WorldWideScience

Sample records for model involving tunneling

  1. Physical model for recognition tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstić, Predrag; Ashcroft, Brian; Lindsay, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Recognition tunneling (RT) identifies target molecules trapped between tunneling electrodes functionalized with recognition molecules that serve as specific chemical linkages between the metal electrodes and the trapped target molecule. Possible applications include single molecule DNA and protein sequencing. This paper addresses several fundamental aspects of RT by multiscale theory, applying both all-atom and coarse-grained DNA models: (1) we show that the magnitude of the observed currents are consistent with the results of non-equilibrium Green’s function calculations carried out on a solvated all-atom model. (2) Brownian fluctuations in hydrogen bond-lengths lead to current spikes that are similar to what is observed experimentally. (3) The frequency characteristics of these fluctuations can be used to identify the trapped molecules with a machine-learning algorithm, giving a theoretical underpinning to this new method of identifying single molecule signals. (paper)

  2. Numerical modeling of tunneling-induced seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Antonio Pio; Urpi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Removal of rock mass in mining environment has been associated since long-time with seismic event of magnitude 3 and above, with the potential to cause damage to the infrastructures or even loss of human life. Although with similarities with mining, relatively unknown up to now are seismic events induced by tunneling. However with modern mechanized tunneling techniques, making possible to digging deeper and longer underground infrastructure, the risk is not negligible. As an example, the excavation of the 57km long Gotthard Base Tunnel has been associated more than hundred seismic events, with the largest one having magnitude of ML 2.4, damaging the tunnel infrastructures. For future scenario of deep geological storage of nuclear waste, tunneling will constitute the primary activity during site construction. Hence, it will be crucial to understand the risk associated with the underground construction operation that can reactivate seismogenic features nearby the future location of emplacement tunnels. Here we present numerical simulation aimed at understanding the potential for inducing seismicity during tunnel construction. The stress changes and their evolution during the excavation are evaluated with a finite element solver (FLAC3d). A strain-softening friction model is then used to simulate the occurrence of a sudden slip on a fault zone (if critical conditions for reactivation are reached). We also present a sensitivity analysis of the potential for inducing different seismic events by different tunnel sizes at varying distance from a nearby failure plane, with the final purpose of evaluating safety of a potential nuclear repository site on the short- and long-term.

  3. Tunnel fire testing and modeling the Morgex North tunnel experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Borghetti, Fabio; Gandini, Paolo; Frassoldati, Alessio; Tavelli, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This book aims to cast light on all aspects of tunnel fires, based on experimental activities and theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. In particular, the authors describe a transient full-scale fire test (~15 MW), explaining how they designed and performed the experimental activity inside the Morgex North tunnel in Italy. The entire organization of the experiment is described, from preliminary evaluations to the solutions found for management of operational difficulties and safety issues. This fire test allowed the collection of different measurements (temperature, air velocity, smoke composition, pollutant species) useful for validating and improving CFD codes and for testing the real behavior of the tunnel and its safety systems during a diesel oil fire with a significant heat release rate. Finally, the fire dynamics are compared with empirical correlations, CFD simulations, and literature measurements obtained in other similar tunnel fire tests. This book will be of interest to all ...

  4. Tunneling-percolation model of multicomponent nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Sohan; Karimi, Pouyan; Sabet, Fereshteh A.; Jasiuk, Iwona; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Using a mixture of different types of fillers has been experimentally shown to improve the electrical conductivity of polymer nanocomposites beyond the weighted average due to synergistic effects. In this study, we develop a critical path analysis-based tunneling-percolation model for multicomponent systems of nanocomposites with ellipsoidal fillers. The nature of the interaction between different filler components is controlled by a key modeling parameter capturing the tunneling interactions between fillers. This generalization allows us to examine scenarios where the nature of a given type of filler can be varied continuously from an insulating-type to a conductive-type. The percolation behavior of two-component systems with a combination of prolate, oblate, and spherical fillers is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations for different relative volume fractions and nature of interactions while keeping the total volume fraction fixed. The simulation results are shown to be in semi-quantitative agreement with predictions made by the second-virial-approximation-based theories. Our results suggest that for multicomponent systems with well-dispersed fillers, the synergistic effects are linked directly with the nature of interactions between different filler types. Moreover, addition of prolate fillers to oblate or spherical fillers should generally improve the electrical conductivity of multicomponent nanocomposites.

  5. Numerical modelling of air movement in road tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashef, A.; Benichou, N.; Lougheed, G. . E-mail; Debs, A.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the Mechanical Ventilation Systems (MVS) in highway tunnels is to provide tunnel patrons with a reasonable degree of comfort during normal operation and to assist in keeping tunnels safe during emergencies. Temperature, humidity, and air velocity are among the parameters that determine the tunnel environment and indicate the level of MVS performance. To investigate the performance of the current emergency ventilation strategies for an existing tunnel system in the event of a fire, a research project is being conducted at the National Research Council of Canada. The primary objectives of the study are: a) to assess and validate the ability of in-place emergency ventilation strategies to control smoke spread and minimize the impact of smoke on tunnel users; and b) to recommend guidelines for improving ventilation operation to maximize intervention effectiveness. This will allow future development of an intelligent ventilation system based on a pre-established scenario of ventilation activated using automatic fire detection. The research study includes two phases, numerical and experimental phases. The numerical phase will use a CFD model (Solvent) to study smoke ventilation in the tunnel. The experimental phase will be used to calibrate and validate the CFD model and to establish the boundary conditions for the numerical model. Solvent was used to model a ventilation scenario using existing data. The current paper presents the initial efforts to validate the CFD model against onsite flow measurements conducted in the tunnel. The CFD model included aerodynamically significant physical features of the tunnel. (author)

  6. Glide back booster wind tunnel model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricop, M. V.; Cojocaru, M. G.; Stoica, C. I.; Niculescu, M. L.; Neculaescu, A. M.; Persinaru, A. G.; Boscoianu, M.

    2017-07-01

    Affordable space access requires partial or ideally full launch vehicle reuse, which is in line with clean environment requirement. Although the idea is old, the practical use is difficult, requiring very large technology investment for qualification. Rocket gliders like Space Shuttle have been successfullyoperated but the price and correspondingly the energy footprint were found not sustainable. For medium launchers, finally there is a very promising platform as Falcon 9. For very small launchers the situation is more complex, because the performance index (payload to start mass) is already small, versus medium and heavy launchers. For partial reusable micro launchers this index is even smaller. However the challenge has to be taken because it is likely that in a multiyear effort, technology is going to enable the performance recovery to make such a system economically and environmentally feasible. The current paper is devoted to a small unitary glide back booster which is foreseen to be assembled in a number of possible configurations. Although the level of analysis is not deep, the solution is analyzed from the aerodynamic point of view. A wind tunnel model is designed, with an active canard, to enablea more efficient wind tunnel campaign, as a national level premiere.

  7. Derivation of the tunnelling exchange time for the model of trap-assisted tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racko, J.; Ballo, P.; Benko, P.; Harmatha, L.; Grmanova, A.; Breza, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present derivation of the tunnelling exchange times that play the key role in the model of trap assisted tunnelling (TAT) considering the electron and hole exchange processes between the trapping centre lying in the forbidden band of the semiconductor and the conduction band, valence band or a metal. All exchange processes are quantitatively described by respective exchange times. The reciprocal values of these exchange times represent the frequency with which the exchange processes contribute to the probability of occupation of the trap by free charge carriers. The crucial problem in any model of TAT is the calculation of the occupation probability. In our approach this probability is expressed in terms of only thermal and tunnelling exchange times. The concept of tunnelling exchange times presents a dominant contribution to our model of TAT. The new approach allows to simply calculate the probability of occupation of the trapping centre by a free charge carrier and subsequently to get the thermal and tunnelling generation-recombination rates occurring in the continuity equations. This is why the TAT model based on thermal and tunnelling exchange times is suitable for simulating the electrical properties of semiconductor nanostructures in which quantum mechanical phenomena play a key role. (authors)

  8. An innovative band-to-band tunneling analytical model and implications in compact modeling of tunneling-based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Michielis, L.; Daǧtekin, N.; Biswas, A.; Lattanzio, L.; Selmi, L.; Luisier, M.; Riel, H.; Ionescu, A. M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, an analytical band-to-band tunneling model is proposed, validated by means of drift-diffusion simulation and comparison with experimental data, implemented in Verilog-A, and finally proven with SPICE simulator through simulation of circuits featuring tunneling diodes. The p-n junction current calculation starts from a non-local Band-to-Band tunneling theory including the electron-phonon interaction and therefore it is particularly suited for indirect semiconductor materials such as silicon- or germanium-based interband tunneling devices.

  9. Wall Correction Model for Wind Tunnels with Open Test Section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2004-01-01

    In th paper we present a correction model for wall interference on rotors of wind turbines or propellers in wind tunnels. The model, that is based on a onedimensional momentum approach, is validated against results from CFD computations using a generalized actuator disc principle. Generally......, the corrections from the model are in very good agreement with the CFD computaions, demonstrating that one-dimensional momentum theory is a reliable way of predicting corrections for wall interference in wind tunnels with closed as well as open cross sections. Keywords: Wind tunnel correction, momentum theory...

  10. Wind Tunnel Management and Resource Optimization: A Systems Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Derya, A.; Aasen, Curtis A.

    2000-01-01

    Time, money, and, personnel are becoming increasingly scarce resources within government agencies due to a reduction in funding and the desire to demonstrate responsible economic efficiency. The ability of an organization to plan and schedule resources effectively can provide the necessary leverage to improve productivity, provide continuous support to all projects, and insure flexibility in a rapidly changing environment. Without adequate internal controls the organization is forced to rely on external support, waste precious resources, and risk an inefficient response to change. Management systems must be developed and applied that strive to maximize the utility of existing resources in order to achieve the goal of "faster, cheaper, better". An area of concern within NASA Langley Research Center was the scheduling, planning, and resource management of the Wind Tunnel Enterprise operations. Nine wind tunnels make up the Enterprise. Prior to this research, these wind tunnel groups did not employ a rigorous or standardized management planning system. In addition, each wind tunnel unit operated from a position of autonomy, with little coordination of clients, resources, or project control. For operating and planning purposes, each wind tunnel operating unit must balance inputs from a variety of sources. Although each unit is managed by individual Facility Operations groups, other stakeholders influence wind tunnel operations. These groups include, for example, the various researchers and clients who use the facility, the Facility System Engineering Division (FSED) tasked with wind tunnel repair and upgrade, the Langley Research Center (LaRC) Fabrication (FAB) group which fabricates repair parts and provides test model upkeep, the NASA and LARC Strategic Plans, and unscheduled use of the facilities by important clients. Expanding these influences horizontally through nine wind tunnel operations and vertically along the NASA management structure greatly increases the

  11. A hierarchical network modeling method for railway tunnels safety assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Xu, Weixiang; Guo, Xin; Liu, Xumin

    2017-02-01

    Using network theory to model risk-related knowledge on accidents is regarded as potential very helpful in risk management. A large amount of defects detection data for railway tunnels is collected in autumn every year in China. It is extremely important to discover the regularities knowledge in database. In this paper, based on network theories and by using data mining techniques, a new method is proposed for mining risk-related regularities to support risk management in railway tunnel projects. A hierarchical network (HN) model which takes into account the tunnel structures, tunnel defects, potential failures and accidents is established. An improved Apriori algorithm is designed to rapidly and effectively mine correlations between tunnel structures and tunnel defects. Then an algorithm is presented in order to mine the risk-related regularities table (RRT) from the frequent patterns. At last, a safety assessment method is proposed by consideration of actual defects and possible risks of defects gained from the RRT. This method cannot only generate the quantitative risk results but also reveal the key defects and critical risks of defects. This paper is further development on accident causation network modeling methods which can provide guidance for specific maintenance measure.

  12. Wall correction model for wind tunnels with open test section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2006-01-01

    In the paper we present a correction model for wall interference on rotors of wind turbines or propellers in wind tunnels. The model, which is based on a one-dimensional momentum approach, is validated against results from CFD computations using a generalized actuator disc principle. In the model...... the exchange of axial momentum between the tunnel and the ambient room is represented by a simple formula, derived from actuator disc computations. The correction model is validated against Navier-Stokes computations of the flow about a wind turbine rotor. Generally, the corrections from the model are in very...... good agreement with the CFD computations, demonstrating that one-dimensional momentum theory is a reliable way of predicting corrections for wall interference in wind tunnels with closed as well as open cross sections....

  13. Wind tunnel modeling of roadways: Comparison with mathematical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidorn, K.; Davies, A.E.; Murphy, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The assessment of air quality impacts from roadways is a major concern to urban planners. In order to assess future road and building configurations, a number of techniques have been developed including mathematical models, which simulate traffic emissions and atmospheric dispersion through a series of mathematical relationships and physical models. The latter models simulate emissions and dispersion through scaling of these processes in a wind tunnel. Two roadway mathematical models, HIWAY-2 and CALINE-4, were applied to a proposed development in a large urban area. Physical modeling procedures developed by Rowan Williams Davies and Irwin Inc. (RWDI) in the form of line source simulators were also applied, and the resulting carbon monoxide concentrations were compared. The results indicated a factor of two agreement between the mathematical and physical models. The physical model, however, reacted to change in building massing and configuration. The mathematical models did not, since no provision for such changes was included in the mathematical models. In general, the RWDI model resulted in higher concentrations than either HIWAY-2 or CALINE-4. Where there was underprediction, it was often due to shielding of the receptor by surrounding buildings. Comparison of these three models with the CALTRANS Tracer Dispersion Experiment showed good results although concentrations were consistently underpredicted

  14. Inverse Analysis and Modeling for Tunneling Thrust on Shield Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of sensor and detection technologies, measured data analysis plays an increasingly important role in the design and control of heavy engineering equipment. The paper proposed a method for inverse analysis and modeling based on mass on-site measured data, in which dimensional analysis and data mining techniques were combined. The method was applied to the modeling of the tunneling thrust on shield machines and an explicit expression for thrust prediction was established. Combined with on-site data from a tunneling project in China, the inverse identification of model coefficients was carried out using the multiple regression method. The model residual was analyzed by statistical methods. By comparing the on-site data and the model predicted results in the other two projects with different tunneling conditions, the feasibility of the model was discussed. The work may provide a scientific basis for the rational design and control of shield tunneling machines and also a new way for mass on-site data analysis of complex engineering systems with nonlinear, multivariable, time-varying characteristics.

  15. Wind Tunnel Experiments with Active Control of Bridge Section Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henriette I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    This paper describes results of wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section model where movable flaps are integrated in the bridge girder so each flap is the streamlined part of the edge of the girder. This active control flap system is patented by COWIconsult and may be used to increase...

  16. POINT CLOUD MODELLING BASED ON THE TUNNEL AXIS AND BLOCK ESTIMATION FOR MONITORING THE BADALING TUNNEL, CHINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed a growing investigation of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS for monitoring the deformation of tunnels. TLS provides the ability to obtain a more accurate and complete description of the tunnel surfaces, allowing the determination of the mechanism and magnitude of tunnel deformation, because the entire surface of the tunnel is more concretely modelled rather than being represented by a number of points. This paper models and analyses the point clouds from TLS to detect the possible deformation of a newly built tunnel. In the application of monitoring the Badaling Tunnel for the Winter Olympics 2020 in Beijing, China, the proposed method includes the following components: the tunnel axis is automatically estimated based on a 3D quadratic form estimation; all of the point clouds are segmented into axis-based blocks; and representative points, solved by a singular value decomposition (SVD method, are estimated to describe the tunnel surface and establish the correspondence of data between days. The deformations are detected in the form of the distance discrepancies of representative points and verified by the measurements using total station.

  17. Overload prevention in model supports for wind tunnel model testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton IVANOVICI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Preventing overloads in wind tunnel model supports is crucial to the integrity of the tested system. Results can only be interpreted as valid if the model support, conventionally called a sting remains sufficiently rigid during testing. Modeling and preliminary calculation can only give an estimate of the sting’s behavior under known forces and moments but sometimes unpredictable, aerodynamically caused model behavior can cause large transient overloads that cannot be taken into account at the sting design phase. To ensure model integrity and data validity an analog fast protection circuit was designed and tested. A post-factum analysis was carried out to optimize the overload detection and a short discussion on aeroelastic phenomena is included to show why such a detector has to be very fast. The last refinement of the concept consists in a fast detector coupled with a slightly slower one to differentiate between transient overloads that decay in time and those that are the result of aeroelastic unwanted phenomena. The decision to stop or continue the test is therefore conservatively taken preserving data and model integrity while allowing normal startup loads and transients to manifest.

  18. Hydrogen Tunneling in Enzymes and Biomimetic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layfield, Joshua P.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-04-09

    Hydrogen transfer reactions play an important role throughout chemistry and biology. In general, hydrogen transfer reactions encompass proton and hydride transfer, which are associated with the transfer of a positively or negatively charged species, respectively, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which corresponds to the net transfer of one electron and one proton in the simplest case. Such PCET reactions can occur by either a sequential mechanism, in which the proton or electron transfers first, or a concerted mechanism, in which the electron and proton transfer in a single kinetic step with no stable intermediate. Furthermore, concerted PCET reactions can be subdivided into hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between the same donor and acceptor (i.e., the transfer of a predominantly neutral species), and electron-proton transfer (EPT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between different donors and acceptors, possibly even in different directions. In all of these types of hydrogen transfer reactions, hydrogen tunneling could potentially play a significant role. The biomimetic portion was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  19. Hydrogen Tunneling in Enzymes and Biomimetic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layfield, Joshua P.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-12-20

    Hydrogen transfer reactions play an important role throughout chemistry and biology. In general, hydrogen transfer reactions encompass proton and hydride transfer, which are associated with the transfer of a positively or negatively charged species, respectively, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which corresponds to the net transfer of one electron and one proton in the simplest case. Such PCET reactions can occur by either a sequential mechanism, in which the proton or electron transfers first, or a concerted mechanism, in which the electron and proton transfer in a single kinetic step with no stable intermediate. Furthermore, concerted PCET reactions can be subdivided into hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between the same donor and acceptor (i.e., the transfer of a predominantly neutral species), and electron-proton transfer (EPT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between different donors and acceptors, possibly even in different directions. In all of these types of hydrogen transfer reactions, hydrogen tunneling could potentially play a signficant role. The theoretical development portion of this Review was supported by the National Science Foundation under CHE-10-57875. The biological portion of this Review was funded by NIH Grant No. GM056207. The biomimetic portion was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electro-catalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  20. Gaussian tunneling model of c-axis twist Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bille, A.; Klemm, R.A.; Scharnberg, K.

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the critical current density J c J ((var p hi) 0 ) for Josephson tunneling between identical high-temperature superconductors twisted an angle (var p hi) 0 about the c axis. Regardless of the shape of the two-dimensional Fermi surface and for very general tunneling matrix elements, an order parameter (OP) with general d-wave symmetry leads to J c J (π/4)=0. This general result is inconsistent with the data of Li et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4160 (1999)] on Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ (Bi2212), which showed J c J to be independent of (var p hi) 0 . If the momentum parallel to the barrier is conserved in the tunneling process, J c J should vary substantially with the twist angle (var p hi) 0 when the tight-binding Fermi surface appropriate for Bi2212 is taken into account, even if the OP is completely isotropic. We quantify the degree of momentum nonconservation necessary to render J c J ((var p hi) 0 ) constant within experimental error for a variety of pair states by interpolating between the coherent and incoherent limits using five specific models to describe the momentum dependence of the tunneling matrix element squared. From the data of Li et al., we conclude that the c-axis tunneling in Bi2212 must be very nearly incoherent, and that the OP must have a nonvanishing Fermi-surface average for T c . We further show that the apparent conventional sum-rule violation observed by Basov et al. [Science 283, 49 (1999)] can be consistent with such strongly incoherent c-axis tunneling.

  1. A Model for the Behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Bryan John [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    A magnetic tunnel junction is a device that changes its electrical resistance with a change in an applied magnetic field. A typical junction consists of two magnetic electrodes separated by a nonmagnetic insulating layer. The magnetizations of the two electrodes can have two possible extreme configurations, parallel and antiparallel. The antiparallel configuration is observed to have the higher measured resistance and the parallel configuration has the lower resistance. To switch between these two configurations a magnetic field is applied to the device which is primarily used to change the orientation of the magnetization of one electrode usually called the free layer, although with sufficient high magnetic field the orientation of the magnetizations of both of the electrodes can be changed. The most commonly used models for describing and explaining the electronic behavior of tunnel junctions are the Simmons model and the Brinkman model. However, both of these models were designed for simple, spin independent tunneling. The Simmons model does not address the issue of applied magnetic fields nor does it address the form of the electronic band structure in the metallic electrodes, including the important factor of spin polarization. The Brinkman model is similar, the main difference between the two models being the shape of the tunneling barrier potential between the two electrodes. Therefore, the research conducted in this thesis has developed a new theoretical model that addresses these important issues starting from basic principles. The main features of the new model include: the development of equations for true spin dependent tunneling through the insulating barrier, the differences in the orientations of the electrode magnetizations on either side of the barrier, and the effects of the density of states function on the behavior of the junction. The present work has explored densities of states that are more realistic than the simplified free electron density

  2. Wind Tunnel Modeling Of Wind Flow Over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, D.; Cochran, B.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation will describe the finding of an atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) wind tunnel study conducted as part of the Bolund Experiment. This experiment was sponsored by Risø DTU (National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark) during the fall of 2009 to enable a blind comparison of various air flow models in an attempt to validate their performance in predicting airflow over complex terrain. Bohlund hill sits 12 m above the water level at the end of a narrow isthmus. The island features a steep escarpment on one side, over which the airflow can be expected to separate. The island was equipped with several anemometer towers, and the approach flow over the water was well characterized. This study was one of only two only physical model studies included in the blind model comparison, the other being a water plume study. The remainder were computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, including both RANS and LES. Physical modeling of air flow over topographical features has been used since the middle of the 20th century, and the methods required are well understood and well documented. Several books have been written describing how to properly perform ABL wind tunnel studies, including ASCE manual of engineering practice 67. Boundary layer wind tunnel tests are the only modelling method deemed acceptable in ASCE 7-10, the most recent edition of the American Society of Civil Engineers standard that provides wind loads for buildings and other structures for buildings codes across the US. Since the 1970’s, most tall structures undergo testing in a boundary layer wind tunnel to accurately determine the wind induced loading. When compared to CFD, the US EPA considers a properly executed wind tunnel study to be equivalent to a CFD model with infinitesimal grid resolution and near infinite memory. One key reason for this widespread acceptance is that properly executed ABL wind tunnel studies will accurately simulate flow separation

  3. Gray-box modelling approach for description of storage tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harremoës, Poul; Carstensen, Jacob

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of a storage tunnel is examined using a model based on on-line measured data and a combination of simple deterministic and black-box stochastic elements. This approach, called gray-box modeling, is a new promising methodology for giving an on-line state description of sewer systems. ...... in a SCADA system because the most important information on the specific system is provided on-line...

  4. Model design and instrumentation experiences with continuous-flow cryogenic tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The development of wind tunnels that can be operated at cryogenic temperatures has placed several new demands on the ability to build and instrument wind tunnel models. The experiences at the NASA Langley Research Center relative to the design and instrumentation of models for continuous flow cryogenic wind tunnels are reviewed.

  5. Investigation of faulted tunnel models by combined photoelasticity and finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Huang, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Models of square and circular tunnels with short faults cutting through their surfaces are investigated by photoelasticity. These models, when duplicated by finite element analysis can predict the stress states of square or circular faulted tunnels adequately. Finite element analysis, using gap elements, may be used to investigate full size faulted tunnel system

  6. Sting Dynamics of Wind Tunnel Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    Titanium Alloys . *N1ckle-Base Superalloys *Steel Alloys * Cobalt -Base Superalloys *Molybdenum Alloys *Tungsten Sintered Tungsten-Titanium Carbide Alloys E... Carbide -Steel Sting... • 0 • • • • • • • • . . . 11 13 14 19 6. Sting Coordinate Systems a. Planar Deflection Geometry of the Sting-Model Concentrated...36 b. Cl’p::; 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 deg . . . . . . 37 10. Motion History for ATT Model and Carbide -Steel Sting, Condition No

  7. Model uncertainty of various settlement estimation methods in shallow tunnels excavation; case study: Qom subway tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademian, Amir; Abdollahipour, Hamed; Bagherpour, Raheb; Faramarzi, Lohrasb

    2017-10-01

    In addition to the numerous planning and executive challenges, underground excavation in urban areas is always followed by certain destructive effects especially on the ground surface; ground settlement is the most important of these effects for which estimation there exist different empirical, analytical and numerical methods. Since geotechnical models are associated with considerable model uncertainty, this study characterized the model uncertainty of settlement estimation models through a systematic comparison between model predictions and past performance data derived from instrumentation. To do so, the amount of surface settlement induced by excavation of the Qom subway tunnel was estimated via empirical (Peck), analytical (Loganathan and Poulos) and numerical (FDM) methods; the resulting maximum settlement value of each model were 1.86, 2.02 and 1.52 cm, respectively. The comparison of these predicted amounts with the actual data from instrumentation was employed to specify the uncertainty of each model. The numerical model outcomes, with a relative error of 3.8%, best matched the reality and the analytical method, with a relative error of 27.8%, yielded the highest level of model uncertainty.

  8. Analytical modelling and experimental studies of SIS tunnel solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheknane, Ali [Laboratoire de Valorisation des Energies Renouvelables et Environnements Agressifs, Universite Amar Telidji de Laghouat, BP 37G route de Ghardaia, Laghouat (03000) Algerie (Algeria)], E-mail: cheknanali@yahoo.com

    2009-06-07

    This paper presents an experimental and computational study of semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor (SIS) tunnel solar cells. A transparent and conductive film of thallium trioxide Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been deposited by anodic oxidation onto an n-Si(1 0 0) face to realize the SIS tunnel solar cells based on Si/SiO{sub x}/Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3}. An efficiency of 8.77% has been obtained under an incident power density of 33 mW cm{sup -2} illumination condition. A PSPICE model is implemented. The calculated results show that the theoretical values are in good agreement with experimental data. Moreover, the simulation clearly demonstrates that the performance of the tested device can be significantly improved.

  9. Two-band modeling of narrow band gap and interband tunneling devices

    OpenAIRE

    Söderström, J. R.; Yu, E. T.; Jackson, M. K.; Rajakarunanayake, Y.; McGill, T. C.

    1990-01-01

    A two-band transfer matrix method has been developed to study tunneling currents in narrow gap and interband tunnel structures. This relatively simple model gives good agreement with recently reported experimental results for InAs/AlSb/InAs/AlSb/InAs double-barrier heterostructures and InAs/AlSb/GaSb/AlSb/InAs resonant interband tunneling devices, and should be useful in the design of new interband tunneling devices.

  10. Building information modelling review with potential applications in tunnel engineering of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weihong; Qin, Haiyang; Qiu, Junling; Fan, Haobo; Lai, Jinxing; Wang, Ke; Wang, Lixin

    2017-08-01

    Building information modelling (BIM) can be applied to tunnel engineering to address a number of problems, including complex structure, extensive design, long construction cycle and increased security risks. To promote the development of tunnel engineering in China, this paper combines actual cases, including the Xingu mountain tunnel and the Shigu Mountain tunnel, to systematically analyse BIM applications in tunnel engineering in China. The results indicate that BIM technology in tunnel engineering is currently mainly applied during the design stage rather than during construction and operation stages. The application of BIM technology in tunnel engineering covers many problems, such as a lack of standards, incompatibility of different software, disorganized management, complex combination with GIS (Geographic Information System), low utilization rate and poor awareness. In this study, through summary of related research results and engineering cases, suggestions are introduced and an outlook for the BIM application in tunnel engineering in China is presented, which provides guidance for design optimization, construction standards and later operation maintenance.

  11. Building information modelling review with potential applications in tunnel engineering of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weihong; Qin, Haiyang; Qiu, Junling; Fan, Haobo; Lai, Jinxing; Wang, Ke; Wang, Lixin

    2017-08-01

    Building information modelling (BIM) can be applied to tunnel engineering to address a number of problems, including complex structure, extensive design, long construction cycle and increased security risks. To promote the development of tunnel engineering in China, this paper combines actual cases, including the Xingu mountain tunnel and the Shigu Mountain tunnel, to systematically analyse BIM applications in tunnel engineering in China. The results indicate that BIM technology in tunnel engineering is currently mainly applied during the design stage rather than during construction and operation stages. The application of BIM technology in tunnel engineering covers many problems, such as a lack of standards, incompatibility of different software, disorganized management, complex combination with GIS (Geographic Information System), low utilization rate and poor awareness. In this study, through summary of related research results and engineering cases, suggestions are introduced and an outlook for the BIM application in tunnel engineering in China is presented, which provides guidance for design optimization, construction standards and later operation maintenance.

  12. Modeling interdisciplinary activities involving Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Steffen Møllegaard

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a didactical model is presented. The goal of the model is to work as a didactical tool, or conceptual frame, for developing, carrying through and evaluating interdisciplinary activities involving the subject of mathematics and philosophy in the high schools. Through the terms...... domains (Michelsen, 2001, 2005a, 2005b). Furthermore the theoretical description rest on a series of qualitative interviews with teachers from the Danish high school (grades 9-11) conducted recently. The special case of concrete interdisciplinary activities between mathematics and philosophy is also...

  13. Modelling of series of types of automated trenchless works tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendarz, P.; Rzasinski, R.

    2016-08-01

    Microtunneling is the newest method for making underground installations. Show method is the result of experience and methods applied in other, previous methods of trenchless underground works. It is considered reasonable to elaborate a series of types of construction of tunneling machines, to develop this particular earthworks method. There are many design solutions of machines, but the current goal is to develop non - excavation robotized machine. Erosion machines with main dimensions of the tunnels which are: 1600, 2000, 2500, 3150 are design with use of the computer aided methods. Series of types of construction of tunneling machines creating process was preceded by analysis of current state. The verification of practical methodology of creating the systematic part series was based on the designed erosion machines series of types. There were developed: method of construction similarity of the erosion machines, algorithmic methods of quantitative construction attributes variant analyzes in the I-DEAS advanced graphical program, relational and program parameterization. There manufacturing process of the parts will be created, which allows to verify the technological process on the CNC machines. The models of designed will be modified and the construction will be consulted with erosion machine users and manufacturers like: Tauber Rohrbau GmbH & Co.KG from Minster, OHL ZS a.s. from Brna,. The companies’ acceptance will result in practical verification by JUMARPOL company.

  14. Conformational changes involving ammonia tunnel formation and allosteric control in GMP synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Justin C; Gudihal, Ravidra; Burgner, John W; Pedley, Anthony M; Zwierko, Alexander T; Davisson, V Jo; Linger, Rebecca S

    2014-03-01

    GMP synthetase is the glutamine amidotransferase that catalyzes the final step in the guanylate branch of de novo purine biosynthesis. Conformational changes are required to efficiently couple distal active sites in the protein; however, the nature of these changes has remained elusive. Structural information derived from both limited proteolysis and sedimentation velocity experiments support the hypothesis of nucleotide-induced loop- and domain-closure in the protein. These results were combined with information from sequence conservation and precedents from other glutamine amidotransferases to develop the first structural model of GMPS in a closed, active state. In analyzing this Catalytic model, an interdomain salt bridge was identified residing in the same location as seen in other triad glutamine amidotransferases. Using mutagenesis and kinetic analysis, the salt bridge between H186 and E383 was shown to function as a connection between the two active sites. Mutations at these residues uncoupled the two half-reactions of the enzyme. The chemical events of nucleotide binding initiate a series of conformational changes that culminate in the establishment of a tunnel for ammonia as well as an activated glutaminase catalytic site. The results of this study provide a clearer understanding of the allostery of GMPS, where, for the first time, key substrate binding and interdomain contacts are modeled and analyzed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimal Allocation of Tunnel Safety Provisions Based on a Quantitative Risk Assessment Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the issue of optimally selecting the tunnel safety provisions. Tunnel safety provisions are the assets of urban road tunnels which are installed and implemented to reduce the tunnel risks, which are basically selected by expert judgment in practice. An optimization model is proposed to obtain the optimal solution for the selection of tunnel safety provisions. The objective function is to minimize the life cycle costs of tunnel safety provisions, which is subject to the requirements for tunnel safety provisions and the safety targets. Finally, by taking advantage of the special structure of the optimization model, a Bi-Section Search and Bound Algorithm (BSSBA is designed to efficiently solve the problem.

  16. Shortcomings of the Winkler model in the Assessment of Sectioned Tunnels under Seismic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Lyngs, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    A Winkler-type model is often applied in the design of tunnels subject to seismic loading. Since the subgrade stiffness is modelled by disjoint springs, distributed continuously along the tunnel, the model does not account for retroaction via the soil. This may not be a problem in the design...... of tunnels with a uniform cross section. However, for sectioned tunnels divided into a number of elements, erroneous results may be expected-especially regarding the relative deformations at the joints. In this paper, the results of a Winkler model are compared with a full three-dimensional continuum finite......-element solution, using a planned tunnel at Thessaloniki, Greece, as a case study. The aim of the analysis is to quantify the inaccuracy of the Winkler model in the prediction of damage at a gasket between two tunnel elements....

  17. Shortcomings of the Winkler Model in the Assessment of Sectioned Tunnels under Seismic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Lyngs, Jakob Hausgaard

    A Winkler-type model is often applied in the design of tunnels subject to seismic loading. Since the subgrade stiffness is modelled by disjoint springs, distributed continuously along the tunnel, the model does not account for retroaction via the soil. This may not be a problem in the design...... of tunnels with a uniform cross section. However, for sectioned tunnels divided into a number of elements, erroneous results may be expected-especially regarding the relative deformations at the joints. In this paper, the results of aWinkler model are compared with a full three-dimensional continuum finite......-element solution, using a planned tunnel at Thessaloniki, Greece, as a case study. The aim of the analysis is to quantify the inaccuracy of the Winkler model in the prediction of damage at a gasket between two tunnel elements....

  18. Extracting Structure Parameters of Dimers for Molecular Tunneling Ionization Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Huang, Fang; Wang, Guo-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2016-03-01

    We determine structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 27 dimers for the molecular tunneling ionization (so called MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402]. The molecular wave functions with correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are numerically created using the density functional theory. We examine the alignment-dependent tunneling ionization probabilities from MO-ADK model for several molecules by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation (MO-SFA) calculations. We show the molecular Perelomov–Popov–Terent'ev (MO-PPT) can successfully give the laser wavelength dependence of ionization rates (or probabilities). Based on the MO-PPT model, two diatomic molecules having valence orbital with antibonding systems (i.e., Cl2, Ne2) show strong ionization suppression when compared with their corresponding closest companion atoms. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11164025, 11264036, 11465016, 11364038, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001, and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  19. Shortcomings of the Winkler Model in the Assessment of Sectioned Tunnels under Seismic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Lyngs, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    A Winkler-type model is often applied in the design of tunnels subject to seismic loading. Since the subgrade stiffness is modelled by disjoint springs, distributed continuously along the tunnel, the model does not account for retroaction via the soil. This may not be a problem in the design of t......-element solution, using a planned tunnel at Thessaloniki, Greece, as a case study. The aim of the analysis is to quantify the inaccuracy of the Winkler model in the prediction of damage at a gasket between two tunnel elements....

  20. Mathematical aspects of ground state tunneling models in luminescence materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, Vasilis, E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.edu [Physics Department, McDaniel College, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Kitis, George [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-12-15

    Luminescence signals from a variety of natural materials have been known to decrease with storage time at room temperature due to quantum tunneling, a phenomenon known as anomalous fading. This paper is a study of several mathematical aspects of two previously published luminescence models which describe tunneling phenomena from the ground state of a donor–acceptor system. It is shown that both models are described by the same type of integral equation, and two new analytical equations are presented. The first new analytical equation describes the effect of anomalous fading on the dose response curves (DRCs) of naturally irradiated samples. The DRCs in the model were previously expressed in the form of integral equations requiring numerical integration, while the new analytical equation can be used immediately as a tool for analyzing experimental data. The second analytical equation presented in this paper describes the anomalous fading rate (g-Value per decade) as a function of the charge density in the model. This new analytical expression for the g-Value is tested using experimental anomalous fading data for several apatite crystals which exhibit high rate of anomalous fading. The two new analytical results can be useful tools for analyzing anomalous fading data from luminescence materials. In addition to the two new analytical equations, an explanation is provided for the numerical value of a constant previously introduced in the models. - Highlights: • Comparative study of two luminescence models for feldspars. • Two new analytical equations for dose response curves and anomalous fading rate. • The numerical value z=1.8 of previously introduced constant in models explained.

  1. Analytical Model of Symmetric Halo Doped DG-Tunnel FET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nagarajan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional analytical model of symmetric halo doped double gate tunnel field effect transistor has been presented in this work. This model is developed based on the 2-D Poisson’s equation. Some important parameters such that surface potential, vertical and lateral electric field, electric field intensity and band energy have been modelled. The doping concentration and length of halo regions are varied and dependency of various parameters is studied. The halo doping is imparted to improve the ON current and to reduce the intrinsic ambipolarity of the device. Hence we can achieve improved ION/IOFF ratio. The scaling property of halo doped structure is analyzed with various dielectric constants.

  2. Static Aeroelastic Scaling and Analysis of a Sub-Scale Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a scaled wind tunnel model for static aeroelastic similarity with a full-scale wing model. The full-scale aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with flexible wing structures referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The baseline stiffness of the ESAC wing represents a conventionally stiff wing model. Static aeroelastic scaling is conducted on the stiff wing configuration to develop the wind tunnel model, but additional tailoring is also conducted such that the wind tunnel model achieves a 10% wing tip deflection at the wind tunnel test condition. An aeroelastic scaling procedure and analysis is conducted, and a sub-scale flexible wind tunnel model based on the full-scale's undeformed jig-shape is developed. Optimization of the flexible wind tunnel model's undeflected twist along the span, or pre-twist or wash-out, is then conducted for the design test condition. The resulting wind tunnel model is an aeroelastic model designed for the wind tunnel test condition.

  3. Low frequency elastic properties of glasses at low temperatures - implications on the tunneling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raychaudhuri, A.K.; Hunklinger, S.

    1984-01-01

    We have measured the low frequency elastic properties of dielectric, normal conducting and superconducting metallic glasses at audio-frequencies (fapprox.=1 kHz) and temperatures down to 10 mK. Our results are discussed in the framework of the tunneling model of glasses. The major assumption of the tunneling model regarding the tunneling states with long relaxation time has been verified, but discrepancies to high frequency measurements have been found. In addition, our experiments on superconducting metallic glasses seem to indicate that the present treatment of the electron-tunneling state interaction is not sufficient. (orig.)

  4. Band-to-Band Tunnel Transistor Design and Modeling for Low Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    MEDICI . We start off with the form of Kane’s tunneling model [2.5] where only one effective mass of the carrier is considered. It is expanded to...calculated for silicon and germanium then put into MEDICI for more exact silicon and germanium tunneling simulations. The dependence of the tunneling rate...simulator MEDICI has the form of Kane’s tunneling model. [2.11] = . × . / × − . × / (2.11) The parameters A.BTBT, B.BTBT

  5. Neural network approach to modelling the behaviour of quantum tunnelling composites as multifunctional sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantada, Andrés Díaz; Morgado, Pilar Lafont; Otero, Javier Echavarri; Munoz-Guijosa, Juan Manuel; Sanz, José Luis Muñoz

    2010-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling composites, or 'QTCs', are composites with an elastomeric polymer matrix and a metal particle filling (usually nickel). At rest, these metal particles do not touch each other and the polymer acts as an insulator. When the material is suitably deformed, however, the particles come together (without actually touching) and the quantum tunnelling effect is promoted, which causes the electrical resistance to fall drastically. This paper contains a detailed description of neural networks for a faster, simpler and more accurate modelling and simulation of QTC behaviour that is based on properly training these neural models with the help of data from characterization tests. Instead of using analytical equations that integrate different quantum and thermomechanical effects, neural networks are used here due to the notable nonlinearity of the aforementioned effects, which involve developing analytical models that are too complex to be of practical use. By conducting tests under different pressures and temperatures that encompass a wide range of operating conditions for these materials, different neural networks are trained and compared as the number of neurons is increased. The results of these tests have also enabled certain previously described phenomena to be simulated with more accuracy, especially those involving the response of QTCs to changes in pressure and temperature

  6. Development of a 3D modeling algorithm for tunnel deformation monitoring based on terrestrial laser scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongyao Xie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Deformation monitoring is vital for tunnel engineering. Traditional monitoring techniques measure only a few data points, which is insufficient to understand the deformation of the entire tunnel. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS is a newly developed technique that can collect thousands of data points in a few minutes, with promising applications to tunnel deformation monitoring. The raw point cloud collected from TLS cannot display tunnel deformation; therefore, a new 3D modeling algorithm was developed for this purpose. The 3D modeling algorithm includes modules for preprocessing the point cloud, extracting the tunnel axis, performing coordinate transformations, performing noise reduction and generating the 3D model. Measurement results from TLS were compared to the results of total station and numerical simulation, confirming the reliability of TLS for tunnel deformation monitoring. Finally, a case study of the Shanghai West Changjiang Road tunnel is introduced, where TLS was applied to measure shield tunnel deformation over multiple sections. Settlement, segment dislocation and cross section convergence were measured and visualized using the proposed 3D modeling algorithm.

  7. New model for mines and transportation tunnels external dose calculation using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allam, Kh. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a new methodology is developed based on Monte Carlo simulation for tunnels and mines external dose calculation. Tunnels external dose evaluation model of a cylindrical shape of finite thickness with an entrance and with or without exit. A photon transportation model was applied for exposure dose calculations. A new software based on Monte Carlo solution was designed and programmed using Delphi programming language. The variation of external dose due to radioactive nuclei in a mine tunnel and the corresponding experimental data lies in the range 7.3 19.9%. The variation of specific external dose rate with position in, tunnel building material density and composition were studied. The given new model has more flexible for real external dose in any cylindrical tunnel structure calculations. (authors)

  8. Unstructed Navier-Stokes Analysis of Wind-Tunnel Aeroelastic Effects on TCA Model 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, Neal T.; Allison, Dennis O.; Parikh, Paresh C.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate a simple technique which accounts for aeroelastic deformations experienced by HSR wind-tunnel models within CFD computations. With improved correlations, CFD can become a more effective tool for augmenting the post-test understanding of experimental data. The present technique involves the loose coupling of a low-level structural representation within the ELAPS code, to an unstructured Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3Dns. The ELAPS model is initially calibrated against bending characteristics of the wind-tunnel model. The strength of this method is that, with a single point calibration of a simple structural representation, the static aeroelastic effects can be accounted for in CFD calculations across a range of test conditions. No prior knowledge of the model deformation during the wind-on test is required. This approach has been successfully applied to the high aspect-ratio planforms of subsonic transports. The current challenge is to adapt the procedure to low aspect-ratio planforms typical of HSR configurations.

  9. An analytic model for gate-all-around silicon nanowire tunneling field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; He, Jin; Chan, Mansun; Du, Cai-Xia; Ye, Yun; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Wen; Deng, Wan-Ling; Wang, Wen-Ping

    2014-09-01

    An analytical model of gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire tunneling field effect transistors (NW-TFETs) is developted based on the surface potential solutions in the channel direction and considering the band to band tunneling (BTBT) efficiency. The three-dimensional Poisson equation is solved to obtain the surface potential distributions in the partition regions along the channel direction for the NW-TFET, and a tunneling current model using Kane's expression is developed. The validity of the developed model is shown by the good agreement between the model predictions and the TCAD simulation results.

  10. Quark tunneling in a one-dimensional nuclear model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerk, G.J.; McKellar, B.H.J.

    1989-01-01

    A general result for the eigenenergies of the one-dimensional Dirac equation for an arbitrary array of delta-function potentials of either Lorentz scalar or vector type is developed. This result is then used to discuss a finite one-dimensional model of the nucleus from which the energy bands of the constituent quarks may be obtained. The resulting energy eigenvalues are compared with those obtained previously via a similar model based on a Klein-Gordon equation. In contrast to this alternative treatment a system consisting of massless quarks confined to a regular periodic one-dimensional nucleus is found to be unbound. The possible surface states are examined and it is found that the so-called Dirac surface states are not expected for potentials of either Lorentz character. The existence and effect of quark surface states is also discussed in terms of our nuclear model. Finally the scattering coefficients for a relativistic particle in an arbitrary array of delta-function potentials are determined and their implications with regard to quark tunnelling in nuclei are discussed. 25 refs., 5 figs

  11. Observations involving broadband impedance modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    Results for single- and multi-bunch instabilities can be significantly affected by the precise model that is used for the broadband impendance. This paper discusses three aspects of broadband impendance modeling. The first is an observation of the effect that a seemingly minor change in an impedance model has on the single-bunch mode coupling threshold. The second is a successful attempt to construct a model for the high-frequency tails of an r.f cavity. The last is a discussion of requirements for the mathematical form of an impendance which follow from the general properties of impendances

  12. Observations involving broadband impedance modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J.S. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Results for single- and multi-bunch instabilities can be significantly affected by the precise model that is used for the broadband impedance. This paper discusses three aspects of broadband impedance modelling. The first is an observation of the effect that a seemingly minor change in an impedance model has on the single-bunch mode coupling threshold. The second is a successful attempt to construct a model for the high-frequency tails of an r.f. cavity. The last is a discussion of requirements for the mathematical form of an impedance which follow from the general properties of impedances. (author)

  13. Molecular modeling study on tunnel behavior in different histone deacetylase isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundarapandian Thangapandian

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs have emerged as effective therapeutic targets in the treatment of various diseases including cancers as these enzymes directly involved in the epigenetic regulation of genes. However the development of isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors has been a challenge till date since all HDAC enzymes possess conserved tunnel-like active site. In this study, using molecular dynamics simulation we have analyzed the behavior of tunnels present in HDAC8, 10, and 11 enzymes of class I, II, and IV, respectively. We have identified the equivalent tunnel forming amino acids in these three isoforms and found that they are very much conserved with subtle differences to be utilized in selective inhibitor development. One amino acid, methionine of HDAC8, among six tunnel forming residues is different in isoforms of other classes (glutamic acid (E in HDAC10 and leucine (L in HDAC 11 based on which mutations were introduced in HDAC11, the less studied HDAC isoform, to observe the effects of this change. The HDAC8-like (L268M mutation in the tunnel forming residues has almost maintained the deep and narrow tunnel as present in HDAC8 whereas HDAC10-like (L268E mutation has changed the tunnel wider and shallow as observed in HDAC10. These results explained the importance of the single change in the tunnel formation in different isoforms. The observations from this study can be utilized in the development of isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors.

  14. Study on the snow drifting modelling criteria in boundary layer wind tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta BĂETU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study on modelling the wind drifting of the snow deposited on the flat roofs of buildings in wind tunnel. The physical model of snow drifting in wind tunnel simulating the urban exposure to wind action is not frequently reported in literature, but is justified by the serious damages under accidental important snow falls combined with strong wind actions on the roofs of various buildings. A uniform layer of snow deposited on the flat roof was exposed to wind action in order to obtain the drifting. The parameters involved in the modelling at reduced scale, with particles of glass beads, of the phenomenon of transportation of the snow from the roof were analysed, particularly the roughness length and the friction wind speed. A numerical simulation in ANSYS CFX program was developed in parallel, by which a more accurate visualization of the particularities of the wind flow over the roof was possible, in the specific areas where the phenomenon of snow transportation was more susceptible to occur. Modified roughness length and friction wind speed were determined through methods used in the literature, an attempt being made in this work to analyse the factors that influence their values.

  15. Safety evaluation model of urban cross-river tunnel based on driving simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingqi; Lu, Linjun; Lu, Jian John

    2017-09-01

    Currently, Shanghai urban cross-river tunnels have three principal characteristics: increased traffic, a high accident rate and rapidly developing construction. Because of their complex geographic and hydrological characteristics, the alignment conditions in urban cross-river tunnels are more complicated than in highway tunnels, so a safety evaluation of urban cross-river tunnels is necessary to suggest follow-up construction and changes in operational management. A driving risk index (DRI) for urban cross-river tunnels was proposed in this study. An index system was also constructed, combining eight factors derived from the output of a driving simulator regarding three aspects of risk due to following, lateral accidents and driver workload. Analytic hierarchy process methods and expert marking and normalization processing were applied to construct a mathematical model for the DRI. The driving simulator was used to simulate 12 Shanghai urban cross-river tunnels and a relationship was obtained between the DRI for the tunnels and the corresponding accident rate (AR) via a regression analysis. The regression analysis results showed that the relationship between the DRI and the AR mapped to an exponential function with a high degree of fit. In the absence of detailed accident data, a safety evaluation model based on factors derived from a driving simulation can effectively assess the driving risk in urban cross-river tunnels constructed or in design.

  16. Wind-Tunnel Survey of an Oscillating Flow Field for Application to Model Helicopter Rotor Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirick, Paul H.; Hamouda, M-Nabil H.; Yeager, William T., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A survey was conducted of the flow field produced by the Airstream Oscillator System (AOS) in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The magnitude of a simulated gust field was measured at 15 locations in the plane of a typical model helicopter rotor when tested in the TDT using the Aeroelastic Rotor Experimental System (ARES) model. These measurements were made over a range of tunnel dynamic pressures typical of those used for an ARES test. The data indicate that the gust field produced by the AOS is non-uniform across the tunnel test section, but should be sufficient to excite a model rotor.

  17. The design of models for cryogenic wind tunnels. [mechanical properties and loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, V. P.

    1977-01-01

    Factors to be considered in the design and fabrication of models for cryogenic wind tunnels include high model loads imposed by the high operating pressures, the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of materials in low temperature environments, and the combination of aerodynamic loads with the thermal environment. Candidate materials are being investigated to establish criteria for cryogenic wind tunnel models and their installation. Data acquired from these tests will be provided to users of the National Transonic Facility.

  18. Modeling Open-Loop MEMS Tunneling Accelerometer Based on Circular Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jodat Kordlar

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper open-loop MEMS tunneling accelerometer was modeled based on a clamped micro circular plate with a tip tunneling at its centre. Mechanical behavior of the micro plate was studied deriving governing equation based on classic Kirchhoff thin plate theory and it was discretized using Galerkin method. Dynamic response of the proposed accelerometer due to step and harmonic external excitation was studied and the magnitude of the applied acceleration was identified by measuring of the changing of tunneling current. Obtained results show that the proposed tunneling accelerometer very sensitive and it can be measure acceleration with very high resolution but very small gap of tip tunneling limit the range of measurable acceleration.

  19. Numerical simulation of flows around deformed aircraft model in a wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenkov, A. V.; Bosnyakov, S. M.; Glazkov, S. A.; Gorbushin, A. R.; Kuzmina, S. I.; Kursakov, I. A.; Matyash, S. V.; Ishmuratov, F. Z.

    2016-10-01

    To obtain accurate data of calculation method error requires detailed simulation of the experiment in wind tunnel with keeping all features of the model, installation and gas flow. Two examples of such detailed data comparison are described in this paper. The experimental characteristics of NASA CRM model obtained in the ETW wind tunnel (Cologne, Germany), and CFD characteristics of this model obtained with the use of EWT-TsAGI application package are compared. Following comparison is carried out for an airplane model in the T-128 wind tunnel (TsAGI, Russia). It is seen that deformation influence on integral characteristics grows with increasing Re number and, accordingly, the dynamic pressure. CFD methods application for problems of experimental research in the wind tunnel allows to separate viscosity and elasticity effects.

  20. Current perpendicular to plane giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance treated with unified model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, PAE

    2002-01-01

    The conceptual similarity between current perpendicular to plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) is exploited by utilizing a unified single-particle model accounting for both types of magnetoresistance. By defining structures composed of ferromagnetic,

  1. Tunnel splitting in biaxial spin models investigated with spin-coherent-state path integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhide; Liang, J.-Q.; Pu, F.-C.

    2003-01-01

    Tunnel splitting in biaxial spin models is investigated with a full evaluation of the fluctuation functional integrals of the Euclidean kernel in the framework of spin-coherent-state path integrals which leads to a magnitude of tunnel splitting quantitatively comparable with the numerical results in terms of diagonalization of the Hamilton operator. An additional factor resulted from a global time transformation converting the position-dependent mass to a constant one seems to be equivalent to the semiclassical correction of the Lagrangian proposed by Enz and Schilling. A long standing question whether the spin-coherent-state representation of path integrals can result in an accurate tunnel splitting is therefore resolved

  2. Adjustment of Sonar and Laser Acquisition Data for Building the 3D Reference Model of a Canal Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Moisan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we focus on the construction of a full 3D model of a canal tunnel by combining terrestrial laser (for its above-water part and sonar (for its underwater part scans collected from static acquisitions. The modeling of such a structure is challenging because the sonar device is used in a narrow environment that induces many artifacts. Moreover, the location and the orientation of the sonar device are unknown. In our approach, sonar data are first simultaneously denoised and meshed. Then, above- and under-water point clouds are co-registered to generate directly the full 3D model of the canal tunnel. Faced with the lack of overlap between both models, we introduce a robust algorithm that relies on geometrical entities and partially-immersed targets, which are visible in both the laser and sonar point clouds. A full 3D model, visually promising, of the entrance of a canal tunnel is obtained. The analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help with obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated way, in the limits of the involved technology.

  3. Adjustment of Sonar and Laser Acquisition Data for Building the 3D Reference Model of a Canal Tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisan, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Pierre; Foucher, Philippe; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Guillemin, Samuel; Koehl, Mathieu

    2015-12-11

    In this paper, we focus on the construction of a full 3D model of a canal tunnel by combining terrestrial laser (for its above-water part) and sonar (for its underwater part) scans collected from static acquisitions. The modeling of such a structure is challenging because the sonar device is used in a narrow environment that induces many artifacts. Moreover, the location and the orientation of the sonar device are unknown. In our approach, sonar data are first simultaneously denoised and meshed. Then, above- and under-water point clouds are co-registered to generate directly the full 3D model of the canal tunnel. Faced with the lack of overlap between both models, we introduce a robust algorithm that relies on geometrical entities and partially-immersed targets, which are visible in both the laser and sonar point clouds. A full 3D model, visually promising, of the entrance of a canal tunnel is obtained. The analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help with obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated way, in the limits of the involved technology.

  4. A Lightweight Radio Propagation Model for Vehicular Communication in Road Tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Ahsan; Noor, Rafidah Md; Shamim, Azra; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Raymond Choo, Kim-Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Radio propagation models (RPMs) are generally employed in Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANETs) to predict path loss in multiple operating environments (e.g. modern road infrastructure such as flyovers, underpasses and road tunnels). For example, different RPMs have been developed to predict propagation behaviour in road tunnels. However, most existing RPMs for road tunnels are computationally complex and are based on field measurements in frequency band not suitable for VANET deployment. Furthermore, in tunnel applications, consequences of moving radio obstacles, such as large buses and delivery trucks, are generally not considered in existing RPMs. This paper proposes a computationally inexpensive RPM with minimal set of parameters to predict path loss in an acceptable range for road tunnels. The proposed RPM utilizes geometric properties of the tunnel, such as height and width along with the distance between sender and receiver, to predict the path loss. The proposed RPM also considers the additional attenuation caused by the moving radio obstacles in road tunnels, while requiring a negligible overhead in terms of computational complexity. To demonstrate the utility of our proposed RPM, we conduct a comparative summary and evaluate its performance. Specifically, an extensive data gathering campaign is carried out in order to evaluate the proposed RPM. The field measurements use the 5 GHz frequency band, which is suitable for vehicular communication. The results demonstrate that a close match exists between the predicted values and measured values of path loss. In particular, an average accuracy of 94% is found with R2 = 0.86.

  5. Self-consistent modelling of resonant tunnelling structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, T.; Jauho, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    We report a comprehensive study of the effects of self-consistency on the I-V-characteristics of resonant tunnelling structures. The calculational method is based on a simultaneous solution of the effective-mass Schrödinger equation and the Poisson equation, and the current is evaluated...

  6. Three dimensional transient electromagnetic model study for fracture prediction from tunnel face; Sanjigen model keisan ni yoru TEM ho no tunnel zenpo tansa eno tekiyosei no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, K.; Tsutsui, T.; Saito, A. [Mitsui Mineral Development Engineering Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Hara, T. [Toda Corp., Tokyo, (Japan); Zhdanov, M. [University of Utah, UT (United States)

    1996-10-01

    In order to apply TEM model to fracture prediction at tunnel face, 3-D TEM model computation by FEM was conducted by installing a transmission loop on a tunnel face. MT field responses diffusing into the 3-D model were computed by time-domain difference calculus, and analytical precision was improved by introducing a staggered grid method. In the case where a low resistive zone exists before a tunnel face, time variance in diffused eddy current and induction current in the low resistive zone could be obtained. The difference in tunnel-axial transient curve (transient phenomenon curve in magnetic field) between uniform medium and low resistive zone models was based on the absorption process of diffused eddy current into the low resistive zone, and the expanding process of it toward the outside. Change in background condition could be predicted from the background and the ratio of transient curves every measurement. The detection limit of the low resistive zone was dependent on resistivity contrast, distance and geometry. Fluctuation in measurement due to noises and S/N ratio were also essential. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Modeling of Turbidity Variation in Two Reservoirs Connected by a Water Transfer Tunnel in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Chung Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Andong and Imha reservoirs in South Korea are connected by a water transfer tunnel. The turbidity of the Imha reservoir is much higher than that of the Andong reservoir. Thus, it is necessary to examine the movement of turbidity between the two reservoirs via the water transfer tunnel. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the water transfer tunnel on the turbidity behavior of the two connecting reservoirs and to further understand the effect of reservoir turbidity distribution as a function of the selective withdrawal depth. This study applied the CE-QUAL-W2, a water quality and 2-dimensional hydrodynamic model, for simulating the hydrodynamic processes of the two reservoirs. Results indicate that, in the Andong reservoir, the turbidity of the released water with the water transfer tunnel was similar to that without the tunnel. However, in the Imha reservoir, the turbidity of the released water with the water transfer tunnel was lower than that without the tunnel. This can be attributed to the higher capacity of the Andong reservoir, which has double the storage of the Imha reservoir. Withdrawal turbidity in the Imha reservoir was investigated using the water transfer tunnel. This study applied three withdrawal selections as elevation (EL. 141.0 m, 146.5 m, and 152.0 m. The highest withdrawal turbidity resulted in EL. 141.0 m, which indicates that the high turbidity current is located at a vertical depth of about 20–30 m because of the density difference. These results will be helpful for understanding the release and selective withdrawal turbidity behaviors for a water transfer tunnel between two reservoirs.

  8. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet with Shock Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Sozer, Emre; Moini-Yekta, Shayan

    2016-01-01

    NASA and Industry are performing vehicle studies of configurations with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern configuration designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty in the aft signatures with often greater boundary layer effects and nozzle jet pressures. Wind tunnel testing at significantly lower Reynolds numbers than in flight and without inlet and nozzle jet pressures make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel from Mach 1.6 to 2.0 will be used to assess the effects of shocks from components passing through nozzle jet plumes on the sonic boom pressure signature and provide datasets for comparison with CFD codes. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of wind tunnel test models with a variety of shock generators that simulate horizontal tails and aft decks have been studied to provide suitable models for sonic boom pressure measurements using a minimally intrusive pressure rail in the wind tunnel. The computational results are presented and the evolution of candidate wind tunnel models is summarized and discussed in this paper.

  9. Bullying Prevention and the Parent Involvement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbert, Jered B.; Schultz, Danielle; Crothers, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis of bullying prevention programs provides support for social-ecological theory, in which parent involvement addressing child bullying behaviors is seen as important in preventing school-based bullying. The purpose of this manuscript is to suggest how Epstein and colleagues' parent involvement model can be used as a…

  10. Reducing the computational requirements for simulating tunnel fires by combining multiscale modelling and multiple processor calculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermesi, Izabella; Rein, Guillermo; Colella, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    in FDS version 6.0, a widely used fire-specific, open source CFD software. Furthermore, it compares the reduction in simulation time given by multiscale modelling with the one given by the use of multiple processor calculation. This was done using a 1200m long tunnel with a rectangular cross...... processor calculation (97% faster when using a single mesh and multiscale modelling; only 46% faster when using the full tunnel and multiple meshes). In summary, it was found that multiscale modelling with FDS v.6.0 is feasible, and the combination of multiple meshes and multiscale modelling was established...

  11. Modeling and Dynamic Analysis of Cutterhead Driving System in Tunnel Boring Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of cutterhead driving system (CDS of tunnel boring machine (TBM often occurs under shock and vibration conditions. To investigate the dynamic characteristics and reduce system vibration further, an electromechanical coupling model of CDS is established which includes the model of direct torque control (DTC system for three-phase asynchronous motor and purely torsional dynamic model of multistage gear transmission system. The proposed DTC model can provide driving torque just as the practical inverter motor operates so that the influence of motor operating behavior will not be erroneously estimated. Moreover, nonlinear gear meshing factors, such as time-variant mesh stiffness and transmission error, are involved in the dynamic model. Based on the established nonlinear model of CDS, vibration modes can be classified into three types, that is, rigid motion mode, rotational vibration mode, and planet vibration mode. Moreover, dynamic responses under actual driving torque and idealized equivalent torque are compared, which reveals that the ripple of actual driving torque would aggravate vibration of gear transmission system. Influence index of torque ripple is proposed to show that vibration of system increases with torque ripple. This study provides useful guideline for antivibration design and motor control of CDS in TBM.

  12. Tunneling Current of Electron in Armchair Graphene Nanoribbon Bipolar Transistor Model Using Transfer Matrix Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, A. K.; Hasanah, L.; Rusdiana, D.; Aminudin, A.; Suhendi, E.

    2017-03-01

    The tunneling current of n-p-n bipolar junction transistor AGNR-based is modeled with semi-numerical method. The exponential solution from Schrödinger equation is used and solved analytically. The potential profile of n-p-n BJT divided into several segments in the numerical method. Then, the solved analytical result is used in the numerical method to compute the electron transmittance. Transfer Matrix Method (TMM) is the numerical method used to compute the electron transmittance. From the calculated transmittance the tunneling current can be computed by using Landauer formula with aid of Gauss-Legendre Quadrature (GLQ). Next, the tunneling current is computed with several change of variables which are base-emitter voltage (VBE), base-collector voltage (VBC), temperature and the AGNR’s width. The computed tunneling current shows that the larger value of applied voltage for both VBE and VBC results in larger value of tunneling current. At the lower temperature, the current is larger. The computed tunneling current shows that at wider width of AGNR, the current is also larger. This is due to the decreased band-gap energy (Eg) because of the wider width of AGNR.

  13. Modeling of the I V characteristics of single and double barrier tunneling diodes using A k · p band model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mui, D.; Patil, M.; Chen, J.; Agarwala, S.; Kumar, N. S.; Morkoc, H.

    1989-11-01

    We model the I-V characteristics of single and double barrier tunneling diodes using the complex band structure of the tunneling barrier obtained from a k · p band model. Band-bending is calculated by solving two coupled 1-D Poisson's equations with a classical potential in the accumulation region. The transfer matrix method is used for the calculation of the transmission probability of the tunneling electron whose complex k-vector is obtained from the band structure. An energy dependent density of states effective mass which is also calculated from the band structure is used. I-V characteristics for In 0.53Ga 0.47As/In 0.52Al 0.48As/In 0.53Ga 0.47As single and double barrier tunneling diodes obtained from this model agree quantitatively with experiment.

  14. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were...... then successfully applied to activity recognition, activity simulation and multi-target tracking. Our method compares favourably with respect to previously reported results using Hidden Markov Models and Relational Particle Filtering....

  15. MODELING METHODS FOR INTEGRAL EQUATIONS OF THIN REINFORCED ELEMENTS OF UNDERGROUND BUILDINGS AND TUNNELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. M. Pasternak

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the model of thin reinforcement that takes into account its tension, shear and bending is developed. The model developed is introduced into the integral equation method for study of stress concentration in the wall of partially reinforced tunnel. The numerical results are obtained and analyzed for different values of reinforcement length and relative rigidity.

  16. Probabilistic Seismic Performance Model for Tunnel Form Concrete Building Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bahram Beheshti Aval

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite widespread construction of mass-production houses with tunnel form structural system across the world, unfortunately no special seismic code is published for design of this type of construction. Through a literature survey, only a few studies are about the seismic behavior of this type of structural system. Thus based on reasonable numerical results, the seismic performance of structures constructed with this technique considering the effective factors on structural behavior is highly noteworthy in a seismic code development process. In addition, due to newness of this system and observed damages in past earthquakes, and especially random nature of future earthquakes, the importance of probabilistic approach and necessity of developing fragility curves in a next generation Performance Based Earthquake Engineering (PBEE frame work are important. In this study, the seismic behavior of 2, 5 and 10 story tunnel form structures with a regular plan is examined. First, the performance levels of these structures under the design earthquake (return period of 475 years with time history analysis and pushover method are assessed, and then through incremental dynamic analysis, fragility curves are extracted for different levels of damage in walls and spandrels. The results indicated that the case study structures have high capacity and strength and show appropriate seismic performance. Moreover, all three structures subjected were in immediate occupancy performance level.

  17. Modelling of continuous and discontinuous floating slab tracks in a tunnel using a periodic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Degrande, G.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a periodic approach to couple a track and a tunnel-soil system of different periodicity. The periodicity of the track and the tunnel-soil system is exploited using the Floquet transform to efficiently formulate the problem in the frequency-wavenumber domain as well as to limit the discretization effort to a reference cell. The track and the tunnel-soil system are modelled as two separate systems of different periodicity and are coupled in the frequency-wavenumber domain. A coupled periodic finite element-boundary element method is used to model the tunnel-soil system, while a periodic finite element model or an analytical approach is used to model the track. A general analytical formulation to compute the response of three-dimensional periodic media that are excited by moving loads is discussed. It is shown that the response due to moving loads on the track can be calculated from the transfer function of the track-tunnel-soil system and the axle loads. A methodology for computing the transfer functions of the coupled track-tunnel-soil system as well as the computation of dynamic forces accounting for the interaction between the moving vehicle and the periodic track are described. The model accounts for quasi-static forces as well as dynamic forces due to parametric excitation and unevenness excitation. The methodology has been used to assess the vibration isolation efficiency of continuous and discontinuous floating slab tracks. It is concluded that both continuous and discontinuous floating slab tracks have a similar efficiency in the frequency range well above the isolation frequency of the slabs, which is usually higher than the slab passage frequency. In case of discontinuous slab tracks, the parametric excitation is found to be important, which results in a poorer performance of the track at low frequencies.

  18. The analysis of creep characteristics of the surrounding rock of the carbonaceous rock tunnel based on Singh-Mitchell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junhui; Mi, Decai; Ye, Qiongyao; Deng, Shengqiang; Zeng, Fuquan; Zeng, Yongjun

    2018-01-01

    Carbonaceous rock has the characteristics of easy disintegration, softening, swelling and environmental sensitivity, which belongs to soft surrounding rock, and the deformation during excavation and long-term stability of the surrounding rock of carbonaceous rock tunnel are common problems in the construction of carbonaceous rock tunnel. According to the above, the Monitor and measure the displacement, temperature and osmotic pressure of the surrounding carbonaceous rock of the tunnel of Guangxi Hebai highway. Then it based on the obtaining data to study the creep mechanism of surrounding rock using Singh-Mitchell model and predict the deformation of surrounding rock before the tunnel is operation. The results show that the Singh-Mitchell creep model can effectively analyse and predict the deformation development law of surrounding rock of tunnel without considering temperature and osmotic pressure, it can provide reference for the construction of carbonaceous rock tunnel and the measures to prevent and reinforce it..

  19. Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models Part 2: A Centerline Supported Fullspan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert C.; Vetter, Travis K.; Penning, Kevin B.; Coulson, David A.; Heeg, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This is part 2 of a two part document. Part 1 is titled: "Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models Part 1: A Sidewall Supported Semispan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation and Flutter Suppression." A team comprised of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Boeing, and the NASA Langley Research Center conducted three aeroservoelastic wind tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to demonstrate active control technologies relevant to large, flexible vehicles. In the first of these three tests, a full-span, aeroelastically scaled, wind tunnel model of a joined wing SensorCraft vehicle was mounted to a force balance to acquire a basic aerodynamic data set. In the second and third tests, the same wind tunnel model was mated to a new, two degree of freedom, beam mount. This mount allowed the full-span model to translate vertically and pitch. Trimmed flight at10 percent static margin and gust load alleviation were successfully demonstrated. The rigid body degrees of freedom required that the model be flown in the wind tunnel using an active control system. This risky mode of testing necessitated that a model arrestment system be integrated into the new mount. The safe and successful completion of these free-flying tests required the development and integration of custom hardware and software. This paper describes the many systems, software, and procedures that were developed as part of this effort. The balance and free flying wind tunnel tests will be summarized. The design of the trim and gust load alleviation control laws along with the associated results will also be discussed.

  20. System Dynamic Analysis of a Wind Tunnel Model with Applications to Improve Aerodynamic Data Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehrle, Ralph David

    1997-01-01

    The research investigates the effect of wind tunnel model system dynamics on measured aerodynamic data. During wind tunnel tests designed to obtain lift and drag data, the required aerodynamic measurements are the steady-state balance forces and moments, pressures, and model attitude. However, the wind tunnel model system can be subjected to unsteady aerodynamic and inertial loads which result in oscillatory translations and angular rotations. The steady-state force balance and inertial model attitude measurements are obtained by filtering and averaging data taken during conditions of high model vibrations. The main goals of this research are to characterize the effects of model system dynamics on the measured steady-state aerodynamic data and develop a correction technique to compensate for dynamically induced errors. Equations of motion are formulated for the dynamic response of the model system subjected to arbitrary aerodynamic and inertial inputs. The resulting modal model is examined to study the effects of the model system dynamic response on the aerodynamic data. In particular, the equations of motion are used to describe the effect of dynamics on the inertial model attitude, or angle of attack, measurement system that is used routinely at the NASA Langley Research Center and other wind tunnel facilities throughout the world. This activity was prompted by the inertial model attitude sensor response observed during high levels of model vibration while testing in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The inertial attitude sensor cannot distinguish between the gravitational acceleration and centrifugal accelerations associated with wind tunnel model system vibration, which results in a model attitude measurement bias error. Bias errors over an order of magnitude greater than the required device accuracy were found in the inertial model attitude measurements during dynamic testing of two model systems. Based on a theoretical modal

  1. THREE-PARAMETER CREEP DAMAGE CONSTITUTIVE MODEL AND ITS APPLICATION IN HYDRAULIC TUNNELLING

    OpenAIRE

    Luo Gang; Chen Liang

    2016-01-01

    Rock deformation is a time-dependent process, generally referred to as rheology. Especially for soft rock strata, design and construction of tunnel shall take full account of rheological properties of adjoining rocks. Based on classic three-parameter HK model (generalized Kelvin model), this paper proposes a three-parameter H-K damage model of which parameters attenuate with increase of equivalent strain, provides attenuation equation of model parameters in the first, second and third stage o...

  2. Voltage and oxide thickness dependent tunneling current density and tunnel resistivity model: Application to high-k material HfO2 based MOS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, N. P.; Maity, Reshmi; Baishya, Srimanta

    2017-11-01

    In this paper presents a straightforward efficient investigation of tunneling current density for ultra thin oxide layer based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices to realization the gate current as a function of applied potential and oxide thickness. Solutions to the Schrödinger's wave equation are evolved for the different potential energy regions of the MOS device considering appropriate effective mass for each region. For finding approximate mathematical solutions to linear differential equations using spatially changeable coefficients the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation technique is considered. A p-substrate based n-channel MOS device has been analyzed consisting of SiO2 material as the oxide dielectric along with high-k material HfO2. The tunnel resistivity is correspondingly assessed employing this tunneling current density model. Synopsys Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) tool results are employed to validate the analytical model. Tremendous agreements among the results are observed.

  3. Attachments for fire modeling for Building 221-T, T Plant canyon deck and railroad tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oar, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this attachment is to provide historical information and documentation for Document No. WHC-SD-CP-ANAL-008 Rev 0, ''Fire Modeling for Building 221-T--T Plant Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel'', dated September 29, 1994. This data compilation contains the following: Resumes of the Technical Director, Senior Engineer and Junior Engineer; Review and Comment Record; Software Files; CFAST Input and Output Files; Calculation Control Sheets; and Estimating Sprinkler Actuation Time in the Canyon and Railroad Tunnel. The T Plant was originally a fuel reprocessing facility. It was modified later to decontaminate and repair PuRex process equipment

  4. Attachments for fire modeling for Building 221-T, T Plant canyon deck and railroad tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oar, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-01-23

    The purpose of this attachment is to provide historical information and documentation for Document No. WHC-SD-CP-ANAL-008 Rev 0, ``Fire Modeling for Building 221-T--T Plant Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel``, dated September 29, 1994. This data compilation contains the following: Resumes of the Technical Director, Senior Engineer and Junior Engineer; Review and Comment Record; Software Files; CFAST Input and Output Files; Calculation Control Sheets; and Estimating Sprinkler Actuation Time in the Canyon and Railroad Tunnel. The T Plant was originally a fuel reprocessing facility. It was modified later to decontaminate and repair PuRex process equipment.

  5. Application of fire and evacuation models in evaluation of fire safety in railway tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cábová, Kamila; Apeltauer, Tomáš; Okřinová, Petra; Wald, František

    2017-09-01

    The paper describes an application of numerical simulation of fire dynamics and evacuation of people in a tunnel. The software tool Fire Dynamics Simulator is used to simulate temperature resolution and development of smoke in a railway tunnel. Comparing to temperature curves which are usually used in the design stage results of the model show that the numerical model gives lower temperature of hot smoke layer. Outputs of the numerical simulation of fire also enable to improve models of evacuation of people during fires in tunnels. In the presented study the calculated high of smoke layer in the tunnel is in 10 min after the fire ignition lower than the level of 2.2 m which is considered as the maximal limit for safe evacuation. Simulation of the evacuation process in bigger scale together with fire dynamics can provide very valuable information about important security conditions like Available Safe Evacuation Time (ASET) vs Required Safe Evacuation Time (RSET). On given example in software EXODUS the paper summarizes selected results of evacuation model which should be in mind of a designer when preparing an evacuation plan.

  6. A reduced theoretical model for estimating condensation effects in combustion-heated hypersonic tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Luo, X.; Qin, F.; Yang, J.

    2018-03-01

    As one of the combustion products of hydrocarbon fuels in a combustion-heated wind tunnel, water vapor may condense during the rapid expansion process, which will lead to a complex two-phase flow inside the wind tunnel and even change the design flow conditions at the nozzle exit. The coupling of the phase transition and the compressible flow makes the estimation of the condensation effects in such wind tunnels very difficult and time-consuming. In this work, a reduced theoretical model is developed to approximately compute the nozzle-exit conditions of a flow including real-gas and homogeneous condensation effects. Specifically, the conservation equations of the axisymmetric flow are first approximated in the quasi-one-dimensional way. Then, the complex process is split into two steps, i.e., a real-gas nozzle flow but excluding condensation, resulting in supersaturated nozzle-exit conditions, and a discontinuous jump at the end of the nozzle from the supersaturated state to a saturated state. Compared with two-dimensional numerical simulations implemented with a detailed condensation model, the reduced model predicts the flow parameters with good accuracy except for some deviations caused by the two-dimensional effect. Therefore, this reduced theoretical model can provide a fast, simple but also accurate estimation of the condensation effect in combustion-heated hypersonic tunnels.

  7. Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Bridge Model with Active Vibration Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H. I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Mendes, P. A.

    The application of active control systems to reduce wind vibrations in bridges is a new area of research. This paper presents the results that were obtained on a set of wind tunnel tests of a bridge model equipped with active movable flaps. Based on the monitored position and motion of the deck...

  8. FEATURES OF THE SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL EXPERIMENT WITH ROTATING MODELS OF AIRCRAFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper contains description of the construction of aircraft model for aerodynamic experiment in subsonic wind-tunnel, during it rotation. The technique of the experiment, and features associated with rotation were mentioned. Provided the results of measuring Magnus force and it comparing with analytical methodology.

  9. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects

  10. A New Global Regression Analysis Method for the Prediction of Wind Tunnel Model Weight Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Norbert Manfred; Bridge, Thomas M.; Amaya, Max A.

    2014-01-01

    A new global regression analysis method is discussed that predicts wind tunnel model weight corrections for strain-gage balance loads during a wind tunnel test. The method determines corrections by combining "wind-on" model attitude measurements with least squares estimates of the model weight and center of gravity coordinates that are obtained from "wind-off" data points. The method treats the least squares fit of the model weight separate from the fit of the center of gravity coordinates. Therefore, it performs two fits of "wind- off" data points and uses the least squares estimator of the model weight as an input for the fit of the center of gravity coordinates. Explicit equations for the least squares estimators of the weight and center of gravity coordinates are derived that simplify the implementation of the method in the data system software of a wind tunnel. In addition, recommendations for sets of "wind-off" data points are made that take typical model support system constraints into account. Explicit equations of the confidence intervals on the model weight and center of gravity coordinates and two different error analyses of the model weight prediction are also discussed in the appendices of the paper.

  11. On the flow of groundwater in closed tunnels. Generic hydrogeological modelling of nuclear waste repository, SFL 3-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmen, J.G.

    1997-06-01

    The purpose is to study the flow of groundwater in closed tunnels by use of mathematical models. The calculations were based on three dimensional models, presuming steady state conditions. The stochastic continuum approach was used for representation of a heterogeneous rock mass. The size of the calculated flow is given as a multiple of an unknown regional groundwater flow. The size of the flow in a tunnel has been studied, as regards: Direction of the regional groundwater flow, Tunnel length, width and conductivity; Heterogeneity of the surrounding rock mass; Flow barriers and encapsulation inside a tunnel. The study includes a model of the planned repository for nuclear waste (SFL 3-5). The flow through the tunnels is estimated for different scenarios. The stochastic continuum approach has been investigated, as regards the representation of a scale dependent heterogeneous conductivity. An analytical method is proposed for the scaling of measured conductivity values, the method is consistent with the stochastic continuum approach. Some general conclusions from the work are: The larger the amount of heterogeneity, the larger the expected flow; The effects of the heterogeneity will decrease with increased tunnel length; If the conductivity of the tunnel is smaller than a threshold value, the tunnel conductivity is the most important parameter; If the tunnel conductivity is large and the tunnel is long, the most important parameter is the direction of the regional flow; Given a heterogeneous rock mass, if the tunnel length is shorter than about 500 m, the heterogeneity will be an important parameter, for lengths shorter than about 250 m, probably the most important; The flow through an encapsulation surrounded by a flow barrier is mainly dependent on the conductivity of the barrier. 70 refs, 110 figs, 10 tabs

  12. On the flow of groundwater in closed tunnels. Generic hydrogeological modelling of nuclear waste repository, SFL 3-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmen, J.G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Inst. of Earth Sciences]|[Golder Associates AB (Sweden)

    1997-06-01

    The purpose is to study the flow of groundwater in closed tunnels by use of mathematical models. The calculations were based on three dimensional models, presuming steady state conditions. The stochastic continuum approach was used for representation of a heterogeneous rock mass. The size of the calculated flow is given as a multiple of an unknown regional groundwater flow. The size of the flow in a tunnel has been studied, as regards: Direction of the regional groundwater flow, Tunnel length, width and conductivity; Heterogeneity of the surrounding rock mass; Flow barriers and encapsulation inside a tunnel. The study includes a model of the planned repository for nuclear waste (SFL 3-5). The flow through the tunnels is estimated for different scenarios. The stochastic continuum approach has been investigated, as regards the representation of a scale dependent heterogeneous conductivity. An analytical method is proposed for the scaling of measured conductivity values, the method is consistent with the stochastic continuum approach. Some general conclusions from the work are: The larger the amount of heterogeneity, the larger the expected flow; The effects of the heterogeneity will decrease with increased tunnel length; If the conductivity of the tunnel is smaller than a threshold value, the tunnel conductivity is the most important parameter; If the tunnel conductivity is large and the tunnel is long, the most important parameter is the direction of the regional flow; Given a heterogeneous rock mass, if the tunnel length is shorter than about 500 m, the heterogeneity will be an important parameter, for lengths shorter than about 250 m, probably the most important; The flow through an encapsulation surrounded by a flow barrier is mainly dependent on the conductivity of the barrier. 70 refs, 110 figs, 10 tabs.

  13. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet Flows with Shock Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Morr, Donald E.; Durston, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry are performing studies of supersonic aircraft concepts with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern aircraft designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty remains in the aft signatures due to boundary layer and nozzle exhaust jet effects. Wind tunnel testing without inlet and nozzle exhaust jet effects at lower Reynolds numbers than in-flight make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel is planned for February 2016 to address the nozzle jet effects on sonic boom. The experiment will provide pressure signatures of test articles that replicate waveforms from aircraft wings, tails, and aft fuselage (deck) components after passing through cold nozzle jet plumes. The data will provide a variety of nozzle plume and shock interactions for comparison with computational results. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of a variety of shock generators were evaluated to define a reduced collection of suitable test models. The computational results of the candidate wind tunnel test models as they evolved are summarized, and pre-test computations of the final designs are provided.

  14. Tunneling dynamics in open ultracold bosonic systems. Numerically exact dynamics - Analytical models - Control schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lode, Axel U.J.

    2013-06-03

    This thesis explores the quantum many-body tunneling dynamics of open ultracold bosonic systems with the recently developed multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree for bosons (MCTDHB) method. The capabilities of MCTDHB to provide solutions to the full time-dependent many-body problem are assessed in a benchmark using the analytically solvable harmonic interaction Hamiltonian and a generalization of it with time-dependent both one- and two-body potentials. In a comparison with numerically exact MCTDHB results, it is shown that e.g. lattice methods fail qualitatively to describe the tunneling dynamics. A model assembling the many-body physics of the process from basic simultaneously happening single-particle processes is derived and verified with a numerically exact MCTDHB description. The generality of the model is demonstrated even for strong interactions and large particle numbers. The ejection of the bosons from the source occurs with characteristic velocities. These velocities are defined by the chemical potentials of systems with different particle numbers which are converted to kinetic energy. The tunneling process is accompanied by fragmentation: the ejected bosons lose their coherence with the source and among each other. It is shown that the various aspects of the tunneling dynamics' can be controlled well with the interaction and the potential threshold.

  15. The Effect of Layer Thickness on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Wind Tunnel RP Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, S.; Adelnia, R.; Aghanajafi, C.

    Nowadays, rapid prototyping (RP) methods are widely used to produce wind tunnel testing models. Layer thickness is an important parameter that affects aerodynamic characteristics of wind tunnel models. This paper describes the effects of Layer thickness, using rapid prototyping, on aerodynamic coefficients to construct wind tunnel testing models. Three models were evaluated. These models were fabricated from ABSi by fused deposition method (FDM). The layer thickness was 0.178 mm, 0.254 mm and 0.33 mm. The surface roughness for each model was 25 μm, 63 μm and 160 μm (RZ) determined by PERTHOMETER2. A wing-body-tail configuration was chosen for the actual study. Testing covered the Mach no. range of Mach 0.3 to Mach 1.2 at an angle-of-attack range of -4° to +16° at zero sideslip. Coefficients of normal force, axial force, pitching moment, and lift over drag are shown at each of these mach numbers. Results from this study show that layer thickness does have effect on the aerodynamic characteristics; in general the difference between the data extracted from three models is less than 6 percent. The layer thickness does have more effect on the aerodynamic characteristics when mach number is decreased and has the most effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of axial force and its derivative coefficients.

  16. A physics-based compact model of ferroelectric tunnel junction for memory and logic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhaohao; Zhao, Weisheng; Kang, Wang; Bouchenak-Khelladi, Anes; Zhang, Yue; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Ravelosona, Dafiné; Chappert, Claude; Zhang, Youguang

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junction (FTJ) is able to store non-volatile data in the spontaneous polarization direction of ferroelectric tunnel barrier. Recent progress has demonstrated its great potential to build up the next generation non-volatile memory and logic (NVM and NVL) thanks to the high OFF/ON resistance ratio, fast operation speed, low write power, non-destructive readout and so on. In this paper, we present the first physics-based compact model for Co/BTO/LSMO FTJ nanopillar, which was reported experimentally to exhibit excellent NVM performance. This model integrates related physical models of tunnel resistance, static switching voltage and dynamic switching delay. Its accuracy is shown by the good agreement between numerical model simulation and experimental measurements. This compact model has been developed in Verilog-A language and validated by single-cell simulation on Cadence Virtuoso Platform. Hybrid simulations based on 40 nm-technology node of FTJ memory arrays and non-volatile full adder were performed to demonstrate the efficiency of our compact model for the simulation and analysis of CMOS/FTJ integrated circuits. (paper)

  17. A physics-based compact model of ferroelectric tunnel junction for memory and logic design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohao; Zhao, Weisheng; Kang, Wang; Bouchenak-Khelladi, Anes; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Youguang; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Ravelosona, Dafiné; Chappert, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junction (FTJ) is able to store non-volatile data in the spontaneous polarization direction of ferroelectric tunnel barrier. Recent progress has demonstrated its great potential to build up the next generation non-volatile memory and logic (NVM and NVL) thanks to the high OFF/ON resistance ratio, fast operation speed, low write power, non-destructive readout and so on. In this paper, we present the first physics-based compact model for Co/BTO/LSMO FTJ nanopillar, which was reported experimentally to exhibit excellent NVM performance. This model integrates related physical models of tunnel resistance, static switching voltage and dynamic switching delay. Its accuracy is shown by the good agreement between numerical model simulation and experimental measurements. This compact model has been developed in Verilog-A language and validated by single-cell simulation on Cadence Virtuoso Platform. Hybrid simulations based on 40 nm-technology node of FTJ memory arrays and non-volatile full adder were performed to demonstrate the efficiency of our compact model for the simulation and analysis of CMOS/FTJ integrated circuits.

  18. Neural network modeling of air pollution in tunnels according to indirect measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaverzneva, T; Lazovskaya, T; Tarkhov, D; Vasilyev, A

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the problem of providing the necessary parameters of air of the working area in dead-end tunnels in the case of ventilation systems powered off. An ill-posed initialboundary problem for the diffusion equation is used as a mathematical model for a description and analysis of mass transfer processes in the tunnel. The neural network approach is applied to construct an approximate solution (regularization) of the identification problem in the case of the approximate measurement data and the set of interval parameters of the modeled system. Two types of model measurements included binary data are considered. The direct problem solution and the inverse problem regularization for the offered neural network approach are constructed uniformly. (paper)

  19. Aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of the DARPA Smart Wing Phase II wind tunnel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Brian P.; Martin, Christopher A.; Cowan, David L.

    2001-06-01

    A wind tunnel demonstration was conducted on a scale model of an unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV). The model was configured with traditional hinged control surfaces and control surfaces manufactured with embedded shape memory alloys. Control surfaces constructed with SMA wires enable a smooth and continuous deformation in both the spanwise and cordwise directions. This continuous shape results in some unique aerodynamic effects. Additionally, the stiffness distribution of the model was selected to understand the aeroelastic behavior of a wing designed with these control surfaces. The wind tunnel experiments showed that the aerodynamic performance of a wing constructed with these control surfaces is significantly improved. However, care must be taken when aeroelastic effects are considered since the wing will show a more rapid reduction in the roll moment due to increased moment arm about the elastic axis. It is shown, experimentally, that this adverse effect is easily counteracted using leading edge control surfaces.

  20. Predicting the aeroelastic behavior of a wind-tunnel model using transonic small disturbance theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code, developed at the NASA-Langley Research Center, is applied to the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model for prediction of the model's transonic aeroelastic behavior. Static aeroelastic solutions using CAP-TSD are computed. Dynamic (flutter) analyses are then performed as perturbations about the static aeroelastic deformations of the AFW. The accuracy of the static aeroelastic procedure is investigated by comparing analytical results to those from AFW wind-tunnel experiments. Dynamic results are presented in the form of root loci at different Mach numbers for a heavy gas and for air test mediums. The resultant flutter boundaries for both gases, and the effects of viscous damping and angle of attack on the flutter boundary in air, are also presented.

  1. Hybrid Wing Body Model Identification Using Forced-Oscillation Water Tunnel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Vicroy, Dan D.; Kramer, Brian; Kerho, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Static and dynamic testing of the NASA 0.7 percent scale Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) configuration was conducted in the Rolling Hills Research Corporation water tunnel to investigate aerodynamic behavior over a large range of angle-of-attack and to develop models that can predict aircraft response in nonlinear unsteady flight regimes. This paper reports primarily on the longitudinal axis results. Flow visualization tests were also performed. These tests provide additional static data and new dynamic data that complement tests conducted at NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. HWB was developed to support the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project goals of lower noise, emissions, and fuel burn. This study also supports the NASA Aviation Safety Program efforts to model and control advanced transport configurations in loss-of-control conditions.

  2. Aeroservoelastic wind-tunnel investigations using the active flexible wing model - Status and recent accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Thomas; Perry, Boyd, III; Tiffany, Sherwood; Cole, Stanley; Buttrill, Carey; Adams, William, Jr.; Houck, Jacob; Srinathkumar, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the joint NASA/Rockwell Active Flexible Wing Wind-Tunnel Test Program. The objectives of the program are to develop and validate the analysis, design and test methodologies required to apply multifunction active control technology for improving aircraft performance and stability. Major tasks of the program include designing digital multiinput/multioutput flutter-suppression and rolling-maneuver-load-alleviation concepts for a flexible full-span wind-tunnel model, obtaining an experimental data base for the basic model and each control concept, and providing comparisons between experimental and analytical results to validate the methodologies. This program is also providing the opportunity to improve real-time simulation techniques and to gain practical experience with digital control law implementation procedures.

  3. Active Control of Wind-Tunnel Model Aeroelastic Response Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 Under a joint research and development effort conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and The Boeing Company (formerly McDonnell Douglas) three neural-network based control systems were developed and tested. The control systems were experimentally evaluated using a transonic wind-tunnel model in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. One system used a neural network to schedule flutter suppression control laws, another employed a neural network in a predictive control scheme, and the third employed a neural network in an inverse model control scheme. All three of these control schemes successfully suppressed flutter to or near the limits of the testing apparatus, and represent the first experimental applications of neural networks to flutter suppression. This paper will summarize the findings of this project.

  4. Advanced analytical modeling of double-gate Tunnel-FETs - A performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graef, Michael; Hosenfeld, Fabian; Horst, Fabian; Farokhnejad, Atieh; Hain, Franziska; Iñíguez, Benjamín; Kloes, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    The Tunnel-FET is one of the most promising devices to be the successor of the standard MOSFET due to its alternative current transport mechanism, which allows a smaller subthreshold slope than the physically limited 60 mV/dec of the MOSFET. Recently fabricated devices show smaller slopes already but mostly not over multiple decades of the current transfer characteristics. In this paper the performance limiting effects, occurring during the fabrication process of the device, such as doping profiles and midgap traps are analyzed by physics-based analytical models and their performance limiting abilities are determined. Additionally, performance enhancing possibilities, such as hetero-structures and ambipolarity improvements are introduced and discussed. An extensive double-gate n-Tunnel-FET model is presented, which meets the versatile device requirements and shows a good fit with TCAD simulations and measurement data.

  5. Aerodynamic testing model guided missiles with jets simulations in the T-35 wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocokoljić Goran J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Testing of the Anti-Tank Missile with jets simulations in the T-35 wind tunnel is part of the development program of short range anti-tank system. The main task of this experiment was to provide an experimental data base for estimation of real jets influence. Analysis was presented for Mach number 0.2, model configurations with and without jets, and three jet tabs positions: tabs out of the jets, upper or lower tabs in the jets. Missile model designed that instead of the products of combustion through nozzles allow high pressure air corresponding mass flow. In additional to the wind tunnel test results the paper, also presents the results of CFD simulations. The results are presented by normal force and pitching moment coefficients.

  6. Two Dimensional Modeling of III-V Heterojunction Gate All Around Tunnel Field Effect Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Manjula Vijh; R.S. Gupta; Sujata Pandey

    2017-01-01

    Tunnel Field Effect Transistor is one of the extensively researched semiconductor devices, which has captured attention over the conventional Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor. This device, due to its varied advantages, is considered in applications where devices are scaled down to deep sub-micron level. Like MOSFETs, many geometries of TFETs have been studied and analyzed in the past few years. This work, presents a two dimensional analytical model for a III-V Heterojunction ...

  7. Development and Evaluation of a Dynamic, 3-Degree-of-Freedom (DOF) Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    ARL-CR-0807● NOV 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Development and Evaluation of a Dynamic, 3-Degree-of-Freedom ( DOF ) Wind...ARL-CR-0807 ● NOV 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Development and Evaluation of a Dynamic, 3-Degree-of-Freedom ( DOF ) Wind...Development and Evaluation of a Dynamic, 3-Degree-of-Freedom ( DOF ) Wind Tunnel Model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911-QX-14-C-0016 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  8. Nonlinear Unsteady Aerodynamic Modeling Using Wind Tunnel and Computational Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Klein, Vladislav; Frink, Neal T.

    2016-01-01

    Extensions to conventional aircraft aerodynamic models are required to adequately predict responses when nonlinear unsteady flight regimes are encountered, especially at high incidence angles and under maneuvering conditions. For a number of reasons, such as loss of control, both military and civilian aircraft may extend beyond normal and benign aerodynamic flight conditions. In addition, military applications may require controlled flight beyond the normal envelope, and civilian flight may require adequate recovery or prevention methods from these adverse conditions. These requirements have led to the development of more general aerodynamic modeling methods and provided impetus for researchers to improve both techniques and the degree of collaboration between analytical and experimental research efforts. In addition to more general mathematical model structures, dynamic test methods have been designed to provide sufficient information to allow model identification. This paper summarizes research to develop a modeling methodology appropriate for modeling aircraft aerodynamics that include nonlinear unsteady behaviors using both experimental and computational test methods. This work was done at Langley Research Center, primarily under the NASA Aviation Safety Program, to address aircraft loss of control, prevention, and recovery aerodynamics.

  9. Computational Design and Analysis of a Transonic Natural Laminar Flow Wing for a Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynde, Michelle N.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    A natural laminar flow (NLF) wind tunnel model has been designed and analyzed for a wind tunnel test in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The NLF design method is built into the CDISC design module and uses a Navier-Stokes flow solver, a boundary layer profile solver, and stability analysis and transition prediction software. The NLF design method alters the pressure distribution to support laminar flow on the upper surface of wings with high sweep and flight Reynolds numbers. The method addresses transition due to attachment line contamination/transition, Gortler vortices, and crossflow and Tollmien-Schlichting modal instabilities. The design method is applied to the wing of the Common Research Model (CRM) at transonic flight conditions. Computational analysis predicts significant extents of laminar flow on the wing upper surface, which results in drag savings. A 5.2 percent scale semispan model of the CRM NLF wing will be built and tested in the NTF. This test will aim to validate the NLF design method, as well as characterize the laminar flow testing capabilities in the wind tunnel facility.

  10. A simple model for the dispersion of pollutants from a road tunnel portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oettl, Dietmar; Sturm, Peter Johann; Bacher, Michael; Pretterhofer, Gerhard; Almbauer, Raimund Alfons

    The dispersion of pollutants from a roadway tunnel portal is mainly determined by the interaction between the ambient wind and the jet stream from the tunnel portal. In principal, Eulerian microscale models by solving the conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy, are thus able to simulate effects such as buoyancy etc. properly. However, for engineering applications such models need too much CPU time, and are not easy to handle by non-scientific personnel. Only a few dispersion models, applicable for regulatory purposes, have so far appeared in the literature. These models are either empirical models not always applicable for different sites, or they do not capture important physical effects like buoyancy phenomena. Here, a rather simple model is presented, which takes into account most of the important processes considered to govern the dispersion of a jet stream from portals. These are the exit velocity, the buoyancy, the influence of ambient wind direction fluctuations on the position of the jet stream, and traffic induced turbulence. Although the model contains some heuristic elements, it was successfully tested against tracer experiments taken near a motorway tunnel portal in Austria. The model requires relatively little CPU time. Current limitations of the model include the neglect of terrain, building, and vehicle effects on the dispersion, and the neglect of the horizontal dispersion arising from entrainment of ambient air in the jet stream. The latter could lead to an underestimation of plume spreads for higher wind speeds. The validation of the model will be the focus of future research. The experimental data set is also available for the scientific community.

  11. Transonic wind tunnel tests of a .015 scale space shuttle orbiter model, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzynski, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    Transonic wind tunnel tests were run on a 0.015 scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Vehicle in an eight-foot tunnel during August 1975. The purpose of the program was to obtain basic shuttle aerodynamic data through a full range of elevon and aileron deflections, verification of data obtained at other facilities, and effects of Reynolds numbers. The second part of a discussion of test procedures and results in both tabular and graphical form were presented. Tests were performed at Mach numbers from 0.35 to 1.20, and at Reynolds numbers from 3.5 million to 8.2 million per foot. The angle of attack was varied from -2 to +20 degrees at sideslip angles of -2, 0, +2 degrees. Sideslip was varied from -6 to +8 degrees at constant angles of attack from 0 to +20 degrees. Various aileron and ailevon settings were tested for various angles of attack.

  12. Transonic wind tunnel tests of A.015 scale space shuttle orbiter model, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzynski, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    Transonic wind tunnel tests were run on a 0.015 scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Vehicle in an eight-foot tunnel during August 1975. The purpose of the program was to obtain basic shuttle aerodynamic data through a full range of elevon and aileron deflections, verification of data obtained at other facilities, and effects of Reynolds numbers. The first part of a discussion of test procedures and results in both tabular and graphical form were presented. Tests were performed at Mach numbers from 0.35 to 1.20, and at Reynolds numbers for 3.5 million to 8.2 million per foot. The angle of attack was varied from -1 to +20 degrees at sideslip angles of -2, 0, +2 degrees. Sideslip was varied from -6 to +8 degrees at constant angles of attack from 0 to +20 degrees. Various aileron and ailevon settings were tested for various angles of attack.

  13. Design model for bending vibrations of single-stage tunnel fan rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasyuk, AM; Kosykh, PV

    2018-03-01

    Using of one-mass model of tunnel fan rotor is justified for estimation calculation of the natural bending vibrations frequency during the design stage. It’s shown that the evaluative computation of the main axial tunnel fan at the early design stage yields the acceptable accuracy. It is shown that after completion of the design, the mass of the stepped-type shaft differs from the mass of the calculated uniform-diameter shaft no more than by 40%. Inclusion of this additional mass in the estimation calculation makes it possible to improve the calculation accuracy. The region of the dimensionless rotor design parameters at which the relative difference of frequency in the evaluative and verification calculations is not higher than 5 % is determined.

  14. A Temporal Millimeter Wave Propagation Model for Tunnels Using Ray Frustum Techniques and FFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choonghyen Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A temporal millimeter wave propagation model for tunnels is presented using ray frustum techniques and fast Fourier transform (FFT. To directly estimate or simulate effects of millimeter wave channel properties on the performance of communication services, time domain impulse responses of demodulated signals should be obtained, which needs rather large computation time. To mitigate the computational burden, ray frustum techniques are used to obtain frequency domain transfer function of millimeter wave propagation environment and FFT of equivalent low pass signals are used to retrieve demodulated waveforms. This approach is numerically efficient and helps to directly estimate impact of tunnel structures and surfaces roughness on the performance of millimeter wave communication services.

  15. Tunneling of electrons via rotor–stator molecular interfaces: Combined ab initio and model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petreska, Irina, E-mail: irina.petreska@pmf.ukim.mk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, PO Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Ohanesjan, Vladimir [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, PO Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Pejov, Ljupčo [Institute of Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Arhimedova 5, P.O. Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Kocarev, Ljupčo [Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Krste Misirkov 2, PO Box 428, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2016-07-01

    Tunneling of electrons through rotor–stator anthracene aldehyde molecular interfaces is studied with a combined ab initio and model approach. Molecular electronic structure calculated from first principles is utilized to model different shapes of tunneling barriers. Together with a rectangular barrier, we also consider a sinusoidal shape that captures the effects of the molecular internal structure more realistically. Quasiclassical approach with the Simmons’ formula for current density is implemented. Special attention is paid on conformational dependence of the tunneling current. Our results confirm that the presence of the side aldehyde group enhances the interesting electronic properties of the pure anthracene molecule, making it a bistable system with geometry dependent transport properties. We also investigate the transition voltage and we show that conformation-dependent field emission could be observed in these molecular interfaces at realistically low voltages. The present study accompanies our previous work where we investigated the coherent transport via strongly coupled delocalized orbital by application of Non-equilibrium Green’s Function Formalism.

  16. Two-dimensional computational modeling of high-speed transient flow in gun tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, A. M.; Yusoff, M. Z.; Hasini, H.; Al-Falahi, A.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, an axisymmetric numerical model was developed to investigate the transient flow inside a 7-meter-long free piston gun tunnel. The numerical solution of the gun tunnel was carried out using the commercial solver Fluent. The governing equations of mass, momentum, and energy were discretized using the finite volume method. The dynamic zone of the piston was modeled as a rigid body, and its motion was coupled with the hydrodynamic forces from the flow solution based on the six-degree-of-freedom solver. A comparison of the numerical data with the theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of a ground-based gun tunnel facility showed good agreement. The effects of parameters such as working gases and initial pressure ratio on the test conditions in the facility were examined. The pressure ratio ranged from 10 to 50, and gas combinations of air-air, helium-air, air-nitrogen, and air-CO2 were used. The results showed that steady nozzle reservoir conditions can be maintained for a longer duration when the initial conditions across the diaphragm are adjusted. It was also found that the gas combination of helium-air yielded the highest shock wave strength and speed, but a longer test time was achieved in the test section when using the CO2 test gas.

  17. Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Borgesson, Lennart; Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Hernelind, Jan; Jing, Lanru; Kobayashi, Akira; Nguyen, Son

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents numerical modeling of excavation-induced damage, permeability changes, and fluid-pressure responses during excavation of the TSX tunnel at the underground research laboratory (URL) in Canada. Four different numerical models were applied, using a wide range of approaches to model damage and permeability changes in the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around the tunnel. Using in situ calibration of model parameters the modeling could reproduce observed spatial distribution of damage and permeability changes around the tunnel, as a combination of disturbance induced by stress redistribution around the tunnel and by the drill-and-blast operation. The modeling showed that stress-induced permeability increase above the tunnel is a result of micro and macrofracturing under high deviatoric (shear) stress, whereas permeability increases alongside the tunnel as a result of opening of existing microfractures under decreased mean stress. The remaining observed fracturing and permeability changes around the periphery of the tunnel were attributed to damage from the drill-and-blast operation. Moreover, a reasonably good agreement was achieved between simulated and observed excavation-induced pressure responses around the TSX tunnel for 1 year following its excavation. The simulations showed that these pressure responses are caused by poroelastic effects as a result of increasing or decreasing mean stress, with corresponding contraction or expansion of the pore volume. The simulation results for pressure evolution were consistent with previous studies, indicating that the observed pressure responses could be captured in a Biot model using a relatively low Biot-Willis coefficient, {alpha} {approx} 0.2, a porosity of n {approx} 0.007, and a relatively low permeability of k {approx} 2 x 10{sup -22} m{sup 2}, which is consistent with the very tight, unfractured granite at the site.

  18. Modelling of the tunnelling effect in granulated metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istratov, A. V.; Kucherik, A. O.

    2018-01-01

    Obtaining thin films of today is unthinkable without use of mathematical modeling, numerical methods and complex programs. In this regard, the practical importance of this calculations is that it can be used to investigate the conductivity of nano-sized granular structures that expands the diagnostic capabilities of thin films, opens up new perspectives in the creation of new devices based on thin-film technology, allow to predict their properties.

  19. New methodologies for calculation of flight parameters on reduced scale wings models in wind tunnel =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mosbah, Abdallah

    In order to improve the qualities of wind tunnel tests, and the tools used to perform aerodynamic tests on aircraft wings in the wind tunnel, new methodologies were developed and tested on rigid and flexible wings models. A flexible wing concept is consists in replacing a portion (lower and/or upper) of the skin with another flexible portion whose shape can be changed using an actuation system installed inside of the wing. The main purpose of this concept is to improve the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft, and especially to reduce the fuel consumption of the airplane. Numerical and experimental analyses were conducted to develop and test the methodologies proposed in this thesis. To control the flow inside the test sections of the Price-Paidoussis wind tunnel of LARCASE, numerical and experimental analyses were performed. Computational fluid dynamics calculations have been made in order to obtain a database used to develop a new hybrid methodology for wind tunnel calibration. This approach allows controlling the flow in the test section of the Price-Paidoussis wind tunnel. For the fast determination of aerodynamic parameters, new hybrid methodologies were proposed. These methodologies were used to control flight parameters by the calculation of the drag, lift and pitching moment coefficients and by the calculation of the pressure distribution around an airfoil. These aerodynamic coefficients were calculated from the known airflow conditions such as angles of attack, the mach and the Reynolds numbers. In order to modify the shape of the wing skin, electric actuators were installed inside the wing to get the desired shape. These deformations provide optimal profiles according to different flight conditions in order to reduce the fuel consumption. A controller based on neural networks was implemented to obtain desired displacement actuators. A metaheuristic algorithm was used in hybridization with neural networks, and support vector machine approaches and their

  20. Wind Tunnel Testing of a 6%-Scale Large Civil Tilt Rotor Model in Airplane and Helicopter Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012 and October 2013, NASA and the U.S. Army jointly conducted a wind tunnel test program examining two notional large tilt rotor designs... rotors in the U.S. Army 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Measurements of all six forces and moments acting on the airframe...airframe models were tested without rotors in the U.S. Army 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. This test entry represents the first

  1. Time-transgressive tunnel-valley infill revealed by a three- dimensional sedimentary model, Hamburg, north-west Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janszen, Adriaan; Moreau, Julien; Moscariello, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    highly intricate and therefore difficult to predict. This study intends to improve the comprehension of the sedimentology and to establish a conceptual model of tunnel-valley infill, which can be used as a predictive tool. To this end, the densely sampled, Pleistocene tunnel valleys in Hamburg (north...... succession filling the Hamburg area tunnel valleys can be subdivided into three distinct units, which are distinguished by their inferred depositional proximity to the ice margin. The overall trend of the succession shows a progressive decrease in transport energy and glacial influence through time. The rate...

  2. Investigation of Rock Mass Stability Around the Tunnels in an Underground Mine in USA Using Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan; Kulatilake, P. H. S. W.; Sandbak, L. A.

    2018-02-01

    The stability of the rock mass around the tunnels in an underground mine was investigated using the distinct element method. A three-dimensional model was developed based on the available geological, geotechnical, and mine construction information. It incorporates a complex lithological system, persistent and non-persistent faults, and a complex tunnel system including backfilled tunnels. The strain-softening constitutive model was applied for the rock masses. The rock mass properties were estimated using the Hoek-Brown equations based on the intact rock properties and the RMR values. The fault material behavior was modeled using the continuously yielding joint model. Sequential construction and rock supporting procedures were simulated based on the way they progressed in the mine. Stress analyses were performed to study the effect of the horizontal in situ stresses and the variability of rock mass properties on tunnel stability, and to evaluate the effectiveness of rock supports. The rock mass behavior was assessed using the stresses, failure zones, deformations around the tunnels, and the fault shear displacement vectors. The safety of rock supports was quantified using the bond shear and bolt tensile failures. Results show that the major fault and weak interlayer have distinct influences on the displacements and stresses around the tunnels. Comparison between the numerical modeling results and the field measurements indicated the cases with the average rock mass properties, and the K 0 values between 0.5 and 1.25 provide satisfactory agreement with the field measurements.

  3. Numerical modeling of time-dependent deformation and induced stresses in concrete pipes constructed in Queenston shale using micro-tunneling technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayder Mohammed Salim Al-Maamori

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Effects of time-dependent deformation (TDD on a tunnel constructed using the micro-tunneling technique in Queenston shale (QS are investigated employing the finite element method. The TDD and strength parameters of the QS were measured from tests conducted on QS specimens soaked in water and lubricant fluids (LFs used in micro-tunneling such as bentonite and polymer solutions. The numerical model was verified using the results of TDD tests performed on QS samples, field measurements of some documented projects, and the closed-form solutions to circular tunnels in swelling rock. The verified model was then employed to conduct a parametric study considering important micro-tunneling design parameters, such as depth and diameter of the tunnel, in situ stress ratio (Ko, and the time lapse prior to replacing LFs with permanent cement grout around the tunnel. It was revealed that the time lapse plays a vital role in controlling deformations and associated stresses developed in the tunnel lining. The critical case of a pipe or tunnel in which the maximum tensile stress develops at its springline occurs when it is constructed at shallow depths in the QS layer. The results of the parametric study were used to suggest recommendations for the construction of tunnels in QS employing micro-tunneling. Keywords: Numerical model, Micro-tunneling, Queenston shale (QS, Lubricant fluids (LFs

  4. Finite element analysis of high aspect ratio wind tunnel wing model: A parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosly, N. A.; Harmin, M. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Procedure for designing the wind tunnel model of a high aspect ratio (HAR) wing containing geometric nonlinearities is described in this paper. The design process begins with identification of basic features of the HAR wing as well as its design constraints. This enables the design space to be narrowed down and consequently, brings ease of convergence towards the design solution. Parametric studies in terms of the spar thickness, the span length and the store diameter are performed using finite element analysis for both undeformed and deformed cases, which respectively demonstrate the linear and nonlinear conditions. Two main criteria are accounted for in the selection of the wing design: the static deflections due to gravitational loading should be within the allowable margin of the size of the wind tunnel test section and the flutter speed of the wing should be much below the maximum speed of the wind tunnel. The findings show that the wing experiences a stiffness hardening effect under the nonlinear static solution and the presence of the store enables significant reduction in linear flutter speed.

  5. Wind tunnel noise reduction at Mach 5 with a rod-wall sound shield. [for prevention of premature boundary layer transition on wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, T. R.; Beckwith, I. E.

    1983-01-01

    A method of shielding a wind-tunnel model from noise radiated by the tunnel-wall boundary layer has been developed and tested at the Langley Research Center. The shield consists of a rectangular array of longitudinal rods with boundary-layer suction through gaps between the rods. Tests were conducted at Mach 5 over a unit Reynolds number range of 1.0-3.5 x 10 to the 7th/m. Hot-wire measurements indicated the freestream noise, expressed in terms of the rms pressure fluctuations normalized by the mean pressure, was reduced from about 1.4 percent just upstream of the shielded region of a minimum level of about 0.4 percent in the forward portion of the shielded flow.

  6. The Role of Hierarchy in Response Surface Modeling of Wind Tunnel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoach, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper is intended as a tutorial introduction to certain aspects of response surface modeling, for the experimentalist who has started to explore these methods as a means of improving productivity and quality in wind tunnel testing and other aerospace applications. A brief review of the productivity advantages of response surface modeling in aerospace research is followed by a description of the advantages of a common coding scheme that scales and centers independent variables. The benefits of model term reduction are reviewed. A constraint on model term reduction with coded factors is described in some detail, which requires such models to be well-formulated, or hierarchical. Examples illustrate the consequences of ignoring this constraint. The implication for automated regression model reduction procedures is discussed, and some opinions formed from the author s experience are offered on coding, model reduction, and hierarchy.

  7. A numerical model for calculating vibration from a railway tunnel embedded in a full-space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, M. F. M.; Hunt, H. E. M.

    2007-08-01

    Vibration generated by underground railways transmits to nearby buildings causing annoyance to inhabitants and malfunctioning to sensitive equipment. Vibration can be isolated through countermeasures by reducing the stiffness of railpads, using floating-slab tracks and/or supporting buildings on springs. Modelling of vibration from underground railways has recently gained more importance on account of the need to evaluate accurately the performance of vibration countermeasures before these are implemented. This paper develops an existing model, reported by Forrest and Hunt, for calculating vibration from underground railways. The model, known as the Pipe-in-Pipe model, has been developed in this paper to account for anti-symmetrical inputs and therefore to model tangential forces at the tunnel wall. Moreover, three different arrangements of supports are considered for floating-slab tracks, one which can be used to model directly-fixed slabs. The paper also investigates the wave-guided solution of the track, the tunnel, the surrounding soil and the coupled system. It is shown that the dynamics of the track have significant effect on the results calculated in the wavenumber-frequency domain and therefore an important role on controlling vibration from underground railways.

  8. THREE-PARAMETER CREEP DAMAGE CONSTITUTIVE MODEL AND ITS APPLICATION IN HYDRAULIC TUNNELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Gang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rock deformation is a time-dependent process, generally referred to as rheology. Especially for soft rock strata, design and construction of tunnel shall take full account of rheological properties of adjoining rocks. Based on classic three-parameter HK model (generalized Kelvin model, this paper proposes a three-parameter H-K damage model of which parameters attenuate with increase of equivalent strain, provides attenuation equation of model parameters in the first, second and third stage of creep deformation and introduces equivalent strain threshold value. When the equivalent strain is greater than the threshold value, the third stage of accelerating creep will be conducted. The three-parameter H-K damage model is used for numerical calculation of finite difference method FLAC3D and deformation features of soft rock with time under high ground stress are described based on diversion tunnel project of Jinping Hydropower Station, of which model parameters can be obtained by back analysis according to measured site data and BP neural network.

  9. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  10. A vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel tests and its application in pollutant dispersion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromke, Christof

    2011-01-01

    A new vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel investigations was developed. The modeling concept is based on fluid dynamical similarity aspects and allows the small-scale modeling of various kinds of vegetation, e.g. field crops, shrubs, hedges, single trees and forest stands. The applicability of the modeling concept was validated in wind tunnel pollutant dispersion studies. Avenue trees in urban street canyons were modeled and their implications on traffic pollutant dispersion were investigated. The dispersion experiments proved the modeling concept to be practicable for wind tunnel studies and suggested to provide reliable concentration results. Unfavorable effects of trees on pollutant dispersion and natural ventilation in street canyons were revealed. Increased traffic pollutant concentrations were found in comparison to the tree-free reference case. - Highlights: → A concept for aerodynamic modelling of vegetation in small scale wind tunnel studies is presented. → The concept was applied to study pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons with avenue tress. → The wind tunnel studies show that modelling the aerodynamic effects of vegetation is important. → Avenue trees give rise to increased pollutant concentrations in urban street canyons. - Avenue trees in urban street canyons affect the pollutant dispersion and result in increased traffic exhaust concentrations.

  11. Establishment of tunnel-boring machine disk cutter rock-breaking model from energy perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Song

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As the most important cutting tools during tunnel-boring machine tunneling construction process, V-type disk cutter’s rock-breaking mechanism has been researched by many scholars all over the world. Adopting finite element method, this article focused on the interaction between V-type disk cutters and the intact rock to carry out microscopic parameter analysis methods: first, the stress model of rock breaking was established through V-type disk cutter motion trajectory analysis; second, based on the incremental theorem of the elastic–plastic theory, the strain model of the relative changes of rock displacement during breaking process was created. According to the principle of admissible work by energy method of the elastic–plastic theory to analyze energy transfer rules in the process of breaking rock, rock-breaking force of the V-type disk cutter could be regarded as the external force in the rock system. Finally, by taking the rock system as the reference object, the total potential energy equivalent model of rock system was derived to obtain the forces of the three directions acting on V-type disk cutter during the rock-breaking process. This derived model, which has been proved to be effective and scientific through comparisons with some original force models and by comparative analysis with experimental data, also initiates a new research strategy taking the view of the micro elastic–plastic theory to study the rock-breaking mechanism.

  12. A vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel tests and its application in pollutant dispersion studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromke, Christof

    2011-01-01

    A new vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel investigations was developed. The modeling concept is based on fluid dynamical similarity aspects and allows the small-scale modeling of various kinds of vegetation, e.g. field crops, shrubs, hedges, single trees and forest stands. The applicability of the modeling concept was validated in wind tunnel pollutant dispersion studies. Avenue trees in urban street canyons were modeled and their implications on traffic pollutant dispersion were investigated. The dispersion experiments proved the modeling concept to be practicable for wind tunnel studies and suggested to provide reliable concentration results. Unfavorable effects of trees on pollutant dispersion and natural ventilation in street canyons were revealed. Increased traffic pollutant concentrations were found in comparison to the tree-free reference case. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of transtibial and transportal techniques in drilling femoral tunnels during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using 3D-CAD models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashiro Y

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Yasutaka Tashiro,1 Ken Okazaki,1 Munenori Uemura,2 Kazutaka Toyoda,2 Kanji Osaki,1 Hirokazu Matsubara,1 Makoto Hashizume,2 Yukihide Iwamoto1 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 2Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the differences in bone tunnel apertures between the trans-accessory medial portal (trans-AMP technique and the transtibial (TT technique in double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The extent of ovalization and the frequency of overlap of the two tunnel apertures were compared. Methods: The simulation of femoral tunnel drilling with the TT and the trans-AMP techniques was performed using three-dimensional computer aided design models from two volunteers. The incidence angle of drilling against the intercondylar wall, the femoral tunnel position, the ovalization, and the overlap were analyzed. The aperture and location of the tunnels were also examined in real anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction cases (n=36. Results: The surgical simulation showed that a lower drill incident angle induced by the TT technique made the apertures of two tunnels more ovalized, located anteromedial tunnels in a shallower position to prevent posterior wall blow out, and led to a higher frequency of tunnel overlap. The trans-AMP group had tunnel places within the footprint and had less ovalization and overlap. The results of analysis for tunnels in the clinical cases were consistent with results from the surgical simulation. Conclusion: In the TT technique, the shallow anteromedial tunnel location and more ovalized tunnel aperture can lead to a higher frequency of tunnel overlap. Compared with the TT technique, the trans-AMP technique was more useful in preparing femoral tunnels anatomically and avoiding tunnel ovalization and overlapping in double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Keywords: anterior cruciate ligament

  14. Enhancements to AERMOD's building downwash algorithms based on wind-tunnel and Embedded-LES modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monbureau, E. M.; Heist, D. K.; Perry, S. G.; Brouwer, L. H.; Foroutan, H.; Tang, W.

    2018-04-01

    Knowing the fate of effluent from an industrial stack is important for assessing its impact on human health. AERMOD is one of several Gaussian plume models containing algorithms to evaluate the effect of buildings on the movement of the effluent from a stack. The goal of this study is to improve AERMOD's ability to accurately model important and complex building downwash scenarios by incorporating knowledge gained from a recently completed series of wind tunnel studies and complementary large eddy simulations of flow and dispersion around simple structures for a variety of building dimensions, stack locations, stack heights, and wind angles. This study presents three modifications to the building downwash algorithm in AERMOD that improve the physical basis and internal consistency of the model, and one modification to AERMOD's building pre-processor to better represent elongated buildings in oblique winds. These modifications are demonstrated to improve the ability of AERMOD to model observed ground-level concentrations in the vicinity of a building for the variety of conditions examined in the wind tunnel and numerical studies.

  15. Real-Space Analysis of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Topography Datasets Using Sparse Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyama, Masamichi J.; Hukushima, Koji

    2018-04-01

    A sparse modeling approach is proposed for analyzing scanning tunneling microscopy topography data, which contain numerous peaks originating from the electron density of surface atoms and/or impurities. The method, based on the relevance vector machine with L1 regularization and k-means clustering, enables separation of the peaks and peak center positioning with accuracy beyond the resolution of the measurement grid. The validity and efficiency of the proposed method are demonstrated using synthetic data in comparison with the conventional least-squares method. An application of the proposed method to experimental data of a metallic oxide thin-film clearly indicates the existence of defects and corresponding local lattice distortions.

  16. A review of selected topics in physics based modeling for tunnel field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esseni, David; Pala, Marco; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Alper, Cem; Rollo, Tommaso

    2017-08-01

    The research field on tunnel-FETs (TFETs) has been rapidly developing in the last ten years, driven by the quest for a new electronic switch operating at a supply voltage well below 1 V and thus delivering substantial improvements in the energy efficiency of integrated circuits. This paper reviews several aspects related to physics based modeling in TFETs, and shows how the description of these transistors implies a remarkable innovation and poses new challenges compared to conventional MOSFETs. A hierarchy of numerical models exist for TFETs covering a wide range of predictive capabilities and computational complexities. We start by reviewing seminal contributions on direct and indirect band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) modeling in semiconductors, from which most TCAD models have been actually derived. Then we move to the features and limitations of TCAD models themselves and to the discussion of what we define non-self-consistent quantum models, where BTBT is computed with rigorous quantum-mechanical models starting from frozen potential profiles and closed-boundary Schrödinger equation problems. We will then address models that solve the open-boundary Schrödinger equation problem, based either on the non-equilibrium Green’s function NEGF or on the quantum-transmitting-boundary formalism, and show how the computational burden of these models may vary in a wide range depending on the Hamiltonian employed in the calculations. A specific section is devoted to TFETs based on 2D crystals and van der Waals hetero-structures. The main goal of this paper is to provide the reader with an introduction to the most important physics based models for TFETs, and with a possible guidance to the wide and rapidly developing literature in this exciting research field.

  17. Noise Localization Method for Model Tests in a Large Cavitation Tunnel Using a Hydrophone Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheolsoo Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Model tests are performed in order to predict the noise level of a full ship and to control its noise signature. Localizing noise sources in the model test is therefore an important research subject along with measuring noise levels. In this paper, a noise localization method using a hydrophone array in a large cavitation tunnel is presented. The 45-channel hydrophone array was designed using a global optimization technique for noise measurement. A set of noise experiments was performed in the KRISO (Korea Research Institute of Ships & Ocean Engineering large cavitation tunnel using scaled models, including a ship with a single propeller, a ship with twin propellers and an underwater vehicle. The incoherent broadband processors defined based on the Bartlett and the minimum variance (MV processors were applied to the measured data. The results of data analysis and localization are presented in the paper. Finally, it is shown that the mechanical noise, as well as the propeller noise can be successfully localized using the proposed localization method.

  18. Computed and Experimental Flutter/LCO Onset for the Boeing Truss-Braced Wing Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Scott, Robert C.; Funk, Christie J.; Allen, Timothy J.; Sexton, Bradley W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents high fidelity Navier-Stokes simulations of the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research truss-braced wing wind-tunnel model and compares the results to linear MSC. Nastran flutter analysis and preliminary data from a recent wind-tunnel test of that model at the NASA Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The simulated conditions under consideration are zero angle of attack, so that structural nonlinearity can be neglected. It is found that, for Mach number greater than 0.78, the linear flutter analysis predicts flutter onset dynamic pressure below the wind-tunnel test and that predicted by the Navier-Stokes analysis. Furthermore, the wind-tunnel test revealed that the majority of the high structural dynamics cases were wing limit cycle oscillation (LCO) rather than flutter. Most Navier-Stokes simulated cases were also LCO rather than hard flutter. There is dip in the wind-tunnel test flutter/LCO onset in the Mach 0.76-0.80 range. Conditions tested above that Mach number exhibited no aeroelastic instability at the dynamic pressures reached in the tunnel. The linear flutter analyses do not show a flutter/LCO dip. The Navier-Stokes simulations also do not reveal a dip; however, the flutter/LCO onset is at a significantly higher dynamic pressure at Mach 0.90 than at lower Mach numbers. The Navier-Stokes simulations indicate a mild LCO onset at Mach 0.82, then a more rapidly growing instability at Mach 0.86 and 0.90. Finally, the modeling issues and their solution related to the use of a beam and pod finite element model to generate the Navier-Stokes structure mode shapes are discussed.

  19. Modeling human learning involved in car driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, car driving is considered at the level of human tracking and maneuvering in the context of other traffic. A model analysis revealed the most salient features determining driving performance and safety. Learning car driving is modelled based on a system theoretical approach and based

  20. Models of charge transport and transfer in molecular switch tunnel junctions of bistable catenanes and rotaxanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flood, Amar H.; Wong, Eric W.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2006-01-01

    The processes by which charge transfer can occur play a foundational role in molecular electronics. Here we consider simplified models of the transfer processes that could be present in bistable molecular switch tunnel junction (MSTJ) devices during one complete cycle of the device from its low- to high- and back to low-conductance state. The bistable molecular switches, which are composed of a monolayer of either switchable catenanes or rotaxanes, exist in either a ground-state co-conformation or a metastable one in which the conduction properties of the two co-conformations, when measured at small biases (+0.1 V), are significantly different irrespective of whether transport is dominated by tunneling or hopping. The voltage-driven generation (±2 V) of molecule-based redox states, which are sufficiently long-lived to allow the relative mechanical movements necessary to switch between the two co-conformations, rely upon unequal charge transfer rates on to and/or off of the molecules. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to image the ground state of the bistable rotaxane in MSTJ-like devices. Consideration of these models provide new ways of looking at molecular electronic devices that rely, not only on nanoscale charge-transport, but also upon the bustling world of molecular motion in mechanically interlocked bistable molecules

  1. Stochastic species abundance models involving special copulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huillet, Thierry E.

    2018-01-01

    Copulas offer a very general tool to describe the dependence structure of random variables supported by the hypercube. Inspired by problems of species abundances in Biology, we study three distinct toy models where copulas play a key role. In a first one, a Marshall-Olkin copula arises in a species extinction model with catastrophe. In a second one, a quasi-copula problem arises in a flagged species abundance model. In a third model, we study completely random species abundance models in the hypercube as those, not of product type, with uniform margins and singular. These can be understood from a singular copula supported by an inflated simplex. An exchangeable singular Dirichlet copula is also introduced, together with its induced completely random species abundance vector.

  2. A novel macro-model for spin-transfer-torque based magnetic-tunnel-junction elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungyeon; Lee, Hyunjoo; Kim, Sojeong; Lee, Seungjun; Shin, Hyungsoon

    2010-04-01

    Spin-transfer-torque (STT) switching in magnetic-tunnel-junction (MTJ) has important merits over the conventional field induced magnetic switching (FIMS) MRAM in avoiding half-select problem, and improving scalability and selectivity. Design of MRAM circuitry using STT-based MTJ elements requires an accurate circuit model which exactly emulates the characteristics of an MTJ in a circuit simulator such as HSPICE. This work presents a novel macro-model that fully emulates the important characteristics of STT-based MTJ. The macro-model is realized as a three terminal sub-circuit that reproduces asymmetric resistance versus current (R-I) characteristics and temperature dependence of R-I hysteresis of STT-based MTJ element.

  3. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration stakeholder involvement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaupanger, R.M.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Milam, L.M.

    1994-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Stakeholder participation in the DOE Environmental Management decision-making process is critical to remediation efforts. Appropriate mechanisms for communication with the public, private sector, regulators, elected officials, and others are being aggressively pursued by BWID to permit informed participation. This document summarizes public outreach efforts during FY-93 and presents a strategy for expanded stakeholder involvement during FY-94

  4. Modeling human learning involved in car driving

    OpenAIRE

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, car driving is considered at the level of human tracking and maneuvering in the context of other traffic. A model analysis revealed the most salient features determining driving performance and safety. Learning car driving is modelled based on a system theoretical approach and based on a neural network approach. The aim of this research is to assess the relative merit of both approaches to describe human learning behavior in car driving specifically and in operating dynamic sys...

  5. Novel compact model for multi-level spin torque magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Sanjay; Verma, Shivam; Kulkarni, Anant Aravind; Kaushik, Brajesh Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Spin-transfer torque (STT) and spin-orbit torque (SOT) based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices are emerging as strong contenders for the next generation memories. Conventional STT magneto-resistive random access memory (MRAM) offers lower power, non-volatility and CMOS process compatibility. However, higher current requirement during the write operation leads to tunnel barrier reliability issues and larger access devices. SOT-MRAM eliminates the reliability issues with strong spin polarized current (100%) and separate read/write current paths; however, the additional two access transistors in SOT-MRAM results into increased cell area. Multilevel cell (MLC) structure paves a way to circumvent the problems related to the conventional STT/SOT based MTJ devices and provides enhanced integration density at reduced cost per bit. Conventional STT/SOT-MRAM requires a unit cell area of 10-60 F2 and reported simulations have been based on available single-level MTJ compact models. However, till date no compact model exists that can capture the device physics of MLC-MTJ accurately. Hence, a novel compact model is proposed in this paper to capture the accurate device physics and behaviour of the MLC-MTJs. It is designed for MLCs with different MTJ configurations demonstrated so far, such as series and parallel free layer based MLC-MTJs. The proposed model is coded in Verilog-A, which is compatible with SPICE for circuit level simulations. The model is in close agreement with the experimental results exhibiting an average error of less than 15%.

  6. Results of investigations on the 0.004-scale model 74-0 of the configuration 4 (modified) space shuttle vehicle orbiter in the NASA/MSFC 14-by-14-inch trisonic wind tunnel (oa131)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an oil flow boundary-layer visualization wind tunnel test of an 0.004-scale model of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Orbiter in the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center 14-by-14-inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel are presented. The model was tested at Mach numbers from 0.60 through 2.75, at angles-of-attack from 0 through 25 degrees, and at unit Reynolds numbers from 5.0 to 7.0 million per foot. The test program involved still and motion picture photography of oil-paint flow patterns on the orbiter, during and immediately after tunnel flow, to determine areas of boundary layer separation and regions of potential auxiliary power unit exhaust recirculation during transonic and low supersonic re-entry flight.

  7. Model Deformation and Optical Angle of Attack Measurement System in the NASA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Laura K.; Drain, Bethany A.; Schairer, Edward T.; Heineck, James T.; Bell, James H.

    2017-01-01

    Both AoA and MDM measurements can be made using an optical system that relies on photogrammetry. Optical measurements are being requested by customers in wind tunnels with increasing frequency due to their non-intrusive nature and recent hardware and software advances that allow measurements to become near real time. The NASA Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel is currently developing a system based on photogrammetry to measure model deformation and model angle of attack. This paper describes the new system, its development, its use on recent tests and plans to further develop the system.

  8. Computational Support of 9x7 Wind Tunnel Test of Sonic Boom Models with Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, James C.; Denison, Marie; Durston, Don; Cliff, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    NASA and its industry partners are performing studies of supersonic aircraft concepts with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The interaction of the nozzle jet flow with the aircrafts' aft components is typically where the greatest uncertainly in the pressure signature is observed with high-fidelity numerical simulations. An extensive wind tunnel test was conducted in February 2016 in the NASA Ames 9- by 7- Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel to help address the nozzle jet effects on sonic boom. Five test models with a variety of shock generators of differing waveforms and strengths were tested with a convergent-divergent nozzle for a wide range of nozzle pressure ratios. The LAVA unstructured flow solver was used to generate first CFD comparisons with the new experimental database using best practice meshing and analysis techniques for sonic boom vehicle design for all five different configurations. LAVA was also used to redesign the internal flow path of the nozzle and to better understand the flow field in the test section, both of which significantly improved the quality of the test data.

  9. Modelling of motorway tunnels scenario for utilization of conditionally released radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrncir, Tomas; Panik, Michal; Necas, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Considerable amount of solid radioactive waste with radioactivity slightly above the limits for unconditional release is generated during the decommissioning of the nuclear installations. Conditional release deals with precisely this type of materials with activity slightly above limits in order to save considerable financial resources, which would be otherwise spend on treatment, conditioning and disposal of these materials at appropriate repository. The basic principles of conditional release as well as possibilities of reusing of the conditionally released materials are described. One of these possibilities of the reusing was chosen and application proposal of conditional release of metal waste - steel reinforcement in the concrete, which could be used for construction of motorway tunnels, was created. The computer code Visiplan 4.0 3D ALARA planning tool software was used for the calculation of effective individual dose for personnel constructing the tunnel and for critical group related to scenario. Particular models for individual scenarios of conditional release have been developed within the scope of this software code. The aim of the paper is to determine a level of the radioactivity of conditional released materials to avoid over exceeding the value of annual individual effective dose 10μSv/year established by international recommendations. (author)

  10. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-06-01

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the "CVBs interaction" that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  11. Modeling of steady motion and vertical-plane dynamics of a tunnel hull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaney Christopher S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available High-speed marine vehicles can take advantage of aerodynamically supported platforms or air wings to increase maximum speed or transportation efficiency. However, this also results in increased complexity of boat dynamics, especially in the presence of waves and wind gusts. In this study, a mathematical model based on the fully unsteady aerodynamic extreme-ground-effect theory and the hydrodynamic added-mass strip theory is applied for simulating vertical-plane motions of a tunnel hull in a disturbed environment, as well as determining its steady states in calm conditions. Calculated responses of the boat to wind gusts and surface waves are demonstrated. The present model can be used as a supplementary method for preliminary estimations of performance of aerodynamically assisted marine craft.

  12. Analysis of the wind tunnel test of a tilt rotor power force model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, R. L.; Ford, D. G.; Ferguson, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    Two series of wind tunnel tests were made to determine performance, stability and control, and rotor wake interaction on the airframe, using a one-tenth scale powered force model of a tilt rotor aircraft. Testing covered hover (IGE/OCE), helicopter, conversion, and airplane flight configurations. Forces and moments were recorded for the model from predetermined trim attitudes. Control positions were adjusted to trim flight (one-g lift, pitching moment and drag zero) within the uncorrected test data balance accuracy. Pitch and yaw sweeps were made about the trim attitudes with the control held at the trimmed settings to determine the static stability characteristics. Tail on, tail off, rotors on, and rotors off configurations were testes to determine the rotor wake effects on the empennage. Results are presented and discussed.

  13. Comparing different CFD wind turbine modelling approaches with wind tunnel measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvig, Siri; Manger, Eirik; Hjertager, Bjørn

    2014-12-01

    The performance of a model wind turbine is simulated with three different CFD methods: actuator disk, actuator line and a fully resolved rotor. The simulations are compared with each other and with measurements from a wind tunnel experiment. The actuator disk is the least accurate and most cost-efficient, and the fully resolved rotor is the most accurate and least cost-efficient. The actuator line method is believed to lie in between the two ends of the scale. The fully resolved rotor produces superior wake velocity results compared to the actuator models. On average it also produces better results for the force predictions, although the actuator line method had a slightly better match for the design tip speed. The open source CFD tool box, OpenFOAM, was used for the actuator disk and actuator line calculations, whereas the market leading commercial CFD code, ANSYS/FLUENT, was used for the fully resolved rotor approach.

  14. Effects of tunnelling and asymmetry for system-bath models of electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiat, Johann; Richardson, Jeremy O.

    2018-03-01

    We apply the newly derived nonadiabatic golden-rule instanton theory to asymmetric models describing electron-transfer in solution. The models go beyond the usual spin-boson description and have anharmonic free-energy surfaces with different values for the reactant and product reorganization energies. The instanton method gives an excellent description of the behaviour of the rate constant with respect to asymmetry for the whole range studied. We derive a general formula for an asymmetric version of the Marcus theory based on the classical limit of the instanton and find that this gives significant corrections to the standard Marcus theory. A scheme is given to compute this rate based only on equilibrium simulations. We also compare the rate constants obtained by the instanton method with its classical limit to study the effect of tunnelling and other quantum nuclear effects. These quantum effects can increase the rate constant by orders of magnitude.

  15. Free-to-Roll Testing of Airplane Models in Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Francis J.; Owens, D. Bruce; Hall, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    A free-to-roll (FTR) test technique and test rig make it possible to evaluate both the transonic performance and the wingdrop/ rock behavior of a high-strength airplane model in a single wind-tunnel entry. The free-to-roll test technique is a single degree-of-motion method in which the model is free to roll about the longitudinal axis. The rolling motion is observed, recorded, and analyzed to gain insight into wing-drop/rock behavior. Wing-drop/rock is one of several phenomena symptomatic of abrupt wing stall. FTR testing was developed as part of the NASA/Navy Abrupt Wing Stall Program, which was established for the purposes of understanding and preventing significant unexpected and uncommanded (thus, highly undesirable) lateral-directional motions associated with wing-drop/rock, which have been observed mostly in fighter airplanes under high-subsonic and transonic maneuvering conditions. Before FTR testing became available, wingrock/ drop behavior of high-performance airplanes undergoing development was not recognized until flight testing. FTR testing is a reliable means of detecting, and evaluating design modifications for reducing or preventing, very complex abrupt wing stall phenomena in a ground facility prior to flight testing. The FTR test rig was designed to replace an older sting attachment butt, such that a model with its force balance and support sting could freely rotate about the longitudinal axis. The rig (see figure) includes a rotary head supported in a stationary head with a forward spherical roller bearing and an aft needle bearing. Rotation is amplified by a set of gears and measured by a shaft-angle resolver; the roll angle can be resolved to within 0.067 degrees at a rotational speed up to 1,000 degrees/s. An assembly of electrically actuated brakes between the rotary and stationary heads can be used to hold the model against a rolling torque at a commanded roll angle. When static testing is required, a locking bar is used to fix the rotating

  16. A Survey on the Modeling of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions for Circuit Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyein Lim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spin-transfer torque-based magnetoresistive random access memory (STT-MRAM is a promising candidate for universal memory that may replace traditional memory forms. It is expected to provide high-speed operation, scalability, low-power dissipation, and high endurance. MRAM switching technology has evolved from the field-induced magnetic switching (FIMS technique to the spin-transfer torque (STT switching technique. Additionally, material technology that induces perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA facilitates low-power operation through the reduction of the switching current density. In this paper, the modeling of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs is reviewed. Modeling methods and models of MTJ characteristics are classified into two groups, macromodels and behavioral models, and the most important characteristics of MTJs, the voltage-dependent MTJ resistance and the switching behavior, are compared. To represent the voltage dependency of MTJ resistance, some models are based on physical mechanisms, such as Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG equation or voltage-dependent conductance. Some behavioral models are constructed by adding fitting parameters or introducing new physical parameters to represent the complex switching behavior of an MTJ over a wide range of input current conditions. Other models that are not based on physical mechanisms are implemented by simply fitting to experimental data.

  17. A New Circuit Model for Spin-Torque Oscillator Including Perpendicular Torque of Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyein Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spin-torque oscillator (STO is a promising new technology for the future RF oscillators, which is based on the spin-transfer torque (STT effect in magnetic multilayered nanostructure. It is expected to provide a larger tunability, smaller size, lower power consumption, and higher level of integration than the semiconductor-based oscillators. In our previous work, a circuit-level model of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR STO was proposed. In this paper, we present a physics-based circuit-level model of the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ-based STO. MTJ-STO model includes the effect of perpendicular torque that has been ignored in the GMR-STO model. The variations of three major characteristics, generation frequency, mean oscillation power, and generation linewidth of an MTJ-STO with respect to the amount of perpendicular torque, are investigated, and the results are applied to our model. The operation of the model was verified by HSPICE simulation, and the results show an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The results also prove that a full circuit-level simulation with MJT-STO devices can be made with our proposed model.

  18. Insights into Airframe Aerodynamics and Rotor-on-Wing Interactions from a 0.25-Scale Tiltrotor Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L. A.; Lillie, D.; McCluer, M.; Yamauchi, G. K.; Derby, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    A recent experimental investigation into tiltrotor aerodynamics and acoustics has resulted in the acquisition of a set of data related to tiltrotor airframe aerodynamics and rotor and wing interactional aerodynamics. This work was conducted in the National Full-scale Aerodynamics Complex's (NFAC) 40-by-80 Foot Wind Tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, on the Full-Span Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM). The full-span TRAM wind tunnel test stand is nominally based on a quarter-scale representation of the V-22 aircraft. The data acquired will enable the refinement of analytical tools for the prediction of tiltrotor aeromechanics and aeroacoustics.

  19. Model, First-Principle Calculation of Ammonia Dissociation on Si(100 Surface. Importance of Proton Tunneling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Z. Zgierski

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The dissociation of an ammonia molecule on a cluster of Si atoms simulating the 100 silicon crystal structure with two Si dimers has been investigated by means of the DFT and an approximate instanton methods. The model corresponds to the low coverage limit of the surface. Absolute rate constants of two different dissociation paths are evaluated together with deuterium isotope effects. It is demonstrated that, even at room temperatures, the process is dominated by tunneling and that dissociation to a silicon atom of the adjacent dimer, rather than a silicon within the same dimer, is the prevailing mechanism. This leads to creation of a metastable structure which will slowly decay through a two-step hydrogen atom migration towards the absolute minimum on the potential energy surface corresponding to the NH2 group and the hydrogen atom residing in the same dimer.

  20. Vibratory Loads Data from a Wind-Tunnel Test of Structurally Tailored Model Helicopter Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Hamouda, M-Nabil H.; Idol, Robert F.; Mirick, Paul H.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to investigate the use of a Bell Helicopter Textron (BHT) rotor structural tailoring concept, known as rotor nodalization, in conjunction with advanced blade aerodynamics as well as to evaluate rotor blade aerodynamic design methodologies. A 1/5-size, four-bladed bearingless hub, three sets of Mach-scaled model rotor blades were tested in forward flight from transition up to an advance ratio of 0.35. The data presented pertain only to the evaluation of the structural tailoring concept and consist of fixed-system and rotating system vibratory loads. These data will be useful for evaluating the effects of tailoring blade structural properties on fixed-system vibratory loads, as well as validating analyses used in the design of advanced rotor systems.

  1. Loads and Performance Data from a Wind-Tunnel Test of Generic Model Helicopter Rotor Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2005-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to acquire data for use in assessing the ability of current and future comprehensive analyses to predict helicopter rotating-system and fixed-system vibratory loads. The investigation was conducted with a generic model helicopter rotor system using blades with rectangular planform, no built-in twist, uniform radial distribution of mass and stiffnesses, and a NACA 0012 airfoil section. Rotor performance data, as well as mean and vibratory components of blade bending and torsion moments, fixed-system forces and moments, and pitch link loads were obtained at advance ratios up to 0.35 for various combinations of rotor shaft angle-of-attack and collective pitch. The data are presented without analysis.

  2. Comparison of the NASA Common Research Model European Transonic Wind Tunnel Test Data to NASA Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Melissa; Quest, Juergen; Rudnik, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations of the NASA Common Research Model have been conducted in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility, the NASA Ames 11-ft wind tunnel, and the European Transonic Wind Tunnel. In the NASA Ames 11-ft wind tunnel, data have been obtained at only a chord Reynolds number of 5 million for a wing/body/tail = 0 degree incidence configuration. Data have been obtained at chord Reynolds numbers of 5, 19.8 and 30 million for the same configuration in the National Transonic Facility and in the European Transonic Facility. Force and moment, surface pressure, wing bending and twist, and surface flow visualization data were obtained in all three facilities but only the force and moment and surface pressure data are presented herein.

  3. Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models Part 1: A Sidewall Supported Semispan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation and Flutter Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert C.; Vetter, Travis K.; Penning, Kevin B.; Coulson, David A.; Heeg, Jennifer.

    2013-01-01

    of a two part document. Part 2 is titled: "Aeroservoelastic Testing of Free Flying Wind Tunnel Models, Part 2: A Centerline Supported Fullspan Model Tested for Gust Load Alleviation." A team comprised of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, and the NASA Langley Research Center conducted three aeroservoelastic wind tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to demonstrate active control technologies relevant to large, flexible vehicles. In the first of these three tests, a semispan, aeroelastically scaled, wind tunnel model of a flying wing SensorCraft vehicle was mounted to a force balance to demonstrate gust load alleviation. In the second and third tests, the same wing was mated to a new, multi-degree of freedom, sidewall mount. This mount allowed the half-span model to translate vertically and pitch at the wing root, allowing better simulation of the full span vehicle's rigid body modes. Gust load alleviation (GLA) and Body freedom flutter (BFF) suppression were successfully demonstrated. The rigid body degrees-of-freedom required that the model be flown in the wind tunnel using an active control system. This risky mode of testing necessitated that a model arrestment system be integrated into the new mount. The safe and successful completion of these free flying tests required the development and integration of custom hardware and software. This paper describes the many systems, software, and procedures that were developed as part of this effort.

  4. Tunnel fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  5. Application of numerical modelling in the design of a full-scale heated Tunnel Sealing Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, R.; Chandler, N.; Martino, J.; Dixon, D.

    2005-10-01

    The Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX) was a full-scale in situ demonstration of technology for constructing nearly water tight-seals in excavations through crystalline rock deep below the surface of the earth. The experiment has been carried out at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) Underground Research Laboratory near Lac du Bonnet, Canada, in support of international programs for geologic disposal of radioactive waste. The TSX, with partners from Canada, Japan, France and the United States, was carried under conditions of high pressure (up to 4 MPa) and elevated temperature (up to 85°C). Comparing numerical model predictions with eight years of data collected from approximately 900 sensors was an important component of this experiment. Model of Transport In Fractured/porous Media (MOTIF), a finite element computer program developed by AECL for simulating fully coupled or uncoupled fluid flow, solute transport and heat transport, was used to model both the ambient temperature and heated phases of the TSX. The plan to heat the water in the TSX to 85°C was developed using model predictions and a comparison of simulated results with measurements during heating of the water in the TSX to about 50°C. The three-dimensional MOTIF simulations were conducted in parallel with axisymmetric modelling using Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua (FLAC), which computed the heat loss from pipes that carried the heated water through the rock to and from the experiment. The numerical model was initially used to develop a plan for operation of the experiment heaters, and then subsequently used to predict temperatures and hydraulic heads in the TSX bulkhead seals and surrounding rock. Copyright

  6. Modelling of the influence of the 'Flimserstein' tunnel on the Lag Tiert karstic spring in Flims; Modellierung des Einflusses des Flimserstein-Tunnels auf die Karstquelle des Lag Tiert (Flims, GR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeannin, P.-Y.; Haeuselmann, P. [Schweizerisches Institut fuer Spelaeologie und Karstkunde SISKA, La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Wildberger, A. [Dr. von Moos AG, Geotechnisches Buero, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2007-12-15

    This report describes the modelling of the influence of the 'Flimserstein' tunnel on the Lag Tiert karstic spring in Flims, Switzerland. When the tunnel, that provides a by-pass for the mountain village of Flims, was built, a karstic system was broached. As a result, several springs dried up and others had their capacity reduced. Also, the quantity of water available for a local hydropower station was reduced. The report describes how the situation as far as the underground watercourses are concerned was modelled and how exactly the tunnel construction changed the water-quantities at the various springs. The results of the study are presented and discussed and recommendations are made concerning the modelling of such karstic systems.

  7. Fastener load tests and retention systems tests for cryogenic wind-tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A-286 stainless steel screws were tested to determine the tensile load capability and failure mode of various screw sizes and types at both cryogenic and room temperature. Additionally, five fastener retention systems were tested by using A-286 screws with specimens made from the primary metallic alloys that are currently used for cryogenic models. The locking system effectiveness was examined by simple no-load cycling to cryogenic temperatures (-275 F) as well as by dynamic and static loading at cryogenic temperatures. In general, most systems were found to be effective retention devices. There are some differences between the various devices with respect to ease of application, cleanup, and reuse. Results of tests at -275 F imply that the cold temperatures act to improve screw retention. The improved retention is probably the result of differential thermal contraction and/or increased friction (thread-binding effects). The data provided are useful in selecting screw sizes, types, and locking devices for model systems to be tested in cryogenic wind tunnels.

  8. Aeroelastic Uncertainty Quantification Studies Using the S4T Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbay, Melike; Heeg, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This paper originates from the joint efforts of an aeroelastic study team in the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel from NATO Science and Technology Organization, with the Task Group number AVT-191, titled "Application of Sensitivity Analysis and Uncertainty Quantification to Military Vehicle Design." We present aeroelastic uncertainty quantification studies using the SemiSpan Supersonic Transport wind tunnel model at the NASA Langley Research Center. The aeroelastic study team decided treat both structural and aerodynamic input parameters as uncertain and represent them as samples drawn from statistical distributions, propagating them through aeroelastic analysis frameworks. Uncertainty quantification processes require many function evaluations to asses the impact of variations in numerous parameters on the vehicle characteristics, rapidly increasing the computational time requirement relative to that required to assess a system deterministically. The increased computational time is particularly prohibitive if high-fidelity analyses are employed. As a remedy, the Istanbul Technical University team employed an Euler solver in an aeroelastic analysis framework, and implemented reduced order modeling with Polynomial Chaos Expansion and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition to perform the uncertainty propagation. The NASA team chose to reduce the prohibitive computational time by employing linear solution processes. The NASA team also focused on determining input sample distributions.

  9. Design of the Wind Tunnel Model Communication Controller Board. Degree awarded by Christopher Newport Univ. on Dec. 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's Wind Tunnel Reinvestment project plans to shrink the existing data acquisition electronics to fit inside a wind tunnel model. Space limitations within a model necessitate a distributed system of Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) rather than a centralized system based on PC boards. This thesis will focus on the design of the prototype of the communication Controller board. A portion of the communication Controller board is to be used as the basis of an ASIC design. The communication Controller board will communicate between the internal model modules and the external data acquisition computer. This board is based around an Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), to allow for reconfigurability. In addition to the FPGA, this board contains buffer Random Access Memory (RAM), configuration memory (EEPROM), drivers for the communications ports, and passive components.

  10. Braze alloy process and strength characterization studies for 18 nickel grade 200 maraging steel with application to wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, James F.; Sandefur, Paul G., Jr.; Young, Clarence P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive study of braze alloy selection process and strength characterization with application to wind tunnel models is presented. The applications for this study include the installation of stainless steel pressure tubing in model airfoil sections make of 18 Ni 200 grade maraging steel and the joining of wing structural components by brazing. Acceptable braze alloys for these applications are identified along with process, thermal braze cycle data, and thermal management procedures. Shear specimens are used to evaluate comparative shear strength properties for the various alloys at both room and cryogenic (-300 F) temperatures and include the effects of electroless nickel plating. Nickel plating was found to significantly enhance both the wetability and strength properties for the various braze alloys studied. The data are provided for use in selecting braze alloys for use with 18 Ni grade 200 steel in the design of wind tunnel models to be tested in an ambient or cryogenic environment.

  11. Validation Study for an Atmospheric Dispersion Model, Using Effective Source Heights Determined from Wind Tunnel Experiments in Nuclear Safety Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamichi Oura

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available For more than fifty years, atmospheric dispersion predictions based on the joint use of a Gaussian plume model and wind tunnel experiments have been applied in both Japan and the U.K. for the evaluation of public radiation exposure in nuclear safety analysis. The effective source height used in the Gaussian model is determined from ground-level concentration data obtained by a wind tunnel experiment using a scaled terrain and site model. In the present paper, the concentrations calculated by this method are compared with data observed over complex terrain in the field, under a number of meteorological conditions. Good agreement was confirmed in near-neutral and unstable stabilities. However, it was found to be necessary to reduce the effective source height by 50% in order to achieve a conservative estimation of the field observations in a stable atmosphere.

  12. Wind Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This ARDEC facility consists of subsonic, transonic, and supersonic wind tunnels to acquire aerodynamic data. Full-scale and sub-scale models of munitions are fitted...

  13. Base Pressure Computations of the DERA Generic Missile Wind Tunnel Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeSpirito, James

    2005-01-01

    .... The investigation was an extension to a previous investigation in which the computed forebody axial force did not compare well with experimental wind tunnel data, while all other forces and moments...

  14. Air Flow Modeling in the Wind Tunnel of the FHWA Aerodynamics Laboratory at Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitek, M. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) Energy Systems Division; Lottes, S. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) Energy Systems Division; Bojanowski, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) Energy Systems Division

    2017-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is widely used in industry for design and in the research community to support, compliment, and extend the scope of experimental studies. Analysis of transportation infrastructure using high performance cluster computing with CFD and structural mechanics software is done at the Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) at Argonne National Laboratory. These resources, available at TRACC, were used to perform advanced three-dimensional computational simulations of the wind tunnel laboratory at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC). The goals were to verify the CFD model of the laboratory wind tunnel and then to use versions of the model to provide the capability to (1) perform larger parametric series of tests than can be easily done in the laboratory with available budget and time, (2) to extend testing to wind speeds that cannot be achieved in the laboratory, and (3) to run types of tests that are very difficult or impossible to run in the laboratory. Modern CFD software has many physics models and domain meshing options. Models, including the choice of turbulence and other physics models and settings, the computational mesh, and the solver settings, need to be validated against measurements to verify that the results are sufficiently accurate for use in engineering applications. The wind tunnel model was built and tested, by comparing to experimental measurements, to provide a valuable tool to perform these types of studies in the future as a complement and extension to TFHRC’s experimental capabilities. Wind tunnel testing at TFHRC is conducted in a subsonic open-jet wind tunnel with a 1.83 m (6 foot) by 1.83 m (6 foot) cross section. A three component dual force-balance system is used to measure forces acting on tested models, and a three degree of freedom suspension system is used for dynamic response tests. Pictures of the room are shown in Figure 1-1 to Figure 1-4. A detailed CAD

  15. Development of a kinematic model to predict finger flexor tendon and subsynovial connective tissue displacement in the carpal tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Keir, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Finger flexor tendinopathies and carpal tunnel syndrome are histologically characterised by non-inflammatory fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) in the carpal tunnel, which is indicative of excessive and repetitive shear forces between the finger flexor tendons and SSCT. We assessed flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon and adjacent SSCT displacements with colour Doppler ultrasound as 16 healthy participants completed long finger flexion/extension movements captured by a motion capture system. FDS tendon displacements fit a second-order regression model based on metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joint flexion angles (R(2) = 0.92 ± 0.01). SSCT displacements were 33.6 ± 1.7% smaller than FDS tendon displacements and also fit a second-order regression model (R(2) = 0.89 ± 0.01). FDS tendon and SSCT displacement both correlated with finger joint thickness, enabling participant-specific anthropometric scaling. We propose the current regression models as an ergonomic method to determine relative displacements between the finger flexor tendons and SSCT. Relative displacements between the finger flexor tendons and SSCT provide insight into gliding and friction in the carpal tunnel. Our regression models represent a move towards mechanistic-based ergonomic risk assessment of the wrist/hand. This is a natural evolution of ergonomic methods based on tendon-joint interaction.

  16. The Feasibility of Multiscale Modeling of Tunnel Fires Using FDS 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermesi, Izabella; Colella, Francesco; Rein, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    and it has yielded satisfactory results in comparison to full scale CFD simulations [1-3]. It combines a 3D domain for the near fire zones, which are characterized by large temperature and pressure gradients, with a 1D network approach for the far field, where the flow is treated as a mono...... of multiscale modeling in FDS used a mono-directional road tunnel with a rectangular cross-section of 8m width and 6.5m height. Its total length of 1200m was split into 400m of 3D domain with two 1D ducts of 400m on either side. The 3D domain was divided into 17 meshes in order to reduce the runtime...... the peak release rate of a burning bus. DISCUSSION The results obtained using FDS showed good agreement with the ones obtained in the reference work by Colella et al [5]. While the multiple meshes introduced an error of approx. 10ºC and velocity errors of less than 0.5m/s, the results showed deviation...

  17. Testing of the Trim Tab Parametric Model in NASA Langley's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Watkins, Anthony N.; Korzun, Ashley M.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    In support of NASA's Entry, Descent, and Landing technology development efforts, testing of Langley's Trim Tab Parametric Models was conducted in Test Section 2 of NASA Langley's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The objectives of these tests were to generate quantitative aerodynamic data and qualitative surface pressure data for experimental and computational validation and aerodynamic database development. Six component force-and-moment data were measured on 38 unique, blunt body trim tab configurations at Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5, angles of attack from -4deg to +20deg, and angles of sideslip from 0deg to +8deg. Configuration parameters investigated in this study were forebody shape, tab area, tab cant angle, and tab aspect ratio. Pressure Sensitive Paint was used to provide qualitative surface pressure mapping for a subset of these flow and configuration variables. Over the range of parameters tested, the effects of varying tab area and tab cant angle were found to be much more significant than varying tab aspect ratio relative to key aerodynamic performance requirements. Qualitative surface pressure data supported the integrated aerodynamic data and provided information to aid in future analyses of localized phenomena for trim tab configurations.

  18. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  19. Wind Tunnel Testing of a 120th Scale Large Civil Tilt-Rotor Model in Airplane and Helicopter Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin R.; Willink, Gina C.; Russell, Carl R.; Amy, Alexander R.; Pete, Ashley E.

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012 and October 2013, NASA and the U.S. Army jointly conducted a wind tunnel test program examining two notional large tilt rotor designs: NASA's Large Civil Tilt Rotor and the Army's High Efficiency Tilt Rotor. The approximately 6%-scale airframe models (unpowered) were tested without rotors in the U.S. Army 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Measurements of all six forces and moments acting on the airframe were taken using the wind tunnel scale system. In addition to force and moment measurements, flow visualization using tufts, infrared thermography and oil flow were used to identify flow trajectories, boundary layer transition and areas of flow separation. The purpose of this test was to collect data for the validation of computational fluid dynamics tools, for the development of flight dynamics simulation models, and to validate performance predictions made during conceptual design. This paper focuses on the results for the Large Civil Tilt Rotor model in an airplane mode configuration up to 200 knots of wind tunnel speed. Results are presented with the full airframe model with various wing tip and nacelle configurations, and for a wing-only case also with various wing tip and nacelle configurations. Key results show that the addition of a wing extension outboard of the nacelles produces a significant increase in the lift-to-drag ratio, and interestingly decreases the drag compared to the case where the wing extension is not present. The drag decrease is likely due to complex aerodynamic interactions between the nacelle and wing extension that results in a significant drag benefit.

  20. Competency modeling targeted on promotion of organizations towards VO involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ermilova, E.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2008-01-01

    During the last decades, a number of models is introduced in research, addressing different perspectives of the organizations’ competencies in collaborative networks. This paper introduces the "4C-model", developed to address competencies of organizations, involved in Virtual organizations Breeding

  1. The effect of a twin tunnel on the propagation of ground-borne vibration from an underground railway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, K. A.; Hunt, H. E. M.; Hussein, M. F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate predictions of ground-borne vibration levels in the vicinity of an underground railway are greatly sought after in modern urban centres. Yet the complexity involved in simulating the underground environment means that it is necessary to make simplifying assumptions about this system. One such commonly made assumption is to ignore the effects of neighbouring tunnels, despite the fact that many underground railway lines consist of twin-bored tunnels, one for the outbound direction and one for the inbound direction. This paper presents a unique model for two tunnels embedded in a homogeneous, elastic fullspace. Each of these tunnels is subject to both known, dynamic train forces and dynamic cavity forces. The net forces acting on the tunnels are written as the sum of those tractions acting on the invert of a single tunnel, and those tractions that represent the motion induced by the neighbouring tunnel. By apportioning the tractions in this way, the vibration response of a two-tunnel system is written as a linear combination of displacement fields produced by a single-tunnel system. Using Fourier decomposition, forces are partitioned into symmetric and antisymmetric modenumber components to minimise computation times. The significance of the interactions between two tunnels is quantified by calculating the insertion gains, in both the vertical and horizontal directions, that result from the existence of a second tunnel. The insertion-gain results are shown to be localised and highly dependent on frequency, tunnel orientation and tunnel thickness. At some locations, the magnitude of these insertion gains is greater than 20 dB. This demonstrates that a high degree of inaccuracy exists in any surface vibration prediction model that includes only one of the two tunnels. This novel two-tunnel solution represents a significant contribution to the existing body of research into vibration from underground railways, as it shows that the second tunnel has a significant

  2. High Fidelity Computational and Wind Tunnel Models in Support of Certification Airworthiness of Control Surfaces with Freeplay and Other Nonlinear Features, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed work will establish high fidelity computational methods and wind tunnel test model in support of new freeplay criteria for the design, construction and...

  3. Gust-Tunnel Investigation of the Effect of a Sharp-Edge Gust on the Flapwise Blade Bending Moments of a Model Helicopter Rotor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maglieri, Domenic

    1955-01-01

    Preliminary investigations have been made in the Langley gust tunnel to determine the effects of a sharp-edge vertical gust on the blade flapwise vibratory bending moments of small model rotors having...

  4. Investigations of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS Integrated Space Shuttle Vehicle Jet-Plume Model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 by11-Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (IA80). Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    The results are documented of jet plume effects wind tunnel test of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS launch configuration space shuttle vehicle model in the 11 x 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This test involved cold gas main propulsion system (MPS) and solid rocket motor (SRB) plume simulations at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.4. Integrated vehicle surface pressure distributions, elevon and rudder hinge moments, and wing and vertical tail root bending and torsional moments due to MPS and SRB plume interactions were determined. Nozzle power conditions were controlled per pretest nozzle calibrations. Model angle of attack was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg; model angle of sideslip was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg. Reynolds number was varied for certain test conditions and configurations, with the nominal freestream total pressure being 14.69 psia. Plotted force and pressure data are presented.

  5. A common geometric data-base approach for computer-aided manufacturing of wind-tunnel models and theoretical aerodynamic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, M. J.; Cozzolongo, J. V.

    1983-01-01

    A more automated process to produce wind tunnel models using existing facilities is discussed. A process was sought to more rapidly determine the aerodynamic characteristics of advanced aircraft configurations. Such aerodynamic characteristics are determined from theoretical analyses and wind tunnel tests of the configurations. Computers are used to perform the theoretical analyses, and a computer aided manufacturing system is used to fabricate the wind tunnel models. In the past a separate set of input data describing the aircraft geometry had to be generated for each process. This process establishes a common data base by enabling the computer aided manufacturing system to use, via a software interface, the geometric input data generated for the theoretical analysis. Thus, only one set of geometric data needs to be generated. Tests reveal that the process can reduce by several weeks the time needed to produce a wind tunnel model component. In addition, this process increases the similarity of the wind tunnel model to the mathematical model used by the theoretical aerodynamic analysis programs. Specifically, the wind tunnel model can be machined to within 0.008 in. of the original mathematical model. However, the software interface is highly complex and cumbersome to operate, making it unsuitable for routine use. The procurement of an independent computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing system with the capability to support both the theoretical analysis and the manufacturing tasks was recommended.

  6. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel model and test information. Volume 2: Orbiter configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternate recoverable configurations as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle. Considerable wind tunnel data was acquired by the competing contractors and the NASA centers for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. All contractor and NASA wind tunnel test data acquiredin the Phase B development have been compiled into a database and are available for applying to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Database is structured by vehicle component and configuration type. Basic components include the booster, the orbiter, and the launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retroglide, and twin body. Orbiter configuration types include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks, and double delta wings. Launch configration types include booster and orbiter components in various stacked and tandom combinations. The digital database consists of 220 files of data containing basic tunnel recorded data.

  7. On the modelling of microsegregation in steels involving thermodynamic databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, D; Bernhard, C; Michelic, S; Wieser, G; Presoly, P

    2016-01-01

    A microsegregation model involving thermodynamic database based on Ohnaka's model is proposed. In the model, the thermodynamic database is applied for equilibrium calculation. Multicomponent alloy effects on partition coefficients and equilibrium temperatures are accounted for. Microsegregation and partition coefficients calculated using different databases exhibit significant differences. The segregated concentrations predicted using the optimized database are in good agreement with the measured inter-dendritic concentrations. (paper)

  8. A Hydrogen Peroxide Hot-Jet Simulator for Wind-Tunnel Tests of Turbojet-Exit Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runckel, Jack F.; Swihart, John M.

    1959-01-01

    A turbojet-engine-exhaust simulator which utilizes a hydrogen peroxide gas generator has been developed for powered-model testing in wind tunnels with air exchange. Catalytic decomposition of concentrated hydrogen peroxide provides a convenient and easily controlled method of providing a hot jet with characteristics that correspond closely to the jet of a gas turbine engine. The problems associated with simulation of jet exhausts in a transonic wind tunnel which led to the selection of a liquid monopropellant are discussed. The operation of the jet simulator consisting of a thrust balance, gas generator, exit nozzle, and auxiliary control system is described. Static-test data obtained with convergent nozzles are presented and shown to be in good agreement with ideal calculated values.

  9. Band electron spectrum and thermodynamic properties of the pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Ya.Farenyuk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels is considered. Generalization of dynamic mean-field method for systems with correlated hopping was applied to the investigation of the model. Electron spectra, electron concentrations, average values of pseudospins and grand canonical potential were calculated within the alloy-analogy approximation. Electron spectrum and dependencies of the electron concentrations on chemical potential were obtained. It was shown that in the alloy-analogy approximation, the model possesses the first order phase transition to ferromagnetic state with the change of chemical potential and the second order phase transition with the change of temperature.

  10. Improved compact model for double-gate tunnel field-effect transistors by the rigorous consideration of gate fringing field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwan; Choi, Woo Young

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the accuracy of a compact current-voltage (I-V) model for double-gate n-channel tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) is improve by considering outer and inner gate fringing field effects. The refined model is benchmarked against technology computer-aided design (TCAD) device simulations and compared against a previously published compact model. The normalized root-mean-square error for current in the linear region of operation (i.e., for 0.05 V drain voltage) is reduced from ˜593 to ˜5%.

  11. Measuring fire size in tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qihui

    2013-01-01

    A new measure of fire size Q′ has been introduced in longitudinally ventilated tunnel as the ratio of flame height to the height of tunnel. The analysis in this article has shown that Q′ controls both the critical velocity and the maximum ceiling temperature in the tunnel. Before the fire flame reaches tunnel ceiling (Q′ 1.0), Fr approaches a constant value. This is also a well-known phenomenon in large tunnel fires. Tunnel ceiling temperature shows the opposite trend. Before the fire flame reaches the ceiling, it increases very slowly with the fire size. Once the flame has hit the ceiling of tunnel, temperature rises rapidly with Q′. The good agreement between the current prediction and three different sets of experimental data has demonstrated that the theory has correctly modelled the relation among the heat release rate of fire, ventilation flow and the height of tunnel. From design point of view, the theoretical maximum of critical velocity for a given tunnel can help to prevent oversized ventilation system. -- Highlights: • Fire sizing is an important safety measure in tunnel design. • New measure of fire size a function of HRR of fire, tunnel height and ventilation. • The measure can identify large and small fires. • The characteristics of different fire are consistent with observation in real fires

  12. Developing a Fracture Model of the Granite Rocks Around the Research Tunnel at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory in Central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, E.; Hadgu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) is located in Tono area in Central Japan. It is operated by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) with the main purpose of providing scientific basis for the research and development of technologies needed for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in fractured crystalline rocks. The current work is focused on the research and experiments in the tunnel located at 500 m depth. The data collected in the tunnel and exploratory boreholes were shared with the participants of the DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation against EXperiments (DECOVALEX), an international research and model comparison collaboration. This study describes the development of the fracture model representing granite rocks around the research tunnel. The model domain is 100x150x100m with the main experimental part of the tunnel, Closure Test Drift, located approximately in the center. The major input data were the fracture traces measured on the tunnel walls (total of 2,023 fractures), fractures observed in the horizontal borehole parallel to the tunnel, and the packer tests conducted in this borehole and one vertical borehole located within the modeling domain. 78 fractures (the ones with the inflow) in the tunnel were incorporated in the development of the fracture model. Fracture size was derived from the fracture trace analysis. It was shown that the fracture radius followed lognormal distributions. Fracture transmissivity was estimated from an analytical solution of inflow into the tunnel through an individual fracture and the total measured inflow into the tunnel. 16 fractures were incorporated in the model along the horizontal borehole. The packer test data in the different well intervals were used to estimate the range in fracture transmissivity. A relationship between the fracture transmissivity and fracture radius was developed. The fractures in the tunnel and borehole were used to derive fracture orientation and

  13. Aeroservoelastic Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Free-Flying, Joined-Wing SensorCraft Model for Gust Load Alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert C.; Castelluccio, Mark A.; Coulson, David A.; Heeg, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    A team comprised of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Boeing, and the NASA Langley Research Center conducted three aeroservoelastic wind-tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to demonstrate active control technologies relevant to large, exible vehicles. In the first of these three tests, a full-span, aeroelastically scaled, wind-tunnel model of a joined-wing SensorCraft vehicle was mounted to a force balance to acquire a basic aerodynamic data set. In the second and third tests, the same wind-tunnel model was mated to a new, two-degree-of-freedom, beam mount. This mount allowed the full-span model to translate vertically and pitch. Trimmed flight at -10% static margin and gust load alleviation were successfully demonstrated. The rigid body degrees of freedom required that the model be own in the wind tunnel using an active control system. This risky mode of testing necessitated that a model arrestment system be integrated into the new mount. The safe and successful completion of these free-flying tests required the development and integration of custom hardware and software. This paper describes the many systems, software, and procedures that were developed as part of this effort. The balance and free ying wind-tunnel tests will be summarized. The design of the trim and gust load alleviation control laws along with the associated results will also be discussed.

  14. Thermal and Pressure Characterization of a Wind Tunnel Force Balance Using the Single Vector System. Experimental Design and Analysis Approach to Model Pressure and Temperature Effects in Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Commo, Sean A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Parker, Peter A,

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel research at NASA Langley Research Center s 31-inch Mach 10 hypersonic facility utilized a 5-component force balance, which provided a pressurized flow-thru capability to the test article. The goal of the research was to determine the interaction effects between the free-stream flow and the exit flow from the reaction control system on the Mars Science Laboratory aeroshell during planetary entry. In the wind tunnel, the balance was exposed to aerodynamic forces and moments, steady-state and transient thermal gradients, and various internal balance cavity pressures. Historically, these effects on force measurement accuracy have not been fully characterized due to limitations in the calibration apparatus. A statistically designed experiment was developed to adequately characterize the behavior of the balance over the expected wind tunnel operating ranges (forces/moments, temperatures, and pressures). The experimental design was based on a Taylor-series expansion in the seven factors for the mathematical models. Model inversion was required to calculate the aerodynamic forces and moments as a function of the strain-gage readings. Details regarding transducer on-board compensation techniques, experimental design development, mathematical modeling, and wind tunnel data reduction are included in this paper.

  15. Preliminary numerical modeling for the G-Tunnel welded tuff mining experiment; Yucca Mountain site characterization project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.L.; Bauer, S.J.

    1991-09-01

    Yucca Mountain, located in Southern Nevada, is to be considered as a potential site for a nuclear waste repository. Located in Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site, G-Tunnel has been the site of a series of experiments, part of whose purpose is to evaluate measurement techniques for rock mechanics before testing in the Exploratory Shaft. Rainier Mesa is composed of welded and nonwelded tuffs that have thermal and mechanical properties and stress states similar to those of tuffs expected to be encountered at Yucca Mountain. A series of finite element calculations were performed to aid in designing instrumentation for the experiments in G-Tunnel and later to correlate with measured data. In this report are presented the results of the preliminary finite element calculations performed in conjunction with experimental measurements of drift convergence, or closure, and rock mass relaxation zones made before, during, and after completing the welded tuff mining experiment in G-Tunnel. Tape extensometer measurements of drift convergences and measurements determined by multiple point borehole extensometers are compared with corresponding calculated values using linear elastic and jointed rock material models. 9 refs., 25 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. The Neutron Peak in the Interlayer Tunneling Model of High Temperature Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Chakravarty, S.; Anderson, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    Recent neutron scattering experiments in optimally doped YBCO exhibit an unusual magnetic peak that appears only below the superconducting transition temperature. The experimental observations are explained within the context of the interlayer tunneling theory of high temperature superconductors. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  17. A qualitative explanation of tunneling characteristics of high-Tc junctions in terms of the McMillan proximity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Chiara, A.; Peluso, G.; Fontana, F.; Tafuri, F.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of proximity effects on the transport properties of high-T c superconductors is considered. On the basis of the experimental results on tunneling spectroscopy reported in the current literature, the authors discuss some of the main features of dI/dV vs. V characteristics. More particularly, attention is focused on the depression of gap structure, the presence of conductance peaks due to the counterelectrode gap, and 'zero-bias anomalies.' A possible explanation of those features in terms of the McMillan proximity model is given along with some examples of applications of the model to experimental data

  18. Development of Aeroservoelastic Analytical Models and Gust Load Alleviation Control Laws of a SensorCraft Wind-Tunnel Model Using Measured Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A.; Vartio, Eric; Shimko, Anthony; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Eure, Kenneth W.; Scott,Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Aeroservoelastic (ASE) analytical models of a SensorCraft wind-tunnel model are generated using measured data. The data was acquired during the ASE wind-tunnel test of the HiLDA (High Lift-to-Drag Active) Wing model, tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) in late 2004. Two time-domain system identification techniques are applied to the development of the ASE analytical models: impulse response (IR) method and the Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) method. Using measured control surface inputs (frequency sweeps) and associated sensor responses, the IR method is used to extract corresponding input/output impulse response pairs. These impulse responses are then transformed into state-space models for use in ASE analyses. Similarly, the GPC method transforms measured random control surface inputs and associated sensor responses into an AutoRegressive with eXogenous input (ARX) model. The ARX model is then used to develop the gust load alleviation (GLA) control law. For the IR method, comparison of measured with simulated responses are presented to investigate the accuracy of the ASE analytical models developed. For the GPC method, comparison of simulated open-loop and closed-loop (GLA) time histories are presented.

  19. Numerical modeling of the creep behavior of clays with emphasis on tunnels and underground openings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    This report presents an interpretive overview and critical assessment of the state-of-the-art for numerical modeling of the creep behavior of clays. The overview and assessment is focused upon application to underground openings. Field and laboratory observations of time-dependent behavior, constitutive modeling of creep behavior, and numerical implementation of constitutive equations are addressed. A critical assessment of the ability of existing models to predict aspects of creep behavior relevant to waste repository design and suggestions for improved analyses that can be developed with existing technology are provided. Both heuristic and mathematical constitutive models are reviewed. Heuristic models provide a basis for evaluation of the required parameters for the continuum mechanics based mathematical models. The continuum mechanics models are required for numerical analysis. It has been demonstrated that, by using iterative and incremental analysis, virtually any viscous or inviscid continuum mechanics material model can be adapted to consider time-dependent behavior. Available numerical models for numerical analysis of geotechnical problems involving creep deformations are reviewed. Models for thermo-mechanical coupling are also addressed in this review. Cases where creep-inclusive analyses have been applied to analysis of prototype behavior are cited. However, the lack of well documented case histories of time-dependent deformations over significant time spans is identified as a major obstacle to model verification. Recommendations are made for an alternative design approach capable of guaranteeing the very long term mechanical integrity of the liner. 167 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Aeroelastic Analysis of a Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents data analysis of a flexible wing wind tunnel model with a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap (VCCTEF) design for drag minimization tested at the University of Washington Aeronautical Laboratory (UWAL). The wind tunnel test was designed to explore the relative merit of the VCCTEF concept for improved cruise efficiency through the use of low-cost aeroelastic model test techniques. The flexible wing model is a 10%-scale model of a typical transport wing and is constructed of woven fabric composites and foam core. The wing structural stiffness in bending is tailored to be half of the stiffness of a Boeing 757-era transport wing while the torsional stiffness is about the same. This stiffness reduction results in a wing tip deflection of about 10% of the wing semi-span. The VCCTEF is a multi-segment flap design having three chordwise camber segments and five spanwise flap sections for a total of 15 individual flap elements. The three chordwise camber segments can be positioned appropriately to create a desired trailing edge camber. Elastomeric material is used to cover the gaps in between the spanwise flap sections, thereby creating a continuous trailing edge. Wind tunnel data analysis conducted previously shows that the VCCTEF can achieve a drag reduction of up to 6.31% and an improvement in the lift-to-drag ratio (L=D) of up to 4.85%. A method for estimating the bending and torsional stiffnesses of the flexible wingUWAL wind tunnel model from static load test data is presented. The resulting estimation indicates that the stiffness of the flexible wing is significantly stiffer in torsion than in bending by as much as 9 to 1. The lift prediction for the flexible wing is computed by a coupled aerodynamic-structural model. The coupled model is developed by coupling a conceptual aerodynamic tool Vorlax with a finite-element model of the flexible wing via an automated geometry deformation tool. Based on the comparison of the lift curve slope

  1. Model Deformation Measurements of Sonic Boom Models in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura K.; Garbeff, Theodore J.; Heineck, James T.

    2015-01-01

    The deformations of two sonic-boom models were measured by stereo photogrammetry during tests in the 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The models were geometrically similar but one was 2.75 times as large as the other. Deformation measurements were made by simultaneously imaging the upper surfaces of the models from two directions by calibrated cameras that were mounted behind windows of the test section. Bending and twist were measured at discrete points using conventional circular targets that had been marked along the leading and trailing edges of the wings and tails. In addition, continuous distributions of bending and twist were measured from ink speckles that had been applied to the upper surfaces of the model. Measurements were made at wind-on (M = 1.6) and wind-off conditions over a range of angles of attack between 2.5 deg. and 5.0 deg. At each condition, model deformation was determined by comparing the wind-off and wind-on coordinates of each measurement point after transforming the coordinates to reference coordinates tied to the model. The necessary transformations were determined by measuring the positions of a set of targets on the rigid center-body of the models whose model-axes coordinates were known. Smoothly varying bending and twist measurements were obtained at all conditions. Bending displacements increased in proportion to the square of the distance to the centerline. Maximum deflection of the wingtip of the larger model was about 5 mm (2% of the semispan) and that of the smaller model was 0.9 mm (1% of the semispan). The change in wing twist due to bending increased in direct proportion to distance from the centerline and reached a (absolute) maximum of about -1? at the highest angle of attack for both models. The measurements easily resolved bending displacements as small as 0.05 mm and bending-induced changes in twist as small as 0.05 deg.

  2. Environmental Management Model for Road Maintenance Operation Involving Community Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triyono, A. R. H.; Setyawan, A.; Sobriyah; Setiono, P.

    2017-07-01

    Public expectations of Central Java, which is very high on demand fulfillment, especially road infrastructure as outlined in the number of complaints and community expectations tweeter, Short Mail Massage (SMS), e-mail and public reports from various media, Highways Department of Central Java province requires development model of environmental management in the implementation of a routine way by involving the community in order to fulfill the conditions of a representative, may serve road users safely and comfortably. This study used survey method with SEM analysis and SWOT with Latent Independent Variable (X), namely; Public Participation in the regulation, development, construction and supervision of road (PSM); Public behavior in the utilization of the road (PMJ) Provincial Road Service (PJP); Safety in the Provincial Road (KJP); Integrated Management System (SMT) and latent dependent variable (Y) routine maintenance of the provincial road that is integrated with the environmental management system and involve the participation of the community (MML). The result showed the implementation of routine maintenance of road conditions in Central Java province has yet to implement an environmental management by involving the community; Therefore developed environmental management model with the results of H1: Community Participation (PSM) has positive influence on the Model of Environmental Management (MML); H2: Behavior Society in Jalan Utilization (PMJ) positive effect on Model Environmental Management (MML); H3: Provincial Road Service (PJP) positive effect on Model Environmental Management (MML); H4: Safety in the Provincial Road (KJP) positive effect on Model Environmental Management (MML); H5: Integrated Management System (SMT) has positive influence on the Model of Environmental Management (MML). From the analysis obtained formulation model describing the relationship / influence of the independent variables PSM, PMJ, PJP, KJP, and SMT on the dependent variable

  3. Recognition tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  4. Recognition tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Sankey, Otto [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 1862 53, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-02

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  5. A New Reliability Analysis Model of the Chegongzhuang Heat-Supplying Tunnel Structure Considering the Coupling of Pipeline Thrust and Thermal Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiawen Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the operating Chegongzhuang heat-supplying tunnel in Beijing, the reliability of its lining structure under the action of large thrust and thermal effect is studied. According to the characteristics of a heat-supplying tunnel service, a three-dimensional numerical analysis model was established based on the mechanical tests on the in-situ specimens. The stress and strain of the tunnel structure were obtained before and after the operation. Compared with the field monitoring data, the rationality of the model was verified. After extracting the internal force of the lining structure, the improved method of subset simulation was proposed as the performance function to calculate the reliability of the main control section of the tunnel. In contrast to the traditional calculation method, the analytic relationship between the sample numbers in the subset simulation method and Monte Carlo method was given. The results indicate that the lining structure is greatly influenced by coupling in the range of six meters from the fixed brackets, especially the tunnel floor. The improved subset simulation method can greatly save computation time and improve computational efficiency under the premise of ensuring the accuracy of calculation. It is suitable for the reliability calculation of tunnel engineering, because “the lower the probability, the more efficient the calculation.”

  6. Evaluation of a new method for puff arrival time as assessed through wind tunnel modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chaloupecká, Hana; Jaňour, Zbyněk; Mikšovský, J.; Jurčáková, Klára; Kellnerová, Radka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 111, October (2017), s. 194-210 ISSN 0957-5820 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-18964S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : wind tunnel * short-term gas leakage * puff Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology OBOR OECD: Meteorology and atmospheric sciences Impact factor: 2.905, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0957582017302203

  7. Modelling and Analysis of the Excavation Phase by the Theory of Blocks Method of Tunnel 4 Kherrata Gorge, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukarm, Riadh; Houam, Abdelkader; Fredj, Mohammed; Boucif, Rima

    2017-12-01

    The aim of our work is to check the stability during excavation tunnel work in the rock mass of Kherrata, connecting the cities of Bejaia to Setif. The characterization methods through the Q system (method of Barton), RMR (Bieniawski classification) allowed us to conclude that the quality of rock mass is average in limestone, and poor in fractured limestone. Then modelling of excavation phase using the theory of blocks method (Software UNWEDGE) with the parameters from the recommendations of classification allowed us to check stability and to finally conclude that the use of geomechanical classification and the theory of blocks can be considered reliable in preliminary design.

  8. Further investigations of the aeroelastic behavior of the AFW wind-tunnel model using transonic small disturbance theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    The Computational Aeroelasticity Program-Transonic Small Disturbance (CAP-TSD) code, developed at LaRC, is applied to the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model for prediction of transonic aeroelastic behavior. A semi-span computational model is used for evaluation of symmetric motions, and a full-span model is used for evaluation of antisymmetric motions, and a full-span model is used for evaluation of antisymmetric motions. Static aeroelastic solutions using CAP-TSD are computed. Dynamic deformations are presented as flutter boundaries in terms of Mach number and dynamic pressure. Flutter boundaries that take into account modal refinements, vorticity and entropy corrections, antisymmetric motion, and sensitivity to the modeling of the wing tip ballast stores are also presented with experimental flutter results.

  9. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel model and test information. Volume 3: Launch configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternate recoverable configuration as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle, including contractor data for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. The test data have been compiled into a database and are available for application to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Database is structured by vehicle component and configuration. Basic components include booster, orbiter, and launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retroglide and twin body. Orbiter configurations include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks and double delta wings. Launch configurations include booster and orbiter components in various stacked and tandem combinations. The digital database consists of 220 files containing basic tunnel data. Database structure is documented in a series of reports which include configuration sketches for the various planforms tested. This is Volume 3 -- launch configurations.

  10. Modeling of modification experiments involving neutral-gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments involve the injection of neutral gases into the upper atmosphere. Examples are critical velocity experiments, MHD wave generation, ionospheric hole production, plasma striation formation, and ion tracing. Many of these experiments are discussed in other sessions of the Active Experiments Conference. This paper limits its discussion to: (1) the modeling of the neutral gas dynamics after injection, (2) subsequent formation of ionosphere holes, and (3) use of such holes as experimental tools

  11. Fires involving radioactive materials : transference model; operative recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.E.; Puntarulo, L.J.; Canibano, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    In all aspects related to the nuclear activity, the occurrence of an explosion, fire or burst type accident, with or without victims, is directly related to the characteristics of the site. The present work analyses the different parameters involved, describing a transference model and recommendations for evaluation and control of the radiological risk for firemen. Special emphasis is placed on the measurement of the variables existing in this kind of operations

  12. The Effects of Realistic Geological Heterogeneity on Seismic Modeling: Applications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface Tunnel Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Christopher Scott

    compressional wave energy may be generated within the shear radiation node of the source. Interestingly, in some cases this shear wave may arise as a coherent pulse, which may be used to improve seismic imaging efforts. In the third and fourth chapters, I discuss the results of a numerical analysis and field study of seismic near-surface tunnel detection methods. Detecting unknown tunnels and voids, such as old mine workings or solution cavities in karst terrain, is a challenging prob- lem in geophysics and has implications for geotechnical design, public safety, and domestic security. Over the years, a number of different geophysical methods have been developed to locate these objects (microgravity, resistivity, seismic diffraction, etc.), each with varying results. One of the major challenges facing these methods is understanding the influence of geologic heterogeneity on their results, which makes this problem a natural extension of the modeling work discussed in previous chapters. In the third chapter, I present the results of a numerical study of surface-wave based tunnel detection methods. The results of this analysis show that these methods are capable of detecting a void buried within one wavelength of the surface, with size potentially much less than one wavelength. In addition, seismic surface- wave based detection methods are effective in media with moderate heterogeneity (epsilon Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve, near Antioch California. I use a com- bination of surface wave backscattering, 1D surface wave attenuation, and 2D attenuation tomography to locate and determine the condition of two tunnels at this site. These results compliment the numerical study in chapter 3 and highlight their usefulness for detecting tunnels at other sites.

  13. Tunneling in high-K isomeric decays

    CERN Document Server

    Shizuma, T; Shimizu, Y R

    2002-01-01

    We have systematically investigated highly-K-forbidden transitions observed in the Hf, W and Os region, using the gamma-tunneling model in which low-K and high-k states interact through a process of quantum tunneling. The measured hindrance factors are compared with the values calculated using the gamma-tunneling model. Isotope dependences of gamma-tunneling probabilities particularly for neutron-rich nuclei and the relation to stimulated decays of isomers are discussed. (author)

  14. Model support system using an industrial robot in low-speed wind tunnel; Sangyoyo robot wo mochiita fudo mokei shiji system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T.; Iwasaki, A.; Fujieda, H.; Shigemi, M. [National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan); Nakayasu, H.; Sagisaka, M. [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-06-01

    A model support system that can set the attitude with an attack angle, sideslip angle, and rotation angle as required by using the mechanism and function of an industrial robot and that can be rapidly moved to the specified position was developed. This system consists of a host computer, robot controller, and robot. A sting for wind tunnel model support and a six-component balance are installed at the tip of a robot arm. The robot has fix freedom levels and can control the attitude of the wind tunnel model. A model with weight capacity of 1470N and precision of {plus_minus}0.5 mm was selected. An A/D input block and external communication function were installed in the robot controller, in consideration of the dynamic floating effect that the machine continuously approaches a ground plate in the wind tunnel test of an experimental machine. The function test of a robot installed in the wind tunnel, the wind tunnel test using a robot, the comparison of aerodynamic data based on the difference of a model support system were investigated. The result showed that this system is very effective.

  15. Two-dimensional analytical model for hetero-junction double-gate tunnel field-effect transistor with a stacked gate-oxide structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui Fang; Gui Guan, Bang

    2017-05-01

    A two-dimensional analytical model for hetero-junction double-gate tunnel FETs (DG TFETs) with a stacked gate-oxide structure is proposed in this paper. The effects of both the channel mobile charges and source/drain depletion regions on the channel potential profile are considered for the higher accuracy of the proposed model. Poisson’s equation is solved using the superposition principle and Fourier series solution to model the channel potential. The band-to-band tunneling generation rate is expressed as a function of the channel electric field derived from the channel potential and then integrated analytically to derive the drain current of the hetero-junction DG TFETs with a stacked gate-oxide structure using the shortest tunneling path. The effects of device parameters on the channel potential, drain current, and transconductance are investigated. Very good agreements are observed between the model calculations and the simulated results.

  16. Heat flux and shock shape measurements on an Aeroassist Flight Experiment model in a high enthalpy free piston shock tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, S. L.; Mudford, N. R.; Hackett, C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of heat flux and shock shapes made on a 2.08 percent scale model of the proposed Aeroassist Flight Experiment model in a high enthalpy free piston shock tunnel T3 at the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia. The enthalpy and Reynolds number range covered were 7.5 MJ/kg to 20 MJ/kg and 150,000 to 270,000 per meter respectively. The test Mach number varied between 7.5 and 8. Two test gases, air and nitrogen, were used and the model angle of attack varied from -10 deg to +10 deg to the free stream. The results are discussed and compared to the Mach 10 cold hypersonic air data as obtained in the Langley 31 inch Mach 10 Facility as well as the perfect gas CFD calculations of NASA LaRC.

  17. Maximum Smoke Temperature in Non-Smoke Model Evacuation Region for Semi-Transverse Tunnel Fire

    OpenAIRE

    B. Lou; Y. Qiu; X. Long

    2017-01-01

    Smoke temperature distribution in non-smoke evacuation under different mechanical smoke exhaust rates of semi-transverse tunnel fire were studied by FDS numerical simulation in this paper. The effect of fire heat release rate (10MW 20MW and 30MW) and exhaust rate (from 0 to 160m3/s) on the maximum smoke temperature in non-smoke evacuation region was discussed. Results show that the maximum smoke temperature in non-smoke evacuation region decreased with smoke exhaust rate. Plug-holing was obse...

  18. First-principles modelling of scanning tunneling microscopy using non-equilibrium Green's functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, H.P.; Rauba, J.M.C.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of electron transport processes in nano-scale architectures plays a crucial role in the development of surface chemistry and nano-technology. Experimentally, an important driving force within this research area has been the concurrent refinements of scanning tunneling microscopy...... into account. As an illustrating example we apply the NEGF-STM method to the Si(001)(2x1):H surface with sub-surface P doping and discuss the results in comparison to the Bardeen and Tersoff-Hamann methods....

  19. Reduced resistance drift in tunnel junctions using confined tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcikowski, Z. S.; Pomeroy, J. M.

    2017-11-01

    Metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junctions with the aluminum oxide tunnel barriers confined between cobalt electrodes exhibit less resistance drift over time than junctions that utilize a thick, unconfined aluminum electrode. The improved long time stability is attributed to better initial oxide quality achieved through confinement (use of a potential energy well for the oxygen) and plasma oxidation. In this work, Co/AlOx/Co and Co/Al/AlOx/Co tunnel junction aging is compared over a period of approximately 9 months using transport measurements and Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) based modelling. The Co/AlOx/Co (confined) tunnel junction resistance increased by (32 ± 6) % over 5400 h, while Co/Al/AlOx/Co (unconfined) tunnel junction resistance increased by (85 ± 23) % over 5200 h. Fit parameters for the tunnel barrier width and potential energy barriers were extracted using WKB transport modelling. These values change only a small amount in the confined Co/AlOx/Co tunnel junction but show a significant drift in the unconfined Co/AlOx/Co tunnel junction.

  20. Wind Tunnel Test of a Risk-Reduction Wing/Fuselage Model to Examine Juncture-Flow Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Neuhart, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    A wing/fuselage wind-tunnel model was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel in preparation for a highly-instrumented Juncture Flow Experiment to be conducted in the same facility. This test, which was sponsored by the NASA Transformational Tool and Technologies Project, is part of a comprehensive set of experimental and computational research activities to develop revolutionary, physics-based aeronautics analysis and design capability. The objectives of this particular test were to examine the surface and off-body flow on a generic wing/body combination to: 1) choose a final wing for a future, highly instrumented model, 2) use the results to facilitate unsteady pressure sensor placement on the model, 3) determine the area to be surveyed with an embedded laser-doppler velocimetry (LDV) system, 4) investigate the primary juncture corner- flow separation region using particle image velocimetry (PIV) to see if the particle seeding is adequately entrained and to examine the structure in the separated region, and 5) to determine the similarity of observed flow features with those predicted by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This report documents the results of the above experiment that specifically address the first three goals. Multiple wing configurations were tested at a chord Reynolds number of 2.4 million. Flow patterns on the surface of the wings and in the region of the wing/fuselage juncture were examined using oil- flow visualization and infrared thermography. A limited number of unsteady pressure sensors on the fuselage around the wing leading and trailing edges were used to identify any dynamic effects of the horseshoe vortex on the flow field. The area of separated flow in the wing/fuselage juncture near the wing trailing edge was observed for all wing configurations at various angles of attack. All of the test objectives were met. The staff of the 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel provided outstanding support and delivered

  1. Evaluation of the source area of rooftop scalar measurements in London, UK using wind tunnel and modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, Aidan; Boon, Alex; Barlow, Janet; Hayden, Paul; Robins, Alan

    2014-05-01

    The source area of an instrument is an estimate of the area of ground over which the measurement is generated. Quantification of the source area of a measurement site provides crucial context for analysis and interpretation of the data. A range of computational models exists to calculate the source area of an instrument, but these are usually based on assumptions which do not hold for instruments positioned very close to the surface, particularly those surrounded by heterogeneous terrain i.e. urban areas. Although positioning instrumentation at higher elevation (i.e. on masts) is ideal in urban areas, this can be costly in terms of installation and maintenance costs and logistically difficult to position instruments in the ideal geographical location. Therefore, in many studies, experimentalists turn to rooftops to position instrumentation. Experimental validations of source area models for these situations are very limited. In this study, a controlled tracer gas experiment was conducted in a wind tunnel based on a 1:200 scale model of a measurement site used in previous experimental work in central London. The detector was set at the location of the rooftop site as the tracer was released at a range of locations within the surrounding streets and rooftops. Concentration measurements are presented for a range of wind angles, with the spread of concentration measurements indicative of the source area distribution. Clear evidence of wind channeling by streets is seen with the shape of the source area strongly influenced by buildings upwind of the measurement point. The results of the wind tunnel study are compared to scalar concentration source areas generated by modelling approaches based on meteorological data from the central London experimental site and used in the interpretation of continuous carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration data. Initial conclusions will be drawn as to how to apply scalar concentration source area models to rooftop measurement sites and

  2. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Measurements on the NASA Common Research Model in the NASA 11-ft Transonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James H.

    2011-01-01

    The luminescence lifetime technique was used to make pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) measurements on a 2.7% Common Research Model in the NASA Ames 11ft Transonic Wind Tunnel. PSP data were obtained on the upper and lower surfaces of the wing and horizontal tail, as well as one side of the fuselage. Data were taken for several model attitudes of interest at Mach numbers between 0.70 and 0.87. Image data were mapped onto a three-dimensional surface grid suitable both for comparison with CFD and for integration of pressures to determine loads. Luminescence lifetime measurements were made using strobed LED (light-emitting diode) lamps to illuminate the PSP and fast-framing interline transfer cameras to acquire the PSP emission.

  3. Application of system identification to analytic rotor modeling from simulated and wind tunnel dynamic test data, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Banerjee, D.

    1977-01-01

    An introduction to aircraft state and parameter identification methods is presented. A simplified form of the maximum likelihood method is selected to extract analytical aeroelastic rotor models from simulated and dynamic wind tunnel test results for accelerated cyclic pitch stirring excitation. The dynamic inflow characteristics for forward flight conditions from the blade flapping responses without direct inflow measurements were examined. The rotor blades are essentially rigid for inplane bending and for torsion within the frequency range of study, but flexible in out-of-plane bending. Reverse flow effects are considered for high rotor advance ratios. Two inflow models are studied; the first is based on an equivalent blade Lock number, the second is based on a time delayed momentum inflow. In addition to the inflow parameters, basic rotor parameters like the blade natural frequency and the actual blade Lock number are identified together with measurement bias values. The effect of the theoretical dynamic inflow on the rotor eigenvalues is evaluated.

  4. Tunnelling Effects in Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL ⎜ ARTICLE. Tunnelling Effects in Chemistry. Molecules in the Strange Quantum World. Sharmistha Karmakar, Deepthi Jose and Ayan Datta. (left) Sharmistha Karmakar is doing her PhD in the group of. Ayan Datta, IACS,. Kolkata. Her research interests are modelling molecules with strong optical absorbtion and.

  5. Distinction between the Poole-Frenkel and tunneling models of electric-field-stimulated carrier emission from deep levels in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganichev, S. D.; Ziemann, E.; Prettl, W.; Yassievich, I. N.; Istratov, A. A.; Weber, E. R.

    2000-01-01

    The enhancement of the emission rate of charge carriers from deep-level defects in electric field is routinely used to determine the charge state of the defects. However, only a limited number of defects can be satisfactorily described by the Poole-Frenkel theory. An electric field dependence different from that expected from the Poole-Frenkel theory has been repeatedly reported in the literature, and no unambiguous identification of the charge state of the defect could be made. In this article, the electric field dependencies of emission of carriers from DX centers in Al x Ga 1-x As:Te, Cu pairs in silicon, and Ge:Hg have been studied applying static and terahertz electric fields, and analyzed by using the models of Poole-Frenkel and phonon assisted tunneling. It is shown that phonon assisted tunneling and Poole-Frenkel emission are two competitive mechanisms of enhancement of emission of carriers, and their relative contribution is determined by the charge state of the defect and by the electric-field strength. At high-electric field strengths carrier emission is dominated by tunneling independently of the charge state of the impurity. For neutral impurities, where Poole-Frenkel lowering of the emission barrier does not occur, the phonon assisted tunneling model describes well the experimental data also in the low-field region. For charged impurities the transition from phonon assisted tunneling at high fields to Poole-Frenkel effect at low fields can be traced back. It is suggested that the Poole-Frenkel and tunneling models can be distinguished by plotting logarithm of the emission rate against the square root or against the square of the electric field, respectively. This analysis enables one to unambiguously determine the charge state of a deep-level defect. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  6. Comparison of Speed-Up Over Hills Derived from Wind-Tunnel Experiments, Wind-Loading Standards, and Numerical Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei Pirooz, Amir A.; Flay, Richard G. J.

    2018-03-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of the speed-up provided in several wind-loading standards by comparison with wind-tunnel measurements and numerical predictions, which are carried out at a nominal scale of 1:500 and full-scale, respectively. Airflow over two- and three-dimensional bell-shaped hills is numerically modelled using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method with a pressure-driven atmospheric boundary layer and three different turbulence models. Investigated in detail are the effects of grid size on the speed-up and flow separation, as well as the resulting uncertainties in the numerical simulations. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical prediction of speed-up, as well as the wake region size and location, with that according to large-eddy simulations and the wind-tunnel results. The numerical results demonstrate the ability to predict the airflow over a hill with good accuracy with considerably less computational time than for large-eddy simulation. Numerical simulations for a three-dimensional hill show that the speed-up and the wake region decrease significantly when compared with the flow over two-dimensional hills due to the secondary flow around three-dimensional hills. Different hill slopes and shapes are simulated numerically to investigate the effect of hill profile on the speed-up. In comparison with more peaked hill crests, flat-topped hills have a lower speed-up at the crest up to heights of about half the hill height, for which none of the standards gives entirely satisfactory values of speed-up. Overall, the latest versions of the National Building Code of Canada and the Australian and New Zealand Standard give the best predictions of wind speed over isolated hills.

  7. Dispersion Modeling of the Air Pollution, Emitted by the Traffic in the Transport Tunnel under the Old Town of Plovdiv, Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Takuchev

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Аir quality control and management is one of the areas in which Europe has been the most active in recent years. Air quality assessment is the process of determining the nature of ambient air pollution using monitoring and supplementary techniques such as modelling. Aim of this study was to evaluate the air pollution as a result of the traffic in the transport tunnel of “Tsar Boris III Obedinitel” Boulevard, situated under the Architectural Reserve “Old Town” in the central part of Plovdiv. Analyses included two consequent steps: (i calculating the emissions of exhaused gases from the motor vehicles in the tunnel using the dispersion modeling software; (ii comparing the values obtained with data from the automatic measuring station of the air quality, located in proximity of the tunnel. Our study revealed that the main air pollutant in the tunnel is the nitrogen oxides whose concentrations were 4 to 6 times higher than TLV. Carbon oxide concentrations were 5 times lower than TLV and those of the soot – two times lower. Curves of the NOx, CO and dust concentrations changes in both cases (modelled and measured, respectively are parallel which confirms the validity of the model used.

  8. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - image interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maca, F.

    1998-01-01

    The basic ideas of image interpretation in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy are presented using simple quantum-mechanical models and supplied with examples of successful application. The importance is stressed of a correct interpretation of this brilliant experimental surface technique

  9. The role of local tunneling states in superconductivity at disordered interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, B.D.; Simanek, E.

    1982-01-01

    The origin of the enhancement of the superconducting transition temperature caused by the presence of disordered interfaces is studied. An enhancement mechanism involving the tunneling of the conduction electrons from metal into the local state coupled to the ''two-level state systems'' in the interfaces region, is considered. In this model, the reduction of the tunneling matrix elements by orthogonality blocking can be avoided. (author)

  10. Numerical solution of multiband k.p model for tunnelling in type-II heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Botha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new and very general method was developed for calculating the charge and spin-resolved electron tunnelling in type-II heterojunctions. Starting from a multiband k.p description of the bulk energy-band structure, a multiband k.p Riccati equation was derived. The reflection and transmission coefficients were obtained for each channel by integrating the Riccati equation over the entire heterostructure. Numerical instability was reduced through this method, in which the multichannel log-derivative of the envelope function matrix, rather than the envelope function itself, was propagated. As an example, a six-band k.p Hamiltonian was used to calculate the current-voltage characteristics of a 10-nm wide InAs/ GaSb/InAs single quantum well device which exhibited negative differential resistance at room temperature. The calculated current as a function of applied (bias voltage was found to be in semiquantitative agreement with the experiment, a result which indicated that inelastic transport mechanisms do not contribute significantly to the valley currents measured in this particular device.

  11. Kinetics modeling of the drying of sunflower stem (Helianthus annuus L.) in a forced convection tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, R.; Vaca, M.; Terres, H.; Lizardi, A.; Morales, J.; Flores, J.; Chávez, S.

    2015-01-01

    The sunflower is an annual plant native to the Americas. It possesses a large inflorescence (flowering head), and its name is derived from the flower's shape and image, which is often used to capture the sun. The plant has a rough, broad, hairy stem, coarsely toothed, with rough leaves, and circular flower heads. The sunflower seeds are appreciated for their oil, which has become a widespread cooking ingredient. Leaves of the sunflower can be used as cattle feed, while the stems contain a fiber that may be used in paper production. Recently this flower has been used in phytoremediation of soils, contaminated with heavy metals. Sunflower has been probed as an efficient phytoextractor of chromium, lead, aluminum, zinc, cadmium from soil. In this work we present the experimental results of the drying of the sunflower stem, cut in 100 mm longitudinal sections, with diameters in the range of 11-18 mm. The aim was to obtain a dry and easy-to-handle final product, since these plants were originally cultivated in order to extract heavy metals from a polluted soil. The dried stems could then be easily confined or sent to recycle premises to concentrate the metals. The drying process was done in forced convection within a hot air tunnel. The used temperature was 60 °C, the velocity of air was 3 m/s and the required times were 8 hours. The initial average wet mass was 28 g and the final value was 5 g, resulting in the aimed product.

  12. Modeling and characterization of double resonant tunneling diodes for application as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehl, Zacharie; Suchet, Daniel; Julian, Anatole; Bernard, Cyril; Miyashita, Naoya; Gibelli, Francois; Okada, Yoshitaka; Guillemolles, Jean-Francois

    2017-02-01

    Double resonant tunneling barriers are considered for an application as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells. Experimental symmetric and asymmetric double resonant tunneling barriers are realized by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by temperature dependent current-voltage measurements. The negative differential resistance signal is enhanced for asymmetric heterostructures, and remains unchanged between low- and room-temperatures. Within Tsu-Esaki description of the tunnel current, this observation can be explained by the voltage dependence of the tunnel transmission amplitude, which presents a resonance under finite bias for asymmetric structures. This effect is notably discussed with respect to series resistance. Different parameters related to the electronic transmission of the structure and the influence of these parameters on the current voltage characteristic are investigated, bringing insights on critical processes to optimize in double resonant tunneling barriers applied to hot carrier solar cells.

  13. A study of the drooped leading edge airfoil. [on wind tunnel models to reduce spin entry after stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. D., Jr.; Barlow, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to examine various aspects of the drooped-leading edge airfoil which reduces the tendency for an airplane to enter a spin after stall occurs. Three baseline models were used for tests of two dimensional models: NACA 0015, 0014.6, and 0014.2. The 14.6% and 14.2% models were derived from NACA 0015 sections by increasing the chord and matching the profiles aft section. Force, balance data (lift, drag, pitching moment) were obtained for each model at a free-steam Reynold's number of 2.66 x 10 to the 6th power/m. In addition, oil flow visualization tests were performed at various angles of attack. An existing NACA 64 sub 1 A211 airfoil was used in a second series of tests. The leading edge flap was segmented in three parts which allowed various baseline/drooped leading edge configurations to be tested. Force balance and flow visualization tests were completer at chord Renolds numbers of 0.44 x 10 to the 6th power, 1.4 x 10 to the 6th power, and 2.11 x 10 to the 6th power. Test results are included.

  14. Quantum tunneling and field electron emission theories

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Shi-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Quantum tunneling is an essential issue in quantum physics. Especially, the rapid development of nanotechnology in recent years promises a lot of applications in condensed matter physics, surface science and nanodevices, which are growing interests in fundamental issues, computational techniques and potential applications of quantum tunneling. The book involves two relevant topics. One is quantum tunneling theory in condensed matter physics, including the basic concepts and methods, especially for recent developments in mesoscopic physics and computational formulation. The second part is the f

  15. INCAS SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu STOICA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The INCAS Subsonic Wind Tunnel is a closed circuit, continuous, atmospheric pressure facility with a maximum speed of 110 m/s. The test section is octagonal ,of 2.5 m wide, 2.0 m high and 4 m long. The tunnel is powered by a 1200 kW, air cooled variable speed DC motor which drives a 12 blade, 3.5 m diameter fan and is equipped with a six component pyramidal type external mechanical balance with a 700 Kgf maximum lift capacity.The angle of attack range is between -45º and +45º while the yaw angle range is between -140º and +216º .The data acquisition system has been modified recently to allow the recording of all test data on a PC - type computer using LABVIEW and a PXI – type chassis containing specialized data acquisition modules.The tunnel is equipped with a variable frequency electrical supply system for powered models and a 10 bar compressed air supply for pneumatic flow control applications.In the recent years the subsonic wind tunnel has been intensively used for tests within several European projects (AVERT, CESAR and others.

  16. Kinetics modeling of the drying of sunflower stem (Helianthus annuus L.) in a forced convection tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, R; Vaca, M; Terres, H; Lizardi, A; Morales, J; Flores, J; Chávez, S

    2015-01-01

    The sunflower is an annual plant native to the Americas. It possesses a large inflorescence (flowering head), and its name is derived from the flower's shape and image, which is often used to capture the sun. The plant has a rough, broad, hairy stem, coarsely toothed, with rough leaves, and circular flower heads. The sunflower seeds are appreciated for their oil, which has become a widespread cooking ingredient. Leaves of the sunflower can be used as cattle feed, while the stems contain a fiber that may be used in paper production. Recently this flower has been used in phytoremediation of soils, contaminated with heavy metals. Sunflower has been probed as an efficient phytoextractor of chromium, lead, aluminum, zinc, cadmium from soil. In this work we present the experimental results of the drying of the sunflower stem, cut in 100 mm longitudinal sections, with diameters in the range of 11-18 mm. The aim was to obtain a dry and easy-to-handle final product, since these plants were originally cultivated in order to extract heavy metals from a polluted soil. The dried stems could then be easily confined or sent to recycle premises to concentrate the metals. The drying process was done in forced convection within a hot air tunnel. The used temperature was 60 °C, the velocity of air was 3 m/s and the required times were 8 hours. The initial average wet mass was 28 g and the final value was 5 g, resulting in the aimed product

  17. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ... three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men. Early diagnosis and treatment are important ...

  18. Preliminary wing model tests in the variable density wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Max M

    1926-01-01

    This report contains the results of a series of tests with three wing models. By changing the section of one of the models and painting the surface of another, the number of models tested was increased to five. The tests were made in order to obtain some general information on the air forces on wing sections at a high Reynolds number and in particular to make sure that the Reynolds number is really the important factor, and not other things like the roughness of the surface and the sharpness of the trailing edge. The few tests described in this report seem to indicate that the air forces at a high Reynolds number are not equivalent to respective air forces at a low Reynolds number (as in an ordinary atmospheric wind tunnel). The drag appears smaller at a high Reynolds number and the maximum lift is increased in some cases. The roughness of the surface and the sharpness of the trailing edge do not materially change the results, so that we feel confident that tests with systematic series of different wing sections will bring consistent results, important and highly useful to the designer.

  19. Automated Boundary Conditions for Wind Tunnel Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2018-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of models tested in wind tunnels require a high level of fidelity and accuracy particularly for the purposes of CFD validation efforts. Considerable effort is required to ensure the proper characterization of both the physical geometry of the wind tunnel and recreating the correct flow conditions inside the wind tunnel. The typical trial-and-error effort used for determining the boundary condition values for a particular tunnel configuration are time and computer resource intensive. This paper describes a method for calculating and updating the back pressure boundary condition in wind tunnel simulations by using a proportional-integral-derivative controller. The controller methodology and equations are discussed, and simulations using the controller to set a tunnel Mach number in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are demonstrated.

  20. Parameter Estimation of Actuators for Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) Wind Tunnel Model with Analysis of Wear and Aerodynamic Loading Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Fung, Jimmy

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the development of transfer function models for the trailing-edge and upper and lower spoiler actuators of the Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) wind tunnel model for application to control system analysis and design. A simple nonlinear least-squares parameter estimation approach is applied to determine transfer function parameters from frequency response data. Unconstrained quasi-Newton minimization of weighted frequency response error was employed to estimate the transfer function parameters. An analysis of the behavior of the actuators over time to assess the effects of wear and aerodynamic load by using the transfer function models is also presented. The frequency responses indicate consistent actuator behavior throughout the wind tunnel test and only slight degradation in effectiveness due to aerodynamic hinge loading. The resulting actuator models have been used in design, analysis, and simulation of controllers for the BACT to successfully suppress flutter over a wide range of conditions.

  1. Modeling the hydraulic characteristics of a fractured rock mass with correlated fracture length and aperture: Application in the underground research tunnel at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Sang Hyuk; Jeon, Seok Won; Kwon, Sang Ki

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional discrete fracture network model was developed in order to simulate the hydraulic characteristics of a granitic rock mass at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) Underground Research Tunnel (KURT). The model N used a three-dimensional discrete fracture network (DFN), assuming a correlation between the length and aperture of the fractures, and a trapezoid flow path in the fractures. These assumptions that previous studies have not considered could make the developed model more practical and reasonable. The geologic and hydraulic data of the fractures were obtained in the rock mass at the KURT. Then, these data were applied to the developed fracture discrete network model. The model was applied in estimating the representative elementary volume (REV), the equivalent hydraulic conductivity tensors, and the amount of groundwater inflow into the tunnel. The developed discrete fracture network model can determine the REV size for the rock mass with respect to the hydraulic behavior and estimate the groundwater flow into the tunnel at the KURT. Therefore, the assumptions that the fracture length is correlated to the fracture aperture and the flow in a fracture occurs in a trapezoid shape appear to be effective in the DFN analysis used to estimate the hydraulic behavior of the fractured rock mass.

  2. CMAQ Involvement in Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Description of Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII). Different chemical transport models are applied by different groups over North America and Europe and evaluated against observations.

  3. [The Waste Package Project. Final report, July 1, 1995--February 27, 1996]: Volume 3, Stress study in faulted tunnel models by combined photoelastic measurements and finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Huang, Yuping.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this part of the Nuclear Waste Package Project research at UNLV is to investigate the stresses in a model of a faulted mountain and the effect of the fault on the stability of drifts in a proposed High Level Nuclear Waste Repository. An investigation was performed to develop a proper technique for analyzing the stresses in and around three adjacent scaled tunnel models, along with the stress concentration factors resulting from the existence of a fault that penetrates two of the three tunnels, at an inclined angel of 44 degrees to the horizontal plane. The results and experience gained from this investigation will be used in a future project in which a full-size repository drift and a penetrating fault will be modeled and analyzed

  4. Decay-out from low-lying superdeformed bands in Pb isotopes: Tunneling widths in a two-level mixing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, A.N.; Davidson, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed two-level mixing model of superdeformed decay is applied to evaluate the tunneling width between the superdeformed and normally deformed potential wells in 192 Pb and 194 Pb. Estimates are made of level densities and γ decay widths for levels in the normally deformed well, which are required for evaluation of the model. Experimental quasicontinuum results are used to suggest a spin-dependent reduction of the energy gap in the level spectrum, resulting in approximately constant level densities and decay widths in the normal well over the decay-out region for each isotope. However, it transpires that the model's prediction of the tunneling width is nearly independent of the normally deformed state widths for both isotopes. This observation is used to extract potential barrier heights for the two nuclei that depend mainly on experimentally determined values

  5. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  6. Static design of steel-concrete lining for traffic tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtasik, Karel; Mohyla, Marek; Hrubesova, Eva

    2017-09-01

    Article summarizes the results of research focused on the structural design of traffic tunnel linings that have been achieved in the framework of a research project TE01020168 that supports The Technology Agency of Czech Republic. This research aim is to find and develop a process for design structure parameters of tunnel linings. These are now mostly build up by a shotcrete technology. The shotcrete is commonly endorsed either with steel girders or steel fibres. Since the installation a lining structure is loaded while strength and deformational parameters of shotcrete start to rise till the setting time elapses. That’s reason why conventional approaches of reinforced concrete are not suitable. As well as there are other circumstances to step in shown in this article. Problem is solved by 3D analysis using numerical model that takes into account all the significant features of a tunnel lining construction process inclusive the interaction between lining structure with rock massive. Analysis output is a view into development of stress-strain state in respective construction parts of tunnel lining the whole structure around, including impact on stability of rock massive. The proposed method comprises all features involved in tunnel fabrication including geotechnics and construction technologies.

  7. Hippocampal and striatal involvement in cognitive tasks: a computational model

    OpenAIRE

    Fabian, Chersi; Neil, Burgess

    2018-01-01

    The hippocampus and the striatum support episodic and procedural memory, respectively, and "place" and "response" learning within spatial navigation. Recently this dichotomy has been linked to "model-based" and "model-free" reinforcement learning. Here we present a well-constrained neural model of how both systems support spatial navigation, and apply the same model to more abstract problems such as sequential decision making. In particular, we show that if a task can be transformed into a Ma...

  8. Variable speed hydrodynamic model of anAuv utilizing cross tunnel thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    controllability at low speeds to safely and effectively dock the vehicle in a subsea environment. Kongsberg, REMUS’s production company , has released a REMUS...actual REMUS controllers’ design and parameters being proprietary information. However, even with a slightly different controller implemented in the model...performed on the model until the behavior of the modeled REMUS closely approximated the characteristic dive and thrust behaviors of the actual vehicle

  9. Improved design and data accuracy through modeling and simulation of wind tunnel facilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. (AS&M) is proposing to develop and validate the procedures and modeling necessary to simulate, using computational...

  10. Submucosal tunneling techniques: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobara H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hideki Kobara,1 Hirohito Mori,1 Kazi Rafiq,2 Shintaro Fujihara,1 Noriko Nishiyama,1 Maki Ayaki,1 Tatsuo Yachida,1 Tae Matsunaga,1 Johji Tani,1 Hisaaki Miyoshi,1 Hirohito Yoneyama,1 Asahiro Morishita,1 Makoto Oryu,1 Hisakazu Iwama,3 Tsutomu Masaki1 1Department of Gastroenterology and Neurology, 2Department of Pharmacology, 3Life Science Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Miki-cho, Kita-Gun, Kagawa, Japan Abstract: Advances in endoscopic submucosal dissection include a submucosal tunneling technique, involving the introduction of tunnels into the submucosa. These tunnels permit safer offset entry into the peritoneal cavity for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Technical advantages include the visual identification of the layers of the gut, blood vessels, and subepithelial tumors. The creation of a mucosal flap that minimizes air and fluid leakage into the extraluminal cavity can enhance the safety and efficacy of surgery. This submucosal tunneling technique was adapted for esophageal myotomy, culminating in its application to patients with achalasia. This method, known as per oral endoscopic myotomy, has opened up the new discipline of submucosal endoscopic surgery. Other clinical applications of the submucosal tunneling technique include its use in the removal of gastrointestinal subepithelial tumors and endomicroscopy for the diagnosis of functional and motility disorders. This review suggests that the submucosal tunneling technique, involving a mucosal safety flap, can have potential values for future endoscopic developments. Keywords: submucosal endoscopy, submucosal tunneling method, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, peroral endoscopic myotomy, gastrointestinal subepithelial tumor, functional and motility disorders

  11. Spatial Extent Models for Natural Language Phrases Involving Directional Containment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, G.; de By, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of assigning a spatial extent to a text phrase such as central northern California', with the objective of allowing spatial interpretations of natural language, and consistency testing of complex utterances that involve multiple phrases from which spatial extent can be derived.

  12. Design Recommendations for Concrete Tunnel Linings : Volume II. Summary of Research and Proposed Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    The report presents design recommendations for concrete tunnel linings for transportation tunnels. The recommendations developed as a result of in-depth analysis and model testing of the behavior of concrete tunnel linings. The research addressed pro...

  13. Wind-tunnel tests on model wing with Fowler flap and specially developed leading-edge slot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weick, Fred E; Platt, Robert C

    1933-01-01

    An investigation was made in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel to find the increase in maximum lift coefficient which could be obtained by providing a model wing with both a Fowler trailing-edge extension flap and a Handley Page type leading-edge slot. A conventional Handley page slot proportioned to operate on the plain wing without a flap gave but a slight increase with the flap; so a special form of slot was developed to work more effectively with the flap. With the best combined arrangement the maximum lift coefficient based on the original area was increased from 3.17, for the Fowler wing, to 3.62. The minimum drag coefficient with both devices retracted was increased in approximately the same proportion. Tests were also made with the special-type slot on the plain wing without the flap. The special slot, used either with or without the Fowler flap, gave definitely higher values of the maximum lift coefficient than the slots of conventional form, with an increase of the same order in the minimum drag coefficient.

  14. Evaporation suppression from reservoirs using floating covers: Lab scale wind-tunnel observations and mechanistic model predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, Dani; Lehmann, Peter; Aminzadeh, Milad; Sommer, Martina; Wey, Hannah; Krentscher, Christiane; Wunderli, Hans; Breitenstein, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    The competition over dwindling fresh water resources is expected to intensify with projected increase in human population in arid regions, expansion of irrigated land and changes in climate and drought patterns. The volume of water stored in reservoirs would also increase to mitigate seasonal shortages due to rainfall variability and to meet irrigation water needs. By some estimates up to half of the stored water is lost to evaporation, thereby exacerbating the water scarcity problem. Recently, there is an upsurge in the use of self-assembling floating covers to suppress evaporation, yet the design and implementation remain largely empirical. We report a systematic experimental evaluation of different cover types and external drivers (radiation, wind, wind plus radiation) on evaporation suppression and energy balance of a 1.4 m2 basin placed in a wind-tunnel. Surprisingly, evaporation suppression by black and white floating covers (balls and plates) were similar despite significantly different energy balance regimes over the cover surfaces. Moreover, the evaporation suppression efficiency was a simple function of the uncovered area (square root of the uncovered fraction) with linear relations with the covered area in some cases. The thermally decoupled floating covers offer an efficient solution to the evaporation suppression with limited influence of the surface energy balance (water temperature for black and white covers was similar and remained nearly constant). The results will be linked with a predictive evaporation-energy balance model and issues of spatial scales and long exposure times will be studied.

  15. Constructing a generalized network design model to study air distribution in ventilation networks in subway with a single-track tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugin, IV

    2018-03-01

    In focus are the features of construction of the generalized design model for the network method to study air distribution in ventilation system in subway with the single-track tunnel. The generalizations, assumptions and simplifications included in the model are specified. The air distribution is calculated with regard to the influence of topology and air resistances of the ventilation network sections. The author studies two variants of the subway line: half-open and closed with dead end on the both sides. It is found that the total air exchange at a subway station depends on the station location within the line. The operating mode of fans remains unaltered in this case. The article shows that elimination of air leakage in the station ventilation room allows an increase in the air flow rate by 7–8% at the same energy consumption by fans. The influence of the stop of a train in the tunnel on the air distribution is illustrated.

  16. On the aero-elastic design of the DTU 10MW wind turbine blade for the LIFES50+ wind tunnel scale model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayati, I.; Belloli, M.; Bernini, L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper illustrates the aero-elastic optimal design, the realization and the verification of the wind tunnel scale model blades for the DTU 10 MW wind turbine model, within LIFES50+ project. The aerodynamic design was focused on the minimization of the difference, in terms of thrust coefficient...... and for different angles of attack. The aero-elastic design algorithm was set to define the optimal spanwise thickness over chord ratio (t/c), the chord length and the twist to match the first flapwise scaled natural frequency. An aluminium mould for the carbon fibre was CNC manufactured based on B-Splines CAD...... definition of the external geometry. Then the wind tunnel tests at Politecnico di Milano confirmed successful design and manufacturing approaches....

  17. Transport of dangerous goods through road tunnels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N O; Lacroix, Didier; Amundsen, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    A paper which describes the work of an OECD research group. The group has suggested a grouping of dangerous materials, a quantitative risk assessment model and a decision support model which should allow tunnel operators to determine if a given material should be allowed throug a given tunnel...

  18. Aeroelastic Analysis of SUGAR Truss-Braced Wing Wind-Tunnel Model Using FUN3D and a Nonlinear Structural Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Scott, Robert C.; Allen, Timothy J.; Sexton, Bradley W.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given in recent years to the design of highly flexible aircraft. The results of numerous studies demonstrate the significant performance benefits of strut-braced wing (SBW) and trussbraced wing (TBW) configurations. Critical aspects of the TBW configuration are its larger aspect ratio, wing span and thinner wings. These aspects increase the importance of considering fluid/structure and control system coupling. This paper presents high-fidelity Navier-Stokes simulations of the dynamic response of the flexible Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) truss-braced wing wind-tunnel model. The latest version of the SUGAR TBW finite element model (FEM), v.20, is used in the present simulations. Limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) of the TBW wing/strut/nacelle are simulated at angle-of-attack (AoA) values of -1, 0 and +1 degree. The modal data derived from nonlinear static aeroelastic MSC.Nastran solutions are used at AoAs of -1 and +1 degrees. The LCO amplitude is observed to be dependent on AoA. LCO amplitudes at -1 degree are larger than those at +1 degree. The LCO amplitude at zero degrees is larger than either -1 or +1 degrees. These results correlate well with both wind-tunnel data and the behavior observed in previous studies using linear aerodynamics. The LCO onset at zero degrees AoA has also been computed using unloaded v.20 FEM modes. While the v.20 model increases the dynamic pressure at which LCO onset is observed, it is found that the LCO onset at and above Mach 0.82 is much different than that produced by an earlier version of the FEM, v. 19.

  19. Application of Geostatistical Modelling to Study the Exploration Adequacy of Uniaxial Compressive Strength of Intact Rock alongthe Behesht-Abad Tunnel Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Doustmohammadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Uniaxial compressive strength (UCS is one of the most significant factors on the stability of underground excavation projects. Most of the time, this factor can be obtained by exploratory boreholes evaluation. Due to the large distance between exploratory boreholes in the majority of geotechnical projects, the application of geostatistical methods has increased as an estimator of rock mass properties. The present paper ties the estimation of UCS values of intact rock to the distance between boreholes of the Behesht-Abad tunnel in central Iran, using SGEMS geostatistical program. Variography showed that UCS estimation of intact rock using geostatistical methods is reasonable. The model establishment and validation was done after assessment that the model was trustworthy. Cross validation proved the high accuracy (98% and reliability of the model to estimate uniaxial compressive strength. The UCS values were then estimated along the tunnel axis. Moreover, using geostatistical estimation led to better identification of the pros and cons of geotechnical explorations in each location of tunnel route.

  20. Involving stakeholders in building integrated fisheries models using Bayesian methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haapasaari, Päivi Elisabet; Mäntyniemi, Samu; Kuikka, Sakari

    2013-01-01

    the potential of the study to contribute to the development of participatory modeling practices. It is concluded that the subjective perspective to knowledge, that is fundamental in Bayesian theory, suits participatory modeling better than a positivist paradigm that seeks the objective truth. The methodology...

  1. Involving stakeholders in building integrated fisheries models using Bayesian methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haapasaari, Päivi Elisabet; Mäntyniemi, Samu; Kuikka, Sakari

    2013-01-01

    A participatory Bayesian approach was used to investigate how the views of stakeholders could be utilized to develop models to help understand the Central Baltic herring fishery. In task one, we applied the Bayesian belief network methodology to elicit the causal assumptions of six stakeholders...... on factors that influence natural mortality, growth, and egg survival of the herring stock in probabilistic terms. We also integrated the expressed views into a meta-model using the Bayesian model averaging (BMA) method. In task two, we used influence diagrams to study qualitatively how the stakeholders frame...... the potential of the study to contribute to the development of participatory modeling practices. It is concluded that the subjective perspective to knowledge, that is fundamental in Bayesian theory, suits participatory modeling better than a positivist paradigm that seeks the objective truth. The methodology...

  2. Numerical modeling of water spray suppression of conveyor belt fires in a large-scale tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liming; Smith, Alex C

    2015-05-01

    Conveyor belt fires in an underground mine pose a serious life threat to miners. Water sprinkler systems are usually used to extinguish underground conveyor belt fires, but because of the complex interaction between conveyor belt fires and mine ventilation airflow, more effective engineering designs are needed for the installation of water sprinkler systems. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to simulate the interaction between the ventilation airflow, the belt flame spread, and the water spray system in a mine entry. The CFD model was calibrated using test results from a large-scale conveyor belt fire suppression experiment. Simulations were conducted using the calibrated CFD model to investigate the effects of sprinkler location, water flow rate, and sprinkler activation temperature on the suppression of conveyor belt fires. The sprinkler location and the activation temperature were found to have a major effect on the suppression of the belt fire, while the water flow rate had a minor effect.

  3. Preliminary modeling for solute transport in a fractured zone at the Korea underground research tunnel (KURT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chung Kyun; Lee, Jaek Wang; Baik, Min Hoon; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2012-01-01

    Migration tests were performed with conservative tracers in a fractured zone that had a single fracture of about 2.5 m distance at the KURT. To interpret the migration of the tracers in the fractured rock, a solute transport model was developed. A two dimensional variable aperture channel model was adopted to describe the fractured path and hydrology, and a particle tracking method was used for solute transport. The simulation tried not only to develop a migration model of solutes for open flow environments but also to produce ideas for a better understanding of solute behaviours in indefinable fracture zones by comparing them to experimental results. The results of our simulations and experiments are described as elution and breakthrough curves, and are quantified by momentum analysis. The main retardation mechanism of nonsorbing tracers, including matrixdiffusion, was investigated.

  4. Modeling of nonlinear responses for reciprocal transducers involving polarization switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Wang, Linxiang

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinearities and hysteresis effects in a reciprocal PZT transducer are examined by use of a dynamical mathematical model on the basis of phase-transition theory. In particular, we consider the perovskite piezoelectric ceramic in which the polarization process in the material can be modeled...... by Landau theory for the first-order phase transformation, in which each polarization state is associated with a minimum of the Landau free-energy function. Nonlinear constitutive laws are obtained by using thermodynamical equilibrium conditions, and hysteretic behavior of the material can be modeled...

  5. Temporal modeling of highway crash severity by involved person age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This project consisted of three studies, each described in the following sections. Three published documents were generated; these are listed in the last section. : Study 1: Temporal Modeling of Highway Crash Counts for Senior and Non-Senior Drivers;...

  6. In situ stresses in rock masses: methodology for its study in tunnel projects in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madirolas Perez, G.; Perucho Martinez, A.

    2014-01-01

    In situ stress is one of the main factors to be taken into account in the design of tunnels, as it can cause inadmissible stresses and strains leading to high deviations in the budgets. For that reason, the stress state is directly introduced into the numerical models used for the design of tunnels. In Spain, although several tunnels have been carried out with an important overburden in tectonically relevant zones, a quantitative determination of the stresses has not been usually included in civil work projects. Therefore, it is considered necessary to implement a routine procedure of study of civil work projects involving tunnels excavated in rock, and a new detailed methodology is proposed. The challenge is that project managers, who face works in which stresses may play a determinant role, may have a practical reference enabling them to optimize available resources and to include the real stress information in the design of underground works. (Author)

  7. Theory of superconducting tunneling without the tunneling Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    When a tunneling barrier is nearly transparent, the standard tunneling (or transfer) Hamiltonian approximation fails. The author describes the theory which is necessary for calculating the tunneling current in these cases, and illustrate it by comparing theory and experiment on superconductor/insulator/superconductor (SIS) junctions have ultra-thin tunnel barriers. This theory accurately explains the subgap structure which appears in the dynamical resistance of such SIS junctions, including many observed details which no previous theory has reproduced. The expression for the current through an SIS junction with an ultrathin barrier is given by I(t) = Re{Sigma/sub n/ J/sub n/ (omega/sub o/)e/sup in omega/o/sup t/} where omega/sub o/ = 2eV/h is the Josephson frequency, V is the bias voltage, and the J/sub n/ are voltage dependent coefficients, one for each positive or negative integer, n, and n=0. The relative sign of the terms involving cos(n omega/sub o/t) and sin(n omega/sub o/t) agrees with experiment, in contrast to previous theories of Josephson tunneling

  8. Approximate Model Checking of PCTL Involving Unbounded Path Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Samik; Ghosh, Arka P.; He, Ru

    We study the problem of applying statistical methods for approximate model checking of probabilistic systems against properties encoded as PCTL formulas. Such approximate methods have been proposed primarily to deal with state-space explosion that makes the exact model checking by numerical methods practically infeasible for large systems. However, the existing statistical methods either consider a restricted subset of PCTL, specifically, the subset that can only express bounded until properties; or rely on user-specified finite bound on the sample path length. We propose a new method that does not have such restrictions and can be effectively used to reason about unbounded until properties. We approximate probabilistic characteristics of an unbounded until property by that of a bounded until property for a suitably chosen value of the bound. In essence, our method is a two-phase process: (a) the first phase is concerned with identifying the bound k 0; (b) the second phase computes the probability of satisfying the k 0-bounded until property as an estimate for the probability of satisfying the corresponding unbounded until property. In both phases, it is sufficient to verify bounded until properties which can be effectively done using existing statistical techniques. We prove the correctness of our technique and present its prototype implementations. We empirically show the practical applicability of our method by considering different case studies including a simple infinite-state model, and large finite-state models such as IPv4 zeroconf protocol and dining philosopher protocol modeled as Discrete Time Markov chains.

  9. Modeling of ventilation experiment in opalinus clay formation of Mont Terri argillaceous rock tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaoyan; Liu Quansheng; Zhang Chengyuan

    2010-01-01

    Deep geological disposal is one of the most realistic methods of nuclear waste disposal, argillaceous rocks are being considered as potential host rocks for deep geological disposal. Our study starts with performing simulations of a laboratory drying test and a ventilation experiment for Mont Terri underground laboratory. It is an main interest of D2011, 5th stage of DECOVALEX. A 3-phase and 3-constituent hydraulic model is introduced to simulate the processes occurring during ventilation, including desaturation/resaturation in the rock, real phase change and air/rock interface, and to explore the Opalinus Clay parameter set There is a good agreement with experimental observations and calculation results from other D2011 participant teams. It means that the 3-phase and 2-constituent hydraulic model is accurate enough and it is a good start for full HMC understanding of the ventilation experiment on argillaceous rock. (authors)

  10. Numerical modeling of water spray suppression of conveyor belt fires in a large-scale tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Liming; Smith, Alex C.

    2015-01-01

    Conveyor belt fires in an underground mine pose a serious life threat to miners. Water sprinkler systems are usually used to extinguish underground conveyor belt fires, but because of the complex interaction between conveyor belt fires and mine ventilation airflow, more effective engineering designs are needed for the installation of water sprinkler systems. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to simulate the interaction between the ventilation airflow, the belt flame spr...

  11. Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

    CERN Multimedia

    Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert

    1981-01-01

    Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

  12. Modeling and Compensatory Processes Underlying Involvement in Child Care among Kibbutz-Reared Fathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Ruth; Bassi, Liat

    2012-01-01

    This study examined modeling and compensatory processes underlying the effects of an early paternal model on father involvement in child care. Drawing on social learning theory, it was hypothesized that father-son relationships would moderate the association between a father's involvement and his own father's involvement. A sample of 136 kibbutz…

  13. Modelling binaural processes involved in simultaneous reflection masking: limitations of current models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholz, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Masked thresholds were measured for a single test reflection, masked by the direct sound, as a function of the reflection delay. This was done for diotic as well as for dichotic stimulus presentations and all stimuli were presented via headphones. The input signal was a 200-ms long broadband noise......, such as normalized cross-correlation models (e.g., Bernstein et al., 1999, JASA, pp. 870-876), the power-addition model (Zurek, 1979, JASA, pp. 1750-1757), or Equalization-Cancellation-based models (e.g., Breebaart et al., 2001, JASA, pp. 1074-1088), cannot account for the psychoacoustical data. The present talk...... aims at understanding why these binaural models in their current form cannot describe the binaural mechanisms involved in reflection masking and a number of model-modifications are discussed that might help to overcome this deficiency....

  14. Resonant tunneling of electrons in quantum wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krive, I.V.; Shekhter, R.I.; Jonson, M.; Krive, I.V.

    2010-01-01

    We considered resonant electron tunneling in various nanostructures including single wall carbon nanotubes, molecular transistors and quantum wires formed in two-dimensional electron gas. The review starts with a textbook description of resonant tunneling of noninteracting electrons through a double-barrier structure. The effects of electron-electron interaction in sequential and resonant electron tunneling are studied by using Luttinger liquid model of electron transport in quantum wires. The experimental aspects of the problem (fabrication of quantum wires and transport measurements) are also considered. The influence of vibrational and electromechanical effects on resonant electron tunneling in molecular transistors is discussed.

  15. Heat transfer in the spin-boson model: a comparative study in the incoherent tunneling regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Dvira

    2014-07-01

    We study the transfer of heat in the nonequilibrium spin-boson model with an Ohmic dissipation. In the nonadiabatic limit we derive a formula for the thermal conductance based on a rate equation formalism at the level of the noninteracting blip approximation, valid for temperatures T>T(K), with T(K) as the Kondo temperature. We evaluate this expression analytically assuming either weak or strong couplings, and demonstrate that our results agree with exact relations. Far-from-equilibrium situations are further examined, showing a close correspondence to the linear response limit.

  16. Small--radiation-amplitude dynamical voltage model of an irradiated, externally unbiased Josephson tunnel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAdory, R.T. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A theory is presented for the nonequilibrium voltage states of an irradiated Josephson junction shunted by an external resistor but with no external current or voltage biasing. This device, referred to as a free-running Josephson junction, is modeled in a small--radiation-amplitude, deterministic regime extending the previous work of Shenoy and Agarwal. The time-averaged induced voltage is treated as a dynamical variable, the external radiation is modeled as a current source, and the induced junction-radiation vector potential, with and without a mode structure, is treated to first order in the driving currents. A dynamical equation for the time-averaged induced voltage yields a (nonequilibrium) steady-state relation between the time-averaged induced voltage and the incident radiation amplitude valid for a wide range of voltages, including zero. Regions of bistability occur in the voltage--versus--incident-amplitude curves, some of which are dependent on the external resistor. The zero-voltage state breaks down, as the external radiation amplitude is increased, at a critical value of the incident-radiation amplitude inversely proportional to the external resistance

  17. Influence of safety measures on the risks of transporting dangerous goods through road tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomanno, Frank; Haastrup, Palle

    2002-12-01

    Quantitative risk assessment (QRA) models are used to estimate the risks of transporting dangerous goods and to assess the merits of introducing alternative risk reduction measures for different transportation scenarios and assumptions. A comprehensive QRA model recently was developed in Europe for application to road tunnels. This model can assess the merits of a limited number of "native safety measures." In this article, we introduce a procedure for extending its scope to include the treatment of a number of important "nonnative safety measures" of interest to tunnel operators and decisionmakers. Nonnative safety measures were not included in the original model specification. The suggested procedure makes use of expert judgment and Monte Carlo simulation methods to model uncertainty in the revised risk estimates. The results of a case study application are presented that involve the risks of transporting a given volume of flammable liquid through a 10-km road tunnel.

  18. A Computational Modeling Mystery Involving Airfoil Trailing Edge Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Yeunun; Epps, Brenden

    2015-11-01

    In a curious result, Fairman (2002) observed that steady RANS calculations predicted larger lift than the experimentally-measured data for six different airfoils with non-traditional trailing edge treatments, whereas the time average of unsteady RANS calculations matched the experiments almost exactly. Are these results reproducible? If so, is the difference between steady and unsteady RANS calculations a numerical artifact, or is there a physical explanation? The goals of this project are to solve this thirteen year old mystery and further to model viscous/load coupling for airfoils with non-traditional trailing edges. These include cupped, beveled, and blunt trailing edges, which are common anti-singing treatments for marine propeller sections. In this talk, we present steady and unsteady RANS calculations (ANSYS Fluent) with careful attention paid to the possible effects of asymmetric unsteady vortex shedding and the modeling of turbulence anisotropy. The effects of non-traditional trailing edge treatments are visualized and explained.

  19. Use of a new model allowing controlled uniaxial loading to evaluate tendon healing in a bone tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeo, Scott A; Voigt, Clifford; Ma, Richard; Solic, John; Stasiak, Mark; Ju, Xiaodong; El-Amin, Saddiq; Deng, Xiang-Hua

    2016-05-01

    The optimal mechanical loading regimen for the healing of a tendon graft in a bone tunnel is unknown. We developed a rat model that directly tensions a healing tendon graft, without the use of confounding joint motion. Fifty cycles of either 0, 3, or 6 N of tension were applied to groups daily for 3 or 6 weeks. At 3 weeks the low load (3 N) group had the highest failure load (p = 0.009), but by 6 weeks there were no differences in failure load among groups. At 3 weeks the high load (6 N) group had greater osteoclast activity compared to the immobilized (0 N) group (p < 0.05), and by 6 weeks there were significantly more osteoclasts in the high load group compared to the low load group (p = 0.01). Bone volume fraction was higher in the immobilized group compared to the 3 N load group at 3 weeks (p = 0.014) and 6 weeks (p = 0.007). At 6 weeks, the immobilized group had greater trabecular number compared to both loading groups (p < 0.05). In conclusion, low magnitude loading had a beneficial early effect but continued loading led to poorer new bone formation over time and no beneficial effect at 6 weeks, perhaps due to delayed maturation from cumulative loads. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:852-859, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Evaluation of an Experimental Model for Flat-Fan Nozzles Drift in Wind Tunnel by Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H Fattahi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Each year, millions of liters of toxic liquid, are used to combat with pests and plant diseases in farms. The wide spread use of chemical pesticides causes great environmental hazards. Particles drift is one of the main problems in spraying which results in the contamination of farm lands, humans and animals. Management of particle size is regarded as the main factor in drift control. In this study, the effect of some parameters on the size of deposited particles on non-target areas was studied using statistical method. The effects of nozzle type (orifice size, spraying pressure, spraying boom height and wind speed as effective factors on drift were examined. A horizontal wind tunnel with working section of 0.47 m wide, 0.75 m height and 5.5 m long was used for testing. Experiment was performed in the form of factorial split-plot based on randomized complete block design with two replications. Droplets were measured in the treatment combinations of the type of flat-fan nozzle with three orifice area (11003- 0.87 mm2, 11004-1.18 mm2 and 11006- 1.8 mm2, spraying pressure (150, 275 and 400 kpa, wind speed (1, 2 and 3 m s-1 and the boom height of (0.35, 0.55 and 0.75 m. Water-sensitive papers were used at intervals of 0.8, 1.6 and 2.4 m from the tip of nozzles for detecting droplets size. The factors of pressure, speed and height had positive effects on the droplet size at the desired distance, but the effect of nozzle size on droplet size was negative. In the regression model the coefficients of speed was higher than the others.

  1. Introducing an Intervention Model for Fostering Affective Involvement with Persons Who Are Congenitally Deafblind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, M.A.W.; Janssen, M.J.; Ruijssenaars, A.J.J.M.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The article presented here introduces the Intervention Model for Affective Involvement (IMAI), which was designed to train staff members (for example, teachers, caregivers, support workers) to foster affective involvement during interaction and communication with persons who have congenital

  2. Wind-Tunnel Tests of a 1/6-Scale Model of Republic XF-12 Vertical Tail Incorporating a De-Icing Air Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLachlan, Robert; Miller, Sadie M.

    1945-01-01

    A 1/6-scale model of the Republic XF-12 vertical tail with stub fuselage, stub horizontal tail, and a de-icing air duct was tested in the Langley stability tunnel. The investigation consisted of a study of the effects of the duct, with and without air flow, on the aerodynamic characteristics of the model. The model tested was a revision of a model previously tested in the Langley stability tunnel. The revised model differed from the original model in that it incorporated a de-icing air duct, included a dorsal fin, and had a larger stub fuselage. A comparison of data obtained form tests of the original and revised models was made. The results of the investigation indicated that the air duct had very little effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of the model. A small change occurred in the variation of rudder hinge-moment coefficient with angle of attack but it is believed that this change can be corrected by a properly applied spring tab.

  3. Detailed hydrogeological investigation and conceptual modelling of an Alpine Main Valley crossed by the Brenner Bases tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Ulrich; San Nicolo, Lorenz; Zurlo, Raffaele

    2014-05-01

    The Brenner Base Tunnel (BBT) will cross the Isarco Valley near the village of Fortezza (BZ) at a depth of approximately 20 m below the riverbed of the Isarco river. The design of this roughly 1 km long stretch through alluvial sediments and below groundwater level required detailed knowledge of the prevailing hydrogeological conditions. In particular, it was necessary to determine if dewatering procedures were feasible and what the impacts on natural water flows in the aquifer after completion of the infrastructure will be. The study area is a typical Alpine valley, filled with alluvial sediments to a maximum depth of approximately 120m. The valley is bounded by granitic rocks with regional, water saturated main fault zones. In addition to the Isarco River, the area is shaped by two lateral rivers. The deposits of these lateral rivers form main alluvial fans. The aim of the study was to study the geological structure and the hydrogeological behaviour of this alpine valley. Therefor a detailed geological and hydrogeological investigation program was carried out, including a geological detailed mapping, construction of 40 boreholes (max. depth 120m; 35 are equipped to groundwater monitoring wells) and 5 large wells (55m - 87m). In order to determine the hydrodynamic characteristics of the aquifer in the valley, several pumping tests were carried out in different study stages: Stage 1: preliminary hydrogeological characterization of the area based on a pumping test carried out in the first well (100l/s pumping for 14 days). Stage 2: individual step tests and constant rate tests in additional four wells Stage 3: main pumping test including all the five wells with a maximum pumping rate of 450l/s for 14 days. The main topics oh the presentation are: - Overview of the BBT-project, the investigation area and investigation program - Description of the validated geological model of the main alpine valley - Results of the various hydraulic tests performed in the individual

  4. Nonlinearity of mechanical damping and stiffness of a spring-suspended sectional model system for wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guangzhong; Zhu, Ledong

    2015-10-01

    The wind tunnel test of spring-suspended sectional models (SSSM) is an important means in the research of wind engineering, which is very frequently employed to check the performances of flutter and vortex-induced resonance of bridges as well as to identify the various aerodynamic and aeroelastic parameters of bridge components, such as aerodynamic derivatives of self-excited forces. However, in practice, the mechanical damping ratios and natural frequencies of SSSM system are prevailingly supposed to be constant in the whole procedure of a test. This assumption often leads to notable errors of the test results or dispersion of the identified aerodynamic parameters because the mechanical damping ratios and natural frequencies of SSSM system are proved to vary in fact to some extent with the change of oscillating amplitude. On that account, the mechanical nonlinearity of SSSM system is investigated and discussed in this paper by taking a flat-closed box section as a research background. The conventional linear model is firstly proved to fail to predict precisely the long-duration free decay responses of the SSSM system. The formulae of equivalent linearization approximation (ELA) are then derived by using a multiple-scale method to model the mechanical nonlinearities in the first-order approximate sense, and a time-domain system identification method is proposed on this basis to identify equivalent amplitude-dependent (EAD) damping ratio and frequency. The proposed ELA and nonlinear system identification methods are then found to be precise enough to model the mechanical nonlinearities of SSSM system. The characteristics of EAD damping ratio and frequency of both the bending and torsional modes are then discussed in detail. It is then found that the major energy dissipation of SSSM vibrations at both the bending and torsional modes generally comes from the combined effect of viscous damping and quadratic damping. However, for the vibration at the bending mode with

  5. Development of procedures for the acquisition of metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) parts for use in the CSIR's wind tunnel models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Johnston, C

    2015-11-04

    Full Text Available The first Additive Manufacturing (AM) non-load-bearing, client furnished part was used in the CSIR’s wind tunnels in 2007. The advent of metal-grown materials, and the acquisition of machines to grow them in South Africa, has made it feasible...

  6. Role of Wind Tunnels in Aircraft Design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wind tunnel is an aerodynamic test facility. It is mostly used to study flow patterns around bodies and measure aerodynamic forces on them. The bodies (called models) are usually scaled down but geometrically similar versions of bodies of interest like an airplane or an automobile. The results from wind tunnel tests can be ...

  7. Test of an 0.8-Scale Model of the AH-64 Apache in the NASA Langley Full- Scale Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    available test rigs - the NASA Generalized Rotor Model System (GRMS) and the Navy Hub and Pylon Evaluation Rig (HPER). Computer programs studying the...I, USAAVSCOM TM-87-D-5 V US ARMY AVIATION SYSTEMS COMMAND TEST OF AN 0.8-SCALE MODEL OF THE AH-64 APACHE IN THE NASA LANGLEY FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL...I% DTIC TAB [ Unan~nounced %] J st f iaton By- PDistributIon / . . AvnI1qbIlitV C -Idns... Dist l SP cI~o: *5* % , -- 5 ~V . - ~5 \\ .\\% TABLE OF

  8. In-vehicle nitrogen dioxide concentrations in road tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ashley N.; Boulter, Paul G.; Roddis, Damon; McDonough, Liza; Patterson, Michael; Rodriguez del Barco, Marina; Mattes, Andrew; Knibbs, Luke D.

    2016-11-01

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding in-vehicle concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) during transit through road tunnels in urban environments. Furthermore, previous studies have tended to involve a single vehicle and the range of in-vehicle NO2 concentrations that vehicle occupants may be exposed to is not well defined. This study describes simultaneous measurements of in-vehicle and outside-vehicle NO2 concentrations on a route through Sydney, Australia that included several major tunnels, minor tunnels and busy surface roads. Tests were conducted on nine passenger vehicles to assess how vehicle characteristics and ventilation settings affected in-vehicle NO2 concentrations and the in-vehicle-to-outside vehicle (I/O) concentration ratio. NO2 was measured directly using a cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) technique that gave a high temporal and spatial resolution. In the major tunnels, transit-average in-vehicle NO2 concentrations were lower than outside-vehicle concentrations for all vehicles with cabin air recirculation either on or off. However, markedly lower I/O ratios were obtained with recirculation on (0.08-0.36), suggesting that vehicle occupants can significantly lower their exposure to NO2 in tunnels by switching recirculation on. The highest mean I/O ratios for NO2 were measured in older vehicles (0.35-0.36), which is attributed to older vehicles having higher air exchange rates. The results from this study can be used to inform the design and operation of future road tunnels and modelling of personal exposure to NO2.

  9. A model of the supplier involvement in the product innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine the product innovation in a supply chain by a supplier and derive a model for a supplier’s product innovation policy. The product innovation of a supplier can contribute to the long-term competitiveness for the supply chain, and as it is for many supply chains a major factor, it should be considered in the development of strategies for a supplier. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of supplier product innovation as a strategic tool to enhance the competitiveness and viability of supply chain. This paper explores the dynamic research performance of a supplier with endogenous time preference under a given arrangement of product innovation. We find that the optimal effort level and the achieved product innovation obey a saddle point path, or show tremendous fluctuations even without introducing the stochastic nature of product innovative activity. We also find that the fluctuation frequency is largely dependent both on the supplier’s characteristics such as supplier’s product innovative ability and on the nature of product innovation process per se. Short-run analyses are also made on the effect of supply chain cooperation in the product innovation process.

  10. The independent spreaders involved SIR Rumor model in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhen; Tang, Shaoting; Zhang, Xiao; Zheng, Zhiming

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies of rumor or information diffusion process in complex networks show that in contrast to traditional comprehension, individuals who participate in rumor spreading within one network do not always get the rumor from their neighbors. They can obtain the rumor from different sources like online social networks and then publish it on their personal sites. In our paper, we discuss this phenomenon in complex networks by adopting the concept of independent spreaders. Rather than getting the rumor from neighbors, independent spreaders learn it from other channels. We further develop the classic "ignorant-spreaders-stiflers" or SIR model of rumor diffusion process in complex networks. A steady-state analysis is conducted to investigate the final spectrum of the rumor spreading under various spreading rate, stifling rate, density of independent spreaders and average degree of the network. Results show that independent spreaders effectively enhance the rumor diffusion process, by delivering the rumor to regions far away from the current rumor infected regions. And though the rumor spreading process in SF networks is faster than that in ER networks, the final size of rumor spreading in ER networks is larger than that in SF networks.

  11. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  12. Quantum theory of tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Razavy, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    In this revised and expanded edition, in addition to a comprehensible introduction to the theoretical foundations of quantum tunneling based on different methods of formulating and solving tunneling problems, different semiclassical approximations for multidimensional systems are presented. Particular attention is given to the tunneling of composite systems, with examples taken from molecular tunneling and also from nuclear reactions. The interesting and puzzling features of tunneling times are given extensive coverage, and the possibility of measurement of these times with quantum clocks are critically examined. In addition by considering the analogy between evanescent waves in waveguides and in quantum tunneling, the times related to electromagnetic wave propagation have been used to explain certain aspects of quantum tunneling times. These topics are treated in both non-relativistic as well as relativistic regimes. Finally, a large number of examples of tunneling in atomic, molecular, condensed matter and ...

  13. Road and Railroad Tunnels

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Tunnels in the United States According to the HSIP Tiger Team Report, a tunnel is defined as a linear underground passageway open at both ends. This dataset is based...

  14. Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is a continuous flow wind-tunnel facility capable of speeds up to Mach 1.2 at stagnation pressures up to one atmosphere. The TDT...

  15. Major SSC tunneling begins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    In Texas, work has been completed on the first on the Superconducting Supercollider's major shafts. Now a boring machine has started driving the fifty-four mile elliptical accelerator tunnel. To date, contracts let for the tunnel have come in far below preliminary estimates. Five of the main fourteen foot diameter tunnel contracts have been awarded for a total of 107.4 million dollars, about forty million dollars below estimates. These contracts represent %60 percent of the total tunneling project

  16. Parents as Role Models: Parental Behavior Affects Adolescents' Plans for Work Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Bettina S.; Freund, Alexandra M.

    2011-01-01

    This study (N = 520 high-school students) investigates the influence of parental work involvement on adolescents' own plans regarding their future work involvement. As expected, adolescents' perceptions of parental work behavior affected their plans for own work involvement. Same-sex parents served as main role models for the adolescents' own…

  17. Wind tunnel CESAR model

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian DOBRE

    2009-01-01

    This document comprises the geometrical definition of a Fowler flap for the LC2B laminar airfoilprovided by DLR. For the purpose of small aircraft, the single slotted Fowler flap for the LC2Blaminar airfoil was designed as a high lift device. This solution ensures a high performance and asimplicity of the design suitable for the intended category of aircraft

  18. Wind tunnel CESAR model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian DOBRE

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This document comprises the geometrical definition of a Fowler flap for the LC2B laminar airfoilprovided by DLR. For the purpose of small aircraft, the single slotted Fowler flap for the LC2Blaminar airfoil was designed as a high lift device. This solution ensures a high performance and asimplicity of the design suitable for the intended category of aircraft

  19. Tunneling time, exit time and exit momentum in strong field tunnel ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teeny, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. It is still an open question when does the electron tunnel ionize and how long is the duration of tunneling. In this work we solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in one and two dimensions and use ab initio quantum calculations in order to answer these questions. Additionally, we determine the exit momentum of the tunnel ionized electron from first principles. We find out results that are different from the assumptions of the commonly employed two-step model, which assumes that the electron ionizes at the instant of electric field maximum with a zero momentum. After determining the quantum final momentum distribution of tunnel ionized electrons we show that the two-step model fails to predict the correct final momentum. Accordingly we suggest how to correct the two-step model. Furthermore, we determine the instant at which tunnel ionization starts, which turns out to be different from the instant usually assumed. From determining the instant at which it is most probable for the electron to enter the tunneling barrier and the instant at which it exits we determine the most probable time spent under the barrier. Moreover, we apply a quantum clock approach in order to determine the duration of tunnel ionization. From the quantum clock we determine an average tunneling time which is different in magnitude and origin with respect to the most probable tunneling time. By defining a probability distribution of tunneling times using virtual detectors we relate both methods and explain the apparent discrepancy. The results found have in general an effect on the interpretation of experiments that measure the spectra of tunnel ionized electrons, and specifically on the calibration of the so called attoclock experiments, because models with imprecise assumptions are usually employed in order to interpret experimental results.

  20. Tunneling time, exit time and exit momentum in strong field tunnel ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeny, Nicolas

    2016-10-18

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. It is still an open question when does the electron tunnel ionize and how long is the duration of tunneling. In this work we solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in one and two dimensions and use ab initio quantum calculations in order to answer these questions. Additionally, we determine the exit momentum of the tunnel ionized electron from first principles. We find out results that are different from the assumptions of the commonly employed two-step model, which assumes that the electron ionizes at the instant of electric field maximum with a zero momentum. After determining the quantum final momentum distribution of tunnel ionized electrons we show that the two-step model fails to predict the correct final momentum. Accordingly we suggest how to correct the two-step model. Furthermore, we determine the instant at which tunnel ionization starts, which turns out to be different from the instant usually assumed. From determining the instant at which it is most probable for the electron to enter the tunneling barrier and the instant at which it exits we determine the most probable time spent under the barrier. Moreover, we apply a quantum clock approach in order to determine the duration of tunnel ionization. From the quantum clock we determine an average tunneling time which is different in magnitude and origin with respect to the most probable tunneling time. By defining a probability distribution of tunneling times using virtual detectors we relate both methods and explain the apparent discrepancy. The results found have in general an effect on the interpretation of experiments that measure the spectra of tunnel ionized electrons, and specifically on the calibration of the so called attoclock experiments, because models with imprecise assumptions are usually employed in order to interpret experimental results.

  1. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Anupam

    2001-02-01

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the space of magnetic fields, known as diabolical points. This phenomena is explained in terms of two approaches, one based on spin-coherent-state path integrals, and the other on a generalization of the phase integral (or WKB) method to difference equations. Explicit formulas for the diabolical points are obtained for a model Hamiltonian.

  2. Tunneling field effect transistor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to the state-of-the art in tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs). Readers will learn the TFETs physics from advanced atomistic simulations, the TFETs fabrication process and the important roles that TFETs will play in enabling integrated circuit designs for power efficiency. · Provides comprehensive reference to tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs); · Covers all aspects of TFETs, from device process to modeling and applications; · Enables design of power-efficient integrated circuits, with low power consumption TFETs.

  3. Using a Person-Environment Fit Model to Predict Job Involvement and Organizational Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Gary J.

    1987-01-01

    Using a sample of registered nurses (N=228) from a large urban hospital, this longitudinal study tested the applicability of a person-environment fit model for predicting job involvement and organizational commitment. Results indicated the proposed person-environment fit model is useful for predicting job involvement, but not organizational…

  4. Examining the effect of adverse geological conditions on jamming of a single shielded TBM in Uluabat tunnel using numerical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohola Hasanpour

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Severe shield jamming events have been reported during excavation of Uluabat tunnel through adverse geological conditions, which resulted in several stoppages at advancing a single shielded tunnel boring machine (TBM. To study the jamming mechanism, three-dimensional (3D simulation of the machine and surrounding ground was implemented using the finite difference code FLAC3D. Numerical analyses were performed for three sections along the tunnel with a higher risk for entrapment due to the combination of overburden and geological conditions. The computational results including longitudinal displacement contours and ground pressure profiles around the shield allow a better understanding of ground behavior within the excavation. Furthermore, they allow realistically assessing the impact of adverse geological conditions on shield jamming. The calculated thrust forces, which are required to move the machine forward, are in good agreement with field observations and measurements. It also proves that the numerical analysis can effectively be used for evaluating the effect of adverse geological environment on TBM entrapments and can be applied to prediction of loads on the shield and pre-estimating of the required thrust force during excavation through adverse ground conditions.

  5. Interband resonant transitions in two-dimensional hexagonal lattices: Rabi oscillations, Zener tunnelling, and tunnelling of phase dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchesnovich, Valery S; Desyatnikov, Anton S; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2008-09-01

    We study, analytically and numerically, the dynamics of interband transitions in two-dimensional hexagonal periodic photonic lattices. We develop an analytical approach employing the Bragg resonances of different types and derive the effective multi-level models of the Landau-Zener-Majorana type. For two-dimensional periodic potentials without a tilt, we demonstrate the possibility of the Rabi oscillations between the resonant Fourier amplitudes. In a biased lattice, i.e., for a two-dimensional periodic potential with an additional linear tilt, we identify three basic types of the interband transitions or Zener tunnelling. First, this is a quasi-one-dimensional tunnelling that involves only two Bloch bands and occurs when the Bloch index crosses the Bragg planes away from one of the high-symmetry points. In contrast, at the high-symmetry points (i.e., at the M and Gamma points), the Zener tunnelling is essentially two-dimensional, and it involves either three or six Bloch bands being described by the corresponding multi-level Landau-Zener-Majorana systems. We verify our analytical results by numerical simulations and observe an excellent agreement. Finally, we show that phase dislocations, or optical vortices, can tunnel between the spectral bands preserving their topological charge. Our theory describes the propagation of light beams in fabricated or optically-induced two-dimensional photonic lattices, but it can also be applied to the physics of cold atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates tunnelling in tilted two-dimensional optical potentials and other types of resonant wave propagation in periodic media.

  6. Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Michael Warren; Masear, Victoria; Chung, Kevin; Maupin, Kent; Andary, Michael; Amadio, Peter C.; Barth, Richard W.; Watters, William C.; Goldberg, Michael J.; Haralson, Robert H.; Turkelson, Charles M.; Wies, Janet L.

    2009-01-01

    This clinical practice guideline was created to improve patient care by outlining the appropriate information-gathering and decision-making processes involved in managing the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. The methods used to develop this clinical practice guideline were designed to combat bias, enhance transparency, and promote reproducibility. The guideline’s recommendations are as follows: The physician should obtain an accurate patient history. The physician should perform a physica...

  7. Modeling and optimization of a double-well double-barrier GaN/AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN resonant tunneling diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Gao, Bo; Gong, Min; Shi, Ruiying

    2017-06-01

    The influence of a GaN layer as a sub-quantum well for an AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) on device performance has been investigated by means of numerical simulation. The introduction of the GaN layer as the sub-quantum well turns the dominant transport mechanism of RTD from the 3D-2D model to the 2D-2D model and increases the energy difference between tunneling energy levels. It can also lower the effective height of the emitter barrier. Consequently, the peak current and peak-to-valley current difference of RTD have been increased. The optimal GaN sub-quantum well parameters are found through analyzing the electrical performance, energy band, and transmission coefficient of RTD with different widths and depths of the GaN sub-quantum well. The most pronounced electrical parameters, a peak current density of 5800 KA/cm2, a peak-to-valley current difference of 1.466 A, and a peak-to-valley current ratio of 6.35, could be achieved by designing RTD with the active region structure of GaN/Al0.2Ga0.8 N/GaN/Al0.2Ga0.8 N (3 nm/1.5 nm/1.5 nm/1.5 nm).

  8. Geotechnical aspects of tunnel construction in deep clay formations for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Moor, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    The significant factors affecting the construction of tunnels in deep clay formations for radioactive waste disposal were outlined. Two aspects of tunneling were discussed; the feasibility of tunnel construction and changes in pore water pressure that might occur with time. Some results of model tunnel tests and analyses were presented. (U.K.)

  9. Reaction of long-lived radicals and vitamin C in γ-irradiated mammalian cells and their model system at 295 K. Tunneling reaction in biological system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takuro; Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Kosugi, Yoshio; Kumada, Takayuki; Koyama, Sinji; Kodama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masami.

    1996-01-01

    When golden hamster embryo (GHE) cells or concentrated albumin solution (0.1 kg dm -3 ) that is a model system of cells is irradiated with γ-rays at 295 K, organic radicals produced can be observed by ESR. The organic radicals survive at both 295 K and 310 K for such a long time as 20 hr. The long-lived radicals in GHE cells and the albumin solution react with vitamin C by the rate constants of 0.007 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and 0.014 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 , respectively. The long-lived radicals in human cells cause gene mutation, which is suppressed by addition of vitamin C. The isotope effect on the rate constant (k) for the reaction of the long-lived radicals and vitamin C has been studied in the albumin solution by use of protonated vitamin C and deuterated vitamin C. The isotope effect (k H /k D ) was more than 20-50 and was interpreted in terms of tunneling reaction. When GHE cells or the aqueous albumin solution (0.1 kg dm -3 ) is irradiated with γ-rays at 295 K, organic radicals produced survive for more than 24 hr at room temperature. Very recently we have found that vitamin C reacts with the long-lived organic radicals in the γ-irradiated albumin solution at high concentration of 0.1 kg dm -3 by the rate constant of 0.014 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . Since most of reactions in biological systems including the reaction of vitamin C are a transfer of a hydrogen atom or a proton that has a large wave character, it is generally expected that the tunneling reaction may play an important role in biological systems at room temperature. The studies of isotope effects on reactions will give an information on the contribution of tunneling reaction. (J.P.N.)

  10. Rudolf Hermann, wind tunnels and aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Charles A.; Coleman, Anne M.

    2008-04-01

    Rudolf Hermann was born on December 15, 1904 in Leipzig, Germany. He studied at the University of Leipzig and at the Aachen Institute of Technology. His involvement with wind tunnels began in 1934 when Professor Carl Wieselsberger engaged him to work at Aachen on the development of a supersonic wind tunnel. On January 6, 1936, Dr. Wernher von Braun visited Dr. Hermann to arrange for use of the Aachen supersonic wind tunnel for Army problems. On April 1, 1937, Dr. Hermann became Director of the Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the Army installation at Peenemunde. Results from the Aachen and Peenemunde wind tunnels were crucial in achieving aerodynamic stability for the A-4 rocket, later designated as the V-2. Plans to build a Mach 10 'hypersonic' wind tunnel facility at Kochel were accelerated after the Allied air raid on Peenemunde on August 17, 1943. Dr. Hermann was director of the new facility. Ignoring destruction orders from Hitler as WWII approached an end in Europe, Dr. Hermann and his associates hid documents and preserved wind tunnel components that were acquired by the advancing American forces. Dr. Hermann became a consultant to the Air Force at its Wright Field in November 1945. In 1951, he was named professor of Aeronautical Engineering at the University of Minnesota. In 1962, Dr. Hermann became the first Director of the Research Institute at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a position he held until he retired in 1970.

  11. Effects of deceptive packaging and product involvement on purchase intention: an elaboration likelihood model perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, H B

    2000-04-01

    From an Elaboration Likelihood Model perspective, it was hypothesized that postexposure awareness of deceptive packaging claims would have a greater negative effect on scores for purchase intention by consumers lowly involved rather than highly involved with a product (n = 40). Undergraduates who were classified as either highly or lowly (ns = 20 and 20) involved with M&Ms examined either a deceptive or non-deceptive package design for M&Ms candy and were subsequently informed of the deception employed in the packaging before finally rating their intention to purchase. As anticipated, highly deceived subjects who were low in involvement rated intention to purchase lower than their highly involved peers. Overall, the results attest to the robustness of the model and suggest that the model has implications beyond advertising effects and into packaging effects.

  12. A predictive analytic model for high-performance tunneling field-effect transistors approaching non-equilibrium Green's function simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, Ramon B.; Appenzeller, Joerg; Ilatikhameneh, Hesameddin; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    A new compact modeling approach is presented which describes the full current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of high-performance (aggressively scaled-down) tunneling field-effect-transistors (TFETs) based on homojunction direct-bandgap semiconductors. The model is based on an analytic description of two key features, which capture the main physical phenomena related to TFETs: (1) the potential profile from source to channel and (2) the elliptic curvature of the complex bands in the bandgap region. It is proposed to use 1D Poisson's equations in the source and the channel to describe the potential profile in homojunction TFETs. This allows to quantify the impact of source/drain doping on device performance, an aspect usually ignored in TFET modeling but highly relevant in ultra-scaled devices. The compact model is validated by comparison with state-of-the-art quantum transport simulations using a 3D full band atomistic approach based on non-equilibrium Green's functions. It is shown that the model reproduces with good accuracy the data obtained from the simulations in all regions of operation: the on/off states and the n/p branches of conduction. This approach allows calculation of energy-dependent band-to-band tunneling currents in TFETs, a feature that allows gaining deep insights into the underlying device physics. The simplicity and accuracy of the approach provide a powerful tool to explore in a quantitatively manner how a wide variety of parameters (material-, size-, and/or geometry-dependent) impact the TFET performance under any bias conditions. The proposed model presents thus a practical complement to computationally expensive simulations such as the 3D NEGF approach

  13. Methodological approaches for tunnel classification according to ADR agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vagiokas, N.; Bletsas, A.; Nelisse, R.M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Past tunnel fire accidents have revealed the high impact of consequences on human life and infrastructure. Furthermore, accidents involving thermal radiation, overpressure and toxicity have even larger consequences when dangerous goods are involved. Therefore, special consideration should be given

  14. Spin-dependent tunnelling in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Mryasov, Oleg N; LeClair, Patrick R

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of electron tunnelling has been known since the advent of quantum mechanics, but continues to enrich our understanding of many fields of physics, as well as creating sub-fields on its own. Spin-dependent tunnelling (SDT) in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) has recently aroused enormous interest and has developed in a vigorous field of research. The large tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) observed in MTJs garnered much attention due to possible applications in non-volatile random-access memories and next-generation magnetic field sensors. This led to a number of fundamental questions regarding the phenomenon of SDT. In this review article we present an overview of this field of research. We discuss various factors that control the spin polarization and magnetoresistance in MTJs. Starting from early experiments on SDT and their interpretation, we consider thereafter recent experiments and models which highlight the role of the electronic structure of the ferromagnets, the insulating layer, and the ferromagnet/insulator interfaces. We also discuss the role of disorder in the barrier and in the ferromagnetic electrodes and their influence on TMR. (topical review)

  15. Modeling the Relations among Parental Involvement, School Engagement and Academic Performance of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alwan, Ahmed F.

    2014-01-01

    The author proposed a model to explain how parental involvement and school engagement related to academic performance. Participants were (671) 9th and 10th graders students who completed two scales of "parental involvement" and "school engagement" in their regular classrooms. Results of the path analysis suggested that the…

  16. The Development of a Structural Equation Model to Demonstrate the Correlations between Marijuana Use and Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherding, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    This quantitative study examined the effects of marijuana on academic and social involvement in undergraduates using a structural equation model. The study was conducted at a midsized comprehensive community college in the Midwest and was guided by Astin's (1985) theory of student involvement. A survey link was e-mailed to all 4,527 eligible…

  17. Examining a Causal Model of Early Drug Involvement Among Inner City Junior High School Youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Richard; And Others

    Reflecting the need to construct more inclusive, socially and culturally relevant conceptions of drug use than currently exist, the determinants of drug involvement among inner-city youths within the context of a causal model were investigated. The drug involvement of the Black and Puerto Rican junior high school girls and boys was hypothesized to…

  18. Multiscale modeling of current-induced switching in magnetic tunnel junctions using ab initio spin-transfer torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Matthew O. A.; Stamenova, Maria; Sanvito, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    There exists a significant challenge in developing efficient magnetic tunnel junctions with low write currents for nonvolatile memory devices. With the aim of analyzing potential materials for efficient current-operated magnetic junctions, we have developed a multi-scale methodology combining ab initio calculations of spin-transfer torque with large-scale time-dependent simulations using atomistic spin dynamics. In this work we introduce our multiscale approach, including a discussion on a number of possible schemes for mapping the ab initio spin torques into the spin dynamics. We demonstrate this methodology on a prototype Co/MgO/Co/Cu tunnel junction showing that the spin torques are primarily acting at the interface between the Co free layer and MgO. Using spin dynamics we then calculate the reversal switching times for the free layer and the critical voltages and currents required for such switching. Our work provides an efficient, accurate, and versatile framework for designing novel current-operated magnetic devices, where all the materials details are taken into account.

  19. Trajectories and traversal times in quantum tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zhi Hong.

    1989-01-01

    The classical concepts of trajectories and traversal times applied to quantum tunneling are discussed. By using the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, it is found that in a forbidden region of a multidimensional space the wave function can be described by two sets of trajectories, or equivalently by two sets of wave fronts. The trajectories belonging to different sets are mutually orthogonal. An extended Huygens construction is proposed to determine these wave fronts and trajectories. In contrast to the classical results in the allowed region, these trajectories couple to each other. However, if the incident wave is normal to the turning surface, the trajectories are found to be independent and can be determined by Newton's equations of motion with inverted potential and energy. The multidimensional tunneling theory is then applied to the scanning tunneling microscope to calculate the current density distribution and to derive the expressions for the lateral resolution and the surface corrugation amplitude. The traversal time in quantum tunneling, i.e. tunneling time, is found to depend on model calculations and simulations. Computer simulation of a wave packet tunneling through a square barrier is performed. Several approaches, including the phase method, Larmor clock, and time-dependent barrier model, are investigated. For a square barrier, two characteristic times are found: One is equal to the barrier width divided by the magnitude of the imaginary velocity; the other is equal to the decay length divided by the incident velocity. It is believed that the tunneling time can only be defined operationally

  20. About tunnelling times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Recami, E.

    1991-08-01

    In this paper, first we critically analyse the main theoretical definitions and calculations of the sub-barrier tunnelling and reflection times. Secondly, we propose a new, physically sensible definition of such durations, on the basis of a recent general formalism (already tested for other types of quantum collisions). At last, we discuss some results regarding temporal evolution of the tunnelling processes, and in particular the ''particle'' speed during tunnelling. (author). 36 refs, 1 fig

  1. The effect of density-of-state tails on band-to-band tunneling: Theory and application to tunnel field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant, S.; Schenk, A.

    2017-10-01

    It is demonstrated how band tail states in the semiconductor influence the performance of a Tunnel Field Effect Transistor (TFET). As a consequence of the smoothened density of states (DOS) around the band edges, the energetic overlap of conduction and valence band states occurs gradually at the onset of band-to-band tunneling (BTBT), thus degrading the sub-threshold swing (SS) of the TFET. The effect of the band tail states on the current-voltage characteristics is modelled quantum-mechanically based on the idea of zero-phonon trap-assisted tunneling between band and tail states. The latter are assumed to arise from a 3-dimensional pseudo-delta potential proposed by Vinogradov [1]. This model potential allows the derivation of analytical expressions for the generation rate covering the whole range from very strong to very weak localization of the tail states. Comparison with direct BTBT in the one-band effective mass approximation reveals the essential features of tail-to-band tunneling. Furthermore, an analytical solution for the problem of tunneling from continuum states of the disturbed DOS to states in the opposite band is found, and the differences to direct BTBT are worked out. Based on the analytical expressions, a semi-classical model is implemented in a commercial device simulator which involves numerical integration along the tunnel paths. The impact of the tail states on the device performance is analyzed for a nanowire Gate-All-Around TFET. The simulations show that tail states notably impact the transfer characteristics of a TFET. It is found that exponentially decaying band tails result in a stronger degradation of the SS than tail states with a Gaussian decay of their density. The developed model allows more realistic simulations of TFETs including their non-idealities.

  2. Quantum tunneling of magnetization in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamp, P.C.E.; Barbara, B.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic solids should, under certain circumstances, show macroscopic quantum behavior, in which coherence exists between completely distinct magnetization states, each involving a very large number of spins (∼10 12 spins). This article reviews the recent work in this field, concentrating particularly on macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) of magnetization. The two main phenomena discussed are the tunneling of magnetization in single-domain particles or grains (in which some 10 3 - 10 4 spins rotate together through an energy barrier), and the tunneling of domain walls in films or in bulk magnets; where walls containing ∼10 10 spins may tunnel off a pinning potential, or from one pinning center to another. Some attention is also given to the quantum nucleation of magnetization reversal in a bulk magnet, and to the quantum motion of other magnetic solitons (such as vortices). After a thorough analysis of the basic grain and wall tunneling phenomena, the authors continue on to a discussion of the various dissipative or decoherence mechanisms, which destroy the phase correlations involved in tunneling. The coupling of grain magnetization to phonons, photons, and electrons is shown to have little consequence for weakly-conducting or insulating grains. Domain walls couple to these and also to magnons and impurities or defects; the 3rd order coupling to magnons can have serious effects, but if one uses pure insulators at low temperatures, these can also be ignored

  3. Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel advances the study of fundamental flow physics relevant to micro air vehicle (MAV) flight and assesses vehicle performance...

  4. Reinventing the PN Junction: Dimensionality Effects on Tunneling Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    model is given in [5]. In this paper the simulator Medici was used to model the tunneling current. The tunneling model in Medici does not account...the requirement for phonons [23] Figure 2.2: The ID-VG characteristics of the silicided source TFET shown above fit well with a Medici model that

  5. Advanced Macro-Model with Pulse-Width Dependent Switching Characteristic for Spin Transfer Torque Based Magnetic-Tunnel-Junction Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojeong Kim,; Seungjun Lee,; Hyungsoon Shin,

    2010-04-01

    In spin transfer torque (STT)-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), the switching depends on the current pulse-width as well as the magnitude of the switching current. We present an advanced macro-model of an STT-MTJ for a circuit simulator such as HSPICE. The macro-model can simulate the dependence of switching behavior on current pulse-width in an STT-MTJ. An imaginary resistor-capacitor (RC) circuit is adopted to emulate complex timing behavior which cannot be described nicely by existing functions in HSPICE. Simulation results show the resistance-current (R-I) curve and timing behavior is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Initial Investigation of the Acoustics of a Counter-Rotating Open Rotor Model with Historical Baseline Blades in a Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David M.

    2012-01-01

    A counter-rotating open rotor scale model was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). This model used a historical baseline blade set with which modern blade designs will be compared against on an acoustic and aerodynamic performance basis. Different blade pitch angles simulating approach and takeoff conditions were tested, along with angle-of-attack configurations. A configuration was also tested in order to determine the acoustic effects of a pylon. The shaft speed was varied for each configuration in order to get data over a range of operability. The freestream Mach number was also varied for some configurations. Sideline acoustic data were taken for each of these test configurations.

  7. Superpoissonian shot noise in organic magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cascales, Juan Pedro; Martinez, Isidoro; Aliev, Farkhad G., E-mail: farkhad.aliev@uam.es [Dpto. Fisica Materia Condensada C3, Instituto Nicolas Cabrera (INC), Condensed Matter Physics Institute (IFIMAC), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Hong, Jhen-Yong; Lin, Minn-Tsong, E-mail: mtlin@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan and Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Szczepański, Tomasz; Dugaev, Vitalii K. [Department of Physics, Rzeszów University of Technology, al. Powstańców Warszawy 6, 35-959 Rzeszów (Poland); Barnaś, Józef [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań, Poland and Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland)

    2014-12-08

    Organic molecules have recently revolutionized ways to create new spintronic devices. Despite intense studies, the statistics of tunneling electrons through organic barriers remains unclear. Here, we investigate conductance and shot noise in magnetic tunnel junctions with 3,4,9,10-perylene-teracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) barriers a few nm thick. For junctions in the electron tunneling regime, with magnetoresistance ratios between 10% and 40%, we observe superpoissonian shot noise. The Fano factor exceeds in 1.5–2 times the maximum values reported for magnetic tunnel junctions with inorganic barriers, indicating spin dependent bunching in tunneling. We explain our main findings in terms of a model which includes tunneling through a two level (or multilevel) system, originated from interfacial bonds of the PTCDA molecules. Our results suggest that interfaces play an important role in the control of shot noise when electrons tunnel through organic barriers.

  8. Hand Shape and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neral, Mithun; Winger, Dan; Imbriglia, Joseph; Wollstein, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    The literature evaluating external anatomical measurements and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) remains inconclusive. The purpose of this study was to compare hand- shape measurements of patients with and without (CTS). A retrospective case - control study of participants with suspected CTS (male/female ratio of 0.69) was performed. Nerve conduction tests (NCT) defined 65 involved hands (CTS) and 73 control hands. The relationship between 3 different hand index ratios (measuring palm length and width) and CTS (defined by NCT) was evaluated using Generalized Estimating Equations model (GEE) with the binary outcome of CTS. Palmar Length/Palmar Width index had the strongest and negative association with CTS with greatest sensitivity and specificity to detect CTS. Hands with more square shape had increased tendency to be diagnosed with CTS. Hand indices that include the shape of the palm may help identify patients with greater likelihood of developing CTS for early screening and prevention.

  9. Semiempirical theory of level spacing distribution beyond the Berry-Robnik regime: modeling the localization and the tunneling effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistic, Benjamin; Robnik, Marko

    2010-01-01

    In this work we study the level spacing distribution in the classically mixed-type quantum systems (which are generic), exhibiting regular motion on invariant tori for some initial conditions and chaotic motion for the complementary initial conditions. In the asymptotic regime of the sufficiently deep semiclassical limit (sufficiently small effective Planck constant) the Berry and Robnik (1984 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 17 2413) picture applies, which is very well established. We present a new quasi-universal semiempirical theory of the level spacing distribution in a regime away from the Berry-Robnik regime (the near semiclassical limit), by describing both the dynamical localization effects of chaotic eigenstates, and the tunneling effects which couple regular and chaotic eigenstates. The theory works extremely well in the 2D mixed-type billiard system introduced by Robnik (1983 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 16 3971) and is also tested in other systems (mushroom billiard and Prosen billiard).

  10. Relationships among Adolescents' Leisure Motivation, Leisure Involvement, and Leisure Satisfaction: A Structural Equation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chieh; Li, Ren-Hau; Chen, Sheng-Hwang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to test a cause-and-effect model of factors affecting leisure satisfaction among Taiwanese adolescents. A structural equation model was proposed in which the relationships among leisure motivation, leisure involvement, and leisure satisfaction were explored. The study collected data from 701 adolescent…

  11. A Reformulated Model of Barriers to Parental Involvement in Education: Comment on Hornby and Lafaele (2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weihua; Li, Nan; Sandoval, Jaime Robert

    2018-01-01

    In a 2011 article in this journal, Hornby and Lafaele provided a comprehensive model to understand barriers that may adversely impact effectiveness of parental involvement (PI) in education. The proposed explanatory model provides researchers with a new comprehensive and systematic perspective of the phenomenon in question with references from an…

  12. The Role of Student Involvement and Perceptions of Integration in a Causal Model of Student Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph B.; Milem, Jeffrey F.

    1999-01-01

    This study refined and applied an integrated model of undergraduate persistence (accounting for both behavioral and perceptual components) to examine first-year retention at a private, highly selective research university. Results suggest that including behaviorally based measures of involvement improves the model's explanatory power concerning…

  13. Adolescents and Music Media: Toward an Involvement-Mediational Model of Consumption and Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Michelle; Rodgers, Kathleen Boyce; Power, Thomas; Austin, Erica Weintraub; Hill, Laura Griner

    2010-01-01

    Using social cognitive theory and structural regression modeling, we examined pathways between early adolescents' music media consumption, involvement with music media, and 3 domains of self-concept (physical appearance, romantic appeal, and global self-worth; N=124). A mediational model was supported for 2 domains of self-concept. Music media…

  14. Scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnig, G.; Rohrer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Based on vacuum tunneling, a novel type of microscope, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was developed. It has an unprecedented resolution in real space on an atomic scale. The authors review the important technical features, illustrate the power of the STM for surface topographies and discuss its potential in other areas of science and technology. (Auth.)

  15. Electron tunneling in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamaraev, K.I.; Khajrutdinov, R.F.; Zhdanov, V.P.; Molin, Yu.N.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical investigations are outlined systematically on electron tunnelling in chemical reactions. Mechanism of electron transport to great distances is shown to be characteristic to chemical compounds of a wide range. The function of tunnel reactions is discussed for various fields of chemistry, including radiation chemistry, electrochemistry, chemistry of solids, chemistry of surface and catalysis

  16. Low speed wind tunnel investigation of a four-engine upper surface blown model having swept wing and rectangular and D-shaped exhaust nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeman, W. C., Jr.; Hohlweg, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    A low speed investigation was conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel to determine the power-on static-turning and powered-lift aerodynamic performance of a four engine upper surface blown transport configuration. Initial tests with a D-shaped exhaust nozzle showed relatively poor flow-turning capability, and the D-nozzles were replaced by rectangular nozzles with a width-height ratio of 6.0. The high lift system consisted of a leading edge slat and two different trailing-edge-flap configurations. A double slotted flap with the gaps sealed was investigated and a simple radius flap was also tested. A maximum lift coefficient of approximately 9.3 was obtained for the model with the rectangular exhaust nozzles with both the double slotted flap deflected 50 deg and the radius flap deflected 90 deg.

  17. Customer involvement in greening the supply chain: an interpretive structural modeling methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Luthra, Sunil; Haleem, Abid

    2013-04-01

    The role of customers in green supply chain management needs to be identified and recognized as an important research area. This paper is an attempt to explore the involvement aspect of customers towards greening of the supply chain (SC). An empirical research approach has been used to collect primary data to rank different variables for effective customer involvement in green concept implementation in SC. An interpretive structural-based model has been presented, and variables have been classified using matrice d' impacts croises- multiplication appliqué a un classement analysis. Contextual relationships among variables have been established using experts' opinions. The research may help practicing managers to understand the interaction among variables affecting customer involvement. Further, this understanding may be helpful in framing the policies and strategies to green SC. Analyzing interaction among variables for effective customer involvement in greening SC to develop the structural model in the Indian perspective is an effort towards promoting environment consciousness.

  18. Medical staff involvement in nursing homes: development of a conceptual model and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Renée; Rosenthal, Marsha; Wetle, Terrie; Tyler, Denise; Clark, Melissa; Intrator, Orna

    2014-02-01

    Medical staff (physicians, nurse practitioners, physicians' assistants) involvement in nursing homes (NH) is limited by professional guidelines, government policies, regulations, and reimbursements, creating bureaucratic burden. The conceptual NH Medical Staff Involvement Model, based on our mixed-methods research, applies the Donabedian "structure-process-outcomes" framework to the NH, identifying measures for a coordinated research agenda. Quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews conducted with medical directors, administrators and directors of nursing, other experts, residents and family members and Minimum Data Set, the Online Certification and Reporting System and Medicare Part B claims data related to NH structure, process, and outcomes were analyzed. NH control of medical staff, or structure, affects medical staff involvement in care processes and is associated with better outcomes (e.g., symptom management, appropriate transitions, satisfaction). The model identifies measures clarifying the impact of NH medical staff involvement on care processes and resident outcomes and has strong potential to inform regulatory policies.

  19. Feldspar tunneling by Fungi along natural productivity gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffland, E.; Giesler, R.; Jongmans, A.G.; Breemen, van N.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, it was hypothesized that ectomycorrhizas hyphae are involved in mineral tunneling. We evaluated the role of ectomycorrhizas in mineral weathering and the ecosystem influx of basic cations by correlating mineral tunnel density to ectomycorrhizas density in two forest productivity gradients.

  20. Nonlinear phased analysis of reinforced concrete tunnels under fire exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lilliu, G.; Meda, A.

    2013-01-01

    Fire analysis of precast segmental tunnels involves several problems, mainly related to the soil-structure interaction during fire exposure, coupled with material degradation. Temperature increase in the tunnel is the cause of thermal expansion of the lining, which is resisted by the soil pressure.

  1. Multi-Objective Optimal Design of a Building Envelope and Structural System Using Cyber-Physical Modeling in a Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Whiteman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the use of a cyber-physical systems (CPS “loop-in-the-model” approach to optimally design the envelope and structural system of low-rise buildings subject to wind loads. Both the components and cladding (C&C and the main wind force resisting system (MWFRS are considered through multi-objective optimization. The CPS approach combines the physical accuracy of wind tunnel testing and efficiency of numerical optimization algorithms to obtain an optimal design. The approach is autonomous: experiments are executed in a boundary layer wind tunnel (BLWT, sensor feedback is monitored and analyzed by a computer, and optimization algorithms dictate physical changes to the structural model in the BLWT through actuators. To explore a CPS approach to multi-objective optimization, a low-rise building with a parapet wall of variable height is considered. In the BLWT, servo-motors are used to adjust the parapet to a particular height. Parapet walls alter the location of the roof corner vortices, reducing suction loads on the windward facing roof corners and edges, a C&C design load. At the same time, parapet walls increase the surface area of the building, leading to an increase in demand on the MWFRS. A combination of non-stochastic and stochastic optimization algorithms were implemented to minimize the magnitude of suction and positive pressures on the roof of a low-rise building model, followed by stochastic multi-objective optimization to simultaneously minimize the magnitude of suction pressures and base shear. Experiments were conducted at the University of Florida Experimental Facility (UFEF of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF Natural Hazard Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI program.

  2. Histological Observation of Regions around Bone Tunnels after Compression of the Bone Tunnel Wall in Ligament Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Shintaro; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Tanigawa, Naoaki; Miyazaki, Kyosuke; Shioda, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the time-course of influence of compression of bone tunnel wall in ligament reconstruction on tissue around the bone tunnel and to histologically examine the mechanism of preventing the complication of bone tunnel dilation, using rabbit tibia. A model in which the femoral origin of the extensor digitorum longus tendon was cut and inserted into a bone tunnel made proximal to the tibia was prepared in the bilateral hind legs of 20 Japanese white rabbits. In each animal, a tunnel was made using a drill only in the right leg, while an undersized bone tunnel was made by drilling and then dilated by compression using a dilator to the same tunnel size as that in the right leg. Animals were sacrificed at 0, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery (4 animals at each time point). Observation of bone tunnels by X-ray radiography showed osteosclerosis in the 2- and 4-week dilation groups. Osteosclerosis appeared as white lines around the bone tunnel on X-ray radiography. This suggests that dilation promotes callus formation in the bone tunnel wall and prevents the complication of bone tunnel enlargement after ligament reconstruction

  3. Stereo Photogrammetry Measurements of the Position and Attitude of a Nozzle-Plume/Shock-Wave Interaction Model in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura K.; Drain, Bethany A.; Heineck, James T.; Durston, Donald A.

    2017-01-01

    Stereo photogrammetry was used to measure the position and attitude of a slender body of revolution during nozzle-plume/shock-wave interaction tests in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The model support system was designed to allow the model to be placed at many locations in the test section relative to a pressure rail on one sidewall. It included a streamwise traverse as well as a thin blade that offset the model axis from the sting axis. With these features the support system was more flexible than usual resulting in higher-than-usual uncertainty in the position and attitude of the model. Also contributing to this uncertainty were the absence of a balance, so corrections for sting deflections could not be applied, and the wings-vertical orientation of the model, which precluded using a gravity-based accelerometer to measure pitch angle. Therefore, stereo photogrammetry was chosen to provide independent measures of the model position and orientation. This paper describes the photogrammetry system and presents selected results from the test.

  4. Expanding the Work Phases Model: User and Expert Involvement in the Construction of Online Specialised Dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leroyer, Patrick

    The purpose of this article is to establish new proposals for the lexicographic process and the involvement of experts and users in the construction of online specialised dictionaries. It is argued that the ENeL action should also have a view to the development of innovative theories...... and methodologies for the construction of online specialised dictionaries, and a new model for user and expert involvement is proposed....

  5. Quantum Tunneling Affects Engine Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Sibendu; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Dingyu D Y; Magnotti, Gina M; Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Longman, Douglas E; Skodje, Rex T; Davis, Michael J

    2013-06-20

    We study the role of individual reaction rates on engine performance, with an emphasis on the contribution of quantum tunneling. It is demonstrated that the effect of quantum tunneling corrections for the reaction HO2 + HO2 = H2O2 + O2 can have a noticeable impact on the performance of a high-fidelity model of a compression-ignition (e.g., diesel) engine, and that an accurate prediction of ignition delay time for the engine model requires an accurate estimation of the tunneling correction for this reaction. The three-dimensional model includes detailed descriptions of the chemistry of a surrogate for a biodiesel fuel, as well as all the features of the engine, such as the liquid fuel spray and turbulence. This study is part of a larger investigation of how the features of the dynamics and potential energy surfaces of key reactions, as well as their reaction rate uncertainties, affect engine performance, and results in these directions are also presented here.

  6. Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Michael Warren; Masear, Victoria; Chung, Kevin; Maupin, Kent; Andary, Michael; Amadio, Peter C.; Barth, Richard W.; Watters, William C.; Goldberg, Michael J.; Haralson, Robert H.; Turkelson, Charles M.; Wies, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    This clinical practice guideline was created to improve patient care by outlining the appropriate information-gathering and decision-making processes involved in managing the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. The methods used to develop this clinical practice guideline were designed to combat bias, enhance transparency, and promote reproducibility. The guideline’s recommendations are as follows: The physician should obtain an accurate patient history. The physician should perform a physical examination of the patient that may include personal characteristics as well as performing a sensory examination, manual muscle testing of the upper extremity, and provocative and/or discriminatory tests for alternative diagnoses. The physician may obtain electrodiagnostic tests to differentiate among diagnoses. This may be done in the presence of thenar atrophy and/or persistent numbness. The physician should obtain electrodiagnostic tests when clinical and/or provocative tests are positive and surgical management is being considered. If the physician orders electrodiagnostic tests, the testing protocol should follow the American Academy of Neurology/American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine/American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation guidelines for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. In addition, the physician should not routinely evaluate patients suspected of having carpal tunnel syndrome with new technology, such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and pressure-specified sensorimotor devices in the wrist and hand. This decision was based on an additional nonsystematic literature review following the face-to-face meeting of the work group. PMID:19474448

  7. Air quality assessment in Salim Slam Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Fadel, M.; Hashisho, Z.; Saikaly, P.

    1999-01-01

    Full text.Vehicle emissions constitute a serious occupational environmental hazard particularly in confined spaces such as tunnels and underground parking garages. these emissions at elevated concentrations, can cause adverse health effects, which range from nausea and eye irritation to mutagenicity, carcinogenicity and even death. This paper presents an environmental air quality assessment in a tunnel located in a highly congested urban area. For this purpose, air samples were collected and analyzed for the presence of primary air pollutants, priority metals, and volatile organic carbons. Air quality modeling was conducted to simulate variations of pollutant concentrations in the tunnel under worst case scenarios including traffic congestion and no air ventilation. Field measurements and mathematical simulation results were used to develop a strategy for proper air quality management in tunnels

  8. Proton tunnelling in intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsewill, A.J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Johnson, M.R. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Trommsdorff, H.P. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1997-04-01

    The wavefunctions of particles extend beyond the classically accessible regions of potential energy-surfaces (PES). A manifestation of this partial delocalization is the quantum-mechanical tunneling effect which enables a particle to escape from a metastable potential-well. Tunnelling is most important for the lightest atoms, so that the determination of its contribution to proton transfer, one of the most fundamental chemical reactions, is an important issue. QENS and NMR techniques have been employed to study the motion of protons in the hydrogen bond of benzoic-acid crystals, a system which has emerged as a particularly suitable model since proton transfer occurs in a near symmetric double-well potential. The influence of quantum tunnelling was revealed and investigated in these experiments. This work provides an experimental benchmark for theoretical descriptions of translational proton-tunnelling. (author). 7 refs.

  9. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  10. Wind Tunnel Evaluation of a Model Helicopter Main-Rotor Blade With Slotted Airfoils at the Tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Kevin W.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Mirick, Paul H.

    2001-01-01

    Data for rotors using unconventional airfoils are of interest to permit an evaluation of this technology's capability to meet the U.S. Army's need for increased helicopter mission effectiveness and improved safety and survivability. Thus, an experimental investigation was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to evaluate the effect of using slotted airfoils in the rotor blade tip region (85 to 100 percent radius) on rotor aerodynamic performance and loads. Four rotor configurations were tested in forward flight at advance ratios from 0.15 to 0.45 and in hover in-ground effect. The hover tip Mach number was 0.627, which is representative of a design point of 4000-ft geometric altitude and a temperature of 95 F. The baseline rotor configuration had a conventional single-element airfoil in the tip region. A second rotor configuration had a forward-slotted airfoil with a -6 deg slat, a third configuration had a forward-slotted airfoil with a -10 slat, and a fourth configuration had an aft-slotted airfoil with a 3 deg flap (trailing edge down). The results of this investigation indicate that the -6 deg slat configuration offers some performance and loads benefits over the other three configurations.

  11. How and Why Fathers Are Involved in Their Children's Education: Gendered Model of Parent Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung won

    2018-01-01

    Accumulating evidence points to the unique contributions fathers make to their children's academic outcomes. However, the large body of multi-disciplinary literature on fatherhood does not address how fathers engage in specific practices relevant to education, while the educational research in the United States focused on parent involvement often…

  12. Smart dynamic rotor control using active flaps on a small-scale wind turbine: aeroelastic modeling and comparison with wind tunnel measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Thanasis K.; van Wingerden, W.; Hulskamp, A.W.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the proof of concept of a smart rotor is illustrated by aeroelastic simulations on a small-scale rotor and comparison with wind tunnel experiments. The application of advanced feedback controllers using actively deformed flaps in the wind tunnel measurements is shown to alleviate d...

  13. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  14. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  15. Hybrid transfinite element modeling/analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems involving phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1988-01-01

    The present paper describes the applicability of hybrid transfinite element modeling/analysis formulations for nonlinear heat conduction problems involving phase change. The methodology is based on application of transform approaches and classical Galerkin schemes with finite element formulations to maintain the modeling versatility and numerical features for computational analysis. In addition, in conjunction with the above, the effects due to latent heat are modeled using enthalpy formulations to enable a physically realistic approximation to be dealt computationally for materials exhibiting phase change within a narrow band of temperatures. Pertinent details of the approach and computational scheme adapted are described in technical detail. Numerical test cases of comparative nature are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed formulations for numerical modeling/analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems involving phase change.

  16. Joint release rate estimation and measurement-by-measurement model correction for atmospheric radionuclide emission in nuclear accidents: An application to wind tunnel experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinpeng; Li, Hong; Liu, Yun; Xiong, Wei; Fang, Sheng

    2018-03-05

    The release rate of atmospheric radionuclide emissions is a critical factor in the emergency response to nuclear accidents. However, there are unavoidable biases in radionuclide transport models, leading to inaccurate estimates. In this study, a method that simultaneously corrects these biases and estimates the release rate is developed. Our approach provides a more complete measurement-by-measurement correction of the biases with a coefficient matrix that considers both deterministic and stochastic deviations. This matrix and the release rate are jointly solved by the alternating minimization algorithm. The proposed method is generic because it does not rely on specific features of transport models or scenarios. It is validated against wind tunnel experiments that simulate accidental releases in a heterogonous and densely built nuclear power plant site. The sensitivities to the position, number, and quality of measurements and extendibility of the method are also investigated. The results demonstrate that this method effectively corrects the model biases, and therefore outperforms Tikhonov's method in both release rate estimation and model prediction. The proposed approach is robust to uncertainties and extendible with various center estimators, thus providing a flexible framework for robust source inversion in real accidents, even if large uncertainties exist in multiple factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Solution of the classical Yang–Baxter equation with an exotic symmetry, and integrability of a multi-species boson tunnelling model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Links

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of the classical Yang–Baxter equation provide a systematic method to construct integrable quantum systems in an algebraic manner. A Lie algebra can be associated with any solution of the classical Yang–Baxter equation, from which commuting transfer matrices may be constructed. This procedure is reviewed, specifically for solutions without skew-symmetry. A particular solution with an exotic symmetry is identified, which is not obtained as a limiting expansion of the usual Yang–Baxter equation. This solution facilitates the construction of commuting transfer matrices which will be used to establish the integrability of a multi-species boson tunnelling model. The model generalises the well-known two-site Bose–Hubbard model, to which it reduces in the one-species limit. Due to the lack of an apparent reference state, application of the algebraic Bethe Ansatz to solve the model is prohibitive. Instead, the Bethe Ansatz solution is obtained by the use of operator identities and tensor product decompositions.

  18. Solution of the classical Yang–Baxter equation with an exotic symmetry, and integrability of a multi-species boson tunnelling model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Links, Jon, E-mail: jrl@maths.uq.edu.au

    2017-03-15

    Solutions of the classical Yang–Baxter equation provide a systematic method to construct integrable quantum systems in an algebraic manner. A Lie algebra can be associated with any solution of the classical Yang–Baxter equation, from which commuting transfer matrices may be constructed. This procedure is reviewed, specifically for solutions without skew-symmetry. A particular solution with an exotic symmetry is identified, which is not obtained as a limiting expansion of the usual Yang–Baxter equation. This solution facilitates the construction of commuting transfer matrices which will be used to establish the integrability of a multi-species boson tunnelling model. The model generalises the well-known two-site Bose–Hubbard model, to which it reduces in the one-species limit. Due to the lack of an apparent reference state, application of the algebraic Bethe Ansatz to solve the model is prohibitive. Instead, the Bethe Ansatz solution is obtained by the use of operator identities and tensor product decompositions.

  19. Job involvement of primary healthcare employees: does a service provision model play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Anne M; Laamanen, Ritva; Simonsen-Rehn, Nina; Sundell, Jari; Brommels, Mats; Suominen, Sakari

    2010-05-01

    To investigate whether the development of job involvement of primary healthcare (PHC) employees in Southern Municipality (SM), where PHC services were outsourced to an independent non-profit organisation, differed from that in the three comparison municipalities (M1, M2, M3) with municipal service providers. Also, the associations of job involvement with factors describing the psychosocial work environment were investigated. A panel mail survey 2000-02 in Finland (n=369, response rates 73% and 60%). The data were analysed by descriptive statistics and multivariate linear regression analysis. Despite the favourable development in the psychosocial work environment, job involvement decreased most in SM, which faced the biggest organisational changes. Job involvement decreased also in M3, where the psychosocial work environment deteriorated most. Job involvement in 2002 was best predicted by high baseline level of interactional justice and work control, positive change in interactional justice, and higher age. Also other factors, such as organisational stability, seemed to play a role; after controlling for the effect of the psychosocial work characteristics, job involvement was higher in M3 than in SM. Outsourcing of PHC services may decrease job involvement at least during the first years. A particular service provision model is better than the others only if it is superior in providing a favourable and stable psychosocial work environment.

  20. RITD – Wind tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukka, Harri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Koryanov, Valeri; Schmidt, Walter; Heilimo, Jyri; Finchenko, Valeri; Martynov, Maxim; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Victor; Arruego, Ignazio

    2015-04-01

    An atmospheric re-entry and descent and landing system (EDLS) concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques is highly promising for the Earth re-entry missions. We developed such EDLS for the Earth re-entry utilizing a concept that was originally developed for Mars. This EU-funded project is called RITD - Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development - and it was to assess the bene¬fits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develope a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. The RITD entry and descent system utilizes an inflatable hypersonic decelerator. Development of such system requires a combination of wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations. This included wind tunnel tests both in transsonic and subsonic regimes. The principal aim of the wind tunnel tests was the determination of the RITD damping factors in the Earth atmosphere and recalculation of the results for the case of the vehicle descent in the Mars atmosphere. The RITD mock-up model used in the tests was in scale of 1:15 of the real-size vehicle as the dimensions were (midsection) diameter of 74.2 mm and length of 42 mm. For wind tunnel testing purposes the frontal part of the mock-up model body was manufactured by using a PolyJet 3D printing technology based on the light curing of liquid resin. The tail part of the mock-up model body was manufactured of M1 grade copper. The structure of the mock-up model placed th center of gravity in the same position as that of the real-size RITD. The wind tunnel test program included the defining of the damping factor at seven values of Mach numbers 0.85; 0.95; 1.10; 1.20; 1.25; 1.30 and 1.55 with the angle of attack ranging from 0 degree to 40 degrees with the step of 5 degrees. The damping characteristics of

  1. New Boundaries for School-Based Management: The High Involvement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlstetter, Priscilla; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The utility of school-based management (SBM) as a means of generating school improvement is examined. A model of high-involvement management is applied to show what makes SBM work and under what conditions in four school districts. The definitions of SBM must be expanded to include organizational redesign. (SLD)

  2. Alcohol Involvement and the Five-Factor Model of Personality: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouff, John M.; Thorsteinsson, Einar B.; Rooke, Sally E.; Schutte, Nicola S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to quantify the relationship between the Five-Factor Model of personality and alcohol involvement and to identify moderators of the relationship. The meta-analysis included 20 studies, 119 effect sizes, and 7,886 participants. Possible moderators examined included: five-factor rating type (self vs. other);…

  3. Predicting Preschoolers' Attachment Security from Fathers' Involvement, Internal Working Models, and Use of Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Lisa A.; Coyl, Diana D.; Freeman, Harry

    2008-01-01

    Associations between preschoolers' attachment security, fathers' involvement (i.e. parenting behaviors and consistency) and fathering context (i.e. fathers' internal working models (IWMs) and use of social support) were examined in a subsample of 102 fathers, taken from a larger sample of 235 culturally diverse US families. The authors predicted…

  4. Results of investigations of an 0.010-scale 140A/B configuration (model 72-OTS) of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter in the NASA/Langley Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrozzi, M. T.; Milam, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in the NASA/Langley unitary plan wind tunnel on a sting mounted 0.010-scale outer mold line model of the 140A/B configuration of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle. The primary test objectives were to obtain: (1) six component force and moment data for the mated vehicle at subsonic and transonic conditions, (2) effects of configuration build-up, (3) effects of protuberances, ET/orbiter fairings and attach structures, and (4) elevon deflection effects on wing bending moment. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data and base and balance cavity pressures were recorded over Mach numbers of 1.6, 2.0, 2.5, 2.86, 3.9, and 4.63 at a nominal Reynolds number of 20 to the 6th power per foot. Selected configurations were tested at angles of attack and sideslip from -10 deg to +10 deg. For all configurations involving the orbiter, wing bending, and torsion coefficients were measured on the right wing.

  5. Wind tunnel tests for a flapping wing model with a changeable camber using macro-fiber composite actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Kwan; Han, Jae-Hung; Kwon, Ki-Jung

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, a biomimetic flexible flapping wing was developed on a real ornithopter scale by using macro-fiber composite (MFC) actuators. With the actuators, the maximum camber of the wing can be linearly changed from −2.6% to +4.4% of the maximum chord length. Aerodynamic tests were carried out in a low-speed wind tunnel to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics, particularly the camber effect, the chordwise flexibility effect and the unsteady effect. Although the chordwise wing flexibility reduces the effective angle of attack, the maximum lift coefficient can be increased by the MFC actuators up to 24.4% in a static condition. Note also that the mean values of the perpendicular force coefficient rise to a value of considerably more than 3 in an unsteady aerodynamic flow region. Additionally, particle image velocimetry (PIV) tests were performed in static and dynamic test conditions to validate the flexibility and unsteady effects. The static PIV results confirm that the effective angle of attack is reduced by the coupling of the chordwise flexibility and the aerodynamic force, resulting in a delay in the stall phenomena. In contrast to the quasi-steady flow condition of a relatively high advance ratio, the unsteady aerodynamic effect due to a leading edge vortex can be found along the wing span in a low advance ratio region. The overall results show that the chordwise wing flexibility can produce a positive effect on flapping aerodynamic characteristics in quasi-steady and unsteady flow regions; thus, wing flexibility should be considered in the design of efficient flapping wings

  6. INCAS TRISONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin MUNTEANU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The 1.2 m x 1.2 m Trisonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel is the largest of the experimental facilities at the National Institute for Aerospace Research - I.N.C.A.S. "Elie Carafoli", Bucharest, Romania. The tunnel has been designed by the Canadian company DSMA (now AIOLOS and since its commissioning in 1978 has performed high speed aerodynamic tests for more than 120 projects of aircraft, missiles and other objects among which the twin jet fighter IAR-93, the jet trainer IAR-99, the MIG-21 Lancer, the Polish jet fighter YRYDA and others. In the last years the wind tunnel has been used mostly for experimental research in European projects such as UFAST. The high flow quality parameters and the wide range of testing capabilities ensure the competitivity of the tunnel at an international level.

  7. Water Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility in Pittsburgh, PA, re-creates the conditions found 3,000 meters beneath the ocean’s surface, allowing scientists to study...

  8. Nonlinear earthquake behaviour of highway tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sevim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Arhavi Highway Tunnel which has two tubes, its geometrical properties, finite element model, and the nonlinear earthquake behaviour under a huge ground motion considering soil-structure interaction. The Arhavi Highway Tunnel is one of the tallest tunnels constructed in the Black Sea region of Turkey as part of the Coast Road Project. The tunnel has two tubes and each of them is about 1000 m tall. In the study, the modal analyses of the tunnel considering soil-structure interaction are performed and natural frequencies and mode shapes are obtained. Then, nonlinear transient analysis of the tunnel using Drucker-Prager criteria is performed applying acceleration components of 1992 Erzincan, Turkey earthquake's ground motion. In the time history analyses, Rayleigh damping coefficients are calculated using main natural frequency obtained from modal analysis. Element matrices are computed using the Gauss numerical integration technique. The Newmark method is used in the solution of the equation of motion. Because too much memory for the analyses is required, the first 7.5 s of the ground motions, which is the most effective duration, is taken into account in calculations. The displacement and stress results are observed to be the allowable level of the concrete material.

  9. A Research Framework for Understanding the Practical Impact of Family Involvement in the Juvenile Justice System: The Juvenile Justice Family Involvement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sarah Cusworth; Bishop, Asia S; Pullmann, Michael D; Bauer, Grace

    2015-12-01

    Family involvement is recognized as a critical element of service planning for children's mental health, welfare and education. For the juvenile justice system, however, parents' roles in this system are complex due to youths' legal rights, public safety, a process which can legally position parents as plaintiffs, and a historical legacy of blaming parents for youth indiscretions. Three recent national surveys of juvenile justice-involved parents reveal that the current paradigm elicits feelings of stress, shame and distrust among parents and is likely leading to worse outcomes for youth, families and communities. While research on the impact of family involvement in the justice system is starting to emerge, the field currently has no organizing framework to guide a research agenda, interpret outcomes or translate findings for practitioners. We propose a research framework for family involvement that is informed by a comprehensive review and content analysis of current, published arguments for family involvement in juvenile justice along with a synthesis of family involvement efforts in other child-serving systems. In this model, family involvement is presented as an ascending, ordinal concept beginning with (1) exclusion, and moving toward climates characterized by (2) information-giving, (3) information-eliciting and (4) full, decision-making partnerships. Specific examples of how courts and facilities might align with these levels are described. Further, the model makes predictions for how involvement will impact outcomes at multiple levels with applications for other child-serving systems.

  10. Autonomous Robotic Inspection in Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopapadakis, E.; Stentoumis, C.; Doulamis, N.; Doulamis, A.; Loupos, K.; Makantasis, K.; Kopsiaftis, G.; Amditis, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an automatic robotic inspector for tunnel assessment is presented. The proposed platform is able to autonomously navigate within the civil infrastructures, grab stereo images and process/analyse them, in order to identify defect types. At first, there is the crack detection via deep learning approaches. Then, a detailed 3D model of the cracked area is created, utilizing photogrammetric methods. Finally, a laser profiling of the tunnel's lining, for a narrow region close to detected crack is performed; allowing for the deduction of potential deformations. The robotic platform consists of an autonomous mobile vehicle; a crane arm, guided by the computer vision-based crack detector, carrying ultrasound sensors, the stereo cameras and the laser scanner. Visual inspection is based on convolutional neural networks, which support the creation of high-level discriminative features for complex non-linear pattern classification. Then, real-time 3D information is accurately calculated and the crack position and orientation is passed to the robotic platform. The entire system has been evaluated in railway and road tunnels, i.e. in Egnatia Highway and London underground infrastructure.

  11. Microscopic tunneling theory of long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, N.; Hattel, Søren A.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1992-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate that the detai......We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate...... that the detailed behavior of a solitonic mode (fluxon dynamics) in the junction is different from the results of the conventional perturbed sine-Gordon model....

  12. The design and commissioning of an acoustic liner for propeller noise testing in the ARA transonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M. E.; Newman, D. A.

    An acoustic liner has been designed and manufactured for use in the ARA transonic wind tunnel to provide an acoustically acceptable environment for propeller noise testing up to high subsonic Mach number. Details of the aerodynamic design and development are presented and calibration of the liner with propeller model support systems is included. It is shown how the design of the acoustic treatment was aided by the use of a theoretical model for the tunnel reverberant field. An acoustic development program was undertaken involving horn tests to improve the quality of the liner. The success of this is demonstrated by propeller noise results. These results also provided the basis for definition of the practical acoustic test regime of the ARA lined tunnel suitable for the accurate measurement of propeller noise.

  13. Toward a New Model of Fatherhood? Discourses on the Process of Paternal Involvement in Urban Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Barbeta-Viñas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades quantitative studies have documented an increase in paternal involvement. These changes have led to hypotheses of a new model of fatherhood. The aim of this paper is to explore the discourses of Spanish fathers regarding paternal involvement, identifying its structure and changing tendencies. The analysis is based on eight focus groups conducted in Madrid and Barcelona. Among the main findings we emphasize that the transition of fatherhood,not without contradictions, is causing the traditional homogeneous fatherhood to evolve toward a more complex and multidimensional conceptualization.

  14. Spin polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczewski, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews tunneling of spin-polarized electrons through molecules positioned between ferromagnetic electrodes, which gives rise to tunneling magnetoresistance. Such measurements yield important insight into the factors governing spin-polarized electron injection into organic semiconductors, thereby offering the possibility to manipulate the quantum-mechanical spin degrees of freedom for charge carriers in optical/electrical devices. In the first section of the chapter a brief description of the Jullière model of spin-dependent electron tunneling is reviewed. Next, a brief description of device fabrication and characterization is presented. The bulk of the review highlights experimental studies on spin-polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions. In addition, some experiments describing spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy on single molecules are mentioned. Finally, some general conclusions and prospectus on the impact of spin-polarized tunneling in molecular junctions are offered.

  15. Anomalous Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin Transfer Torque in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Embedded Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Useinov, Arthur; Ye, Lin-Xiu; Useinov, Niazbeck; Wu, Te-Ho; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2015-01-01

    The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with embedded nanoparticles (NPs) was calculated in range of the quantum-ballistic model. The simulation was performed for electron tunneling through the insulating layer with embedded magnetic and non-magnetic NPs within the approach of the double barrier subsystem connected in parallel to the single barrier one. This model can be applied for both MTJs with in-plane magnetization and perpendicular one. We also calculated the in-plane component of the spin transfer torque (STT) versus the applied voltage in MTJs with magnetic NPs and determined that its value can be much larger than in single barrier system (SBS) for the same tunneling thickness. The reported simulation reproduces experimental data of the TMR suppression and peak-like TMR anomalies at low voltages available in leterature. PMID:26681336

  16. Asymmetric voltage behavior of the tunnel magnetoresistance in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we study the value of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as a function of the applied voltage in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJs) with the left and right ferromagnetic (FM) layers being pinned and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions (equal barriers and electrodes). DMTJs are modeled as two single barrier junctions connected in series with consecutive tunneling (CST). We investigated the asymmetric voltage behavior of the TMR for the CST in the range of a general theoretical model. Significant asymmetries of the experimental curves, which arise due to different annealing regimes, are mostly explained by different heights of the tunnel barriers and asymmetries of spin polarizations in magnetic layers. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications.

  17. A two-dimensional analytical model of vapor intrusion involving vertical heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Verginelli, Iason; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we present an analytical chlorinated vapor intrusion (CVI) model that can estimate source-to-indoor air concentration attenuation by simulating two-dimensional (2-D) vapor concentration profile in vertically heterogeneous soils overlying a homogenous vapor source. The analytical solution describing the 2-D soil gas transport was obtained by applying a modified Schwarz-Christoffel mapping method. A partial field validation showed that the developed model provides results (especially in terms of indoor emission rates) in line with the measured data from a case involving a building overlying a layered soil. In further testing, it was found that the new analytical model can very closely replicate the results of three-dimensional (3-D) numerical models at steady state in scenarios involving layered soils overlying homogenous groundwater sources. By contrast, by adopting a two-layer approach (capillary fringe and vadose zone) as employed in the EPA implementation of the Johnson and Ettinger model, the spatially and temporally averaged indoor concentrations in the case of groundwater sources can be higher than the ones estimated by the numerical model up to two orders of magnitude. In short, the model proposed in this work can represent an easy-to-use tool that can simulate the subsurface soil gas concentration in layered soils overlying a homogenous vapor source while keeping the simplicity of an analytical approach that requires much less computational effort.

  18. A two-dimensional analytical model of vapor intrusion involving vertical heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Verginelli, Iason; Suuberg, Eric M

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we present an analytical chlorinated vapor intrusion (CVI) model that can estimate source-to-indoor air concentration attenuation by simulating two-dimensional (2-D) vapor concentration profile in vertically heterogeneous soils overlying a homogenous vapor source. The analytical solution describing the 2-D soil gas transport was obtained by applying a modified Schwarz-Christoffel mapping method. A partial field validation showed that the developed model provides results (especially in terms of indoor emission rates) in line with the measured data from a case involving a building overlying a layered soil. In further testing, it was found that the new analytical model can very closely replicate the results of three-dimensional (3-D) numerical models at steady state in scenarios involving layered soils overlying homogenous groundwater sources. By contrast, by adopting a two-layer approach (capillary fringe and vadose zone) as employed in the EPA implementation of the Johnson and Ettinger model, the spatially and temporally averaged indoor concentrations in the case of groundwater sources can be higher than the ones estimated by the numerical model up to two orders of magnitude. In short, the model proposed in this work can represent an easy-to-use tool that can simulate the subsurface soil gas concentration in layered soils overlying a homogenous vapor source while keeping the simplicity of an analytical approach that requires much less computational effort.

  19. Canadian Whole-Farm Model Holos - Development, Stakeholder Involvement, and Model Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroebel, R.; Janzen, H.; Beauchemin, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's Holos model, based mostly on emission factors, aims to explore the effect of management on Canadian whole-farm greenhouse gas emissions. The model includes 27 commonly grown annual and perennial crops, summer fallow, grassland, and 8 types of tree plantings, along with beef, dairy, sheep, swine and other livestock or poultry operations. Model outputs encompass net emissions of CO2, CH4, and N2O (in CO2 equivalents), calculated for various farm components. Where possible, algorithms are drawn from peer-reviewed publications. For consistency, Holos is aligned with the Canadian sustainability indicator and national greenhouse gas inventory objectives. Although primarily an exploratory tool for research, the model's design makes it accessible and instructive also to agricultural producers, educators, and policy makers. Model development, therefore, proceeds iteratively, with extensive stakeholder feedback from training sessions or annual workshops. To make the model accessible to diverse users, the team developed a multi-layered interface, with general farming scenarios for general use, but giving access to detailed coefficients and assumptions to researchers. The model relies on extensive climate, soil, and agronomic databases to populate regionally-applicable default values thereby minimizing keyboard entries. In an initial application, the model was used to assess greenhouse gas emissions from the Canadian beef production system; it showed that enteric methane accounted for 63% of total GHG emissions and that 84% of emissions originated from the cow-calf herd. The model further showed that GHG emission intensity per kg beef, nationally, declined by 14% from 1981 to 2011, owing to gains in production efficiency. Holos is now being used to consider further potential advances through improved rations or other management options. We are now aiming to expand into questions of grazing management, and are developing a novel carbon

  20. Dielectric breakdown in AlO{sub x} tunnelling barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, D M; Carara, M; Schelp, L F; Dorneles, L S [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Roraima, 1000, Santa Maria 97105-900, RS (Brazil); Fichtner, P F P, E-mail: lsdorneles@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Instituto de Fisica, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, Caixa Postal 15051, Porto Alegre 91501-970, RS (Brazil)

    2011-04-06

    We studied the dielectric breakdown in tunnelling barriers produced by plasma-assisted oxidation of an aluminium surface. The barrier mean height, thickness and the effective tunnelling area were extracted from current versus voltage curves measured at room temperature. The effective tunnelling area ranged from 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}, corresponding to less than 1% of the geometrical surface of the samples. The estimated electrical field to breakdown agreed with predictions from thermochemical models, and decreased exponentially with the effective tunnelling area.

  1. Experimental evaluation of two turning vane designs for fan drive corner of 0.1-scale model of NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed altitude wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldman, Donald R.; Moore, Royce D.; Shyne, Rickey J.

    1987-01-01

    Two turning vane designs were experimentally evaluated for corner 2 of a 0.1 scale model of the NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed Altitude Wind Tunnel (AWT). Corner 2 contained a simulated shaft fairing for a fan drive system to be located downstream of the corner. The corner was tested with a bellmouth inlet followed by a 0.1 scale model of the crossleg diffuser designed to connect corners 1 and 2 of the AWT. Vane A was a controlled-diffusion airfoil shape; vane B was a circular-arc airfoil shape. The A vanes were tested in several arrangements which included the resetting of the vane angle by -5 degrees or the removal of the outer vane. The lowest total pressure loss for vane A configuration was obtained at the negative reset angle. The loss coefficient increased slightly with the Mach number, ranging from 0.165 to 0.175 with a loss coefficient of 0.170 at the inlet design Mach number of 0.24. Removal of the outer vane did not alter the loss. Vane B loss coefficients were essentially the same as those for the reset vane A configurations. The crossleg diffuser loss coefficient was 0.018 at the inlet design Mach number of 0.33.

  2. Simultaneous leaching of arsenite, arsenate, selenite and selenate, and their migration in tunnel-excavated sedimentary rocks: II. Kinetic and reactive transport modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabelin, Carlito Baltazar; Sasaki, Ryosuke; Igarashi, Toshifumi; Park, Ilhwan; Tamoto, Shuichi; Arima, Takahiko; Ito, Mayumi; Hiroyoshi, Naoki

    2017-12-01

    Predicting the fates of arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) in natural geologic media like rocks and soils necessitates the understanding of how their various oxyanionic species behave and migrate under dynamic conditions. In this study, geochemical factors and processes crucial in the leaching and transport of arsenite (As III ), arsenate (As V ), selenite (Se IV ) and selenate (Se VI ) in tunnel-excavated rocks of marine origin were investigated using microscopic/extraction techniques, column experiments, dissolution-precipitation kinetics and one-dimensional reactive transport modeling. The results showed that evaporite salts were important because aside from containing As and Se, they played crucial roles in the evolution of pH and concentrations of coexisting ions, both of which had strong effects on adsorption-desorption reactions of As and Se species with iron oxyhydroxide minerals/phases. The observed leaching trends of As V , As III , Se IV and Se VI were satisfactorily simulated by one-dimensional reactive transport models, which predict that preferential adsorptions of As V and Se IV were magnified by geochemical changes in the columns due to water flow. Moreover, our results showed that migrations of As III , Se IV and Se VI could be predicted adequately by 1D solute transport with simple activity-K' d approach, but surface complexation was more reliable to simulate adsorption-desorption behavior of As V . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Degree of multicollinearity and variables involved in linear dependence in additive-dominant models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Petrini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the degree of multicollinearity and to identify the variables involved in linear dependence relations in additive-dominant models. Data of birth weight (n=141,567, yearling weight (n=58,124, and scrotal circumference (n=20,371 of Montana Tropical composite cattle were used. Diagnosis of multicollinearity was based on the variance inflation factor (VIF and on the evaluation of the condition indexes and eigenvalues from the correlation matrix among explanatory variables. The first model studied (RM included the fixed effect of dam age class at calving and the covariates associated to the direct and maternal additive and non-additive effects. The second model (R included all the effects of the RM model except the maternal additive effects. Multicollinearity was detected in both models for all traits considered, with VIF values of 1.03 - 70.20 for RM and 1.03 - 60.70 for R. Collinearity increased with the increase of variables in the model and the decrease in the number of observations, and it was classified as weak, with condition index values between 10.00 and 26.77. In general, the variables associated with additive and non-additive effects were involved in multicollinearity, partially due to the natural connection between these covariables as fractions of the biological types in breed composition.

  4. Consumer input into health care: Time for a new active and comprehensive model of consumer involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alix E; Bryant, Jamie; Sanson-Fisher, Rob W; Fradgley, Elizabeth A; Proietto, Anthony M; Roos, Ian

    2018-03-07

    To ensure the provision of patient-centred health care, it is essential that consumers are actively involved in the process of determining and implementing health-care quality improvements. However, common strategies used to involve consumers in quality improvements, such as consumer membership on committees and collection of patient feedback via surveys, are ineffective and have a number of limitations, including: limited representativeness; tokenism; a lack of reliable and valid patient feedback data; infrequent assessment of patient feedback; delays in acquiring feedback; and how collected feedback is used to drive health-care improvements. We propose a new active model of consumer engagement that aims to overcome these limitations. This model involves the following: (i) the development of a new measure of consumer perceptions; (ii) low cost and frequent electronic data collection of patient views of quality improvements; (iii) efficient feedback to the health-care decision makers; and (iv) active involvement of consumers that fosters power to influence health system changes. © 2018 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A comparison of RANS computations and wind tunnel tests for RMS pressures on a high-rise building model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, I.M.; Bronkhorst, A.J.; Bentum, C.A. van; Franke, J.

    2012-01-01

    Five root-mean-square (RMS) pressure models are used in combination with different turbulence models to determine whether it is possible to obtain a conservative estimate of RMS pressures on a high-rise building model from a RANS calculation. When a precursor domain is used for the generation of

  6. Portraiture of constructivist parental involvement: A model to develop a community of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignam, Christopher Anthony

    This qualitative research study addressed the problem of the lack of parental involvement in secondary school science. Increasing parental involvement is vital in supporting student academic achievement and social growth. The purpose of this emergent phenomenological study was to identify conditions required to successfully construct a supportive learning environment to form partnerships between students, parents, and educators. The overall research question in this study investigated the conditions necessary to successfully enlist parental participation with students during science inquiry investigations at the secondary school level. One hundred thirteen pairs of parents and students engaged in a 6-week scientific inquiry activity and recorded attitudinal data in dialogue journals, questionnaires, open-ended surveys, and during one-one-one interviews conducted by the researcher between individual parents and students. Comparisons and cross-interpretations of inter-rater, codified, triangulated data were utilized for identifying emergent themes. Data analysis revealed the active involvement of parents in researching with their child during inquiry investigations, engaging in journaling, and assessing student performance fostered partnerships among students, parents, and educators and supported students' social skills development. The resulting model, employing constructivist leadership and enlisting parent involvement, provides conditions and strategies required to develop a community of practice that can help effect social change. The active involvement of parents fostered improved efficacy and a holistic mindset to develop in parents, students, and teachers. Based on these findings, the interactive collaboration of parents in science learning activities can proactively facilitate a community of practice that will assist educators in facilitating social change.

  7. Development of a Gravid Uterus Model for the Study of Road Accidents Involving Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriault, F; Thollon, L; Behr, M

    2016-01-01

    Car accident simulations involving pregnant women are well documented in the literature and suggest that intra-uterine pressure could be responsible for the phenomenon of placental abruption, underlining the need for a realistic amniotic fluid model, including fluid-structure interactions (FSI). This study reports the development and validation of an amniotic fluid model using an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation in the LS-DYNA environment. Dedicated to the study of the mechanisms responsible for fetal injuries resulting from road accidents, the fluid model was validated using dynamic loading tests. Drop tests were performed on a deformable water-filled container at acceleration levels that would be experienced in a gravid uterus during a frontal car collision at 25 kph. During the test device braking phase, container deformation induced by inertial effects and FSI was recorded by kinematic analysis. These tests were then simulated in the LS-DYNA environment to validate a fluid model under dynamic loading, based on the container deformations. Finally, the coupling between the amniotic fluid model and an existing finite-element full-body pregnant woman model was validated in terms of pressure. To do so, experimental test results performed on four postmortem human surrogates (PMHS) (in which a physical gravid uterus model was inserted) were used. The experimental intra-uterine pressure from these tests was compared to intra uterine pressure from a numerical simulation performed under the same loading conditions. Both free fall numerical and experimental responses appear strongly correlated. The relationship between the amniotic fluid model and pregnant woman model provide intra-uterine pressure values correlated with the experimental test responses. The use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation allows the analysis of FSI between the amniotic fluid and the gravid uterus during a road accident involving pregnant women.

  8. Single Electron Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-01-01

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  9. Estimation in a multiplicative mixed model involving a genetic relationship matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eccleston John A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic models partitioning additive and non-additive genetic effects for populations tested in replicated multi-environment trials (METs in a plant breeding program have recently been presented in the literature. For these data, the variance model involves the direct product of a large numerator relationship matrix A, and a complex structure for the genotype by environment interaction effects, generally of a factor analytic (FA form. With MET data, we expect a high correlation in genotype rankings between environments, leading to non-positive definite covariance matrices. Estimation methods for reduced rank models have been derived for the FA formulation with independent genotypes, and we employ these estimation methods for the more complex case involving the numerator relationship matrix. We examine the performance of differing genetic models for MET data with an embedded pedigree structure, and consider the magnitude of the non-additive variance. The capacity of existing software packages to fit these complex models is largely due to the use of the sparse matrix methodology and the average information algorithm. Here, we present an extension to the standard formulation necessary for estimation with a factor analytic structure across multiple environments.

  10. Understanding quantum tunneling using diffusion Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inack, E. M.; Giudici, G.; Parolini, T.; Santoro, G.; Pilati, S.

    2018-03-01

    In simple ferromagnetic quantum Ising models characterized by an effective double-well energy landscape the characteristic tunneling time of path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations has been shown to scale as the incoherent quantum-tunneling time, i.e., as 1 /Δ2 , where Δ is the tunneling gap. Since incoherent quantum tunneling is employed by quantum annealers (QAs) to solve optimization problems, this result suggests that there is no quantum advantage in using QAs with respect to quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations. A counterexample is the recently introduced shamrock model (Andriyash and Amin, arXiv:1703.09277), where topological obstructions cause an exponential slowdown of the PIMC tunneling dynamics with respect to incoherent quantum tunneling, leaving open the possibility for potential quantum speedup, even for stoquastic models. In this work we investigate the tunneling time of projective QMC simulations based on the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) algorithm without guiding functions, showing that it scales as 1 /Δ , i.e., even more favorably than the incoherent quantum-tunneling time, both in a simple ferromagnetic system and in the more challenging shamrock model. However, a careful comparison between the DMC ground-state energies and the exact solution available for the transverse-field Ising chain indicates an exponential scaling of the computational cost required to keep a fixed relative error as the system size increases.

  11. Interaction between groundwater and TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) excavated tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Font Capó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    A number of problems, e.g. sudden inflows are encountered during tunneling under the piezometric level, especially when the excavation crosses high transmissivity areas. These inflows may drag materials when the tunnel crosses low competent layers, resulting in subsidence, chimney formation and collapses. Moreover, inflows can lead to a decrease in head level because of aquifer drainage. Tunnels can be drilled by a tunnel boring machine (TBM) to minimize inflows and groundwater impacts, restr...

  12. Theoretical consideration of spin-polarized resonant tunneling in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Haifeng; Zhu Zhengang; Zheng Qingrong; Jin Biao; Wang Zhengchuan; Su Gang

    2004-01-01

    A recent elegant experimental realization [S. Yuasa et al., Science 297 (2002) 234] of the spin-polarized resonant tunneling in magnetic tunnel junctions is interpreted in terms of a two-band model. It is shown that the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) decays oscillatorily with the thickness of the normal metal (NM) layer, being fairly in agreement with the experimental observation. The tunnel conductance is found to decay with slight oscillations with the increase of the NM layer thickness, which is also well consistent with the experiment. In addition, when the magnetizations of both ferromagnet electrodes are not collinearly aligned, TMR is found to exhibit sharp resonant peaks at some particular thickness of the NM layer. The peaked TMR obeys nicely a Gaussian distribution against the relative orientation of the magnetizations

  13. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in double-barrier planar magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, A. N.

    2011-08-24

    We present a theoretical approach to calculate the spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DMTJ), in which the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer can be aligned parallel or antiparallel in relation to the fixed magnetizations of the left and right ferromagnetic electrodes. The electron transport through the DMTJ is considered as a three-dimensional problem, taking into account all transmitting electron trajectories as well as the spin-dependent momentum conservation law. The dependence of the transmission coefficient and spin-polarized currents on the applied voltage is derived as an exact solution to the quantum-mechanical problem for the spin-polarized transport. In the range of the developed physical model, the resonant tunneling, nonresonant tunneling, and enhanced spin filtering can be explained; the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF WIND LOAD APPLIED TO THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURES BY VIRTUE OF ITS SIMULATION IN THE WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroshenko Sergey Aleksandrovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors discuss wind loads applied to a set of two buildings. The wind load is simulated with the help of the wind tunnel. In the Russian Federation, special attention is driven to the aerodynamics of high-rise buildings and structures. According to the Russian norms, identification of aerodynamic coefficients for high-rise buildings, as well as the influence of adjacent buildings and structures, is performed on the basis of models of structures exposed to wind impacts simulated in the wind tunnel. This article deals with the results of the wind tunnel test of buildings. The simulation was carried out with the involvement of a model of two twenty-three storied buildings. The experiment was held in a wind tunnel of the closed type at in the Institute of Mechanics of Moscow State University. Data were compared at the zero speed before and after the experiment. LabView software was used to process the output data. Graphs and tables were developed in the Microsoft Excel package. GoogleSketchUp software was used as a visualization tool. The three-dimensional flow formed in the wind tunnel can't be adequately described by solving the two-dimensional problem. The aerodynamic experiment technique is used to analyze the results for eighteen angles of the wind attack.

  15. Power Effects on High Lift, Stability and Control Characteristics of the TCA Model Tested in the LaRC 14 x 22 Ft Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glessner, Paul T.

    1999-01-01

    The TCA-2 wind-tunnel test was the second in a series of planned tests utilizing the 5% Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) model. Each of the tests was planned to utilize the unique capabilities of the NASA Langley 14'x22' and the NASA Ames 12' test facilities, in order to assess specific aspects of the high lift and stability and control characteristics of the TCA configuration. However, shortly after the completion of the TCA-1 test, an early projection of the Technology Configuration (TC) identified the need for several significant changes to the baseline TCA configuration. These changes were necessary in order to meet more stringent noise certification levels, as well as, to provide a means to control dynamic structural modes. The projected changes included a change to the outboard wing (increased aspect ratio and lower sweep) and a reconfiguration of the longitudinal control surfaces to include a medium size canard and a reduced horizontal tail. The impact of these proposed changes did not affect the TCA-2 test, because it was specifically planned to address power effects on the empennage and a smaller horizontal tail was in the plan to be tested. However, the focus of future tests was reevaluated and the emphasis was shifted away from assessment of TCA specific configurations to a more general assessment of configurations that encompass the projected design space for the TC.

  16. Reaction of long-lived radicals and vitamin C in γ-irradiated mammalian cells and their model system at 295 K. Tunneling reaction in biological system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takuro; Kumada, Takayuki; Kodama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masami

    1997-01-01

    When golden hamster embryo (GHE) cells or concentrated albumin solution (0.1 kg dm -3 ), that is a model system of cells, is irradiated with γ-rays at 295 K, organic radicals produced can be observed by ESR. The organic radicals survive at both 295 and 310 K for as long as 20 h. The long-lived radicals in GHE cells and the albumin solution react with vitamin C by the rate constants of 0.007 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and 0.014 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 , respectively. The long-lived radicals in human cells cause gene mutation, which is suppressed by the addition of vitamin C. The isotope effect on the rate constant (κ) for the reaction of the long-lived radicals and vitamin C has been studied in the albumin solution by use of protonated vitamin C and deuterated vitamin C. The isotope effect (κ H /κ D ) was more than 20 ∼ 50 and was interpreted in terms of tunnelling reaction. (author)

  17. Modeling and performance analysis of GaN nanowire field-effect transistors and band-to-band tunneling field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayer, M. Abul; Lake, Roger K.

    2010-11-01

    The real and imaginary bandstructures of deeply scaled GaN nanowire (NW) field-effect transistors (FETs) are calculated with an eight-band k ṡp model. Analysis of the transport properties of both GaN NW FETs and NW band-to-band tunneling FETs (TFETs) is presented. Deeply scaled n-type GaN NW FETs operate in the classical capacitance limit (CCL) in stead of operating in the quantum capacitance limit. This is a result of the high electron effective mass and high density of states. We discuss how the CCL operation of these devices affect the device performance. For the GaN NW FETs, within a source Fermi level of 0.2 eV, the current density varies from 5 to 8.5 A/mm. For the GaN TFETs, we present analysis on the effect of NW diameter on the on-currents, the off-currents, and the required electric fields. We show that a drive current of ˜0.05 A/mm can be achieved for the GaN NW TFETs. These devices show potential for high-speed and high-power applications.

  18. Experimental Study on the Wake Meandering Within a Scale Model Wind Farm Subject to a Wind-Tunnel Flow Simulating an Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudou, Nicolas; Buckingham, Sophia; Bricteux, Laurent; van Beeck, Jeroen

    2018-04-01

    The phenomenon of meandering of the wind-turbine wake comprises the motion of the wake as a whole in both horizontal and vertical directions as it is advected downstream. The oscillatory motion of the wake is a crucial factor in wind farms, because it increases the fatigue loads, and, in particular, the yaw loads on downstream turbines. To address this phenomenon, experimental investigations are carried out in a wind-tunnel flow simulating an atmospheric boundary layer with the Coriolis effect neglected. A 3 × 3 scaled wind farm composed of three-bladed rotating wind-turbine models is subject to a neutral boundary layer over a slightly-rough surface, i.e. corresponding to offshore conditions. Particle-image-velocimetry measurements are performed in a horizontal plane at hub height in the wakes of the three wind turbines occupying the wind-farm centreline. These measurements allow determination of the wake centrelines, with spectral analysis indicating the characteristic wavelength of the wake-meandering phenomenon. In addition, measurements with hot-wire anemometry are performed along a vertical line in the wakes of the same wind turbines, with both techniques revealing the presence of wake meandering behind all three turbines. The spectral analysis performed with the spatial and temporal signals obtained from these two measurement techniques indicates a Strouhal number of ≈ 0.20 - 0.22 based on the characteristic wake-meandering frequency, the rotor diameter and the flow speed at hub height.

  19. Seepage into PEP tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, H.

    1990-01-01

    The current rate of seepage into the PEP tunnel in the vicinity of IR-10 is very low compared to previous years. Adequate means of handling this low flow are in place. It is not clear whether the reduction in the flow is temporary, perhaps due to three consecutive dry years, or permanent due to drainage of a perched water table. During PEP construction a large amount of effort was expended in attempts to seal the tunnel, with no immediate effect. The efforts to ''manage'' the water flow are deemed to be successful. By covering equipment to protect it from dripping water and channeling seepage into the drainage gutters, the seepage has been reduced to a tolerable nuisance. There is no sure, safe procedure for sealing a leaky shotcreted tunnel

  20. Results of investigations with an 0.015-scale model (49-0) of the Rockwell International space shuttle vehicle 140A/B configuration with modified OMS pods and elevons in the AEDC VKF tunnel B (0A79)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, V.; Lindsay, A. I.

    1975-01-01

    Aerodynamic data obtained from wind tunnel tests of an 0.015-scale space shuttle vehicle Orbiter model of a 140A/B configuration with modified orbital manuevering system pods and elevons are documented. Force data was obtained at various control surface settings and Reynolds numbers in the angle of attack range of 15 deg to 45 deg and at angles of sideslip of -5 deg to +5 deg. Control surface variables included elevon, rudder, speed brake, and body flap configurations.

  1. System Model Bias Processing Approach for Regional Coordinated States Information Involved Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zebo Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Kalman filtering applications, the conventional dynamic model which connects the states information of two consecutive epochs by state transition matrix is usually predefined and assumed to be invariant. Aiming to improve the adaptability and accuracy of dynamic model, we propose multiple historical states involved filtering algorithm. An autoregressive model is used as the dynamic model which is subsequently combined with observation model for deriving the optimal window-recursive filter formulae in the sense of minimum mean square error principle. The corresponding test statistics characteristics of system residuals are discussed in details. The test statistics of regional predicted residuals are then constructed in a time-window for model bias testing with two hypotheses, that is, the null and alternative hypotheses. Based on the innovations test statistics, we develop a model bias processing procedure including bias detection, location identification, and state correction. Finally, the minimum detectable bias and bias-to-noise ratio are both computed for evaluating the internal and external reliability of overall system, respectively.

  2. LEP tunnel monorail

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    A monorail from CERN's Large Electron Positron collider (LEP, for short). It ran around the 27km tunnel, transporting equipment and personnel. With its 27-kilometre circumference, LEP was the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built and ran from 1989 to 2000. During 11 years of research, LEP's experiments provided a detailed study of the electroweak interaction. Measurements performed at LEP also proved that there are three – and only three – generations of particles of matter. LEP was closed down on 2 November 2000 to make way for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider in the same tunnel.

  3. Excavating a transfer tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The transfer tunnel being dug here will take the 450 GeV beam from the SPS and inject it into the LHC where the beam energies will be increased to 7 TeV. In order to transfer this beam from the SPS to the LHC, two transfer tunnels are used to circulate the beams in opposite directions. When excavated, the accelerator components, including magnets, beam pipes and cryogenics will be installed and connected to both the SPS and LHC ready for operation to begin in 2008.

  4. Simplified Model for the Population Dynamics Involved in a Malaria Crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenfack-Jiotsa, A.; Fotsa-Ngaffo, F.

    2009-12-01

    We adapt a simple model of predator-prey to the population involved in a crisis of malaria. The study is made only in the stream blood inside the human body except for the liver. Particularly we look at the dynamics of the malaria parasites 'merozoites' and their interaction with the blood components, more specifically the red blood cells (RBC) and the immune response grouped under the white blood cells (WBC). The stability analysis of the system reveals an important practical direction to investigate as regards the ratio WBC over RBC since it is a fundamental parameter that characterizes stable regions. The model numerically presents a wide range of possible features of the disease. Even with its simplified form, the model not only recovers well-known results but in addition predicts possible hidden phenomenon and an interesting clinical feature a malaria crisis. (author)

  5. Breaking through the tranfer tunnel

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the tunnel boring machine breaking through the transfer tunnel into the LHC tunnel. Proton beams will be transferred from the SPS pre-accelerator to the LHC at 450 GeV through two specially constructed transfer tunnels. From left to right: LHC Project Director, Lyn Evans; CERN Director-General (at the time), Luciano Maiani, and Director for Accelerators, Kurt Hubner.

  6. Gap anisotropy and tunneling currents. [MPS3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarides, N.; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    1996-01-01

    The tunneling Hamiltonian formalism is applied to calculate the tunnelingcurrents through a small superconducting tunnel junction. The formalism isextended to nonconstant tunneling matrix elements. The electrodes of thejunction are assumed to......The tunneling Hamiltonian formalism is applied to calculate the tunnelingcurrents through a small superconducting tunnel junction. The formalism isextended to nonconstant tunneling matrix elements. The electrodes of thejunction are assumed to...

  7. A comparative modeling and molecular docking study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhar, Zeynab; Naiker, Suhashni; Alves, Claudio N; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Lameira, Jeronimo; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Kruger, Hendrik G; Honarparvar, Bahareh

    2016-11-01

    An alarming rise of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and the continuous high global morbidity of tuberculosis have reinvigorated the need to identify novel targets to combat the disease. The enzymes that catalyze the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan in M. tuberculosis are essential and noteworthy therapeutic targets. In this study, the biochemical function and homology modeling of MurI, MurG, MraY, DapE, DapA, Alr, and Ddl enzymes of the CDC1551 M. tuberculosis strain involved in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan cell wall are reported. Generation of the 3D structures was achieved with Modeller 9.13. To assess the structural quality of the obtained homology modeled targets, the models were validated using PROCHECK, PDBsum, QMEAN, and ERRAT scores. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate root mean square deviation (RMSD) and radius of gyration (Rg) of MurI and MurG target proteins and their corresponding templates. For further model validation, RMSD and Rg for selected targets/templates were investigated to compare the close proximity of their dynamic behavior in terms of protein stability and average distances. To identify the potential binding mode required for molecular docking, binding site information of all modeled targets was obtained using two prediction algorithms. A docking study was performed for MurI to determine the potential mode of interaction between the inhibitor and the active site residues. This study presents the first accounts of the 3D structural information for the selected M. tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

  8. EVALUATION OF A FAST-RESPONSE URBAN WIND MODEL - COMPARISON TO SINGLE-BUILDING WIND TUNNEL DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.R. PARDYJAK; M.J. BROWN

    2001-01-01

    Prediction of the 3-dimensional flow field around buildings and other obstacles is important for a number of applications, including urban air quality studies, the tracking of plumes from accidental releases of toxic air contaminants, indoor/outdoor air pollution problems, and thermal comfort assessments. Various types of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been used for determining the flow fields around buildings (e.g., Reisner et al., 1998; Eichhorn et al., 1988). Comparisons to measurements show that these models work reasonably well for the most part (e.g., Ehrhard et al., 2 ; Johnson and Hunter, 1998; Murakami, 1997). However, CFD models are computationally intensive and for some applications turn-around time is of the essence. For example, planning and assessment studies in which hundreds of cases must be analyzed or emergency response scenarios in which plume transport must be computed quickly. Several fast-response dispersion models of varying levels of fidelity have been developed to explicitly account for the effects of a single building or groups of buildings (e.g., UDM - Hall et al. (2000), NRC-Ramsdell and Fosmire (1995), CBP-3 - Yamartino and Wiegand (1986), APRAC - Daerdt et al. (1973)). Although a few of these models include the Hotchkiss and Harlow (1973) analytical solution for potential flow in a notch to describe the velocity field within an urban canyon, in general, these models do not explicitly compute the velocity field around groups of buildings. The EPA PRIME model (Schulman et al., 2000) has been empirically derived to provide streamlines around a single isolated building

  9. Highly functional tunnelling devices integrated in 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Lars-Erik; Lind, Erik; Lindström, Peter

    2003-01-01

    to adjust the peak voltage of certain peaks in a controlled fashion, which creates a highly functional tunnelling device. These results show the need for a strong interaction between the development of circuit models and processing technology to develop new nano-electronic devices and circuits. Copyright...... circuit in order to optimize the performance of the device. In addition to the tunnelling structure below the grating, these transistors may be integrated in 3D by the introduction of another tunnelling structure directly over the metal grating. In the integrated device structure, the gate acts...... simultaneously on both tunnelling structures and the obtained characteristics are the result of the interplay between the two tunnelling structures and the gate. An equivalent circuit model is developed and we show how this interaction influences the current-voltage characteristics. The gate may be used...

  10. Unstable Semiclassical Trajectories in Tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Levkov, D G; Sibiryakov, S M

    2007-01-01

    Some tunneling phenomena are described, in the semiclassical approximation, by unstable complex trajectories. We develop a systematic procedure to stabilize the trajectories and to calculate the tunneling probability, including both the suppression exponent and prefactor. We find that the instability of tunneling solutions modifies the power-law dependence of the prefactor on h as compared to the case of stable solutions.

  11. Wind Tunnel Measurements at LM Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    2012-01-01

    This section presents the results obtained during the experimental campaign that was conducted in the wind tunnel at LM Wind Power in Lunderskov from August 16th to 26th, 2010. The goal of this study is to validate the so-called TNO trailing edge noise model through measurements of the boundary...... layer turbulence characteristics and the far-field noise generated by the acoustic scattering of the turbulent boundary layer vorticies as they convect past the trailing edge. This campaign was conducted with a NACA0015 airfoil section that was placed in the wind tunnel section. It is equipped with high...

  12. Validating a Model of Motivational Factors Influencing Involvement for Parents of Transition-Age Youth with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Kara A.; Shanley, Lina; Garbacz, S. Andrew; Rowe, Dawn A.; Lindstrom, Lauren; Leve, Leslie D.

    2018-01-01

    Parent involvement is a predictor of postsecondary education and employment outcomes, but rigorous measures of parent involvement for youth with disabilities are lacking. Hirano, Garbacz, Shanley, and Rowe adapted scales based on Hoover-Dempsey and Sandler model of parent involvement for use with parents of youth with disabilities aged 14 to 23.…

  13. Enhancements to AERMOD’s Building Downwash Algorithms based on Wind Tunnel and Embedded-LES Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation presents three modifications to the building downwash algorithm in AERMOD that improve the physical basis and internal consistency of the model, and one modification to AERMOD’s building pre-processor to better represent elongated buildings in oblique wind...

  14. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansoldi, S. [National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) (Italy); Tanaka, T., E-mail: tanaka@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. We discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in the literature.

  15. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    OpenAIRE

    Ansoldi, Stefano; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. Here we discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in literature.

  16. Tunnelling Effects in Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 2. Tunnelling Effects in Chemistry: Molecules in the Strange Quantum World. Sharmistha Karmakar Deepthi Jose Ayan Datta. General Article Volume 19 Issue 2 February 2014 pp 160-174 ...

  17. Shaking-Table Tests for Immersed Tunnels at Different Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjun Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Immersed tunnels are typically built in areas subjected to ground motion. Therefore, an evaluation of the seismic performance of the soil-tunnel system is essential. A series of shaking-table tests was conducted to study the influences of the site soil and overlying water layer on the seismic responses of soil deposits and an immersed tunnel. Detailed information on the experiment setup is provided with special focus on the similitude relationship, fabrication of the model system, measurement setup, and loading procedures for a simulation of the seismic waves. Three groups of tests at different sites in dry sand, saturated sand, and saturated sand with an overlying water layer were carried out using the same seismic excitations. The seismic responses of the soil deposits and the dynamic responses of the tunnel model were obtained. The experiment results indicate that, when considering only horizontal earthquake excitations, soil liquefaction significantly influences the propagation of seismic waves and the dynamic responses of the tunnel, whereas the water layer has no obvious effects on the dynamic performance of the ground or tunnel. Furthermore, the acceleration responses of the tunnel elements were analyzed qualitatively, and the joints are deemed important elements in an antiseismic immersed tunnel design.

  18. The Channel Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. The undersea section of the tunnel is unsurpassed in length in the world. A proposal for a Channel tunnel was first put forward by a French engineer in 1802. In 1881, a first attempt was made at boring a tunnel from the English side; the work was halted after 800 m. Again in 1922, English workers started boring a tunnel, and advanced 120 m before it too was halted for political reasons. The most recent attempt was begun in 1987, and the tunnel was officially opened in 1994. At completion it was estimated that the project cost around $18 billion. It has been operating at a significant loss since its opening, despite trips by over 7 million passengers per year on the Eurostar train, and over 3 million vehicles per year. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The

  19. University Physics Students' Use of Models in Explanations of Phenomena Involving Interaction between Metals and Electromagnetic Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfors, Andreas; Ryder, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Examines third year university physics students' use of models when explaining familiar phenomena involving interaction between metals and electromagnetic radiation. Concludes that few students use a single model consistently. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  20. An explanatory model of maths achievement:Perceived parental involvement and academic motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Susana; Piñeiro, Isabel; Gómez-Taibo, Mª L; Regueiro, Bibiana; Estévez, Iris; Valle, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    Although numerous studies have tried to explain performance in maths very few have deeply explored the relationship between different variables and how they jointly explain mathematical performance. With a sample of 897 students in 5th and 6th grade in Primary Education and using structural equation modeling (SEM), this study analyzes how the perception of parents’ beliefs is related to children´s beliefs, their involvement in mathematical tasks and their performance. Perceived parental involvement contributes to the motivation of their children in mathematics. Direct supervision of students’ academic work by parents may increase students’ concerns about the image and rating of their children, but not their academic performance. In fact, maths achievement depends directly and positively on the parents’ expectations and children’s maths self-efficacy and negatively on the parents’ help in tasks and performance goal orientation. Perceived parental involvement contributes to children’s motivation in maths essentially conveying confidence in their abilities and showing interest in their progress and schoolwork.

  1. Using the Health Belief Model to explain patient involvement in patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Andrea C; Baker, G Ross; Boyle, Todd A; MacKinnon, Neil J

    2015-12-01

    With the knowledge that patient safety incidents can significantly impact patients, providers and health-care organizations, greater emphasis on patient involvement as a means to mitigate risks warrants further research. To understand whether patient perceptions of patient safety play a role in patient involvement in factual and challenging patient safety practices and whether the constructs of the Health Belief Model (HBM) help to explain such perceptions. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis of survey data. Four inpatient units located in two tertiary hospitals in Atlantic Canada. Patients discharged from participating units between November 2010 and January 2011. None. A total of 217 of the 587 patient surveys were returned for a final response rate of 37.0%. The PLS analysis revealed relationships between patient perceptions of threat and self-efficacy and the performance of factual and challenging patient safety practices, explaining 46 and 42% of the variance, respectively. The results from this study provide evidence for the constructs and relationships set forth by the HBM. Perceptions of patient safety were shown to influence patient likelihood for engaging in selected patient safety practices. While perceptions of barriers and benefits and threats were found to be a contributing factor to patient involvement in patient safety practices, self-efficacy plays an important role as a mediating factor. Overall, the use of the HBM within patient safety provides for increased understanding of how such perceptions can be influenced to improve patient engagement in promoting safer health care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Monitoring pilot projects on bored tunnelling : The Second Heinenoord Tunnel and the Botlek Rail Tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, K.J.; De Boer, F.; Admiraal, J.B.M.; Van Jaarsveld, E.P.

    1999-01-01

    Two pilot projects for bored tunnelling in soft soil have been undertaken in the Netherlands. The monitoring was commissioned under the authority of the Centre for Underground Construction (COB). A description of the research related to the Second Heinenoord Tunnel and the Botlek Rail Tunnel will be

  3. Effect of winglets on a first-generation jet transport wing. 6: Stability characteristics for a full-span model at subsonic speeds. [conducted in Langley 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flechner, S. G.

    1979-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation to identify changes in stability and control characteristics of a model KC-135A due to the addition of winglets is presented. Static longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics were determined for the model with and without winglets. Variations in the aerodynamic characteristics at various Mach numbers, angles of attack, and angles of slidslip are discussed. The effect of the winglets on the drag and lift coefficients are evaluated and the low speed and high speed characteristics of the model are reported.

  4. Tunneling features in semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseev, P. I.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Maslova, N. S.; Panov, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    The most telling scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) data available on the influence of nonequilibrium tunneling effects and electronic spectra reconstruction are reviewed and theoretically explained by self-consistently accounting for nonequilibrium electron distribution and the change (due to the tunneling current) in the electron density of states near the tunneling junction. The paper discusses the basic ideas of the self-consistent tunneling theory, which forms the basis for experimental research and which allows many effects observed in STM/STS experiments to be explained and new phenomena to be predicted.

  5. Análisis y evaluación de riesgo de túneles carreteros en explotación Risk assessment models for road tunnels in operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Martínez Montes

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Tras los fatales accidentes en los últimos años, la seguridad en la explotación de túneles de carreteras se ha convertido en una prioridad de la política de transportes a nivel internacional y en especial en la Unión Europea. Esta circunstancia se ha traducido principalmente en la exigencia del análisis y evaluación de riesgo en aquellos túneles que por sus singulares características así lo aconsejan. A lo largo del presente artículo se analiza el marco conceptual del riesgo en ingeniería, así como las principales opciones metodológicas existentes para el análisis de riesgo en túneles en explotación, deterministas y probabilísticas. La conclusión del estudio es la utilización generalizada de las primeras completadas con un estudio deterministic o centrado en aquellos casos cuyas consecuencias presentan unas mayores pérdidas en términos absolutos para la sociedadAfter tunnel fire catastrophes at the end of the 1990's, the safety at road tunnel operations has become a priority on transportation policies at international level especially inside the European Union. This circumstance has required the analysis and risk assessment in those tunnels that for their special characteristics it is highly recommended. This article presents a biographical review in the topic along with a research of risk assessment models for road tunnels. The main conclusion of this study is the need of applying probabilistic models complemented by determinist studies centred in cases which may present biggest losses to the society

  6. Calculation of quantum tunneling for a spatially extended defect: The dislocation kink in copper has a low effective mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Tejs; Sethna, J.P.; Cheong, S.-A.

    2001-01-01

    , and quantum tunneling rates fur dislocation kinks and jogs in copper screw dislocations. We find that jugs are unlikely to tunnel, but the kinks should have large quantum fluctuations. The kink motion involves hundreds of atoms each shifting a tiny amount, leading to a small effective mass and tunneling...

  7. Output voltage calculations in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with asymmetric voltage behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2011-10-22

    In this paper we study the asymmetric voltage behavior (AVB) of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) for single and double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) in range of a quasi-classical free electron model. Numerical calculations of the TMR-V curves, output voltages and I-V characteristics for negative and positive values of applied voltages were carried out using MTJs with CoFeB/MgO interfaces as an example. Asymmetry of the experimental TMR-V curves is explained by different values of the minority and majority Fermi wave vectors for the left and right sides of the tunnel barrier, which arises due to different annealing regimes. Electron tunneling in DMTJs was simulated in two ways: (i) Coherent tunneling, where the DMTJ is modeled as one tunnel system and (ii) consecutive tunneling, where the DMTJ is modeled by two single barrier junctions connected in series. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of the influence of building a road on the stability of the tunnel lining in a Banska Bystrica railway tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vavrek Pavol

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with solving the problem of tunnel lining stability in a railway tunnel. The road cut was made into the overburden of the tunnel. I investigated the effect of the road cut on the stability of tunnel lining. The FLAC3D mathematical modelling technique was used for this purpose. The solution consist of: - - - - - - - - - - - -modelling the initial situation before building the intervention,Determing the internal characteristics of the tunnel lining in its original state,modelling the situation after making the road cut,Determing the internal characteristics of the tunnel lining after the building intervention,Comparison of the internal characteristics of the tunnel lining before and after the building intervention.In the model, I used these general geotechnical properties of the rock environment and the tunnel lining:Material Youngus modulus [MPa] Poissons RatioClay 8 0,42Weakly wheathered calcite 3 000 0,25Hard wheathered calcite 600 0,30Fill 300 0,25Lining 20 000 0,20The arbitration of the tunnel lining stability was executed on the basis of the Mohr – Coulomb limit of the state. Building the road cut does not lead to loss of stability in the tunnel a at Station 1.225 00 or at Station 1.300 00.

  9. Generating Small Numbers by Tunneling in Multi-Throat Compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverstein, Eva M

    2001-07-25

    A generic F-theory compactification containing many D3 branes develops multiple brane throats. The interaction of observers residing inside different throats involves tunneling suppression and, as a result, is very weak. This suggests a new mechanism for generating small numbers in Nature. One application is to the hierarchy problem: large supersymmetry breaking near the unification scale inside a shallow throat causes TeV-scale SUSY-breaking inside the standard-model throat. Another application, inspired by nuclear-decay, is in designing naturally long-lived particles: a cold dark matter particle residing near the standard model brane decays to an approximate CFT-state of a longer throat within a Hubble time. This suggests that most of the mass of the universe today could consist of CFT-matter and may soften structure formation at sub-galactic scales. The tunneling calculation demonstrates that the coupling between two throats is dominated by higher dimensional modes and consequently is much larger than a naive application of holography might suggest.

  10. Tissue adhesion to bioactive glass-coated silicone tubing in a rat model of peritoneal dialysis catheters and catheter tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Edward A; Batich, Christopher D; Clapp, William L; Sallustio, Judith E; Lee, Nadeen C

    2003-02-01

    Silicone peritoneal dialysis catheters do not develop tissue ingrowth, lack a mechanical barrier to periluminal bacterial migration and need cuffs for anchorage. We hypothesized that a bioactive glass coating composed of silicon, calcium, sodium and phosphorous oxides would cause a beneficial tissue reaction causing catheter adhesion, and tested this in a rat model. A hexane solvent-based method of coating silicone tubes with Bioglass powder was used, which maintained flexibility, and then the ultrastructure was confirmed with scanning electron microscopy (EM). Segments 2.5 cm were implanted subcutaneously in 8 Sprague-Dawley rats, with uncoated tubes as a contralateral control, and histology was done at 2, 4 and 6 weeks, including special stains and EM. The uncoated segments grossly had no adherence to surrounding tissue, and were physically separate from a thin fibrous capsule of approximately 50 micro width. Trichrome stains demonstrated the capsule was rich in collagen. There was minimal adjacent tissue reaction. In contrast, the coated tubes were palpably fixed to the soft tissues, and sections demonstrated an adjacent prominent layer of macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Small numbers of lymphocytes were noted. This cellular reaction increased over the 6-week implant duration, and was also associated with neovascularization of the tissue adjacent to the segments (33 vessels in coated vs. 20 in controls per x 200 field, P tubing by promoting adhesion by collagen and cell proliferation, and are promising for future studies of peritoneal dialysis catheters.

  11. Nanowire resonant tunneling diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, M. T.; Ohlsson, B. J.; Thelander, C.; Persson, A. I.; Deppert, K.; Wallenberg, L. R.; Samuelson, L.

    2002-12-01

    Semiconductor heterostructures and their implementation into electronic and photonic devices have had tremendous impact on science and technology. In the development of quantum nanoelectronics, one-dimensional (1D) heterostructure devices are receiving a lot of interest. We report here functional 1D resonant tunneling diodes obtained via bottom-up assembly of designed segments of different semiconductor materials in III/V nanowires. The emitter, collector, and the central quantum dot are made from InAs and the barrier material from InP. Ideal resonant tunneling behavior, with peak-to-valley ratios of up to 50:1 and current densities of 1 nA/μm2 was observed at low temperatures.

  12. Cadmium Handling, Toxicity and Molecular Targets Involved during Pregnancy: Lessons from Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Jacobo-Estrada

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Even decades after the discovery of Cadmium (Cd toxicity, research on this heavy metal is still a hot topic in scientific literature: as we wrote this review, more than 1440 scientific articles had been published and listed by the PubMed.gov website during 2017. Cadmium is one of the most common and harmful heavy metals present in our environment. Since pregnancy is a very particular physiological condition that could impact and modify essential pathways involved in the handling of Cd, the prenatal life is a critical stage for exposure to this non-essential element. To give the reader an overview of the possible mechanisms involved in the multiple organ toxic effects in fetuses after the exposure to Cd during pregnancy, we decided to compile some of the most relevant experimental studies performed in experimental models and to summarize the advances in this field such as the Cd distribution and the factors that could alter it (diet, binding-proteins and membrane transporters, the Cd-induced toxicity in dams (preeclampsia, fertility, kidney injury, alteration in essential element homeostasis and bone mineralization, in placenta and in fetus (teratogenicity, central nervous system, liver and kidney.

  13. Hawking Radiation As Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, Maulik K.; Wilczek, Frank

    2000-01-01

    We present a short and direct derivation of Hawking radiation as a tunneling process, based on particles in a dynamical geometry. The imaginary part of the action for the classically forbidden process is related to the Boltzmann factor for emission at the Hawking temperature. Because the derivation respects conservation laws, the exact spectrum is not precisely thermal. We compare and contrast the problem of spontaneous emission of charged particles from a charged conductor

  14. The beam dump tunnels

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    In these images workers are digging the tunnels that will be used to dump the counter-circulating beams. Travelling just a fraction under the speed of light, the beams at the LHC will each carry the energy of an aircraft carrier travelling at 12 knots. In order to dispose of these beams safely, a beam dump is used to extract the beam and diffuse it before it collides with a radiation shielded graphite target.

  15. Carpal tunnel release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Bo; Sørensen, A I; Crone, K L

    2013-01-01

    A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial was done to compare the results of carpal tunnel release using classic incision, short incision, or endoscopic technique. In total, 90 consecutive cases were included. Follow-up was 24 weeks. We found a significantly shorter sick leave in the endoscopi...... incision could be found. There were no serious complications in either group. The results indicate that the endoscopic procedure is safe and has the benefit of faster rehabilitation and return to work....

  16. Tunnel blasting - recent developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.E.

    1999-05-01

    While tunnelling machines are more efficient than previously, there are still areas where blasting is a more efficient method of advance. Drilling and design methods are increasingly sophisticated, as is choice of explosive. Explosive deployment must be carefully calculated so as to avoid desensitisation. Nitroglycerine may be used as slurries; bulk mixing on site of ANFO is also practised in mining in the UK. Electric detonators, Nonel tubes, and electronic detonators are also increasingly employed.

  17. Heavy-Atom Tunneling Calculations in Thirteen Organic Reactions: Tunneling Contributions are Substantial, and Bell's Formula Closely Approximates Multidimensional Tunneling at ≥250 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubleday, Charles; Armas, Randy; Walker, Dana; Cosgriff, Christopher V; Greer, Edyta M

    2017-10-09

    Multidimensional tunneling calculations are carried out for 13 reactions, to test the scope of heavy-atom tunneling in organic chemistry, and to check the accuracy of one-dimensional tunneling models. The reactions include pericyclic, cycloaromatization, radical cyclization and ring opening, and S N 2. When compared at the temperatures that give the same effective rate constant of 3×10 -5  s -1 , tunneling accounts for 25-95 % of the rate in 8 of the 13 reactions. Values of transmission coefficients predicted by Bell's formula, κ Bell  , agree well with multidimensional tunneling (canonical variational transition state theory with small curvature tunneling), κ SCT . Mean unsigned deviations of κ Bell vs. κ SCT are 0.08, 0.04, 0.02 at 250, 300 and 400 K. This suggests that κ Bell is a useful first choice for predicting transmission coefficients in heavy-atom tunnelling. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Processes and parameters involved in modeling radionuclide transport from bedded salt repositories. Final report. Technical memorandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evenson, D.E.; Prickett, T.A.; Showalter, P.A.

    1979-07-01

    The parameters necessary to model radionuclide transport in salt beds are identified and described. A proposed plan for disposal of the radioactive wastes generated by nuclear power plants is to store waste canisters in repository sites contained in stable salt formations approximately 600 meters below the ground surface. Among the principal radioactive wastes contained in these canisters will be radioactive isotopes of neptunium, americium, uranium, and plutonium along with many highly radioactive fission products. A concern with this form of waste disposal is the possibility of ground-water flow occurring in the salt beds and endangering water supplies and the public health. Specifically, the research investigated the processes involved in the movement of radioactive wastes from the repository site by groundwater flow. Since the radioactive waste canisters also generate heat, temperature is an important factor. Among the processes affecting movement of radioactive wastes from a repository site in a salt bed are thermal conduction, groundwater movement, ion exchange, radioactive decay, dissolution and precipitation of salt, dispersion and diffusion, adsorption, and thermomigration. In addition, structural changes in the salt beds as a result of temperature changes are important. Based upon the half-lives of the radioactive wastes, he period of concern is on the order of a million years. As a result, major geologic phenomena that could affect both the salt bed and groundwater flow in the salt beds was considered. These phenomena include items such as volcanism, faulting, erosion, glaciation, and the impact of meteorites. CDM reviewed all of the critical processes involved in regional groundwater movement of radioactive wastes and identified and described the parameters that must be included to mathematically model their behavior. In addition, CDM briefly reviewed available echniques to measure these parameters

  19. New Tunneling Features in Polar III-Nitride Resonant Tunneling Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimy Encomendero

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available For the past two decades, repeatable resonant tunneling transport of electrons in III-nitride double barrier heterostructures has remained elusive at room temperature. In this work we theoretically and experimentally study III-nitride double-barrier resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs, the quantum transport characteristics of which exhibit new features that are unexplainable using existing semiconductor theory. The repeatable and robust resonant transport in our devices enables us to track the origin of these features to the broken inversion symmetry in the uniaxial crystal structure, which generates built-in spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields. Resonant tunneling transport enabled by the ground state as well as by the first excited state is demonstrated for the first time over a wide temperature window in planar III-nitride RTDs. An analytical transport model for polar resonant tunneling heterostructures is introduced for the first time, showing a good quantitative agreement with experimental data. From this model we realize that tunneling transport is an extremely sensitive measure of the built-in polarization fields. Since such electric fields play a crucial role in the design of electronic and photonic devices, but are difficult to measure, our work provides a completely new method to accurately determine their magnitude for the entire class of polar heterostructures.

  20. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  1. In situ stresses in rock masses: methodology for its study in tunnel projects in Spain; Metodologia de estudio y obtencion de las tensiones in situ en los proyectos de obra subterranea realizados en Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madirolas Perez, G.; Perucho Martinez, A.

    2014-07-01

    In situ stress is one of the main factors to be taken into account in the design of tunnels, as it can cause inadmissible stresses and strains leading to high deviations in the budgets. For that reason, the stress state is directly introduced into the numerical models used for the design of tunnels. In Spain, although several tunnels have been carried out with an important overburden in tectonically relevant zones, a quantitative determination of the stresses has not been usually included in civil work projects. Therefore, it is considered necessary to implement a routine procedure of study of civil work projects involving tunnels excavated in rock, and a new detailed methodology is proposed. The challenge is that project managers, who face works in which stresses may play a determinant role, may have a practical reference enabling them to optimize available resources and to include the real stress information in the design of underground works. (Author)

  2. Coupled Boundary and Finite Element Analysis of Vibration from Railway Tunnels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Jones, C. J. C.

    2004-01-01

    body vibration (about 4 to 80 Hz). A coupled finite element and boundary element scheme is applied in both two and three dimensions. Two tunnel designs are considered: a cut-and-cover tunnel for a double track and a single-track tunnel dug with the New Austrian Tunnelling Method (NATM).......The analysis of vibration from railway tunnels is of growing interest as new and higher-speed railways are built under the ground to address the transport problems of growing modern urban areas around cities. Such analysis can be carried out using numerical methods but models and therefore......-dimensional wave propagation. The aim of this paper is to investigate the quality of the information that can be gained from a two-dimensional model of a railway tunnel. The vibration transmission from the tunnel floor to the ground surface is analysed for the frequency range relevant to the perception of whole...

  3. Coupled Boundary and Finite Element Analysis of Vibration from Railway Tunnels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Jones, C.J.C.

    2006-01-01

    body vibration (about 4 to 80 Hz). A coupled finite element and boundary element scheme is applied in both two and three dimensions. Two tunnel designs are considered: a cut-and-cover tunnel for a double track and a single-track tunnel dug with the New Austrian Tunnelling Method (NATM).......The analysis of vibration from railway tunnels is of growing interest as new and higher-speed railways are built under the ground to address the transport problems of growing modern urban areas around cities. Such analysis can be carried out using numerical methods but models and therefore......-dimensional wave propagation. The aim of this paper is to investigate the quality of the information that can be gained from a two-dimensional model of a railway tunnel. The vibration transmission from the tunnel floor to the ground surface is analysed for the frequency range relevant to the perception of whole...

  4. The possibility to determine a constant of spin-orbit interaction by scanning tunneling microscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khotkevich, N.V.; Kolesnichenko, Yu.A.; Vovk, N.P.

    2016-01-01

    The electron tunneling from the quasi-two-dimensional (surface) states with the spin-orbit interaction into bulk-mode states is studied in the framework of a model of an infinitely thin inhomogeneous tunnel magnetic barrier. The influence of the scattering of quasi-two-dimensional electrons by a single magnetic defect on the tunnel current is analyzed. Analytic formulas for the conductance of a tunnel point-contact as a function of its distance from the defect are obtained. It is shown that the analysis of the local magnetization density around the defect by means of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy allows finding the constant of spin orbit interaction.

  5. Materials and construction techniques for cryogenic wind tunnel facilities for instruction/research use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, S. F.; Roper, A. T.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the cryogenic wind tunnel program conducted at NASA Langley Research Center are presented to provide a starting point for the design of an instructional/research wind tunnel facility. The advantages of the cryogenic concept are discussed, and operating envelopes for a representative facility are presented to indicate the range and mode of operation. Special attention is given to the design, construction and materials problems peculiar to cryogenic wind tunnels. The control system for operation of a cryogenic tunnel is considered, and a portion of a linearized mathematical model is developed for determining the tunnel dynamic characteristics.

  6. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in phencyclidine-induced cognitive deficits modelling schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigano, Daniela; Guidali, Cinzia; Petrosino, Stefania; Realini, Natalia; Rubino, Tiziana; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Parolaro, Daniela

    2009-06-01

    Recent advances in the neurobiology of cannabinoids have renewed interest in the association between cannabis and schizophrenia. Our studies showed that chronic-intermittent phencyclidine (PCP) treatment of rats, an animal model of schizophrenia-like cognitive deficit, impaired recognition memory in the novel object recognition (NOR) test and induced alterations in CB1 receptor functionality and in endocannabinoid levels mainly in the prefrontal cortex. In this region, we observed a significant reduction in GTPgammaS binding (-41%) accompanied by an increase in the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-AG (+38%) in PCP-treated rats, suggesting that a maladaptation of the endocannabinoid system might contribute to the glutamatergic-related cognitive symptoms encountered in schizophrenia disorders. Moreover, we evaluated the ability of the main psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), to modulate the cognitive dysfunctions and neuroadaptations in the endocannabinoid system induced by PCP. Chronic THC co-treatment worsened PCP-induced cognitive impairment, without inducing any effect per se, and in parallel, it provoked a severe reduction in the levels of the other endocannabinoid, AEA, vs. either vehicle (-73%) or PCP (-64%), whereas it reversed the PCP-induced increase in 2-AG levels. These results point to the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in this pharmacological model of cognitive dysfunction, with a potentially different role of AEA and 2-AG in schizophrenia-like behaviours and suggest that prolonged cannabis use might aggravate cognitive performances induced by chronic PCP by throwing off-balance the endocannabinoid system.

  7. The Involvement of the Oxidative Stress in Murine Blue LED Light-Induced Retinal Damage Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Maho; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    The aim of study was to establish a mouse model of blue light emitting diode (LED) light-induced retinal damage and to evaluate the effects of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Mice were exposed to 400 or 800 lx blue LED light for 2 h, and were evaluated for retinal damage 5 d later by electroretinogram amplitude and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness. Additionally, we investigated the effect of blue LED light exposure on shorts-wave-sensitive opsin (S-opsin), and rhodopsin expression by immunohistochemistry. Blue LED light induced light intensity dependent retinal damage and led to collapse of S-opsin and altered rhodopsin localization from inner and outer segments to ONL. Conversely, NAC administered at 100 or 250 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice a day, before dark adaptation and before light exposure. NAC protected the blue LED light-induced retinal damage in a dose-dependent manner. Further, blue LED light-induced decreasing of S-opsin levels and altered rhodopsin localization, which were suppressed by NAC. We established a mouse model of blue LED light-induced retinal damage and these findings indicated that oxidative stress was partially involved in blue LED light-induced retinal damage.

  8. Involving mental health service users in suicide-related research: a qualitative inquiry model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, David; Procter, Nicholas; Fassett, Denise; Handley, Christine

    2016-03-01

    To describe the research model developed and successfully deployed as part of a multi-method qualitative study investigating suicidal service-users' experiences of mental health nursing care. Quality mental health care is essential to limiting the occurrence and burden of suicide, however there is a lack of relevant research informing practice in this context. Research utilising first-person accounts of suicidality is of particular importance to expanding the existing evidence base. However, conducting ethical research to support this imperative is challenging. The model discussed here illustrates specific and more generally applicable principles for qualitative research regarding sensitive topics and involving potentially vulnerable service-users. Researching into mental health service users with first-person experience of suicidality requires stakeholder and institutional support, researcher competency, and participant recruitment, consent, confidentiality, support and protection. Research with service users into their experiences of sensitive issues such as suicidality can result in rich and valuable data, and may also provide positive experiences of collaboration and inclusivity. If challenges are not met, objectification and marginalisation of service-users may be reinforced, and limitations in the evidence base and service provision may be perpetuated.

  9. Methodology for Measurement the Energy Efficiency Involving Solar Heating Systems Using Stochastic Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno G. Menita

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to evaluate gains through measurement and verification methodology adapted from the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol, from case studies involving Energy Efficiency Projects in the Goias State, Brazil. This paper also presents the stochastic modelling for the generation of future scenarios of electricity saving resulted by these Energy Efficiency Projects. The model is developed by using the Geometric Brownian Motion Stochastic Process with Mean Reversion associated with the Monte Carlo simulation technique. Results show that the electricity saved from the replacement of electric showers by solar water heating systems in homes of low-income families has great potential to bring financial benefits to such families, and that the reduction in peak demand obtained from this Energy Efficiency Action is advantageous to the Brazilian electrical system. Results contemplate also the future scenarios of electricity saving and a sensitivity analysis in order to verify how values of some parameters influence on the results, once there is no historical data available for obtaining these values.

  10. A structural model of customer satisfaction and trust in vendors involved in mobile commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suki, N.M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide an explanation of factors influencing customer satisfaction and trust in vendors involved in mobile commerce (m-commerce. The study sample consists of 200 respondents. Data were analyzed by employing structural equation modelling (SEM supported by AMOS 5.0 with maximum likelihood estimation in order to test the proposed hypotheses. The proposed model was empirically tested and results confirmed that users’ satisfaction with vendors in m-commerce was not significantly influenced by two antecedents of the vendor’s website quality: interactivity and customisation, and also two antecedents of mobile technology quality: usefulness and ease-of-use. Meanwhile, users’ trust towards the vendor in m-commerce is affected by users’ satisfaction with the vendor. Interestingly, vendor quality dimensions such as responsiveness and brand image influence customer satisfaction with vendors in m-commerce. Based on the findings, vendors in m-commerce should focus on the factors which generate more satisfaction and trust among customers. For vendors in general, the results can help them to better develop customer trust in m-commerce. Vendors of m-commerce can provide a more satisfying experience for customers.

  11. Nanowire Tunnel Field Effect Transistors: Prospects and Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvia, Somaia Sarwat

    The tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) has the potential to operate at lower voltages and lower power than the field effect transistor (FET). The TFET can circumvent the fundamental thermal limit of the inverse subthreshold slope (S) by exploiting interband tunneling of non-equilibrium "cold" carriers. The conduction mechanism in the TFET is governed by band-to-band tunneling which limits the drive current. TFETs built with III-V materials like InAs and InSb can produce enough tunneling current because of their small direct bandgap. Our simulation results show that although they require highly degenerate source doping to support the high electric fields in the tunnel region, the devices achieve minimum inverse subthreshold slopes of 30 mV/dec. In subthreshold, these devices experience both regimes of voltage-controlled tunneling and cold-carrier injection. Numerical results based on a discretized 8-band k.p model are compared to analytical WKB theory. For both regular FETs and TFETs, direct channel tunneling dominates the leakage current when the physical gate length is reduced to 5 nm. Therefore, a survey of materials is performed to determine their ability to suppress the direct tunnel current through a 5 nm barrier. The tunneling effective mass gives the best indication of the relative size of the tunnel currents. Si gives the lowest overall tunnel current for both the conduction and valence band and, therefore, it is the optimum choice for suppressing tunnel current at the 5 nm scale. Our numerical simulation shows that the finite number, random placement, and discrete nature of the dopants in the source of an InAs nanowire (NW) TFET affect both the mean value and the variance of the drive current and the inverse subthreshold slope. The discrete doping model gives an average drive current and an inverse subthreshold slope that are less than those predicted from the homogeneous doping model. The doping density required to achieve a target drive current is

  12. Tunnel flexibility effect on the ground surface acceleration response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baziar, Mohammad Hassan; Moghadam, Masoud Rabeti; Choo, Yun Wook; Kim, Dong-Soo

    2016-09-01

    Flexibility of underground structures relative to the surrounding medium, referred to as the flexibility ratio, is an important factor that influences their dynamic interaction. This study investigates the flexibility effect of a box-shaped subway tunnel, resting directly on bedrock, on the ground surface acceleration response using a numerical model verified against dynamic centrifuge test results. A comparison of the ground surface acceleration response for tunnel models with different flexibility ratios revealed that the tunnels with different flexibility ratios influence the acceleration response at the ground surface in different ways. Tunnels with lower flexibility ratios have higher acceleration responses at short periods, whereas tunnels with higher flexibility ratios have higher acceleration responses at longer periods. The effect of the flexibility ratio on ground surface acceleration is more prominent in the high range of frequencies. Furthermore, as the flexibility ratio of the tunnel system increases, the acceleration response moves away from the free field response and shifts towards the longer periods. Therefore, the flexibility ratio of the underground tunnels influences the peak ground acceleration (PGA) at the ground surface, and may need to be considered in the seismic zonation of urban areas.

  13. Quantum dissipation, scattering and tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleuterio, S.M.; Vilela Mendes, R.

    1984-01-01

    A quantization technique for dissipative systems is used to discuss one dimensional problems including tunneling with dissipation, capture in dissipative potential wells and quantum coherence. (orig.)

  14. Molecular Oxygen Formation in Interstellar Ices Does Not Require Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzella, Marco; Unke, Oliver T; Meuwly, Markus

    2018-03-29

    The formation of molecular oxygen in and on amorphous ice in the interstellar medium requires oxygen diffusion to take place. Recent experiments suggest that this process involves quantum tunneling of the oxygen atoms at sufficiently low temperatures. Fitting experimental diffusion rates between 6 and 25 K to an expression that accounts for the roughness of the surface yields excellent agreement. The molecular dynamics of adsorbed oxygen is characterized by rapid intrasite dynamics, followed by intersite transitions over distances of ∼10 Å. Explicit simulations using a realistic free-energy surface for oxygen diffusion on amorphous ice down to 10 K show that quantum tunneling is not required for mobility of adsorbed oxygen. This is confirmed by comparing quantum and classical simulations using the same free-energy surface. The ratio of diffusional and desorption energy E dif / E des = 275/1082 ≈ 0.3 is at the lower end of typically used values but is still consistent with the assumptions made in models for interstellar chemistry.

  15. Flicker (1/f) noise in tunnel junction DC SQUIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, R.H.; Clarke, J.; Goubau, W.M.; Martinis, J.M.; Pegrum, C.M.; Van Harlingen, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    We have measured the spectral density of the 1/f voltage noise in current-biased resistively shunted Josephson tunnel junctions and dc SQUIDs. A theory in which fluctuations in the temperature give rise to fluctuations in the critical current and hence in the voltage predicts the magnitude of the noise quite accurately for junctions with areas of about 2 x 10 4 μm 2 , but significantly overestimates the noise for junctions with areas of about 6 μm 2 . DC SQUIDs fabricated from these two types of junctions exhibit substantially more 1/f voltage noise than would be predicted from a model in which the noise arises from critical current fluctuations in the junctions. This result was confirmed by an experiment involving two different bias current and flux modulation schemes, which demonstrated that the predominant 1/f voltage noise arises not from critical current fluctuations, but from some unknown source that can be regarded as an apparent 1/f flux noise. Measurements on five different configurations of dc SQUIDs fabricated with thin-film tunnel junctions and with widely varying areas, inductances, and junction capacitances show that the spectral density of the 1/f equivalent flux noise is roughtly constant, within a factor of three of (10 -10 /f)phi 2 0 Hz -1 . It is emphasized that 1/f flux noise may not be the predominant source of 1/f noise in SQUIDS fabricated with other technologies

  16. Modeling economic costs of disasters and recovery involving positive effects of reconstruction: analysis using a dynamic CGE model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W.; Li, N.; Wu, J.-D.; Hao, X.-L.

    2013-11-01

    Disaster damages have negative effects on economy, whereas reconstruction investments have positive effects. The aim of this study is to model economic causes of disasters and recovery involving positive effects of reconstruction activities. Computable general equilibrium (CGE) model is a promising approach because it can incorporate these two kinds of shocks into a unified framework and further avoid double-counting problem. In order to factor both shocks in CGE model, direct loss is set as the amount of capital stock reduced on supply side of economy; A portion of investments restore the capital stock in existing period; An investment-driven dynamic model is formulated due to available reconstruction data, and the rest of a given country's saving is set as an endogenous variable. The 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake is selected as a case study to illustrate the model, and three scenarios are constructed: S0 (no disaster occurs), S1 (disaster occurs with reconstruction investment) and S2 (disaster occurs without reconstruction investment). S0 is taken as business as usual, and the differences between S1 and S0 and that between S2 and S0 can be interpreted as economic losses including reconstruction and excluding reconstruction respectively. The study showed that output from S1 is found to be closer to real data than that from S2. S2 overestimates economic loss by roughly two times that under S1. The gap in economic aggregate between S1 and S0 is reduced to 3% in 2011, a level that should take another four years to achieve under S2.

  17. Tunneling-assisted transport of carriers through heterojunctions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Myers, Samuel M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Modine, Normand A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    The formulation of carrier transport through heterojunctions by tunneling and thermionic emission is derived from first principles. The treatment of tunneling is discussed at three levels of approximation: numerical solution of the one-band envelope equation for an arbitrarily specified potential profile; the WKB approximation for an arbitrary potential; and, an analytic formulation assuming constant internal field. The effects of spatially varying carrier chemical potentials over tunneling distances are included. Illustrative computational results are presented. The described approach is used in exploratory physics models of irradiated heterojunction bipolar transistors within Sandia's QASPR program.

  18. Characterization of magnetic tunnel junction test pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Kjær, Daniel; Nielsen, Peter Folmer

    2015-01-01

    relies on four-point probe measurements performed with a range of different probe pitches and was originally developed for infinite samples. Using the method of images, we derive a modified CIPT model, which compensates for the insulating boundaries of a finite rectangular sample geometry. We measure...... as a function of position on a square tunnel junction pad are used to investigate the sensitivity of the measurement results to probe misalignment....... on square tunnel junction pads with varying sizes and analyze the measured data using both the original and the modified CIPT model. Thus, we determine in which sample size range the modified CIPT model is needed to ensure validity of the extracted sample parameters, RA and TMR. In addition, measurements...

  19. Time evolution of tunneling in a thermal medium: Environment-driven excited tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Sh.; Yoshimura, M.

    2004-01-01

    Time evolution of tunneling phenomena proceeding in a thermal medium is studied using a standard model of environmental interaction. A semiclassical probability formula for the particle motion in a metastable state of a one-dimensional system put in a thermal medium is combined with the formula of the quantum penetration factor through a potential barrier to derive the tunneling rate in the medium. The effect of environment, its influence on time evolution in particular, is clarified in our real-time formalism. A nonlinear resonance effect is shown to enhance the tunneling rate at finite times of order 2/η, with η the friction coefficient unless η is too small. In the linear approximation this effect has relevance to the parametric resonance. This effect enhances the possibility of early termination of the cosmological phase transition much prior to the typical Hubble time

  20. Thermovoltages in vacuum tunneling investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, D. H.; Rettenberger, Armin; Grand, Jean Yves; Läuger, K.; Leiderer, Paul; Dransfeld, Klaus; Möller, Rolf

    1995-01-01

    By heating the tunneling tip of a scanning tunneling microscope the thermoelectric properties of a variable vacuum barrier have been investigated. The lateral variation of the observed thermovoltage will be discussed for polycrystalline gold, stepped surfaces of silver, as well as for copper islands on silver.

  1. Fundamental visual problems in tunnels : sumposium on tunnel lighting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    2018-01-01

    Tunnels and underpasses are likely to play a greater part in our future road network. Daytime lighting for tunnel entrances represents a considerable proportion of their total running costs and it is important that the right solution should be found. Guidance is given in CIE Publication No. 26

  2. Engineers win award for Swiss tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A Derby engineering consultancy has won the Tunnelling Industry Award 2003 for Excellence in Tunnel Design, offered by the British Tunnelling Society, for its work on the LHC in Geneva, Switzerland (1/2 page).

  3. Modelling atopic dermatitis during the morphogenetic process involved in reconstruction of a human epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vuyst, É; Mound, A; Lambert de Rouvroit, C; Poumay, Y

    Most crucial role of epidermis is to maintain efficient barrier between the organism and its environment. This barrier is however perturbed in inflammatory skin conditions like atopic dermatitis (AD), one common chronic disease. This review depicts characteristics of a model intending to reproduce epidermal features of AD in vitro. Firstly, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) during reconstruction of epidermis was used to deplete cholesterol from plasma membrane because this condition reproduces characteristics of AD at transcriptomic level in monolayer cultures. Major changes are confirmed after same treatment inside reconstructed human epidermis (RHE). However, since early treatment do not reveal impairment to reconstruct a functional epidermal barrier and given the importance of the Th2 dysregulated immune response in AD, cholesterol-depleted RHE at day 11 of reconstruction were then incubated with three Th2-related cytokines (IL-4, IL-13 and IL-25) previously reported as playing important roles in the development of AD, as well as altering overall function of epidermal barrier. When combining both treatments, essential epidermal features of AD are observed. Indeed, RHE then exhibit spongiosis, disappearing granular layer, alteration of barrier function, as well as dysregulated expression levels for genes involved in AD pathogenesis. Moreover, while trying to identify individual roles for each component used to create AD-like alterations, incubation with IL-4 following cholesterol depletion from plasma membrane was found inducing most of the reported alterations. This model suggests potential for better investigations of epidermal AD features and may be considered for eventual in vitro screening of cosmetics or therapeutic compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Counter Tunnel Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    DSP-3000 fiber - optic gyro , MicroStrain 3DM-GX2 IMU, with USB and Ethernet connec- tors. Small enough to fit into all the tunnels that were explored...frame arms were sufficient for de- ployment of the RDC. Gigabit multi-mode fiber - optic communication and 48 VDC power were passed to the RDC through...with AcuAMP ACT050 current sensors. The control box monitoring all of the information, as well as the source of the 48 VDC and fiber - optic cable to

  5. Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennault, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel in Building 11 at the NASA Glenn Research Center is committed to researching the effects of in flight icing on aircraft and testing ways to stop the formation of hazardous icing conditions on planes. During this summer, I worked here with Richard DelRosa, the lead engineer for this area. address one of the major concerns of aviation: icing conditions. During the war, many planes crashed (especially supply planes going over the.Himalayas) because ice built up in their wings and clogged the engines. To this day, it remains the largest ice tunnel in the world, with a test section that measures 6 feet high, 9 feet long, and 20 feet wide. It can simulate airspeeds from 50 to 300 miles per hour at temperatures as low as -50 Fahrenheit. Using these capabilities, IRT can simulate actual conditions at high altitudes. The first thing I did was creating a cross reference in Microsoft Excel. It lists commands for the DPU units that control the pressure and temperature variations in the tunnel, as well as the type of command (keyboard, multiplier, divide, etc). The cross reference also contains the algorithm for every command, and which page it is listed in on the control sheet (visual Auto-CAD graphs, which I helped to make). I actually spent most of the time on the computer using Auto-CAD. I drew a diagram of the entire icing tunnel and then drew diagrams of its various parts. Between my mentor and me, we have drawings of every part of it, from the spray bars to the thermocouples, power cabinets, input-output connectors for power systems, and layouts of various other machines. I was also responsible for drawing schematics for the Escort system (which controls the spray bars), the power system, DPUs, and other electrical systems. In my spare time, I am attempting to build and program the "toddler". Toddler is a walking robot that I have to program in PBASIC language. When complete, it should be able to walk on level terrain while avoiding obstacles in

  6. The Oskarshamn model for public involvement in the siting of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aahagen, H.; CarIsson, Torsten; Hallberg, K.; Andersson, Kjell

    1999-01-01

    The Oskarshamn model has so far worked extremely well as a tool to achieve openness and public participation. The municipality involvement has been successful in several aspects, e.g.: It has been possible to influence the program, to a large extent, to meet certain municipality conditions and to ensure the local perspective. The local competence has increased to a considerable degree. The activities generated by the six working groups with a total of 40 members have generated a large number of contacts with various organisations, schools, mass media, individuals in the general public and interest groups. For the future, clarification of the disposal method and site selection criteria as well as the site selection process as such is crucial. The municipality has also emphasised the importance of SKB having shown the integration between site selection criteria, the feasibility study and the safety assessment. Furthermore, the programs for the encapsulation facility and the repository must be co-ordinated. For Oskarshamn it will be of utmost importance that the repository is well under way to be realised before the encapsulation facility can be built

  7. Characterization of Pneumococcal Genes Involved in Bloodstream Invasion in a Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla K Mahdi

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus continues to account for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, as well as less serious infections such as sinusitis, conjunctivitis and otitis media. Current polysaccharide vaccines are strictly serotype-specific and also drive the emergence of non-vaccine serotype strains. In this study, we used microarray analysis to compare gene expression patterns of either serotype 4 or serotype 6A pneumococci in the nasopharynx and blood of mice, as a model to identify genes involved in invasion of blood in the context of occult bacteremia in humans. In this manner, we identified 26 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the nasopharynx and 36 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the blood that were common to both strains. Gene Ontology classification revealed that transporter and DNA binding (transcription factor activities constitute the significantly different molecular functional categories for genes up-regulated in the nasopharynx and blood. Targeted mutagenesis of selected genes from both niches and subsequent virulence and pathogenesis studies identified the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SodA as most likely to be essential for colonization, and the cell wall-associated serine protease (PrtA as important for invasion of blood. This work extends our previous analyses and suggests that both PrtA and SodA warrant examination in future studies aimed at prevention and/or control of pneumococcal disease.

  8. Spinal dopaminergic involvement in the antihyperalgesic effect of antidepressants in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mi; Hoshino, Hajime; Saito, Shigeru; Yang, Yang; Obata, Hideaki

    2017-05-10

    Antidepressants such as tricyclic antidepressants, and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors are a first-line treatment for neuropathic pain. Here, we aimed to determine the involvement of the spinal dopaminergic system in the antihyperalgesic effects of antidepressants in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve ligation (SNL). The right L5 spinal nerve of male Sprague-Dawley rats was ligated under inhalation anesthesia to induce hyperalgesia. Behavioral testing was performed by measuring ipsilateral hindpaw withdrawal thresholds after intraperitoneal injection of amitriptyline, duloxetine, milnacipran, and fluoxetine. D2-like receptors were blocked by intrathecal administration of sulpiride. We also determined the concentrations of dopamine in the spinal cord using microdialysis after injection of antidepressants. The dopamine contents in the spinal dorsal horn were also measured in normal and SNL rats at 2, 3, 4, and 8 weeks after SNL surgery. Intraperitoneal injection of amitriptyline, duloxetine, milnacipran, and fluoxetine (3-30mg/kg) produced antihyperalgesic effects, and prevented by intrathecal pre-injection of sulpiride (30μg). Microdialysis revealed the dopamine levels in the spinal cord were increased after intraperitoneal injection of each antidepressant (10mg/kg). Furthermore, the dopamine content in homogenized spinal cord tissue were increased at 2 weeks after SNL and then subsequently declined. Our results suggest that the effect of antidepressants against neuropathic pain is related to modulation of not only noradrenalin and serotonin but also dopamine levels in the spinal cord. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Visualization of pool boiling from complex surfaces with internal tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastuszko Robert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental investigations of boiling heat transfer for a system of connected narrow horizontal and vertical tunnels. These extended surfaces, named narrow tunnel structure (NTS, can be applied to electronic element cooling. The experiments were carried out with ethanol at atmospheric pressure. The tunnel external covers were manufactured out of 0.1 mm thick perforated copper foil (hole diameters 0.5 mm, sintered with the mini-fins, formed on the vertical side of the 10 mm high rectangular fins and horizontal inter-fin surface. Visualization studies were conducted with a transparent structured model of joined narrow tunnels limited with the perforated foil. The visualization investigations aimed to formulate assumptions for the boiling model through distinguishing boiling types and defining all phases of bubble growth.

  10. Hawking temperature from tunnelling formalism

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, P.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the attempt to understand Hawking radiation as tunnelling across black hole horizons produces a Hawking temperature double the standard value. It is explained here how one can obtain the standard value in the same tunnelling approach.

  11. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the ...

  12. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Search English Español Carpal Tunnel Syndrome KidsHealth / For Kids / Carpal Tunnel Syndrome What's in this article? Where ...

  13. Magnetic interaction between spatially extended superconducting tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    2002-01-01

    A general description of magnetic interactions between superconducting tunnel junctions is given. The description covers a wide range of possible experimental systems, and we explicitly explore two experimentally relevant limits of coupled junctions. One is the limit of junctions with tunneling...... been considered through arrays of superconducting weak links based on semiconductor quantum wells with superconducting electrodes. We use the model to make direct interpretations of the published experiments and thereby propose that long-range magnetic interactions are responsible for the reported...

  14. Photogrammetry Applied to Wind Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian-Shu; Cattafesta, L. N., III; Radeztsky, R. H.; Burner, A. W.

    2000-01-01

    In image-based measurements, quantitative image data must be mapped to three-dimensional object space. Analytical photogrammetric methods, which may be used to accomplish this task, are discussed from the viewpoint of experimental fluid dynamicists. The Direct Linear Transformation (DLT) for camera calibration, used in pressure sensitive paint, is summarized. An optimization method for camera calibration is developed that can be used to determine the camera calibration parameters, including those describing lens distortion, from a single image. Combined with the DLT method, this method allows a rapid and comprehensive in-situ camera calibration and therefore is particularly useful for quantitative flow visualization and other measurements such as model attitude and deformation in production wind tunnels. The paper also includes a brief description of typical photogrammetric applications to temperature- and pressure-sensitive paint measurements and model deformation measurements in wind tunnels.

  15. Tunneling of heat: Beyond linear response regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Kamil; Saroka, David

    2018-02-01

    We examine nanoscale processes of heat (energy) transfer as carried by electrons tunneling via potential barriers and molecular interconnects between two heat reservoirs (thermal baths). For that purpose, we use Landauer-type formulas to calculate thermal conductance and quadratic correction to heat flux flowing via quantum systems. As an input, we implement analytical expressions for transmission functions related to simple potential barriers and atomic bridges. Our results are discussed with respect to energy of tunneling electrons, temperature, the presence of resonant states, and specific parameters characterizing potential barriers as well as heat carriers. The simplicity of semi-analytical models developed by us allows to fit experimental data and extract crucial information about the values of model parameters. Further investigations are expected for more realistic transmission functions, while time-dependent aspects of nanoscale heat transfer may be addressed by using the concept of wave packets scattered on potential barriers and point-like defects within regular (periodic) nanostructures.

  16. Static Aeroelastic Deformation Effects in Preliminary Wind-tunnel Tests of Silent Supersonic Technology Demonstrator

    OpenAIRE

    Makino, Yoshikazu; Ohira, Keisuke; Makimoto, Takuya; Mitomo, Toshiteru; 牧野, 好和; 大平, 啓介; 牧本, 卓也; 三友, 俊輝

    2011-01-01

    Effects of static aeroelastic deformation of a wind-tunnel test model on the aerodynamic characteristics are discussed in wind-tunnel tests in the preliminary design phase of the silent supersonic technology demonstrator (S3TD). The static aeroelastic deformation of the main wing is estimated for JAXA 2m x 2m transonic wind-tunnel and 1m x 1m supersonic wind-tunnel by a finite element method (FEM) structural analysis in which its structural model is tuned with the model deformation calibratio...

  17. Tunneling in thin MOS structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserjian, J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent results on tunneling in thin MOS structures are described. Thermally grown SiO2 films in the thickness range of 22-40 A have been shown to be effectively uniform on an atomic scale and exhibit an extremely abrupt oxide-silicon interface. Resonant reflections are observed at this interface for Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and are shown to agree with the exact theory for a trapezoidal barrier. Tunneling at lower fields is consistent with elastic tunneling into the silicon direct conduction band and, at still lower fields, inelastic tunneling into the indirect conduction band. Approximate dispersion relations are obtained over portions of the silicon-dioxide energy gap and conduction band.

  18. Risk Analysis for Road Tunnels – A Metamodel to Efficiently Integrate Complex Fire Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berchtold, Florian; Knaust, Christian; Arnold, Lukas

    2018-01-01

    Fires in road tunnels constitute complex scenarios with interactions between the fire, tunnel users and safety measures. More and more methodologies for risk analysis quantify the consequences of these scenarios with complex models. Examples for complex models are the computational fluid dynamics...... in risk analysis. We further emphasise that the metamodel is broadly applicable on various experimental or modelling issues in fire safety engineering....

  19. Modeling of drug release from matrix systems involving moving boundaries: approximate analytical solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ping I

    2011-10-10

    The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of approximate analytical solutions to the general moving boundary diffusion problems encountered during the release of a dispersed drug from matrix systems. Starting from the theoretical basis of the Higuchi equation and its subsequent improvement and refinement, available approximate analytical solutions for the more complicated cases involving heterogeneous matrix, boundary layer effect, finite release medium, surface erosion, and finite dissolution rate are also discussed. Among various modeling approaches, the pseudo-steady state assumption employed in deriving the Higuchi equation and related approximate analytical solutions appears to yield reasonably accurate results in describing the early stage release of a dispersed drug from matrices of different geometries whenever the initial drug loading (A) is much larger than the drug solubility (C(s)) in the matrix (or A≫C(s)). However, when the drug loading is not in great excess of the drug solubility (i.e. low A/C(s) values) or when the drug loading approaches the drug solubility (A→C(s)) which occurs often with drugs of high aqueous solubility, approximate analytical solutions based on the pseudo-steady state assumption tend to fail, with the Higuchi equation for planar geometry exhibiting a 11.38% error as compared with the exact solution. In contrast, approximate analytical solutions to this problem without making the pseudo-steady state assumption, based on either the double-integration refinement of the heat balance integral method or the direct simplification of available exact analytical solutions, show close agreement with the exact solutions in different geometries, particularly in the case of low A/C(s) values or drug loading approaching the drug solubility (A→C(s)). However, the double-integration heat balance integral approach is generally more useful in obtaining approximate analytical solutions especially when exact solutions are not

  20. Study of the involvement of allogeneic MSCs in bone formation using the model of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Daria; Prodanets, Natalia; Rodimova, Svetlana; Antonov, Evgeny; Meleshina, Aleksandra; Timashev, Peter; Zagaynova, Elena

    2017-05-04

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are thought to be the most attractive type of cells for bone repair. However, much still remains unknown about MSCs and needs to be clarified before this treatment can be widely applied in the clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to establish the involvement of allogeneic MSCs in the bone formation in vivo, using a model of transgenic mice and genetically labeled cells. Polylactide scaffolds with hydroxyapatite obtained by surface selective laser sintering were used. The scaffolds were sterilized and individually seeded with MSCs from the bone marrow of 5-week-old GFP(+) transgenic C57/Bl6 or GFP(-)C57/Bl6 mice. 4-mm-diameter critical-size defects were created on the calvarial bone of mice using a dental bur. Immediately after the generation of the cranial bone defects, the scaffolds with or without seeded cells were implanted into the injury sites. The cranial bones were harvested at either 6 or 12 weeks after the implantation. GFP(+) transgenic mice having scaffolds with unlabeled MSCs were used for the observation of the host cell migration into the scaffold. GFP(-) mice having scaffolds with GFP(+)MSCs were used to assess the functioning of the seeded MSCs. The obtained data demonstrated that allogeneic MSCs were found on the scaffolds 6 and 12 weeks post-implantation. By week 12, a newly formed bone tissue from the seeded cells was observed, without an osteogenic pre-differentiation. The host cells did not appear, and the control scaffolds without seeded cells remained empty. Besides, a possibility of vessel formation from seeded MSCs was shown, without a preliminary cell cultivation under controlled conditions.

  1. Analysis of aerodynamic measurements on a model wind turbine placed in the NASA-Ames tunnel. Contribution of ECN and TUD to IEA Wind Task XX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, J.G. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Van Rooij, R.P.J.O.M. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2008-10-15

    In this report the most important contributions of ECN and DUT to IEA Wind Task XX are summarized. IEA Wind Task XX is an international cooperation between several parties from 7 countries coordinated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, NREL from the USA. The main aim of IEA Wind Task XX is to analyze the detailed aerodynamic measurements which were performed by NREL on a wind turbine placed in the large (24.4 x 36.6 m) NASA-Ames wind tunnel.

  2. Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  3. Going the extra mile - creating a co-operative model for supporting patient and public involvement in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horobin, Adele

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the Chief Medical Officer and Director General of Research and Development commissioned a review of patient and public involvement in the National Institute for Health Research. The report on this review, entitled 'Going the Extra Mile' was published in March, 2015. It described the bold goal of expecting all people using health and social care, and increasing numbers of the public, to be aware of and choosing to be involved in research. This requires more effort to build public awareness of research and better support for the public and researchers to do patient and public involvement in research. The author has created a new way of providing support for patient and public involvement based on co-operation between organisations. Termed 'share-banking', this model pools limited resources across organisations to deliver a regional programme of support activities for patient and public involvement over the long term. This includes helping organisations to share and learn from each other to avoid 're-inventing wheels' (where separate organisations each develop the same thing from the beginning). The 'Going the Extra Mile' report recommends that local organisations should work together to deliver public involvement activities across a region. 'Share-banking' should help fulfil this recommendation. The 'Going the Extra Mile' final report opened with the ambition to increase the public's awareness, participation and involvement in research. It stated the need for public and researchers to be better supported to do public involvement. A new co-operative model, termed 'share-banking', has been developed whereby organisations pool limited resources to create and sustain support for patient and public involvement in research. This should fulfil the 'Going the Extra Mile' report's recommendation to take a collaborative, cross-organisational and regional approach to public involvement.

  4. Nonlinear dynamic failure process of tunnel-fault system in response to strong seismic event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhihua; Lan, Hengxing; Zhang, Yongshuang; Gao, Xing; Li, Langping

    2013-03-01

    Strong earthquakes and faults have significant effect on the stability capability of underground tunnel structures. This study used a 3-Dimensional Discrete Element model and the real records of ground motion in the Wenchuan earthquake to investigate the dynamic response of tunnel-fault system. The typical tunnel-fault system was composed of one planned railway tunnel and one seismically active fault. The discrete numerical model was prudentially calibrated by means of the comparison between the field survey and numerical results of ground motion. It was then used to examine the detailed quantitative information on the dynamic response characteristics of tunnel-fault system, including stress distribution, strain, vibration velocity and tunnel failure process. The intensive tunnel-fault interaction during seismic loading induces the dramatic stress redistribution and stress concentration in the intersection of tunnel and fault. The tunnel-fault system behavior is characterized by the complicated nonlinear dynamic failure process in response to a real strong seismic event. It can be qualitatively divided into 5 main stages in terms of its stress, strain and rupturing behaviors: (1) strain localization, (2) rupture initiation, (3) rupture acceleration, (4) spontaneous rupture growth and (5) stabilization. This study provides the insight into the further stability estimation of underground tunnel structures under the combined effect of strong earthquakes and faults.

  5. Tunneling and Transport in Nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, Allen M.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this program was to study new physical phenomena that might be relevant to the performance of conductive devices and circuits of the smallest realizable feature sizes possible using physical rather than biological techniques. Although the initial scientific work supported involved the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to ascertain the statistics of the energy level distribution of randomly sized and randomly shaped quantum dots, or nano-crystals, the main focus was on the investigation of selected properties, including superconductivity, of conducting and superconducting nanowires prepared using electron-beam-lithography. We discovered a magnetic-field-restoration of superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium nanowires driven resistive by current. This phenomenon was explained by the existence of a state in which dissipation coexisted with nonvanishing superconducting order. We also produced ultra-small superconducting loops to study a predicted anomalous fluxoid quantization, but instead, found a magnetic-field-dependent, high-resistance state, rather than superconductivity. Finally, we developed a simple and controllable nanowire in an induced charged layer near the surface of a masked single-crystal insulator, SrTiO 3 . The layer was induced using an electric double layer transistor employing an ionic liquid (IL). The transport properties of the induced nanowire resembled those of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots.

  6. Tunneling and Transport in Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Allen M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-08-16

    The goal of this program was to study new physical phenomena that might be relevant to the performance of conductive devices and circuits of the smallest realizable feature sizes possible using physical rather than biological techniques. Although the initial scientific work supported involved the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to ascertain the statistics of the energy level distribution of randomly sized and randomly shaped quantum dots, or nano-crystals, the main focus was on the investigation of selected properties, including superconductivity, of conducting and superconducting nanowires prepared using electron-beam-lithography. We discovered a magnetic-field-restoration of superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium nanowires driven resistive by current. This phenomenon was explained by the existence of a state in which dissipation coexisted with nonvanishing superconducting order. We also produced ultra-small superconducting loops to study a predicted anomalous fluxoid quantization, but instead, found a magnetic-field-dependent, high-resistance state, rather than superconductivity. Finally, we developed a simple and controllable nanowire in an induced charged layer near the surface of a masked single-crystal insulator, SrTiO3. The layer was induced using an electric double layer transistor employing an ionic liquid (IL). The transport properties of the induced nanowire resembled those of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots.

  7. Students’ Involvement in Authentic Modelling Practices as Contexts in Chemistry Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, G.T.; Bulte, A.M.W.; van Driel, J.H.; Pilot, A.

    2009-01-01

    In science education students should come to understand the nature and significance of models. A promising strategy to achieve this goal is using authentic modelling practices as contexts for meaningful learning of models and modelling. An authentic practice is defined as professionals working with

  8. Impact of resilience and job involvement on turnover intention of new graduate nurses using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mi; Lee, Haeyoung

    2018-03-06

    Nurses' turnover intention is not just a result of their maladjustment to the field; it is an organizational issue. This study aimed to construct a structural model to verify the effects of new graduate nurses' work environment satisfaction, emotional labor, and burnout on their turnover intention, with consideration of resilience and job involvement, and to test the adequacy of the developed model. A cross-sectional study and a structural equation modelling approach were used. A nationwide survey was conducted of 371 new nurses who were working in hospitals for ≤18 months between July and October, 2014. The final model accounted for 40% of the variance in turnover intention. Emotional labor and burnout had a significant positive direct effect and an indirect effect on nurses' turnover intention. Resilience had a positive direct effect on job involvement. Job involvement had a negative direct effect on turnover intention. Resilience and job involvement mediated the effect of work environment satisfaction, emotional labor, and burnout on turnover intention. It is important to strengthen new graduate nurses' resilience in order to increase their job involvement and to reduce their turnover intention. © 2018 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  9. BIM Methodology Approach to Infrastructure Design: Case Study of Paniga Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osello, Anna; Rapetti, Niccolò; Semeraro, Francesco

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, the implementation of Building Information Modelling (BIM) in civil design represent a new challenge for the AECO (Architecture, Engineering, Construction, Owner and Operator) world, which will involve the interest of many researchers in the next years. It is due to the incentives of Public Administration and European Directives that aim to improve the efficiency and to enhance a better management of the complexity of infrastructure projects. For these reasons, the goal of this research is to propose a methodology for the use of BIM in a tunnel project, analysing the definition of a correct level of detail (LOD) and the possibility to share information via interoperability for FEM analysis.

  10. Small Numbers From Tunneling Between Brane Throats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachru, Shamit

    2001-07-25

    Generic classes of string compactifications include ''brane throats'' emanating from the compact dimensions and separated by effective potential barriers raised by the background gravitational fields. The interaction of observers inside different throats occurs via tunneling and is consequently weak. This provides a new mechanism for generating small numbers in Nature. We apply it to the hierarchy problem, where supersymmetry breaking near the unification scale causes TeV sparticle masses inside the standard model throat. We also design naturally long-lived cold dark matter which decays within a Hubble time to the approximate conformal matter of a long throat. This may soften structure formation at galactic scales and raises the possibility that much of the dark matter of the universe is conformal matter. Finally, the tunneling rate shows that the coupling between throats, mediated by bulk modes, is stronger than a naive application of holography suggests.

  11. Wind tunnel tests of an 0.019-scale space shuttle integrated vehicle -2A configuration (model 14-OTS) in the NASA Ames 8 X 7 foot unitary wind tunnel, volume 3. [cold jet gas plumes and pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, R. B.; Burrows, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effects of cold jet gas plumes on (1) the integrated vehicle longitudinal and lateral-directional force data, (2) exposed wing hinge moment, (3) wing pressure distributions, (4) orbiter MPS external pressure distributions, and (5) model base pressures. An investigation was undertaken to determine the similarity between solid and gaseous plumes; fluorescent oil flow visualization studies were also conducted. Tabulated data listings are included.

  12. Wind tunnel tests of an 0.019-scale space shuttle integrated vehicle -2A configuration (model 14-OTS) in the NASA Ames 8 X 7 foot unitary wind tunnel, volume 2. [cold jet gas plumes and pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, R. B.; Burrows, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the test was to determine the effects of cold jet gas plumes on (1) the integrated vehicle longitudinal and lateral-directional force data, (2) exposed wing hinge moment, (3) wing pressure distributions, (4) orbiter MPS external pressure distributions, and (5) model base pressures. An investigation was undertaken to determine the similarity between solid and gaseous plumes; fluorescent oil flow visualization studies were also conducted. Plotted wing pressure data is tabulated.

  13. KAERI underground research tunnel (KURT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Won Jin; Kwon, Sang Ki; Park, Jeong Hwa; Choi, Jong Won

    2007-01-01

    An underground research tunnel is essential to validate the integrity of a high-level waste disposal system, and the safety of geological disposal. In this study, KAERI underground research tunnel (KURT) was constructed in the site of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI). The results of the site investigation and the design of underground tunnel were presented. The procedure for the construction permits and the construction of KURT were described briefly. The in-situ experiments being carried out at KURT were also introduced

  14. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  15. Role of Wind Tunnels in Aircraft Design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    large wind tunnels simulating the actual flight conditions as nearly as possible. Often, several wind tunnels ... wind tunnel tests can be 'scaled' to the actual velocity and actual body size using suitable scaling laws. A typical wind tunnel consists ofa test section ... tion and control positions. Some of this instrumentation like six.

  16. 78 FR 46117 - National Tunnel Inspection Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... busiest vehicular tunnel in the world. The Fort McHenry Tunnel handles a daily traffic volume of more than... vehicular, transit, and rail tunnels in the New York City metropolitan area. Although it is still too early... congestion along alternative routes, and save users both dollars and fuel. If these tunnels were closed due...

  17. Temperature dependence of electron spin-lattice relaxation of radiation-produced silver atoms in polycrystalline aqueous and glassy organic matrices. Importance of relaxation by tunneling modes in disordered matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.; Kevan, L.

    1978-01-01

    The electron spin-lattice relaxation of trapped silver atoms in polycrystalline ice matrices and in methanol, ethanol, propylene carbonate, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran organic glasses has been directly studied as a function of temperature by the saturation-recovery method. Below 40 K the dominant electron spin-lattice relaxation mechanism involves modulation of the electron nuclear dipolar interaction with nuclei in the radical's environment by tunneling of those nuclei between two nearly equal energy configurations. This relaxation mechanism occurs with high efficiency, has a characteristic linear temperature dependence, and is typically found in highly disordered matrices. The efficiency of this relaxation mechanism seems to decrease with decreasing polarity of the matrix. Deuteration experiments show that the tunneling nuclei are protons and in methanol it is shown that the methyl protons have more tunneling modes available than the hydroxyl protons. In polycrystalline ice matrices silver atoms can be stabilized with two different orientations of surrounding water molecules; the efficiency of the tunneling relaxation reflects this difference. From these and previous results on tunneling relaxation of trapped electrons in glassy matrices it appears that tunneling relaxation may be used to distinguish models with different geometrical configurations and to determine the relative rigidity of such configurations around trapped radicals in disordered solids. (author)

  18. Temperature and composition dependent density of states extracted using overlapping large polaron tunnelling model in MnxCo1-xFe2O4 (x=0.25, 0.5, 0.75) nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Arifa; Afsar, M. F.; Sher, F.; Rafiq, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    We report detailed ac electrical and structural characterization of manganese cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, prepared by coprecipitation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed single-phase cubic spinel structure of the nanoparticles. Tetrahedral (A) and octahedral (B) group complexes were present in the spinel lattice as determined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images revealed presence of spherical shape nanoparticles having an average diameter 50-80 nm. Composition, temperature and frequency dependent ac electrical study of prepared nanoparticles interpreted the role of cationic distribution between A and B sites. Overlapping large polaron tunnelling (OLPT) conduction mechanism was observed from 290 to 200 K. Frequency exponent s was fitted theoretically using OLPT model. High values of Density of States (DOS) of the order of 1022-1024 eV-1 cm-3 were extracted from ac conductivity for different compositions. We found that DOS was dependent on distribution of cations in the tunnel-type cavities along the a and b axis.

  19. Use of a strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cement in accelerating the healing of soft-tissue tendon graft within the bone tunnel in a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, G M; Yau, W P; Lu, W W; Chiu, K Y

    2013-07-01

    We investigated whether strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cement (Sr-CPC)-treated soft-tissue tendon graft results in accelerated healing within the bone tunnel in reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A total of 30 single-bundle ACL reconstructions using tendo Achillis allograft were performed in 15 rabbits. The graft on the tested limb was treated with Sr-CPC, whereas that on the contralateral limb was untreated and served as a control. At timepoints three, six, nine, 12 and 24 weeks after surgery, three animals were killed for histological examination. At six weeks, the graft-bone interface in the control group was filled in with fibrovascular tissue. However, the gap in the Sr-CPC group had already been completely filled in with new bone, and there was evidence of the early formation of Sharpey fibres. At 24 weeks, remodelling into a normal ACL-bone-like insertion was found in the Sr-CPC group. Coating of Sr-CPC on soft tissue tendon allograft leads to accelerated graft healing within the bone tunnel in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction using Achilles tendon allograft.

  20. Tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmire, W.H.; Munzer, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The current status of tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is presented in this paper. The Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a key part of the YMP, has been long in development and construction is ongoing. This is a progress report on the tunneling aspects of the ESF as of January 1, 1996. For purposes of discussion in this summary, the tunneling has progressed in four general phases. The paper describes: tunneling in jointed rock under low stress; tunneling through the Bow Ridge Fault and soft rock; tunneling through the Imbricate Fault Zone; and Tunneling into the candidate repository formation