalize any experimental data so they can be compared on a consistent basis using a master equation.

  7. The Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas fluidized bed combustor; El combustor de lecho fluidizado del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milan Foressi, Julio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1991-12-31

    After synthesizing the most important aspects of the combustion technology in fluidized bed, the experimental combustor developed at the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) is described, as well as the test results of the experiences carried out with coal from Rio Escondido, Coahuila. [Espanol] Tras sintetizar los aspectos mas importantes de la tecnologia de combustion en lecho fluidizado, se describe el combustor experimental desarrollado en el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), asi como los resultados de las experiencias realizadas con carbon proveniente de Rio Escondido, Coahuila.

  8. Numerical Studies on the Performance of Scramjet Combustor with Alternating Wedge-Shaped Strut Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Gautam; Pandey, K. M.

    2017-04-01

    Numerical analysis of the supersonic combustion and flow structure through a scramjet engine at Mach 7 with alternating wedge fuel injection and with three angle of attack (α=-3°, α=0°, α=3°) have been studied in the present research article. The configuration used here is slight modification of the Rabadan et al. scramjet model. Steady two dimensional (2D) Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation and Shear stress transport (SST) based on k-ω turbulent model is used to predict the shock structure and combustion phenomenon inside the scramjet combustor. All the simulations are done by using Ansys 14-Fluent code. The combustion model used here is the combination of eddy dissipation and finite rate chemistry models since this model avoids Arrhenius calculations in which reaction rates are controlled by turbulence. Present results show that the geometry with negative angle of attack (α=-3°) have lowest ignition delay and it improves the performance of scramjet combustor as compared to geometry with α=0°, α=3°. The combustion phenomena and efficiency is also found to be stronger and highest in case of α=-3°.

  9. The Model Laboratory Animal and the‘Trojan Horse' in Biosecurity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen Driver

    2003-01-01

    @@ Today's sophisticated biomedical research sometimes requires the use of laboratory animals raised in stable micronen vironments free from the microorganisms that may compromise the success of an experiment. Laboratory rodents can be obtained in one of several categories defined by the degree to which they harbour microflora, whether commensal, potentially pathogenic or pathogenic. It is now possible to specify the different species of organism that are tolerated and those that are not tolerated, In such model laboratory animals it is essential to raise and maintain them in circumstances under which microorganisms that would not be tolerated cannot enter the production system.

  10. Inertial waves in a laboratory model of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Santiago Andres

    2011-12-01

    A water-filled three-meter diameter spherical shell built as a model of the Earth's core shows evidence of precessionally forced flows and, when spinning the inner sphere differentially, inertial modes are excited. We identified the precessionally forced flow to be primarily the spin-over inertial mode, i.e., a uniform vorticity flow whose rotation axis is not aligned with the container's rotation axis. A systematic study of the spin-over mode is carried out, showing that the amplitude dependence on the Poincare number is in qualitative agreement with Busse's laminar theory while its phase differs significantly, likely due to topographic effects. At high rotation rates free shear layers concentrating most of the kinetic energy of the spin-over mode have been observed. When spinning the inner sphere differentially, a total of 12 inertial modes have been identified, reproducing and extending previous experimental results. The inertial modes excited appear ordered according to their azimuthal drift speed as the Rossby number is varied.

  11. An Integrated Visualization and Basic Molecular Modeling Laboratory for First-Year Undergraduate Medicinal Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    A 3D model visualization and basic molecular modeling laboratory suitable for first-year undergraduates studying introductory medicinal chemistry is presented. The 2 h practical is embedded within a series of lectures on drug design, target-drug interactions, enzymes, receptors, nucleic acids, and basic pharmacokinetics. Serving as a teaching aid…

  12. An Integrated Visualization and Basic Molecular Modeling Laboratory for First-Year Undergraduate Medicinal Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    A 3D model visualization and basic molecular modeling laboratory suitable for first-year undergraduates studying introductory medicinal chemistry is presented. The 2 h practical is embedded within a series of lectures on drug design, target-drug interactions, enzymes, receptors, nucleic acids, and basic pharmacokinetics. Serving as a teaching aid…

  13. Novel designs of fluidized bed combustors for low pollutant emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W.; Bleek, C.M. van den [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Dam-Johansen, K. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-12-31

    It is known that NH{sub 3}, released during the devolatilization of fuel, is an important precursor for NO formation in fluidized bed combustors. On the other hand, NH{sub 3} may be used as a reducing agent in the thermal DeNO{sub x} process to reduce NO{sub x} emission levels. In this paper, a new concept of fluidized bed combustors is proposed based on the idea of in situ reduction of NO{sub x} by self-produced NH{sub 3} from fuel without lowering the sulfur capture level. This design is intended to separate the NH{sub 3} release process under reducing conditions from the char combustion process under oxidizing conditions; this self-released NH{sub 3}, together with some combustibles, is mixed with gaseous combustion products in the upper part of the combustor for a further reduction of the NO{sub x} formed during combustion. Furthermore, the combustion of the combustibles may cause the temperature to rise in this upper zone and thereby reduce the emission of N{sub 2}O. The applications of this design to bubbling and circulating fluidized bed combustors are described and the mechanisms of the main reactions involved discussed.

  14. MHD coal combustor technology. Final report, phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The design, performance, and testing of a 20-MW coal combustor for scaleup to 50 MW for use in an MHD generator are described. The design incorporates the following key features: (1) a two-stage combustor with an intermediate slag separator to remove slag at a low temperture, thus minimizing enthalpy losses required for heating and vaporizing the slag; (2) a first-stage pentad (four air streams impinging on one coal stream) injector design with demonstrated efficient mixing, promoting high carbon burnout; (3) a two-section first-stage combustion chamber; the first stage using a thin slag-protected refractory layer and the second section using a thick refractory layer, both to minimize heat losses; (4) a refractory lining in the slag separator to minimize heat losses; (5) a second-stage combustor, which provided both de-swirl of the combustion products exiting from the slag separator and simple mixing of the vitiated secondary air and seed; (6) a dense-phase coal feed system to minimize cold carrier gas entering the first-stage combustors; (7) a dry seed injection system using pulverized K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ with a 1% amorphous, fumed silicon dioxide additive to enhance flowability, resulting in rapid vaporization and ionization and ensuring maximum performance; and (8) a performance evaluation module (PEM) of rugged design based on an existing, successfully-fired unit. (WHK)

  15. Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.; Lippert, Thomas E.

    2008-12-16

    A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

  16. Flow in the Ebro Delta shelf, Numerical models and laboratory simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, A.; Fraunie, P.; Durand, N.

    2009-04-01

    This work presents the results of two laboratory and numerical experiments. The characteristic induced structures by stationer typical conditions from spring, summer, fall and winter. Laboratory experiences were developed on a five meters turntable (SINTEF facilities) obeys the Froude-Rossby similarities. While, the meso-escale numerical model was developed in the LSEET laboratory. This work evidences complementary results from the vortex sort characteristic by radius from both experimental and model methods. Additionally numerical model has a better representation from the conditions in the first 15km and the laboratory model represent the resolution between the large and the meso scale boundary. Physical variables that describe mixing are compared with experimental laboratory results from a large number of studies of mixing dynamics in environmental fluids to find habitat regimes for primary production. The work relates physical and biological variables, and emphasises the utility of laboratory studies. Several laboratory experiments that focused on turbulent mixing dynamics in stratified shear flows are used to describe (a) mixing in the estuary and (b) induced circulation in the river plume. Mixing descriptors as entrainment, Richardson number and Reynolds number and field data were employed, and advanced techniques of laboratory simulations, image processing and numerical modelling were used to match (a) to (b). Four kinds of experiments were used to describe the dynamics in the whole estuary. Mixing turbulence across a density interface generated by an oscillating grid inside a mixing-box. The horizontal advance of a turbulent front in a stratified system with a lateral current, inside a 1 m x 1 m square box. Induced circulation in the delta del Ebro slope and shelf that were performed with an experimental model in a 2 m x 4 m rectangular tank on a 5-m diameter turntable. Dispersion simulations in the river plume with the OCK3D code. Experiments were

  17. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  18. Development of collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media for instrumental analytical chemistry lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurweni, Wibawa, Basuki; Erwin, Tuti Nurian

    2017-08-01

    The framework for teaching and learning in the 21st century was prepared with 4Cs criteria. Learning providing opportunity for the development of students' optimal creative skills is by implementing collaborative learning. Learners are challenged to be able to compete, work independently to bring either individual or group excellence and master the learning material. Virtual laboratory is used for the media of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry (Vis, UV-Vis-AAS etc) lectures through simulations computer application and used as a substitution for the laboratory if the equipment and instruments are not available. This research aims to design and develop collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media for Instrumental Analytical Chemistry lectures, to know the effectiveness of this design model adapting the Dick & Carey's model and Hannafin & Peck's model. The development steps of this model are: needs analyze, design collaborative-creative learning, virtual laboratory media using macromedia flash, formative evaluation and test of learning model effectiveness. While, the development stages of collaborative-creative learning model are: apperception, exploration, collaboration, creation, evaluation, feedback. Development of collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media can be used to improve the quality learning in the classroom, overcome the limitation of lab instruments for the real instrumental analysis. Formative test results show that the Collaborative-Creative Learning Model developed meets the requirements. The effectiveness test of students' pretest and posttest proves significant at 95% confidence level, t-test higher than t-table. It can be concluded that this learning model is effective to use for Instrumental Analytical Chemistry lectures.

  19. A Simple Laboratory Scale Model of Iceberg Dynamics and its Role in Undergraduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, J. C.; MacAyeal, D. R.; Nakamura, N.

    2011-12-01

    Lab-scale models of geophysical phenomena have a long history in research and education. For example, at the University of Chicago, Dave Fultz developed laboratory-scale models of atmospheric flows. The results from his laboratory were so stimulating that similar laboratories were subsequently established at a number of other institutions. Today, the Dave Fultz Memorial Laboratory for Hydrodynamics (http://geosci.uchicago.edu/~nnn/LAB/) teaches general circulation of the atmosphere and oceans to hundreds of students each year. Following this tradition, we have constructed a lab model of iceberg-capsize dynamics for use in the Fultz Laboratory, which focuses on the interface between glaciology and physical oceanography. The experiment consists of a 2.5 meter long wave tank containing water and plastic "icebergs". The motion of the icebergs is tracked using digital video. Movies can be found at: http://geosci.uchicago.edu/research/glaciology_files/tsunamigenesis_research.shtml. We have had 3 successful undergraduate interns with backgrounds in mathematics, engineering, and geosciences perform experiments, analyze data, and interpret results. In addition to iceberg dynamics, the wave-tank has served as a teaching tool in undergraduate classes studying dam-breaking and tsunami run-up. Motivated by the relatively inexpensive cost of our apparatus (~1K-2K dollars) and positive experiences of undergraduate students, we hope to serve as a model for undergraduate research and education that other universities may follow.

  20. The heterogeneous decomposition reactions of NO and N{sub 2}O in coal chars produced in a fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boavida, D.; Gulyurtlu, I.; Cabrita, I. [INETI-ITE-DTC, Lisboa (Portugal); Lobo, L.S. [Univ. Nova de Lisboa (Portugal). Dept. Quimica

    1997-12-31

    In the present work, the effects of temperature and type of char on the heterogeneous reduction of both NO and N{sub 2}O on char surfaces were investigated using the TGA technique. The kinetic parameters for the decomposition in both NO and N{sub 2}O on the char surfaces was obtained and correlated with the previous results from the combustion of coals and of the same chars in a laboratorial fludized bed combustor. (orig.)

  1. Design and fabrication of a meso-scale stirling engine and combustor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echekki, Tarek (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Haroldsen, Brent L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Krafcik, Karen L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Morales, Alfredo Martin (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Mills, Bernice E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Liu, Shiling (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Lee, Jeremiah C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Karpetis, Adionos N. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Chen, Jacqueline H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ceremuga, Joseph T. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Raber, Thomas N. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hekmuuaty, Michelle A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-05-01

    prototypes to verify the design. A final high precision engine was created via LIGA. The micro-combustor was based on an excess enthalpy concept. Development of a micro-combustor included both modeling and experiments. We developed a suite of simulation tools both in support of the design of the prototype combustors, and to investigate more fundamental aspects of combustion at small scales. Issues of heat management and integration with the micro-scale Stirling engine were pursued using CFD simulations. We found that by choice of the operating conditions and channel dimensions energy conversion occurs by catalysis-dominated or catalysis-then-homogeneous phase combustion. The purpose of the experimental effort in micro-combustion was to study the feasibility and explore the design parameters of excess enthalpy combustors. The efforts were guided by the necessity for a practical device that could be implemented in a miniature power generator, or as a stand-alone device used for heat generation. Several devices were fabricated and successfully tested using methane as the fuel.

  2. Useful measures and models for analytical quality management in medical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgard, James O

    2016-02-01

    The 2014 Milan Conference "Defining analytical performance goals 15 years after the Stockholm Conference" initiated a new discussion of issues concerning goals for precision, trueness or bias, total analytical error (TAE), and measurement uncertainty (MU). Goal-setting models are critical for analytical quality management, along with error models, quality-assessment models, quality-planning models, as well as comprehensive models for quality management systems. There are also critical underlying issues, such as an emphasis on MU to the possible exclusion of TAE and a corresponding preference for separate precision and bias goals instead of a combined total error goal. This opinion recommends careful consideration of the differences in the concepts of accuracy and traceability and the appropriateness of different measures, particularly TAE as a measure of accuracy and MU as a measure of traceability. TAE is essential to manage quality within a medical laboratory and MU and trueness are essential to achieve comparability of results across laboratories. With this perspective, laboratory scientists can better understand the many measures and models needed for analytical quality management and assess their usefulness for practical applications in medical laboratories.

  3. Numerical Investigation on Hydrogen-Fueled Scramjet Combustor with Parallel Strut Fuel Injector at a Flight Mach Number of 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical analysis of the inlet-combustor interaction and flow structure through a scramjet engine at a flight Mach number M = 6 with parallel injection (Strut with circular inlet is presented in the present research article. Three different angles of attack (α=-4°, α=0°, α=4° have been studied for parallel injection. The scramjet configuration used here is a modified version of DLR scramjet model. Fuel is injected at supersonic speed (M=2 through a parallel strut injector. For parallel injection, the shape of the strut is chosen in a way to produce strong stream wise vorticity and thus to enhance the hydrogen/air mixing inside the combustor. These numerical simulations are aimed to study the flow structure, supersonic mixing, and combustion phenomena for the three different types of geometries along with circular shaped strut configuration.

  4. Low emissions combustor development for an industrial gas turbine to utilize LCV fuel gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsall, G.J.; Smith, M.A. (British Coal Corp., Glos (United Kingdom). Coal Research Establishment); Cannon, M.F. (European Gas Turbines Ltd., Lincoln (United Kingdom). Aero and Technology Products)

    1994-07-01

    Advanced coal-based power generation systems such as the British Coal Topping Cycle offer the potential for high-efficiency electricity generation with minimum environmental impact. An important component of the Topping cycle program is the gas turbine, for which development of a combustion system to burn low calorific value coal derived fuel gas, at a turbine inlet temperature of 1,260 C (2,300 F), with minimum pollutant emissions, is a key R and D issue. A phased combustor development program is underway burning low calorific value fuel gas (3.6--4.1 MJ/m[sup 3]) with low emissions, particularly NO[sub x] derived from fuel-bound nitrogen. The first phase of the combustor development program has now been completed using a generic tubo-annular, prototype combustor design. Tests were carried out at combustor loading and Mach numbers considerably greater than the initial design values. Combustor performance at these conditions was encouraging. The second phase of the program is currently in progress. This will assess, initially, an improved variant of the prototype combustor operating at conditions selected to represent a particular medium sized industrial gas turbine. This combustor will also be capable of operating using natural gas as an auxiliary fuel, to suite the start-up procedure for the Topping Cycle. The paper presents the Phase 1 test program results for the prototype combustor. Design of the modified combustor for Phase 2 of the development program is discussed, together with preliminary combustor performance results.

  5. Conversion of Fuel-N to N2O and NOx during Coal Combustion in Combustors of Different Scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周昊; 黄燕; 莫桂源; 廖子昱; 岑可法

    2013-01-01

    With focus on investigating the effect of combustor scale on the conversion of fuel-N to NOx and N2O, experiments are carried out in three combustors, including single coal particle combustion test rig, laboratory scale circulating fluidized-bed boiler (CFB) and full scale CFB in this work. For single coal particle combustion, the ma-jority of fuel-N (65%-82%) is released as NOx, while only a little (less than 8%) fuel-N yields N2O. But in labora-tory scale CFB, the conversion of fuel-N to N2O is increases, but the conversion of fuel-N to NOx is quite less than that of single coal particle combustion. This is because much char in CFB can promote the NOx reduction by in-creasing N2O formation. In full scale CFB, both of the conversion of fuel-N to NOx and the conversion of fuel-N to N2O are smaller than laboratory scale CFB.

  6. A Laboratory Exercise Using a Physical Model for Demonstrating Countercurrent Heat Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Catherine; Davis-Berg, Elizabeth C.; Botz, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    A physical model was used in a laboratory exercise to teach students about countercurrent exchange mechanisms. Countercurrent exchange is the transport of heat or chemicals between fluids moving in opposite directions separated by a permeable barrier (such as blood within adjacent blood vessels flowing in opposite directions). Greater exchange of…

  7. 3D Printing of Protein Models in an Undergraduate Laboratory: Leucine Zippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    An upper-division undergraduate laboratory experiment is described that explores the structure/function relationship of protein domains, namely leucine zippers, through a molecular graphics computer program and physical models fabricated by 3D printing. By generating solvent accessible surfaces and color-coding hydrophobic, basic, and acidic amino…

  8. Implementation of Argument-Driven Inquiry as an Instructional Model in a General Chemistry Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadayifci, Hakki; Yalcin-Celik, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI) as an instructional model in a general chemistry laboratory course. The study was conducted over the course of ten experimental sessions with 125 pre-service science teachers. The participants' level of reflective thinking about the ADI activities, changes in their science…

  9. Design and Study of a Low-Cost Laboratory Model Digital Wind Power Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Rugmini; Karthika, S.

    2010-01-01

    A vane-type low-cost laboratory model anemometer cum power meter is designed and constructed for measuring low wind energy created from accelerating fluids. The constructed anemometer is a device which records the electrical power obtained by the conversion of wind power using a wind sensor coupled to a DC motor. It is designed for its…

  10. Coupling Molecular Modeling to the Traditional "IR-ID" Exercise in the Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes-Huby, Heather; Vitale, Dale E.

    2007-01-01

    This exercise integrates the infrared unknown identification ("IR-ID") experiment common to most organic laboratory syllabi with computer molecular modeling. In this modification students are still required to identify unknown compounds from their IR spectra, but must additionally match some of the absorptions with computed frequencies they…

  11. Examination of Bond Properties through Infrared Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csizmar, Clifford M.; Force, Dee Ann; Warner, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    A concerted effort has been made to increase the opportunities for undergraduate students to address scientific problems employing the processes used by practicing chemists. As part of this effort, an infrared (IR) spectroscopy and molecular modeling experiment was developed for the first-year general chemistry laboratory course. In the…

  12. Laboratory-based grain-shape models for simulating dust infrared spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutschke, H.; Min, M.; Tamanai, A.

    2009-01-01

    Context. Analysis of thermal dust emission spectra for dust mineralogy and physical grain properties depends on comparison spectra, which are either laboratory-measured infrared extinction spectra or calculated extinction cross sections based on certain grain models. Often, the agreement between the

  13. A Laboratory Exercise Using a Physical Model for Demonstrating Countercurrent Heat Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Catherine; Davis-Berg, Elizabeth C.; Botz, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    A physical model was used in a laboratory exercise to teach students about countercurrent exchange mechanisms. Countercurrent exchange is the transport of heat or chemicals between fluids moving in opposite directions separated by a permeable barrier (such as blood within adjacent blood vessels flowing in opposite directions). Greater exchange of…

  14. 3D Printing of Protein Models in an Undergraduate Laboratory: Leucine Zippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    An upper-division undergraduate laboratory experiment is described that explores the structure/function relationship of protein domains, namely leucine zippers, through a molecular graphics computer program and physical models fabricated by 3D printing. By generating solvent accessible surfaces and color-coding hydrophobic, basic, and acidic amino…

  15. Modeling Soil Organic Carbon at Regional Scale by Combining Multi-Spectral Images with Laboratory Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Yi; Xiong, Xiong; Adhikari, Kabindra

    2015-01-01

    results by separately modeling uplands and wetlands. A total of 328 topsoil samples were collected and analyzed for SOC. Satellite Pour l’Observation de la Terre (SPOT5), Landsat Data Continuity Mission (Landsat 8) images, laboratory Vis-NIR and other ancillary environmental data including terrain...

  16. Design and Study of a Low-Cost Laboratory Model Digital Wind Power Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Rugmini; Karthika, S.

    2010-01-01

    A vane-type low-cost laboratory model anemometer cum power meter is designed and constructed for measuring low wind energy created from accelerating fluids. The constructed anemometer is a device which records the electrical power obtained by the conversion of wind power using a wind sensor coupled to a DC motor. It is designed for its…

  17. Examination of Bond Properties through Infrared Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csizmar, Clifford M.; Force, Dee Ann; Warner, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    A concerted effort has been made to increase the opportunities for undergraduate students to address scientific problems employing the processes used by practicing chemists. As part of this effort, an infrared (IR) spectroscopy and molecular modeling experiment was developed for the first-year general chemistry laboratory course. In the…

  18. Model-based fuzzy control solutions for a laboratory Antilock Braking System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precup, Radu-Emil; Spataru, Sergiu; Rǎdac, Mircea-Bogdan;

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives two original model-based fuzzy control solutions dedicated to the longitudinal slip control of Antilock Braking System laboratory equipment. The parallel distributed compensation leads to linear matrix inequalities which guarantee the global stability of the fuzzy control systems...

  19. Model-based reasoning in the physics laboratory: Framework and initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Hu, Dehui; Finkelstein, Noah; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] We review and extend existing frameworks on modeling to develop a new framework that describes model-based reasoning in introductory and upper-division physics laboratories. Constructing and using models are core scientific practices that have gained significant attention within K-12 and higher education. Although modeling is a broadly applicable process, within physics education, it has been preferentially applied to the iterative development of broadly applicable principles (e.g., Newton's laws of motion in introductory mechanics). A significant feature of the new framework is that measurement tools (in addition to the physical system being studied) are subjected to the process of modeling. Think-aloud interviews were used to refine the framework and demonstrate its utility by documenting examples of model-based reasoning in the laboratory. When applied to the think-aloud interviews, the framework captures and differentiates students' model-based reasoning and helps identify areas of future research. The interviews showed how students productively applied similar facets of modeling to the physical system and measurement tools: construction, prediction, interpretation of data, identification of model limitations, and revision. Finally, we document students' challenges in explicitly articulating assumptions when constructing models of experimental systems and further challenges in model construction due to students' insufficient prior conceptual understanding. A modeling perspective reframes many of the seemingly arbitrary technical details of measurement tools and apparatus as an opportunity for authentic and engaging scientific sense making.

  20. Innovative Adaptive Control Method Demonstrated for Active Suppression of Instabilities in Engine Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George

    2005-01-01

    This year, an improved adaptive-feedback control method was demonstrated that suppresses thermoacoustic instabilities in a liquid-fueled combustor of a type used in aircraft engines. Extensive research has been done to develop lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle to reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems. However, these lean-burning combustors are susceptible to thermoacoustic instabilities (high-frequency pressure waves), which can fatigue combustor components and even downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the safe operating life of the combustor and turbine. Thus, suppressing the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for meeting the low-emission goals of the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project.

  1. An Adaptive Instability Suppression Controls Method for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive controls method for instability suppression in gas turbine engine combustors has been developed and successfully tested with a realistic aircraft engine combustor rig. This testing was part of a program that demonstrated, for the first time, successful active combustor instability control in an aircraft gas turbine engine-like environment. The controls method is called Adaptive Sliding Phasor Averaged Control. Testing of the control method has been conducted in an experimental rig with different configurations designed to simulate combustors with instabilities of about 530 and 315 Hz. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in suppressing combustor instabilities. In addition, a dramatic improvement in suppression of the instability was achieved by focusing control on the second harmonic of the instability. This is believed to be due to a phenomena discovered and reported earlier, the so called Intra-Harmonic Coupling. These results may have implications for future research in combustor instability control.

  2. Laboratory Experiments on Steady State Seepage-Induced Landslides Using Slope Models and Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra G. Catane; Mark Albert H. Zarco; Cathleen Joyce N. Cordero; Roy Albert N. Kaimo; Ricarido M. Saturay, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the failure initiation process is crucial in the development of physicallybased early warning system for landslides and slope failures. Laboratory-scale slope models were constructed and subjected to instability through simulated groundwater infiltration. This is done by progressively increasing the water level in the upslope tank and allowing water to infiltrate laterally towards the toe of the slope. Physical changes in the slope models were recorded by tilt sens...

  3. Should hydraulic tomography data be interpreted using geostatistical inverse modeling? A laboratory sandbox investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illman, Walter A.; Berg, Steven J.; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2015-05-01

    The robust performance of hydraulic tomography (HT) based on geostatistics has been demonstrated through numerous synthetic, laboratory, and field studies. While geostatistical inverse methods offer many advantages, one key disadvantage is its highly parameterized nature, which renders it computationally intensive for large-scale problems. Another issue is that geostatistics-based HT may produce overly smooth images of subsurface heterogeneity when there are few monitoring interval data. Therefore, some may question the utility of the geostatistical inversion approach in certain situations and seek alternative approaches. To investigate these issues, we simultaneously calibrated different groundwater models with varying subsurface conceptualizations and parameter resolutions using a laboratory sandbox aquifer. The compared models included: (1) isotropic and anisotropic effective parameter models; (2) a heterogeneous model that faithfully represents the geological features; and (3) a heterogeneous model based on geostatistical inverse modeling. The performance of these models was assessed by quantitatively examining the results from model calibration and validation. Calibration data consisted of steady state drawdown data from eight pumping tests and validation data consisted of data from 16 separate pumping tests not used in the calibration effort. Results revealed that the geostatistical inversion approach performed the best among the approaches compared, although the geological model that faithfully represented stratigraphy came a close second. In addition, when the number of pumping tests available for inverse modeling was small, the geological modeling approach yielded more robust validation results. This suggests that better knowledge of stratigraphy obtained via geophysics or other means may contribute to improved results for HT.

  4. Experimental studies on Gas—Particle Flows and Coal Combustion in New Generation Spouting—Cyclone COmbustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.X.Wang; Z.H.Ma; 等

    1996-01-01

    Besed on previous studies,an improved non-slagging spouting-cyclone combustor with two-stage combustion,organized in perpendicularly vortexing flows,is developed for clean coal combustion applied is small-size industrial furnaces and domestic furnaces.The isothermal model test and the combustion test give some encouraging results.In this study,further improvement of the gemoetrical configuration was made,a visualization method and a LDA system were used to study the gas-particle flow behavior and the temperature and gas composition in combustion experiments were measured by using thermocouples and a COSA-6000-CD Portable Stack Analyzer.Stronger recirculation in the sopouting zone and the strongly swirling efect in the cyclone zone were obtained in the improved combustor.The combustion temperature distribution is uniform.These results indicate that the improved geometrical configuration of the combustor is favorable to the stabilization of coal flame and the intensification of coal combustion.and is provides a basis for the practical application of this technique.

  5. Lean blowout limits of a gas turbine combustor operated with aviation fuel and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Huang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Lean blowout (LBO) limits is critical to the operational performance of combustion systems in propulsion and power generation. The swirl cup plays an important role in flame stability and has been widely used in aviation engines. Therefore, the effects of swirl cup geometry and flow dynamics on LBO limits are significant. An experiment was conducted for studying the lean blowout limits of a single dome rectangular model combustor with swirl cups. Three types of swirl cup (dual-axial swirl cup, axial-radial swirl cup, dual-radial swirl cup) were employed in the experiment which was operated with aviation fuel (Jet A-1) and methane under the idle condition. Experimental results showed that, with using both Jet A-1 and methane, the LBO limits increase with the air flow of primary swirler for dual-radial swirl cup, while LBO limits decrease with the air flow of primary swirler for dual-axial swirl cup. In addition, LBO limits increase with the swirl intensity for three swirl cups. The experimental results also showed that the flow dynamics instead of atomization poses a significant influence on LBO limits. An improved semi-empirical correlation of experimental data was derived to predict the LBO limits for gas turbine combustors.

  6. The Two-Dimensional Supersonic Flow and Mixing with a Perpendicular Injection in a Scramjet Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Ali; S.Ahmed; A.K.M.Sadrul Islam

    2003-01-01

    A numerical investigation has been performed on supersonic mixing of hydrogen with air in a Scramjet(Supersonic Combustion Ramjet) combustor and its flame holding capability by solving Two-Dimensional full Navier-Stokes equations. The main flow is air entering through a finite width of inlet and gaseous hydrogen is injected perpendicularly from the side wall. An explicit Harten-Yee Non-MUSCL Modified-flux-type TVD scheme has been used to solve the system of equations, and a zero-equation algebraic turbulence model to calculate the eddy viscosity coefficient. In this study the enhancement of mixing and good flame holding capability of a supersonic combustor have been investigated by varying the distance of injector position from left boundary keeping constant the backward-facing step height and other calculation parameters. The results show that the configuration for small distance of injector position has high mixing efficiency but the upstream recirculation can not evolved properly which is an important factor for flame holding capability. On the other hand, the configuration for very long distance has lower mixing efficiency due to lower gradient of hydrogen mass concentration on the top of injector caused by the expansion of side jet in both upstream and downstream of injector. For moderate distance of injector position, large and elongated upstream recirculation can evolve which might be activated as a good flame holder.

  7. Effect of flue gas recirculation on heat transfer in a supercritical circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczuk, Artur

    2015-09-01

    This paper focuses on assessment of the effect of flue gas recirculation (FGR) on heat transfer behavior in 1296t/h supercritical coal-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor. The performance test in supercritical CFB combustor with capacity 966 MWth was performed with the low level of flue gas recirculation rate 6.9% into furnace chamber, for 80% unit load at the bed pressure of 7.7 kPa and the ratio of secondary air to the primary air SA/PA = 0.33. Heat transfer behavior in a supercritical CFB furnace between the active heat transfer surfaces (membrane wall and superheater) and bed material has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameters of 0.219 and 0.246 mm. Bed material used in the heat transfer experiments had particle density of 2700 kg/m3. A mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach was used in this work. A heat transfer analysis of CFB combustion system with detailed consideration of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient distributions along furnace height is investigated. Heat transfer data for FGR test were compared with the data obtained for representative conditions without recycled flue gases back to the furnace through star-up burners.

  8. Thermionic combustor application to combined gas and steam turbine power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskolczy, G.; Wang, C. C.; Lieb, D. P.; Margulies, A. E.; Fusegni, L. J.; Lovell, B. J.

    A design for the insertion of thermionic converters into the wall of a conventional combustor to produce electricity in a topping cycle is described, and a study for applications in gas and steam generators of 70 and 30 MW is evaluated for engineering and economic feasibility. Waste heat from the thermionic elements is used to preheat the combustor air; the heat absorbed by the elements plus further quenching of the exhaust gases with ammonia is projected to reduce NO(x) emissions to acceptable levels. Schematics, flow diagrams, and components of a computer model for cost projections are provided. It was found that temperatures around the emitters must be maintained above 1,600 K, with maximum efficiency and allowable temperature at 1,800 K, while collectors generate maximally at 950 K, with a corresponding work function of 1.5 eV. Cost sensitive studies indicate an installed price of $475/kW for the topping cycle, with improvements in thermionic converter characteristics bringing the cost to $375/kW at a busbar figure of 500 mills/kWh.

  9. Effect of flue gas recirculation on heat transfer in a supercritical circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on assessment of the effect of flue gas recirculation (FGR on heat transfer behavior in 1296t/h supercritical coal-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB combustor. The performance test in supercritical CFB combustor with capacity 966 MWth was performed with the low level of flue gas recirculation rate 6.9% into furnace chamber, for 80% unit load at the bed pressure of 7.7 kPa and the ratio of secondary air to the primary air SA/PA = 0.33. Heat transfer behavior in a supercritical CFB furnace between the active heat transfer surfaces (membrane wall and superheater and bed material has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameters of 0.219 and 0.246 mm. Bed material used in the heat transfer experiments had particle density of 2700 kg/m3. A mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach was used in this work. A heat transfer analysis of CFB combustion system with detailed consideration of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient distributions along furnace height is investigated. Heat transfer data for FGR test were compared with the data obtained for representative conditions without recycled flue gases back to the furnace through star-up burners.

  10. Computational investigation on combustion instabilities in a rocket combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Shen, Chibing

    2016-10-01

    High frequency combustion instability is viewed as the most challenging task in the development of Liquid Rocket Engines. In this article, results of attempts to capture the self-excited high frequency combustion instability in a rocket combustor are shown. The presence of combustion instability was demonstrated using point measurements, along with Fast Fourier Transform analysis and instantaneous flowfield contours. A baseline case demonstrates a similar wall heat flux profile as the associated experimental case. The acoustic oscillation modes and corresponding frequencies predicted by current simulations are almost the same as the results obtained from classic acoustic analysis. Pressure wave moving back and forth across the combustor was also observed. Then this baseline case was compared against different fuel-oxidizer velocity ratios. It predicts a general trend: the smaller velocity ratio produces larger oscillation amplitudes than the larger one. A possible explanation for the trend was given using the computational results.

  11. Features of Ignition and Stable Combustion in Supersonic Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfeld, M.; Starov, A.; Timofeev, K.

    2009-01-01

    Present paper describes the results of experimental investigations of the supersonic combustor with entrance Mach numbers from 2 to 4 at static pressure from 0.8 to 2.5 bars, total temperature from 2000K to 3000K. Hydrogen and kerosene were used as fuel. The conditions, under which the self-ignition and intensive combustion of the fuel realized were found. Position of ignition area in the channel was determined and features of flame propagation in the channel presented. A possibility to ensure an efficient combustion of hydrogen and kerosene at a high supersonic flow velocity at the combustor entrance without special throttling and/or pseudo-shock introduction was shown. Analysis of applicability of existing methods of criterion descriptions of conditions of self-ignition and extinction of combustion is executed for generalization of experimental results on the basis of results obtained.

  12. Analytical fuel property effects, small combustors, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of nonstandard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor was analyzed. The T700/CT7 engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. Higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity for the current T700 combustor which serves as a baseline were anticipated. It is, therefore, predicted that out of specification smoke visibility and higher than normal shell temperatures will exist when using NASA ERBS fuels with a consequence of severe reduction in cyclic life. Three new designs are proposed to compensate for the deficiencies expected with the existing design. They have emerged as the best of the eight originally proposed redesigns or combinations thereof. After the five choices that were originally made by NASA on the basis of competing performance factors, General Electric narrowed the field to the three proposed.

  13. N+2 Advanced Low NOx Combustor Technology Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbon, John; Aicholtz, John; Hsieh, Shih-Yang; Viars, Philip; Birmaher, Shai; Brown, Dan; Patel, Nayan; Carper, Doug; Cooper, Clay; Fitzgerald, Russell

    2017-01-01

    In accordance with NASAs technology goals for future subsonic vehicles, this contract identified and developed new combustor concepts toward meeting N+2 generation (2020) LTO (landing and take-off) NOx emissions reduction goal of 75 from the standard adopted at Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection 6 (CAEP6). Based on flame tube emissions, operability, and autoignition testing, one concept was down selected for sector testing at NASA. The N+2 combustor sector successfully demonstrated 75 reduction for LTO NOx (vs. CAEP6) and cruise NOx (vs. 2005 B777-200 reference) while maintaining 99.9 cruise efficiency and no increase in CO and HC emissions.The program also developed enabling technologies for the combustion system including ceramic matrix composites (CMC) liner materials, active combustion control concepts, and laser ignition for improved altitude relight.

  14. Systems and methods for preventing flashback in a combustor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present application include a combustor assembly. The combustor assembly may include a combustion chamber, a first plenum, a second plenum, and one or more elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes. Each of the elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes may include a first length at least partially disposed within the first plenum and configured to receive a first fluid from the first plenum. Moreover, each of the elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes may include a second length disposed downstream of the first length and at least partially disposed within the second plenum. The second length may be formed of a porous wall configured to allow a second fluid from the second plenum to enter the second length and create a boundary layer about the porous wall.

  15. A Global Remote Laboratory Experimentation Network and the Experiment Service Provider Business Model and Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor Ivar Eikaas

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from the IST KAII Trial project ReLAX - Remote LAboratory eXperimentation trial (IST 1999-20827, and contributes with a framework for a global remote laboratory experimentation network supported by a new business model. The paper presents this new Experiment Service Provider business model that aims at bringing physical experimentation back into the learning arena, where remotely operable laboratory experiments used in advanced education and training schemes are made available to a global education and training market in industry and academia. The business model is based on an approach where individual experiment owners offer remote access to their high-quality laboratory facilities to users around the world. The usage can be for research, education, on-the-job training etc. The access to these facilities is offered via an independent operating company - the Experiment Service Provider. The Experiment Service Provider offers eCommerce services like booking, access control, invoicing, dispute resolution, quality control, customer evaluation services and a unified Lab Portal.

  16. Effects of Immersed Surfaces on the Combustor Efficiency of Small-Scale Fluidized Beds

    OpenAIRE

    Nurdil Eskin; Afsin Gungor

    2005-01-01

    In this study, effects of the different types of heat exchanger surfaces on the second law efficiency of a small-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor are analyzed and the results are compared with the bubbling fluidized bed coal combustor effectiveness values. Using a previously developed simulation program, combustor efficiency and entropy generation values are obtained at different operation velocities at different height and volume ratios of the immersed surfaces, both for circu...

  17. Modeling Soil Organic Carbon at Regional Scale by Combining Multi-Spectral Images with Laboratory Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yi; Xiong, Xiong; Adhikari, Kabindra; Knadel, Maria; Grunwald, Sabine; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    2015-01-01

    There is a great challenge in combining soil proximal spectra and remote sensing spectra to improve the accuracy of soil organic carbon (SOC) models. This is primarily because mixing of spectral data from different sources and technologies to improve soil models is still in its infancy. The first objective of this study was to integrate information of SOC derived from visible near-infrared reflectance (Vis-NIR) spectra in the laboratory with remote sensing (RS) images to improve predictions of topsoil SOC in the Skjern river catchment, Denmark. The second objective was to improve SOC prediction results by separately modeling uplands and wetlands. A total of 328 topsoil samples were collected and analyzed for SOC. Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT5), Landsat Data Continuity Mission (Landsat 8) images, laboratory Vis-NIR and other ancillary environmental data including terrain parameters and soil maps were compiled to predict topsoil SOC using Cubist regression and Bayesian kriging. The results showed that the model developed from RS data, ancillary environmental data and laboratory spectral data yielded a lower root mean square error (RMSE) (2.8%) and higher R2 (0.59) than the model developed from only RS data and ancillary environmental data (RMSE: 3.6%, R2: 0.46). Plant-available water (PAW) was the most important predictor for all the models because of its close relationship with soil organic matter content. Moreover, vegetation indices, such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), were very important predictors in SOC spatial models. Furthermore, the 'upland model' was able to more accurately predict SOC compared with the 'upland & wetland model'. However, the separately calibrated 'upland and wetland model' did not improve the prediction accuracy for wetland sites, since it was not possible to adequately discriminate the vegetation in the RS summer images. We conclude that laboratory Vis

  18. Design and Performance of an Improved Trapped Vortex Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Yi; HE Xiaomin; JIANG Bo; WU Zejun; DING Guoyu

    2012-01-01

    A trapped vortex combustor (TVC) has been a very promising novel concept for it offers improvements in lean blow out,altitude relight,operating range,as well as a potential to decrease NOx emissions compared to conventional combustors.The present paper discusses the improved designs of the new combustor over the prior ones of our research group,including that:a) the overall dimensions,both axial and radial,are reduced to those of an actual aero-engine combustor; b) the air flow distribution is optimized,and especially 15% of the air is fed into the liner as cooling air; c) a straight-wall diffuser with divergence angle 9° is added.A series of experiments (cavity-fueled only,under atmospheric pressure) has been conducted to investigate the performance of the improved TVC.Experimental results show that at the inlet temperature of 523 K,the inlet pressure of 0.1 MPa,stable operation of the TVC test rig is observed for the Mach number 0.15-0.34,indicating good flame stability; the combustion efficiency obtained in this paper falls into the range of 60%-96%; as the total excess air ratio increases,the combustion efficiency decreases,while the increase of the inlet temperature is beneficial to high combustion efficiency; besides,the optimal Mach numbers for high combustion efficiency under different inlet conditions are confirmed.The outlet temperature profiles feature a bottom in the mid-height of the exit.This paper demonstrates the feasibility for the TVC to be applied to a realistic aero-engine preliminarily and provides reference for TVC design.

  19. System for tuning a combustor of a gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Michael John

    2016-12-27

    A system for tuning a combustor of a gas turbine includes a flow sleeve having an annular main body. The main body includes an upstream end, a downstream end, an inner surface and an outer surface. A cooling channel extends along the inner surface of the main body. The cooling channel extends at least partially between the downstream end and the upstream end of the main body.

  20. Model-Based Reasoning in the Upper-Division Physics Laboratory: Framework and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Zwickl, Benjamin M; Finkelstein, Noah; Lewandowski, H J

    2014-01-01

    Constructing and using models are core scientific practices that have gained significant attention within K-12 and higher education. Although modeling is a broadly applicable process, within physics education, it has been preferentially applied to the iterative development of broadly applicable principles (e.g., Newton's laws of motion in introductory mechanics). We review and extend existing frameworks on modeling to develop a new framework that more naturally describes model-based reasoning in upper-division physics labs. A significant feature of the new framework is that measurement tools (in addition to the physical system being studied) are subjected to the process of modeling. Think-aloud interviews were used to document examples of model-based reasoning in the laboratory and refine the modeling framework. The interviews showed how students productively applied similar facets of modeling to the physical system and measurement tools: construction, prediction, interpretation of data, identification of mod...

  1. Flame dynamics of a meso-scale heat recirculating combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayan, V.; Gupta, A.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The dynamics of premixed propane-air flame in a meso-scale ceramic combustor has been examined here. The flame characteristics in the combustor were examined by measuring the acoustic emissions and preheat temperatures together with high-speed cinematography. For the small-scale combustor, the volume to surface area ratio is small and hence the walls have significant effect on the global flame structure, flame location and flame dynamics. In addition to the flame-wall thermal coupling there is a coupling between flame and acoustics in the case of confined flames. Flame-wall thermal interactions lead to low frequency flame fluctuations ({proportional_to}100 Hz) depending upon the thermal response of the wall. However, the flame-acoustic interactions can result in a wide range of flame fluctuations ranging from few hundred Hz to few kHz. Wall temperature distribution is one of the factors that control the amount of reactant preheating which in turn effects the location of flame stabilization. Acoustic emission signals and high-speed flame imaging confirmed that for the present case flame-acoustic interactions have more significant effect on flame dynamics. Based on the acoustic emissions, five different flame regimes have been identified; whistling/harmonic mode, rich instability mode, lean instability mode, silent mode and pulsating flame mode. (author)

  2. Combustor cap having non-round outlets for mixing tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael John; Boardman, Gregory Allen; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Arguinzoni, Carlo Antonio

    2016-12-27

    A system includes a a combustor cap configured to be coupled to a plurality of mixing tubes of a multi-tube fuel nozzle, wherein each mixing tube of the plurality of mixing tubes is configured to mix air and fuel to form an air-fuel mixture. The combustor cap includes multiple nozzles integrated within the combustor cap. Each nozzle of the multiple nozzles is coupled to a respective mixing tube of the multiple mixing tubes. In addition, each nozzle of the multiple nozzles includes a first end and a second end. The first end is coupled to the respective mixing tube of the multiple mixing tubes. The second end defines a non-round outlet for the air-fuel mixture. Each nozzle of the multiple nozzles includes an inner surface having first and second portions, the first portion radially diverges along an axial direction from the first end to the second end, and the second portion radially converges along the axial direction from the first end to the second end.

  3. Evaluation of a staged fuel combustor for turboprop engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdouw, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    Proposed EPA emission regulations require emission reduction by 1979 for various gas turbine engine classes. Extensive combustion technology advancements are required to meet the proposed regulations. The T56 turboprop engine requires CO, UHC, and smoke reduction. A staged fuel combustor design was tested on a combustion rig to evaluate emission reduction potential in turboprop engines from fuel zoning. The can-type combustor has separately fueled-pilot and main combustion zones in series. The main zone fueling system was arranged for potential incorporation into the T56 with minor or no modifications to the basic engine. Three combustor variable geometry systems were incorporated to evaluate various airflow distributions. Emission results with fixed geometry operation met all proposed EPA regulations over the EPA LTO cycle. CO reduction was 82 percent, UHC reduction was 96 percent, and smoke reduction was 84 percent. NOx increased 14 percent over the LTO cycle. At high power, NOx reduction was 40 to 55 percent. This NOx reduction has potential application to stationary gas turbine powerplants which have different EPA regulations.

  4. Combustor concepts for aircraft gas turbine low-power emissions reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mularz, E. J.; Gleason, C. C.; Dodds, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Three combustor concepts have been designed and tested to demonstrate significant reductions in aircraft engine idle pollutant emissions. Each concept used a different approach for pollutant reductions: the Hot Wall Combustor employs a thermal barrier coating and impingement cooled liners, the Recuperative Cooling Combustor preheats the air before entering the combustion chamber, and the Catalytic Converter Combustor is composed of a conventional primary zone followed by a catalytic bed for pollutant cleanup. The designs are discussed in detail and test results are presented for a range of aircraft engine idle conditions. The results indicate that ultra-low levels of unburned hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide emissions can be achieved with this technology.

  5. Effect of variation of length-to-depth ratio and Mach number on the performance of a typical double cavity scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahto, Navin Kumar; Choubey, Gautam; Suneetha, Lakka; Pandey, K. M.

    2016-11-01

    The two equation standard k-ɛ turbulence model and the two-dimensional compressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations have been used to computationally simulate the double cavity scramjet combustor. Here all the simulations are performed by using ANSYS 14-FLUENT code. At the same time, the validation of the present numerical simulation for double cavity has been performed by comparing its result with the available experimental data which is in accordance with the literature. The results are in good agreement with the schlieren image and the pressure distribution curve obtained experimentally. However, the pressure distribution curve obtained numerically is under-predicted in 5 locations by numerical calculation. Further, investigations on the variations of the effects of the length-to-depth ratio of cavity and Mach number on the combustion characteristics has been carried out. The present results show that there is an optimal length-to-depth ratio for the cavity for which the performance of combustor significantly improves and also efficient combustion takes place within the combustor region. Also, the shifting of the location of incident oblique shock took place in the downstream of the H2 inlet when the Mach number value increases. But after achieving a critical Mach number range of 2-2.5, the further increase in Mach number results in lower combustion efficiency which may deteriorate the performance of combustor.

  6. Active vibration control with model correction on a flexible laboratory grid structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamel, George C., II; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and computational comparisons of three active damping control laws applied to a complex laboratory structure. Two reduced structural models were used with one model being corrected on the basis of measured mode shapes and frequencies. Three control laws were investigated, a time-invariant linear quadratic regulator with state estimation and two direct rate feedback control laws. Experimental results for all designs were obtained with digital implementation. It was found that model correction improved the agreement between analytical and experimental results. The best agreement was obtained with the simplest direct rate feedback control.

  7. Ultrasound data for laboratory calibration of an analytical model to calculate crack depth on asphalt pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Franesqui

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the ultrasound data employed to calibrate in the laboratory an analytical model that permits the calculation of the depth of partial-depth surface-initiated cracks on bituminous pavements using this non-destructive technique. This initial calibration is required so that the model provides sufficient precision during practical application. The ultrasonic pulse transit times were measured on beam samples of different asphalt mixtures (semi-dense asphalt concrete AC-S; asphalt concrete for very thin layers BBTM; and porous asphalt PA. The cracks on the laboratory samples were simulated by means of notches of variable depths. With the data of ultrasound transmission time ratios, curve-fittings were carried out on the analytical model, thus determining the regression parameters and their statistical dispersion. The calibrated models obtained from laboratory datasets were subsequently applied to auscultate the evolution of the crack depth after microwaves exposure in the research article entitled “Top-down cracking self-healing of asphalt pavements with steel filler from industrial waste applying microwaves” (Franesqui et al., 2017 [1].

  8. Ultrasound data for laboratory calibration of an analytical model to calculate crack depth on asphalt pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franesqui, Miguel A; Yepes, Jorge; García-González, Cándida

    2017-08-01

    This article outlines the ultrasound data employed to calibrate in the laboratory an analytical model that permits the calculation of the depth of partial-depth surface-initiated cracks on bituminous pavements using this non-destructive technique. This initial calibration is required so that the model provides sufficient precision during practical application. The ultrasonic pulse transit times were measured on beam samples of different asphalt mixtures (semi-dense asphalt concrete AC-S; asphalt concrete for very thin layers BBTM; and porous asphalt PA). The cracks on the laboratory samples were simulated by means of notches of variable depths. With the data of ultrasound transmission time ratios, curve-fittings were carried out on the analytical model, thus determining the regression parameters and their statistical dispersion. The calibrated models obtained from laboratory datasets were subsequently applied to auscultate the evolution of the crack depth after microwaves exposure in the research article entitled "Top-down cracking self-healing of asphalt pavements with steel filler from industrial waste applying microwaves" (Franesqui et al., 2017) [1].

  9. Microbial dynamics in a High Arctic glacier forefield: a combined field, laboratory, and modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, James A.; Arndt, Sandra; Šabacká, Marie; Benning, Liane G.; Barker, Gary L.; Blacker, Joshua J.; Yallop, Marian L.; Wright, Katherine E.; Bellas, Christopher M.; Telling, Jonathan; Tranter, Martyn; Anesio, Alexandre M.

    2016-10-01

    Modelling the development of soils in glacier forefields is necessary in order to assess how microbial and geochemical processes interact and shape soil development in response to glacier retreat. Furthermore, such models can help us predict microbial growth and the fate of Arctic soils in an increasingly ice-free future. Here, for the first time, we combined field sampling with laboratory analyses and numerical modelling to investigate microbial community dynamics in oligotrophic proglacial soils in Svalbard. We measured low bacterial growth rates and growth efficiencies (relative to estimates from Alpine glacier forefields) and high sensitivity of bacterial growth rates to soil temperature (relative to temperate soils). We used these laboratory measurements to inform parameter values in a new numerical model and significantly refined predictions of microbial and biogeochemical dynamics of soil development over a period of roughly 120 years. The model predicted the observed accumulation of autotrophic and heterotrophic biomass. Genomic data indicated that initial microbial communities were dominated by bacteria derived from the glacial environment, whereas older soils hosted a mixed community of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. This finding was simulated by the numerical model, which showed that active microbial communities play key roles in fixing and recycling carbon and nutrients. We also demonstrated the role of allochthonous carbon and microbial necromass in sustaining a pool of organic material, despite high heterotrophic activity in older soils. This combined field, laboratory, and modelling approach demonstrates the value of integrated model-data studies to understand and quantify the functioning of the microbial community in an emerging High Arctic soil ecosystem.

  10. Effect of the air-fuel mixing on the NOx yield in a low-emission gas-turbine plant combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, V. D.; Bulysova, L. A.; Berne, A. L.

    2016-04-01

    The article deals with construction of a simplified model of inhibition of nitric oxides formed in the combustors of the gas-turbine plants (GTPs) operating on natural gas. A combustor in which premixed, lean air-fuel mixtures are burnt is studied theoretically and experimentally. The research was carried out using a full-scale combustor that had parameters characteristic of modern GTPs. The article presents the results computed by the FlowVision software and the results of the experiments carried out on the test bench of the All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute. The calculations and the tests were conducted under the following conditions: a flow rate of approximately 4.6 kg/s, a pressure to 450 kPa, an air temperature at the combustor inlet of approximately 400°C, the outlet temperature t 3 ≤ 1200°C, and natural gas as the fuel. The comparison of the simulated parameters with the experimental results underlies the constructed correlation dependence of the experimental NO x emission on the calculated parameter of nonuniform fuel concentration at the premixing zone outlet. The postulate about a weak dependence of the emission of NO x formed upon combustion of a perfectly mixed air-fuel mixture—when the methane concentration in air is constant at any point of the air-fuel mixture, i.e., constant in the mixture bulk—on the pressure in the combustor has been experimentally proven. The correctness and the practicability of the stationary mathematical model of the mixing process used to assess the NO x emission by the calculated amount of the air-fuel mixture generated in the premixing zone has been validated. This eliminates some difficulties that arise in the course of calculation of combustion and formation of NO x .

  11. International on Workshop Advances in Laboratory Testing & Modelling of Soils and Shales

    CERN Document Server

    Laloui, Lyesse

    2017-01-01

    In this spirit, the ATMSS International Workshop “Advances in Laboratory Testing & Modelling of Soils and Shales” (Villars-sur-Ollon, Switzerland; 18-20 January 2017) has been organized to promote the exchange of ideas, experience and state of the art among major experts active in the field of experimental testing and modelling of soils and shales. The Workshop has been organized under the auspices of the Technical Committees TC-101 “Laboratory Testing”, TC-106 “Unsaturated Soils” and TC-308 “Energy Geotechnics” of the International Society of Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering. This volume contains the invited keynote and feature lectures, as well as the papers that have been presented at the Workshop. The topics of the lectures and papers cover a wide range of theoretical and experimental research, including unsaturated behaviour of soils and shales, multiphysical testing of geomaterials, hydro–mechanical behaviour of shales and stiff clays, the geomechanical behaviour of the ...

  12. Iceberg capsize hydrodynamics: a comparison of laboratory experiments and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, J. C.; Cathles, L. M.; Correa-Legisos, S.; Ellowitz, J.; Darnell, K.; Zhang, W. W.; MacAyeal, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Large icebergs are often observed to capsize in open water near fjords. During capsize, large amounts of gravitational potential energy are released which can lead to coastal tsunamis, mixing of the water column, and possibly lead to further calving at the glacier terminus. This process is rarely studied; in nature the scale and irregular timing of the events makes observations exceedingly difficult. Here we compare laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of the capsize process to better understand the coupling of the hydrodynamic forces to the solid iceberg. Although the characteristic Reynolds number is much lower for both the laboratory model and the numerical simulations, the comparison provides a starting point to quantify and identify generic features that can be estimated in the field, such as hydrodynamic pressure, water flow velocities, vertical mixing, and elastic stresses on the iceberg itself, which could lead to fracture.

  13. The aerodynamics of the near field of pressurised pulverized fuel combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeles, G.; Anagnostopoulos, J.; Papadakis, G.; Mouzakis, F.; Voyages, C. [National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece). Lab. for Aerodynamics, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-12-31

    This research aims at improving knowledge of an effective design of pressurized pulverized fuel combustors (PPFC). Problems investigated are slag, cleaning efficiency, near burner aerodynamics and effects of pressure on combustion characteristics and on NO concentration levels. The Coal Combustion Algorithm (CO. C.A.-3D code) was the basis for the numerical work performed. Several new models were developed and incorporated into the basic code; a model for the calculation of slag formation, thickness and flow inside a PPFC, three different techniques for domain decomposition by the use of locally refined, staggered or collocated grids; an improved NO postprocessor to account for elevated pressure and turbulence effects. A new version of the final code was developed to obtain solutions in 3-D, cylindrical co-ordinates. All the above models were validated using available experimental data. The slag model predictions were in agreement with the practical evidence. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the domain decomposition techniques were assessed. The best proposed technique was found to combine simplicity, increased accuracy of the predictions in complex flow regions, and significantly reduced computer memory and storage requirements. The use of cylindrical co-ordinates for calculations inside cylindrical-type combustion chambers was found to achieve a more stable convergence of the algorithm and a considerable reduction of numerical diffusion. The proposed modifications of a basic NO formation model produced very encouraging predictions in a wide range of combustion conditions examined (various pressures, temperatures and oxygen concentrations). The numerical work performed provides a engineering tool to improve the physical understanding of the effects of pressurization on the performance and efficiency of combustor design. 33 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Large-eddy simulations of real-fluid effects in rocket engine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Peter C.; Hickey, Jean-Pierre; Ihme, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    This study is concerned with the LES-modeling of real-fluid effects in rocket combustors. The non-ideal fluid behavior is modeled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state, and high-pressure effects on the thermo-viscous transport properties are also considered. An efficient and robust algorithm is developed to evaluate the thermodynamic state-vector. The highly non-linear coupling of the primitive thermodynamic variables in regions near the critical point requires special consideration to avoid spurious numerical oscillations. To avoid these non-physical oscillations, a second-order essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) scheme is applied in regions that are identified by a density-based sensor. The resulting algorithm is applied in LES to a coaxial rocket-injector, and super- and transcritical operating conditions are considered. Simulation results and comparisons with experimental data will be presented, and the influence of boundary conditions on the mixing characteristics will be discussed.

  15. Hybrid-structure atomic models for HED laboratory plasma diagnostics and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Stephanie

    2010-03-01

    While theoretical atomic physics calculations are well developed for isolated atoms and have been thoroughly benchmarked against low-density laboratory sources such as electron beam ion traps and tokamak plasmas, the high energy density (HED) regime offers significant challenges for atomic physics and spectroscopic modeling. High plasma densities lead to collective effects such as continuum lowering, line broadening, and significant populations in multiply excited atomic states. These effects change the plasma equation of state and the character of emission and absorption spectra and must be accounted for in order to accurately simulate radiative transfer in and apply spectroscopic diagnostics to HED plasmas. Modeling complex mid- and high-Z ions in the HED regime is a particular challenge because exponential growth in accessible configuration space overwhelms the reduction of the Rydberg levels through continuum lowering. This talk will discuss one approach to generating a tractable spectroscopic-quality atomic kinetics model and describe its application to HED laboratory plasmas produced on Sandia's Z facility. [4pt] Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Incorporating learning goals about modeling into an upper-division physics laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Finkelstein, Noah; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2014-09-01

    Implementing a laboratory activity involves a complex interplay among learning goals, available resources, feedback about the existing course, best practices for teaching, and an overall philosophy about teaching labs. Building on our previous work, which described a process of transforming an entire lab course, we now turn our attention to how an individual lab activity on the polarization of light was redesigned to include a renewed emphasis on one broad learning goal: modeling. By using this common optics lab as a concrete case study of a broadly applicable approach, we highlight many aspects of the activity development and show how modeling is used to integrate sophisticated conceptual and quantitative reasoning into the experimental process through the various aspects of modeling: constructing models, making predictions, interpreting data, comparing measurements with predictions, and refining models. One significant outcome is a natural way to integrate an analysis and discussion of systematic error into a lab activity.

  17. Survey of biomedical and environental data bases, models, and integrated computer systems at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murarka, I.P.; Bodeau, D.J.; Scott, J.M.; Huebner, R.H.

    1978-08-01

    This document contains an inventory (index) of information resources pertaining to biomedical and environmental projects at Argonne National Laboratory--the information resources include a data base, model, or integrated computer system. Entries are categorized as models, numeric data bases, bibliographic data bases, or integrated hardware/software systems. Descriptions of the Information Coordination Focal Point (ICFP) program, the system for compiling this inventory, and the plans for continuing and expanding it are given, and suggestions for utilizing the services of the ICFP are outlined.

  18. Comparison of truncated shell model calculations in the laboratory and intrinsic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catara, F.; Insolia, A.; Sambataro, M.; Maglione, E.; Vitturi, A.

    1985-08-01

    We perform, in the case of particles moving in a single-j level, shell model calculations in which the angular momentum of the individual pairs is restricted to a maximum value. The comparison with the full calculation shows the need for including at least the G pairs in the model space in order to reproduce the correct moments of inertia and transition rates of the different rotational bands. We also show that a level scheme very close to that obtained in the laboratory system can be alternatively obtained by angular momentum projection starting from intrinsic states evaluated in the intrinsic frame.

  19. Description of a digital computer simulation of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, C. T.; Groom, N. J.

    1981-01-01

    A description of a digital computer simulation of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory model is presented. The AMCD is a momentum exchange device which is under development as an advanced control effector for spacecraft attitude control systems. The digital computer simulation of this device incorporates the following models: six degree of freedom rigid body dynamics; rim warp; controller dynamics; nonlinear distributed element axial bearings; as well as power driver and power supply current limits. An annotated FORTRAN IV source code listing of the computer program is included.

  20. 40 CFR 60.53a - Standard for municipal waste combustor organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for municipal waste combustor organics. 60.53a Section 60.53a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... September 20, 1994 § 60.53a Standard for municipal waste combustor organics. (a) (b) On and after the...

  1. Grimethorpe experimental pressurized fluidized-bed combustor: in future energy concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    The experimental pressurized fluidized bed combustor project at Grimethorpe, UK, is described. The design of the combustor, which is a pressure vessel containing a furnace, which contains the fluidized bed is discussed. Details of the process, the steam water circuit, the fuel system and method of feeding coal, ash removal during the process, the water treatment plant and plant control are given.

  2. The preliminary design of an annular combustor for a mini gas turbine

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, Bronwyn C

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study involves the redesign of the combustor liner for a 200N mini gas turbine engine using first principles and the design methods of the NREC series as shown in Figure 1. The combustor design was performed using five different operating...

  3. Gas Turbine Combustor Liner Life Assessment Using a Combined Fluid/Structural Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinga, Tiedo; Kampen, van J.F.; Jager, de B.; Kok, J.B.W.

    2007-01-01

    A life assessment was performed on a fighter jet engine annular combustor liner, using a combined fluid/structural approach. Computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed to obtain the thermal loading of the combustor liner and finite element analyses were done to calculate the temperature an

  4. Mapping mantle flow during retreating subduction: Laboratory models analyzed by feature tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funiciello, F.; Moroni, M.; Piromallo, C.; Faccenna, C.; Cenedese, A.; Bui, H. A.

    2006-03-01

    Three-dimensional dynamically consistent laboratory models are carried out to model the large-scale mantle circulation induced by subduction of a laterally migrating slab. A laboratory analogue of a slab-upper mantle system is set up with two linearly viscous layers of silicone putty and glucose syrup in a tank. The circulation pattern is continuously monitored and quantitatively estimated using a feature tracking image analysis technique. The effects of plate width and mantle viscosity/density on mantle circulation are systematically considered. The experiments show that rollback subduction generates a complex three-dimensional time-dependent mantle circulation pattern characterized by the presence of two distinct components: the poloidal and the toroidal circulation. The poloidal component is the answer to the viscous coupling between the slab motion and the mantle, while the toroidal one is produced by lateral slab migration. Spatial and temporal features of mantle circulation are carefully analyzed. These models show that (1) poloidal and toroidal mantle circulation are both active since the beginning of the subduction process, (2) mantle circulation is intermittent, (3) plate width affects the velocity and the dimension of subduction induced mantle circulation area, and (4) mantle flow in subduction zones cannot be correctly described by models assuming a two-dimensional steady state process. We show that the intermittent toroidal component of mantle circulation, missed in those models, plays a crucial role in modifying the geometry and the efficiency of the poloidal component.

  5. Cross-flow turbines: progress report on physical and numerical model studies at large laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, Martin; Bachant, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Cross-flow turbines show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) applications. A research focus is on accurately predicting device performance and wake evolution to improve turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction. Experiments were carried with large laboratory-scale cross-flow turbines D O (1 m) using a turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. Several turbines of varying solidity were employed, including the UNH Reference Vertical Axis Turbine (RVAT) and a 1:6 scale model of the DOE-Sandia Reference Model 2 (RM2) turbine. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier-Stokes models. Results are presented for the simulation of performance and wake dynamics of cross-flow turbines and compared with experiments and body-fitted mesh, blade-resolving CFD. Supported by NSF-CBET Grant 1150797, Sandia National Laboratories.

  6. Cryosphere Science Outreach using the Ice Sheet System Model and a Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. L. C.; Halkides, D. J.; Larour, E. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the role of Cryosphere Science within the larger context of Sea Level Rise is both a technical and educational challenge that needs to be addressed if the public at large is to trulyunderstand the implications and consequences of Climate Change. Within this context, we propose a new approach in which scientific tools are used directly inside a mobile/website platform geared towards Education/Outreach. Here, we apply this approach by using the Ice Sheet System Model, a state of the art Cryosphere model developed at NASA, and integrated within a Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory, with the goal is to outreach Cryospherescience to K-12 and College level students. The approach mixes laboratory experiments, interactive classes/lessons on a website, and a simplified interface to a full-fledged instance of ISSM to validate the classes/lessons. This novel approach leverages new insights from the Outreach/Educational community and the interest of new generations in web based technologies and simulation tools, all of it delivered in a seamlessly integrated web platform. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory undera contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryosphere Science Program.

  7. Outreach/education interface for Cryosphere models using the Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larour, E. Y.; Halkides, D. J.; Romero, V.; Cheng, D. L.; Perez, G.

    2014-12-01

    In the past decade, great strides have been made in the development of models capable of projecting the future evolution of glaciers and the polar ice sheets in a changing climate. These models are now capable of replicating some of the trends apparent in satellite observations. However, because this field is just now maturing, very few efforts have been dedicated to adapting these capabilities to education. Technologies that have been used in outreach efforts in Atmospheric and Oceanic sciences still have not been extended to Cryospheric Science. We present a cutting-edge, technologically driven virtual laboratory, geared towards outreach and k-12 education, dedicated to the polar ice sheets on Antarctica and Greenland, and their role as major contributors to sea level rise in coming decades. VISL (Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory) relies on state-of-the art Web GL rendering of polar ice sheets, Android/iPhone and web portability using Javascript, as well as C++ simulations (back-end) based on the Ice Sheet System Model, the NASA model for simulating the evolution of polar ice sheets. Using VISL, educators and students can have an immersive experience into the world of polar ice sheets, while at the same exercising the capabilities of a state-of-the-art climate model, all of it embedded into an education experience that follows the new STEM standards for education.This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryosphere Science Program.

  8. Development and testing of pulsed and rotating detonation combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. George, Andrew C.

    Detonation is a self-sustaining, supersonic, shock-driven, exothermic reaction. Detonation combustion can theoretically provide significant improvements in thermodynamic efficiency over constant pressure combustion when incorporated into existing cycles. To harness this potential performance benefit, countless studies have worked to develop detonation combustors and integrate these devices into existing systems. This dissertation consists of a series of investigations on two types of detonation combustors: the pulse detonation combustor (PDC) and the rotating detonation combustor (RDC). In the first two investigations, an array of air-breathing PDCs is integrated with an axial power turbine. The system is initially operated with steady and pulsed cold air flow to determine the effect of pulsed flow on turbine performance. Various averaging approaches are employed to calculate turbine efficiency, but only flow-weighted (e.g., mass or work averaging) definitions have physical significance. Pulsed flow turbine efficiency is comparable to steady flow efficiency at high corrected flow rates and low rotor speeds. At these conditions, the pulse duty cycle expands and the variation of the rotor incidence angle is constrained to a favorable range. The system is operated with pulsed detonating flow to determine the effect of frequency, fill fraction, and rotor speed on turbine performance. For some conditions, output power exceeds the maximum attainable value from steady constant pressure combustion due to a significant increase in available power from the detonation products. However, the turbine component efficiency estimated from classical thermodynamic analysis is four times lower than the steady design point efficiency. Analysis of blade angles shows a significant penalty due to the detonation, fill, and purge processes simultaneously imposed on the rotor. The latter six investigations focus on fundamental research of the RDC concept. A specially-tailored RDC data

  9. Heat Pump Water Heater Technology Assessment Based on Laboratory Research and Energy Simulation Models: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudon, K.; Sparn, B.; Christensen, D.; Maguire, J.

    2012-02-01

    This paper explores the laboratory performance of five integrated Heat Pump Water Heaters (HPWHs) across a wide range of operating conditions representative of US climate regions. Laboratory results demonstrate the efficiency of this technology under most of the conditions tested and show that differences in control schemes and design features impact the performance of the individual units. These results were used to understand current model limitations, and then to bracket the energy savings potential for HPWH technology in various US climate regions. Simulation results show that HPWHs are expected to provide significant energy savings in many climate zones when compared to other types of water heaters (up to 64%, including impact on HVAC systems).

  10. The Role of Heterogeneous Chemistry of Volatile ORganic Compounds: A Modeling and Laboratory Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory R. Carmichael; Vicki H. Grassian

    2007-03-01

    Overview The outputs of this research have been reported annually via the RIMS system. This report serves as an update and final report. The focus of our DOE BES funded project is on the importance of heterogeneous reactions in the troposphere. The primary objectives of our study were to: (i) Evaluate the extent to which heterogeneous chemistry affects the photochemical oxidant cycle, particularly, sources and sinks of tropospheric ozone; and (ii) Conduct laboratory studies on heterogeneous reactions involving NOy, O3 and VOCs on aerosol surfaces. These objectives were pursued through a multidisciplinary approach that combines modeling and laboratory components as discussed in more detail below. In addition, in response to the reconfiguring of the Atmospheric Science Program to focus on aerosol radiative forcing of climate, we also began to investigate the radiative properties of atmospheric aerosol.

  11. Parametric Study of Pulse-Combustor-Driven Ejectors at High-Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yungster, Shaye; Paxson, Daniel E.; Perkins, Hugh D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse-combustor configurations developed in recent studies have demonstrated performance levels at high-pressure operating conditions comparable to those observed at atmospheric conditions. However, problems related to the way fuel was being distributed within the pulse combustor were still limiting performance. In the first part of this study, new configurations are investigated computationally aimed at improving the fuel distribution and performance of the pulse-combustor. Subsequent sections investigate the performance of various pulse-combustor driven ejector configurations operating at highpressure conditions, focusing on the effects of fuel equivalence ratio and ejector throat area. The goal is to design pulse-combustor-ejector configurations that maximize pressure gain while achieving a thermal environment acceptable to a turbine, and at the same time maintain acceptable levels of NOx emissions and flow non-uniformities. The computations presented here have demonstrated pressure gains of up to 2.8%.

  12. A conceptual design of shock-eliminating clover combustor for large scale scramjet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-bo; Zhao, Yu-xin; Zhao, Guo-yan; Liu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    A new concept of shock-eliminating clover combustor is proposed for large scale scramjet engine to fulfill the requirements of fuel penetration, total pressure recovery and cooling. To generate the circular-to-clover transition shape of the combustor, the streamline tracing technique is used based on an axisymmetric expansion parent flowfield calculated using the method of characteristics. The combustor is examined using inviscid and viscous numerical simulations and a pure circular shape is calculated for comparison. The results showed that the combustor avoids the shock wave generation and produces low total pressure losses in a wide range of flight condition with various Mach number. The flameholding device for this combustor is briefly discussed.

  13. Laboratory strains of Escherichia coli: model citizens or deceitful delinquents growing old disgracefully?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobman, Jon L; Penn, Charles W; Pallen, Mark J

    2007-05-01

    Escherichia coli stands unchallenged as biology's premier model organism. However, we propose, equipped with insights from the post-genomic era, a contrary view: that microbiology's chief idol has feet of clay. E. coli laboratory strains, particularly E. coli K-12, are far from model citizens, but instead degenerate and deceitful delinquents growing old disgracefully in our scientific institutions. E. coli K-12 is neither archetype nor ancestor. In addition, it has a far from optimal provenance for a model organism, with strong grounds for believing that current versions of the strain are quite distinct from any original wild-type free-living ancestor. In addition, it is usually studied under conditions far removed from its natural habitats and in ignorance of the selective pressures that have shaped its evolution. Fortunately, a flood of information from high-throughput genome sequencing, together with a new 'eco-evo' view of this model organism, promises to help put K-12 better into context.

  14. The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: 2. Dynamic implications of geodynamic simulations validated with laboratory models

    KAUST Repository

    van Dinther, Y.

    2013-04-01

    The physics governing the seismic cycle at seismically active subduction zones remains poorly understood due to restricted direct observations in time and space. To investigate subduction zone dynamics and associated interplate seismicity, we validate a continuum, visco-elasto-plastic numerical model with a new laboratory approach (Paper 1). The analogous laboratory setup includes a visco-elastic gelatin wedge underthrusted by a rigid plate with defined velocity-weakening and -strengthening regions. Our geodynamic simulation approach includes velocity-weakening friction to spontaneously generate a series of fast frictional instabilities that correspond to analog earthquakes. A match between numerical and laboratory source parameters is obtained when velocity-strengthening is applied in the aseismic regions to stabilize the rupture. Spontaneous evolution of absolute stresses leads to nucleation by coalescence of neighboring patches, mainly occurring at evolving asperities near the seismogenic zone limits. Consequently, a crack-, or occasionally even pulse-like, rupture propagates toward the opposite side of the seismogenic zone by increasing stresses ahead of its rupture front, until it arrests on a barrier. The resulting surface displacements qualitatively agree with geodetic observations and show landward and, from near the downdip limit, upward interseismic motions. These are rebound and reversed coseismically. This slip increases adjacent stresses, which are relaxed postseismically by afterslip and thereby produce persistent seaward motions. The wide range of observed physical phenomena, including back-propagation and repeated slip, and the agreement with laboratory results demonstrate that visco-elasto-plastic geodynamic models with rate-dependent friction form a new tool that can greatly contribute to our understanding of the seismic cycle at subduction zones.

  15. Investigation of LPP combustors under elevated pressure conditions; Untersuchungen zu LPP-Flugtriebwerksbrennkammern unter erhoehtem Druck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, R.

    2001-05-01

    The development of new combustor concepts for aero engines to meet future emissions regulations in based on a detailed knowledge of the combustion process and the velocity field. In the presented thesis, non intrusive measurements were performed in a model combustion chamber under almost realistic pressure and temperature conditions. The species OH, NO, unburned hydrocarbons and fuel droplets were detected in 2 dimensions with the Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). The velocity field was measured with the Particle Image Velocimetry technique (PIV). [German] Die Weiterentwicklung neuer Brennkammerkonzepte zur Erfuellung zukuenftiger Schadstoffemissionsrichtlinien erfordert genaue Kenntnisse der ablaufenden Verbrennungs- und Stroemungsvorgaenge in der Brennkammer. Bei den in der Arbeit vorgestellten Untersuchungen wurden in einer LPP-Modellbrennkammer unter annaehernd realistischen Eintrittsbedingungen die Spezies OH, NO, unverbrannte Kohlenwasserstoffe sowie noch fluessiger Brennstoff zweidimensional anhand der Laserinduzierten Fluoreszenz (LIF) nachgewiesen. Das Stroemungsfeld wurde mit Hilfe der Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) gemessen.

  16. Large-Eddy Simulation of combustion instabilities in a variable-length combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garby, Romain; Selle, Laurent; Poinsot, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a simulation of a model rocket combustor with continuously variable acoustic properties thanks to a variable-length injector tube. Fully compressible Large-Eddy Simulations are conducted using the AVBP code. An original flame stabilization mechanism is uncovered where the recirculation of hot gases in the corner recirculation zone creates a triple flame structure. An unstable operating point is then chosen to investigate the mechanism of the instability. The simulations are compared to experimental results in terms of frequency and mode structure. Two-dimensional axi-symmetric computations are compared to full 3D simulations in order to assess the validity of the axi-symmetry assumption for the prediction of mean and unsteady features of this flow. Despite the inaccuracies inherent to the 2D description of a turbulent flow, for this configuration and the particular operating point investigated, the axi-symmetric simulation qualitatively reproduces some features of the instability.

  17. A Computer Code for Swirling Turbulent Axisymmetric Recirculating Flows in Practical Isothermal Combustor Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, D. G.; Rhode, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    A primitive pressure-velocity variable finite difference computer code was developed to predict swirling recirculating inert turbulent flows in axisymmetric combustors in general, and for application to a specific idealized combustion chamber with sudden or gradual expansion. The technique involves a staggered grid system for axial and radial velocities, a line relaxation procedure for efficient solution of the equations, a two-equation k-epsilon turbulence model, a stairstep boundary representation of the expansion flow, and realistic accommodation of swirl effects. A user's manual, dealing with the computational problem, showing how the mathematical basis and computational scheme may be translated into a computer program is presented. A flow chart, FORTRAN IV listing, notes about various subroutines and a user's guide are supplied as an aid to prospective users of the code.

  18. Predictions and measurements of isothermal flowfields in axisymmetric combustor geometries. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, D. L.; Lilley, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical predictions, flow visualization experiments and time-mean velocity measurements were obtained for six basic nonreacting flowfields (with inlet swirl vane angles of 0 (swirler removed), 45 and 70 degrees and sidewall expansion angles of 90 and 45 degrees) in an idealized axisymmetric combustor geometry. A flowfield prediction computer program was developed which solves appropriate finite difference equations including a conventional two equation k-epsilon eddy viscosity turbulence model. The wall functions employed were derived from previous swirling flow measurements, and the stairstep approximation was employed to represent the sloping wall at the inlet to the test chamber. Recirculation region boundaries have been sketched from the entire flow visualization photograph collection. Tufts, smoke, and neutrally buoyant helium filled soap bubbles were employed as flow tracers. A five hole pitot probe was utilized to measure the axial, radial, and swirl time mean velocity components.

  19. Development Report on the Idaho National Laboratory Sitewide Three-Dimensional Aquifer Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas R. Wood; Catherine M. Helm-Clark; Hai Huang; Swen Magnuson; Travis McLing; Brennon Orr; Michael J. Rohe; Mitchell A. Plummer; Robert Podgorney; Erik Whitmore; Michael S. Roddy

    2007-09-01

    A sub-regional scale, three-dimensional flow model of the Snake River Plain Aquifer was developed to support remediation decisions for Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10 08 at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. This model has been calibrated primarily to water levels and secondarily to groundwater velocities interpreted from stable isotope disequilibrium studies and the movement of anthropogenic contaminants in the aquifer from facilities at the INL. The three-dimensional flow model described in this report is one step in the process of constructing a fully three-dimensional groundwater flow and contaminant transport model as prescribed in the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Operable Unit 10-08 Sitewide Groundwater Model Work Plan. An updated three-dimensional hydrogeologic conceptual model is presented along with the geologic basis for the conceptual model. Sediment-dominated three-dimensional volumes were used to represent the geology and constrain groundwater flow as part of the conceptual model. Hydrological, geochemical, and geological data were summarized and evaluated to infer aquifer behavior. A primary observation from development and evaluation of the conceptual model was that relative to flow on a regional scale, the aquifer can be treated with steady-state conditions. Boundary conditions developed for the three-dimensional flow model are presented along with inverse simulations that estimate parameterization of hydraulic conductivity. Inverse simulations were performed using the pilot-point method to estimate permeability distributions. Thermal modeling at the regional aquifer scale and at the sub-regional scale using the inverted permeabilities is presented to corroborate the results of the flow model. The results from the flow model show good agreement with simulated and observed water levels almost always within 1 meter. Simulated velocities show generally good agreement with some discrepancies in an interpreted low

  20. Diffusion Combustion in a Tube-Nested Combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuji, Seko; Ryosuke, Matsumoto; Yoshitomo, Shintani; Isao, Ishihara; Mamoru, Ozawa

    2004-01-01

    An advanced-type compact water-tube boiler has been designed on the basis of the new concept of cooling flame by water-tube bank in the furnace, and is referred to as "tube-nested combustor". It realized drastic reduction in boiler size as well as in the NO_x emission. In this present study, aiming at further improvement of boiler efficiency and reduction of NO_x emission, the combustion characteristics in the furnace were investigated by using the test boiler of 0.5t/h steam output. Experime...

  1. Device for improved air and fuel distribution to a combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laster, Walter R.; Schilp, Reinhard

    2016-05-31

    A flow conditioning device (30, 50, 70, 100, 150) for a can annular gas turbine engine, including a plurality of flow elements (32, 34, 52, 54, 72, 74, 102) disposed in a compressed air flow path (42, 60, 80, 114, 122) leading to a combustor (12), configured such that relative adjustment of at least one flow directing element (32, 52, 72, 110) with respect to an adjacent flow directing element (34, 54, 74, 112, 120) during operation of the gas turbine engine is effective to adjust a level of choking of the compressed air flow path (42, 60, 80, 114, 122).

  2. Refractory experience in circulating fluidized bed combustors, Task 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, R.Q.

    1989-11-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation into the status of the design and selection of refractory materials for coal-fueled circulating fluidized-bed combustors. The survey concentrated on operating units in the United States manufactured by six different boiler vendors: Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, Foster Wheeler, Keeler Dorr-Oliver, Pyropower, and Riley Stoker. Information was obtained from the boiler vendors, refractory suppliers and installers, and the owners/operators of over forty units. This work is in support of DOE's Clean Coal Technology program, which includes circulating fluidized-bed technology as one of the selected concepts being evaluated.

  3. Laboratory cohabitation challenge model for shrimp hepatopancreatic microsporidiosis (HPM) caused by Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salachan, Paul Vinu; Jaroenlak, Pattana; Thitamadee, Siripong; Itsathitphaisarn, Ornchuma; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya

    2017-01-05

    Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP) causes hepatopancreatic microsporidiosis (HPM) in shrimp. It is probably endemic in Australasia and was first characterized and named from the giant or black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon from Thailand in 2009. Later, it was also found to infect exotic Penaeus vannamei imported for cultivation in Asia. HPM is not normally associated with shrimp mortality, but information from shrimp farmers indicates that it is associated with significant growth retardation that is not clearly noticeable until 2-3 months of cultivation. In order to study modes of HPM transmission and to test possible control measures, a laboratory challenge model was needed that would mimic the mode of infection in shrimp ponds. We describe successful transmission in a cohabitation model with natural E. hepatopenaei (EHP)-infected shrimp in closed, perforated plastic containers placed in aquaria together with free-swimming, uninfected shrimp. After a period of 14 days all the free-swimming shrimp tested positive by PCR (approximately 60% with heavy infections evident by 1-step PCR positive test results) and gave positive histological and in situ hybridization results for E. hepatopenaei (EHP) in the hepatopancreas. A laboratory cohabitation model for studying E. hepatopenaei (EHP) has been developed and used to confirm that E. hepatopenaei (EHP) can be directly transmitted horizontally among shrimp via water. The model will facilitate studies on methods to prevent the E. hepatopenaei (EHP) transmission.

  4. Application of a learning model in a traditional engineering classroom and laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cordelia Magalene

    The purpose of this dissertation research was to develop a learning model. This three-phase learning model involved administering pre-assessment inventories, facilitating collaborative exercises, and evaluating learning experiences. This dissertation explores the potential effects the learning model might have on course performance and overall academic performance. It focuses on potential relationships between course performance and learning style preferences data, demographics, and level of participation in phases of the learning model. It also examines relationships between confidence levels and the performance of course objectives. The first and final phases were applied to an introductory Electrical Engineering course. The second phase was applied to selected sections of the course. In the initial phase, students in all sections of the course were administered the Index of Learning Styles Questionnaire, a Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and a pre-laboratory evaluation. In the second phase of the learning model, the students in the selected sections participated in weekly learning sessions. The weekly learning sessions provided students with practice problem sets and a structured environment to collaboratively practice problems and discuss course concepts. The final phase of the learning model evaluated the performance of students in both environments. From the application of the learning model, the effects that various instructional methods would have on students' performance in a laboratory type of environment were investigated. Overall, students that participated in the weekly learning sessions earned grades that were comparable or better than non-participants. Participants and non-participants in the weekly learning sessions with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Engineering Type (INTJ or ISTJ) earned about the same grade. Participants in the weekly learning sessions with types other than MBTI Engineering Type outperformed their peers of the same MBTI type

  5. Model prediction uncertainty of bromide and pesticides transport in laboratory column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Dohnal, Michal; Snehota, Michal; Sobotkova, Martina; Ray, Chittaranjan; Vogel, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of transport parameters of reactive solutes such as pesticides is a prerequisite for reliable predictions of their fate and transport in soil porous systems. Water flow and transport of bromide tracer and five pesticides (atrazine, imazaquin, sulfometuron methyl, S-metolachlor, and imidacloprid) through an undisturbed soil column of tropical Oxisol were analyzed using a one-dimensional numerical model. Laboratory column leaching experiment with three flow interruptions was conducted. The applied numerical model is based on Richards' equation for solving water flow and the advection-dispersion equation for solving solute transport. A global optimization method was used to evaluate the model's sensitivity to transport parameters and the uncertainty of model predictions. Within the Monte Carlo modeling framework, multiple forward simulations searching through the parametric space, were executed to describe the observed breakthrough curves. All pesticides were found to be relatively mobile. Experimental data indicated significant non-conservative behavior of bromide tracer. All pesticides, with the exception of imidacloprid, were found less persistent. Three of the five pesticides (atrazine, sulfometuron methyl, and S-metolachlor) were better described by the linear kinetic sorption model, while the breakthrough curves of imazaquin and imidacloprid were more appropriately approximated using nonlinear instantaneous sorption. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the model is most sensitive to sorption distribution coefficient. The prediction limits contained most of the measured points of the experimental breakthrough curves, indicating adequate model concept and model structure for the description of transport processes in the soil column under study.

  6. Learning Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Lyn; Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Considers the school library media center as an information learning laboratory. Topics include information literacy; Kuhlthau's Information Search Process model; inquiry theory and approach; discovery learning; process skills of laboratory science; the information scientist; attitudes of media specialists, teachers, and students; displays and Web…

  7. The Marine Virtual Laboratory (version 2.1): enabling efficient ocean model configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oke, Peter R.; Proctor, Roger; Rosebrock, Uwe; Brinkman, Richard; Cahill, Madeleine L.; Coghlan, Ian; Divakaran, Prasanth; Freeman, Justin; Pattiaratchi, Charitha; Roughan, Moninya; Sandery, Paul A.; Schaeffer, Amandine; Wijeratne, Sarath

    2016-09-01

    The technical steps involved in configuring a regional ocean model are analogous for all community models. All require the generation of a model grid, preparation and interpolation of topography, initial conditions, and forcing fields. Each task in configuring a regional ocean model is straightforward - but the process of downloading and reformatting data can be time-consuming. For an experienced modeller, the configuration of a new model domain can take as little as a few hours - but for an inexperienced modeller, it can take much longer. In pursuit of technical efficiency, the Australian ocean modelling community has developed the Web-based MARine Virtual Laboratory (WebMARVL). WebMARVL allows a user to quickly and easily configure an ocean general circulation or wave model through a simple interface, reducing the time to configure a regional model to a few minutes. Through WebMARVL, a user is prompted to define the basic options needed for a model configuration, including the model, run duration, spatial extent, and input data. Once all aspects of the configuration are selected, a series of data extraction, reprocessing, and repackaging services are run, and a "take-away bundle" is prepared for download. Building on the capabilities developed under Australia's Integrated Marine Observing System, WebMARVL also extracts all of the available observations for the chosen time-space domain. The user is able to download the take-away bundle and use it to run the model of his or her choice. Models supported by WebMARVL include three community ocean general circulation models and two community wave models. The model configuration from the take-away bundle is intended to be a starting point for scientific research. The user may subsequently refine the details of the model set-up to improve the model performance for the given application. In this study, WebMARVL is described along with a series of results from test cases comparing WebMARVL-configured models to observations

  8. Botany Facility. Thermal Control (TC) subsystem test report on experiment container of laboratory model and breadboard centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, W.

    1986-11-01

    The Botany Facility TC (Thermal Control or Thermocouple) subsystem was tested in the environmental laboratory. All data could be generated within the required accuracy and to the required extent. The TC-subsystems of the Laboratory Model and Experiment Container and Centrifuge were successfully tested.

  9. Leveraging the laboratory response network model for the global health security agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, Chris N; Maryogo-Robinson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Promoting global health security as an international priority is a challenge; the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in its Global Health Security Agenda has articulated the importance of accelerating progress toward a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats. The goals are to (1) prevent and reduce the likelihood of outbreaks-natural, accidental, or intentional; (2) detect threats early to save lives; and (3) respond rapidly and effectively using multisectoral, international coordination and communication. Foundational to this agenda is the World Health Organization (WHO) Revised International Health Regulations (IHR) of 2005, which provide the legal framework for countries to strengthen their health systems in order to be able to respond to any public health emergency of international concern. This article proposes leveraging the distributed structure of the US-managed Laboratory Response Network for Biological Threats Preparedness (LRN-B) to develop the core capacity of laboratory testing and to fulfill the laboratory-strengthening component of the Global Health Security Agenda. The LRN model offers an effective mechanism to detect and respond to public health emergencies of international concern.

  10. Development of a prediction model on the acceptance of electronic laboratory notebooks in academic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloeckner, Frederik; Farkas, Robert; Franken, Tobias; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Documentation of research data plays a key role in the biomedical engineering innovation processes. It makes an important contribution to the protection of intellectual property, the traceability of results and fulfilling the regulatory requirement. Because of the increasing digitalization in laboratories, an electronic alternative to the commonly-used paper-bound notebooks could contribute to the production of sophisticated documentation. However, compared to in an industrial environment, the use of electronic laboratory notebooks is not widespread in academic laboratories. Little is known about the acceptance of an electronic documentation system and the underlying reasons for this. Thus, this paper aims to establish a prediction model on the potential preference and acceptance of scientists either for paper-based or electronic documentation. The underlying data for the analysis originate from an online survey of 101 scientists in industrial, academic and clinical environments. Various parameters were analyzed to identify crucial factors for the system preference using binary logistic regression. The analysis showed significant dependency between the documentation system preference and the supposed workload associated with the documentation system (pnotebook before implementation.

  11. Labs21 Laboratory Modeling Guidelines using ASHRAE 90.1-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Susan; Walsh, Michael; Graham, Carl; Maor, Itzhak; Mathew, Paul; Porter, Fred; Sartor, Dale; Van Geet, Otto

    2005-10-01

    The following is a guideline for energy modeling of laboratory spaces in a building in accordance with the Energy Cost Budget method described in ASHRAE 90.1-1999 Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. For the purposes of this document, a laboratory is defined as any space requiring once through ventilation systems (recirculation of air to other spaces in a building is not allowed). To accomplish this, ventilation systems in laboratories typically provide 100% outside air to the occupied space. The guideline is structured similarly to the ASHRAE 90.1-99 standard. Only those sections being clarified or modified are discussed in the guideline; all other sections should be followed as defined in the standard. Specifically, those sections that are affected include the following: (1) 6.3.3.1 - Fan Power Limitation (modification); (2) 6.3.7.2 - Fume Hoods (modification); (3) 11.3.11 - Schedules (modification); (4) 11.4.3 - HVAC Systems (clarification); (5) 11.4.3 (h) Budget Supply-Air-to-Room Air Temperature Difference (modification); (6) 11.4.3(i) - Fan system efficiency (modification); and (7) Table 11.4.3A - Budget System Descriptions (modification). For energy efficiency measures that are not explicitly addressed by the standard, we recommend application of Section 11.5, Exceptional Calculation Methods. This guideline does not cover the details of such calculation methods.

  12. Simulation of the hydraulic performance of highway filter drains through laboratory models and stormwater management tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sañudo-Fontaneda, Luis A; Jato-Espino, Daniel; Lashford, Craig; Coupe, Stephen J

    2017-05-23

    Road drainage is one of the most relevant assets in transport infrastructure due to its inherent influence on traffic management and road safety. Highway filter drains (HFDs), also known as "French Drains", are the main drainage system currently in use in the UK, throughout 7000 km of its strategic road network. Despite being a widespread technique across the whole country, little research has been completed on their design considerations and their subsequent impact on their hydraulic performance, representing a gap in the field. Laboratory experiments have been proven to be a reliable indicator for the simulation of the hydraulic performance of stormwater best management practices (BMPs). In addition to this, stormwater management tools (SMT) have been preferentially chosen as a design tool for BMPs by practitioners from all over the world. In this context, this research aims to investigate the hydraulic performance of HFDs by comparing the results from laboratory simulation and two widely used SMT such as the US EPA's stormwater management model (SWMM) and MicroDrainage®. Statistical analyses were applied to a series of rainfall scenarios simulated, showing a high level of accuracy between the results obtained in laboratory and using SMT as indicated by the high and low values of the Nash-Sutcliffe and R (2) coefficients and root-mean-square error (RMSE) reached, which validated the usefulness of SMT to determine the hydraulic performance of HFDs.

  13. Laboratory and Modeling Evaluations in Support of Field Testing for Desiccation at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2011-02-23

    The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau includes testing of the desiccation technology as a potential technology to be used in conjunction with surface infiltration control to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. Laboratory and modeling efforts were conducted to investigate technical uncertainties related to the desiccation process and its impact on contaminant transport. This information is intended to support planning, operation, and interpretation of a field test for desiccation in the Hanford Central Plateau.

  14. Magnetic field reversals: the geodynamo, laboratory experiments and models (Lewis Fry Richardson Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauve, S.

    2009-04-01

    I will first compare reversals of Earth's magnetic field known from palaeomagnetic data to the ones observed in a laboratory experiment for the magnetic field generated by a turbulent flow of liquid sodium (VKS experiment). Despite major differences between the flow in Earth's core and in the experiment, both systems display reversals that share a lot of similar properties. I will understand them using a simple model in the framework of low dynamical system theory. Finally, I will discuss what can be learnt from numerical simulations.

  15. A Model Computing Laboratory for University Schools of Nursing: The Michigan Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Samuel

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an historical view of a prototype four-phase developmental system for university level instruction in computing and data analysis for nursing curricula. Specific hardware, instrumented classrooms and computing laboratory designs are discussed as they relate to typical program growth. Although the historical view presents a system which spans more than 13 years of growth, the paper concludes with a presentation of the current state-of-the-art microcomputer system and an archetypical four-phase system model potentially useful for other health science computing curricula.

  16. Detecting deterministic nature of pressure measurements from a turbulent combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tony, J.; Gopalakrishnan, E. A.; Sreelekha, E.; Sujith, R. I.

    2015-12-01

    Identifying nonlinear structures in a time series, acquired from real-world systems, is essential to characterize the dynamics of the system under study. A single time series alone might be available in most experimental situations. In addition to this, conventional techniques such as power spectral analysis might not be sufficient to characterize a time series if it is acquired from a complex system such as a thermoacoustic system. In this study, we analyze the unsteady pressure signal acquired from a turbulent combustor with bluff-body and swirler as flame holding devices. The fractal features in the unsteady pressure signal are identified using the singularity spectrum. Further, we employ surrogate methods, with translational error and permutation entropy as discriminating statistics, to test for determinism visible in the observed time series. In addition to this, permutation spectrum test could prove to be a robust technique to characterize the dynamical nature of the pressure time series acquired from experiments. Further, measures such as correlation dimension and correlation entropy are adopted to qualitatively detect noise contamination in the pressure measurements acquired during the state of combustion noise. These ensemble of measures is necessary to identify the features of a time series acquired from a system as complex as a turbulent combustor. Using these measures, we show that the pressure fluctuations during combustion noise has the features of a high-dimensional chaotic data contaminated with white and colored noise.

  17. Single Cavity Trapped Vortex Combustor Dynamics – Part-1: Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Singhal

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a water-cooled, modular, atmospheric pressure Trapped Vortex Combustor (TVC test rig is designed and fabricated for reacting and non-reacting flow experiments. The unique features of this rig consist of a continuously variable length-to-depth ratio (L/D of the cavity and optical access through quartz plates provided on three sides for visualization. Flame stabilization in the single cavity TVC was successfully achieved with methane as fuel and the range of flow conditions for stable operation were identified. From these, a few cases were selected for detailed experimentation. Reacting flow experiments for the selected cases indicated that reducing L/D ratio and increasing cavity-air velocity favour stable combustion. The pressure drop across the single cavity TVC is observed to be lower as compared to conventional combustors. Temperatures are measured at the exit using thermocouples and corrected for radiative losses. Species concentrations are measured at the exit using an exhaust gas analyzer. The combustion efficiency is observed to be around 97-99 % and the pattern factor is observed to be in the range of 0.08 to 0.13. High-speed imaging made possible by the optical access indicates that the overall combustion is fairly steady, and there is no vortex shedding downstream.

  18. Scaling of heat transfer in gas-gas injector combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiao-Wei; Cai Guo-Biao; Gao Yu-Shan

    2011-01-01

    The scaling of heat transfer in gas-gas injector combuetor is investigated theoretically, numerically and experimentally based on the previous study on the scaling of gas-gas combustion flowfield. The similarity condition of the gas-gas injector combustor heat transfer is obtained by conducting a formulation analysis of the boundary layer Navier-Stokes equations and a dimensional analysis of the corresponding heat transfer phenomenon. Then, a practicable engineering scaling criterion of the gas-gas injector combustor heat transfer is put forward. The criterion implies that when the similarity conditions of inner flowfield are satisfied, the size and the pressure of gas-gas combustion chamber can be changed, while the heat transfer can still be qualitatively similar to the distribution trend and quantitatively correlates well with the size and pressure as q ∝ pc0.8dt-0.2. Based on the criterion, single-element injector chambers with different geometric sizes and at different chamber pressures ranging from 1 MPa to 20 MPa are numerically simulated. A single-element injector chamber is designed and hot-fire tested at seven chamber pressures from 0.92 MPa to 6.1 MPa.The inner wall heat flux are obtained and analysed. The numerical and experimental results both verified the scaling criterion in gas-gas injector combustion chambers under different chamber pressures and geometries.

  19. Effects of activity and energy budget balancing algorithm on laboratory performance of a fish bioenergetics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, Charles P.; David, Solomon R.; Pothoven, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush that were fed ad libitum in laboratory tanks under regimes of low activity and high activity. In addition, we compared model performance under two different model algorithms: (1) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t and (2) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t + 1. Results indicated that the model significantly underestimated consumption for both inactive and active lake trout when algorithm 1 was used and that the degree of underestimation was similar for the two activity levels. In contrast, model performance substantially improved when using algorithm 2, as no detectable bias was found in model predictions of consumption for inactive fish and only a slight degree of overestimation was detected for active fish. The energy budget was accurately balanced by using algorithm 2 but not by using algorithm 1. Based on the results of this study, we recommend the use of algorithm 2 to estimate food consumption by fish in the field. Our study results highlight the importance of accurately accounting for changes in fish energy density when balancing the energy budget; furthermore, these results have implications for the science of evaluating fish bioenergetics model performance and for more accurate estimation of food consumption by fish in the field when fish energy density undergoes relatively rapid changes.

  20. Climate systems modeling on massively parallel processing computers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, W.F.; Mirin, A.A.; Bolstad, J.H. [and others

    1996-09-01

    A comprehensive climate system model is under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The basis for this model is a consistent coupling of multiple complex subsystem models, each describing a major component of the Earth`s climate. Among these are general circulation models of the atmosphere and ocean, a dynamic and thermodynamic sea ice model, and models of the chemical processes occurring in the air, sea water, and near-surface land. The computational resources necessary to carry out simulations at adequate spatial resolutions for durations of climatic time scales exceed those currently available. Distributed memory massively parallel processing (MPP) computers promise to affordably scale to the computational rates required by directing large numbers of relatively inexpensive processors onto a single problem. We have developed a suite of routines designed to exploit current generation MPP architectures via domain and functional decomposition strategies. These message passing techniques have been implemented in each of the component models and in their coupling interfaces. Production runs of the atmospheric and oceanic components performed on the National Environmental Supercomputing Center (NESC) Cray T3D are described.

  1. A Wildfire Behavior Modeling System at Los Alamos National Laboratory for Operational Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.W. Koch; R.G.Balice

    2004-11-01

    To support efforts to protect facilities and property at Los Alamos National Laboratory from damages caused by wildfire, we completed a multiyear project to develop a system for modeling the behavior of wildfires in the Los Alamos region. This was accomplished by parameterizing the FARSITE wildfire behavior model with locally gathered data representing topography, fuels, and weather conditions from throughout the Los Alamos region. Detailed parameterization was made possible by an extensive monitoring network of permanent plots, weather towers, and other data collection facilities. We also incorporated a database of lightning strikes that can be used individually as repeatable ignition points or can be used as a group in Monte Carlo simulation exercises and in other randomization procedures. The assembled modeling system was subjected to sensitivity analyses and was validated against documented fires, including the Cerro Grande Fire. The resulting modeling system is a valuable tool for research and management. It also complements knowledge based on professional expertise and information gathered from other modeling technologies. However, the modeling system requires frequent updates of the input data layers to produce currently valid results, to adapt to changes in environmental conditions within the Los Alamos region, and to allow for the quick production of model outputs during emergency operations.

  2. Growth of Microbial Populations. Mathematical Modeling, Laboratory Exercises, and Model-Based Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juska, Alfonsas; Gedminiene, Genovaite; Ivanec, Ruta

    2006-01-01

    This paper has arisen as a result of teaching Models in Biology to undergraduates of Bioengineering at the Gediminas Technical University of Vilnius. The aim is to teach the students to use a fresh approach to the problems they are familiar with, to come up with an articulate verbal model after a mental effort, to express it in rigorous…

  3. Predictive models for deposition of inhaled diesel exhaust particles in humans and laboratory species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.P.; Xu, G.B. (State Univ. of New York at Buffalo, Amherst (USA))

    1987-01-01

    Mathematical and computer models of the respiratory tracts of human beings and of laboratory animals (rats, hamsters, guinea pigs) were used to estimate the deposition patterns of inhaled diesel exhaust particles from automobile emissions. Our goal was to be able to predict the relation between exposure to diesel exhaust particles and the deposition of these particles in the lungs of humans of various ages. Diesel exhaust particles are aggregates with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of approximately 0.2 micron. Their actual size depends on the conditions under which they are generated. Using an appropriate particle model, we derived mathematical expressions that describe the effects of diffusion, sedimentation, impaction, and interception on the deposition of these particles. Because of their small size, we found that most diesel exhaust particles deposited through diffusion, and that the role of the other mechanisms was minor. Anatomical models of the human lung from birth to adulthood, as well as models of the lungs of laboratory species were formulated mathematically using available morphometric data. We used these lung models, together with the corresponding ventilation conditions of each species, to calculate deposition of diesel exhaust particles in the lungs. Under normal breathing conditions, we calculated that 7 to 13 percent (depending on particle size) of inhaled diesel exhaust particles deposit in the alveolar region of the adult human lung. Although the breathing mode (nose or mouth breathing) did not appear to affect alveolar deposition, increasing the minute ventilation increased alveolar deposition significantly. The calculated deposition patterns for diesel exhaust particles in younger humans (under age 25) were similar.

  4. The development and testing of a 2D laboratory seismic modelling system for heterogeneous structure investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yike; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Karaman, Hakki

    2015-05-01

    Lateral velocity variations and low velocity near-surface layers can produce strong scattered and guided waves which interfere with reflections and lead to severe imaging problems in seismic exploration. In order to investigate these specific problems by laboratory seismic modelling, a simple 2D ultrasonic model facility has been recently assembled within the Wave Propagation Lab at ETH Zurich. The simulated geological structures are constructed from 2 mm thick metal and plastic sheets, cut and bonded together. The experiments entail the use of a piezoelectric source driven by a pulse amplifier at ultrasonic frequencies to generate Lamb waves in the plate, which are detected by piezoelectric receivers and recorded digitally on a National Instruments recording system, under LabVIEW software control. The 2D models employed were constructed in-house in full recognition of the similitude relations. The first heterogeneous model features a flat uniform low velocity near-surface layer and deeper dipping and flat interfaces separating different materials. The second model is comparable but also incorporates two rectangular shaped inserts, one of low velocity, the other of high velocity. The third model is identical to the second other than it has an irregular low velocity surface layer of variable thickness. Reflection as well as transmission experiments (crosshole & vertical seismic profiling) were performed on each model. The two dominant Lamb waves recorded are the fundamental symmetric mode (non-dispersive) and the fundamental antisymmetric (flexural) dispersive mode, the latter normally being absent when the source transducer is located on a model edge but dominant when it is on the flat planar surface of the plate. Experimental group and phase velocity dispersion curves were determined and plotted for both modes in a uniform aluminium plate. For the reflection seismic data, various processing techniques were applied, as far as pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The

  5. Combustion Dynamics in Multi-Nozzle Combustors Operating on High-Hydrogen Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santavicca, Dom; Lieuwen, Tim

    2013-09-30

    Actual gas turbine combustors for power generation applications employ multi-nozzle combustor configurations. Researchers at Penn State and Georgia Tech have extended previous work on the flame response in single-nozzle combustors to the more realistic case of multi-nozzle combustors. Research at Georgia Tech has shown that asymmetry of both the flow field and the acoustic forcing can have a significant effect on flame response and that such behavior is important in multi-flame configurations. As a result, the structure of the flame and its response to forcing is three-dimensional. Research at Penn State has led to the development of a three-dimensional chemiluminescence flame imaging technique that can be used to characterize the unforced (steady) and forced (unsteady) flame structure of multi-nozzle combustors. Important aspects of the flame response in multi-nozzle combustors which are being studied include flame-flame and flame-wall interactions. Research at Penn State using the recently developed three-dimensional flame imaging technique has shown that spatial variations in local flame confinement must be accounted for to accurately predict global flame response in a multi-nozzle can combustor.

  6. Experimental Study on Effects of Fuel Injection on Scramjet Combustor Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xianyu; Li Xiaoshan; Ding Meng; Liu Weidong; Wang Zhenguo

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of fuel injection distribution on the scramjet combustor performance, there are conducted three sets of test on a hydrocarbon fueled direct-connect scramjet test facility. The results of Test A; whose fuel injection is carried out with injectors located on the top-wall and the bottom-wall, show that the fuel injection with an appropriate close-front and centralized distribution would be of much help to optimize combustor performances. The results of Test B, whose fuel injection is performed at the optimal injection locations found in Test A, with a given equivalence ratio and different injection proportions for each injector, show that this injection mode is of little benefit to improve combustor performances. The results of Test C with a circumferential fuel injection distribution displaies the possibility of ameliorating combustor performance. By analyzing the effects of injection location parameters on combustor performances on the base of the data of Test C, it is clear that the injector location has strong coupled influences on combustor performances. In addition, an inner-force synthesis specific impulse is used to reduce the errors caused by the disturbance of fuel supply and working state of air heater while assessing combustor performances.

  7. Laboratory model of the cardiovascular system for experimental demonstration of pulse wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Nestorović, Zorica; Djurić, Biljana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Žikić, Dejan

    2017-03-01

    The velocity by which a disturbance moves through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is among the key parameters in hemodynamics. Investigation of wave propagation through the fluid-filled elastic tube has a great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through the cardiovascular system. Here, we present a laboratory model of the cardiovascular system. We have designed an experimental setup which can help medical and nursing students to properly learn and understand basic fluid hemodynamic principles, pulse wave and the phenomenon of wave propagation in blood vessels. Demonstration of wave propagation allowed a real time observation of the formation of compression and expansion waves by students, thus enabling them to better understand the difference between the two waves, and also to measure the pulse wave velocity for different fluid viscosities. The laboratory model of the cardiovascular system could be useful as an active learning methodology and a complementary tool for understanding basic principles of hemodynamics.

  8. Assessing pharmacokinetics of different doses of fosfomycin in laboratory rats enables adequate exposure for pharmacodynamic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeppl, Wolfgang; Lingscheid, Tilman; Bernitzky, Dominik; Donath, Oliver; Reznicek, Gottfried; Zeitlinger, Markus; Burgmann, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Fosfomycin has been the subject of numerous pharmacodynamic in vivo models in recent years. The present study set out to determine fosfomycin pharmacokinetics in laboratory rats to enable adequate dosing regimens in future rodent models. Fosfomycin was given intraperitoneally as single doses of 75, 200 and 500 mg/kg bodyweight to 4 Sprague-Dawley rats per dose group. Blood samples were collected over 8 h and fosfomycin concentrations were determined by HPLC-mass spectrometry. Fosfomycin showed a dose-proportional pharmacokinetic profile indicated by a correlation of 0.99 for maximum concentration and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC). The mean AUC0-8 after intraperitoneal administration of 75, 200 or 500 mg/kg bodyweight fosfomycin were 109.4, 387.0 and 829.1 µg·h/ml, respectively. In conclusion, a dosing regimen of 200-500 mg/kg 3 times daily is appropriate to obtain serum concentrations in laboratory rats, closely mimicking human serum concentrations over time.

  9. Modeling extreme wave heights from laboratory experiments with the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. D.; Guedes Soares, C.; Cherneva, Z.; Onorato, M.

    2014-04-01

    Spatial variation of nonlinear wave groups with different initial envelope shapes is theoretically studied first, confirming that the simplest nonlinear theoretical model is capable of describing the evolution of propagating wave packets in deep water. Moreover, three groups of laboratory experiments run in the wave basin of CEHIPAR (Canal de Experiencias Hidrodinámicas de El Pardo, known also as El Pardo Model Basin) was founded in 1928 by the Spanish Navy. are systematically compared with the numerical simulations of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Although a little overestimation is detected, especially in the set of experiments characterized by higher initial wave steepness, the numerical simulation still displays a high degree of agreement with the laboratory experiments. Therefore, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation catches the essential characteristics of the extreme waves and provides an important physical insight into their generation. The modulation instability, resulting from the quasi-resonant four-wave interaction in a unidirectional sea state, can be indicated by the coefficient of kurtosis, which shows an appreciable correlation with the extreme wave height and hence is used in the modified Edgeworth-Rayleigh distribution. Finally, some statistical properties on the maximum wave heights in different sea states have been related with the initial Benjamin-Feir index.

  10. Laboratory light scattering from regolith surface and simulation of data by Hapke model

    CERN Document Server

    Deb, S

    2015-01-01

    The small atmosphereless objects of our solar system, such as asteroids, the moon are covered by layer of dust particles known as regolith, formed by meteoritic impact. The light scattering studies of such dust layer by laboratory experiment and numerical simulation are two important tools to investigate their physical properties. In the present work, the light scattered from a layer of dust particles, containing 0.3{\\mu}m Al2O3 at wavelength 632.8 nm is analysed. This work has been performed by using a light scattering instrument 'ellipsometer', at the Department of Physics, Assam Universiy, Silchar, India. Through this experiment, we generated in laboratory the photometric and polarimetric phase curves of light scattered from such a layer. In order to numerically simulate this data, we used Hapke's model combined with Mie's single particle scattering properties. The perpendicular and parallel components of single particle albedo and the phase function were derived from Mie theory. By using the Hapke's model...

  11. Computed tomography study of VAPEX process in laboratory 3D model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, G.Q.; Kantzas, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Tomographic Imaging and Porous Media Laboratory; Salama, D. [Nexen Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This paper provided details of a 3-D laboratory model of the VAPEX process that used computerized tomography (CT) to examine vapour chamber expansion behaviour in longitudinal and radial directions. The model was comprised of an aluminum cylinder with 2 slotted tubes installed inside to act as injection and production wells. Propane was used as a solvent with heavy oil. The results of experiments conducted with the model showed that the V shape vapour chamber expansion pattern predicted by the 2-D model was a localized phenomenon. The dominant characteristic of the vapour chamber was an overriding of the injected solvent at the top of the model. The overriding was attributed to gravity segregation. The study also showed that longitudinal expansion was more significant than upwards expansion during the early stages of the VAPEX process. Oil production performance was then examined using different solvent injection rates. An analysis of the CT images was conducted to obtain model porosity, density, and oil saturation profiles. The study demonstrated that pressure cycles caused oil to be produced intermittently. Oil swelling by solvent gas dissolution was an important recovery mechanism. It was concluded that solvent soaking can be used to recover additional residual oil during the VAPEX process. 19 refs., 1 tab., 24 figs.

  12. Comparison of Model Predictions and Laboratory Observations of Transgene Frequencies in Continuously-Breeding Mosquito Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Laura; North, Ace; Collins, C Matilda; Mumford, John D; Facchinelli, Luca; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Benedict, Mark Q

    2016-09-22

    The persistence of transgenes in the environment is a consideration in risk assessments of transgenic organisms. Combining mathematical models that predict the frequency of transgenes and experimental demonstrations can validate the model predictions, or can detect significant biological deviations that were neither apparent nor included as model parameters. In order to assess the correlation between predictions and observations, models were constructed to estimate the frequency of a transgene causing male sexual sterility in simulated populations of a malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae that were seeded with transgenic females at various proportions. Concurrently, overlapping-generation laboratory populations similar to those being modeled were initialized with various starting transgene proportions, and the subsequent proportions of transgenic individuals in populations were determined weekly until the transgene disappeared. The specific transgene being tested contained a homing endonuclease gene expressed in testes, I-PpoI, that cleaves the ribosomal DNA and results in complete male sexual sterility with no effect on female fertility. The transgene was observed to disappear more rapidly than the model predicted in all cases. The period before ovipositions that contained no transgenic progeny ranged from as little as three weeks after cage initiation to as long as 11 weeks.

  13. Comparison of Model Predictions and Laboratory Observations of Transgene Frequencies in Continuously-Breeding Mosquito Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Valerio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of transgenes in the environment is a consideration in risk assessments of transgenic organisms. Combining mathematical models that predict the frequency of transgenes and experimental demonstrations can validate the model predictions, or can detect significant biological deviations that were neither apparent nor included as model parameters. In order to assess the correlation between predictions and observations, models were constructed to estimate the frequency of a transgene causing male sexual sterility in simulated populations of a malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae that were seeded with transgenic females at various proportions. Concurrently, overlapping-generation laboratory populations similar to those being modeled were initialized with various starting transgene proportions, and the subsequent proportions of transgenic individuals in populations were determined weekly until the transgene disappeared. The specific transgene being tested contained a homing endonuclease gene expressed in testes, I-PpoI, that cleaves the ribosomal DNA and results in complete male sexual sterility with no effect on female fertility. The transgene was observed to disappear more rapidly than the model predicted in all cases. The period before ovipositions that contained no transgenic progeny ranged from as little as three weeks after cage initiation to as long as 11 weeks.

  14. Fluidized-bed reactor model with generalized particle balances. Part 2. Coal combustion application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overturf, B.W.; Reklaitis, G.V.

    1983-09-01

    In the second part, the model is applied to the study of an atmospheric fluidized-bed coal combustor. Case studies are investigated to show the effects of a number of parameters. Proper representation of the grid region and use of actual feed distributions are shown to be essential to the prediction of combustor performance. Better particle elutriation and single-particle combustion sub-models are found to be key requirements for improved combustor modelling.

  15. Small scale magnetosphere: Laboratory experiment, physical model and Hall MHD simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaikhislamov, I F; Zakharov, Yu P; Boyarintsev, E L; Melekhov, A V; Posukh, V G; Ponomarenko, A G

    2011-01-01

    A problem of magnetosphere formation on ion inertia scale around weakly magnetized bodies is investigated by means of laboratory experiment, analytical analysis and 2.5D Hall MHD simulation. Experimental evidence of specific magnetic field generated by the Hall term is presented. Direct comparison of regimes with small and large ion inertia length revealed striking differences in measured magnetopause position and plasma stand off distance. Analytical model is presented, which explains such basic features of mini-magnetosphere observed in previous kinetic simulations as disappearance of bow shock and plasma stopping at Stoermer particle limit instead of pressure balance distance. Numerical simulation is found to be in a good agreement with experiments and analytical model. It gives detailed spatial structure of Hall field and reveals that while ions penetrate deep inside mini-magnetosphere electrons overflow around it along magnetopause boundary.

  16. Extrapolation modeling of aerosol deposition in human and laboratory rat lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martonen, T.B.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory test animals are often used as surrogates in exposure studies to assess the potential threat to human health following inhalation of airborne contaminants. To aid in the interpretation and extrapolation of data to man, dosimetric considerations need to be addressed. Therefore, a mathematical model describing the behavior and fate of inhaled particulate matter within the respiratory tracts of man and rats has been developed. In the computer simulations, the CO2 concentrations of inhalation exposure chamber atmospheres are controlled to produce desired breathing patterns in the rat which mimic human breathing patterns as functions of physical activity levels. Herein, deposition patterns in human and rat lung airways are specifically examined as functions of respiratory intensities and particle parameters. The model provides a basis for the re-evaluation of data from past experiments, and, perhaps most importantly, permits new inhalation exposure tests to be designed and conducted in a sound scientific manner regarding this endpoint: the extrapolation of results to human conditions.

  17. Modeling of the Sedimentary Interbedded Basalt Stratigraphy for the Idaho National Laboratory Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzette Payne

    2006-04-01

    This report summarizes how the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy were modeled in the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Drill holes indicate the bedrock beneath INL facilities is composed of about 1.1 km of alternating layers of basalt rock and loosely consolidated sediments. Alternating layers of hard rock and “soft” loose sediments tend to attenuate seismic energy greater than uniform rock due to scattering and damping. The INL PSHA incorporated the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy by developing site-specific shear (S) wave velocity profiles. The profiles were used in the PSHA to model the near-surface site response by developing site-specific stochastic attenuation relationships.

  18. Modeling of the Sedimentary Interbedded Basalt Stratigraphy for the Idaho National Laboratory Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzette Payne

    2007-08-01

    This report summarizes how the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy were modeled in the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Drill holes indicate the bedrock beneath INL facilities is composed of about 1.1 km of alternating layers of basalt rock and loosely consolidated sediments. Alternating layers of hard rock and “soft” loose sediments tend to attenuate seismic energy greater than uniform rock due to scattering and damping. The INL PSHA incorporated the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy by developing site-specific shear (S) wave velocity profiles. The profiles were used in the PSHA to model the near-surface site response by developing site-specific stochastic attenuation relationships.

  19. Mathematical modeling of convective air drying of quinoa-supplemented feed for laboratory rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Vega-Gálvez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Drying kinetics of quinoa-supplemented feed for laboratory rats during processing at 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90ºC was studied and modeled in this work. Desorption isotherm was obtained at 60ºC giving a monolayer moisture content of 0.04 g water/g d.m. The experimental drying curves showed that drying process took place only in the falling rate period. Several thin-layer drying equations available in the literature were evaluated based on determination coefficient (r², sum squared errors (SSE and Chi-square (χ2 statisticals. In comparison to the experimental moisture values, the values estimated with the Logarithmic model gave the best fit quality (r² >0.994, SSE < 0.00015 and χ2 < 0.00018, showing this equation could predict very accurately the drying time of rat feed under the operative conditions applied.

  20. Laboratory Measurements and Modeling of Molecular Photoabsorption Cross Sections in the Ultraviolet for Astronomical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Glenn; Smith, P. L.

    2008-09-01

    Our research program is dedicated to the measurement and modeling of vacuum ultraviolet and UV molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on molecular nitrogen, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and diatomic sulfur are in progress. N2: We focus on the measurement of line f-values and line widths within the complex spectrum between 80 and 100 nm. Our measurements are incorporated into a theoretical model of the absorption spectrum of N2 which has established the mechanisms responsible for predissociation and reproduces all observed features in 14N2 and its isotopomers as a function of temperature. CO2: The photodissociation of CO2 is a fundamental photochemical process in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Our research centers on the measurement of high resolution cross sections from 91 to 120 nm. We have completed measurements at 295 K and 195 K over the 106 to 120 nm region, and we are analyzing recent measurements of cross sections between 91 and 106 nm. SO2: We provide astronomers with high-resolution cross section data for the complex ultraviolet absorption spectrum between 198 and 325 nm. Using the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have completed and published room temperature cross sections, and we are completing work on low-temperature measurements over the same spectral region. S2: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S2 absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are beginning an effort to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S2 from 200 to 300 nm based on theoretical calculations and laboratory measurements. Coupled-channel calculations will be complemented by measurements of the absorption spectrum of S2 at high resolution.

  1. Laboratory Measurements and Modeling of Molecular Photoabsorption Cross Sections for Planetary Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, G.; Smith, P. L.; Lewis, B. R.; Heays, A.; Blackie, D.; Pickering, J.

    2010-12-01

    Our research program comprises the measurement and modeling of ultraviolet molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on molecular nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, diatomic sulfur, and carbon dioxide are in progress. Molecular Nitrogen: We focus on the measurement of line f-values and line widths within the complex spectrum between 80 and 100 nm. Our measurements are incorporated into a theoretical model of the absorption spectrum of N2 which has established the mechanisms responsible for predissociation and reproduces all observed features in 14N2 and its isotopomers as a function of temperature. Sulfur Dioxide: We provide astronomers with high-resolution cross section data for the complex ultraviolet SO2 absorption spectrum. Using the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have completed and published room temperature cross sections from 198 to 325 nm and 160 K cross sections from 199 to 220 nm. We have completed work on further low-temperature measurements from 220 to 325 nm. Diatomic Sulfur: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S2 absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are working to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S2 from 200 to 300 nm based on laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. We have designed an experimental apparatus to produce a stable column of S2 vapor. Measurements of the absorption spectrum of S2 at high resolution will be complemented by coupled-channel calculations. Carbon Dioxide: The photodissociation of CO2 is a fundamental photochemical process in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Our research centers on the measurement of high resolution cross sections from 87 to 120 nm. We have completed measurements at 295 K and 195 K over the 106 to 120 nm region, and we have

  2. Laboratory Measurements and Modeling of Molecular Photoabsorption Cross Sections in the Ultraviolet for Planetary Atmospheres Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Glenn; Smith, P. L.; Lewis, B. R.; Heays, A. N.; Pickering, J.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Blackie, D.

    2008-09-01

    Our research program is dedicated to the measurement and modeling of vacuum ultraviolet and UV molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on molecular nitrogen, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and diatomic sulfur are in progress. N2: We focus on the measurement of line f-values and line widths within the complex spectrum between 80 and 100 nm. Our measurements are incorporated into a theoretical model of the absorption spectrum of N2 which has established the mechanisms responsible for predissociation and reproduces all observed features in 14N2 and its isotopomers as a function of temperature. CO2: The photodissociation of CO2 is a fundamental photochemical process in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Our research centers on the measurement of high resolution cross sections from 91 to 120 nm. We have completed measurements at 295 K and 195 K over the 106 to 120 nm region, and we are analyzing recent measurements of cross sections between 91 and 106 nm. SO2: We provide astronomers with high-resolution cross section data for the complex ultraviolet absorption spectrum between 198 and 325 nm. Using the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have completed and published room temperature cross sections, and we are completing work on low-temperature measurements over the same spectral region. S2: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S2 absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are beginning an effort to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S2 from 200 to 300 nm based on theoretical calculations and laboratory measurements. Coupled-channel calculations will be complemented by measurements of the absorption spectrum of S2 at high resolution.

  3. Quantitative inverse modelling of a cylindrical object in the laboratory using ERT: An error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korteland, Suze-Anne; Heimovaara, Timo

    2015-03-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a geophysical technique that can be used to obtain three-dimensional images of the bulk electrical conductivity of the subsurface. Because the electrical conductivity is strongly related to properties of the subsurface and the flow of water it has become a valuable tool for visualization in many hydrogeological and environmental applications. In recent years, ERT is increasingly being used for quantitative characterization, which requires more detailed prior information than a conventional geophysical inversion for qualitative purposes. In addition, the careful interpretation of measurement and modelling errors is critical if ERT measurements are to be used in a quantitative way. This paper explores the quantitative determination of the electrical conductivity distribution of a cylindrical object placed in a water bath in a laboratory-scale tank. Because of the sharp conductivity contrast between the object and the water, a standard geophysical inversion using a smoothness constraint could not reproduce this target accurately. Better results were obtained by using the ERT measurements to constrain a model describing the geometry of the system. The posterior probability distributions of the parameters describing the geometry were estimated with the Markov chain Monte Carlo method DREAM(ZS). Using the ERT measurements this way, accurate estimates of the parameters could be obtained. The information quality of the measurements was assessed by a detailed analysis of the errors. Even for the uncomplicated laboratory setup used in this paper, errors in the modelling of the shape and position of the electrodes and the shape of the domain could be identified. The results indicate that the ERT measurements have a high information content which can be accessed by the inclusion of prior information and the consideration of measurement and modelling errors.

  4. Space Weather Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Weather Computational Laboratory is a Unix and PC based modeling and simulation facility devoted to research analysis of naturally occurring electrically...

  5. Naval Reseaarch Laboratory Gulf of Mexico Geoid Model Texas Reference Center Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, D. B.; Lyle, S. D.; Roman, D. R.; Mulcare, D. M.; Jeffress, G.; Sadovski, A.; Aiken, C. L.; Smith, R.; Childers, V. A.; Brozena, J. M.

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to improve elevations in Texas and nearby regions for flooding, mapping and hurricane preparedness. The U.S. Navy Department's Naval Research Laboratory and Texas A&M University- Corpus Christi are planning an aircraft-based gravity data collection effort along the Gulf of Mexico and the southern boundary of the United States. This project will utilize the Naval Airborne Gravity modeling system to improve elevations along the coast and throughout the United States in support of shallow-water navigation, aviation, and ground monitoring systems used by federal, state and local public safety agencies. The current project plan will address the issue of inconsistencies in the gravity field from onshore to offshore, facilitate the identification of systematic problems and otherwise help resolve issues related to existing, legacy gravity data. The widespread and increasing use of GPS for height determinations fundamentally depends on the use of a geoid height model to convert GPS-derived heights into heights above mean sea level. Current geoid models are inadequate. Accurate, homogeneous gravity measurements are essential for the computation of geoid models. To address the inadequate gravity data set for the US, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and National Geodetic Survey (NGS) have developed a new approach based on airborne methods. The new approach yields spatially well distributed high-quality, consistent, and contemporary gravity data. The method to be employed has undergone extensive testing and is now ready for additional investigation. The airborne gravitational data will be used in conjunction with existing ground and marine gravity data sets and data from the Texas Coastal Ocean Observation Network (TCOON), a network of 32 tide gauges, to be used to help identify problems of tying the geoid to mean sea-level. These improved gravity data will lead to the creation of new and improved US geoid models. Accurate geoid models will

  6. Design and preliminary results of a fuel flexible industrial gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, A. S.; Troth, D. L.; Yacobucci, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The design characteristics are presented of a fuel tolerant variable geometry staged air combustor using regenerative/convective cooling. The rich/quench/lean variable geometry combustor is designed to achieve low NO(x) emission from fuels containing fuel bound nitrogen. The physical size of the combustor was calculated for a can-annular combustion system with associated operating conditions for the Allison 570-K engine. Preliminary test results indicate that the concept has the potential to meet emission requirements at maximum continuous power operation. However, airflow sealing and improved fuel/air mixing are necessary to meet Department of Energy program goals.

  7. Design and preliminary results of a fuel flexible industrial gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, A. S.; Troth, D. L.; Yacobucci, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The design characteristics are presented of a fuel tolerant variable geometry staged air combustor using regenerative/convective cooling. The rich/quench/lean variable geometry combustor is designed to achieve low NO(x) emission from fuels containing fuel bound nitrogen. The physical size of the combustor was calculated for a can-annular combustion system with associated operating conditions for the Allison 570-K engine. Preliminary test results indicate that the concept has the potential to meet emission requirements at maximum continuous power operation. However, airflow sealing and improved fuel/air mixing are necessary to meet Department of Energy program goals.

  8. Fast Ignition and Stable Combustion of Coarse Coal Particles in a Nonslagging Cyclone Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BiaoZhou; X.L.Wang; 等

    1995-01-01

    A combustion set-up of an innovative nonalagging cyclone combustor called “Spouting-Cyclone Combustor(SCC)”,,with two-stage combustion,organized in orthogonal vortex flows,was established and the experimental studies on the fast ignition and stable combustion of coarse coal particles in this combustor were carried out.The flame temperature versus ignition time and the practical fast ignition the temperature fields in SCC were obtained.These results whow that it is possible to obtain highly efficient and clean combustion of unground coal particles by using this technology.

  9. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  10. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, C. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, M. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the Building America research team ARBI validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. This project also looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. The team concluded that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws, which has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  11. Experimental and operational modal analysis of a laboratory scale model of a tripod support structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, M. M.; Mucchi, E.; Telega, J.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the research is to develop a vibration-based procedure for the identification of structural failures in a laboratory scale model of a tripod supporting structure of an offshore wind turbine. In particular, this paper presents an experimental campaign on the scale model tested in two stages. Stage one encompassed the model tripod structure tested in air. The second stage was done in water. The tripod model structure allows to investigate the propagation of a circumferential representative crack of a cylindrical upper brace. The in-water test configuration included the tower with three bladed rotor. The response of the structure to the different waves loads were measured with accelerometers. Experimental and operational modal analysis was applied to identify the dynamic properties of the investigated scale model for intact and damaged state with different excitations and wave patterns. A comprehensive test matrix allows to assess the differences in estimated modal parameters due to damage or as potentially introduced by nonlinear structural response. The presented technique proves to be effective for detecting and assessing the presence of representative cracks.

  12. Electrical triggering of earthquakes: results of laboratory experiments at spring-block models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, Victor A.; Okunev, Vladimir I.; Klyuchkin, Vadim N.; Liu, Jing; Ruzhin, Yuri Ya.; Shen, Xuhui

    2017-05-01

    Recently published results of field and laboratory experiments on the seismic/acoustic response to injection of direct current (DC) pulses into the Earth crust or stressed rock samples raised a question on a possibility of electrical earthquake triggering. A physical mechanism of the considered phenomenon is not clear yet in view of the very low current density (10-7-10-8 A/m2) generated by the pulsed power systems at the epicenter depth (5-10 km) of local earthquakes occurred just after the current injection. The paper describes results of laboratory "earthquake" triggering by DC pulses under conditions of a spring-block model simulated the seismogenic fault. It is experimentally shown that the electric triggering of the laboratory "earthquake" (sharp slip of a movable block of the spring-block system) is possible only within a range of subcritical state of the system, when the shear stress between the movable and fixed blocks obtains 0.98-0.99 of its critical value. The threshold of electric triggering action is about 20 A/m2 that is 7-8 orders of magnitude higher than estimated electric current density for Bishkek test site (Northern Tien Shan, Kirghizia) where the seismic response to the man-made electric action was observed. In this connection, the electric triggering phenomena may be explained by contraction of electric current in the narrow conductive areas of the faults and the corresponding increase in current density or by involving the secondary triggering mechanisms like electromagnetic stimulation of conductive fluid migration into the fault area resulted in decrease in the fault strength properties.

  13. MAID : An effect size based model for microarray data integration across laboratories and platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Aled M

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression profiling has the potential to unravel molecular mechanisms behind gene regulation and identify gene targets for therapeutic interventions. As microarray technology matures, the number of microarray studies has increased, resulting in many different datasets available for any given disease. The increase in sensitivity and reliability of measurements of gene expression changes can be improved through a systematic integration of different microarray datasets that address the same or similar biological questions. Results Traditional effect size models can not be used to integrate array data that directly compare treatment to control samples expressed as log ratios of gene expressions. Here we extend the traditional effect size model to integrate as many array datasets as possible. The extended effect size model (MAID can integrate any array datatype generated with either single or two channel arrays using either direct or indirect designs across different laboratories and platforms. The model uses two standardized indices, the standard effect size score for experiments with two groups of data, and a new standardized index that measures the difference in gene expression between treatment and control groups for one sample data with replicate arrays. The statistical significance of treatment effect across studies for each gene is determined by appropriate permutation methods depending on the type of data integrated. We apply our method to three different expression datasets from two different laboratories generated using three different array platforms and two different experimental designs. Our results indicate that the proposed integration model produces an increase in statistical power for identifying differentially expressed genes when integrating data across experiments and when compared to other integration models. We also show that genes found to be significant using our data integration method are of direct

  14. Construction, implementation, and evaluation of an undergraduate biology laboratory teaching model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Todd M.

    This dissertation documents a time series study in which an undergraduate non-majors biology laboratory was revised, leading to the development of a new teaching model. The course model was developed at a large Midwestern university enrolling about 827 students in 32 sections per semester and using graduate teaching assistants as primary instructors. The majority of the students consisted of freshman and sophomores, with the remainder being juniors and seniors. This dissertation explains the rationale leading to the development and implementation of this educational model using graduate teaching assistants as the primary course instructors and embedded course assessment as evidence of its success. The major components of this model include six major items including: learning community, course design, GTA professional development, course delivery, assessment, and the filter. The major aspects of this model include clear links between instruction, GTA professional development, embedded assessment (student and GTA), course revision, student perceptions, and performance. The model includes the following components: Formal and informal discourse in the learning community, teaching assistant professional development, the use of multiple assessment tools, a filter to guide course evaluation, and redirection and delivery of course content based on embedded formal course assessment. Teaching assistants receive both initial and ongoing professional development throughout the semester in effective instructional pedagogy from an instructor of record. Results for three years of operation show a significant increase in student biology content knowledge and the use of scientific process/critical thinking skills with mean improvement in student performance of 25.5% and 18.9% respectively. Mean attendance for ISB 208L is 95% for the six semesters of this study showing students regularly attend the laboratory classes and remain in the course with a completion rate of 93

  15. OH PLIF Visualization of a Premixed Ethylene-fueled Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Luca M. L.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.; Johansen, Craig T.; Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; McDaniel, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) planar induced laser fluorescence (PLIF) measurements have been performed in a small-scale scramjet combustor at the University of Virginia Aerospace Research Laboratory at nominal simulated Mach 5 enthalpy. OH lines were carefully chosen to have fluorescent signal that is independent of pressure and temperature but linear with mole fraction. The OH PLIF signal was imaged in planes orthogonal to and parallel to the freestream flow at different equivalence ratios. Flameout limits were tested and identified. Instantaneous planar images were recorded and analyzed to compare the results with width increased dual-pump enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (WIDECARS) measurements in the same facility and large eddy simulation/Reynolds average Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) numerical simulation. The flame angle was found to be approximately 10 degrees for several different conditions, which is in agreement with numerical predictions and measurements using WIDECARS. Finally, a comparison between NO PLIF non-combustion cases and OH PLIF combustion cases is provided: the comparison reveals that the dominant effect of flame propagation is freestream turbulence rather than heat release and concentration gradients.

  16. Laboratory Experiments on Steady State Seepage-Induced Landslides Using Slope Models and Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra G. Catane

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of the failure initiation process is crucial in the development of physicallybased early warning system for landslides and slope failures. Laboratory-scale slope models were constructed and subjected to instability through simulated groundwater infiltration. This is done by progressively increasing the water level in the upslope tank and allowing water to infiltrate laterally towards the toe of the slope. Physical changes in the slope models were recorded by tilt sensors and video cameras. When the model slope was destabilized, the chronology of events occurred in the following sequence: (1 bulging at the toe, (2 seepage at the toe, (3 initial failure of soil mass, (4 piping, (5 retrogressive failure, (6 formation of tension cracks and (7 major failure of soil mass. Tension cracks, piping and eventual failure are manifestations of differential settlements due to variations in void ratio. Finite element analysis indicates that instability and subsequent failures in the model slope were induced primarily by high hydraulic gradients in the toe area. Seepage, initial deformation and subsequent failures were manifested in the toe area prior to failure, providing a maximum of 36 min lead time. Similar lead times are expected in slopes of the same material as shown in many case studies of dam failure. The potential of having a longer lead time is high for natural slopes made of materials with higher shear strength thus evacuation is possible. The tilt sensors were able to detect the initial changes before visual changes manifested, indicating the importance of instrumental monitoring.

  17. A three-dimensional laboratory steam injection model allowing in situ saturation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demiral, B.M.R.; Pettit, P.A.; Castanier, L.M.; Brigham, W.E.

    1992-08-01

    The CT imaging technique together with temperature and pressure measurements were used to follow the steam propagation during steam and steam foam injection experiments in a three dimensional laboratory steam injection model. The advantages and disadvantages of different geometries were examined to find out which could best represent radial and gravity override flows and also fit the dimensions of the scanning field of the CT scanner. During experiments, steam was injected continuously at a constant rate into the water saturated model and CT scans were taken at six different cross sections of the model. Pressure and temperature data were collected with time at three different levels in the model. During steam injection experiments, the saturations obtained by CT matched well with the temperature data. That is, the steam override as observed by temperature data was also clearly seen on the CT pictures. During the runs where foam was present, the saturation distributions obtained from CT pictures showed a piston like displacement. However, the temperature distributions were different depending on the type of steam foam process used. The results clearly show that the pressure/temperature data alone are not sufficient to study steam foam in the presence of non-condensible gas.

  18. Gas turbine combustor exit piece with hinged connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charron, Richard C.; Pankey, William W.

    2016-04-26

    An exit piece (66) with an inlet throat (67) that conducts a combustion gas flow (36A) in a path (82) from a combustor (63) to an annular chamber (68) that feeds the first blade section (37) of a gas turbine (26). The exit piece further includes an outlet portion (69) that forms a circumferential segment of the annular chamber. The outlet portion interconnects with adjacent outlet portions by hinges (78A, 78B, 80A, 80B). Each hinge may have a hinge axis (82A, 82B) parallel to a centerline (21) of the turbine. Respective gas flows (36A) are configured by an assembly (60) of the exit pieces to converge on the feed chamber (68) into a uniform helical flow that drives the first blade section with minimal circumferential variations in force.

  19. Development of a pressure gain combustor for improved cycle efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Janus, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents results from an experimental research program attempting to improve the thermodynamic efficiencies of gas-turbine combustors. An elementary thermodynamic analysis shows that the thermodynamic cycle efficiencies of gas turbines can be significantly improved by using unsteady combustion that achieves quasi-constant-volume combustion. The ability to produce the so-called pressure gain via this process has already been demonstrated by others for pressures less than 3 atmospheres. This paper presents experimental results for pressures up to 11 atmospheres, compares certain process parameters to a numerical simulation, and briefly examines the problem of scale-up. Results of pollutant measurements over the 2--11 atmospheric range of operation are also included.

  20. Combustion of hydrogen in an experimental trapped vortex combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui; Chen, Qin; Shao, Weiwei; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Yue; Xiao, Yunhan

    2009-09-01

    Combustion performances of pure hydrogen in an experimental trapped vortex combustor have been tested under different operating conditions. Pressure fluctuations, NOx emissions, OH distributions, and LBO (Lean Blow Out) were measured in the tests. Results indicate that the TVC test rig has successfully realized a double vortex construction in the cavity zone in a wide range of flow conditions. Hydrogen combustion in the test rig has achieved an excellent LBO performance and relatively low NOx emissions. Through comparison of dynamic pressure data, OH fluctuation images, and NOx emissions, the optimal operating condition has been found out to be Φp =0.4, fuel split =0.4, and primary air/fuel premixed.

  1. Laboratory modelling of the transfer processes between the ocean and atmosphere in the boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Daniil; Kandaurov, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Vdovin, Maxim

    2016-11-01

    The processes of momentum and heat transfer between ocean and atmosphere in the boundary layer were investigated within laboratory modeling for a wide range of wind speed and surface wave including hurricane conditions. Experiments were carried out on the Wind-Wave Flume of the Large Thermostratified Tank of IAP RAS. A special net located under the surface at different depths allows to vary parameters of surface waves independently on wind parameters. Theory of self-similarity of air flow parameters in the flume was used to calculate values aerodynamic and heat transfer coefficients from the measured velocity and temperature profiles by Pito and hotfilm gauges respectively. Simultaneous measurements of surface elevation with system wire allow to obtain spectra and integral parameters of waves. It was demonstrated that in contrast to the drag coefficient, heat transfer coefficient is virtually independent of wind speed and wave parameters to the moment of the beginning of spray generation and then increases rapidly.

  2. Development of a laboratory model of SSSC using RTAI on Linux platform

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anju Meghwani; A M Kulkarni

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents the implementation of Static Synchronous Series Compensator (SSSC) controller on Real Time Application Interface (RTAI) for Linux Operating System (OS). RTAI provides real-time capability to Linux General Purpose Operating System (GPOS) over and above the capabilities of non real-time Linux environment, e.g. access to TCP/IP, graphical display and windowing systems, file and database systems. Both Type II controllers, DC voltage and current scheduling controllers, are implemented in RTAI. To create a user friendly environment, Graphical User Interface (GUI) is developed in Linux OS in user space (non real-time) using a software available from Quasar Technologies (Qt). The controller is tested on a small scale laboratory model of a Voltage Source Converter(VSC) connected in series with a transmission line. The real time controller performs well in both inductive and capacitive regions.

  3. Laboratory modelling of the transfer processes between the ocean and atmosphere in the boundary layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeev Daniil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of momentum and heat transfer between ocean and atmosphere in the boundary layer were investigated within laboratory modeling for a wide range of wind speed and surface wave including hurricane conditions. Experiments were carried out on the Wind-Wave Flume of the Large Thermostratified Tank of IAP RAS. A special net located under the surface at different depths allows to vary parameters of surface waves independently on wind parameters. Theory of self-similarity of air flow parameters in the flume was used to calculate values aerodynamic and heat transfer coefficients from the measured velocity and temperature profiles by Pito and hotfilm gauges respectively. Simultaneous measurements of surface elevation with system wire allow to obtain spectra and integral parameters of waves. It was demonstrated that in contrast to the drag coefficient, heat transfer coefficient is virtually independent of wind speed and wave parameters to the moment of the beginning of spray generation and then increases rapidly.

  4. Laboratory simulation and modeling of size, shape distributed interstellar graphite dust analogues: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruah, Manash J.; Gogoi, Ankur; Ahmed, Gazi A.

    2016-06-01

    The computation of the light scattering properties of size and shape distributed interstellar graphite dust analogues using discrete dipole approximation (DDA) is presented. The light scattering properties of dust particles of arbitrary shapes having sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 μm were computed using DDSCAT 7.3.0 software package and an indigenously developed post-processing tool for size and shape averaging. In order to model realistic samples of graphite dust and compute their light scattering properties using DDA, different target geometries were generated to represent the graphite particle composition in terms of surface smoothness, surface roughness and aggregation or their combination, for using as the target for DDSCAT calculations. A comparison of the theoretical volume scattering function at 543.5 nm and 632.8 nm incident wavelengths with laboratory simulation is also presented in this paper.

  5. Reconciling laboratory and observational models of mantle rheology in geodynamic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Scott D.

    2016-10-01

    Experimental and geophysical observations constraining mantle rheology are reviewed with an emphasis on their impact on mantle geodynamic modelling. For olivine, the most studied and best-constrained mantle mineral, the tradeoffs associated with the uncertainties in the activation energy, activation volume, grain-size and water content allow the construction of upper mantle rheology models ranging from nearly uniform with depth to linearly increasing from the base of the lithosphere to the top of the transition zone. Radial rheology models derived from geophysical observations allow for either a weak upper mantle or a weak transition zone. Experimental constraints show that wadsleyite and ringwoodite are stronger than olivine at the top of the transition zone; however the uncertainty in the concentration of water in the transition zone precludes ruling out a weak transition zone. Both observational and experimental constraints allow for strong or weak slabs and the most promising constraints on slab rheology may come from comparing inferred slab geometry from seismic tomography with systematic studies of slab morphology from dynamic models. Experimental constraints on perovskite and ferropericlase strength are consistent with general feature of rheology models derived from geophysical observations and suggest that the increase in viscosity through the top of the upper mantle could be due to the increase in the strength of ferropericlase from 20-65 GPa. The decrease in viscosity in the bottom half of the lower mantle could be the result of approaching the melting temperature of perovskite. Both lines of research are consistent with a high-viscosity lithosphere, a low viscosity either in the upper mantle or transition zone, and high viscosity in the lower mantle, increasing through the upper half of the lower mantle and decreasing in the bottom half of the lower mantle, with a low viscosity above the core. Significant regions of the mantle, including high

  6. Thermal treatment of wastes in an advanced cyclonic combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, H.A.; Khinkis, M.J.; Kunc, W.

    1991-01-01

    IGT is developing an advanced waste combustion concept, based on cyclonic combustion principles, for application to a wide range of industrial wastes. In IGT's cyclonic combustor, a mixture of fuel and combustion air is fed tangentially at a relatively high velocity into a cylindrical chamber. The waste is injected either tangentially with the fuel or separately in a tangential, radial, or axial configuration. This approach provides high combustion intensity with internal recirculation of combustion products, which results in extremely stable and complete combustion, even at relatively low temperatures. IGT has performed three successful test programs involving cyclonic waste combustion for industrial clients. In one program, industrial wastewaters containing 40% to 50% organics and inorganics with heating values of 1600 to 3270 Btu/lb were combusted to 99.9% completion at only 2000{degrees}F. The low combustion temperature minimized the supplemental fuel required. In another program, simulated low-Btu industrial off-gases (55 to 65 BTu/SCF) were successfully combusted with stable combustion at 1900{degrees}F using air and waste preheat. Supplemental fuel was unnecessary because of the mixing that occurs in the cyclonic combustor. The conversion of fuel-bonded nitrogen to NO{sub x} was as low as 5%, and CO levels were in the range of 25 to 30 ppm. In the third program, CCl{sub 4} (as a test surrogate for PCBs) was efficiently destroyed by firing natural gas or hexane. With 100% CCl{sub 4} and natural gas firing, the DRE at 2200{degrees}F and a 0.25-second residence time ranged from 99.9999% to 99.9999%. These successful tests have led to the design and construction of a modular test facility at IGT's Energy Development Center. 13 figs., 17 tabs.

  7. Numerical exploration of mixing and combustion in a dual-mode combustor with backward-facing steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Lang-quan; Yan, Li; Liao, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Dual-mode scramjet combustor is the crucial component for the combined cycle engine of space mission vehicles. The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model and the finite-rate reaction model have been utilized to investigate the mixing and combustion in a dual-mode combustor with backward-facing steps, and the species distributions and the Mach number profile of a turbulent diffusion combustion problem have been employed to validate the numerical approach. Moreover, the influences of the injection strategy and the fuel equivalence ratio arrangement on its mixing and combustion flow fields have been explored. The obtained results show that the vertical injection is beneficial for mode transition, and an obvious high pressure region is generated with the vertical injection strategy. Accordingly, its mass-weighted average Mach number drops more sharply. The lower total equivalence ratio is beneficial for the mixing augmentation, as well the smaller fuel equivalence ratio discrepancy. However, the larger total equivalence ratio is beneficial for the mode transition.

  8. Tennessee Valley Authority atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor simulation interim annual report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, J.W.; Krishnan, R.P.

    1980-10-01

    This report contains a detailed description of the work performed during 1979 for the Tennessee Valley Authority in support of the TVA Fluidized-Bed Combustor (FBC) Demonstration Plant Program. The work was carried out under task 4, modeling and simulation of atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) systems. The overall objective of this task is to develop a steady-state mathematical model with the capability of predicting trends in bed performance under various feed and operating conditions. As part of this effort, three predictive subprograms (subcodes) were developed during 1979: (1) bubble-growth subcode, (2) sorbent-coal ash elutriation and attrition subcode, and (3) coal combustion subcode. These codes, which are currently being tested with experimental data, are capable of predicting how some of the important operating variables in the AFBC affect its performance. After testing against field data, these subcodes will be incorporated into an overall AFBC system code, which was developed earlier at ORNL for analysis of the Department of Energy (DOE) Component Test and Integration Unit (CTIU) at Morgantown, West Virginia. In addition to these predictive subcodes, the overall system code previously developed for the CTIU is described. The material balance is closed, based on vendor-supplied data. This balance is then used to predict the heat transfer characteristics of the surfaces (submerged and freeboard) in the AFBC. Existing correlations for heat transfer in AFBC are used in the code along with thermophysical properties of the various streams.

  9. Developing a Laboratory Model for the Professional Preparation of Future Science Teachers: A Situated Cognition Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Aldrin E.; Paradis, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    Although laboratory activities are widely acknowledged as being fundamental to the teaching of science, many secondary science school teachers have limited knowledge of how to design and run effective teaching laboratories. Utilising a situated cognition theoretical framework, we discuss our collaborative efforts to develop a laboratory based…

  10. Two-dimensional modelling of benzene transport and biodegradation in a laboratory-scale aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, N C; Choi, J W; Kim, S B; Park, S J; Kim, D J

    2009-01-01

    In this study biodegradation of aqueous benzene during transport in a laboratory-scale aquifer model was investigated by conducting a 2-D plume test and numerical modelling. Benzene biodegradation and transport was simulated with the 2-D numerical model developed for solute transport coupled with a Haldane-Andrews type function for inclusion of an inhibition constant which is effective for high concentrations. Experimental data revealed that in the early stages the benzene plume showed a rather clear shape but lost its shape with increased travel time. The mass recoveries of benzene at 9, 16, and 22 h were 37, 13 and 8%, respectively, showing that a significant mass reduction of aqueous benzene occurred in the model aquifer. The major processes responsible for the mass reduction were biodegradation and irreversible sorption. The modelling results also indicated that the simulation based on the microbial parameters from the batch experiments slightly overestimated the mass reduction of benzene during transport. The sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the benzene plume was sensitive to the maximum specific growth rate and slightly sensitive to the half-saturation constant of benzene but almost insensitive to the Haldane inhibition constant. The insensitivity to the Haldane inhibition constant was due to the rapid decline of the benzene peak concentration by natural attenuation such as hydrodynamic dispersion and irreversible sorption. An analysis of the model simulation also indicated that the maximum specific growth rate was the key parameter controlling the plume behaviour, but its impact on the plume was affected by competing parameter such as the irreversible sorption rate coefficient.

  11. Robust High Fidelity Large Eddy Simulation Tool for Gas Turbine Combustors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective is to develop and demonstrate the use of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) for computations of gas turbine combustor flow and transport processes, using the...

  12. A variable-geometry combustor used to study primary and secondary zone stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briehl, D.; Schultz, D. F.; Ehlers, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    A combustion program is underway to evaluate fuel quality effects on gas turbine combustors. A rich-lean variable geometry combustor design was chosen to evaluate fuel quality effects over a wide range of primary and secondary zone equivalence ratios at simulated engine operating conditions. The first task of this effort, was to evaluate the performance of the variable geometry combustor. The combustor incorporates three stations of variable geometry to control primary and secondary zone equivalence ratio and overall pressure loss. Geometry changes could be made while a test was in progress through the use of remote control actuators. The primary zone liner was water cooled to eliminate the concern of liner durability. Emissions and performance data were obtained at simulated engine conditions of 80 percent and full power. Inlet air temperature varied from 611 to 665K, inlet total pressure varied from 1.02 to 1.24 MPa, reference velocity was a constant 1400 K.

  13. Design of Combustor for Long-range Ram-jet Engine and Performance of Rectangular Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayle, Warren D; Koch, Richard G

    1954-01-01

    The report describes the design of a piloted combustor intended for a ram-jet engine of long flight range. The unit comprises a large annular basket of V-type cross-section, the inner surface of which is slotted and bent into small V-gutters. At the trailing edge of the basket, eight V-gutters are used to propagate the flame into the main stream. A rectangular analog of this combustor was tested at air-flow conditions corresponding to those that might be obtained during cruise. At these conditions, combustion efficiencies of as much as 90 percent were calculated for the combustor at the design equivalence ratio of 0.52. The performance of the unit was relatively insensitive to mounting and flow variables; the greatest effect on efficiency was that of the manner and location of the fuel injection. A full-scale version of this combustor has been designed for a 48-inch-diameter engine.

  14. TRW Advanced Slagging Coal Combustor Utility Demonstration. Fourth Quarterly progress report, August 1989--October 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    The TRW Advanced Slagging Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O&R) Utility Corporation`s Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/ou desip unit to fire 2.5 sulfur coal. The slogging combustor process will provide NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Envirommental Standards. TRW-CBU scope of work includes the engineering, design and supply of the slogging combustors, coal and limestone feed systems and a control system for these components. During this report period, the design activities for all systems progressed to permit the release of specifications and requests for proposals. Award of contracts for long-delivery items and major equipment are being placed to meet the revised program schedule.

  15. Coupled generator and combustor performance calculations for potential early commercial MHD power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, T. C.; Hnat, J. G.; Marston, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    A parametric study of the performance of the MHD generator and combustor components of potential early commercial open-cycle MHD/steam power plants is presented. Consideration is given to the effects of air heater system concept, MHD combustor type, coal type, thermal input power, oxygen enrichment of the combustion, subsonic and supersonic generator flow and magnetic field strength on coupled generator and combustor performance. The best performance is found to be attained with a 3000 F, indirectly fired air heater, no oxygen enrichment, Illinois no. 6 coal, a two-stage cyclone combustor with 85% slag rejection, a subsonic generator, and a magnetic field configuration yielding a constant transverse electric field of 4 kV/m. Results indicate that optimum net MHD generator power is generally compressor-power-limited rather than electric-stress-limited, with optimum net power a relatively weak function of operating pressure.

  16. Rocket Combustor Validation Data for Advanced Combustion Models Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The pace and cost of developing an engine system for future explorations is strongly influenced by the inadequacies of design tools and the supporting databases. The...

  17. Presentation on the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC): A Working Model and Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, G. B.; Vican, L.

    2015-12-01

    Physical analog models and demonstrations can be effective educational tools for helping instructors teach abstract concepts in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Reducing the learning challenges for students using physical analog models and demonstrations, however, can often increase instructors' workload and budget because the cost and time needed to produce and maintain such curriculum materials is substantial. First, this presentation describes a working model for the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC) to support instructors' use of physical analog models and demonstrations in the science classroom. The working model is based on a combination of instructional resource models developed by the Association of College & Research Libraries and by the Physics Instructional Resource Association. The MEDL-CMC aims to make the curriculum materials available for all science courses and outreach programs within the institution where the MEDL-CMC resides. The sustainability and value of the MEDL-CMC comes from its ability to provide and maintain a variety of physical analog models and demonstrations in a wide range of science disciplines. Second, the presentation then reports on the development, progress, and future of the MEDL-CMC at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). Development of the UCLA MEDL-CMC was funded by a grant from UCLA's Office of Instructional Development and is supported by the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences. Other UCLA science departments have recently shown interest in the UCLA MEDL-CMC services, and therefore, preparations are currently underway to increase our capacity for providing interdepartmental service. The presentation concludes with recommendations and suggestions for other institutions that wish to start their own MEDL-CMC in order to increase educational effectiveness and decrease instructor workload. We welcome an interuniversity collaboration to

  18. Numerical Simulations of Two-Phase Reacting Flow in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Combustor Using NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Wey, C. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor have been conducted by using the National Combustion Code (NCC). The simulations have been carried out using the time filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach ranging from the steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), unsteady RANS (URANS), to the dynamic flow structure simulation (DFS). The sub-grid model employed for turbulent mixing and combustion includes the well-mixed model, the linear eddy mixing (LEM) model, and the filtered mass density function (FDF/PDF) model. The starting condition of the injected liquid spray is specified via empirical droplet size correlation, and a five-species single-step global reduced mechanism is employed for fuel chemistry. All the calculations use the same grid whose resolution is of the RANS type. Comparisons of results from various models are presented.

  19. Echinococcus metacestodes as laboratory models for the screening of drugs against cestodes and trematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, A; Stadelmann, B; Scholl, S; Müller, J; Spiliotis, M; Müller, N; Gottstein, B; Siles-Lucas, M

    2010-03-01

    Among the cestodes, Echinococcus granulosus, Echinococcus multilocularis and Taenia solium represent the most dangerous parasites. Their larval stages cause the diseases cystic echinococcosis (CE), alveolar echinococcosis (AE) and cysticercosis, respectively, which exhibit considerable medical and veterinary health concerns with a profound economic impact. Others caused by other cestodes, such as species of the genera Mesocestoides and Hymenolepis, are relatively rare in humans. In this review, we will focus on E. granulosus and E. multilocularis metacestode laboratory models and will review the use of these models in the search for novel drugs that could be employed for chemotherapeutic treatment of echinococcosis. Clearly, improved therapeutic drugs are needed for the treatment of AE and CE, and this can only be achieved through the development of medium-to-high throughput screening approaches. The most recent achievements in the in vitro culture and genetic manipulation of E. multilocularis cells and metacestodes, and the accessability of the E. multilocularis genome and EST sequence information, have rendered the E. multilocularis model uniquely suited for studies on drug-efficacy and drug target identification. This could lead to the development of novel compounds for the use in chemotherapy against echinococcosis, and possibly against diseases caused by other cestodes, and potentially also trematodes.

  20. A Real-Space Cellular Automaton Laboratory for the modeling of complex dunefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozier, Olivier; Narteau, Clement

    2013-04-01

    Using applications in the physics of sand dunes, we explore the capabilities of a Real Space Cellular Automaton Laboratory (ReSCAL), a generator of 3D stochastic cellular automaton stochastic cellular automaton models with continuous time. The objective of this software is to develop interdisciplinary research collaboration to investigate the dynamics of complex systems. In the vast majority of numerical models, any point in space is entirely characterized by a local set of physical variables (e. g. temperature, pressure, velocity) that are recalculated over time according to some predetermined set of fundamental laws. However, there is not always a satisfactory theoretical framework from which we can try to quantify the overall dynamics of the system. For this reason, we prefer concentrate on features of organization and ReSCAL is entirely constructed from a finite number of discrete states that represent the different phases of matter involved in the system under consideration. Then, an elementary cell is a real-space representation of the physical environment. Pairs of nearest neighbor cells are called doublets and each individual physical process is associated with a set of doublet transitions and a characteristic transition rate. Using a modular approach, we show how it is possible to model and combine a wide range of physical, chemical and/or anthropological processes. As an example, we discuss different dune morphologies with respect to rotating wind conditions.

  1. Limitations of mathematical modelling and numerical simulation of industrial and laboratory high-pressure processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Cornelia; Delgado, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    High pressures up to several hundreds of MPa are utilised in a wide range of applications in chemical engineering, bioengineering, and food engineering, aiming at selective control of (bio-)chemical reactions. Non-uniformity of process conditions may threaten the safety and quality of the resulting products as the process conditions such as pressure, temperature, and treatment history are crucial for the course of (bio-)chemical reactions. Therefore, thermofluid dynamical phenomena during the high-pressure process have to be examined, and tools to predict process uniformity and to optimise the processes have to be developed. Recently, mathematical models and numerical simulations of laboratory and industrial scale high-pressure processes have been set up and validated by experimental results. This contribution deals with the assumption of the modelling that relevant (bio-)chemical compounds are ideally dissolved or diluted particles in a continuum flow. By considering the definition of the continuum hypothesis regarding the minimum particle population in a distinct volume, limitations of this modelling and simulation are addressed.

  2. Model Predictive Control of the Reverse Osmosis Plant at AICA Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel González Santos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Process control is an essential part of the desalination industry that requires to be controlled at theoptimum operating conditions to guarantee an increase in the life time of the plant and reduction of theunit product cost. Desalination is a highly complex process, so the majority of dynamic models are ofthe form of Multi-Inputs-Multi-Outputs (MIMO systems. Controlling a MIMO system is a complexoperation because of the interconnections between the inputs and the influence of each one of them onthe system outputs. In this paper, we present the MIMO dynamic model that was developed for a twostageReverse Osmosis (RO desalination system at AICA Laboratories. The purpose of this researchwas to apply a new control strategy to the system based on a Model Predictive Control (MPC algorithm.The control system proposed was simulated through computer by using Simulink/Matlab software.The simulation results show the efficiency of the proposed controller based on MPC strategy and canbe useful to increase knowledge in control processes in reverse osmosis desalination systems.

  3. VESL: The Virtual Earth Sheet Laboratory for Ice Sheet Modeling and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. L. C.; Larour, E. Y.; Quinn, J. D.; Halkides, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce the Virtual Earth System Laboratory (VESL), a scientific modeling and visualization tool delivered through an integrated web portal for dissemination of data, simulation of physical processes, and promotion of climate literacy. The current prototype leverages NASA's Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), a state-of-the-art polar ice sheet dynamics model developed at the Jet Propulsion Lab and UC Irvine. We utilize the Emscripten source-to-source compiler to convert the C/C++ ISSM engine core to JavaScript, and bundled pre/post-processing JS scripts to be compatible with the existing ISSM Python/Matlab API. Researchers using VESL will be able to effectively present their work for public dissemination with little-to-no additional post-processing. This will allow for faster publication in peer-reviewed journals and adaption of results for educational applications. Through future application of this concept to multiple aspects of the Earth System, VESL has the potential to broaden data applications in the geosciences and beyond. At this stage, we seek feedback from the greater scientific and public outreach communities regarding the ease of use and feature set of VESL, as we plan its expansion, and aim to achieve more rapid communication and presentation of scientific results.

  4. Combustor having mixing tube bundle with baffle arrangement for directing fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Michael John; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin

    2016-08-23

    A combustor includes a tube bundle that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor. The tube bundle includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface, and a plurality of tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface to provide fluid communication through the tube bundle. A barrier extends radially inside the tube bundle between the upstream and downstream surfaces, and a baffle extends axially inside the tube bundle between the upstream surface and the barrier.

  5. Laser-Induced Fluorescence and Performance Analysis of the Ultra-Compact Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    fuel consumption TVC Trapped Vortex Combustion UCC Ultra Compact Combustor UHC Unburned hydrocarbons UV Ultra-violet VI Virtual Instrument 2-D...unburned hydrocarbons ( UHC ), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), and soot particles (Turns, 2006:3). In conventional combustors, a high...power (fuel-rich) condition tends to produce more NOx and soot, while low power (fuel-lean) produces more UHC and CO (Quaale, 2003:27). While the UCC

  6. A Model for Program-Wide Assessment of the Effectiveness of Writing Instruction in Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitta, Erin K.; Zemliansky, Pavel; Turner, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a model for program-wide assessment of the effectiveness of writing instruction in a chemistry laboratory course. This model, which involves collaboration between faculty from chemistry, the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) program, and the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, is based on several theories and…

  7. Effects of Combined Hands-on Laboratory and Computer Modeling on Student Learning of Gas Laws: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiufeng

    2006-01-01

    Based on current theories of chemistry learning, this study intends to test a hypothesis that computer modeling enhanced hands-on chemistry laboratories are more effective than hands-on laboratories or computer modeling laboratories alone in facilitating high school students' understanding of chemistry concepts. Thirty-three high school chemistry…

  8. Laboratory-Measured and Property-Transfer Modeled Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Snake River Plain Aquifer Sediments at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kim S.

    2008-01-01

    Sediments are believed to comprise as much as 50 percent of the Snake River Plain aquifer thickness in some locations within the Idaho National Laboratory. However, the hydraulic properties of these deep sediments have not been well characterized and they are not represented explicitly in the current conceptual model of subregional scale ground-water flow. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the nature of the sedimentary material within the aquifer and to test the applicability of a site-specific property-transfer model developed for the sedimentary interbeds of the unsaturated zone. Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) was measured for 10 core samples from sedimentary interbeds within the Snake River Plain aquifer and also estimated using the property-transfer model. The property-transfer model for predicting Ksat was previously developed using a multiple linear-regression technique with bulk physical-property measurements (bulk density [pbulk], the median particle diameter, and the uniformity coefficient) as the explanatory variables. The model systematically underestimates Ksat,typically by about a factor of 10, which likely is due to higher bulk-density values for the aquifer samples compared to the samples from the unsaturated zone upon which the model was developed. Linear relations between the logarithm of Ksat and pbulk also were explored for comparison.

  9. Ionian Paterae: New Insights from Observations, Numerical Modeling and Laboratory Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, T. K.; Lopes, R. M.; Black, S. M.; Lougen, J.

    2006-12-01

    To constrain the behavior of Ionian volcanic paterae in general, and Loki Patera in particular, we have used the following techniques in concert: 1) geologic mapping and analyses; 2) laboratory simulations; and 3) mathematical modeling. Here, we present preliminary results from the synthesis of these data. Loki Patera (310°W, 12°°N) is significantly different from the rest of the Ionian paterae for the following reasons: 1) its surface area falls 6 s outside the range for other Ionian paterae; 2) it is the only patera containing a bright "island" that is cut by dark lineaments; 3) at times of a thermal brightening event, it emits up to 15% of Io's global heat flux. Debate continues over whether Loki Paterae is an overturning lava lake, or a depression whose floor is periodically resurfaced by lava flows. Laboratory simulations, in which corn syrup or polyethylene glycol wax (PEG) were extruded into a square tank through 1 or 2 floor vents at a constant rate, were conducted to provide insight into Loki Patera's behavior. Results from both sets of experiments suggest that a single convection cell would be difficult to establish at Loki Patera. Crustal foundering of a lava lake may be possible under special conditions. Given the unique nature of Loki Patera and its island, we propose that the island may be similar to a resurgent dome in a terrestrial caldera complex composed primarily of evolved lavas, such as Long Valley Caldera, California. We examined other paterae that contain bright "islands" on their floors in an effort to constrain their origins. Geologic mapping, and shape analyses of the paterae and the islands they contain, suggest that most paterae islands are patches of cooled lava on the paterae floor. Only about 8% of paterae islands have morphologies and geologic relations that are consistent with a tectonic origin.

  10. Acid/base front propagation in saturated porous media: 2D laboratory experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyaux-Lawniczak, Stéphanie; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    We perform laboratory scale reactive transport experiments involving acid-basic reactions between nitric acid and sodium hydroxide. A two-dimensional experimental setup is designed to provide continuous on-line measurements of physico-chemical parameters such as pH, redox potential (Eh) and electrical conductivity (EC) inside the system under saturated flow through conditions. The electrodes provide reliable values of pH and EC, while sharp fronts associated with redox potential dynamics could not be captured. Care should be taken to properly incorporate within a numerical model the mixing processes occurring inside the electrodes. The available observations are modeled through a numerical code based on the advection-dispersion equation. In this framework, EC is considered as a variable behaving as a conservative tracer and pH and Eh require solving the advection dispersion equation only once. The agreement between the computed and measured pH and EC is good even without recurring to parameters calibration on the basis of the experiments. Our findings suggest that the classical advection-dispersion equation can be used to interpret these kinds of experiments if mixing inside the electrodes is adequately considered.

  11. Plume Characterization of a Laboratory Model 22 N GPIM Thruster via High-Frequency Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Kinzbach, McKenzie I.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the capability of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive areas of the spacecraft from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. Plume characterization of a laboratory-model 22 N thruster via optical diagnostics was conducted at NASA GRC in a space-simulated environment. A high-frequency pulsed laser was coupled with an electron-multiplied ICCD camera to perform Raman spectroscopy in the near-field, low-pressure plume. The Raman data yielded plume constituents and temperatures over a range of thruster chamber pressures and as a function of thruster (catalyst) operating time. Schlieren images of the near-field plume enabled calculation of plume velocities and revealed general plume structure of the otherwise invisible plume. The measured velocities are compared to those predicted by a two-dimensional, kinetic model. Trends in data and numerical results are presented from catalyst mid-life to end-of-life. The results of this investigation were coupled with the Raman and Schlieren data to provide an anchor for plume impingement analysis presented in a companion paper. The results of both analyses will be used to improve understanding of the nature of AF-M315E plumes and their impacts to GPIM and other future missions.

  12. Neuronavigated Fiber Dissection with Pial Preservation: Laboratory Model to Simulate Opercular Approaches to Insular Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Martino, Juan; Sarubbo, Silvio; Corrivetti, Francesco; Bouazza, Schahrazed; Bresson, Damien; Duffau, Hugues; Froelich, Sebastien

    2017-02-01

    Advances in the oncologic and functional results of insular surgery have been reported recently. Such successes have been made possible by the advent of the transopercular approach under awake monitoring and by improved anatomic and functional knowledge of white matter pathways surrounding the insula. Nonetheless, given the rarity of insular tumors, it is difficult to get familiar with the complex 3-dimensional anatomy of the different neuronal and vascular structures encountered during a transopercular insular resection. We thus propose to develop a laboratory model allowing to train transopercular approaches of the insula. Two hemispheres prepared with Klinger's technique were dissected under light microscope, preserving all pial membranes. The different steps of the dissection were video recorded. Preservation of pial membranes enabled us to simulate subpial resection, both during operculum removal and during insular cortex resection. The medial wall of the resection was defined by the inferior-fronto-occipital fasciculus, protecting from the lenticulostriate arteries. In this paper, we show that Klinger dissection with preservation of pial membranes provides a realistic model of insular surgery, allowing surgeons to learn and train on this highly specialized surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Use of an Ultra-Compact Combustor as an Inter-Turbine Burner for Improved Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Alstom , formally known as ABB Power Generation, developed a line of SCgas turbines for the power generation industry [12]. The Alstom GT24 and GT26...consist of a primary combustor a turbine and a reheat combustor, with the aim of achieving high efficiency while delivering low emissions. Alstom has been...utilizing the SC concepts since the 1940’s using diffusion type combustors. In 1995 Alstom developed their modern line SC gas turbines shown in Figure

  14. Health monitoring data analysis and comparison of prototype and laboratorial model for long-span cable-stayed bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ou; Ou, Jinping

    2009-03-01

    Since 2004, Shandong Binzhou Yellow River highway bridge health monitoring (SHM) system has started to operate. Abundance data has been acquired during these years. To make full use of these data, a 1/40 scale laboratorial model has been built based on the design information of Shandong Binzhou Yellow River highway bridge. And a health monitoring system of the laboratorial model, which included loading system, local response monitoring subsystem and global response monitoring subsystem, has been designed and implemented. The dynamic performance of bridge model and prototype has been compared and the error analysis has been provided also. The numeric simulation of cable damage localization utilizing damage location vectors (DLVs) has been demonstrated. And the results indicated that using DLVs to localize the cable damage is feasible and accurate. The goal of these efforts is to utilize the convenience of the laboratorial environment to obtain the structural information in ideal state which is hard to get in field.

  15. Effects of injection pressure variation on mixing in a cold supersonic combustor with kerosene fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Lai; Zhu, Lin; Qi, Yin-Yin; Ge, Jia-Ru; Luo, Feng; Zou, Hao-Ran; Wei, Min; Jen, Tien-Chien

    2017-10-01

    Spray jet in cold kerosene-fueled supersonic flow has been characterized under different injection pressures to assess the effects of the pressure variation on the mixing between incident shock wave and transverse cavity injection. Based on the real scramjet combustor, a detailed computational fluid dynamics model is developed. The injection pressures are specified as 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 MPa, respectively, with the other constant operation parameters (such as the injection diameter, angle and velocity). A three dimensional Couple Level Set & Volume of Fluids approach incorporating an improved Kelvin-Helmholtz & Rayleigh-Taylor model is used to investigate the interaction between kerosene and supersonic air. The numerical simulations primarily concentrate on penetration depth, span expansion area, angle of shock wave and sauter mean diameter distribution of the kerosene droplets with/without evaporation. Validation has been implemented by comparing the calculated against the measured in literature with good qualitative agreement. Results show that the penetration depth, span-wise angle and expansion area of the transverse cavity jet are all increased with the injection pressure. However, when the injection pressure is further increased, the value in either penetration depth or expansion area increases appreciably. This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of the combination of Couple Level Set & Volume of Fluids approach and an improved Kelvin-Helmholtz & Rayleigh-Taylor model, in turn providing insights into scramjet design improvement.

  16. Inventory of data bases, models, and graphics packages at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, P.J.; Mathisen, D.I.

    1978-10-01

    The Information Coordination Focal Point (ICFP) was initiated in FY77 because DOE had a need for improved access to information at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Savannah River Laboratory, and the six DOE national laboratories. The task for FY77 was to establish guidelines and procedures for this activity with plans of implementing the procedures in FY78 and FY79. The purpose of this report is to document the progress that has been made during FY78 for this project.

  17. Development of differential coastal cooling above sloping bottom: laboratory and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Natilya

    2013-04-01

    The process of formation of differential coastal cooling above sloping bottom, often observed in autumn in coastal regions of seas and large lakes, is investigated by means of laboratory experiments and numerical modelling. During this period, an integral heat flux is directed from water to atmosphere. When water temperature is above that of maximum density (what is typically the case in autumn), it results in a negative buoyancy flux through the surface and the appearance of vertical convection. Water temperature decreases, and in shallow parts the process goes faster than in deeper ones, so that significant horizontal temperature gradients above sloping bottom are formed along with vertical thermal homogeneity of every particular water column. The corresponding density and pressure gradients cause large-scale exchange flows between shallow and deep parts of a basin. The goal of this work is an investigation of the process of establishment of the surface water temperature profile from the coast to the deep part and comparison of the characteristics of this profile with the observed flow rate of the horizontal exchange flows. A series of laboratory experiments was conducted in a rectangular plexiglas laboratory channel with internal dimensions 33 cm × 33 cm × 750 cm; a 5m-long part of the bottom had a slope of A~0.03; walls and bottom were thermally insulated. Heat exchange through the surface with cooler air in laboratory provided natural cooling; initial water temperature varied between 25 and 31 ° C, air temperature - from 19 to 25 ° C. Maximum water layer depth (10, 12, 13, 16, 20, 22.5, 24, 24.5, 27 cm) and the initial air-water temperature difference (Δ~4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11 °C) were changing parameters in the experiments. Registration of water temperature time series in 8 points (1 cm below the water surface in the sloping region with time step 30 s) and vertical profilings in these locations were carried out by electronic thermistors. Flow-rate of

  18. Laboratory And Lysimeter Experimentation And Transport Modeling Of Neptunium And Strontium In Savannah River Site Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Powell, B. A.; Miller, Todd J.

    2012-09-24

    existing data sets. The first data set used laboratory generated Np sorption data as a function of concentration (three orders of magnitude) and as a function of pH (four orders of magnitude of proton concentration). In this modeling exercise, a very simple solution was identified by assuming that all sorption occurred only to the iron oxides in the sediment and that all the added NpO{sub 4}{sup -} remained in the oxidized state and was not reduced to the Np(IV) state (as occurs rapidly with Pu(V)). With rather limited input data, very good agreement between experimental and modeling results was observed. This modeling approach would be easy to add to the PA with little additional data requirements. This model would be useful in a system where pH is expected to change greatly, such as directly beneath a grout or concrete structure. The second model discussed in the report was to derive strontium K{sub d} values from data collected in an 11-year-old field transport study. In this controlled lysimeter study, a sensitivity analysis was conducted of hydrological and chemical processes that influence contaminant transport, including diffusion coefficients, seepage velocity, and K{sub d} value. The best overall K{sub d} derived from the model fit to the data was 32 L kg{sup -1}, which was the same value that was previously measured in traditional laboratory batch sorption studies. This was an unexpected result given the differences in experimental conditions between the batch test and the lysimeter flow through test, in particular the differences between strontium adsorption and desorption processes occurring in the latter test and not in the former. There were some trends in the lysimeter strontium data that were not predicted by the K{sub d} model, which suggest that other geochemical processes are likely also controlling strontium transport. Strontium release and cation exchange are being evaluated. These results suggest that future modeling efforts (e.g., PAs) could be

  19. Laboratory And Lysimeter Experimentation And Transport Modeling Of Neptunium And Strontium In Savannah River Site Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Powell, B. A.; Miller, Todd J.

    2012-09-24

    existing data sets. The first data set used laboratory generated Np sorption data as a function of concentration (three orders of magnitude) and as a function of pH (four orders of magnitude of proton concentration). In this modeling exercise, a very simple solution was identified by assuming that all sorption occurred only to the iron oxides in the sediment and that all the added NpO{sub 4}{sup -} remained in the oxidized state and was not reduced to the Np(IV) state (as occurs rapidly with Pu(V)). With rather limited input data, very good agreement between experimental and modeling results was observed. This modeling approach would be easy to add to the PA with little additional data requirements. This model would be useful in a system where pH is expected to change greatly, such as directly beneath a grout or concrete structure. The second model discussed in the report was to derive strontium K{sub d} values from data collected in an 11-year-old field transport study. In this controlled lysimeter study, a sensitivity analysis was conducted of hydrological and chemical processes that influence contaminant transport, including diffusion coefficients, seepage velocity, and K{sub d} value. The best overall K{sub d} derived from the model fit to the data was 32 L kg{sup -1}, which was the same value that was previously measured in traditional laboratory batch sorption studies. This was an unexpected result given the differences in experimental conditions between the batch test and the lysimeter flow through test, in particular the differences between strontium adsorption and desorption processes occurring in the latter test and not in the former. There were some trends in the lysimeter strontium data that were not predicted by the K{sub d} model, which suggest that other geochemical processes are likely also controlling strontium transport. Strontium release and cation exchange are being evaluated. These results suggest that future modeling efforts (e.g., PAs) could be

  20. Testing geochemical models of bentonite pore water evolution against laboratory experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, David; Arthur, Randy; Watson, Claire; Wilson, James; Strömberg, Bo

    The determination of a bentonite pore water composition and understanding its evolution with time underpins many radioactive waste disposal issues, such as buffer erosion, canister corrosion, and radionuclide solubility, sorption, and diffusion, inter alia. Previous modelling approaches have tended to ignore clay dissolution-precipitation reactions, a consequence of which is that montmorillonite is theoretically preserved indefinitely in the repository system. Here, we investigate the applicability of an alternative clay pore fluid evolution model, that incorporates clay dissolution-precipitation reactions as an integral component and test it against well-characterised laboratory experimental data, where key geochemical parameters, Eh and pH, have been measured directly in compacted bentonite. Simulations have been conducted using different computer codes (Geochemist’s Workbench, PHREEQC, and QPAC) to test the applicability of this model. Thermodynamic data for the Gibb’s free energy of formation of MX-80 smectite used in the calculations were estimated using two different methods (‘Polymer’ and ‘Vieillard’ Models). Simulations of ‘end-point’ pH measurements in batch bentonite-water slurry experiments showed different pH values according to the complexity of the system studied. The most complete system investigated revealed pH values were a strong function of partial pressure of carbon dioxide, with pH increasing with decreasing PCO 2 (with log PCO 2 values ranging from -3.5 to -7.5 bars produced pH values ranging from 7.9 to 9.6). A second set of calculations investigated disequilibrium between clay and pore fluid in laboratory squeezing cell tests involving pure water (pH = 9.0) or a 1 M NaOH solution (pH = 12.1). Simulations carried out for 100 days (the same timescale as the experiments) showed that smectite remained far from equilibrium throughout, and that the lowering of pH due to smectite hydrolysis was trivial. However, extending the

  1. Application of open-source photogrammetric software MicMac for monitoring surface deformation in laboratory models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Olivier; Bertelsen, Hâvard S.; Guldstrand, Frank; Girod, Luc; Johannessen, Rikke F.; Bjugger, Fanny; Burchardt, Steffi; Mair, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying deformation is essential in modern laboratory models of geological systems. This paper presents a new laboratory monitoring method through the implementation of the open-source software MicMac, which efficiently implements photogrammetry in Structure-from-Motion algorithms. Critical evaluation is provided using results from two example laboratory geodesy scenarios: magma emplacement and strike-slip faulting. MicMac automatically processes images from synchronized cameras to compute time series of digital elevation models (DEMs) and orthorectified images of model surfaces. MicMac also implements digital image correlation to produce high-resolution displacements maps. The resolution of DEMs and displacement maps corresponds to the pixel size of the processed images. Using 24 MP cameras, the precision of DEMs and displacements is ~0.05 mm on a 40 × 40 cm surface. Processing displacement maps with Matlab® scripts allows automatic fracture mapping on the monitored surfaces. MicMac also offers the possibility to integrate 3-D models of excavated structures with the corresponding surface deformation data. The high resolution and high precision of MicMac results and the ability to generate virtual 3-D models of complex structures make it a very promising tool for quantitative monitoring in laboratory models of geological systems.

  2. Dielectric Properties of Ice-Water Systems: Laboratory Characterization and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J.; Rippin, D. M.; Endres, A. L.; Murray, T.

    2005-05-01

    Glacier mechanical properties, and hence their response to climatic change, depend strongly on the proportion and distribution of unfrozen water at ice grain boundaries. Glaciologists have characterized unfrozen water content in several ways, notably via thin section microscopic analysis of ice cores to measure porewater contents, and field surveys of electromagnetic properties using radar. Water content has a very strong influence on the velocity of electromagnetic (radar) waves in ice, because of the high dielectric constant of water (~80) in comparison with ice (~3). However, there is a strong discrepancy between the two methods of measurement, with field radar surveys on glaciers giving unfrozen water contents of several volumetric percent, whereas ice-core microscopy gives values of less than one percent. This discrepancy has called into question the approach used to obtain the unfrozen water content from radar wave velocity. This approach assumes that the ice-water mixture is a lossless medium. Here, we report a laboratory and modeling based investigation of the relationship between dielectric properties and unfrozen water content of ice cores from the Glacier de Tsanfleuron, Switzerland, aimed at resolving the discrepancy. The laboratory study uses the technique of Time Domain Reflectometry to characterize the dielectric properties of ice cores from a range of ice facies. `Press on' TDR waveguides have been developed specifically for use on ice cores. Several press-on probe designs have been developed and aspects of their performance are reported. An independent estimate of unfrozen water content is determined from temperature and total pore fluid ionic strength. The results allow the establishment of relationships between the high frequency (~500MHz) dielectric properties and water content for various ice-crystal geometries. Mathematical modeling of the dependence of dielectric constant on frequency and water phase conductivity has been undertaken using

  3. Laboratory Experiments Concerning Upwellings From the Slab-Graveyard: Implications For Geochemical and Seismic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A. C.; Kincaid, C.; Hall, P.

    2005-12-01

    The ongoing plume debate appears to focus on upwellings characterized by large heads and smaller tails, that form from a deep or basal thermal boundary layer (BTBL), which are driven by temperature excesses in the range of 200° C. We use 3-D laboratory experiments to explore how upwellings might differ from this common plume description when BTBLs are influenced by subducted plates. An important aspect of the models is the representation of ridge chemical differentiation processes resulting in slabs with two distinct layers; a lighter, depleted upper mantle component (Harzburgite:H) and a heavier, iron-rich crustal component (Basalt/Eclogite:B/E). Laboratory experiments utilize a working fluid of glucose syrup with temperature dependent density and viscosity. Compositionally distinct mantle reservoirs are represented through isothermal density/viscosity contrasts controlled by water content. The ambient fluid (AF) is contained within a rectangular tank that is heated from below and cooled from above to produce background convection with a Rayleigh number of 10-5-10-6. Highly viscous, tabular slabs are produced by pouring compositionally distinct syrup from two slab reservoirs (B/E and H) into a mold which is chilled to -5° C. The viscous layered slab is emplaced at the fluid surface and subsequently sinks through, stalls and spreads within a BTBL roughly twice the slab thickness (1 cm). Results show that a wide variety in upwelling morphologies form when layered slabs reside within the BTBL and that plume heads/tails are largely dissimilar to those of the standard plume model. The manner in which the slab laminae vs. AF in the BTBL combine (or segregate) within upwellings depends on viscosity/density contrasts, how slabs collapse in the BTBL, and time. End-member regimes include: experiments dominated by a very light H-slab component with early, cold H-plumes and late, hot B/E-AF plumes and experiments where density differences between H, B/E and AF are small and

  4. Laboratory modelling of resonant wave-current interaction in the vicinity wind farm masts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnoo, Hans; Abcha, Nizar; Garcia-Hermosa, Maria-Isabel; Ezersky, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    In the nearest future, by 2020, about 4% of electricity in Europe will be supplied by sea stations operating from renewable sources: ocean thermal energy, wave and tidal energy, wind farms. By now the wind stations located in the coastal zone, provide the most part of electricity in different European countries. Meanwhile, effects of wind farms on the environment are not sufficiently studied. We report results of laboratory simulations aimed at investigation of hydrodynamic fields arising in the vicinity of wind farm masts under the action of currents and surface waves. The main attention is paid to modeling the resonance effects when the amplitude of velocity pulsations in the vicinity of the masts under the joint action of currents and harmonic waves demonstrate significant growth. This resonance can lead to an increase in Reynolds stress on the bottom, intensification of sediment transport and sound generation. The experiments are performed in the 17 meters hydrodynamical channel of laboratory Morphodynamique Continentale et Côtière UMR CNRS 6143. Mast are modeled by vertical cylinder placed in a steady flow. Behind the cylinder turbulent Karman vortex street occurs. Results are obtained in interval of Reynolds numbers Re=103 - 104(Re=Ud/v, where U is the velocity of the flow, d is diameter of the cylinder, ν is cinematic viscosity). Harmonic surface waves of small amplitude propagating upstream are excited by computer controlled wave maker. In the absence of surface waves, turbulent Karman street with averaged frequency f is observed. It is revealed experimentally that harmonic surface waves with a frequencies closed to 2f can synchronize vortex shedding and increase the amplitude of velocity fluctuations in the wake of the cylinder. Map of regimes is found on the parameter plane amplitude of the surface wave - wave frequency. In order to distinguish the synchronization regimes, we defined phase of oscillations using the Hilbert transform technique. We

  5. Use of latent class models to accommodate inter-laboratory variation in assessing genetic polymorphisms associated with disease risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Stephen D

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Researchers wanting to study the association of genetic factors with disease may encounter variability in the laboratory methods used to establish genotypes or other traits. Such variability leads to uncertainty in determining the strength of a genotype as a risk factor. This problem is illustrated using data from a case-control study of cervical cancer in which some subjects were independently assessed by different laboratories for the presence of a genetic polymorphism. Inter-laboratory agreement was only moderate, which led to a very wide range of empirical odds ratios (ORs with the disease, depending on how disagreements were treated. This paper illustrates the use of latent class models (LCMs and to estimate OR while taking laboratory accuracy into account. Possible LCMs are characterised in terms of the number of laboratory measurements available, and if their error rates are assumed to be differential or non-differential by disease status and/or laboratory. Results The LCM results give maximum likelihood estimates of laboratory accuracy rates and the OR of the genetic variable and disease, and avoid the ambiguities of the empirical results. Having allowed for possible measurement error in the expure, the LCM estimates of exposure – disease associations are typically stronger than their empirical equivalents. Also the LCM estimates exploit all the available data, and hence have relatively low standard errors. Conclusion Our approach provides a way to evaluate the association of a polymorphism with disease, while taking laboratory measurement error into account. Ambiguities in the empirical data arising from disagreements between laboratories are avoided, and the estimated polymorphism-disease association is typically enhanced.

  6. Geyser preplay and eruption in a laboratory model with a bubble trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, Esther; Tran, Aaron; Saez, Carolina Muñoz; Shteinberg, Alexander; Manga, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We present visual observations and temperature measurements from a laboratory model of a geyser. Our model incorporates a bubble trap, a zone in which vapor can accumulate in the geyser's subsurface plumbing, in a vertical conduit connected to a basal chamber. Analogous features have been identified at several natural geysers. We observe three types of eruptions: 1) rising bubbles eject a small volume of liquid in a weak spout (small eruption); 2) boiling occurs in the conduit above the bubble trap (medium eruption); and 3) boiling occurs in the conduit and chamber (large eruption). In the last two cases, boiling in the conduit causes a rapid hydrostatic pressure drop that allows for the rise and eruption of liquid water in a vigorous spout. Boiling initiates at depth rather than propagating downward from the surface. In a single eruption cycle, multiple small eruptions precede every medium and large eruption. At least one eruption cycle that culminates in a medium eruption (i.e., a quiescent period followed by a series of small eruptions leading up to a medium eruption) precedes every eruption cycle that culminates in a large eruption. We find that the transfer of fluid with high enthalpy to the upper conduit during small and medium eruptions is necessary to heat the upper conduit and prepare the system for the full boiling required for a large eruption. The placement of the bubble trap midway up the conduit allows for more efficient heating of the upper conduit. Our model provides insight into the influence of conduit geometry on eruption style and the importance of heat transfer by smaller events in preparing the geyser system for eruption.

  7. Mantle flow and dynamic topography associated with slab window opening: Insights from laboratory models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Moroni, Monica; Funiciello, Francesca; Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We present dynamically self-consistent mantle-scale laboratory models that have been conducted to improve our understanding of the influence of slab window opening on subduction dynamics, mantle flow and associated dynamic topography over geological time scales. The adopted setup consists of a two-layer linearly viscous system simulating the subduction of a fixed plate of silicone (lithosphere) under negative buoyancy in a viscous layer of glucose syrup (mantle). Our experimental setting is also characterized by a constant-width rectangular window located at the center of a laterally confined slab, modeling the case of the interaction of a trench-parallel spreading ridge with a wide subduction zone. We found that the opening of a slab window does not produce consistent changes of the geometry and the kinematics of the slab. On the contrary, slab-induced mantle circulation, quantified both in the vertical and horizontal sections using the Feature Tracking image analysis technique, is strongly modified. In particular, rollback subduction and the opening of the slab window generate a complex mantle circulation pattern characterized by the presence of poloidal and toroidal components, with the importance of each evolving according to kinematic stages. Mantle coming from the oceanic domain floods through the slab window, indenting the supra-slab mantle zone and producing its deformation without any mixing between mantle portions. The opening of the slab window and the upwelling of sub-slab mantle produce a regional-scale non-isostatic topographic uplift of the overriding plate that would correspond to values ranging between ca. 1 and 5 km in nature. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compared them to the tectonics and volcanism of the Patagonian subduction zone. We found that the anomalous backarc volcanism that has been developing since the middle Miocene could result from the lateral flow of sub

  8. The dynamics of laterally variable subductions: laboratory models applied to the Hellenides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Guillaume

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We design three-dimensional dynamically self-consistent laboratory models of subduction to analyze the relationships between overriding plate deformation and subduction dynamics in the upper mantle. We investigate the effects of the subduction of a lithosphere of laterally variable buoyancy on the temporal evolution of trench kinematics and shape, horizontal flow at the top of the asthenosphere, dynamic topography and deformation of the overriding plate. The interface between the two units, analogue to a trench-perpendicular tear fault between a negatively buoyant oceanic plate and positively buoyant continental one, is either fully-coupled or shear-stress free. Differential rates of trench retreat, in excess of 6 cm yr−1 between the two units, trigger a more vigorous mantle flow above the oceanic slab unit than above the continental slab unit. The resulting asymmetrical sublithospheric flow shears the overriding plate in front of the tear fault, and deformation gradually switches from extension to transtension through time. The consistency between our models results and geological observations suggests that the Late Cenozoic deformation of the Aegean domain, including the formation of the North Aegean Trough and Central Hellenic Shear zone, results from the spatial variations in the buoyancy of the subducting lithosphere. In particular, the lateral changes of the subduction regime caused by the Early Pliocene subduction of the old oceanic Ionian plate redesigned mantle flow and excited an increasingly vigorous dextral shear underneath the overriding plate. The models suggest that it is the inception of the Kefalonia Fault that caused the transition between an extension dominated tectonic regime to transtension, in the North Aegean, Mainland Greece and Peloponnese. The subduction of the tear fault may also have helped the propagation of the North Anatolian Fault into the Aegean domain.

  9. Estimation method for random sonic fatigue life of thin-walled structure of a combustor liner based on stress probability distribution%Estimation method for random sonic fatigue life of thin-walled structure of a combustor liner based on stress probability distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHA Yun-dong; GUO Xiao-peng; LIAO Lian-fang; XIE Li-juan

    2011-01-01

    As to the sonic fatigue problem of an aero-engine combustor liner structure under the random acoustic loadings, an effective method for predicting the fatigue life of a structure under random loadings was studied. Firstly, the probability distribution of Von Mises stress of thin-walled structure under random loadings was studied, analysis suggested that probability density function of Von Mises stress process accord approximately with two-parameter Weibull distribution. The formula for calculating Weibull parameters were given. Based on the Miner linear theory, the method for predicting the random sonic fatigue life based on the stress probability density was developed, and the model for fatigue life prediction was constructed. As an example, an aero-engine combustor liner structure was considered. The power spectrum density (PSD) of the vibrational stress response was calculated by using the coupled FEM/BEM (finite element method/boundary element method) model, the fatigue life was estimated by using the constructed model. And considering the influence of the wide frequency band, the calculated results were modified. Comparetive analysis shows that the estimated results of sonic fatigue of the combustor liner structure by using Weibull distribution of Von Mises stress are more conservative than using Dirlik distribution to some extend. The results show that the methods presented in this paper are practical for the random fatigue life analysis of the aeronautical thin-walled structures.

  10. Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etemad, Shahrokh [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States); Baird, Benjamin [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States); Alavandi, Sandeep [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States); Pfefferle, William [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States)

    2010-04-01

    PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOE's goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar

  11. Characterization of wastewater treatment plant microbial communities and the effects of carbon sources on diversity in laboratory models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwon Lee

    Full Text Available We are developing a laboratory-scale model to improve our understanding and capacity to assess the biological risks of genetically engineered bacteria and their genetic elements in the natural environment. Our hypothetical scenario concerns an industrial bioreactor failure resulting in the introduction of genetically engineered bacteria to a downstream municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP. As the first step towards developing a model for this scenario, we sampled microbial communities from the aeration basin of a MWWTP at three seasonal time points. Having established a baseline for community composition, we investigated how the community changed when propagated in the laboratory, including cell culture media conditions that could provide selective pressure in future studies. Specifically, using PhyloChip 16S-rRNA-gene targeting microarrays, we compared the compositions of sampled communities to those of inocula propagated in the laboratory in simulated wastewater conditionally amended with various carbon sources (glucose, chloroacetate, D-threonine or the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C2mim]Cl. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria were predominant in both aeration basin and laboratory-cultured communities. Laboratory-cultured communities were enriched in γ-Proteobacteria. Enterobacteriaceae, and Aeromonadaceae were enriched by glucose, Pseudomonadaceae by chloroacetate and D-threonine, and Burkholderiacea by high (50 mM concentrations of chloroacetate. Microbial communities cultured with chloroacetate and D-threonine were more similar to sampled field communities than those cultured with glucose or [C2mim]Cl. Although observed relative richness in operational taxonomic units (OTUs was lower for laboratory cultures than for field communities, both flask and reactor systems supported phylogenetically diverse communities. These results importantly provide a foundation for laboratory models of industrial

  12. Modeling hexavalent chromium reduction in groundwater in field-scale transport and laboratory batch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedly, J.C.; Davis, J.A.; Kent, D.B.

    1995-01-01

    located in the reducing stratum. Within this context and as long as there is adequate reductive capacity present, the transport simulation results are insensitive to the parameters important for the batch simulations. The results illustrate how a combination of field measurements and batch laboratory studies can be used to improve predictive modeling of contaminant transport.

  13. Using Model Organisms in an Undergraduate Laboratory to Link Genotype, Phenotype, and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs-McDaniels, Nicole L.; Maine, Eleanor M.; Albertson, R. Craig; Wiles, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    We developed laboratory exercises using zebrafish ("Danio rerio") and nematodes ("Caenorhabditis elegans") for a sophomore-level Integrative Biology Laboratory course. Students examined live wildtype zebrafish at different stages of development and noted shifts occurring in response to "fgf8a" deficiency. Students were introduced to development in…

  14. Beyond a Battery Hen Model?: A Computer Laboratory, Micropolitics and Educational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshaber, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates what happened in one Australian primary school as part of the establishment, use and development of a computer laboratory over a period of two years. As part of a school renewal project, the computer laboratory was introduced as an "innovative" way to improve the skills of teachers and children in information and…

  15. Combustion and Energy Transfer Experiments: A Laboratory Model for Linking Core Concepts across the Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Jose C.; Dubetz, Terry A.; Schmidt, Diane L.; Isern, Sharon; Beatty, Thomas; Brown, David W.; Gillman, Edward; Alberte, Randall S.; Egiebor, Nosa O.

    2007-01-01

    Core concepts can be integrated throughout lower-division science and engineering courses by using a series of related, cross-referenced laboratory experiments. Starting with butane combustion in chemistry, the authors expanded the underlying core concepts of energy transfer into laboratories designed for biology, physics, and engineering. This…

  16. The role of viscosity contrast on plume structure in laboratory modeling of mantle convection

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Vivek N; Arakeri, Jaywant H

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted laboratory experiments to model important aspects of plumes in mantle convection. We focus on the role of the viscosity ratio U (between the ambient fluid and the plume fluid) in determining the plume structure and dynamics. In our experiments, we are able to capture geophysical convection regimes relevant to mantle convection both for hot spots (when U > 1) and plate-subduction (when U < 1) regimes. The planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique is used for flow visualization and characterizing the plume structures. The convection is driven by compositional buoyancy generated by the perfusion of lighter fluid across a permeable mesh and the viscosity ratio U is systematically varied over a range from 1/300 to 2500. The planform, near the bottom boundary for U=1, exhibits a well-known dendritic line plume structure. As the value of U is increased, a progressive morphological transition is observed from the dendritic-plume structure to discrete spherical plumes, accompanied with th...

  17. Mars science laboratory radiation assessment detector (MSL/RAD) modeling workshop proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Norbury, John W.; Reitz, Günther

    2017-08-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) (Hassler et al., 2012; Zeitlin et al., 2016) onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover (Grotzinger et al., 2012) is a sophisticated charged and neutral particle radiation analyzer developed by an international team of scientists and engineers from Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado as the leading institution, the University of Kiel and the German Aerospace Center in Cologne, Germany. RAD is a compact, powerful instrument capable of distinguishing between ionizing particles and neutral particles and providing neutron, gamma, and charged particle spectra from protons to iron as well as absorbed dose measurements in tissue-equivalent material. During the 6 month cruise to Mars, inside the MSL spacecraft, RAD served as a proxy to validate models of the radiation levels expected inside a spacecraft that future astronauts might experience (Zeitlin et al., 2013). RAD was turned on one day after the landing on August 7, 2012, exactly 100 years to the day after the discovery of cosmic rays on Earth by Victor Hess. These measurements are the first of their kind on the surface of another planet (Hassler et al., 2014), and the radiation data collected by RAD on the surface of Mars will inform projections of crew health risks and the design of protective surface habitats and other countermeasures for future human missions in the coming decades.

  18. Laboratory model of adaptive radiation: a selection experiment in the bank vole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowska, Edyta T; Baliga-Klimczyk, Katarzyna; Chrzaścik, Katarzyna M; Koteja, Paweł

    2008-01-01

    In a laboratory colony of a wild rodent, the bank vole Myodes (=Clethrionomys) glareolus, a multiway artificial selection experiment was applied to mimic evolution toward high aerobic metabolism achieved during locomotor activity, predatory behavior, and ability to cope with herbivorous diet. Four lines for each of the selection directions and four unselected control lines have been maintained. After three generations of within-family selection, the maximum rate of oxygen consumption achieved during swimming was 15% higher in the selected than in the control lines (least square means, adjusted for body mass: 252.0 vs. 218.6 mL O(2)/h, P = 0.0001). When fed a low-quality diet made of dried grass, voles from the lines selected for ability to cope with herbivorous diet lost about 0.7 g less mass than voles from the control lines (-2.44 vs. -3.16 g/4 d, P = 0.008). In lines selected for predatory behavior toward crickets, proportion of "predatory" individuals was higher than in the control lines (43.6% vs. 24.9%; P = 0.045), but "time to capture" calculated for the successful trials did not differ between the lines. The experiment continues, and the selected lines of voles will provide a unique model for testing hypotheses concerning correlated evolution of complex traits.

  19. Three-dimensional laboratory modeling of the Tonga trench and Samoan plume interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druken, K. A.; Kincaid, C. R.; Pockalny, R. A.; Griffiths, R. W.; Hart, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    Plume processes occurring near ridge centers (e.g. Iceland) or mid-plate (e.g. Hawaii) have been well studied; however, the behavior of a plume near a subducting plate is still poorly understood and may in fact differ from the typical expected plume surfacing patterns. We investigate how three-dimensional subduction-driven flow relates to the deformation and dispersal of nearby upwelling plume material and the associated geochemical spatial patterns, with site-specific comparisons to the Tonga trench and Samoan plume system. Eighteen plume-trench laboratory experiments were conducted with varied combinations of subduction motions (down-dip, trench rollback, slab steepening and back-arc extension) and plume parameters (position and temperature.) A phenolic plate and glucose syrup, with a temperature dependent viscosity, are used to model the slab and upper mantle, respectively. Hydraulic pistons control longitudinal, translational and steepening motions of the slab as a simplified kinematic approach to mimic dynamic experiments. Results show that the subduction-induced flow dominates the upwelling strength of the plume, causing a significant portion of the plume head to subduct before reaching the melt zone. The remaining material is entrained around the slab edge into the mantle wedge by the trench rollback-induced flow. The proportion of subducted verses entrained material is predominantly dependent on plume location (relative to the trench) and thermal strength, with additional effects from back-arc extension and plate steepening.

  20. Characterization and Simulation of Thermoacoustic Instability in a Low Emissions Combustor Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    Extensive research is being done toward the development of ultra-low-emissions combustors for aircraft gas turbine engines. However, these combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities. This type of instability was recently observed in an advanced, low emissions combustor prototype installed in a NASA Glenn Research Center test stand. The instability produces pressure oscillations that grow with increasing fuel/air ratio, preventing full power operation. The instability behavior makes the combustor a potentially useful test bed for research into active control methods for combustion instability suppression. The instability behavior was characterized by operating the combustor at various pressures, temperatures, and fuel and air flows representative of operation within an aircraft gas turbine engine. Trends in instability behavior vs. operating condition have been identified and documented. A simulation developed at NASA Glenn captures the observed instability behavior. The physics-based simulation includes the relevant physical features of the combustor and test rig, employs a Sectored 1-D approach, includes simplified reaction equations, and provides time-accurate results. A computationally efficient method is used for area transitions, which decreases run times and allows the simulation to be used for parametric studies, including control method investigations. Simulation results show that the simulation exhibits a self-starting, self-sustained combustion instability and also replicates the experimentally observed instability trends vs. operating condition. Future plans are to use the simulation to investigate active control strategies to suppress combustion instabilities and then to experimentally demonstrate active instability suppression with the low emissions combustor prototype, enabling full power, stable operation.

  1. Characterization and Simulation of the Thermoacoustic Instability Behavior of an Advanced, Low Emissions Combustor Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    Extensive research is being done toward the development of ultra-low-emissions combustors for aircraft gas turbine engines. However, these combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities. This type of instability was recently observed in an advanced, low emissions combustor prototype installed in a NASA Glenn Research Center test stand. The instability produces pressure oscillations that grow with increasing fuel/air ratio, preventing full power operation. The instability behavior makes the combustor a potentially useful test bed for research into active control methods for combustion instability suppression. The instability behavior was characterized by operating the combustor at various pressures, temperatures, and fuel and air flows representative of operation within an aircraft gas turbine engine. Trends in instability behavior versus operating condition have been identified and documented, and possible explanations for the trends provided. A simulation developed at NASA Glenn captures the observed instability behavior. The physics-based simulation includes the relevant physical features of the combustor and test rig, employs a Sectored 1-D approach, includes simplified reaction equations, and provides time-accurate results. A computationally efficient method is used for area transitions, which decreases run times and allows the simulation to be used for parametric studies, including control method investigations. Simulation results show that the simulation exhibits a self-starting, self-sustained combustion instability and also replicates the experimentally observed instability trends versus operating condition. Future plans are to use the simulation to investigate active control strategies to suppress combustion instabilities and then to experimentally demonstrate active instability suppression with the low emissions combustor prototype, enabling full power, stable operation.

  2. Experiments and numerical studies on a Syngas-fired Ultra low NOx combustor

    KAUST Repository

    S, Krishna

    2017-06-06

    Exhaust measurements of temperature and pollutants in a syngas-fired model trapped vortex combustor for stationary power generation applications are reported. The performance was further evaluated for configurations where mixing enhancement was obtained using struts in the mainstream flow. Mainstream premixing of fuel was also studied to investigate its effect on emissions. The exhaust temperature pattern factor was found to be poor for baseline cases, but improved with the introduction of struts. NO emissions were steadily below 3-ppm across various flow conditions, whereas CO emissions tended to increase with increasing Momentum Flux Ratios (MFRs) and mainstream fuel addition. Combustion efficiencies ~96% were observed for all conditions. The performance characteristics were found to be favourable at higher MFRs with low pattern factors and high combustion efficiencies. Numerical simulations employing RANS and LES with Presumed Probability Distribution Function (PPDF) model were also carried out. Mixture fraction profiles in the TVC cavity for non-reacting conditions show that LES simulations are able to capture the mean mixing field better than the RANS-based approach. This is attributed to the prediction of the jet decay rate and is reflected on the mean velocity magnitude fields, which reinforce this observation at different sections in the cavity. Both RANS and LES simulations show close agreement with the experimentally measured OH concentration, however, the RANS approach does not perform satisfactorily in capturing the trend of velocity magnitude. LES simulations clearly capture the trend observed in exhaust measurements which is primarily attributed to the flame stabilization mechanism.

  3. Combustion characteristics of spent catalyst and paper sludge in an internally circulating fluidized-bed combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Seon Ah; Jung, Dae Sung; Kim, Sang Done; Guy, Christophe

    2005-09-01

    Combustion of spent vacuum residue hydrodesulfurization catalyst and incineration of paper sludge were carried out in thermo-gravimetric analyzer and an internally circulating fluidized-bed (ICFB) reactor. From the thermo-gravimetric analyzer-differential thermo-gravimetric curves, the pre-exponential factors and activation energies are determined at the divided temperature regions, and the thermo-gravimetric analysis patterns can be predicted by the kinetic equations. The effects of bed temperature, gas velocity in the draft tube and annulus, solid circulation rate, and waste feed rate on combustion efficiency of the wastes have been determined in an ICFB from the experiments and the model studies. The ICFB combustor exhibits uniform temperature distribution along the bed height with high combustion efficiency (>90%). The combustion efficiency increases with increasing reaction temperature, gas velocity in the annulus region, and solid circulation rate and decreases with increasing waste feed rate and gas velocity in the draft tube. The simulated data from the kinetic equation and the hydrodynamic models predict the experimental data reasonably well.

  4. Investigation of combustion control in a dump combustor using the feedback free fluidic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Eric J.

    mechanism by which the fluidic oscillators were able to suppress the combustion instability. Results for steady jet secondary injection, showed a strong coupling between the jet injection and the combustion instability pressure pulse. The computational results were able to closely match the experimental results and previous CFD data. The model with the oscillating fluidic oscillator injection was unable to match the stable combustion seen in the experimental data. Further investigation is needed to determine the role higher order chemistry kinetics play in the process and the role of manifolds on the un-choked fuel and fluidic oscillator inlets. This research demonstrates the ability to modulate propellant injection and suppress combustion instabilities using fluidic devices that require no electrical power or moving parts. The advent of advanced manufacturing technologies such as direct metal laser sintering will allow for integration of fluidic devices into combustors to provide open loop active control with a high degree of reliability. Additionally, 2-D CFD analysis is demonstrated to be a valid tool for predicting the feedback free fluidic oscillator oscillation mechanism.

  5. Laboratory measurements and model sensitivity studies of dust deposition ice nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kulkarni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the ice nucleating properties of mineral dust particles to understand the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties to two different representations of contact angle in the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT. These contact angle representations are based on two sets of laboratory deposition ice nucleation measurements: Arizona Test Dust (ATD particles of 100, 300 and 500 nm sizes were tested at three different temperatures (−25, −30 and −35 °C, and 400 nm ATD and kaolinite dust species were tested at two different temperatures (−30 and −35 °C. These measurements were used to derive the onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice required to activate 1% of dust particles as ice nuclei, from which the onset single contact angles were then calculated based on CNT. For the probability density function (PDF representation, parameters of the log-normal contact angle distribution were determined by fitting CNT-predicted activated fraction to the measurements at different RHice. Results show that onset single contact angles vary from ~18 to 24 degrees, while the PDF parameters are sensitive to the measurement conditions (i.e. temperature and dust size. Cloud modeling simulations were performed to understand the sensitivity of cloud properties (i.e. ice number concentration, ice water content, and cloud initiation times to the representation of contact angle and PDF distribution parameters. The model simulations show that cloud properties are sensitive to onset single contact angles and PDF distribution parameters. The comparison of our experimental results with other studies shows that under similar measurement conditions the onset single contact angles are consistent within ±2.0 degrees, while our derived PDF parameters have larger discrepancies.

  6. Laboratory measurements and model sensitivity studies of dust deposition ice nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the ice nucleating properties of mineral dust particles to understand the sensitivity of modeled cloud properties to different representations of contact angle in the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT: onset single angle and probability density function (PDF distribution approaches. These contact angle representations are based on two sets of laboratory deposition ice nucleation measurements: Arizona Test Dust (ATD particles of 100, 300, and 500 nm sizes were tested at three different temperatures (−25, −30 and −35 °C, and 400 nm ATD and Kaolinite dust species were tested at two different temperatures (−30 and −35 °C. These measurements were used to derive the onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice required to activate 1% of dust particles as ice nuclei, from which the onset single contact angles were then calculated based on the CNT. For the PDF representation, parameters of the log-normal contact angle distribution (mean and standard deviation were determined by fitting the CNT-predicted activated fraction to the measurements at different RHice. Results show that onset single contact angles are not much different between experiments, while the PDF parameters are sensitive to those environmental conditions (i.e., temperature and dust size. The cloud resolving model simulations show that cloud properties (i.e. ice number concentration, ice water content, and cloud initiation times are sensitive to onset single contact angles and PDF distribution parameters, particularly to the mean value. The comparison of our experimental results with other studies shows that under similar measurement conditions the onset single contact angles are consistent within ±2.0°, while our derived PDF parameters have discrepancies.

  7. Prediction and Diagnosis of Typhoon Morakot (2009 Using the Naval Research Laboratory's Mesoscale Tropical Cyclone Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Hendricks

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of Typhoon Morakot (2009 were performed using the Naval Research Laboratory¡¦s Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System for Tropical Cyclones (COAMPS-TC. COAMPS-TC was run in real-time in 2009 in the western North Pacific Ocean basin, and simulations of Morakot were executed during its life cycle, from formation through landfall in Taiwan. In this work, an evaluation of the model¡¦s performance is presented. The COAMPS-TC average track errors were small and very close to those of the consensus. Further, the intensity errors were small; the mean absolute intensity error at the 48 h lead time was 9 kt. Particular focus was placed on the 72-h simulation beginning on 1200 UTC 6 August, encompassing the time frame before, during and after landfall. COAMPS-TC was able to predict the structure of Morakot reasonably well before and after landfall, capturing a large asymmetric tropical cyclone with the precipitation shield shifted to the south of its center. Qualitatively, the precipitation forecast was consistent with observations from the Taiwan rain gauge network, as the model was able to predict two maxima, in both the northern and southern portions of the central mountain range. However, the accumulated precipitation maximum in the southern portion of the central mountain range was underpredicted by approximately 50%. The underprediction in precipitation by COAMPS-TC in southern Taiwan was due to four factors: (i the premature dissipation of tropical storm Goni causing errors in the large-scale flow and moisture pattern after landfall, (ii inaccuracies in the spatial location and timing of convective and stratiform precipitation as Morakot interacted with land and the southwest monsoon flow, (iii a simulated track that moved slightly too slow prior to landfall and slightly too fast after landfall, and (iv a horizontal resolution (5-km that may be too coarse to resolve the interaction of convection with the

  8. Kinetic and radiation-hydrodynamic modeling of x-ray heating in laboratory photoionized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    In experiments performed at the Z facility of Sandia National Laboratories a cm-scale cell filled with neon gas was driven by the burst of broadband x-rays emitted at the collapse of a wire-array z-pinch turning the gas into a photoionized plasma. Transmission spectroscopy of a narrowband portion of the x-ray flux was used to diagnose the plasma. The data show a highly-ionized neon plasma with a rich line absorption spectrum that permits the extraction of the ionization distribution among Be-, Li-, He- and H-like ions. Analysis of the spectra produced atomic ground and low excited state areal densities in these ions, and from the ratio of first-excited to ground state populations in Li-like neon a temperature of 19±4eV was extracted to characterize the x-ray heating of the plasma. To interpret this observation, we have performed data-constrained view-factor calculations of the spectral distribution of the x-ray drive, self-consistent modeling of electron and atomic kinetics, and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. For the conditions of the experiment, the electron distribution thermalizes quickly, has a negligible high-energy tail, and is very well approximated by a single Maxwellian distribution. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with either LTE or NLTE (i.e. non-equilibrium) atomic physics provide a more complete modeling of the experiment. We found that in order to compute electron temperatures consistent with observation inline non-equilibrium collisional-radiative neon atomic kinetics needs to be taken into account. We discuss the details of LTE and NLTE simulations, and the impact of atomic physics on the radiation heating and cooling rates that determine the plasma temperature. This work was sponsored in part by DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  9. Final Progress Report for the NASA Inductrack Model Rocket Launcher at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, L S; Post, R F; Martinez-Frias, J

    2001-06-27

    The Inductrack magnetic levitation system, developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was studied for its possible use for launching rockets. Under NASA sponsorship, a small model system was constructed at the Laboratory to pursue key technical aspects of this proposed application. The Inductrack is a passive magnetic levitation system employing special arrays of high-field permanent magnets (Halbach arrays) on the levitating cradle, moving above a ''track'' consisting of a close-packed array of shorted coils with which are interleaved with special drive coils. Halbach arrays produce a strong spatially periodic magnetic field on the front surface of the arrays, while canceling the field on their back surface. Relative motion between the Halbach arrays and the track coils induces currents in those coils. These currents levitate the cradle by interacting with the horizontal component of the magnetic field. Pulsed currents in the drive coils, synchronized with the motion of the carrier, interact with the vertical component of the magnetic field to provide acceleration forces. Motional stability, including resistance to both vertical and lateral aerodynamic forces, is provided by having Halbach arrays that interact with both the upper and the lower sides of the track coils. At present, a 7.8 meter track composed of drive and levitation coils has been built and the electronic drive circuitry performs as designed. A 9 kg cradle that carries the Halbach array of permanent magnets has been built. A mechanical launcher is nearly complete which will provide an initial cradle velocity of 9 m/s into the electronic drive section. We have found that the drag forces from the levitation coils were higher than in our original design. However, measurements of drag force at velocities less than 1 m/s are exactly as predicted by theory. Provided here are recommended design changes to improve the track's performance so that a final velocity of 40

  10. Turbine endwall film cooling with combustor-turbine interface gap leakage flow: Effect of incidence angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Yuan, Xin

    2013-04-01

    This paper is focused on the film cooling performance of combustor-turbine leakage flow at off-design condition. The influence of incidence angle on film cooling effectiveness on first-stage vane endwall with combustor-turbine interface slot is studied. A baseline slot configuration is tested in a low speed four-blade cascade comprising a large-scale model of the GE-E3Nozzle Guide Vane (NGV). The slot has a forward expansion angle of 30 deg. to the endwall surface. The Reynolds number based on the axial chord and inlet velocity of the free-stream flow is 3.5 × 105 and the testing is done in a four-blade cascade with low Mach number condition (0.1 at the inlet). The blowing ratio of the coolant through the interface gap varies from M = 0.1 to M = 0.3, while the blowing ratio varies from M = 0.7 to M = 1.3 for the endwall film cooling holes. The film-cooling effectiveness distributions are obtained using the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique. The results show that with an increasing blowing ratio the film-cooling effectiveness increases on the endwall. As the incidence angle varies from i = +10 deg. to i = -10 deg., at low blowing ratio, the averaged film-cooling effectiveness changes slightly near the leading edge suction side area. The case of i = +10 deg. has better film-cooling performance at the downstream part of this region where the axial chord is between 0.15 and 0.25. However, the disadvantage of positive incidence appears when the blowing ratio increases, especially at the upstream part of near suction side region where the axial chord is between 0 and 0.15. On the main passage endwall surface, as the incidence angle changes from i = +10 deg. to i = -10 deg., the averaged film-cooling effectiveness changes slightly and the negative incidence appears to be more effective for the downstream part film cooling of the endwall surface where the axial chord is between 0.6 and 0.8.

  11. Use of a PhET Interactive Simulation in General Chemistry Laboratory: Models of the Hydrogen Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ted M.; Chamberlain, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    An activity supporting the PhET interactive simulation, Models of the Hydrogen Atom, has been designed and used in the laboratory portion of a general chemistry course. This article describes the framework used to successfully accomplish implementation on a large scale. The activity guides students through a comparison and analysis of the six…

  12. Validating the Technology Acceptance Model in the Context of the Laboratory Information System-Electronic Health Record Interface System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Cesar A.

    2014-01-01

    This study represents a research validating the efficacy of Davis' Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) by pairing it with the Organizational Change Readiness Theory (OCRT) to develop another extension to the TAM, using the medical Laboratory Information Systems (LIS)--Electronic Health Records (EHR) interface as the medium. The TAM posits that it is…

  13. Effects of pesticides on soil invertebrates in model ecosystem and field studies: a review and comparison with laboratory toxicity data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jänsch, S.; Frampton, G.K.; Römbke, J.; Brink, van den P.J.; Scott-Fordsmand, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    A systematic review was carried out to investigate the extent to which higher-tier (terrestrial model ecosystem [TME] and field) data regarding pesticide effects can be compared with laboratory toxicity data for soil invertebrates. Data in the public domain yielded 970 toxicity endpoint data sets, r

  14. Use of a PhET Interactive Simulation in General Chemistry Laboratory: Models of the Hydrogen Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ted M.; Chamberlain, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    An activity supporting the PhET interactive simulation, Models of the Hydrogen Atom, has been designed and used in the laboratory portion of a general chemistry course. This article describes the framework used to successfully accomplish implementation on a large scale. The activity guides students through a comparison and analysis of the six…

  15. Validating the Technology Acceptance Model in the Context of the Laboratory Information System-Electronic Health Record Interface System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Cesar A.

    2014-01-01

    This study represents a research validating the efficacy of Davis' Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) by pairing it with the Organizational Change Readiness Theory (OCRT) to develop another extension to the TAM, using the medical Laboratory Information Systems (LIS)--Electronic Health Records (EHR) interface as the medium. The TAM posits that it is…

  16. Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development; Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollis, Rebecca

    2013-03-31

    Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in 2005 to study and develop a competing technology for use in future fossil-fueled power generation facilities that could operate with near zero emissions. CES’s background in oxy-fuel (O-F) rocket technology lead to the award of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42645, “Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development,” where CES was to first evaluate the potential of these O-F power cycles, then develop the detailed design of a commercial-scale O-F combustor for use in these clean burning fossil-fueled plants. Throughout the studies, CES found that in order to operate at competitive cycle efficiencies a high-temperature intermediate pressure turbine was required. This led to an extension of the Agreement for, “Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications” where CES was to also develop an intermediate-pressure O-F turbine (OFT) that could be deployed in O-F industrial plants that capture and sequester >99% of produced CO2, at competitive cycle efficiencies using diverse fuels. The following report details CES’ activities from October 2005 through March 2013, to evaluate O-F power cycles, develop and validate detailed designs of O-F combustors (main and reheat), and to design, manufacture, and test a commercial-scale OFT, under the three-phase Cooperative Agreement.

  17. Comparison of aquifer characterization approaches through steady state groundwater model validation: A controlled laboratory sandbox study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illman, W.A.; Zhu, J.; Craig, A.J.; Yin, D.

    2010-01-01

    groundwater model validation is possible in this laboratory sandbox aquifer if the heterogeneous K distribution and forcing functions (boundary conditions and source/sink terms) are characterized sufficiently. ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Validation of a Numerical Model for Dynamic Three-Dimensional Railway Bridge Analysis by Comparison with a Small-Scale Laboratory Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucinskas, Paulius; Sneideris, Jonas; Agapii, Liuba

    2017-01-01

    is constructed in the laboratory, and the results are compared with the proposed computational model. The computational analysis employs a multi-degree-of-freedom system for the vehicle, a three-dimensional finite-element model for the bridge structure and a semi-analytical solution for the subsoil, using...... that the numerical model reproduces the structural response of the experimental model with fair accuracy for a variety of cases regarding the subsoil....

  19. Emission Characteristics of A P and W Axially Staged Sector Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhuohui J.; Wey, Changlie; Chang, Clarence T.; Lee, Chi Ming; Surgenor, Angela D.; Kopp-Vaughan, Kristin; Cheung, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Emission characteristics of a three-cup P and W Axially Controlled Stoichiometry (ACS) sector combustor are reported in this article. Multiple injection points and fuel staging strategies are used in this combustor design. Pilot-stage injectors are located on the front dome plate of the combustor, and main-stage injectors are positioned on the top and bottom of the combustor liners downstream. Low power configuration uses only pilot-stage injectors. Main-stage injectors are added to high power configuration to help distribute fuel more evenly and achieve overall lean burn yielding very low NOx emissions. Combustion efficiencies at four ICAO LTO conditions were all above 99%. Three EINOx emissions correlation equations were developed based on the experimental data to describe the NOx emission trends of this combustor concept. For the 7% and 30% engine power conditions, NOx emissions are obtained with the low power configuration, and the EINOx values are 6.16 and 6.81. The high power configuration was used to assess 85% and 100% engine power NOx emissions, with measured EINOx values of 4.58 and 7.45, respectively. The overall landing-takeoff cycle NOx emissions are about 12% relative to ICAO CAEP/6 level.

  20. Combustion Dynamic Characteristics Identification in a 9-point LDI Combustor Under Choked Outlet Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhuohui J.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2017-01-01

    Combustion dynamics data were collected at the NASA Glenn Research Center's CE-5 flame tube test facility under combustor outlet choked conditions. Two 9-point Swirl-Venturi Lean Direct Injection (SV-LDI) configurations were tested in a rectangular cuboid combustor geometry. Combustion dynamic data were measured at different engine operational conditions up to inlet air pressure and temperature of 24.13 bar and 828 K, respectively. In this study, the effects of acoustic cavity resonance, precessing vortex core (PVC), and non-uniform thermal expansion on the dynamic noise spectrum are identified by comparing the dynamic data that collected at various combustor inlet conditions along with combustor geometric calculations. The results show that the acoustic cavity resonance noises were seen in the counter-rotating pilot configuration but not in the co-rotating pilot configuration. Dynamic pressure noise band at around 0.9 kHz was only detected at the P'41 location (9.8 cm after fuel injector face) but not at the P'42 location (29 cm after the fuel injector face); the amplitude of this noise band depended on the thermal expansion ratio (T4/T3). The noise band at around 1.8 kHz was found to depend on the inlet air pressure or the air density inside the combustor. The PVC frequency was not observed in these two configurations.