WorldWideScience

Sample records for model involving tunneling

  1. Quantum tunneling in the driven SU(2) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, P.; Ploszajczak, M.; Arvieu, R.

    1992-01-01

    The tunneling rate is investigated in the quantum and classical limits using an exactly soluble driven SU(2) model. The tunneling rate is obtained by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation and projecting the exact wave-function on the space of coherent states using the Husimi distribution. The presence of the classical chaotic structures leads to the enormous growth in the tunneling rate. The results suggest the existence of a new mechanism of quantum tunneling, involving transport of the wave-function between stable regions of the classical phase-space due to a coupling with 'chaotic' levels. (author) 17 refs., 13 figs

  2. Quantum tunneling in the adiabatic Dicke model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Gang; Chen Zidong; Liang Jiuqing

    2007-01-01

    The Dicke model describes N two-level atoms interacting with a single-mode bosonic field and exhibits a second-order phase transition from the normal to the superradiant phase. The energy levels are not degenerate in the normal phase but have degeneracy in the superradiant phase, where quantum tunneling occurs. By means of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and the instanton method in quantum field theory, the tunneling splitting, inversely proportional to the tunneling rate for the adiabatic Dicke model, in the superradiant phase can be evaluated explicitly. It is shown that the tunneling splitting vanishes as exp(-N) for large N, whereas for small N it disappears as √(N)/exp(N). The dependence of the tunneling splitting on the relevant parameters, especially on the atom-field coupling strength, is also discussed

  3. Enhanced Tunnelling Models for Child Universe Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ansoldi, S; Shilon, I

    2015-01-01

    Starting from a recently proposed model that allows for an enhanced rate of child universe production under generic conditions, we elaborate on refinements that may allow for non-singular initial configurations. A possibility to treat both, the initial state and the tunnelling beyond the semiclassical level will also be introduced.

  4. Tunnel fire testing and modeling the Morgex North tunnel experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Borghetti, Fabio; Gandini, Paolo; Frassoldati, Alessio; Tavelli, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This book aims to cast light on all aspects of tunnel fires, based on experimental activities and theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. In particular, the authors describe a transient full-scale fire test (~15 MW), explaining how they designed and performed the experimental activity inside the Morgex North tunnel in Italy. The entire organization of the experiment is described, from preliminary evaluations to the solutions found for management of operational difficulties and safety issues. This fire test allowed the collection of different measurements (temperature, air velocity, smoke composition, pollutant species) useful for validating and improving CFD codes and for testing the real behavior of the tunnel and its safety systems during a diesel oil fire with a significant heat release rate. Finally, the fire dynamics are compared with empirical correlations, CFD simulations, and literature measurements obtained in other similar tunnel fire tests. This book will be of interest to all ...

  5. Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Models. Design and Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, C. P., Jr. (Compiler); Gloss, B. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    The principal motivating factor was the National Transonic Facility (NTF). Since the NTF can achieve significantly higher Reynolds numbers at transonic speeds than other wind tunnels in the world, and will therefore occupy a unique position among ground test facilities, every effort is being made to ensure that model design and fabrication technology exists to allow researchers to take advantage of this high Reynolds number capability. Since a great deal of experience in designing and fabricating cryogenic wind tunnel models does not exist, and since the experience that does exist is scattered over a number of organizations, there is a need to bring existing experience in these areas together and share it among all interested parties. Representatives from government, the airframe industry, and universities are included.

  6. Sting Dynamics of Wind Tunnel Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    Patterson AFB, AFFDL, Ohio, October 1964. 17. Brunk, James E. "Users Manual: Extended Capability Magnus Rotor and Ballistic Body 6-DOF Trajectory...measure "second-order" aerodynamic effects resulting, for example, from Reynolds number in- fluence. Consequently, all wind tunnel data systems are...sting-model interference effects , sting configurations normally consist of one or more linearly tapered sections combined with one or more untapered

  7. Quantum tunneling in the periodically driven SU(2) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvieu, R.

    1991-01-01

    The tunneling rate is investigated in the quantum and classical limits using an exactly soluble, periodically driven SU(2) model. The tunneling rate is obtained by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation and projecting the exact wave-function on the space of coherent states using the Husimi distribution. The oscillatory, coherent tunneling of the wave-function between two Hartree-Fock minima is observed. The driving plays an important role increasing the tunneling rate by orders of magnitude as compared to the semiclassical results. This is due to the dominant role of excited states in the driven quantum tunneling. (author) 15 refs., 4 figs

  8. Wind tunnel tests of a deep seabed penetrator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visintini, L.; Murray, C.N.

    1991-01-01

    C.C.R. Euratom Ispra are currently involved in studies on the possibility of storing radioactive wastes in deep ocean sediment beds. The report summarizes the results of wind tunnel tests performed in March 1985 on a 1:2.5 scale model of a European Standard Penetrator in Aermacchi low speed wind tunnel. Tests covered the measurement of overall fluid dynamic forces at varying angle of attack and measurement of unsteady pressures acting on the instrumentation head protruding in the penetrator's wake. Overall force coefficients were found to be in good agreement with predictions. Unsteady pressures were found to be much smaller than expected so that no mechanical damage to instrumentation is to be foreseen even at the high dynamic pressures typical of the penetrator moving into water. The present work has been undertaken under contract 2450-84-08 ED ISP I of C.C.R. EURATOM ISPRA

  9. Glide back booster wind tunnel model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricop, M. V.; Cojocaru, M. G.; Stoica, C. I.; Niculescu, M. L.; Neculaescu, A. M.; Persinaru, A. G.; Boscoianu, M.

    2017-07-01

    Affordable space access requires partial or ideally full launch vehicle reuse, which is in line with clean environment requirement. Although the idea is old, the practical use is difficult, requiring very large technology investment for qualification. Rocket gliders like Space Shuttle have been successfullyoperated but the price and correspondingly the energy footprint were found not sustainable. For medium launchers, finally there is a very promising platform as Falcon 9. For very small launchers the situation is more complex, because the performance index (payload to start mass) is already small, versus medium and heavy launchers. For partial reusable micro launchers this index is even smaller. However the challenge has to be taken because it is likely that in a multiyear effort, technology is going to enable the performance recovery to make such a system economically and environmentally feasible. The current paper is devoted to a small unitary glide back booster which is foreseen to be assembled in a number of possible configurations. Although the level of analysis is not deep, the solution is analyzed from the aerodynamic point of view. A wind tunnel model is designed, with an active canard, to enablea more efficient wind tunnel campaign, as a national level premiere.

  10. Presentation of Austrians recommended dispersion model for tunnel portals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oettl, D.; Sturm, P.; Almbauer, R. [Inst. for Internal Combustion Engines and Thermodynamics, Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Street tunnels in cities are often suggested as solution to avoid daily congestions but also to prevent residential areas from high noise and air pollution emissions. In case of longitudinal ventilated tunnels high pollution levels may occur in the vicinity of the portals. The dispersion of pollutants from tunnel portals is considered to differ significantly from those of other sources, such as line or point sources. To the best of the authors knowledge, there exist currently two distinct dispersion models, which are especially designed to treat dispersion from tunnel portals. Okamoto et al proposed a diagnostic wind field model, where the dispersion is modelled using a Taylor-Galerkin-Forester filter method. Oettl et al. developed a Lagrangian-type model (GRAL TM 3.5=Graz Lagrangian model Tunnel Module version 3.5), which is briefly described in the next section. (orig.)

  11. Derivation of the tunnelling exchange time for the model of trap-assisted tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racko, J.; Ballo, P.; Benko, P.; Harmatha, L.; Grmanova, A.; Breza, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present derivation of the tunnelling exchange times that play the key role in the model of trap assisted tunnelling (TAT) considering the electron and hole exchange processes between the trapping centre lying in the forbidden band of the semiconductor and the conduction band, valence band or a metal. All exchange processes are quantitatively described by respective exchange times. The reciprocal values of these exchange times represent the frequency with which the exchange processes contribute to the probability of occupation of the trap by free charge carriers. The crucial problem in any model of TAT is the calculation of the occupation probability. In our approach this probability is expressed in terms of only thermal and tunnelling exchange times. The concept of tunnelling exchange times presents a dominant contribution to our model of TAT. The new approach allows to simply calculate the probability of occupation of the trapping centre by a free charge carrier and subsequently to get the thermal and tunnelling generation-recombination rates occurring in the continuity equations. This is why the TAT model based on thermal and tunnelling exchange times is suitable for simulating the electrical properties of semiconductor nanostructures in which quantum mechanical phenomena play a key role. (authors)

  12. Addressing student models of energy loss in quantum tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmann, Michael C; Morgan, Jeffrey T; Bao Lei

    2005-01-01

    We report on a multi-year, multi-institution study to investigate students' reasoning about energy in the context of quantum tunnelling. We use ungraded surveys, graded examination questions, individual clinical interviews and multiple-choice exams to build a picture of the types of responses that students typically give. We find that two descriptions of tunnelling through a square barrier are particularly common. Students often state that tunnelling particles lose energy while tunnelling. When sketching wavefunctions, students also show a shift in the axis of oscillation, as if the height of the axis of oscillation indicated the energy of the particle. We find inconsistencies between students' conceptual, mathematical and graphical models of quantum tunnelling. As part of a curriculum in quantum physics, we have developed instructional materials designed to help students develop a more robust and less inconsistent picture of tunnelling, and present data suggesting that we have succeeded in doing so

  13. Wall Correction Model for Wind Tunnels with Open Test Section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2004-01-01

    , the corrections from the model are in very good agreement with the CFD computaions, demonstrating that one-dimensional momentum theory is a reliable way of predicting corrections for wall interference in wind tunnels with closed as well as open cross sections. Keywords: Wind tunnel correction, momentum theory...

  14. An analytical gate tunneling current model for MOSFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazerouni, Iman Abaspur, E-mail: imanabaspur@gmail.com; Hosseini, Seyed Ebrahim [Sabzevar Tarbiat Moallem University, Electrical and Computer Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Gate tunneling current of MOSFETs is an important factor in modeling ultra small devices. In this paper, gate tunneling in present-generation MOSFETs is studied. In the proposed model, we calculate the electron wave function at the semiconductor-oxide interface and inversion charge by treating the inversion layer as a potential well, including some simplifying assumptions. Then we compute the gate tunneling current using the calculated wave function. The proposed model results have an excellent agreement with experimental results in the literature.

  15. Wall correction model for wind tunnels with open test section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2006-01-01

    In the paper we present a correction model for wall interference on rotors of wind turbines or propellers in wind tunnels. The model, which is based on a one-dimensional momentum approach, is validated against results from CFD computations using a generalized actuator disc principle. In the model...... good agreement with the CFD computations, demonstrating that one-dimensional momentum theory is a reliable way of predicting corrections for wall interference in wind tunnels with closed as well as open cross sections....

  16. Atomistic modeling trap-assisted tunneling in hole tunnel field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Pengyu; Huang, Jun Z.; Povolotskyi, Michael; Sarangapani, Prasad; Valencia-Zapata, Gustavo A.; Kubis, Tillmann; Rodwell, Mark J. W.; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2018-05-01

    Tunnel Field Effect Transistors (FETs) have the potential to achieve steep Subthreshold Swing (S.S.) below 60 mV/dec, but their S.S. could be limited by trap-assisted tunneling (TAT) due to interface traps. In this paper, the effect of trap energy and location on OFF-current (IOFF) of tunnel FETs is evaluated systematically using an atomistic trap level representation in a full quantum transport simulation. Trap energy levels close to band edges cause the highest leakage. Wave function penetration into the surrounding oxide increases the TAT current. To estimate the effects of multiple traps, we assume that the traps themselves do not interact with each other and as a whole do not modify the electrostatic potential dramatically. Within that model limitation, this numerical metrology study points to the critical importance of TAT in the IOFF in tunnel FETs. The model shows that for Dit higher than 1012/(cm2 eV) IO F F is critically increased with a degraded IO N/IO F F ratio of the tunnel FET. In order to have an IO N/IO F F ratio higher than 104, the acceptable Dit near Ev should be controlled to no larger than 1012/(cm2 eV) .

  17. Wind Tunnel Management and Resource Optimization: A Systems Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Derya, A.; Aasen, Curtis A.

    2000-01-01

    Time, money, and, personnel are becoming increasingly scarce resources within government agencies due to a reduction in funding and the desire to demonstrate responsible economic efficiency. The ability of an organization to plan and schedule resources effectively can provide the necessary leverage to improve productivity, provide continuous support to all projects, and insure flexibility in a rapidly changing environment. Without adequate internal controls the organization is forced to rely on external support, waste precious resources, and risk an inefficient response to change. Management systems must be developed and applied that strive to maximize the utility of existing resources in order to achieve the goal of "faster, cheaper, better". An area of concern within NASA Langley Research Center was the scheduling, planning, and resource management of the Wind Tunnel Enterprise operations. Nine wind tunnels make up the Enterprise. Prior to this research, these wind tunnel groups did not employ a rigorous or standardized management planning system. In addition, each wind tunnel unit operated from a position of autonomy, with little coordination of clients, resources, or project control. For operating and planning purposes, each wind tunnel operating unit must balance inputs from a variety of sources. Although each unit is managed by individual Facility Operations groups, other stakeholders influence wind tunnel operations. These groups include, for example, the various researchers and clients who use the facility, the Facility System Engineering Division (FSED) tasked with wind tunnel repair and upgrade, the Langley Research Center (LaRC) Fabrication (FAB) group which fabricates repair parts and provides test model upkeep, the NASA and LARC Strategic Plans, and unscheduled use of the facilities by important clients. Expanding these influences horizontally through nine wind tunnel operations and vertically along the NASA management structure greatly increases the

  18. Model Penilaian Transaksi Pihak Berelasi Yang Terindikasi Tunneling: Bukti Empiris Pada Transaksi Pihak Berelasi Di Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, Ratna Chandra

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the expropriation of non-controlling shareholders through tunneling activity. Current study in tunneling still found obstacles in measurement because it is difficult to prove, although tunneling activity going on in business practices. The objective of this is to develop tunneling valuation model. This study defines the tunneling as related party transactions that are used to tunnel out of public companies' resource for the benefit of the controlling shareholder. Tunneli...

  19. A hierarchical network modeling method for railway tunnels safety assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Xu, Weixiang; Guo, Xin; Liu, Xumin

    2017-02-01

    Using network theory to model risk-related knowledge on accidents is regarded as potential very helpful in risk management. A large amount of defects detection data for railway tunnels is collected in autumn every year in China. It is extremely important to discover the regularities knowledge in database. In this paper, based on network theories and by using data mining techniques, a new method is proposed for mining risk-related regularities to support risk management in railway tunnel projects. A hierarchical network (HN) model which takes into account the tunnel structures, tunnel defects, potential failures and accidents is established. An improved Apriori algorithm is designed to rapidly and effectively mine correlations between tunnel structures and tunnel defects. Then an algorithm is presented in order to mine the risk-related regularities table (RRT) from the frequent patterns. At last, a safety assessment method is proposed by consideration of actual defects and possible risks of defects gained from the RRT. This method cannot only generate the quantitative risk results but also reveal the key defects and critical risks of defects. This paper is further development on accident causation network modeling methods which can provide guidance for specific maintenance measure.

  20. Gray-box modelling approach for description of storage tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harremoës, Poul; Carstensen, Jacob

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of a storage tunnel is examined using a model based on on-line measured data and a combination of simple deterministic and black-box stochastic elements. This approach, called gray-box modeling, is a new promising methodology for giving an on-line state description of sewer systems...... of the water in the overflow structures. The capacity of a pump draining the storage tunnel is estimated for two different rain events, revealing that the pump was malfunctioning during the first rain event. The proposed modeling approach can be used in automated online surveillance and control and implemented...

  1. A 2D analytical cylindrical gate tunnel FET (CG-TFET) model: impact of shortest tunneling distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, S.; Mishra, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    A 2D analytical tunnel field-effect transistor (FET) potential model with cylindrical gate (CG-TFET) based on the solution of Laplace’s equation is proposed. The band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) current is derived by the help of lateral electric field and the shortest tunneling distance. However, the analysis is extended to obtain the subthreshold swing (SS) and transfer characteristics of the device. The dependency of drain current, SS and transconductance on gate voltage and shortest tunneling distance is discussed. Also, the effect of scaling the gate oxide thickness and the cylindrical body diameter on the electrical parameters of the device is analyzed.

  2. A 2D analytical cylindrical gate tunnel FET (CG-TFET) model: impact of shortest tunneling distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, S; Mishra, G P

    2015-01-01

    A 2D analytical tunnel field-effect transistor (FET) potential model with cylindrical gate (CG-TFET) based on the solution of Laplace’s equation is proposed. The band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) current is derived by the help of lateral electric field and the shortest tunneling distance. However, the analysis is extended to obtain the subthreshold swing (SS) and transfer characteristics of the device. The dependency of drain current, SS and transconductance on gate voltage and shortest tunneling distance is discussed. Also, the effect of scaling the gate oxide thickness and the cylindrical body diameter on the electrical parameters of the device is analyzed. (paper)

  3. Wind tunnel modeling of roadways: Comparison with mathematical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidorn, K.; Davies, A.E.; Murphy, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The assessment of air quality impacts from roadways is a major concern to urban planners. In order to assess future road and building configurations, a number of techniques have been developed including mathematical models, which simulate traffic emissions and atmospheric dispersion through a series of mathematical relationships and physical models. The latter models simulate emissions and dispersion through scaling of these processes in a wind tunnel. Two roadway mathematical models, HIWAY-2 and CALINE-4, were applied to a proposed development in a large urban area. Physical modeling procedures developed by Rowan Williams Davies and Irwin Inc. (RWDI) in the form of line source simulators were also applied, and the resulting carbon monoxide concentrations were compared. The results indicated a factor of two agreement between the mathematical and physical models. The physical model, however, reacted to change in building massing and configuration. The mathematical models did not, since no provision for such changes was included in the mathematical models. In general, the RWDI model resulted in higher concentrations than either HIWAY-2 or CALINE-4. Where there was underprediction, it was often due to shielding of the receptor by surrounding buildings. Comparison of these three models with the CALTRANS Tracer Dispersion Experiment showed good results although concentrations were consistently underpredicted

  4. Dextrose-induced subsynovial connective tissue fibrosis in the rabbit carpal tunnel: A potential model to study carpal tunnel syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oh, S.; Ettema, A.M.; Zhao, C.; Zobitz, M.E.; Wold, L.E.; An, K.N.; Amadio, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    In this pilot study, hypertonic dextrose solution was used to induce fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) and create an animal model of potential use in the study of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The SSCT of the carpal tunnel in 15 New Zealand white rabbits were injected with 0.05 ml

  5. Inverse Analysis and Modeling for Tunneling Thrust on Shield Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of sensor and detection technologies, measured data analysis plays an increasingly important role in the design and control of heavy engineering equipment. The paper proposed a method for inverse analysis and modeling based on mass on-site measured data, in which dimensional analysis and data mining techniques were combined. The method was applied to the modeling of the tunneling thrust on shield machines and an explicit expression for thrust prediction was established. Combined with on-site data from a tunneling project in China, the inverse identification of model coefficients was carried out using the multiple regression method. The model residual was analyzed by statistical methods. By comparing the on-site data and the model predicted results in the other two projects with different tunneling conditions, the feasibility of the model was discussed. The work may provide a scientific basis for the rational design and control of shield tunneling machines and also a new way for mass on-site data analysis of complex engineering systems with nonlinear, multivariable, time-varying characteristics.

  6. Modelling of tunnelling processes and rock cutting tool wear with the particle finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Josep Maria; Oñate, Eugenio; Suárez, Benjamín

    2013-09-01

    Underground construction involves all sort of challenges in analysis, design, project and execution phases. The dimension of tunnels and their structural requirements are growing, and so safety and security demands do. New engineering tools are needed to perform a safer planning and design. This work presents the advances in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for the modelling and the analysis of tunneling processes including the wear of the cutting tools. The PFEM has its foundation on the Lagrangian description of the motion of a continuum built from a set of particles with known physical properties. The method uses a remeshing process combined with the alpha-shape technique to detect the contacting surfaces and a finite element method for the mechanical computations. A contact procedure has been developed for the PFEM which is combined with a constitutive model for predicting the excavation front and the wear of cutting tools. The material parameters govern the coupling of frictional contact and wear between the interacting domains at the excavation front. The PFEM allows predicting several parameters which are relevant for estimating the performance of a tunnelling boring machine such as wear in the cutting tools, the pressure distribution on the face of the boring machine and the vibrations produced in the machinery and the adjacent soil/rock. The final aim is to help in the design of the excavating tools and in the planning of the tunnelling operations. The applications presented show that the PFEM is a promising technique for the analysis of tunnelling problems.

  7. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on organic semiconductors : experiment and model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemerink, M.; Alvarado, S.F.; Müller, P.; Koenraad, P.M.; Salemink, H.W.M.; Wolter, J.H.; Janssen, R.A.J.

    2004-01-01

    Scanning-tunneling spectroscopy expts. performed on conjugated polymer films are compared with three-dimensional numerical model calcns. for charge injection and transport. It is found that if a sufficiently sharp tip is used, the field enhancement near the tip apex leads to a significant increase

  8. Multiband model for tunneling in MgB2 junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Alexander; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch; Rogalla, Horst; Dolgov, O.V.; Kortus, J.; Kong, Y.; Jepsen, O.; Andersen, O.K.

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical model for quasiparticle and Josephson tunneling in multiband superconductors is developed and applied to MgB2-based junctions. The gap functions in different bands in MgB2 are obtained from an extended Eliashberg formalism, using the results of band structure calculations. The

  9. Overload prevention in model supports for wind tunnel model testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton IVANOVICI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Preventing overloads in wind tunnel model supports is crucial to the integrity of the tested system. Results can only be interpreted as valid if the model support, conventionally called a sting remains sufficiently rigid during testing. Modeling and preliminary calculation can only give an estimate of the sting’s behavior under known forces and moments but sometimes unpredictable, aerodynamically caused model behavior can cause large transient overloads that cannot be taken into account at the sting design phase. To ensure model integrity and data validity an analog fast protection circuit was designed and tested. A post-factum analysis was carried out to optimize the overload detection and a short discussion on aeroelastic phenomena is included to show why such a detector has to be very fast. The last refinement of the concept consists in a fast detector coupled with a slightly slower one to differentiate between transient overloads that decay in time and those that are the result of aeroelastic unwanted phenomena. The decision to stop or continue the test is therefore conservatively taken preserving data and model integrity while allowing normal startup loads and transients to manifest.

  10. TUNNEL POINT CLOUD FILTERING METHOD BASED ON ELLIPTIC CYLINDRICAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zhu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The large number of bolts and screws that attached to the subway shield ring plates, along with the great amount of accessories of metal stents and electrical equipments mounted on the tunnel walls, make the laser point cloud data include lots of non-tunnel section points (hereinafter referred to as non-points, therefore affecting the accuracy for modeling and deformation monitoring. This paper proposed a filtering method for the point cloud based on the elliptic cylindrical model. The original laser point cloud data was firstly projected onto a horizontal plane, and a searching algorithm was given to extract the edging points of both sides, which were used further to fit the tunnel central axis. Along the axis the point cloud was segmented regionally, and then fitted as smooth elliptic cylindrical surface by means of iteration. This processing enabled the automatic filtering of those inner wall non-points. Experiments of two groups showed coincident results, that the elliptic cylindrical model based method could effectively filter out the non-points, and meet the accuracy requirements for subway deformation monitoring. The method provides a new mode for the periodic monitoring of tunnel sections all-around deformation in subways routine operation and maintenance.

  11. Hydrogen Tunneling in Enzymes and Biomimetic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layfield, Joshua P.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-04-09

    Hydrogen transfer reactions play an important role throughout chemistry and biology. In general, hydrogen transfer reactions encompass proton and hydride transfer, which are associated with the transfer of a positively or negatively charged species, respectively, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which corresponds to the net transfer of one electron and one proton in the simplest case. Such PCET reactions can occur by either a sequential mechanism, in which the proton or electron transfers first, or a concerted mechanism, in which the electron and proton transfer in a single kinetic step with no stable intermediate. Furthermore, concerted PCET reactions can be subdivided into hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between the same donor and acceptor (i.e., the transfer of a predominantly neutral species), and electron-proton transfer (EPT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between different donors and acceptors, possibly even in different directions. In all of these types of hydrogen transfer reactions, hydrogen tunneling could potentially play a significant role. The biomimetic portion was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  12. Hydrogen Tunneling in Enzymes and Biomimetic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layfield, Joshua P.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-12-20

    Hydrogen transfer reactions play an important role throughout chemistry and biology. In general, hydrogen transfer reactions encompass proton and hydride transfer, which are associated with the transfer of a positively or negatively charged species, respectively, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which corresponds to the net transfer of one electron and one proton in the simplest case. Such PCET reactions can occur by either a sequential mechanism, in which the proton or electron transfers first, or a concerted mechanism, in which the electron and proton transfer in a single kinetic step with no stable intermediate. Furthermore, concerted PCET reactions can be subdivided into hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between the same donor and acceptor (i.e., the transfer of a predominantly neutral species), and electron-proton transfer (EPT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between different donors and acceptors, possibly even in different directions. In all of these types of hydrogen transfer reactions, hydrogen tunneling could potentially play a signficant role. The theoretical development portion of this Review was supported by the National Science Foundation under CHE-10-57875. The biological portion of this Review was funded by NIH Grant No. GM056207. The biomimetic portion was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electro-catalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  13. Gaussian tunneling model of c-axis twist Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bille, A.; Klemm, R.A.; Scharnberg, K.

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the critical current density J c J ((var p hi) 0 ) for Josephson tunneling between identical high-temperature superconductors twisted an angle (var p hi) 0 about the c axis. Regardless of the shape of the two-dimensional Fermi surface and for very general tunneling matrix elements, an order parameter (OP) with general d-wave symmetry leads to J c J (π/4)=0. This general result is inconsistent with the data of Li et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4160 (1999)] on Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ (Bi2212), which showed J c J to be independent of (var p hi) 0 . If the momentum parallel to the barrier is conserved in the tunneling process, J c J should vary substantially with the twist angle (var p hi) 0 when the tight-binding Fermi surface appropriate for Bi2212 is taken into account, even if the OP is completely isotropic. We quantify the degree of momentum nonconservation necessary to render J c J ((var p hi) 0 ) constant within experimental error for a variety of pair states by interpolating between the coherent and incoherent limits using five specific models to describe the momentum dependence of the tunneling matrix element squared. From the data of Li et al., we conclude that the c-axis tunneling in Bi2212 must be very nearly incoherent, and that the OP must have a nonvanishing Fermi-surface average for T c . We further show that the apparent conventional sum-rule violation observed by Basov et al. [Science 283, 49 (1999)] can be consistent with such strongly incoherent c-axis tunneling.

  14. Wind Tunnel Modeling Of Wind Flow Over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, D.; Cochran, B.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation will describe the finding of an atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) wind tunnel study conducted as part of the Bolund Experiment. This experiment was sponsored by Risø DTU (National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark) during the fall of 2009 to enable a blind comparison of various air flow models in an attempt to validate their performance in predicting airflow over complex terrain. Bohlund hill sits 12 m above the water level at the end of a narrow isthmus. The island features a steep escarpment on one side, over which the airflow can be expected to separate. The island was equipped with several anemometer towers, and the approach flow over the water was well characterized. This study was one of only two only physical model studies included in the blind model comparison, the other being a water plume study. The remainder were computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, including both RANS and LES. Physical modeling of air flow over topographical features has been used since the middle of the 20th century, and the methods required are well understood and well documented. Several books have been written describing how to properly perform ABL wind tunnel studies, including ASCE manual of engineering practice 67. Boundary layer wind tunnel tests are the only modelling method deemed acceptable in ASCE 7-10, the most recent edition of the American Society of Civil Engineers standard that provides wind loads for buildings and other structures for buildings codes across the US. Since the 1970’s, most tall structures undergo testing in a boundary layer wind tunnel to accurately determine the wind induced loading. When compared to CFD, the US EPA considers a properly executed wind tunnel study to be equivalent to a CFD model with infinitesimal grid resolution and near infinite memory. One key reason for this widespread acceptance is that properly executed ABL wind tunnel studies will accurately simulate flow separation

  15. Modeling interdisciplinary activities involving Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Steffen Møllegaard

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a didactical model is presented. The goal of the model is to work as a didactical tool, or conceptual frame, for developing, carrying through and evaluating interdisciplinary activities involving the subject of mathematics and philosophy in the high schools. Through the terms...... of Horizontal Intertwining, Vertical Structuring and Horizontal Propagation the model consists of three phases, each considering different aspects of the nature of interdisciplinary activities. The theoretical modelling is inspired by work which focuses on the students abilities to concept formation in expanded...... domains (Michelsen, 2001, 2005a, 2005b). Furthermore the theoretical description rest on a series of qualitative interviews with teachers from the Danish high school (grades 9-11) conducted recently. The special case of concrete interdisciplinary activities between mathematics and philosophy is also...

  16. Investigation of faulted tunnel models by combined photoelasticity and finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Huang, Yuping

    1994-01-01

    Models of square and circular tunnels with short faults cutting through their surfaces are investigated by photoelasticity. These models, when duplicated by finite element analysis can predict the stress states of square or circular faulted tunnels adequately. Finite element analysis, using gap elements, may be used to investigate full size faulted tunnel system

  17. Model uncertainty of various settlement estimation methods in shallow tunnels excavation; case study: Qom subway tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademian, Amir; Abdollahipour, Hamed; Bagherpour, Raheb; Faramarzi, Lohrasb

    2017-10-01

    In addition to the numerous planning and executive challenges, underground excavation in urban areas is always followed by certain destructive effects especially on the ground surface; ground settlement is the most important of these effects for which estimation there exist different empirical, analytical and numerical methods. Since geotechnical models are associated with considerable model uncertainty, this study characterized the model uncertainty of settlement estimation models through a systematic comparison between model predictions and past performance data derived from instrumentation. To do so, the amount of surface settlement induced by excavation of the Qom subway tunnel was estimated via empirical (Peck), analytical (Loganathan and Poulos) and numerical (FDM) methods; the resulting maximum settlement value of each model were 1.86, 2.02 and 1.52 cm, respectively. The comparison of these predicted amounts with the actual data from instrumentation was employed to specify the uncertainty of each model. The numerical model outcomes, with a relative error of 3.8%, best matched the reality and the analytical method, with a relative error of 27.8%, yielded the highest level of model uncertainty.

  18. Modelling band-to-band tunneling current in InP-based heterostructure photonic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Engelen, J.P.; Shen, L.; van der Tol, J.J.G.M.; Smit, M.K.; Kockaert, P.; Emplit, P.; Gorza, S.-P.; Massar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Some semiconductor photonic devices show large discontinuities in the band structure. Short tunnel paths caused by this band structure may lead to an excessive tunneling current, especially in highly doped layers. Modelling of this tunnelling current is therefore important when designing photonic

  19. Klein tunneling in the α -T3 model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, E.; Nicol, E. J.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate Klein tunneling for the α -T3 model, which interpolates between graphene and the dice lattice via parameter α . We study transmission across two types of electrostatic interfaces: sharp potential steps and sharp potential barriers. We find both interfaces to be perfectly transparent for normal incidence for the full range of the parameter α for both interfaces. For other angles of incidence, we find that transmission is enhanced with increasing α . For the dice lattice, we find perfect, all-angle transmission across a potential step for incoming electrons with energy equal to half of the height of the potential step. This is analogous to the "super", all-angle transmission reported for the dice lattice for Klein tunneling across a potential barrier.

  20. Building information modelling review with potential applications in tunnel engineering of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weihong; Qin, Haiyang; Qiu, Junling; Fan, Haobo; Lai, Jinxing; Wang, Ke; Wang, Lixin

    2017-08-01

    Building information modelling (BIM) can be applied to tunnel engineering to address a number of problems, including complex structure, extensive design, long construction cycle and increased security risks. To promote the development of tunnel engineering in China, this paper combines actual cases, including the Xingu mountain tunnel and the Shigu Mountain tunnel, to systematically analyse BIM applications in tunnel engineering in China. The results indicate that BIM technology in tunnel engineering is currently mainly applied during the design stage rather than during construction and operation stages. The application of BIM technology in tunnel engineering covers many problems, such as a lack of standards, incompatibility of different software, disorganized management, complex combination with GIS (Geographic Information System), low utilization rate and poor awareness. In this study, through summary of related research results and engineering cases, suggestions are introduced and an outlook for the BIM application in tunnel engineering in China is presented, which provides guidance for design optimization, construction standards and later operation maintenance.

  1. Modelling of series of types of automated trenchless works tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendarz, P.; Rzasinski, R.

    2016-08-01

    Microtunneling is the newest method for making underground installations. Show method is the result of experience and methods applied in other, previous methods of trenchless underground works. It is considered reasonable to elaborate a series of types of construction of tunneling machines, to develop this particular earthworks method. There are many design solutions of machines, but the current goal is to develop non - excavation robotized machine. Erosion machines with main dimensions of the tunnels which are: 1600, 2000, 2500, 3150 are design with use of the computer aided methods. Series of types of construction of tunneling machines creating process was preceded by analysis of current state. The verification of practical methodology of creating the systematic part series was based on the designed erosion machines series of types. There were developed: method of construction similarity of the erosion machines, algorithmic methods of quantitative construction attributes variant analyzes in the I-DEAS advanced graphical program, relational and program parameterization. There manufacturing process of the parts will be created, which allows to verify the technological process on the CNC machines. The models of designed will be modified and the construction will be consulted with erosion machine users and manufacturers like: Tauber Rohrbau GmbH & Co.KG from Minster, OHL ZS a.s. from Brna,. The companies’ acceptance will result in practical verification by JUMARPOL company.

  2. Model of tunnelling through periodic array of quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meynster Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several explicitly solvable models of electron tunnelling in a system of single and double two-dimensional periodic arrays of quantum dots with two laterally coupled leads in a homogeneous magnetic field are constructed. First, a model of single layer formed by periodic array of zero-range potentials is described. The Landau operator (the Schrodinger operator with a magnetic field with point-like interactions is the system Hamiltonian. We deal with two types of the layer lattices: square and honeycomb. The periodicity condition gives one an invariance property for the Hamiltonian in respect to magnetic translations group. The consideration of double quantum layer reduces to the replacement of the basic cell for the single layer by a cell including centers of different layers. Two variants of themodel for the double layer are suggested: with direct tunneling between the layers and with the connecting channels (segments in the model between the layers. The theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators is a mathematical background of the model. The third stage of the construction is the description of leads connection. It is made by the operator extensions theory method too. Electron tunneling from input lead to the output lead through the double quantum layer is described. Energy ranges with extremely small (practically, zero transmission were found. Dependencies of the transmission coefficient (particularly, “zero transmission bands” positions on the magnetic field, the energy of electron and the distance between layers are investigated. The results are compared with the corresponding single-layer transmission.

  3. Modelling of optoelectronic circuits based on resonant tunneling diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rei, João. F. M.; Foot, James A.; Rodrigues, Gil C.; Figueiredo, José M. L.

    2017-08-01

    Resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) are the fastest pure electronic semiconductor devices at room temperature. When integrated with optoelectronic devices they can give rise to new devices with novel functionalities due to their highly nonlinear properties and electrical gain, with potential applications in future ultra-wide-band communication systems (see e.g. EU H2020 iBROW Project). The recent coverage on these devices led to the need to have appropriated simulation tools. In this work, we present RTD based optoelectronic circuits simulation packages to provide circuit signal level analysis such as transient and frequency responses. We will present and discuss the models, and evaluate the simulation packages.

  4. Influence of structural parameter included in nonlocal rock mass model on stress concentration around circular tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrikov, SV; Mikenina, OA; Revuzhenko, AF

    2018-03-01

    A model of elastic body, including local curvature of elementary volume, is matched with a nonlocal model with a linear structural parameter in the differential approximation. The problem on deformation of rock mass around a circular cross section tunnel is solved numerically. The contours of the calculated stresses are plotted. It is shown that inclusion of local bends in the model results in expansion of influence zone of the tunnel and reduces stress concentration factor at the tunnel boundary.

  5. Shortcomings of the Winkler Model in the Assessment of Sectioned Tunnels under Seismic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Lyngs, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    A Winkler-type model is often applied in the design of tunnels subject to seismic loading. Since the subgrade stiffness is modelled by disjoint springs, distributed continuously along the tunnel, the model does not account for retroaction via the soil. This may not be a problem in the design......-element solution, using a planned tunnel at Thessaloniki, Greece, as a case study. The aim of the analysis is to quantify the inaccuracy of the Winkler model in the prediction of damage at a gasket between two tunnel elements....

  6. Shortcomings of the Winkler Model in the Assessment of Sectioned Tunnels under Seismic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Lyngs, Jakob Hausgaard

    A Winkler-type model is often applied in the design of tunnels subject to seismic loading. Since the subgrade stiffness is modelled by disjoint springs, distributed continuously along the tunnel, the model does not account for retroaction via the soil. This may not be a problem in the design......-element solution, using a planned tunnel at Thessaloniki, Greece, as a case study. The aim of the analysis is to quantify the inaccuracy of the Winkler model in the prediction of damage at a gasket between two tunnel elements....

  7. Modeling of inter-ribbon tunneling in graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Van de Put, Maarten L.; Vandenberghe, William G.; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim; Fischetti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The tunneling current between two crossed graphene ribbons is described invoking the empirical pseudopotential approximation and the Bardeen transfer Hamiltonian method. Results indicate that the density of states is the most important factor determining the tunneling current between small (nm) ribbons. The quasi-one dimensional nature of graphene nanoribbons is shown to result in resonant tunneling.

  8. Mathematical aspects of ground state tunneling models in luminescence materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Kitis, George

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence signals from a variety of natural materials have been known to decrease with storage time at room temperature due to quantum tunneling, a phenomenon known as anomalous fading. This paper is a study of several mathematical aspects of two previously published luminescence models which describe tunneling phenomena from the ground state of a donor–acceptor system. It is shown that both models are described by the same type of integral equation, and two new analytical equations are presented. The first new analytical equation describes the effect of anomalous fading on the dose response curves (DRCs) of naturally irradiated samples. The DRCs in the model were previously expressed in the form of integral equations requiring numerical integration, while the new analytical equation can be used immediately as a tool for analyzing experimental data. The second analytical equation presented in this paper describes the anomalous fading rate (g-Value per decade) as a function of the charge density in the model. This new analytical expression for the g-Value is tested using experimental anomalous fading data for several apatite crystals which exhibit high rate of anomalous fading. The two new analytical results can be useful tools for analyzing anomalous fading data from luminescence materials. In addition to the two new analytical equations, an explanation is provided for the numerical value of a constant previously introduced in the models. - Highlights: • Comparative study of two luminescence models for feldspars. • Two new analytical equations for dose response curves and anomalous fading rate. • The numerical value z=1.8 of previously introduced constant in models explained.

  9. Observations involving broadband impedance modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J S [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Results for single- and multi-bunch instabilities can be significantly affected by the precise model that is used for the broadband impedance. This paper discusses three aspects of broadband impedance modelling. The first is an observation of the effect that a seemingly minor change in an impedance model has on the single-bunch mode coupling threshold. The second is a successful attempt to construct a model for the high-frequency tails of an r.f. cavity. The last is a discussion of requirements for the mathematical form of an impedance which follow from the general properties of impedances. (author)

  10. Observations involving broadband impedance modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    Results for single- and multi-bunch instabilities can be significantly affected by the precise model that is used for the broadband impendance. This paper discusses three aspects of broadband impendance modeling. The first is an observation of the effect that a seemingly minor change in an impedance model has on the single-bunch mode coupling threshold. The second is a successful attempt to construct a model for the high-frequency tails of an r.f cavity. The last is a discussion of requirements for the mathematical form of an impendance which follow from the general properties of impendances

  11. D Modelling of Tunnel Excavation Using Pressurized Tunnel Boring Machine in Overconsolidated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demagh, Rafik; Emeriault, Fabrice

    2013-06-01

    The construction of shallow tunnels in urban areas requires a prior assessment of their effects on the existing structures. In the case of shield tunnel boring machines (TBM), the various construction stages carried out constitute a highly three-dimensional problem of soil/structure interaction and are not easy to represent in a complete numerical simulation. Consequently, the tunnelling- induced soil movements are quite difficult to evaluate. A 3D simulation procedure, using a finite differences code, namely FLAC3D, taking into account, in an explicit manner, the main sources of movements in the soil mass is proposed in this paper. It is illustrated by the particular case of Toulouse Subway Line B for which experimental data are available and where the soil is saturated and highly overconsolidated. A comparison made between the numerical simulation results and the insitu measurements shows that the 3D procedure of simulation proposed is relevant, in particular regarding the adopted representation of the different operations performed by the tunnel boring machine (excavation, confining pressure, shield advancement, installation of the tunnel lining, grouting of the annular void, etc). Furthermore, a parametric study enabled a better understanding of the singular behaviour origin observed on the ground surface and within the solid soil mass, till now not mentioned in the literature.

  12. Low frequency elastic properties of glasses at low temperatures - implications on the tunneling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raychaudhuri, A.K.; Hunklinger, S.

    1984-01-01

    We have measured the low frequency elastic properties of dielectric, normal conducting and superconducting metallic glasses at audio-frequencies (fapprox.=1 kHz) and temperatures down to 10 mK. Our results are discussed in the framework of the tunneling model of glasses. The major assumption of the tunneling model regarding the tunneling states with long relaxation time has been verified, but discrepancies to high frequency measurements have been found. In addition, our experiments on superconducting metallic glasses seem to indicate that the present treatment of the electron-tunneling state interaction is not sufficient. (orig.)

  13. Kondo dynamics of quasiparticle tunneling in a two-reservoir Anderson model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jongbae

    2011-07-13

    We study the Kondo dynamics in a two-reservoir Anderson impurity model in which quasiparticle tunneling occurs between two reservoirs. We show that singlet hopping is an essential component of Kondo dynamics in the quasiparticle tunneling. We prove that two resonant tunneling levels exist in the two-reservoir Anderson impurity model and the quasiparticle tunnels through one of these levels when a bias is applied. The Kondo dynamics is explained by obtaining the retarded Green's function. We obtain the analytic expressions of the spectral weights of coherent peaks by analyzing the Green's function at the atomic limit.

  14. Kondo dynamics of quasiparticle tunneling in a two-reservoir Anderson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jongbae

    2011-01-01

    We study the Kondo dynamics in a two-reservoir Anderson impurity model in which quasiparticle tunneling occurs between two reservoirs. We show that singlet hopping is an essential component of Kondo dynamics in the quasiparticle tunneling. We prove that two resonant tunneling levels exist in the two-reservoir Anderson impurity model and the quasiparticle tunnels through one of these levels when a bias is applied. The Kondo dynamics is explained by obtaining the retarded Green's function. We obtain the analytic expressions of the spectral weights of coherent peaks by analyzing the Green's function at the atomic limit.

  15. Neural network approach to modelling the behaviour of quantum tunnelling composites as multifunctional sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantada, Andrés Díaz; Morgado, Pilar Lafont; Otero, Javier Echavarri; Munoz-Guijosa, Juan Manuel; Sanz, José Luis Muñoz

    2010-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling composites, or 'QTCs', are composites with an elastomeric polymer matrix and a metal particle filling (usually nickel). At rest, these metal particles do not touch each other and the polymer acts as an insulator. When the material is suitably deformed, however, the particles come together (without actually touching) and the quantum tunnelling effect is promoted, which causes the electrical resistance to fall drastically. This paper contains a detailed description of neural networks for a faster, simpler and more accurate modelling and simulation of QTC behaviour that is based on properly training these neural models with the help of data from characterization tests. Instead of using analytical equations that integrate different quantum and thermomechanical effects, neural networks are used here due to the notable nonlinearity of the aforementioned effects, which involve developing analytical models that are too complex to be of practical use. By conducting tests under different pressures and temperatures that encompass a wide range of operating conditions for these materials, different neural networks are trained and compared as the number of neurons is increased. The results of these tests have also enabled certain previously described phenomena to be simulated with more accuracy, especially those involving the response of QTCs to changes in pressure and temperature

  16. A new theoretical model for inelastic tunneling in realistic systems : comparing STM simulations with experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, E.T.R.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis has been dedicated to modeling the electron transport in tunnel junctions in order to efficiently describe and predict inelastic effects that occur when electrons pass a tunnel junction. These inelastic effects can be considered at several levels of sophistication, from very simple to

  17. Analytical model for vibration prediction of two parallel tunnels in a full-space

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Zhou, Shunhua; Guo, Peijun; Di, Honggui; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional analytical model for the prediction of ground vibrations from two parallel tunnels embedded in a full-space. The two tunnels are modelled as cylindrical shells of infinite length, and the surrounding soil is modelled as a full-space with two cylindrical cavities. A virtual interface is introduced to divide the soil into the right layer and the left layer. By transforming the cylindrical waves into the plane waves, the solution of wave propagation in the full-space with two cylindrical cavities is obtained. The transformations from the plane waves to cylindrical waves are then used to satisfy the boundary conditions on the tunnel-soil interfaces. The proposed model provides a highly efficient tool to predict the ground vibration induced by the underground railway, which accounts for the dynamic interaction between neighbouring tunnels. Analysis of the vibration fields produced over a range of frequencies and soil properties is conducted. When the distance between the two tunnels is smaller than three times the tunnel diameter, the interaction between neighbouring tunnels is highly significant, at times in the order of 20 dB. It is necessary to consider the interaction between neighbouring tunnels for the prediction of ground vibrations induced underground railways.

  18. New model for mines and transportation tunnels external dose calculation using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allam, Kh. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a new methodology is developed based on Monte Carlo simulation for tunnels and mines external dose calculation. Tunnels external dose evaluation model of a cylindrical shape of finite thickness with an entrance and with or without exit. A photon transportation model was applied for exposure dose calculations. A new software based on Monte Carlo solution was designed and programmed using Delphi programming language. The variation of external dose due to radioactive nuclei in a mine tunnel and the corresponding experimental data lies in the range 7.3 19.9%. The variation of specific external dose rate with position in, tunnel building material density and composition were studied. The given new model has more flexible for real external dose in any cylindrical tunnel structure calculations. (authors)

  19. Unstructed Navier-Stokes Analysis of Wind-Tunnel Aeroelastic Effects on TCA Model 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, Neal T.; Allison, Dennis O.; Parikh, Paresh C.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate a simple technique which accounts for aeroelastic deformations experienced by HSR wind-tunnel models within CFD computations. With improved correlations, CFD can become a more effective tool for augmenting the post-test understanding of experimental data. The present technique involves the loose coupling of a low-level structural representation within the ELAPS code, to an unstructured Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3Dns. The ELAPS model is initially calibrated against bending characteristics of the wind-tunnel model. The strength of this method is that, with a single point calibration of a simple structural representation, the static aeroelastic effects can be accounted for in CFD calculations across a range of test conditions. No prior knowledge of the model deformation during the wind-on test is required. This approach has been successfully applied to the high aspect-ratio planforms of subsonic transports. The current challenge is to adapt the procedure to low aspect-ratio planforms typical of HSR configurations.

  20. An analytic model for gate-all-around silicon nanowire tunneling field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ying; He Jin; Chan Mansun; Ye Yun; Zhao Wei; Wu Wen; Deng Wan-Ling; Wang Wen-Ping; Du Cai-Xia

    2014-01-01

    An analytical model of gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire tunneling field effect transistors (NW-TFETs) is developted based on the surface potential solutions in the channel direction and considering the band to band tunneling (BTBT) efficiency. The three-dimensional Poisson equation is solved to obtain the surface potential distributions in the partition regions along the channel direction for the NW-TFET, and a tunneling current model using Kane's expression is developed. The validity of the developed model is shown by the good agreement between the model predictions and the TCAD simulation results. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  1. A New Model of Multiphonon Excitation Trap-Assisted Band-to-Band Tunneling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Racko

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a new approach to calculating the currents in a pn-diode based on the extension of the Shockley-Read-Hall recombination-generation model. The presented theory is an alternative to Schenk’s model of trap-assisted tunneling. The new approach takes into account generation and recombination as well as tunneling processes in pn-junctions. Using this model, the real “soft” I-V curve usually observed in the case of switching diodes and transistors was modeled as a result of the high concentration of traps that assist in the process of tunneling.

  2. Revalidation of the NASA Ames 11-by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel with a Commercial Airplane Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmak, Frank J.; Hudgins, M.; Hergert, D.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The 11-By 11-Foot Transonic leg of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) was modernized to improve tunnel performance, capability, productivity, and reliability. Wind tunnel tests to demonstrate the readiness of the tunnel for a return to production operations included an Integrated Systems Test (IST), calibration tests, and airplane validation tests. One of the two validation tests was a 0.037-scale Boeing 777 model that was previously tested in the 11-By 11-Foot tunnel in 1991. The objective of the validation tests was to compare pre-modernization and post-modernization results from the same airplane model in order to substantiate the operational readiness of the facility. Evaluation of within-test, test-to-test, and tunnel-to-tunnel data repeatability were made to study the effects of the tunnel modifications. Tunnel productivity was also evaluated to determine the readiness of the facility for production operations. The operation of the facility, including model installation, tunnel operations, and the performance of tunnel systems, was observed and facility deficiency findings generated. The data repeatability studies and tunnel-to-tunnel comparisons demonstrated outstanding data repeatability and a high overall level of data quality. Despite some operational and facility problems, the validation test was successful in demonstrating the readiness of the facility to perform production airplane wind tunnel%, tests.

  3. Molecular modeling study on tunnel behavior in different histone deacetylase isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundarapandian Thangapandian

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs have emerged as effective therapeutic targets in the treatment of various diseases including cancers as these enzymes directly involved in the epigenetic regulation of genes. However the development of isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors has been a challenge till date since all HDAC enzymes possess conserved tunnel-like active site. In this study, using molecular dynamics simulation we have analyzed the behavior of tunnels present in HDAC8, 10, and 11 enzymes of class I, II, and IV, respectively. We have identified the equivalent tunnel forming amino acids in these three isoforms and found that they are very much conserved with subtle differences to be utilized in selective inhibitor development. One amino acid, methionine of HDAC8, among six tunnel forming residues is different in isoforms of other classes (glutamic acid (E in HDAC10 and leucine (L in HDAC 11 based on which mutations were introduced in HDAC11, the less studied HDAC isoform, to observe the effects of this change. The HDAC8-like (L268M mutation in the tunnel forming residues has almost maintained the deep and narrow tunnel as present in HDAC8 whereas HDAC10-like (L268E mutation has changed the tunnel wider and shallow as observed in HDAC10. These results explained the importance of the single change in the tunnel formation in different isoforms. The observations from this study can be utilized in the development of isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors.

  4. A voice-actuated wind tunnel model leak checking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, William E.

    1989-01-01

    A computer program has been developed that improves the efficiency of wind tunnel model leak checking. The program uses a voice recognition unit to relay a technician's commands to the computer. The computer, after receiving a command, can respond to the technician via a voice response unit. Information about the model pressure orifice being checked is displayed on a gas-plasma terminal. On command, the program records up to 30 seconds of pressure data. After the recording is complete, the raw data and a straight line fit of the data are plotted on the terminal. This allows the technician to make a decision on the integrity of the orifice being checked. All results of the leak check program are stored in a database file that can be listed on the line printer for record keeping purposes or displayed on the terminal to help the technician find unchecked orifices. This program allows one technician to check a model for leaks instead of the two or three previously required.

  5. Study on the snow drifting modelling criteria in boundary layer wind tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta BĂETU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study on modelling the wind drifting of the snow deposited on the flat roofs of buildings in wind tunnel. The physical model of snow drifting in wind tunnel simulating the urban exposure to wind action is not frequently reported in literature, but is justified by the serious damages under accidental important snow falls combined with strong wind actions on the roofs of various buildings. A uniform layer of snow deposited on the flat roof was exposed to wind action in order to obtain the drifting. The parameters involved in the modelling at reduced scale, with particles of glass beads, of the phenomenon of transportation of the snow from the roof were analysed, particularly the roughness length and the friction wind speed. A numerical simulation in ANSYS CFX program was developed in parallel, by which a more accurate visualization of the particularities of the wind flow over the roof was possible, in the specific areas where the phenomenon of snow transportation was more susceptible to occur. Modified roughness length and friction wind speed were determined through methods used in the literature, an attempt being made in this work to analyse the factors that influence their values.

  6. Safety evaluation model of urban cross-river tunnel based on driving simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingqi; Lu, Linjun; Lu, Jian John

    2017-09-01

    Currently, Shanghai urban cross-river tunnels have three principal characteristics: increased traffic, a high accident rate and rapidly developing construction. Because of their complex geographic and hydrological characteristics, the alignment conditions in urban cross-river tunnels are more complicated than in highway tunnels, so a safety evaluation of urban cross-river tunnels is necessary to suggest follow-up construction and changes in operational management. A driving risk index (DRI) for urban cross-river tunnels was proposed in this study. An index system was also constructed, combining eight factors derived from the output of a driving simulator regarding three aspects of risk due to following, lateral accidents and driver workload. Analytic hierarchy process methods and expert marking and normalization processing were applied to construct a mathematical model for the DRI. The driving simulator was used to simulate 12 Shanghai urban cross-river tunnels and a relationship was obtained between the DRI for the tunnels and the corresponding accident rate (AR) via a regression analysis. The regression analysis results showed that the relationship between the DRI and the AR mapped to an exponential function with a high degree of fit. In the absence of detailed accident data, a safety evaluation model based on factors derived from a driving simulation can effectively assess the driving risk in urban cross-river tunnels constructed or in design.

  7. The design of models for cryogenic wind tunnels. [mechanical properties and loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, V. P.

    1977-01-01

    Factors to be considered in the design and fabrication of models for cryogenic wind tunnels include high model loads imposed by the high operating pressures, the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of materials in low temperature environments, and the combination of aerodynamic loads with the thermal environment. Candidate materials are being investigated to establish criteria for cryogenic wind tunnel models and their installation. Data acquired from these tests will be provided to users of the National Transonic Facility.

  8. Electrochemistry at a Metal Nanoparticle on a Tunneling Film: A Steady-State Model of Current Densities at a Tunneling Ultramicroelectrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Caleb M; Kim, Jiyeon; Bard, Allen J

    2015-09-09

    Here, a new methodology is proposed for treating electrochemical current densities in metal-insulator-metal nanoparticle (M-I-MNP) systems. The described model provides broad, practical insights about MNP-mediated electron transfer to redox species in solution, where electron transfer from the underlying electrode to a MNP via tunneling and heterogeneous electron transfer from the MNP to redox species in solution are treated as sequential steps. Tunneling is treated through an adaptation of the Simmons model of tunneling in metal-insulator-metal structures, and explicit equations are provided for tunneling currents, which demonstrate the effect of various experimental parameters, such as insulator thickness and MNP size. Overall, a general approach is demonstrated for determining experimental conditions where tunneling will have a measurable impact on the electrochemistry of M-I-MNP systems.

  9. A model to relate wind tunnel measurements to open field odorant emissions from liquid area sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucernoni, F.; Capelli, L.; Busini, V.; Sironi, S.

    2017-05-01

    Waste Water Treatment Plants are known to have significant emissions of several pollutants and odorants causing nuisance to the near-living population. One of the purposes of the present work is to study a suitable model to evaluate odour emissions from liquid passive area sources. First, the models describing volatilization under a forced convection regime inside a wind tunnel device, which is the sampling device that typically used for sampling on liquid area sources, were investigated. In order to relate the fluid dynamic conditions inside the hood to the open field and inside the hood a thorough study of the models capable of describing the volatilization phenomena of the odorous compounds from liquid pools was performed and several different models were evaluated for the open field emission. By means of experimental tests involving pure liquid acetone and pure liquid butanone, it was verified that the model more suitable to describe precisely the volatilization inside the sampling hood is the model for the emission from a single flat plate in forced convection and laminar regime, with a fluid dynamic boundary layer fully developed and a mass transfer boundary layer not fully developed. The proportionality coefficient for the model was re-evaluated in order to account for the specific characteristics of the adopted wind tunnel device, and then the model was related with the selected model for the open field thereby computing the wind speed at 10 m that would cause the same emission that is estimated from the wind tunnel measurement furthermore, the field of application of the proposed model was clearly defined for the considered models during the project, discussing the two different kinds of compounds commonly found in emissive liquid pools or liquid spills, i.e. gas phase controlled and liquid phase controlled compounds. Lastly, a discussion is presented comparing the presented approach for emission rates recalculation in the field, with other approaches

  10. Modeling Open-Loop MEMS Tunneling Accelerometer Based on Circular Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jodat Kordlar

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper open-loop MEMS tunneling accelerometer was modeled based on a clamped micro circular plate with a tip tunneling at its centre. Mechanical behavior of the micro plate was studied deriving governing equation based on classic Kirchhoff thin plate theory and it was discretized using Galerkin method. Dynamic response of the proposed accelerometer due to step and harmonic external excitation was studied and the magnitude of the applied acceleration was identified by measuring of the changing of tunneling current. Obtained results show that the proposed tunneling accelerometer very sensitive and it can be measure acceleration with very high resolution but very small gap of tip tunneling limit the range of measurable acceleration.

  11. Numerical simulation of flows around deformed aircraft model in a wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenkov, A. V.; Bosnyakov, S. M.; Glazkov, S. A.; Gorbushin, A. R.; Kuzmina, S. I.; Kursakov, I. A.; Matyash, S. V.; Ishmuratov, F. Z.

    2016-10-01

    To obtain accurate data of calculation method error requires detailed simulation of the experiment in wind tunnel with keeping all features of the model, installation and gas flow. Two examples of such detailed data comparison are described in this paper. The experimental characteristics of NASA CRM model obtained in the ETW wind tunnel (Cologne, Germany), and CFD characteristics of this model obtained with the use of EWT-TsAGI application package are compared. Following comparison is carried out for an airplane model in the T-128 wind tunnel (TsAGI, Russia). It is seen that deformation influence on integral characteristics grows with increasing Re number and, accordingly, the dynamic pressure. CFD methods application for problems of experimental research in the wind tunnel allows to separate viscosity and elasticity effects.

  12. The Feasibility of Multiscale Modeling of Tunnel Fires Using FDS 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermesi, Izabella; Colella, Francesco; Rein, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    The HVAC component of FDS 6 was used to divide a 1.2km tunnel into a 3D near fire area and a 1D area further away from the fire in order to investigate the feasibility of multiscale modeling of tunnel fires with this new feature in FDS. The two sub-models were coupled directly. The results were...... compared with reference works on multiscale modeling and the outcome is considered positive, with a deviation of less than 5% in magnitude of relevant parameters, yet with a significant reduction of the simulation runtime. As such, the multiscale method is deemed feasible for simulating tunnel fires in FDS......6. However, the simplifications that are made in this work require further investigation in order to take full advantage of the potential of this computational method. INTRODUCTION Multiscale modeling for tunnel flows and fires has previously been studied using RANS general purpose CFD software...

  13. Current perpendicular to plane giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance treated with unified model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, PAE

    2002-01-01

    The conceptual similarity between current perpendicular to plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) is exploited by utilizing a unified single-particle model accounting for both types of magnetoresistance. By defining structures composed of ferromagnetic,

  14. Fire modeling for Building 221-T - T Plant Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oar, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    This report was prepared by Hughes Associates, Inc. to document the results of fire models for building 221-T Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel. Backup data is contained in document No. WHC-SD-CP-ANAL-010, Rev. 0

  15. Bullying Prevention and the Parent Involvement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbert, Jered B.; Schultz, Danielle; Crothers, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis of bullying prevention programs provides support for social-ecological theory, in which parent involvement addressing child bullying behaviors is seen as important in preventing school-based bullying. The purpose of this manuscript is to suggest how Epstein and colleagues' parent involvement model can be used as a…

  16. Prevalent involvement of thenar motor fibres in vineyard workers with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelli, M; Baldasseroni, A; Aretini, A; Ginanneschi, F; Padua, L

    2010-08-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has a high prevalence in agricultural workers, especially those engaged in vineyards. We postulated that vineyard CTS was electrophysiologically different from CTS of other subjects. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional electrophysiological study of two cohorts of consecutive patients with CTS, the first consisting of vineyard workers and the second, of other unselected types of workers, housewives and pensioners. Thirty-three vineyard workers (mean age 46.8years, 42% women) and 205 patients with other occupations (mean age 53.7years; 66% women) were enrolled. All patients underwent sensory and motor neurography of the median and ulnar nerves. Differences in demographic and electrophysiological findings between groups were calculated and multiple linear regression analysis was performed to eliminate the influence of potential confounding factors (age, sex, BMI, clinical severity of CTS) on the results of univariate difference analysis. Univariate analysis showed that DML was longer and compound muscle action potential amplitude of the median nerve, recorded from the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, was smaller in vineyard workers than in the other CTS patients. These differences remained significant after adjusting the results for confounding factors. The vineyard workers showed a different pattern of CTS than the other patients: thenar motor fibres were more affected, presumably due to chronic compression on the thenar branch. This suggests an association between "common" CTS and thenar mononeuropathy. Occupational physiologists should clarify the mechanisms of neuromuscular engagement in particular jobs and ergonomists design suitable working tools, because many "individual" risk factors are difficult to change, but workplace-related risk factors can be modified. Copyright 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasonic attenuation measurements in neutron-irradiated quartz: a microscopic model for the tunneling states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppens, V.; Laermans, C.; Coeck, M.

    1996-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation measurements are carried out in neutron-irradiated z-cut quartz for three different doses, in a frequency range from 70 to 320 MHz. The data are analyzed using the tunneling model, and the typical TS-parameters are derived. A comparison with the results obtained from similar x-cut samples shows that the coupling of the tunneling states with the longitudinal phonons is direction-dependent. This confirms the anisotropic behaviour of the tunneling states and gives support to the microscopic picture of the TS as a rotation of coupled SiO 4 tetrahedra. (orig.)

  18. Tunnel splitting in biaxial spin models investigated with spin-coherent-state path integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhide; Liang, J.-Q.; Pu, F.-C.

    2003-01-01

    Tunnel splitting in biaxial spin models is investigated with a full evaluation of the fluctuation functional integrals of the Euclidean kernel in the framework of spin-coherent-state path integrals which leads to a magnitude of tunnel splitting quantitatively comparable with the numerical results in terms of diagonalization of the Hamilton operator. An additional factor resulted from a global time transformation converting the position-dependent mass to a constant one seems to be equivalent to the semiclassical correction of the Lagrangian proposed by Enz and Schilling. A long standing question whether the spin-coherent-state representation of path integrals can result in an accurate tunnel splitting is therefore resolved

  19. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were t...

  20. A Lightweight Radio Propagation Model for Vehicular Communication in Road Tunnels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ahsan Qureshi

    Full Text Available Radio propagation models (RPMs are generally employed in Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANETs to predict path loss in multiple operating environments (e.g. modern road infrastructure such as flyovers, underpasses and road tunnels. For example, different RPMs have been developed to predict propagation behaviour in road tunnels. However, most existing RPMs for road tunnels are computationally complex and are based on field measurements in frequency band not suitable for VANET deployment. Furthermore, in tunnel applications, consequences of moving radio obstacles, such as large buses and delivery trucks, are generally not considered in existing RPMs. This paper proposes a computationally inexpensive RPM with minimal set of parameters to predict path loss in an acceptable range for road tunnels. The proposed RPM utilizes geometric properties of the tunnel, such as height and width along with the distance between sender and receiver, to predict the path loss. The proposed RPM also considers the additional attenuation caused by the moving radio obstacles in road tunnels, while requiring a negligible overhead in terms of computational complexity. To demonstrate the utility of our proposed RPM, we conduct a comparative summary and evaluate its performance. Specifically, an extensive data gathering campaign is carried out in order to evaluate the proposed RPM. The field measurements use the 5 GHz frequency band, which is suitable for vehicular communication. The results demonstrate that a close match exists between the predicted values and measured values of path loss. In particular, an average accuracy of 94% is found with R2 = 0.86.

  1. Physical properties and analytical models of band-to-band tunneling in low-bandgap semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Chun-Hsing; Dang Chien, Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Low-bandgap semiconductors, such as InAs and InSb, are widely considered to be ideal for use in tunnel field-effect transistors to ensure sufficient on-current boosting at low voltages. This work elucidates the physical and mathematical considerations of applying conventional band-to-band tunneling models in low-bandgap semiconductors, and presents a new analytical alternative for practical use. The high-bandgap tunneling generates most at maximum field region with shortest tunnel path, whereas the low-bandgap generations occur dispersedly because of narrow tunnel barrier. The local electrical field associated with tunneling-electron numbers dominates in low-bandgap materials. This work proposes decoupled electric-field terms in the pre-exponential factor and exponential function of generation-rate expressions. Without fitting, the analytical results and approximated forms exhibit great agreements with the sophisticated forms both in high- and low-bandgap semiconductors. Neither nonlocal nor local field is appropriate to be used in numerical simulations for predicting the tunneling generations in a variety of low- and high-bandgap semiconductors

  2. Three dimensional transient electromagnetic model study for fracture prediction from tunnel face; Sanjigen model keisan ni yoru TEM ho no tunnel zenpo tansa eno tekiyosei no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, K; Tsutsui, T; Saito, A [Mitsui Mineral Development Engineering Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Hara, T [Toda Corp., Tokyo, (Japan); Zhdanov, M [University of Utah, UT (United States)

    1996-10-01

    In order to apply TEM model to fracture prediction at tunnel face, 3-D TEM model computation by FEM was conducted by installing a transmission loop on a tunnel face. MT field responses diffusing into the 3-D model were computed by time-domain difference calculus, and analytical precision was improved by introducing a staggered grid method. In the case where a low resistive zone exists before a tunnel face, time variance in diffused eddy current and induction current in the low resistive zone could be obtained. The difference in tunnel-axial transient curve (transient phenomenon curve in magnetic field) between uniform medium and low resistive zone models was based on the absorption process of diffused eddy current into the low resistive zone, and the expanding process of it toward the outside. Change in background condition could be predicted from the background and the ratio of transient curves every measurement. The detection limit of the low resistive zone was dependent on resistivity contrast, distance and geometry. Fluctuation in measurement due to noises and S/N ratio were also essential. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Modeling of Turbidity Variation in Two Reservoirs Connected by a Water Transfer Tunnel in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Chung Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Andong and Imha reservoirs in South Korea are connected by a water transfer tunnel. The turbidity of the Imha reservoir is much higher than that of the Andong reservoir. Thus, it is necessary to examine the movement of turbidity between the two reservoirs via the water transfer tunnel. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the water transfer tunnel on the turbidity behavior of the two connecting reservoirs and to further understand the effect of reservoir turbidity distribution as a function of the selective withdrawal depth. This study applied the CE-QUAL-W2, a water quality and 2-dimensional hydrodynamic model, for simulating the hydrodynamic processes of the two reservoirs. Results indicate that, in the Andong reservoir, the turbidity of the released water with the water transfer tunnel was similar to that without the tunnel. However, in the Imha reservoir, the turbidity of the released water with the water transfer tunnel was lower than that without the tunnel. This can be attributed to the higher capacity of the Andong reservoir, which has double the storage of the Imha reservoir. Withdrawal turbidity in the Imha reservoir was investigated using the water transfer tunnel. This study applied three withdrawal selections as elevation (EL. 141.0 m, 146.5 m, and 152.0 m. The highest withdrawal turbidity resulted in EL. 141.0 m, which indicates that the high turbidity current is located at a vertical depth of about 20–30 m because of the density difference. These results will be helpful for understanding the release and selective withdrawal turbidity behaviors for a water transfer tunnel between two reservoirs.

  4. Performance of overlapped shield tunneling through an integrated physical model tests, numerical simulations and real-time field monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junlong Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, deformations and internal forces of an existing tunnel subjected to a closely overlapped shield tunneling are monitored and analyzed using a series of physical model experiments and numerical simulations. Effects of different excavation sequences and speeds are explicitly considered in the analysis. The results of the physical model experiments show that the bottom-up tunneling procedure is better than the top-down tunneling procedure. The incurred deformations and internal forces of the existing tunnel increase with the excavation speed and the range of influence areas also increase accordingly. For construction process control, real-time monitoring of the power tunnel is used. The monitoring processes feature full automation, adjustable frequency, real-time monitor and dynamic feedback, which are used to guide the construction to achieve micro-disturbance control. In accordance with the situation of crossing construction, a numerical study on the performance of power tunnel is carried out. Construction control measures are given for the undercrossing construction, which helps to accomplish the desired result and meet protection requirements of the existing tunnel structure. Finally, monitoring data and numerical results are compared, and the displacement and joint fracture change models in the power tunnel subject to the overlapped shield tunnel construction are analyzed. Keywords: Overlapped tunnel, Automatic monitoring, Micro-disturbance control

  5. Self-consistent modelling of resonant tunnelling structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, T.; Jauho, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    We report a comprehensive study of the effects of self-consistency on the I-V-characteristics of resonant tunnelling structures. The calculational method is based on a simultaneous solution of the effective-mass Schrödinger equation and the Poisson equation, and the current is evaluated...... applied voltages and carrier densities at the emitter-barrier interface. We include the two-dimensional accumulation layer charge and the quantum well charge in our self-consistent scheme. We discuss the evaluation of the current contribution originating from the two-dimensional accumulation layer charges......, and our qualitative estimates seem consistent with recent experimental studies. The intrinsic bistability of resonant tunnelling diodes is analyzed within several different approximation schemes....

  6. Performing wind-tunnel modeling for better management of near-field risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ju-Chrong; Weber, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    All industrial complexes must be able to demonstrate that air pollutant concentrations from normal and accidental releases are within the bounds of stringent acceptance criteria. The offsite concentrations are comparatively easy to compute with the standard Gaussian models. By contrast, the onsite (in particular, near-field) concentrations can be more complex since the wind flows can interact with various structures in complex ways to create regions of relatively high local concentrations. Three methods can be used to predict the air pollutant concentrations: (1) mathematical models, (2) field experiments, and (3) fluid models (wind-tunnel testing). The complex flow in the vicinity of buildings is not amenable to simple mathematical generalizations. Field experiments cannot encompass the wind spectrum of meteorological conditions in the time generally allotted. Wind tunnel testing works best where numerical models fail and field testing is not applicable. This paper covers the following aspects related to the wind-tunnel modeling studies: (1) planning strategies; (2) types of wind-tunnel modeling studies flow visualization and concentration measurement experiments; (3) highlights (video tape show) of the wind tunnel experiments; (4) technical challenges; and (5) various applications

  7. Modeling and Dynamic Analysis of Cutterhead Driving System in Tunnel Boring Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of cutterhead driving system (CDS of tunnel boring machine (TBM often occurs under shock and vibration conditions. To investigate the dynamic characteristics and reduce system vibration further, an electromechanical coupling model of CDS is established which includes the model of direct torque control (DTC system for three-phase asynchronous motor and purely torsional dynamic model of multistage gear transmission system. The proposed DTC model can provide driving torque just as the practical inverter motor operates so that the influence of motor operating behavior will not be erroneously estimated. Moreover, nonlinear gear meshing factors, such as time-variant mesh stiffness and transmission error, are involved in the dynamic model. Based on the established nonlinear model of CDS, vibration modes can be classified into three types, that is, rigid motion mode, rotational vibration mode, and planet vibration mode. Moreover, dynamic responses under actual driving torque and idealized equivalent torque are compared, which reveals that the ripple of actual driving torque would aggravate vibration of gear transmission system. Influence index of torque ripple is proposed to show that vibration of system increases with torque ripple. This study provides useful guideline for antivibration design and motor control of CDS in TBM.

  8. The 12-foot pressure wind tunnel restoration project model support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Glen E.

    1992-01-01

    The 12 Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel is a variable density, low turbulence wind tunnel that operates at subsonic speeds, and up to six atmospheres total pressure. The restoration of this facility is of critical importance to the future of the U.S. aerospace industry. As part of this project, several state of the art model support systems are furnished to provide an optimal balance between aerodynamic and operational efficiency parameters. Two model support systems, the Rear Strut Model Support, and the High Angle of Attack Model Support are discussed. This paper covers design parameters, constraints, development, description, and component selection.

  9. Charge transport model in nanodielectric composites based on quantum tunneling mechanism and dual-level traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guochang; Chen, George, E-mail: gc@ecs.soton.ac.uk, E-mail: sli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); School of Electronic and Computer Science, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Li, Shengtao, E-mail: gc@ecs.soton.ac.uk, E-mail: sli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-08-08

    Charge transport properties in nanodielectrics present different tendencies for different loading concentrations. The exact mechanisms that are responsible for charge transport in nanodielectrics are not detailed, especially for high loading concentration. A charge transport model in nanodielectrics has been proposed based on quantum tunneling mechanism and dual-level traps. In the model, the thermally assisted hopping (TAH) process for the shallow traps and the tunnelling process for the deep traps are considered. For different loading concentrations, the dominant charge transport mechanisms are different. The quantum tunneling mechanism plays a major role in determining the charge conduction in nanodielectrics with high loading concentrations. While for low loading concentrations, the thermal hopping mechanism will dominate the charge conduction process. The model can explain the observed conductivity property in nanodielectrics with different loading concentrations.

  10. Current-voltage relation for thin tunnel barriers: Parabolic barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim; Brandbyge, Mads

    2004-01-01

    We derive a simple analytic result for the current-voltage curve for tunneling of electrons through a thin uniform insulating layer modeled by a parabolic barrier. Our model, which goes beyond the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation, is applicable also in the limit of highly transparant...

  11. Probabilistic Seismic Performance Model for Tunnel Form Concrete Building Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bahram Beheshti Aval

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite widespread construction of mass-production houses with tunnel form structural system across the world, unfortunately no special seismic code is published for design of this type of construction. Through a literature survey, only a few studies are about the seismic behavior of this type of structural system. Thus based on reasonable numerical results, the seismic performance of structures constructed with this technique considering the effective factors on structural behavior is highly noteworthy in a seismic code development process. In addition, due to newness of this system and observed damages in past earthquakes, and especially random nature of future earthquakes, the importance of probabilistic approach and necessity of developing fragility curves in a next generation Performance Based Earthquake Engineering (PBEE frame work are important. In this study, the seismic behavior of 2, 5 and 10 story tunnel form structures with a regular plan is examined. First, the performance levels of these structures under the design earthquake (return period of 475 years with time history analysis and pushover method are assessed, and then through incremental dynamic analysis, fragility curves are extracted for different levels of damage in walls and spandrels. The results indicated that the case study structures have high capacity and strength and show appropriate seismic performance. Moreover, all three structures subjected were in immediate occupancy performance level.

  12. Development of an apparatus to measure thermophysical properties of wind tunnel heat transfer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, R. F.; Steinberg, I. H.

    1974-01-01

    The apparatus and technique for measuring the thermophysical properties of models used with the phase-change paint method for obtaining wind tunnel heat transfer data are described. The method allows rapid measurement of the combined properties in a transient manner similar to an actual wind tunnel test. An effective value of the thermophysical properties can be determined which accounts for changes in thermal properties with temperature or with depth into the model surface. The apparatus was successfully tested at various heating rates between 19,000 and 124,000 watts per square meter.

  13. Turbofan Noise Studied in Unique Model Research Program in NASA Glenn's 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive aeroacoustic research program called the Source Diagnostic Test was recently concluded in NASA Glenn Research Center's 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The testing involved representatives from Glenn, NASA Langley Research Center, GE Aircraft Engines, and the Boeing Company. The technical objectives of this research were to identify the different source mechanisms of noise in a modern, high-bypass turbofan aircraft engine through scale-model testing and to make detailed acoustic and aerodynamic measurements to more fully understand the physics of how turbofan noise is generated.

  14. The analysis of creep characteristics of the surrounding rock of the carbonaceous rock tunnel based on Singh-Mitchell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junhui; Mi, Decai; Ye, Qiongyao; Deng, Shengqiang; Zeng, Fuquan; Zeng, Yongjun

    2018-01-01

    Carbonaceous rock has the characteristics of easy disintegration, softening, swelling and environmental sensitivity, which belongs to soft surrounding rock, and the deformation during excavation and long-term stability of the surrounding rock of carbonaceous rock tunnel are common problems in the construction of carbonaceous rock tunnel. According to the above, the Monitor and measure the displacement, temperature and osmotic pressure of the surrounding carbonaceous rock of the tunnel of Guangxi Hebai highway. Then it based on the obtaining data to study the creep mechanism of surrounding rock using Singh-Mitchell model and predict the deformation of surrounding rock before the tunnel is operation. The results show that the Singh-Mitchell creep model can effectively analyse and predict the deformation development law of surrounding rock of tunnel without considering temperature and osmotic pressure, it can provide reference for the construction of carbonaceous rock tunnel and the measures to prevent and reinforce it..

  15. A 3D finite element simulation model for TBM tunnelling in soft ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Thomas; Meschke, Günther

    2004-12-01

    A three-dimensional finite element simulation model for shield-driven tunnel excavation is presented. The model takes into account all relevant components of the construction process (the soil and the ground water, the tunnel boring machine with frictional contact to the soil, the hydraulic jacks, the tunnel lining and the tail void grouting). The paper gives a detailed description of the model components and the stepwise procedure to simulate the construction process. The soil and the grout material are modelled as saturated porous media using a two-field finite element formulation. This allows to take into account the groundwater, the grouting pressure and the fluid interaction between the soil and slurry at the cutting face and between the soil and grout around the tail void. A Cam-Clay plasticity model is used to describe the material behaviour of cohesive soils. The cementitious grouting material in the tail void is modelled as an ageing elastic material with time-dependent stiffness and permeability. To allow for an automated computation of arbitrarily long and also curvilinear driving paths with suitable finite element meshes, the simulation procedure has been fully automated. The simulation of a tunnel advance in soft cohesive soil below the ground water table is presented and the results are compared with measurements taken from the literature. Copyright

  16. System Dynamic Analysis of a Wind Tunnel Model with Applications to Improve Aerodynamic Data Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehrle, Ralph David

    1997-01-01

    The research investigates the effect of wind tunnel model system dynamics on measured aerodynamic data. During wind tunnel tests designed to obtain lift and drag data, the required aerodynamic measurements are the steady-state balance forces and moments, pressures, and model attitude. However, the wind tunnel model system can be subjected to unsteady aerodynamic and inertial loads which result in oscillatory translations and angular rotations. The steady-state force balance and inertial model attitude measurements are obtained by filtering and averaging data taken during conditions of high model vibrations. The main goals of this research are to characterize the effects of model system dynamics on the measured steady-state aerodynamic data and develop a correction technique to compensate for dynamically induced errors. Equations of motion are formulated for the dynamic response of the model system subjected to arbitrary aerodynamic and inertial inputs. The resulting modal model is examined to study the effects of the model system dynamic response on the aerodynamic data. In particular, the equations of motion are used to describe the effect of dynamics on the inertial model attitude, or angle of attack, measurement system that is used routinely at the NASA Langley Research Center and other wind tunnel facilities throughout the world. This activity was prompted by the inertial model attitude sensor response observed during high levels of model vibration while testing in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The inertial attitude sensor cannot distinguish between the gravitational acceleration and centrifugal accelerations associated with wind tunnel model system vibration, which results in a model attitude measurement bias error. Bias errors over an order of magnitude greater than the required device accuracy were found in the inertial model attitude measurements during dynamic testing of two model systems. Based on a theoretical modal

  17. Fluorescence Imaging and Streamline Visualization of Hypersonic Flow over Rapid Prototype Wind-Tunnel Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Berger, Karen T.; Buck, Gregory M.; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Reentry models for use in hypersonic wind tunnel tests were fabricated using a stereolithography apparatus. These models were produced in one day or less, which is a significant time savings compared to the manufacture of ceramic or metal models. The models were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel. Only a few of the models survived repeated tests in the tunnel, and several failure modes of the models were identified. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of nitric oxide (NO) was used to visualize the flowfields in the wakes of these models. Pure NO was either seeded through tubes plumbed into the model or via a tube attached to the strut holding the model, which provided localized addition of NO into the model s wake through a porous metal cylinder attached to the end of the tube. Models included several 2- inch diameter Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) models and 5-inch diameter Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) models. Various model configurations and NO seeding methods were used, including a new streamwise visualization method based on PLIF. Virtual Diagnostics Interface (ViDI) technology, developed at NASA Langley Research Center, was used to visualize the data sets in post processing. The use of calibration "dotcards" was investigated to correct for camera perspective and lens distortions in the PLIF images.

  18. Spin-polarized tunneling with GaAs tips in scanning tunneling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.W.J.; Jansen, R.; Kempen, van H.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a model as well as experiments on spin-polarized tunneling with the aid of optical spin orientation. This involves tunnel junctions between a magnetic material and gallium arsenide (GaAs), where the latter is optically excited with circularly polarized light in order to generate

  19. Attachments for fire modeling for Building 221-T, T Plant canyon deck and railroad tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oar, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this attachment is to provide historical information and documentation for Document No. WHC-SD-CP-ANAL-008 Rev 0, ''Fire Modeling for Building 221-T--T Plant Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel'', dated September 29, 1994. This data compilation contains the following: Resumes of the Technical Director, Senior Engineer and Junior Engineer; Review and Comment Record; Software Files; CFAST Input and Output Files; Calculation Control Sheets; and Estimating Sprinkler Actuation Time in the Canyon and Railroad Tunnel. The T Plant was originally a fuel reprocessing facility. It was modified later to decontaminate and repair PuRex process equipment

  20. Application of fire and evacuation models in evaluation of fire safety in railway tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cábová, Kamila; Apeltauer, Tomáš; Okřinová, Petra; Wald, František

    2017-09-01

    The paper describes an application of numerical simulation of fire dynamics and evacuation of people in a tunnel. The software tool Fire Dynamics Simulator is used to simulate temperature resolution and development of smoke in a railway tunnel. Comparing to temperature curves which are usually used in the design stage results of the model show that the numerical model gives lower temperature of hot smoke layer. Outputs of the numerical simulation of fire also enable to improve models of evacuation of people during fires in tunnels. In the presented study the calculated high of smoke layer in the tunnel is in 10 min after the fire ignition lower than the level of 2.2 m which is considered as the maximal limit for safe evacuation. Simulation of the evacuation process in bigger scale together with fire dynamics can provide very valuable information about important security conditions like Available Safe Evacuation Time (ASET) vs Required Safe Evacuation Time (RSET). On given example in software EXODUS the paper summarizes selected results of evacuation model which should be in mind of a designer when preparing an evacuation plan.

  1. A reduced theoretical model for estimating condensation effects in combustion-heated hypersonic tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Luo, X.; Qin, F.; Yang, J.

    2018-03-01

    As one of the combustion products of hydrocarbon fuels in a combustion-heated wind tunnel, water vapor may condense during the rapid expansion process, which will lead to a complex two-phase flow inside the wind tunnel and even change the design flow conditions at the nozzle exit. The coupling of the phase transition and the compressible flow makes the estimation of the condensation effects in such wind tunnels very difficult and time-consuming. In this work, a reduced theoretical model is developed to approximately compute the nozzle-exit conditions of a flow including real-gas and homogeneous condensation effects. Specifically, the conservation equations of the axisymmetric flow are first approximated in the quasi-one-dimensional way. Then, the complex process is split into two steps, i.e., a real-gas nozzle flow but excluding condensation, resulting in supersaturated nozzle-exit conditions, and a discontinuous jump at the end of the nozzle from the supersaturated state to a saturated state. Compared with two-dimensional numerical simulations implemented with a detailed condensation model, the reduced model predicts the flow parameters with good accuracy except for some deviations caused by the two-dimensional effect. Therefore, this reduced theoretical model can provide a fast, simple but also accurate estimation of the condensation effect in combustion-heated hypersonic tunnels.

  2. Reducing the computational requirements for simulating tunnel fires by combining multiscale modelling and multiple processor calculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermesi, Izabella; Rein, Guillermo; Colella, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Multiscale modelling of tunnel fires that uses a coupled 3D (fire area) and 1D (the rest of the tunnel) model is seen as the solution to the numerical problem of the large domains associated with long tunnels. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of the implementation of this method...... in FDS version 6.0, a widely used fire-specific, open source CFD software. Furthermore, it compares the reduction in simulation time given by multiscale modelling with the one given by the use of multiple processor calculation. This was done using a 1200m long tunnel with a rectangular cross......-section as a demonstration case. The multiscale implementation consisted of placing a 30MW fire in the centre of a 400m long 3D domain, along with two 400m long 1D ducts on each side of it, that were again bounded by two nodes each. A fixed volume flow was defined in the upstream duct and the two models were coupled...

  3. Modeling cooking of chicken meat in industrial tunnel ovens with the Flory-Rehner theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a numerical model describing the heat and mass transport during the cooking of chicken meat in industrial tunnels. The mass transport is driven by gradients in the swelling pressure, which is described by the Flory-Rehner theory, which relates to the water holding capacity

  4. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects

  5. Wind-tunnel investigation of the thrust augmentor performance of a large-scale swept wing model. [in the Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, D. G.; Falarski, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    Tests were made in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel to determine the forward speed effects on wing-mounted thrust augmentors. The large-scale model was powered by the compressor output of J-85 driven viper compressors. The flap settings used were 15 deg and 30 deg with 0 deg, 15 deg, and 30 deg aileron settings. The maximum duct pressure, and wind tunnel dynamic pressure were 66 cmHg (26 in Hg) and 1190 N/sq m (25 lb/sq ft), respectively. All tests were made at zero sideslip. Test results are presented without analysis.

  6. Comparison of band-to-band tunneling models in Si and Si—Ge junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Yipeng; Wang Taihuan; Wei Kangliang; Du Gang; Liu Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    We compared several different band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) models with both Sentaurus and the two-dimensional full-band Monte Carlo simulator in Si homo-junctions and Si—Ge hetero-junctions. It was shown that in Si homo-junctions, different models could achieve similar results. However, in the Si—Ge hetero-junctions, there were significant differences among these models at high reverse biases (over 2 V). Compared to the nonlocal model, the local models in Sentaurus underrated the BTBT rate distinctly, and the Monte Carlo method was shown to give a better approximation. Additionally, it was found that in the Si region near the interface of the Si—Ge hetero-junctions, the direct tunneling rates increased largely due to the interaction of the band structures of Si and Ge. (semiconductor physics)

  7. Finite element implementation of strain-hardening Drucker–Prager plasticity model with application to tunnel excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a finite element implementation of a strain-hardening Drucker–Prager model and its application to tunnel excavation. The computational model was constructed based on the return mapping scheme, in which an elastic trial step was first executed, followed by plastic correction involving the Newton–Raphson method to return the predicted state of stresses to the supposed yield surface. By combining the plastic shear hardening rule and stress correction equations, the loading index for the strain-hardening Drucker–Prager model was solved. It is therefore possible to update the stresses, elastic and plastic strains, and slope of the yield locus at the end of each incremental step. As an illustrative example, an integration algorithm was incorporated into ABAQUS through the user subroutine UMAT to solve the tunnel excavation problem in strain-hardening Drucker–Prager rock formations. The obtained numerical results were found to be in excellent agreement with the available analytical solutions, thus indicating the validity and accuracy of the proposed UMAT code, as well as the finite element model.

  8. On the flow of groundwater in closed tunnels. Generic hydrogeological modelling of nuclear waste repository, SFL 3-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmen, J.G.

    1997-06-01

    The purpose is to study the flow of groundwater in closed tunnels by use of mathematical models. The calculations were based on three dimensional models, presuming steady state conditions. The stochastic continuum approach was used for representation of a heterogeneous rock mass. The size of the calculated flow is given as a multiple of an unknown regional groundwater flow. The size of the flow in a tunnel has been studied, as regards: Direction of the regional groundwater flow, Tunnel length, width and conductivity; Heterogeneity of the surrounding rock mass; Flow barriers and encapsulation inside a tunnel. The study includes a model of the planned repository for nuclear waste (SFL 3-5). The flow through the tunnels is estimated for different scenarios. The stochastic continuum approach has been investigated, as regards the representation of a scale dependent heterogeneous conductivity. An analytical method is proposed for the scaling of measured conductivity values, the method is consistent with the stochastic continuum approach. Some general conclusions from the work are: The larger the amount of heterogeneity, the larger the expected flow; The effects of the heterogeneity will decrease with increased tunnel length; If the conductivity of the tunnel is smaller than a threshold value, the tunnel conductivity is the most important parameter; If the tunnel conductivity is large and the tunnel is long, the most important parameter is the direction of the regional flow; Given a heterogeneous rock mass, if the tunnel length is shorter than about 500 m, the heterogeneity will be an important parameter, for lengths shorter than about 250 m, probably the most important; The flow through an encapsulation surrounded by a flow barrier is mainly dependent on the conductivity of the barrier. 70 refs, 110 figs, 10 tabs

  9. On the flow of groundwater in closed tunnels. Generic hydrogeological modelling of nuclear waste repository, SFL 3-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmen, J.G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Inst. of Earth Sciences]|[Golder Associates AB (Sweden)

    1997-06-01

    The purpose is to study the flow of groundwater in closed tunnels by use of mathematical models. The calculations were based on three dimensional models, presuming steady state conditions. The stochastic continuum approach was used for representation of a heterogeneous rock mass. The size of the calculated flow is given as a multiple of an unknown regional groundwater flow. The size of the flow in a tunnel has been studied, as regards: Direction of the regional groundwater flow, Tunnel length, width and conductivity; Heterogeneity of the surrounding rock mass; Flow barriers and encapsulation inside a tunnel. The study includes a model of the planned repository for nuclear waste (SFL 3-5). The flow through the tunnels is estimated for different scenarios. The stochastic continuum approach has been investigated, as regards the representation of a scale dependent heterogeneous conductivity. An analytical method is proposed for the scaling of measured conductivity values, the method is consistent with the stochastic continuum approach. Some general conclusions from the work are: The larger the amount of heterogeneity, the larger the expected flow; The effects of the heterogeneity will decrease with increased tunnel length; If the conductivity of the tunnel is smaller than a threshold value, the tunnel conductivity is the most important parameter; If the tunnel conductivity is large and the tunnel is long, the most important parameter is the direction of the regional flow; Given a heterogeneous rock mass, if the tunnel length is shorter than about 500 m, the heterogeneity will be an important parameter, for lengths shorter than about 250 m, probably the most important; The flow through an encapsulation surrounded by a flow barrier is mainly dependent on the conductivity of the barrier. 70 refs, 110 figs, 10 tabs.

  10. A New Global Regression Analysis Method for the Prediction of Wind Tunnel Model Weight Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Norbert Manfred; Bridge, Thomas M.; Amaya, Max A.

    2014-01-01

    A new global regression analysis method is discussed that predicts wind tunnel model weight corrections for strain-gage balance loads during a wind tunnel test. The method determines corrections by combining "wind-on" model attitude measurements with least squares estimates of the model weight and center of gravity coordinates that are obtained from "wind-off" data points. The method treats the least squares fit of the model weight separate from the fit of the center of gravity coordinates. Therefore, it performs two fits of "wind- off" data points and uses the least squares estimator of the model weight as an input for the fit of the center of gravity coordinates. Explicit equations for the least squares estimators of the weight and center of gravity coordinates are derived that simplify the implementation of the method in the data system software of a wind tunnel. In addition, recommendations for sets of "wind-off" data points are made that take typical model support system constraints into account. Explicit equations of the confidence intervals on the model weight and center of gravity coordinates and two different error analyses of the model weight prediction are also discussed in the appendices of the paper.

  11. Tunneling dynamics in open ultracold bosonic systems. Numerically exact dynamics - Analytical models - Control schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lode, Axel U.J.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores the quantum many-body tunneling dynamics of open ultracold bosonic systems with the recently developed multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree for bosons (MCTDHB) method. The capabilities of MCTDHB to provide solutions to the full time-dependent many-body problem are assessed in a benchmark using the analytically solvable harmonic interaction Hamiltonian and a generalization of it with time-dependent both one- and two-body potentials. In a comparison with numerically exact MCTDHB results, it is shown that e.g. lattice methods fail qualitatively to describe the tunneling dynamics. A model assembling the many-body physics of the process from basic simultaneously happening single-particle processes is derived and verified with a numerically exact MCTDHB description. The generality of the model is demonstrated even for strong interactions and large particle numbers. The ejection of the bosons from the source occurs with characteristic velocities. These velocities are defined by the chemical potentials of systems with different particle numbers which are converted to kinetic energy. The tunneling process is accompanied by fragmentation: the ejected bosons lose their coherence with the source and among each other. It is shown that the various aspects of the tunneling dynamics' can be controlled well with the interaction and the potential threshold.

  12. Tunneling dynamics in open ultracold bosonic systems. Numerically exact dynamics - Analytical models - Control schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lode, Axel U.J.

    2013-06-03

    This thesis explores the quantum many-body tunneling dynamics of open ultracold bosonic systems with the recently developed multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree for bosons (MCTDHB) method. The capabilities of MCTDHB to provide solutions to the full time-dependent many-body problem are assessed in a benchmark using the analytically solvable harmonic interaction Hamiltonian and a generalization of it with time-dependent both one- and two-body potentials. In a comparison with numerically exact MCTDHB results, it is shown that e.g. lattice methods fail qualitatively to describe the tunneling dynamics. A model assembling the many-body physics of the process from basic simultaneously happening single-particle processes is derived and verified with a numerically exact MCTDHB description. The generality of the model is demonstrated even for strong interactions and large particle numbers. The ejection of the bosons from the source occurs with characteristic velocities. These velocities are defined by the chemical potentials of systems with different particle numbers which are converted to kinetic energy. The tunneling process is accompanied by fragmentation: the ejected bosons lose their coherence with the source and among each other. It is shown that the various aspects of the tunneling dynamics' can be controlled well with the interaction and the potential threshold.

  13. Wind tunnel tests on a one-foot diameter SR-7L propfan model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabri, Abdullah S.

    1987-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests have been conducted on a one-foot diameter model of the SR-7L propfan in the Langley 16-Foot and 4 x 7 Meter Wind Tunnels as part of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) Program. The model propfan was sized to be used on a 1/9-scale model of the PTA testbed aircraft. The model propeller was tested in isolation and wing-mounted on the aircraft configuration at various Mach numbers and blade pitch angles. Agreement between data obtained from these tests and data from Hamilton Standard validate that the 1/9-scale propeller accurately simulates the aerodynamics of the SR-7L propfan. Predictions from an analytical computer program are presented and show good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. A Wind Tunnel Model to Explore Unsteady Circulation Control for General Aviation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, Christopher M.; Jones, Gregory S.

    2002-01-01

    Circulation Control airfoils have been demonstrated to provide substantial improvements in lift over conventional airfoils. The General Aviation Circular Control model is an attempt to address some of the concerns of this technique. The primary focus is to substantially reduce the amount of air mass flow by implementing unsteady flow. This paper describes a wind tunnel model that implements unsteady circulation control by pulsing internal pneumatic valves and details some preliminary results from the first test entry.

  15. Neural network modeling of air pollution in tunnels according to indirect measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaverzneva, T; Lazovskaya, T; Tarkhov, D; Vasilyev, A

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the problem of providing the necessary parameters of air of the working area in dead-end tunnels in the case of ventilation systems powered off. An ill-posed initialboundary problem for the diffusion equation is used as a mathematical model for a description and analysis of mass transfer processes in the tunnel. The neural network approach is applied to construct an approximate solution (regularization) of the identification problem in the case of the approximate measurement data and the set of interval parameters of the modeled system. Two types of model measurements included binary data are considered. The direct problem solution and the inverse problem regularization for the offered neural network approach are constructed uniformly. (paper)

  16. Automated As-Built Model Generation of Subway Tunnels from Mobile LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Arastounia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes fully-automated methods for as-built model generation of subway tunnels employing mobile Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR data. The employed dataset is acquired by a Velodyne HDL 32E and covers 155 m of a subway tunnel containing six million points. First, the tunnel’s main axis and cross sections are extracted. Next, a preliminary model is created by fitting an ellipse to each extracted cross section. The model is refined by employing residual analysis and Baarda’s data snooping method to eliminate outliers. The final model is then generated by applying least squares adjustment to outlier-free data. The obtained results indicate that the tunnel’s main axis and 1551 cross sections at 0.1 m intervals are successfully extracted. Cross sections have an average semi-major axis of 7.8508 m with a standard deviation of 0.2 mm and semi-minor axis of 7.7509 m with a standard deviation of 0.1 mm. The average normal distance of points from the constructed model (average absolute error is also 0.012 m. The developed algorithm is applicable to tunnels with any horizontal orientation and degree of curvature since it makes no assumptions, nor does it use any a priori knowledge regarding the tunnel’s curvature and horizontal orientation.

  17. Modeling of damage, permeability changes and pressure responses during excavation of the TSX tunnel in granitic rock at URL, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Börgesson, Lennart; Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Hernelind, Jan; Jing, Lanru; Kobayashi, Akira; Nguyen, Son

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents numerical modeling of excavation-induced damage, permeability changes, and fluid-pressure responses during excavation of a test tunnel associated with the tunnel sealing experiment (TSX) at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in Canada. Four different numerical models were applied using a wide range of approaches to model damage and permeability changes in the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around the tunnel. Using in situ calibration of model parameters, the modeling could reproduce observed spatial distribution of damage and permeability changes around the tunnel as a combination of disturbance induced by stress redistribution around the tunnel and by the drill-and-blast operation. The modeling showed that stress-induced permeability increase above the tunnel is a result of micro and macrofracturing under high deviatoric (shear) stress, whereas permeability increase alongside the tunnel is a result of opening of existing microfractures under decreased mean stress. The remaining observed fracturing and permeability changes around the periphery of the tunnel were attributed to damage from the drill-and-blast operation. Moreover, a reasonably good agreement was achieved between simulated and observed excavation-induced pressure responses around the TSX tunnel for 1 year following its excavation. The simulations showed that these pressure responses are caused by poroelastic effects as a result of increasing or decreasing mean stress, with corresponding contraction or expansion of the pore volume. The simulation results for pressure evolution were consistent with previous studies, indicating that the observed pressure responses could be captured in a Biot model using a relatively low Biot-Willis’ coefficient, α ≈ 0.2, a porosity of n ≈ 0.007, and a relatively low permeability of k ≈ 2 × 10-22 m2, which is consistent with the very tight, unfractured granite at the site.

  18. Noise model for serrated trailing edges compared to wind tunnel measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas; Bertagnolio, Franck; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    A new CFD RANS based method to predict the far field sound pressure emitted from an aerofoil with serrated trailing edge has been developed. The model was validated by comparison to measurements conducted in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel. The model predicted 3 dB lower sound pressure...... levels, but the tendencies for the different configurations were predicted correctly. Therefore the model can be used to optimise the serration geometry. A disadvantage of the new model is that the computational costs are significantly higher than for the Amiet model for a straight trailing edge. However...

  19. Tunneling current between graphene layers

    OpenAIRE

    Poklonski, Nikolai A.; Siahlo, Andrei I.; Vyrko, Sergey A.; Popov, Andrey M.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2013-01-01

    The physical model that allows to calculate the values of the tunneling current be-tween graphene layers is proposed. The tunneling current according to the pro-posed model is proportional to the area of tunneling transition. The calculated value of tunneling conductivity is in qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  20. Hybrid Wing Body Model Identification Using Forced-Oscillation Water Tunnel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Vicroy, Dan D.; Kramer, Brian; Kerho, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Static and dynamic testing of the NASA 0.7 percent scale Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) configuration was conducted in the Rolling Hills Research Corporation water tunnel to investigate aerodynamic behavior over a large range of angle-of-attack and to develop models that can predict aircraft response in nonlinear unsteady flight regimes. This paper reports primarily on the longitudinal axis results. Flow visualization tests were also performed. These tests provide additional static data and new dynamic data that complement tests conducted at NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. HWB was developed to support the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project goals of lower noise, emissions, and fuel burn. This study also supports the NASA Aviation Safety Program efforts to model and control advanced transport configurations in loss-of-control conditions.

  1. Experiences with a high-blockage model tested in the NASA Ames 12-foot pressure wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coder, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Representation of the flow around full-scale ships was sought in the subsonic wind tunnels in order to a Hain Reynolds numbers as high as possible. As part of the quest to attain the largest possible Reynolds number, large models with high blockage are used which result in significant wall interference effects. Some experiences with such a high blockage model tested in the NASA Ames 12-foot pressure wind tunnel are summarized. The main results of the experiment relating to wind tunnel wall interference effects are also presented.

  2. Airflow over Barchan dunes: field measurements, mathematical modelling and wind tunnel testing

    OpenAIRE

    Wiggs, G. F. S.

    1992-01-01

    There are few empirical measurements of velocity, shear velocity, sand transport, morphological change on the windward slopes of dunes.This thesis compares field measurements on a barchan dune in Oman with calculations using a mathematical model (FLOWSTAR) and measurements in a wind tunnel. All three techniques demonstrate similar patterns of velocity, confirming the acceleration of flow up the windward slope, deceleration between the crest and brink and significant flow decele...

  3. Two-dimensional analytical model for dual-material control-gate tunnel FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui Fang; Dai, Yue Hua; Gui Guan, Bang; Zhang, Yong Feng

    2016-09-01

    An analytical model for a dual-material control-gate (DMCG) tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) is presented for the first time in this paper, and the influence of the mobile charges on the potential profile is taken into account. On the basis of the potential profile, the lateral electric field is derived and the expression for the drain current is obtained by integrating the band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) generation rate applicable to low-bandgap and high-bandgap materials over the tunneling region. The model also predicts the impacts of the control-gate work function on the potential and drain current. The advantage of this work is that it not only offers physical insight into device physics but also provides the basic designing guideline for DMCG TFETs, enabling the designer to optimize the device in terms of the on-state current, the on-off current ratio, and suppressed ambipolar behavior. Very good agreements for both the potential and drain current are observed between the model calculations and the simulated results.

  4. Advancing Control for Shield Tunneling Machine by Backstepping Design with LuGre Friction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shield tunneling machine is widely applied for underground tunnel construction. The shield machine is a complex machine with large momentum and ultralow advancing speed. The working condition underground is rather complicated and unpredictable, and brings big trouble in controlling the advancing speed. This paper focused on the advancing motion control on desired tunnel axis. A three-state dynamic model was established with considering unknown front face earth pressure force and unknown friction force. LuGre friction model was introduced to describe the friction force. Backstepping design was then proposed to make tracking error converge to zero. To have a comparison study, controller without LuGre model was designed. Tracking simulations of speed regulations and simulations when front face earth pressure changed were carried out to show the transient performances of the proposed controller. The results indicated that the controller had good tracking performance even under changing geological conditions. Experiments of speed regulations were carried out to have validations of the controllers.

  5. Analytical modeling of Schottky tunneling source impact ionization MOSFET with reduced breakdown voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Singh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated a novel Schottky tunneling source impact ionization MOSFET (STS-IMOS to lower the breakdown voltage of conventional impact ionization MOS (IMOS and developed an analytical model for the same. In STS-IMOS there is an accumulative effect of both impact ionization and source induced barrier tunneling. The silicide source offers very low parasitic resistance, the outcome of which is an increment in voltage drop across the intrinsic region for the same applied bias. This reduces operating voltage and hence, it exhibits a significant reduction in both breakdown and threshold voltage. STS-IMOS shows high immunity against hot electron damage. As a result of this the device reliability increases magnificently. The analytical model for impact ionization current (Iii is developed based on the integration of ionization integral (M. Similarly, to get Schottky tunneling current (ITun expression, Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB approximation is employed. Analytical models for threshold voltage and subthreshold slope is optimized against Schottky barrier height (ϕB variation. The expression for the drain current is computed as a function of gate-to-drain bias via integral expression. It is validated by comparing it with the technology computer-aided design (TCAD simulation results as well. In essence, this analytical framework provides the physical background for better understanding of STS-IMOS and its performance estimation.

  6. Design model for bending vibrations of single-stage tunnel fan rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasyuk, AM; Kosykh, PV

    2018-03-01

    Using of one-mass model of tunnel fan rotor is justified for estimation calculation of the natural bending vibrations frequency during the design stage. It’s shown that the evaluative computation of the main axial tunnel fan at the early design stage yields the acceptable accuracy. It is shown that after completion of the design, the mass of the stepped-type shaft differs from the mass of the calculated uniform-diameter shaft no more than by 40%. Inclusion of this additional mass in the estimation calculation makes it possible to improve the calculation accuracy. The region of the dimensionless rotor design parameters at which the relative difference of frequency in the evaluative and verification calculations is not higher than 5 % is determined.

  7. A Temporal Millimeter Wave Propagation Model for Tunnels Using Ray Frustum Techniques and FFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choonghyen Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A temporal millimeter wave propagation model for tunnels is presented using ray frustum techniques and fast Fourier transform (FFT. To directly estimate or simulate effects of millimeter wave channel properties on the performance of communication services, time domain impulse responses of demodulated signals should be obtained, which needs rather large computation time. To mitigate the computational burden, ray frustum techniques are used to obtain frequency domain transfer function of millimeter wave propagation environment and FFT of equivalent low pass signals are used to retrieve demodulated waveforms. This approach is numerically efficient and helps to directly estimate impact of tunnel structures and surfaces roughness on the performance of millimeter wave communication services.

  8. An analysis model of the secondary tunnel lining considering ground-primary support-secondary lining interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seong-Ho; Chang, Seok-Bue [Yooshin Engineering Corporation, Seoul(Korea); Lee, Sang-Duk [Ajou University, Suwon(Korea)

    2002-06-30

    It is the common practice to over design the reinforcement for the secondary tunnel lining due to the lack of rational insight into the ground loosening loads, and due to the conservative application of the empirical design methods. The main loads of the secondary lining are the ground loosening loads and the ground water pressure, and the ground load is critical in the reinforcement design of the secondary lining in the case of drained tunnel. If the external load is absent around a tunnel. the reasons of the load for secondary tunnel lining are the deterioration of the primary supports such as shotcrete, steel rib, and rock bolts. Accordingly, the analysis method considering the ground-primary supports-secondary lining interaction should be required for the rational design of the secondary tunnel lining. In this paper, the interaction was conceptually described by the simple mass-spring model and the load transfer from the ground and primary supports to the secondary lining is showed by the ground-primary supports-secondary lining reaction curves for the theoretical solution of a circular tunnel, And also, the application of this proposed model to numerical analysis is verified in order to check the potential for the tunnel with the complex analysis conditions. (author). 8 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  9. Two-dimensional computational modeling of high-speed transient flow in gun tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, A. M.; Yusoff, M. Z.; Hasini, H.; Al-Falahi, A.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, an axisymmetric numerical model was developed to investigate the transient flow inside a 7-meter-long free piston gun tunnel. The numerical solution of the gun tunnel was carried out using the commercial solver Fluent. The governing equations of mass, momentum, and energy were discretized using the finite volume method. The dynamic zone of the piston was modeled as a rigid body, and its motion was coupled with the hydrodynamic forces from the flow solution based on the six-degree-of-freedom solver. A comparison of the numerical data with the theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of a ground-based gun tunnel facility showed good agreement. The effects of parameters such as working gases and initial pressure ratio on the test conditions in the facility were examined. The pressure ratio ranged from 10 to 50, and gas combinations of air-air, helium-air, air-nitrogen, and air-CO2 were used. The results showed that steady nozzle reservoir conditions can be maintained for a longer duration when the initial conditions across the diaphragm are adjusted. It was also found that the gas combination of helium-air yielded the highest shock wave strength and speed, but a longer test time was achieved in the test section when using the CO2 test gas.

  10. Transport spectroscopy and modeling of a clean MOS point contact tunnel barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhorshidian, Amir; Bishop, Nathaniel; Dominguez, Jason; Grubbs, Robert; Wendt, Joel; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2014-03-01

    We present transport spectroscopy of non-implanted and antimony-implanted tunnel barriers formed in MOS split-gate structures at 4K. The non-implanted barrier shows no signs of resonant behavior while the Sb-implanted barrier shows resonances superimposed on the clean transport. We simulate the transmission through the clean barrier over the entire gate and bias range of the experiment using a phenomenological 1D-tunneling model that includes Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and Schottky barrier lowering to capture effects at high bias. The model is qualitatively similar to experiment when the barrier height has a quadratic dependence in contrast to a linear one, which can be a sign of 2D effects such as confinement perpendicular to the transport direction. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. This work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Simulating flow around scaled model of a hypersonic vehicle in wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, T. V.; Aksenov, A. A.; Zhluktov, S. V.; Savitsky, D. V.; Gavrilov, A. D.; Son, E. E.; Prokhorov, A. N.

    2016-11-01

    A prospective hypersonic HEXAFLY aircraft is considered in the given paper. In order to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of a new construction design of the aircraft, experiments with a scaled model have been carried out in a wind tunnel under different conditions. The runs have been performed at different angles of attack with and without hydrogen combustion in the scaled propulsion engine. However, the measured physical quantities do not provide all the information about the flowfield. Numerical simulation can complete the experimental data as well as to reduce the number of wind tunnel experiments. Besides that, reliable CFD software can be used for calculations of the aerodynamic characteristics for any possible design of the full-scale aircraft under different operation conditions. The reliability of the numerical predictions must be confirmed in verification study of the software. The given work is aimed at numerical investigation of the flowfield around and inside the scaled model of the HEXAFLY-CIAM module under wind tunnel conditions. A cold run (without combustion) was selected for this study. The calculations are performed in the FlowVision CFD software. The flow characteristics are compared against the available experimental data. The carried out verification study confirms the capability of the FlowVision CFD software to calculate the flows discussed.

  12. Tunneling of electrons via rotor–stator molecular interfaces: Combined ab initio and model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petreska, Irina, E-mail: irina.petreska@pmf.ukim.mk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, PO Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Ohanesjan, Vladimir [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, PO Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Pejov, Ljupčo [Institute of Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Arhimedova 5, P.O. Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Kocarev, Ljupčo [Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Krste Misirkov 2, PO Box 428, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2016-07-01

    Tunneling of electrons through rotor–stator anthracene aldehyde molecular interfaces is studied with a combined ab initio and model approach. Molecular electronic structure calculated from first principles is utilized to model different shapes of tunneling barriers. Together with a rectangular barrier, we also consider a sinusoidal shape that captures the effects of the molecular internal structure more realistically. Quasiclassical approach with the Simmons’ formula for current density is implemented. Special attention is paid on conformational dependence of the tunneling current. Our results confirm that the presence of the side aldehyde group enhances the interesting electronic properties of the pure anthracene molecule, making it a bistable system with geometry dependent transport properties. We also investigate the transition voltage and we show that conformation-dependent field emission could be observed in these molecular interfaces at realistically low voltages. The present study accompanies our previous work where we investigated the coherent transport via strongly coupled delocalized orbital by application of Non-equilibrium Green’s Function Formalism.

  13. Theoretical evaluation of maximum electric field approximation of direct band-to-band tunneling Kane model for low bandgap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang Chien, Nguyen; Shih, Chun-Hsing; Hoa, Phu Chi; Minh, Nguyen Hong; Thi Thanh Hien, Duong; Nhung, Le Hong

    2016-06-01

    The two-band Kane model has been popularly used to calculate the band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) current in tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) which is currently considered as a promising candidate for low power applications. This study theoretically clarifies the maximum electric field approximation (MEFA) of direct BTBT Kane model and evaluates its appropriateness for low bandgap semiconductors. By analysing the physical origin of each electric field term in the Kane model, it has been elucidated in the MEFA that the local electric field term must be remained while the nonlocal electric field terms are assigned by the maximum value of electric field at the tunnel junction. Mathematical investigations have showed that the MEFA is more appropriate for low bandgap semiconductors compared to high bandgap materials because of enhanced tunneling probability in low field regions. The appropriateness of the MEFA is very useful for practical uses in quickly estimating the direct BTBT current in low bandgap TFET devices.

  14. Multichannel model of magneto tunneling in disordered electron nanodevices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, M.; Dominguez-Adame, F.; Diez, E.

    2005-01-01

    We present a multichannel model of magnetotunneling transport in unintentionally disordered double-barrier GaAs-Al x Ga 1-x As heterostructures. The source of disorder comes from interface roughness at the heterojunctions. Disorder break translational symmetry along the lateral direction and therefore electrons can be scattered off the growth direction. The model correctly describes channel mixing due to these elastic scattering events. The magnetic field applied to the double-barrier heterostructure splits the resonant level into a set of equally-spaced resonances, the level spacing increasing with the magnetic field. We discuss the influence of the various parameters (epilayer widths and magnitude or disorder) on the lineshape of the resonant levels

  15. Modelling of the tunnelling effect in granulated metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istratov, A. V.; Kucherik, A. O.

    2018-01-01

    Obtaining thin films of today is unthinkable without use of mathematical modeling, numerical methods and complex programs. In this regard, the practical importance of this calculations is that it can be used to investigate the conductivity of nano-sized granular structures that expands the diagnostic capabilities of thin films, opens up new perspectives in the creation of new devices based on thin-film technology, allow to predict their properties.

  16. Ergodicity-breaking bifurcations and tunneling in hyperbolic transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giona, M.; Brasiello, A.; Crescitelli, S.

    2015-11-01

    One of the main differences between parabolic transport, associated with Langevin equations driven by Wiener processes, and hyperbolic models related to generalized Kac equations driven by Poisson processes, is the occurrence in the latter of multiple stable invariant densities (Frobenius multiplicity) in certain regions of the parameter space. This phenomenon is associated with the occurrence in linear hyperbolic balance equations of a typical bifurcation, referred to as the ergodicity-breaking bifurcation, the properties of which are thoroughly analyzed.

  17. Spin-dependent transport in metal/semiconductor tunnel junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.W.J.; Kempen, van H.; Leuken, Van H.; Groot, de R.A.; Roy, van W.; De Boeck, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a model as well as experiments on spin-polarized tunnelling with the aid of optical spin orientation. This involves tunnel junctions between a magnetic material and gallium arsenide (GaAs), where the latter is optically excited with circularly polarized light in order to

  18. New methodologies for calculation of flight parameters on reduced scale wings models in wind tunnel =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mosbah, Abdallah

    In order to improve the qualities of wind tunnel tests, and the tools used to perform aerodynamic tests on aircraft wings in the wind tunnel, new methodologies were developed and tested on rigid and flexible wings models. A flexible wing concept is consists in replacing a portion (lower and/or upper) of the skin with another flexible portion whose shape can be changed using an actuation system installed inside of the wing. The main purpose of this concept is to improve the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft, and especially to reduce the fuel consumption of the airplane. Numerical and experimental analyses were conducted to develop and test the methodologies proposed in this thesis. To control the flow inside the test sections of the Price-Paidoussis wind tunnel of LARCASE, numerical and experimental analyses were performed. Computational fluid dynamics calculations have been made in order to obtain a database used to develop a new hybrid methodology for wind tunnel calibration. This approach allows controlling the flow in the test section of the Price-Paidoussis wind tunnel. For the fast determination of aerodynamic parameters, new hybrid methodologies were proposed. These methodologies were used to control flight parameters by the calculation of the drag, lift and pitching moment coefficients and by the calculation of the pressure distribution around an airfoil. These aerodynamic coefficients were calculated from the known airflow conditions such as angles of attack, the mach and the Reynolds numbers. In order to modify the shape of the wing skin, electric actuators were installed inside the wing to get the desired shape. These deformations provide optimal profiles according to different flight conditions in order to reduce the fuel consumption. A controller based on neural networks was implemented to obtain desired displacement actuators. A metaheuristic algorithm was used in hybridization with neural networks, and support vector machine approaches and their

  19. Performance evaluation of parallel electric field tunnel field-effect transistor by a distributed-element circuit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yukinori; Mori, Takahiro; Migita, Shinji; Mizubayashi, Wataru; Tanabe, Akihito; Fukuda, Koichi; Matsukawa, Takashi; Endo, Kazuhiko; O'uchi, Shin-ichi; Liu, Yongxun; Masahara, Meishoku; Ota, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    The performance of parallel electric field tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs), in which band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) was initiated in-line to the gate electric field was evaluated. The TFET was fabricated by inserting an epitaxially-grown parallel-plate tunnel capacitor between heavily doped source wells and gate insulators. Analysis using a distributed-element circuit model indicated there should be a limit of the drain current caused by the self-voltage-drop effect in the ultrathin channel layer.

  20. Numerical modeling of time-dependent deformation and induced stresses in concrete pipes constructed in Queenston shale using micro-tunneling technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayder Mohammed Salim Al-Maamori

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Effects of time-dependent deformation (TDD on a tunnel constructed using the micro-tunneling technique in Queenston shale (QS are investigated employing the finite element method. The TDD and strength parameters of the QS were measured from tests conducted on QS specimens soaked in water and lubricant fluids (LFs used in micro-tunneling such as bentonite and polymer solutions. The numerical model was verified using the results of TDD tests performed on QS samples, field measurements of some documented projects, and the closed-form solutions to circular tunnels in swelling rock. The verified model was then employed to conduct a parametric study considering important micro-tunneling design parameters, such as depth and diameter of the tunnel, in situ stress ratio (Ko, and the time lapse prior to replacing LFs with permanent cement grout around the tunnel. It was revealed that the time lapse plays a vital role in controlling deformations and associated stresses developed in the tunnel lining. The critical case of a pipe or tunnel in which the maximum tensile stress develops at its springline occurs when it is constructed at shallow depths in the QS layer. The results of the parametric study were used to suggest recommendations for the construction of tunnels in QS employing micro-tunneling. Keywords: Numerical model, Micro-tunneling, Queenston shale (QS, Lubricant fluids (LFs

  1. Establishing model credibility involves more than validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, T.

    1991-01-01

    One widely used definition of validation is that the quantitative test of the performance of a model through the comparison of model predictions to independent sets of observations from the system being simulated. The ability to show that the model predictions compare well with observations is often thought to be the most rigorous test that can be used to establish credibility for a model in the scientific community. However, such tests are only part of the process used to establish credibility, and in some cases may be either unnecessary or misleading. Naylor and Finger extended the concept of validation to include the establishment of validity for the postulates embodied in the model and the test of assumptions used to select postulates for the model. Validity of postulates is established through concurrence by experts in the field of study that the mathematical or conceptual model contains the structural components and mathematical relationships necessary to adequately represent the system with respect to the goals for the model. This extended definition of validation provides for consideration of the structure of the model, not just its performance, in establishing credibility. Evaluation of a simulation model should establish the correctness of the code and the efficacy of the model within its domain of applicability. (24 refs., 6 figs.)

  2. Investigation of Rock Mass Stability Around the Tunnels in an Underground Mine in USA Using Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan; Kulatilake, P. H. S. W.; Sandbak, L. A.

    2018-02-01

    The stability of the rock mass around the tunnels in an underground mine was investigated using the distinct element method. A three-dimensional model was developed based on the available geological, geotechnical, and mine construction information. It incorporates a complex lithological system, persistent and non-persistent faults, and a complex tunnel system including backfilled tunnels. The strain-softening constitutive model was applied for the rock masses. The rock mass properties were estimated using the Hoek-Brown equations based on the intact rock properties and the RMR values. The fault material behavior was modeled using the continuously yielding joint model. Sequential construction and rock supporting procedures were simulated based on the way they progressed in the mine. Stress analyses were performed to study the effect of the horizontal in situ stresses and the variability of rock mass properties on tunnel stability, and to evaluate the effectiveness of rock supports. The rock mass behavior was assessed using the stresses, failure zones, deformations around the tunnels, and the fault shear displacement vectors. The safety of rock supports was quantified using the bond shear and bolt tensile failures. Results show that the major fault and weak interlayer have distinct influences on the displacements and stresses around the tunnels. Comparison between the numerical modeling results and the field measurements indicated the cases with the average rock mass properties, and the K 0 values between 0.5 and 1.25 provide satisfactory agreement with the field measurements.

  3. Simulation of Model Force-Loading with Changing Its Position in the Wind Tunnel Test Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Bui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When planning and implementing an aerodynamic experiment, model sizes and its position in the test section of the wind tunnel (WT play very important role. The paper focuses on the value variations of the aerodynamic characteristics of a model through changing its position in the WT test section and on the attenuation of the velocity field disturbance in front of the model. Flow around aerodynamic model profile in the open test section of the low-speed WT T-500 is simulated at BMSTU Department SM3. The problem is solved in a two-dimensional case using the ANSYS Fluent package. The mathematical model of flow is based on the Reynolds equations closed by the SST turbulence model. The paper also presents the results of the experiment. Experiments conducted in WT T-500 well correlate with the calculated data and show the optimal position in the middle of the test section when conducting the weighing and drainage experiments. Disturbance of tunnel dynamic pressure (velocity head and flow upwash around the model profile and circular cylinder in the WT test section is analyzed. It was found that flow upstream from the front stagnation point on the body weakly depends on the Reynolds number and obtained results can be used to assess the level of disturbances in the flow around a model by incompressible airflow.

  4. Tensile strained Ge tunnel field-effect transistors: k · p material modeling and numerical device simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Kuo-Hsing; De Meyer, Kristin; Verhulst, Anne S.; Van de Put, Maarten; Soree, Bart; Magnus, Wim; Vandenberghe, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Group IV based tunnel field-effect transistors generally show lower on-current than III-V based devices because of the weaker phonon-assisted tunneling transitions in the group IV indirect bandgap materials. Direct tunneling in Ge, however, can be enhanced by strain engineering. In this work, we use a 30-band k · p method to calculate the band structure of biaxial tensile strained Ge and then extract the bandgaps and effective masses at Γ and L symmetry points in k-space, from which the parameters for the direct and indirect band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) models are determined. While transitions from the heavy and light hole valence bands to the conduction band edge at the L point are always bridged by phonon scattering, we highlight a new finding that only the light-hole-like valence band is strongly coupling to the conduction band at the Γ point even in the presence of strain based on the 30-band k · p analysis. By utilizing a Technology Computer Aided Design simulator equipped with the calculated band-to-band tunneling BTBT models, the electrical characteristics of tensile strained Ge point and line tunneling devices are self-consistently computed considering multiple dynamic nonlocal tunnel paths. The influence of field-induced quantum confinement on the tunneling onset is included. Our simulation predicts that an on-current up to 160 (260) μA/μm can be achieved along with on/off ratio > 10 6 for V DD  = 0.5 V by the n-type (p-type) line tunneling device made of 2.5% biaxial tensile strained Ge

  5. Tensile strained Ge tunnel field-effect transistors: k · p material modeling and numerical device simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Kuo-Hsing; De Meyer, Kristin [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Verhulst, Anne S. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Van de Put, Maarten; Soree, Bart; Magnus, Wim [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Physics, Universiteit Antwerpen, 2000 Antwerpen (Belgium); Vandenberghe, William G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-01-28

    Group IV based tunnel field-effect transistors generally show lower on-current than III-V based devices because of the weaker phonon-assisted tunneling transitions in the group IV indirect bandgap materials. Direct tunneling in Ge, however, can be enhanced by strain engineering. In this work, we use a 30-band k · p method to calculate the band structure of biaxial tensile strained Ge and then extract the bandgaps and effective masses at Γ and L symmetry points in k-space, from which the parameters for the direct and indirect band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) models are determined. While transitions from the heavy and light hole valence bands to the conduction band edge at the L point are always bridged by phonon scattering, we highlight a new finding that only the light-hole-like valence band is strongly coupling to the conduction band at the Γ point even in the presence of strain based on the 30-band k · p analysis. By utilizing a Technology Computer Aided Design simulator equipped with the calculated band-to-band tunneling BTBT models, the electrical characteristics of tensile strained Ge point and line tunneling devices are self-consistently computed considering multiple dynamic nonlocal tunnel paths. The influence of field-induced quantum confinement on the tunneling onset is included. Our simulation predicts that an on-current up to 160 (260) μA/μm can be achieved along with on/off ratio > 10{sup 6} for V{sub DD} = 0.5 V by the n-type (p-type) line tunneling device made of 2.5% biaxial tensile strained Ge.

  6. A model study of tunneling conductance spectra of ferromagnetically ordered manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Saswati; Kar, J. K.; Rout, G. C.

    2018-02-01

    We report here the interplay of ferromagnetism (FM) and charge density wave (CDW) in manganese oxide systems through the study of tunneling conductance spectra. The model Hamiltonian consists of strong Heisenberg coupling in core t2g band electrons within mean-field approximation giving rise to ferromagnetism. Ferromagnetism is induced in the itinerant eg electrons due to Kubo-Ohata type double exchange (DE) interaction among the t2g and eg electrons. The charge ordering (CO) present in the eg band giving rise to CDW interaction is considered as the extra-mechanism to explain the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) property of manganites. The magnetic and CDW order parameters are calculated using Zubarev's Green's function technique and solved self-consistently and numerically. The eg electron density of states (DOS) calculated from the imaginary part of the Green's function explains the experimentally observed tunneling conductance spectra. The DOS graph exhibits a parabolic gap near the Fermi energy as observed in tunneling conductance spectra experiments.

  7. Modeling human learning involved in car driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, car driving is considered at the level of human tracking and maneuvering in the context of other traffic. A model analysis revealed the most salient features determining driving performance and safety. Learning car driving is modelled based on a system theoretical approach and based

  8. Wind tunnel noise reduction at Mach 5 with a rod-wall sound shield. [for prevention of premature boundary layer transition on wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, T. R.; Beckwith, I. E.

    1983-01-01

    A method of shielding a wind-tunnel model from noise radiated by the tunnel-wall boundary layer has been developed and tested at the Langley Research Center. The shield consists of a rectangular array of longitudinal rods with boundary-layer suction through gaps between the rods. Tests were conducted at Mach 5 over a unit Reynolds number range of 1.0-3.5 x 10 to the 7th/m. Hot-wire measurements indicated the freestream noise, expressed in terms of the rms pressure fluctuations normalized by the mean pressure, was reduced from about 1.4 percent just upstream of the shielded region of a minimum level of about 0.4 percent in the forward portion of the shielded flow.

  9. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration stakeholder involvement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaupanger, R.M.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Milam, L.M.

    1994-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Stakeholder participation in the DOE Environmental Management decision-making process is critical to remediation efforts. Appropriate mechanisms for communication with the public, private sector, regulators, elected officials, and others are being aggressively pursued by BWID to permit informed participation. This document summarizes public outreach efforts during FY-93 and presents a strategy for expanded stakeholder involvement during FY-94

  10. The Role of Hierarchy in Response Surface Modeling of Wind Tunnel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoach, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper is intended as a tutorial introduction to certain aspects of response surface modeling, for the experimentalist who has started to explore these methods as a means of improving productivity and quality in wind tunnel testing and other aerospace applications. A brief review of the productivity advantages of response surface modeling in aerospace research is followed by a description of the advantages of a common coding scheme that scales and centers independent variables. The benefits of model term reduction are reviewed. A constraint on model term reduction with coded factors is described in some detail, which requires such models to be well-formulated, or hierarchical. Examples illustrate the consequences of ignoring this constraint. The implication for automated regression model reduction procedures is discussed, and some opinions formed from the author s experience are offered on coding, model reduction, and hierarchy.

  11. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  12. A vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel tests and its application in pollutant dispersion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromke, Christof

    2011-01-01

    A new vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel investigations was developed. The modeling concept is based on fluid dynamical similarity aspects and allows the small-scale modeling of various kinds of vegetation, e.g. field crops, shrubs, hedges, single trees and forest stands. The applicability of the modeling concept was validated in wind tunnel pollutant dispersion studies. Avenue trees in urban street canyons were modeled and their implications on traffic pollutant dispersion were investigated. The dispersion experiments proved the modeling concept to be practicable for wind tunnel studies and suggested to provide reliable concentration results. Unfavorable effects of trees on pollutant dispersion and natural ventilation in street canyons were revealed. Increased traffic pollutant concentrations were found in comparison to the tree-free reference case. - Highlights: → A concept for aerodynamic modelling of vegetation in small scale wind tunnel studies is presented. → The concept was applied to study pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons with avenue tress. → The wind tunnel studies show that modelling the aerodynamic effects of vegetation is important. → Avenue trees give rise to increased pollutant concentrations in urban street canyons. - Avenue trees in urban street canyons affect the pollutant dispersion and result in increased traffic exhaust concentrations.

  13. Optimized aerodynamic design process for subsonic transport wing fitted with winglets. [wind tunnel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a wind-tunnel model of a wing representative of that of a subsonic jet transport aircraft, fitted with winglets, was performed using two recently developed optimal wing-design computer programs. Both potential flow codes use a vortex lattice representation of the near-field of the aerodynamic surfaces for determination of the required mean camber surfaces for minimum induced drag, and both codes use far-field induced drag minimization procedures to obtain the required spanloads. One code uses a discrete vortex wake model for this far-field drag computation, while the second uses a 2-D advanced panel wake model. Wing camber shapes for the two codes are very similar, but the resulting winglet camber shapes differ widely. Design techniques and considerations for these two wind-tunnel models are detailed, including a description of the necessary modifications of the design geometry to format it for use by a numerically controlled machine for the actual model construction.

  14. Establishment of tunnel-boring machine disk cutter rock-breaking model from energy perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Song

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As the most important cutting tools during tunnel-boring machine tunneling construction process, V-type disk cutter’s rock-breaking mechanism has been researched by many scholars all over the world. Adopting finite element method, this article focused on the interaction between V-type disk cutters and the intact rock to carry out microscopic parameter analysis methods: first, the stress model of rock breaking was established through V-type disk cutter motion trajectory analysis; second, based on the incremental theorem of the elastic–plastic theory, the strain model of the relative changes of rock displacement during breaking process was created. According to the principle of admissible work by energy method of the elastic–plastic theory to analyze energy transfer rules in the process of breaking rock, rock-breaking force of the V-type disk cutter could be regarded as the external force in the rock system. Finally, by taking the rock system as the reference object, the total potential energy equivalent model of rock system was derived to obtain the forces of the three directions acting on V-type disk cutter during the rock-breaking process. This derived model, which has been proved to be effective and scientific through comparisons with some original force models and by comparative analysis with experimental data, also initiates a new research strategy taking the view of the micro elastic–plastic theory to study the rock-breaking mechanism.

  15. Competition Between Two Large-Amplitude Motion Models: New Hybrid Hamiltonian Versus Old Pure-Tunneling Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Isabelle; Hougen, Jon T.

    2017-06-01

    In this talk we report on our progress in trying to make the hybrid Hamiltonian competitive with the pure-tunneling Hamiltonian for treating large-amplitude motions in methylamine. A treatment using the pure-tunneling model has the advantages of: (i) requiring relatively little computer time, (ii) working with relatively uncorrelated fitting parameters, and (iii) yielding in the vast majority of cases fits to experimental measurement accuracy. These advantages are all illustrated in the work published this past year on a gigantic v_{t} = 1 data set for the torsional fundamental band in methyl amine. A treatment using the hybrid model has the advantages of: (i) being able to carry out a global fit involving both v_{t} = 0 and v_{t} = 1 energy levels and (ii) working with fitting parameters that have a clearer physical interpretation. Unfortunately, a treatment using the hybrid model has the great disadvantage of requiring a highly correlated set of fitting parameters to achieve reasonable fitting accuracy, which complicates the search for a good set of molecular fitting parameters and a fit to experimental accuracy. At the time of writing this abstract, we have been able to carry out a fit with J up to 15 that includes all available infrared data in the v_{t} = 1-0 torsional fundamental band, all ground-state microwave data with K up to 10 and J up to 15, and about a hundred microwave lines within the v_{t} = 1 torsional state, achieving weighted root-mean-square (rms) deviations of about 1.4, 2.8, and 4.2 for these three categories of data. We will give an update of this situation at the meeting. I. Gulaczyk, M. Kreglewski, V.-M. Horneman, J. Mol. Spectrosc., in Press (2017).

  16. Enhancements to AERMOD's building downwash algorithms based on wind-tunnel and Embedded-LES modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monbureau, E. M.; Heist, D. K.; Perry, S. G.; Brouwer, L. H.; Foroutan, H.; Tang, W.

    2018-04-01

    Knowing the fate of effluent from an industrial stack is important for assessing its impact on human health. AERMOD is one of several Gaussian plume models containing algorithms to evaluate the effect of buildings on the movement of the effluent from a stack. The goal of this study is to improve AERMOD's ability to accurately model important and complex building downwash scenarios by incorporating knowledge gained from a recently completed series of wind tunnel studies and complementary large eddy simulations of flow and dispersion around simple structures for a variety of building dimensions, stack locations, stack heights, and wind angles. This study presents three modifications to the building downwash algorithm in AERMOD that improve the physical basis and internal consistency of the model, and one modification to AERMOD's building pre-processor to better represent elongated buildings in oblique winds. These modifications are demonstrated to improve the ability of AERMOD to model observed ground-level concentrations in the vicinity of a building for the variety of conditions examined in the wind tunnel and numerical studies.

  17. Effect of film roughness in Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions: model calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edalati Boostan, Saeideh; Heiliger, Christian [I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus Liebig University Giessen, D-35392 (Germany); Moradi, Hosein [Department of Physics,Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    We calculate how interface roughness affects the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) in Fe/MgO/Fe (100) junctions. The used method is based on a single-band tight-binding (SBTB) approximation employing the Green's function formalism. We investigate the influence of disorder at the TMR ratio. Thereby, the disorder is modeled by considering different occupation probabilities of Fe and MgO at interface sites. We calculate the current densities for parallel and anti-parallel configurations for different disorders. The results show that the roughness decreases the TMR that match well with experimental observations.

  18. Modeling and control of temperature of heat-calibration wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yunhua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the temperature control of the heat air-flow wind tunnel for sensor temperature-calibration and heat strength experiment. Firstly, a mathematical model was established to describe the dynamic characteristics of the fuel supplying system based on a variable frequency driving pump. Then, based on the classical cascade control, an improved control law with the Smith predictive estimate and the fuzzy proportional-integral-derivative was proposed. The simulation result shows that the control effect of the proposed control strategy is better than the ordinary proportional-integral-derivative cascade control strategy.

  19. Real-Space Analysis of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Topography Datasets Using Sparse Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyama, Masamichi J.; Hukushima, Koji

    2018-04-01

    A sparse modeling approach is proposed for analyzing scanning tunneling microscopy topography data, which contain numerous peaks originating from the electron density of surface atoms and/or impurities. The method, based on the relevance vector machine with L1 regularization and k-means clustering, enables separation of the peaks and peak center positioning with accuracy beyond the resolution of the measurement grid. The validity and efficiency of the proposed method are demonstrated using synthetic data in comparison with the conventional least-squares method. An application of the proposed method to experimental data of a metallic oxide thin-film clearly indicates the existence of defects and corresponding local lattice distortions.

  20. SFR inverse modelling Part 2. Uncertainty factors of predicted flow in deposition tunnels and uncertainty in distribution of flow paths from deposition tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmen, Johan

    2007-10-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) is operating the SFR repository for low- and intermediate-level nuclear waste. An update of the safety analysis of SFR was carried out by SKB as the SAFE project (Safety Assessment of Final Disposal of Operational Radioactive Waste). The aim of the project was to update the safety analysis and to produce a safety report. The safety report has been submitted to the Swedish authorities. This study is a continuation of the SAFE project, and concerns the hydrogeological modelling of the SFR repository, which was carried out as part of the SAFE project, it describes the uncertainty in the tunnel flow and distributions of flow paths from the storage tunnels. Uncertainty factors are produced for two different flow situations, corresponding to 2,000 AD (the sea covers the repository) and 4,000 AD (the sea has retreated form the repository area). Uncertainty factors are produced for the different deposition tunnels. The uncertainty factors are discussed in Chapter 2 and two lists (matrix) of uncertainty factors have been delivered as a part of this study. Flow paths are produced for two different flow situations, corresponding to 2,000 AD (the sea covers the repository) and 5,000 AD (the sea has retreated form the repository area). Flow paths from the different deposition tunnels have been simulated, considering the above discussed base case and the 60 realisation that passed all tests of this base case. The flow paths are presented and discussed in Chapter 3 and files presenting the results of the flow path analyses have been delivered as part of this study. The uncertainty factors (see Chapter 2) are not independent from the flow path data (see Chapter 3). When stochastic calculations are performed by use of a transport model and the data presented in this study is used as input to such calculations, the corresponding uncertainty factors and flow path data should be used. This study also includes a brief discussion of

  1. Monitoring Si growth on Ag(111) with scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that silicene structure involves silver atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prévot, G.; Bernard, R.; Cruguel, H.; Borensztein, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), the elaboration of the so-called silicene layer on Ag(111) is monitored in real time during Si evaporation at different temperatures. It is shown that the growth of silicene is accompanied by the release of about 65% of the surface Ag atoms from the Si covered areas. We observe that Si islands develop on the Ag terraces and Si strips at the Ag step edges, progressively forming ordered (4×4), (√(13)×√(13)) R13.9°, and dotted phases. Meanwhile, displaced Ag atoms group to develop additional bare Ag terraces growing round the Si islands from the pristine Ag step edges. This indicates a strong interaction between Si and Ag atoms, with an important modification of the Ag substrate beneath the surface layer. This observation is in contradiction with the picture of a silicene layer weakly interacting with the unreconstructed Ag substrate, and strongly indicates that the structure of silicene on Ag(111) corresponds either to a Si-Ag surface alloy or to a Si plane covered with Ag atoms

  2. A review of selected topics in physics based modeling for tunnel field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esseni, David; Pala, Marco; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Alper, Cem; Rollo, Tommaso

    2017-08-01

    The research field on tunnel-FETs (TFETs) has been rapidly developing in the last ten years, driven by the quest for a new electronic switch operating at a supply voltage well below 1 V and thus delivering substantial improvements in the energy efficiency of integrated circuits. This paper reviews several aspects related to physics based modeling in TFETs, and shows how the description of these transistors implies a remarkable innovation and poses new challenges compared to conventional MOSFETs. A hierarchy of numerical models exist for TFETs covering a wide range of predictive capabilities and computational complexities. We start by reviewing seminal contributions on direct and indirect band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) modeling in semiconductors, from which most TCAD models have been actually derived. Then we move to the features and limitations of TCAD models themselves and to the discussion of what we define non-self-consistent quantum models, where BTBT is computed with rigorous quantum-mechanical models starting from frozen potential profiles and closed-boundary Schrödinger equation problems. We will then address models that solve the open-boundary Schrödinger equation problem, based either on the non-equilibrium Green’s function NEGF or on the quantum-transmitting-boundary formalism, and show how the computational burden of these models may vary in a wide range depending on the Hamiltonian employed in the calculations. A specific section is devoted to TFETs based on 2D crystals and van der Waals hetero-structures. The main goal of this paper is to provide the reader with an introduction to the most important physics based models for TFETs, and with a possible guidance to the wide and rapidly developing literature in this exciting research field.

  3. Noise Localization Method for Model Tests in a Large Cavitation Tunnel Using a Hydrophone Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheolsoo Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Model tests are performed in order to predict the noise level of a full ship and to control its noise signature. Localizing noise sources in the model test is therefore an important research subject along with measuring noise levels. In this paper, a noise localization method using a hydrophone array in a large cavitation tunnel is presented. The 45-channel hydrophone array was designed using a global optimization technique for noise measurement. A set of noise experiments was performed in the KRISO (Korea Research Institute of Ships & Ocean Engineering large cavitation tunnel using scaled models, including a ship with a single propeller, a ship with twin propellers and an underwater vehicle. The incoherent broadband processors defined based on the Bartlett and the minimum variance (MV processors were applied to the measured data. The results of data analysis and localization are presented in the paper. Finally, it is shown that the mechanical noise, as well as the propeller noise can be successfully localized using the proposed localization method.

  4. Modelling the complete operation of a free-piston shock tunnel for a low enthalpy condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilvray, M.; Dann, A. G.; Jacobs, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    Only a limited number of free-stream flow properties can be measured in hypersonic impulse facilities at the nozzle exit. This poses challenges for experimenters when subsequently analysing experimental data obtained from these facilities. Typically in a reflected shock tunnel, a simple analysis that requires small amounts of computational resources is used to calculate quasi-steady gas properties. This simple analysis requires initial fill conditions and experimental measurements in analytical calculations of each major flow process, using forward coupling with minor corrections to include processes that are not directly modeled. However, this simplistic approach leads to an unknown level of discrepancy to the true flow properties. To explore the simple modelling techniques accuracy, this paper details the use of transient one and two-dimensional numerical simulations of a complete facility to obtain more refined free-stream flow properties from a free-piston reflected shock tunnel operating at low-enthalpy conditions. These calculations were verified by comparison to experimental data obtained from the facility. For the condition and facility investigated, the test conditions at nozzle exit produced with the simple modelling technique agree with the time and space averaged results from the complete facility calculations to within the accuracy of the experimental measurements.

  5. Nonlinear modeling and stability analysis of hydro-turbine governing system with sloping ceiling tailrace tunnel under load disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Wencheng; Yang, Jiandong; Wang, Mingjiang; Lai, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel nonlinear mathematical model of hydro-turbine governing system is proposed. • Hopf bifurcation analysis on the governing system is conducted. • Stability of the system under load disturbance is studied. • Influence of four factors on stability is analyzed. • Optimization methods of improving system stability are put forward. - Abstract: In order to overcome the problem of nonlinear dynamics of hydro-turbine governing system with sloping ceiling tailrace tunnel, which is caused by the interface movement of the free surface-pressurized flow in the tailrace tunnel, and the difficulty of analyzing the stability of system, this paper uses the Hopf bifurcation theory to study the stability of hydro-turbine governing system of hydropower station with sloping ceiling tailrace tunnel. Firstly, a novel and rational nonlinear mathematical model of the hydro-turbine governing system is proposed. This model contains the dynamic equation of pipeline system which can accurately describe the motion characteristics of the interface of free surface-pressurized flow in sloping ceiling tailrace tunnel. According to the nonlinear mathematical model, the existence and direction of Hopf bifurcation of the nonlinear dynamic system are analyzed. Furthermore, the algebraic criterion of the occurrence of Hopf bifurcation is derived. Then the stability domain and bifurcation diagram of hydro-turbine governing system are drawn by the algebraic criterion, and the characteristics of stability under different state parameters are investigated. Finally, the influence of step load value, ceiling slope angle and section form of tailrace tunnel and water depth at the interface in tailrace tunnel on stability are analyzed based on stable domain. The results indicate that: The Hopf bifurcation of hydro-turbine governing system with sloping ceiling tailrace tunnel is supercritical. The phase space trajectories of characteristic variables stabilize at the equilibrium points

  6. Application of unconventional geoelectrical methods to the hydrogeological examination of the Mt. S. Croce rock formations (Umbria, Italy involved in a railway tunnel project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Patella

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available he project of doubling and developing of the railway line Orte-Falconara, committed by the Italian State Railway Company to the COMAVI Consortium (Rome, Italy, envisaged building the Mt. S. Croce tunnel, about 3200 m long between the stations of Narni and Nera Montoro (Umbria, ltaly. During the last phase of the feasibility project, a geophysical research based on geoelectrical prospecting methods was carried out to complement other geognostic investigations with the following goals: a to outline the complex geotectonic model of the rock system, which will be affected by the new railway layout; b to gain information on the hydrogeologic features of the survey area, in relation to the existing geologic situation and the consequent effects on the digging conditions of the tunnel and on the operation conditions of the railway layout. The geophysical work was thus organized according to the following scheme: a execution of dipole electrical sounding pro-files, to depict a series of significant tomographic pseudosections, both across and along the new railway layout; b execution of self-potential measurements, to draw an anomaly map over the whole hydrogeological network system in the survey area. The research provided information which has helped to improve the geological-structural model of the area and disclosed the hydrogelogic network, conforming to the classified field surface manifestations. At present, further detailed field investigations are being carried out, which confirm all the results obtained by the geoelectrical survey.

  7. New Model Exhaust System Supports Testing in NASA Lewis' 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, James W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    In early 1996, the ability to run NASA Lewis Research Center's Abe Silverstein 10- by 10- Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10x10) at subsonic test section speeds was reestablished. Taking advantage of this new speed range, a subsonic research test program was scheduled for the 10x10 in the fall of 1996. However, many subsonic aircraft test models require an exhaust source to simulate main engine flow, engine bleed flows, and other phenomena. This was also true of the proposed test model, but at the time the 10x10 did not have a model exhaust capability. So, through an in-house effort over a period of only 5 months, a new model exhaust system was designed, installed, checked out, and made ready in time to support the scheduled test program.

  8. Models of charge transport and transfer in molecular switch tunnel junctions of bistable catenanes and rotaxanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flood, Amar H.; Wong, Eric W.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2006-01-01

    The processes by which charge transfer can occur play a foundational role in molecular electronics. Here we consider simplified models of the transfer processes that could be present in bistable molecular switch tunnel junction (MSTJ) devices during one complete cycle of the device from its low- to high- and back to low-conductance state. The bistable molecular switches, which are composed of a monolayer of either switchable catenanes or rotaxanes, exist in either a ground-state co-conformation or a metastable one in which the conduction properties of the two co-conformations, when measured at small biases (+0.1 V), are significantly different irrespective of whether transport is dominated by tunneling or hopping. The voltage-driven generation (±2 V) of molecule-based redox states, which are sufficiently long-lived to allow the relative mechanical movements necessary to switch between the two co-conformations, rely upon unequal charge transfer rates on to and/or off of the molecules. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to image the ground state of the bistable rotaxane in MSTJ-like devices. Consideration of these models provide new ways of looking at molecular electronic devices that rely, not only on nanoscale charge-transport, but also upon the bustling world of molecular motion in mechanically interlocked bistable molecules

  9. Modeling cooking of chicken meat in industrial tunnel ovens with the Flory-Rehner theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sman, R G M

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present a numerical model describing the heat and mass transport during the cooking of chicken meat in industrial tunnels. The mass transport is driven by gradients in the swelling pressure, which is described by the Flory-Rehner theory, which relates to the water holding capacity (WHC). For cooking temperatures up to boiling point and practical relevant cooking times, the model renders good prediction of heat and mass transport and the total loss of moisture. We have shown that for cooking temperatures above boiling point, the model has to be extended with the dynamic growth of capillary water (drip) channels. Furthermore, we discuss that the Flory-Rehner theory provides the proper physical basis for describing the change of the WHC by a wide variety of factors like salt and pH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel macro-model for spin-transfer-torque based magnetic-tunnel-junction elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungyeon; Lee, Hyunjoo; Kim, Sojeong; Lee, Seungjun; Shin, Hyungsoon

    2010-04-01

    Spin-transfer-torque (STT) switching in magnetic-tunnel-junction (MTJ) has important merits over the conventional field induced magnetic switching (FIMS) MRAM in avoiding half-select problem, and improving scalability and selectivity. Design of MRAM circuitry using STT-based MTJ elements requires an accurate circuit model which exactly emulates the characteristics of an MTJ in a circuit simulator such as HSPICE. This work presents a novel macro-model that fully emulates the important characteristics of STT-based MTJ. The macro-model is realized as a three terminal sub-circuit that reproduces asymmetric resistance versus current (R-I) characteristics and temperature dependence of R-I hysteresis of STT-based MTJ element.

  11. The design of a wind tunnel VSTOL fighter model incorporating turbine powered engine simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, R. O.; Maraz, M. R.; Hiley, P. E.

    1981-01-01

    A wind-tunnel model of a supersonic VSTOL fighter aircraft configuration has been developed for use in the evaluation of airframe-propulsion system aerodynamic interactions. The model may be employed with conventional test techniques, where configuration aerodynamics are measured in a flow-through mode and incremental nozzle-airframe interactions are measured in a jet-effects mode, and with the Compact Multimission Aircraft Propulsion Simulator which is capable of the simultaneous simulation of inlet and exhaust nozzle flow fields so as to allow the evaluation of the extent of inlet and nozzle flow field coupling. The basic configuration of the twin-engine model has a geometrically close-coupled canard and wing, and a moderately short nacelle with nonaxisymmetric vectorable exhaust nozzles near the wing trailing edge, and may be converted to a canardless configuration with an extremely short nacelle. Testing is planned to begin in the summer of 1982.

  12. Results of investigations on the 0.004-scale model 74-0 of the configuration 4 (modified) space shuttle vehicle orbiter in the NASA/MSFC 14-by-14-inch trisonic wind tunnel (oa131)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an oil flow boundary-layer visualization wind tunnel test of an 0.004-scale model of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Orbiter in the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center 14-by-14-inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel are presented. The model was tested at Mach numbers from 0.60 through 2.75, at angles-of-attack from 0 through 25 degrees, and at unit Reynolds numbers from 5.0 to 7.0 million per foot. The test program involved still and motion picture photography of oil-paint flow patterns on the orbiter, during and immediately after tunnel flow, to determine areas of boundary layer separation and regions of potential auxiliary power unit exhaust recirculation during transonic and low supersonic re-entry flight.

  13. Model Deformation and Optical Angle of Attack Measurement System in the NASA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Laura K.; Drain, Bethany A.; Schairer, Edward T.; Heineck, James T.; Bell, James H.

    2017-01-01

    Both AoA and MDM measurements can be made using an optical system that relies on photogrammetry. Optical measurements are being requested by customers in wind tunnels with increasing frequency due to their non-intrusive nature and recent hardware and software advances that allow measurements to become near real time. The NASA Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel is currently developing a system based on photogrammetry to measure model deformation and model angle of attack. This paper describes the new system, its development, its use on recent tests and plans to further develop the system.

  14. User's manual for the model interface and plugboard cabinets in the 14- by 22-foot subsonic tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Robert B.; Quinto, P. Frank

    1994-01-01

    The primary method of connection between the wind tunnel model instrumentation and the data acquisition system in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel is through the Model Interface (MIF) and Plugboard cabinets. The MIF and Plugboard cabinets allow versatility in the connection of the instrumentation to the different data systems in the facility. The User's Manual describes the components inside the MIF cabinet, the input and output of the MIF, and the MIF patchboard, and the Plugboard cabinets. There are examples of standard connections for most of the instrumentation used in the facility.

  15. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-06-01

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the "CVBs interaction" that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  16. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-01-01

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices

  17. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A. [Integrated Systems Laboratory ETH Zürich, Gloriastrasse 35, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-06-21

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  18. Modeling of Electronic Transport in Scanning Tunneling Microscope Tip-Carbon Nanotube Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A model is proposed for two observed current-voltage (I-V) patterns in a recent experiment with a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a carbon nanotube. We claim that there are two mechanical contact modes for a tip (metal) -nanotube (semiconductor) junction (1) with or (2) without a tiny vacuum gap (0.1 - 0.2 nm). With the tip grounded, the tunneling case in (1) would produce large dI/dV with V > 0, small dI/dV with V < 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 for an either n- or p-nanotube; the Schottky mechanism in (2) would result in I does not equal 0 only with V < 0 for an n-nanotube, and the bias polarities would be reversed for a p-nanotube. The two observed I-V patterns are thus entirely explained by a tip-nanotube contact of the two types, where the nanotube must be n-type.

  19. A flying superconducting magnet and cryostat for magnetic suspension of wind-tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, C.; Goodyer, M. J.; Scurlock, R. G.; Wu, Y. Y.

    1984-01-01

    The engineering practicality of a persistent high-field superconducting solenoid cryostat as a magnetic suspension and balance system (MSBS) for wind-tunnel testing of aircraft and missile models is examined. The test apparatus is a simple solenoid of filamentary NbTi superconductor with a cupronickel matrix. The apparatus, with a length-to-diameter ratio of 6 to 1 and a radius of 32 mm, used a 0.25 mm wire with a critical current of 27 A in an external field of 6 T. The total heat inleak of 150 mW was achieved. Helium boiloff rates were tested over a range of operating conditions, including pitch attitudes from 10 deg nose down to 90 deg nose up; the rate was estimated as low, but the aerodynamic acceptability of venting gaseous helium has not been determined. It is shown that the effectiveness of the concept increases with increasing scale, and performance in excess of that of conventional ferromagnets is achievable with reduction in size and costs, and with aptness to transonic wind-tunnel testing. Detailed specifications and schematics are included.

  20. Modelling of motorway tunnels scenario for utilization of conditionally released radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrncir, Tomas; Panik, Michal; Necas, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Considerable amount of solid radioactive waste with radioactivity slightly above the limits for unconditional release is generated during the decommissioning of the nuclear installations. Conditional release deals with precisely this type of materials with activity slightly above limits in order to save considerable financial resources, which would be otherwise spend on treatment, conditioning and disposal of these materials at appropriate repository. The basic principles of conditional release as well as possibilities of reusing of the conditionally released materials are described. One of these possibilities of the reusing was chosen and application proposal of conditional release of metal waste - steel reinforcement in the concrete, which could be used for construction of motorway tunnels, was created. The computer code Visiplan 4.0 3D ALARA planning tool software was used for the calculation of effective individual dose for personnel constructing the tunnel and for critical group related to scenario. Particular models for individual scenarios of conditional release have been developed within the scope of this software code. The aim of the paper is to determine a level of the radioactivity of conditional released materials to avoid over exceeding the value of annual individual effective dose 10μSv/year established by international recommendations. (author)

  1. Wind tunnel investigation of an STOL aircraft model. STOL zenki mokei-fudo shiken. ; Engine nacelle keijo koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The nacelle shape of a mimic engine mounted on the wind tunnel test model for an STOL aircraft developed by the National Aerospace Laboratory has much larger length than in the nacelle of a scale reduced to 8% of an actual engine, and the shape below the nacelle is different. Therefore, in order to estimate the air force in the actual aircraft from the aerodynamic data obtained in a wind tunnel test, the data are corrected by using differences in aerodynamic loads (estimated values) applied on the mimic engine and the actual engine. For the purpose of discussing the reasonability of this correction, an 8%-scale flow through nacelle with the same shape as in the actual aircraft (the actual aircraft type) and a flow through nacelle for a wind tunnel testing model of the experimental STOL aircraft were fabricated and wind tunnel tests were performed. These results were compared with the corrected results of the mimic engine wind tunnel test. As a result, it was made clear that the force data have been corrected excessively, and the moments have been corrected considerably well. 7 refs., 32 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Modeling of steady motion and vertical-plane dynamics of a tunnel hull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaney Christopher S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available High-speed marine vehicles can take advantage of aerodynamically supported platforms or air wings to increase maximum speed or transportation efficiency. However, this also results in increased complexity of boat dynamics, especially in the presence of waves and wind gusts. In this study, a mathematical model based on the fully unsteady aerodynamic extreme-ground-effect theory and the hydrodynamic added-mass strip theory is applied for simulating vertical-plane motions of a tunnel hull in a disturbed environment, as well as determining its steady states in calm conditions. Calculated responses of the boat to wind gusts and surface waves are demonstrated. The present model can be used as a supplementary method for preliminary estimations of performance of aerodynamically assisted marine craft.

  3. Comparing different CFD wind turbine modelling approaches with wind tunnel measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalvig, Siri; Hjertager, Bjørn; Manger, Eirik

    2014-01-01

    The performance of a model wind turbine is simulated with three different CFD methods: actuator disk, actuator line and a fully resolved rotor. The simulations are compared with each other and with measurements from a wind tunnel experiment. The actuator disk is the least accurate and most cost-efficient, and the fully resolved rotor is the most accurate and least cost-efficient. The actuator line method is believed to lie in between the two ends of the scale. The fully resolved rotor produces superior wake velocity results compared to the actuator models. On average it also produces better results for the force predictions, although the actuator line method had a slightly better match for the design tip speed. The open source CFD tool box, OpenFOAM, was used for the actuator disk and actuator line calculations, whereas the market leading commercial CFD code, ANSYS/FLUENT, was used for the fully resolved rotor approach

  4. 3D Centrifuge Modeling of the Effect of Twin Tunneling to an Existing Pile Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Soomr

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In densely built urban areas, it is inevitable that tunnels will be constructed near existing pile groups. The bearing capacity of a pile group depends on shear stress along the soil-pile interface and normal stress underneath the pile toe while the two would be adversely affected by the unloading process of tunneling. Although extensive studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of tunnel construction on existing single piles, the influence of twin tunnel advancement on an existing pile group is merely reported in the literature. In this study, a series of three-dimensional centrifuge tests were carried out to investigate the response of an existing pile group under working load subjected to twin tunneling at various locations in dry Toyoura sand. In each twin tunneling test, the first tunnel is constructed near the mid-depth of the pile shaft, while the second tunnel is subsequently constructed either next to, below or right underneath the pile toe (Tests G_ST, G_SB and G_SU, respectively. Among the three tests, the 2nd tunnel excavated near the pile toe (Test G_ST results in the smallest settlement but the largest transverse tilting (0.2% of pile group. Significant bending moment was induced at the pile head (1.4 times of its bending moment capacity due to the 2nd tunnel T. On the contrary, tunneling right underneath the toe of pile (i.e., Test G_SU results in the smallest tilting but largest settlement of the pile group (4.6% of pile diameter and incremental mobilisation of shaft resistance (13%. Due to stress release by the twin tunneling, the axial force taken by the front piles close to tunnels was reduced and partially transferred to the rear piles. This load transfer can increase the axial force in rear piles by 24%.

  5. Knee rotation influences the femoral tunnel angle measurement after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a 3-dimensional computed tomography model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Thorhauer, Eric; Marsh, Chelsea; Fu, Freddie H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Femoral tunnel angle (FTA) has been proposed as a metric for evaluating whether ACL reconstruction was performed anatomically. In clinic, radiographic images are typically acquired with an uncertain amount of internal/external knee rotation. The extent to which knee rotation will influence FTA measurement is unclear. Furthermore, differences in FTA measurement between the two common positions (0° and 45° knee flexion) have not been established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of knee rotation on FTA measurement after ACL reconstruction. Methods Knee CT data from 16 subjects were segmented to produce 3D bone models. Central axes of tunnels were identified. The 0° and 45° flexion angles were simulated. Knee internal/external rotations were simulated in a range of ±20°. FTA was defined as the angle between the tunnel axis and femoral shaft axis, orthogonally projected into the coronal plane. Results Femoral tunnel angle was positively/negatively correlated with knee rotation angle at 0°/45° knee flexion. At 0° knee flexion, FTA for anterio-medial (AM) tunnels was significantly decreased at 20° of external knee rotation. At 45° knee flexion, more than 16° external or 19° internal rotation significantly altered FTA measurements for single-bundle tunnels; smaller rotations (±9° for AM, ±5° for PL) created significant errors in FTA measurements after double-bundle reconstruction. Conclusion Femoral tunnel angle measurements were correlated with knee rotation. Relatively small imaging malalignment introduced significant errors with knee flexed 45°. This study supports using the 0° flexion position for knee radiographs to reduce errors in FTA measurement due to knee internal/external rotation. Level of evidence Case–control study, Level III. PMID:23589127

  6. Research on Dynamic Models and Performances of Shield Tunnel Boring Machine Cutterhead Driving System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianhong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A general nonlinear time-varying (NLTV dynamic model and linear time-varying (LTV dynamic model are presented for shield tunnel boring machine (TBM cutterhead driving system, respectively. Different gear backlashes and mesh damped and transmission errors are considered in the NLTV dynamic model. The corresponding multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO state space models are also presented. Through analyzing the linear dynamic model, the optimal reducer ratio (ORR and optimal transmission ratio (OTR are obtained for the shield TBM cutterhead driving system, respectively. The NLTV and LTV dynamic models are numerically simulated, and the effects of physical parameters under various conditions of NLTV dynamic model are analyzed. Physical parameters such as the load torque, gear backlash and transmission error, gear mesh stiffness and damped, pinions inertia and damped, large gear inertia and damped, and motor rotor inertia and damped are investigated in detail to analyze their effects on dynamic response and performances of the shield TBM cutterhead driving system. Some preliminary approaches are proposed to improve dynamic performances of the cutterhead driving system, and dynamic models will provide a foundation for shield TBM cutterhead driving system's cutterhead fault diagnosis, motion control, and torque synchronous control.

  7. Automatic control of cryogenic wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishna, S.

    1989-01-01

    Inadequate Reynolds number similarity in testing of scaled models affects the quality of aerodynamic data from wind tunnels. This is due to scale effects of boundary-layer shock wave interaction which is likely to be severe at transonic speeds. The idea of operation of wind tunnels using test gas cooled to cryogenic temperatures has yielded a quantrum jump in the ability to realize full scale Reynolds number flow similarity in small transonic tunnels. In such tunnels, the basic flow control problem consists of obtaining and maintaining the desired test section flow parameters. Mach number, Reynolds number, and dynamic pressure are the three flow parameters that are usually required to be kept constant during the period of model aerodynamic data acquisition. The series of activity involved in modeling, control law development, mechanization of the control laws on a microcomputer, and the performance of a globally stable automatic control system for the 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) are discussed. A lumped multi-variable nonlinear dynamic model of the cryogenic tunnel, generation of a set of linear control laws for small perturbation, and nonlinear control strategy for large set point changes including tunnel trajectory control are described. The details of mechanization of the control laws on a 16 bit microcomputer system, the software features, operator interface, the display and safety are discussed. The controller is shown to provide globally stable and reliable temperature control to + or - 0.2 K, pressure to + or - 0.07 psi and Mach number to + or - 0.002 of the set point value. This performance is obtained both during large set point commands as for a tunnel cooldown, and during aerodynamic data acquisition with intrusive activity like geometrical changes in the test section such as angle of attack changes, drag rake movements, wall adaptation and sidewall boundary-layer removal. Feasibility of the use of an automatic Reynolds number control mode with

  8. SPICE modelling of magnetic tunnel junctions written by spin-transfer torque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, W; Prenat, G; De Mestier, N; Baraduc, C; Dieny, B [SPINTEC, UMR(8191), INAC, CEA/CNRS/UJF, 17 Av. des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Javerliac, V; El Baraji, M, E-mail: guillaume.prenat@cea.f [CROCUS Technology, 5 Place Robert Schuman, 38025 Grenoble (France)

    2010-06-02

    Spintronics aims at extending the possibility of conventional electronics by using not only the charge of the electron but also its spin. The resulting spintronic devices, combining the front-end complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology of electronics with a magnetic back-end technology, employ magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) as core elements. With the intent of simulating a circuit without fabricating it first, a reliable MTJ electrical model which is applicable to the standard SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis) simulator is required. Since such a model was lacking so far, we present a MTJ SPICE model whose magnetic state is written by using the spin-transfer torque effect. This model has been developed in the C language and validated on the Cadence Virtuoso Platform with a Spectre simulator. Its operation is similar to that of the standard BSIM (Berkeley Short-channel IGFET Model) SPICE model of the MOS transistor and fully compatible with the SPICE electrical simulator. The simulation results obtained using this model have been found in good accord with those theoretical macrospin calculations and results.

  9. A New Circuit Model for Spin-Torque Oscillator Including Perpendicular Torque of Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyein Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spin-torque oscillator (STO is a promising new technology for the future RF oscillators, which is based on the spin-transfer torque (STT effect in magnetic multilayered nanostructure. It is expected to provide a larger tunability, smaller size, lower power consumption, and higher level of integration than the semiconductor-based oscillators. In our previous work, a circuit-level model of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR STO was proposed. In this paper, we present a physics-based circuit-level model of the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ-based STO. MTJ-STO model includes the effect of perpendicular torque that has been ignored in the GMR-STO model. The variations of three major characteristics, generation frequency, mean oscillation power, and generation linewidth of an MTJ-STO with respect to the amount of perpendicular torque, are investigated, and the results are applied to our model. The operation of the model was verified by HSPICE simulation, and the results show an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The results also prove that a full circuit-level simulation with MJT-STO devices can be made with our proposed model.

  10. Numerical modelling of the reinforced concrete influence on a combined system of tunnel support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grujić Bojana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the experimental, laboratory determined rheological-dynamic analysis of the properties of fiber reinforced concrete, which was then utilized to show nonlinear analysis of combined system of tunnel support structure. According to the performed experiments and calculations, different processes of destructive behavior of tunnel lining were simulated in combination with elastic and elastic-plastic behavior of materials taking into account the tunnel loading, the interaction between the fiber reinforced concrete and soil, as well as the interaction between the fiber reinforced concrete and the inner lining of the tunnel.

  11. Numerical modelling of the reinforced concrete influence on a combined system of tunnel support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujić, Bojana; Jokanović, Igor; Grujić, Žarko; Zeljić, Dragana

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the experimental, laboratory determined rheological-dynamic analysis of the properties of fiber reinforced concrete, which was then utilized to show nonlinear analysis of combined system of tunnel support structure. According to the performed experiments and calculations, different processes of destructive behavior of tunnel lining were simulated in combination with elastic and elastic-plastic behavior of materials taking into account the tunnel loading, the interaction between the fiber reinforced concrete and soil, as well as the interaction between the fiber reinforced concrete and the inner lining of the tunnel.

  12. Wind-tunnel investigation of a large-scale VTOL aircraft model with wing root and wing thrust augmentors. [Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, K.; Aiken, T. N.

    1979-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale V/STOL aircraft model with thrust augmentors. The model had a double-delta wing of aspect ratio 1.65 with augmentors located in the wing root and the wing trailing edge. The supply air for the augmentor primary nozzles was provided by the YJ-97 turbojet engine. The airflow was apportioned approximately 74 percent to the wing root augmentor and 24 percent to wing augmentor. Results were obtained at several trailing-edge flap deflections with the nozzle jet-momentum coefficients ranging from 0 to 7.9. Three-component longitudinal data are presented with the agumentor operating with and without the horizontal tail. A limited amount of six component data are also presented.

  13. Model, First-Principle Calculation of Ammonia Dissociation on Si(100 Surface. Importance of Proton Tunneling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Z. Zgierski

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The dissociation of an ammonia molecule on a cluster of Si atoms simulating the 100 silicon crystal structure with two Si dimers has been investigated by means of the DFT and an approximate instanton methods. The model corresponds to the low coverage limit of the surface. Absolute rate constants of two different dissociation paths are evaluated together with deuterium isotope effects. It is demonstrated that, even at room temperatures, the process is dominated by tunneling and that dissociation to a silicon atom of the adjacent dimer, rather than a silicon within the same dimer, is the prevailing mechanism. This leads to creation of a metastable structure which will slowly decay through a two-step hydrogen atom migration towards the absolute minimum on the potential energy surface corresponding to the NH2 group and the hydrogen atom residing in the same dimer.

  14. Stresses in faulted tunnel models by photoelasticity and adaptive finite element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Huang, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Research efforts in this area continue to investigate the development of a proper technique to analyze the stresses in the Ghost Dance fault and the effect of the fault on the stability of drifts in the proposed repository. Results from two parallel techniques are being compared to each other - Photoelastic models and Finite Element (FE) models. The Photoelastic plexiglass model (88.89 mm thick ampersand 256.1 mm long and wide) has two adjacent spare openings (57.95 mm long and wide) and a central round opening (57.95 mm diameter) placed at a clear distance approximately equal to its diameter from the square openings. The vertical loading on top of the model is 2269 N (500 lb.). Saw cuts (0.5388 mm wide), representing a fault, are being propagated from the tunnels outward with stress measurements taken at predefined locations, as the saw cuts increase in length. The FE model duplicates exactly the Photoelastic models. The adaptive mesh generation method is used to refine the FE grid at every step of the analysis. This nonlinear interactive computational techniques uses various uses various percent tolerance errors in the convergence of stress values as a measure in ending the iterative process

  15. CFD modelling and wind tunnel validation of airflow through plant canopies using 3D canopy architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endalew, A. Melese; Hertog, M.; Delele, M.A.; Baetens, K.; Persoons, T.; Baelmans, M.; Ramon, H.; Nicolai, B.M.; Verboven, P.

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of pesticide application to agricultural fields and the resulting environmental contamination highly depend on atmospheric airflow. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of airflow within plant canopies using 3D canopy architecture was developed to understand the effect of the canopy to airflow. The model average air velocity was validated using experimental results in a wind tunnel with two artificial model trees of 24 cm height. Mean air velocities and their root mean square (RMS) values were measured on a vertical plane upstream and downstream sides of the trees in the tunnel using 2D hotwire anemometer after imposing a uniform air velocity of 10 m s -1 at the inlet. 3D virtual canopy geometries of the artificial trees were modelled and introduced into a computational fluid domain whereby airflow through the trees was simulated using Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations and k-ε turbulence model. There was good agreement of the average longitudinal velocity, U between the measurements and the simulation results with relative errors less than 2% for upstream and 8% for downstream sides of the trees. The accuracy of the model prediction for turbulence kinetic energy k and turbulence intensity I was acceptable within the tree height when using a roughness length (y 0 = 0.02 mm) for the surface roughness of the tree branches and by applying a source model in a porous sub-domain created around the trees. The approach was applied for full scale orchard trees in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and was compared with previous approaches and works. The simulation in the ABL was made using two groups of full scale orchard trees; short (h = 3 m) with wider branching and long (h = 4 m) with narrow branching. This comparison showed good qualitative agreements on the vertical profiles of U with small local differences as expected due to the spatial disparities in tree architecture. This work was able to show airflow within and above the

  16. Tunneling works. Tunnel koji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higo, M [Hazam Gumi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-10-25

    A mountain tunneling method for rock-beds used to be applied mainly to construction works in the mountains under few restrictions by environmental problems. However, construction works near residential sreas have been increasing. There are such enviromental problems due to tunneling works as vibration, noise, lowering of ground-water level, and influences on other structures. This report mainly describes the measurement examples of vibration and noise accompanied with blasting and the effects of the measures to lessen such influences. When the tunneling works for the railroad was carried out on the natural ground mainly composed of basalt, vibration of the test blasting was measured at three stations with piezoelectric accelerometers. Then, ordinary blasting, mutistage blasting, and ABM blasting methods were used properly besed on the above results, and only a few complaints were made. In the different works, normal noise and low-frequency sound were mesured at 22 stations around the pit mouth. As countermeasures for noise, sound-proof sheets, walls, and single and double doors were installed and foundto be effective. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Five challenges for stochastic epidemic models involving global transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Britton

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The most basic stochastic epidemic models are those involving global transmission, meaning that infection rates depend only on the type and state of the individuals involved, and not on their location in the population. Simple as they are, there are still several open problems for such models. For example, when will such an epidemic go extinct and with what probability (questions depending on the population being fixed, changing or growing? How can a model be defined explaining the sometimes observed scenario of frequent mid-sized epidemic outbreaks? How can evolution of the infectious agent transmission rates be modelled and fitted to data in a robust way?

  18. A bayesian nework based risk model for volume loss in soft soils in mechanized bored tunnels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chivatá Cárdenas, Ibsen; Al-Jibouri, Saad H.S.; Halman, Johannes I.M.

    2012-01-01

    Volume loss is one of the most important risks when boring a tunnel. This is particularly true when a tunnel is being constructed in soft soils. The risk of excessive volume loss, if materialised can lead to large consequences such as damage in buildings on the surface. This paper describes the

  19. Numerical modeling of the flow conditions in a closed-circuit low-speed wind tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, P.; Blocken, B.J.E.; Roels, S.; Carmeliet, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    A methodology for numerically simulating the flow conditions in closed-circuit wind tunnels is developed as a contribution to the general philosophy of incorporating Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in wind tunnel design and testing and to CFD validation studies. The methodology is applied to the

  20. Floquet Engineering of Correlated Tunneling in the Bose-Hubbard Model with Ultracold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinert, F; Mark, M J; Lauber, K; Daley, A J; Nägerl, H-C

    2016-05-20

    We report on the experimental implementation of tunable occupation-dependent tunneling in a Bose-Hubbard system of ultracold atoms via time-periodic modulation of the on-site interaction energy. The tunneling rate is inferred from a time-resolved measurement of the lattice site occupation after a quantum quench. We demonstrate coherent control of the tunneling dynamics in the correlated many-body system, including full suppression of tunneling as predicted within the framework of Floquet theory. We find that the tunneling rate explicitly depends on the atom number difference in neighboring lattice sites. Our results may open up ways to realize artificial gauge fields that feature density dependence with ultracold atoms.

  1. Research on Influence and Prediction Model of Urban Traffic Link Tunnel curvature on Fire Temperature Based on Pyrosim--SPSS Multiple Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao Ju; Yao, Kun; Dai, Jun Yu; Song, Yun Long

    2018-05-01

    The underground space, also known as the “fourth dimension” of the city, reflects the efficient use of urban development intensive. Urban traffic link tunnel is a typical underground limited-length space. Due to the geographical location, the special structure of space and the curvature of the tunnel, high-temperature smoke can easily form the phenomenon of “smoke turning” and the fire risk is extremely high. This paper takes an urban traffic link tunnel as an example to focus on the relationship between curvature and the temperature near the fire source, and use the pyrosim built different curvature fire model to analyze the influence of curvature on the temperature of the fire, then using SPSS Multivariate regression analysis simulate curvature of the tunnel and fire temperature data. Finally, a prediction model of urban traffic link tunnel curvature on fire temperature was proposed. The regression model analysis and test show that the curvature is negatively correlated with the tunnel temperature. This model is feasible and can provide a theoretical reference for the urban traffic link tunnel fire protection design and the preparation of the evacuation plan. And also, it provides some reference for other related curved tunnel curvature design and smoke control measures.

  2. Evaluation of a micro-scale wind model's performance over realistic building clusters using wind tunnel experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Du, Yunsong; Miao, Shiguang; Fang, Xiaoyi

    2016-08-01

    The simulation performance over complex building clusters of a wind simulation model (Wind Information Field Fast Analysis model, WIFFA) in a micro-scale air pollutant dispersion model system (Urban Microscale Air Pollution dispersion Simulation model, UMAPS) is evaluated using various wind tunnel experimental data including the CEDVAL (Compilation of Experimental Data for Validation of Micro-Scale Dispersion Models) wind tunnel experiment data and the NJU-FZ experiment data (Nanjing University-Fang Zhuang neighborhood wind tunnel experiment data). The results show that the wind model can reproduce the vortexes triggered by urban buildings well, and the flow patterns in urban street canyons and building clusters can also be represented. Due to the complex shapes of buildings and their distributions, the simulation deviations/discrepancies from the measurements are usually caused by the simplification of the building shapes and the determination of the key zone sizes. The computational efficiencies of different cases are also discussed in this paper. The model has a high computational efficiency compared to traditional numerical models that solve the Navier-Stokes equations, and can produce very high-resolution (1-5 m) wind fields of a complex neighborhood scale urban building canopy (~ 1 km ×1 km) in less than 3 min when run on a personal computer.

  3. EVALUATION OF REINFORCING EFFECT ON FACEBOLTS FOR TUNNELING USING X-RAY CT AND CENTRIFUGE MODEL TEST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Daiki; Otani, Jun; Date, Kensuke; Yokot, Yasuhiro; Nagatani, Hideki

    The purpose of this paper is firstly to simulate the tunnel face failure in laboratory with four cases of model tests by pulling out tunnel model from a sandy ground that are without using auxiliary method nor facebolts and using facebolts with three different lengths of bolts, and secondary, to investigate the behavior of model ground using X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner to visualize the failure zone in three dimensions. In addition to those results, a series of centrifuge model tests are conducted to confirm the results of X-ray CT test and also to discuss the ground behavior under full scale stress level. Finally, the effect of face bolting method is evaluated based on all the test results.

  4. Modeling of Aerodynamic Force Acting in Tunnel for Analysis of Riding Comfort in a Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikko, Satoshi; Tanifuji, Katsuya; Sakanoue, Kei; Nanba, Kouichiro

    In this paper, we aimed to model the aerodynamic force that acts on a train running at high speed in a tunnel. An analytical model of the aerodynamic force is developed from pressure data measured on car-body sides of a test train running at the maximum revenue operation speed. The simulation of an 8-car train running while being subjected to the modeled aerodynamic force gives the following results. The simulated car-body vibration corresponds to the actual vibration both qualitatively and quantitatively for the cars at the rear of the train. The separation of the airflow at the tail-end of the train increases the yawing vibration of the tail-end car while it has little effect on the car-body vibration of the adjoining car. Also, the effect of the moving velocity of the aerodynamic force on the car-body vibration is clarified that the simulation under the assumption of a stationary aerodynamic force can markedly increase the car-body vibration.

  5. Modeling of switching energy of magnetic tunnel junction devices with tilted magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surawanitkun, C.; Kaewrawang, A.; Siritaratiwat, A.; Kruesubthaworn, A.; Sivaratana, R.; Jutong, N.; Mewes, C.K.A.; Mewes, T.

    2015-01-01

    For spin transfer torque (STT), the switching energy and thermal stability of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) bits utilized in memory devices are important factors that have to be considered simultaneously. In this article, we examined the minimum energy for STT induced magnetization switching in MTJ devices for different in-plane angles of the magnetization in the free layer and the pinned layer with respect to the major axis of the elliptical cylinder of the cell. Simulations were performed by comparing the analytical solution with macrospin and full micromagnetic calculations. The results show good agreement of the switching energy calculated by using the three approaches for different initial angles of the magnetization of the free layer. Also, the low-energy location specifies the suitable value of both time and current in order to reduce the heat effect during the switching process. - Highlights: • Switching energy model was firstly examined with tiled magnetization in STT-RAM. • Simulation was performed by analytical solution, macrospin and micromagnetic models. • Low energy results from three models show agreement for tilt angle in free layer. • We also found an optimal tilt angle of the pinned layer. • Low-energy location specifies the suitable switching location to reduce heat effect

  6. On the modelling of microsegregation in steels involving thermodynamic databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, D; Bernhard, C; Michelic, S; Wieser, G; Presoly, P

    2016-01-01

    A microsegregation model involving thermodynamic database based on Ohnaka's model is proposed. In the model, the thermodynamic database is applied for equilibrium calculation. Multicomponent alloy effects on partition coefficients and equilibrium temperatures are accounted for. Microsegregation and partition coefficients calculated using different databases exhibit significant differences. The segregated concentrations predicted using the optimized database are in good agreement with the measured inter-dendritic concentrations. (paper)

  7. Nanomanipulation and Lithography: The Building (and Modeling) of Carbon Nanotube Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Richard Nam

    2002-12-01

    Aircraft fuselages suffer alternating stress during takeoffs and landings, and fatigue cracks begin to grow, usually at rivet holes. The detection of these fatigue cracks under installed fasteners in aging aircraft is a major goal of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) community. The use of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors in electromagnetic (EM) NDE has been increasing rapidly. For example, here at Langley Research Center, a Rotating Probe System (RPS) containing a GMR element has been incorporated into a product to detect deeply buried flaws in aerospace structures. In order to advance this eddy current probe application and many similar ones, research to create smaller, more sensitive and energy-efficient EM sensors has been aggressively pursued. Recent theoretical and experimental work on spin coherent transport supports the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT) based magnetic tunnel junctions. In this study, a spatial filtering scheme is presented that improves the signal to noise ratio of the RPS and does not significantly impact the number of false alarms. Signals due to buried flaws occur at higher frequencies than do signals due to rivet tilt or probe misalignment, and the strategy purposefully targets this fact. Furthermore, the spatial filtering scheme exploits decreases in the probe output that are observed immediately preceding and following the peak in output due to a fatigue crack. Using the new filters, an enhanced probability of flaw detection is expected. In the future, even tinier, more sensitive, low-power sensors are envisioned for the rotating probe and other nondestructive inspection systems. These may be comprised of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) that connect two ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes. Theoretical work has been done at Langley to model the electrical and magnetoconductance behavior of such junctions, for systems containing short "armchair" nanotubes. The present work facilitates the modeling of more realistic system

  8. Modeling and Implementation of HfO2-based Ferroelectric Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Spencer Allen

    HfO2-based ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) represent a unique opportunity as both a next-generation digital non-volatile memory and as synapse devices in braininspired logic systems, owing to their higher reliability compared to filamentary resistive random-access memory (ReRAM) and higher speed and lower power consumption compared to competing devices, including phase-change memory (PCM) and state-of-the-art FTJ. Ferroelectrics are often easier to deposit and have simpler material structure than films for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). Ferroelectric HfO2 also enables complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatibility, since lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and BaTiO3-based FTJs often are not. No other groups have yet demonstrated a HfO2-based FTJ (to best of the author's knowledge) or applied it to a suitable system. For such devices to be useful, system designers require models based on both theoretical physical analysis and experimental results of fabricated devices in order to confidently design control systems. Both the CMOS circuitry and FTJs must then be designed in layout and fabricated on the same die. This work includes modeling of proposed device structures using a custom python script, which calculates theoretical potential barrier heights as a function of material properties and corresponding current densities (ranging from 8x103 to 3x10-2 A/cm 2 with RHRS/RLRS ranging from 5x105 to 6, depending on ferroelectric thickness). These equations were then combined with polynomial fits of experimental timing data and implemented in a Verilog-A behavioral analog model in Cadence Virtuoso. The author proposes tristate CMOS control systems, and circuits, for implementation of FTJ devices as digital memory and presents simulated performance. Finally, a process flow for fabrication of FTJ devices with CMOS is presented. This work has therefore enabled the fabrication of FTJ devices at RIT and the continued investigation of them as applied to any

  9. Tunnel fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  10. Modelling of the influence of the 'Flimserstein' tunnel on the Lag Tiert karstic spring in Flims; Modellierung des Einflusses des Flimserstein-Tunnels auf die Karstquelle des Lag Tiert (Flims, GR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeannin, P.-Y.; Haeuselmann, P. [Schweizerisches Institut fuer Spelaeologie und Karstkunde SISKA, La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Wildberger, A. [Dr. von Moos AG, Geotechnisches Buero, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2007-12-15

    This report describes the modelling of the influence of the 'Flimserstein' tunnel on the Lag Tiert karstic spring in Flims, Switzerland. When the tunnel, that provides a by-pass for the mountain village of Flims, was built, a karstic system was broached. As a result, several springs dried up and others had their capacity reduced. Also, the quantity of water available for a local hydropower station was reduced. The report describes how the situation as far as the underground watercourses are concerned was modelled and how exactly the tunnel construction changed the water-quantities at the various springs. The results of the study are presented and discussed and recommendations are made concerning the modelling of such karstic systems.

  11. Compilation of information on uncertainties involved in deposition modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewellen, W.S.; Varma, A.K.; Sheng, Y.P.

    1985-04-01

    The current generation of dispersion models contains very simple parameterizations of deposition processes. The analysis here looks at the physical mechanisms governing these processes in an attempt to see if more valid parameterizations are available and what level of uncertainty is involved in either these simple parameterizations or any more advanced parameterization. The report is composed of three parts. The first, on dry deposition model sensitivity, provides an estimate of the uncertainty existing in current estimates of the deposition velocity due to uncertainties in independent variables such as meteorological stability, particle size, surface chemical reactivity and canopy structure. The range of uncertainty estimated for an appropriate dry deposition velocity for a plume generated by a nuclear power plant accident is three orders of magnitude. The second part discusses the uncertainties involved in precipitation scavenging rates for effluents resulting from a nuclear reactor accident. The conclusion is that major uncertainties are involved both as a result of the natural variability of the atmospheric precipitation process and due to our incomplete understanding of the underlying process. The third part involves a review of the important problems associated with modeling the interaction between the atmosphere and a forest. It gives an indication of the magnitude of the problem involved in modeling dry deposition in such environments. Separate analytics have been done for each section and are contained in the EDB

  12. Aeroelastic Uncertainty Quantification Studies Using the S4T Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbay, Melike; Heeg, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This paper originates from the joint efforts of an aeroelastic study team in the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel from NATO Science and Technology Organization, with the Task Group number AVT-191, titled "Application of Sensitivity Analysis and Uncertainty Quantification to Military Vehicle Design." We present aeroelastic uncertainty quantification studies using the SemiSpan Supersonic Transport wind tunnel model at the NASA Langley Research Center. The aeroelastic study team decided treat both structural and aerodynamic input parameters as uncertain and represent them as samples drawn from statistical distributions, propagating them through aeroelastic analysis frameworks. Uncertainty quantification processes require many function evaluations to asses the impact of variations in numerous parameters on the vehicle characteristics, rapidly increasing the computational time requirement relative to that required to assess a system deterministically. The increased computational time is particularly prohibitive if high-fidelity analyses are employed. As a remedy, the Istanbul Technical University team employed an Euler solver in an aeroelastic analysis framework, and implemented reduced order modeling with Polynomial Chaos Expansion and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition to perform the uncertainty propagation. The NASA team chose to reduce the prohibitive computational time by employing linear solution processes. The NASA team also focused on determining input sample distributions.

  13. Wind-tunnel modelling of the tip-speed ratio influence on the wake evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Victor P.; Kaltenbach, Hans-Jakob

    2016-09-01

    Wind-tunnel measurements on the near-wake evolution of a three bladed horizontal axis wind turbine model (HAWT) in the scale 1:O(350) operating in uniform flow conditions and within a turbulent boundary layer at different tip speed ratios are presented. Operational conditions are chosen to exclude Reynolds number effects regarding the turbulent boundary layer as well as the rotor performance. Triple-wire anemometry is used to measure all three velocity components in the mid-vertical and mid-horizontal plane, covering the range from the near- to the far-wake region. In order to analyse wake properties systematically, power and thrust coefficients of the turbine were measured additionally. It is confirmed that realistic modelling of the wake evolution is not possible in a low-turbulence uniform approach flow. Profiles of mean velocity and turbulence intensity exhibit large deviations between the low-turbulence uniform flow and the turbulent boundary layer, especially in the far-wake region. For nearly constant thrust coefficients differences in the evolution of the near-wake can be identified for tip speed ratios in the range from 6.5 to 10.5. It is shown that with increasing downstream distances mean velocity profiles become indistinguishable whereas for turbulence statistics a subtle dependency on the tip speed ratio is still noticeable in the far-wake region.

  14. Braze alloy process and strength characterization studies for 18 nickel grade 200 maraging steel with application to wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, James F.; Sandefur, Paul G., Jr.; Young, Clarence P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive study of braze alloy selection process and strength characterization with application to wind tunnel models is presented. The applications for this study include the installation of stainless steel pressure tubing in model airfoil sections make of 18 Ni 200 grade maraging steel and the joining of wing structural components by brazing. Acceptable braze alloys for these applications are identified along with process, thermal braze cycle data, and thermal management procedures. Shear specimens are used to evaluate comparative shear strength properties for the various alloys at both room and cryogenic (-300 F) temperatures and include the effects of electroless nickel plating. Nickel plating was found to significantly enhance both the wetability and strength properties for the various braze alloys studied. The data are provided for use in selecting braze alloys for use with 18 Ni grade 200 steel in the design of wind tunnel models to be tested in an ambient or cryogenic environment.

  15. Capabilities of wind tunnels with two-adaptive walls to minimize boundary interference in 3-D model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebstock, Rainer; Lee, Edwin E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    An initial wind tunnel test was made to validate a new wall adaptation method for 3-D models in test sections with two adaptive walls. First part of the adaptation strategy is an on-line assessment of wall interference at the model position. The wall induced blockage was very small at all test conditions. Lift interference occurred at higher angles of attack with the walls set aerodynamically straight. The adaptation of the top and bottom tunnel walls is aimed at achieving a correctable flow condition. The blockage was virtually zero throughout the wing planform after the wall adjustment. The lift curve measured with the walls adapted agreed very well with interference free data for Mach 0.7, regardless of the vertical position of the wing in the test section. The 2-D wall adaptation can significantly improve the correctability of 3-D model data. Nevertheless, residual spanwise variations of wall interference are inevitable.

  16. Validation Study for an Atmospheric Dispersion Model, Using Effective Source Heights Determined from Wind Tunnel Experiments in Nuclear Safety Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamichi Oura

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available For more than fifty years, atmospheric dispersion predictions based on the joint use of a Gaussian plume model and wind tunnel experiments have been applied in both Japan and the U.K. for the evaluation of public radiation exposure in nuclear safety analysis. The effective source height used in the Gaussian model is determined from ground-level concentration data obtained by a wind tunnel experiment using a scaled terrain and site model. In the present paper, the concentrations calculated by this method are compared with data observed over complex terrain in the field, under a number of meteorological conditions. Good agreement was confirmed in near-neutral and unstable stabilities. However, it was found to be necessary to reduce the effective source height by 50% in order to achieve a conservative estimation of the field observations in a stable atmosphere.

  17. Wind Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This ARDEC facility consists of subsonic, transonic, and supersonic wind tunnels to acquire aerodynamic data. Full-scale and sub-scale models of munitions are fitted...

  18. Air Flow Modeling in the Wind Tunnel of the FHWA Aerodynamics Laboratory at Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitek, M. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) Energy Systems Division; Lottes, S. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) Energy Systems Division; Bojanowski, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) Energy Systems Division

    2017-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is widely used in industry for design and in the research community to support, compliment, and extend the scope of experimental studies. Analysis of transportation infrastructure using high performance cluster computing with CFD and structural mechanics software is done at the Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) at Argonne National Laboratory. These resources, available at TRACC, were used to perform advanced three-dimensional computational simulations of the wind tunnel laboratory at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC). The goals were to verify the CFD model of the laboratory wind tunnel and then to use versions of the model to provide the capability to (1) perform larger parametric series of tests than can be easily done in the laboratory with available budget and time, (2) to extend testing to wind speeds that cannot be achieved in the laboratory, and (3) to run types of tests that are very difficult or impossible to run in the laboratory. Modern CFD software has many physics models and domain meshing options. Models, including the choice of turbulence and other physics models and settings, the computational mesh, and the solver settings, need to be validated against measurements to verify that the results are sufficiently accurate for use in engineering applications. The wind tunnel model was built and tested, by comparing to experimental measurements, to provide a valuable tool to perform these types of studies in the future as a complement and extension to TFHRC’s experimental capabilities. Wind tunnel testing at TFHRC is conducted in a subsonic open-jet wind tunnel with a 1.83 m (6 foot) by 1.83 m (6 foot) cross section. A three component dual force-balance system is used to measure forces acting on tested models, and a three degree of freedom suspension system is used for dynamic response tests. Pictures of the room are shown in Figure 1-1 to Figure 1-4. A detailed CAD

  19. Submucosal tunneling techniques: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujihara, Shintaro; Nishiyama, Noriko; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Matsunaga, Tae; Tani, Johji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Morishita, Asahiro; Oryu, Makoto; Iwama, Hisakazu; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Advances in endoscopic submucosal dissection include a submucosal tunneling technique, involving the introduction of tunnels into the submucosa. These tunnels permit safer offset entry into the peritoneal cavity for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Technical advantages include the visual identification of the layers of the gut, blood vessels, and subepithelial tumors. The creation of a mucosal flap that minimizes air and fluid leakage into the extraluminal cavity can enhance the safety and efficacy of surgery. This submucosal tunneling technique was adapted for esophageal myotomy, culminating in its application to patients with achalasia. This method, known as per oral endoscopic myotomy, has opened up the new discipline of submucosal endoscopic surgery. Other clinical applications of the submucosal tunneling technique include its use in the removal of gastrointestinal subepithelial tumors and endomicroscopy for the diagnosis of functional and motility disorders. This review suggests that the submucosal tunneling technique, involving a mucosal safety flap, can have potential values for future endoscopic developments.

  20. Stochastic Channel Modeling for Railway Tunnel Scenarios at 25 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danping He

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available More people prefer using rail traffic for travel or for commuting owing to its convenience and flexibility. The railway scenario has become an important communication scenario in the fifth generation era. The communication system should be designed to support high‐data‐rate demands with seamless connectivity at a high mobility. In this paper, the channel characteristics are studied and modeled for the railway tunnel scenario with straight and curved route shapes. On the basis of measurements using the “Mobile Hotspot Network” system, a three‐dimensional ray tracer (RT is calibrated and validated for the target scenarios. More channel characteristics are explored via RT simulations at 25.25 GHz with a 500‐MHz bandwidth. The key channel parameters are extracted, provided, and incorporated into a 3rd‐Generation‐Partnership‐Project‐like stochastic channel generator. The necessary channel information can be practically realized, which can support the link‐level and system‐level design of the communication system in similar scenarios.

  1. An extended model of electrons: experimental evidence from high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, Werner A

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper we introduced a model of extended electrons, which is fully compatible with quantum mechanics in the formulation of Schrödinger. However, it contradicts the current interpretation of electrons as point-particles. Here, we show by a statistical analysis of high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments, that the interpretation of electrons as point particles and, consequently, the interpretation of the density of electron charge as a statistical quantity will lead to a conflict with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Given the precision in these experiments we find that the uncertainty principle would be violated by close to two orders of magnitude, if this interpretation were correct. We are thus forced to conclude that the density of electron charge is a physically real, i.e. in principle precisely measurable quantity, as derived in a recent paper. Experimental evidence to the contrary, in particular high-energy scattering experiments, is briefly discussed. The finding is expected to have wide implications in condensed matter physics, chemistry, and biology, scientific disciplines which are based on the properties and interactions of electrons.

  2. Quasiparticle energies and lifetimes in a metallic chain model of a tunnel junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szepieniec, Mark; Yeriskin, Irene; Greer, J C

    2013-04-14

    As electronics devices scale to sub-10 nm lengths, the distinction between "device" and "electrodes" becomes blurred. Here, we study a simple model of a molecular tunnel junction, consisting of an atomic gold chain partitioned into left and right electrodes, and a central "molecule." Using a complex absorbing potential, we are able to reproduce the single-particle energy levels of the device region including a description of the effects of the semi-infinite electrodes. We then use the method of configuration interaction to explore the effect of correlations on the system's quasiparticle peaks. We find that when excitations on the leads are excluded, the device's highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital quasiparticle states when including correlation are bracketed by their respective values in the Hartree-Fock (Koopmans) and ΔSCF approximations. In contrast, when excitations on the leads are included, the bracketing property no longer holds, and both the positions and the lifetimes of the quasiparticle levels change considerably, indicating that the combined effect of coupling and correlation is to alter the quasiparticle spectrum significantly relative to an isolated molecule.

  3. Preliminary studies of tunnel interface response modeling using test data from underground storage facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bartel, Lewis Clark

    2010-11-01

    In attempting to detect and map out underground facilities, whether they be large-scale hardened deeply-buried targets (HDBT's) or small-scale tunnels for clandestine border or perimeter crossing, seismic imaging using reflections from the tunnel interface has been seen as one of the better ways to both detect and delineate tunnels from the surface. The large seismic impedance contrast at the tunnel/rock boundary should provide a strong, distinguishable seismic response, but in practice, such strong indicators are often lacking. One explanation for the lack of a good seismic reflection at such a strong contrast boundary is that the damage caused by the tunneling itself creates a zone of altered seismic properties that significantly changes the nature of this boundary. This report examines existing geomechanical data that define the extent of an excavation damage zone around underground tunnels, and the potential impact on rock properties such as P-wave and S-wave velocities. The data presented from this report are associated with sites used for the development of underground repositories for the disposal of radioactive waste; these sites have been excavated in volcanic tuff (Yucca Mountain) and granite (HRL in Sweden, URL in Canada). Using the data from Yucca Mountain, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the damage zone on seismic responses. Calculations were performed using the parallelized version of the time-domain finitedifference seismic wave propagation code developed in the Geophysics Department at Sandia National Laboratories. From these numerical simulations, the damage zone does not have a significant effect upon the tunnel response, either for a purely elastic case or an anelastic case. However, what was discovered is that the largest responses are not true reflections, but rather reradiated Stoneley waves generated as the air/earth interface of the tunnel. Because of this, data processed in the usual way may not

  4. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  5. Charge–mass ratio bound and optimization in the Parikh–Wilczek tunneling model of Hawking radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Kiu; Wen, Wen-Yu

    2014-01-01

    In this Letter, we study the mutual information hidden in the Parikh–Wilczek tunneling model of Hawking radiation for Reissner–Nordström black holes. We argue that the condition of nonnegativity of mutual information suggests bound(s) for charge–mass ratio of emitted particles. We further view the radiation as an optimization process and discuss its effect on time evolution of a charged black hole.

  6. Wind Tunnel Testing of a 120th Scale Large Civil Tilt-Rotor Model in Airplane and Helicopter Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin R.; Willink, Gina C.; Russell, Carl R.; Amy, Alexander R.; Pete, Ashley E.

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012 and October 2013, NASA and the U.S. Army jointly conducted a wind tunnel test program examining two notional large tilt rotor designs: NASA's Large Civil Tilt Rotor and the Army's High Efficiency Tilt Rotor. The approximately 6%-scale airframe models (unpowered) were tested without rotors in the U.S. Army 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Measurements of all six forces and moments acting on the airframe were taken using the wind tunnel scale system. In addition to force and moment measurements, flow visualization using tufts, infrared thermography and oil flow were used to identify flow trajectories, boundary layer transition and areas of flow separation. The purpose of this test was to collect data for the validation of computational fluid dynamics tools, for the development of flight dynamics simulation models, and to validate performance predictions made during conceptual design. This paper focuses on the results for the Large Civil Tilt Rotor model in an airplane mode configuration up to 200 knots of wind tunnel speed. Results are presented with the full airframe model with various wing tip and nacelle configurations, and for a wing-only case also with various wing tip and nacelle configurations. Key results show that the addition of a wing extension outboard of the nacelles produces a significant increase in the lift-to-drag ratio, and interestingly decreases the drag compared to the case where the wing extension is not present. The drag decrease is likely due to complex aerodynamic interactions between the nacelle and wing extension that results in a significant drag benefit.

  7. Investigations of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS Integrated Space Shuttle Vehicle Jet-Plume Model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 by11-Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (IA80). Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    The results are documented of jet plume effects wind tunnel test of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS launch configuration space shuttle vehicle model in the 11 x 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This test involved cold gas main propulsion system (MPS) and solid rocket motor (SRB) plume simulations at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.4. Integrated vehicle surface pressure distributions, elevon and rudder hinge moments, and wing and vertical tail root bending and torsional moments due to MPS and SRB plume interactions were determined. Nozzle power conditions were controlled per pretest nozzle calibrations. Model angle of attack was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg; model angle of sideslip was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg. Reynolds number was varied for certain test conditions and configurations, with the nominal freestream total pressure being 14.69 psia. Plotted force and pressure data are presented.

  8. Gust-Tunnel Investigation of the Effect of a Sharp-Edge Gust on the Flapwise Blade Bending Moments of a Model Helicopter Rotor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maglieri, Domenic

    1955-01-01

    Preliminary investigations have been made in the Langley gust tunnel to determine the effects of a sharp-edge vertical gust on the blade flapwise vibratory bending moments of small model rotors having...

  9. A 2.5D finite element and boundary element model for the ground vibration from trains in tunnels and validation using measurement data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qiyun; Thompson, David J.; Lurcock, Daniel E. J.; Toward, Martin G. R.; Ntotsios, Evangelos

    2018-05-01

    A numerical model is presented for the ground-borne vibration produced by trains running in tunnels. The model makes use of the assumption that the geometry and material properties are invariant in the axial direction. It is based on the so-called two-and-a-half dimensional (2.5D) coupled Finite Element and Boundary Element methodology, in which a two-dimensional cross-section is discretised into finite elements and boundary elements and the third dimension is represented by a Fourier transform over wavenumbers. The model is applied to a particular case of a metro line built with a cast-iron tunnel lining. An equivalent continuous model of the tunnel is developed to allow it to be readily implemented in the 2.5D framework. The tunnel structure and the track are modelled using solid and beam finite elements while the ground is modelled using boundary elements. The 2.5D track-tunnel-ground model is coupled with a train consisting of several vehicles, which are represented by multi-body models. The response caused by the passage of a train is calculated as the sum of the dynamic component, excited by the combined rail and wheel roughness, and the quasi-static component, induced by the constant moving axle loads. Field measurements have been carried out to provide experimental validation of the model. These include measurements of the vibration of the rail, the tunnel invert and the tunnel wall. In addition, simultaneous measurements were made on the ground surface above the tunnel. Rail roughness and track characterisation measurements were also made. The prediction results are compared with measured vibration obtained during train passages, with good agreement.

  10. Environmental Management Model for Road Maintenance Operation Involving Community Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triyono, A. R. H.; Setyawan, A.; Sobriyah; Setiono, P.

    2017-07-01

    Public expectations of Central Java, which is very high on demand fulfillment, especially road infrastructure as outlined in the number of complaints and community expectations tweeter, Short Mail Massage (SMS), e-mail and public reports from various media, Highways Department of Central Java province requires development model of environmental management in the implementation of a routine way by involving the community in order to fulfill the conditions of a representative, may serve road users safely and comfortably. This study used survey method with SEM analysis and SWOT with Latent Independent Variable (X), namely; Public Participation in the regulation, development, construction and supervision of road (PSM); Public behavior in the utilization of the road (PMJ) Provincial Road Service (PJP); Safety in the Provincial Road (KJP); Integrated Management System (SMT) and latent dependent variable (Y) routine maintenance of the provincial road that is integrated with the environmental management system and involve the participation of the community (MML). The result showed the implementation of routine maintenance of road conditions in Central Java province has yet to implement an environmental management by involving the community; Therefore developed environmental management model with the results of H1: Community Participation (PSM) has positive influence on the Model of Environmental Management (MML); H2: Behavior Society in Jalan Utilization (PMJ) positive effect on Model Environmental Management (MML); H3: Provincial Road Service (PJP) positive effect on Model Environmental Management (MML); H4: Safety in the Provincial Road (KJP) positive effect on Model Environmental Management (MML); H5: Integrated Management System (SMT) has positive influence on the Model of Environmental Management (MML). From the analysis obtained formulation model describing the relationship / influence of the independent variables PSM, PMJ, PJP, KJP, and SMT on the dependent variable

  11. Model equations for Calculating Rn-gas Concentrations in Air of Uranium Exploratory Tunnels, Allouga, West-Central Sinai , Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Monem, A.A.; Soliman, S.F.H.; Abd El-Kader, F.H.; El-Naggar, A.M.; Eissa, H.M.; Abd El-Hafez, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Gabal Allouga area is located some 40 km due east from Abu Zenima town on the east coast of the Gulf of Suez, West-Central Sinai, Egypt. A network of exploratory tunnels totaling 670m in length and approximately 2x2 m in cross section, were excavated within a paleosol clayey bed. They host (Fe, Mn)-, Cu-, and U-mineralizations. Portions of the tunnels are naturally ventilated and others portions are non-ventilated and show ground water seepage through fractures. Model equations were developed for calculating the Rn-gas concentrations in the air of the tunnels under dry conditions where Rn-gas transport is mainly by air flow through porous media as well as for wet conditions where Rn-gas transport is mainly by ground water flow into the tunnels. Under dry conditions the model calculated Rn-gas concentrations(15.2-60.6 PCi/1) are consistent with measured values by active techniques (3.26-22.85 pCi/1) and by SSNTD techniques (19-69.1 pCi/1) when the Rn-emanation coefficient (alpha= 0.05-0.2), the emanating rock thickness (X=10 cm) and U-concentration averages 30 ppm. Under wet and non-ventilated conditions the model calculated Rn-gas concentrations (159-1248 pCi/1) are consistent with the measured values by active techniques (231-1348 pCi/1) and by SSNTD techniques (144-999pCi/1), when the Rn-emanation coefficient (alpha=0.1-0.25), the ground water flow (F=0.04-0.10 ml/s -1 cm -2 ) and U-concertrations (100-250ppm)

  12. Adaptation of the model of tunneling in a metal/CaF{sub 2}/Si(111) system for use in industrial simulators of MIS devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vexler, M. I., E-mail: shulekin@mail.ioffe.ru; Illarionov, Yu. Yu.; Tyaginov, S. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Grasser, T. [Institute for Microelectronics, TU Vienna (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    An approach toward simplification of the model of the tunneling transport of electrons through a thin layer of crystalline calcium fluoride into a silicon (111) substrate with subsequent implementation in simulators of semiconductor devices is suggested. The validity of the approach is proven by comparing the results of modeling using simplified formulas with the results of precise calculations and experimental data. The approach can be applied to calculations of tunneling currents in structures with any crystalline insulators on Si (111)

  13. Band electron spectrum and thermodynamic properties of the pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Ya.Farenyuk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels is considered. Generalization of dynamic mean-field method for systems with correlated hopping was applied to the investigation of the model. Electron spectra, electron concentrations, average values of pseudospins and grand canonical potential were calculated within the alloy-analogy approximation. Electron spectrum and dependencies of the electron concentrations on chemical potential were obtained. It was shown that in the alloy-analogy approximation, the model possesses the first order phase transition to ferromagnetic state with the change of chemical potential and the second order phase transition with the change of temperature.

  14. Measuring fire size in tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qihui

    2013-01-01

    A new measure of fire size Q′ has been introduced in longitudinally ventilated tunnel as the ratio of flame height to the height of tunnel. The analysis in this article has shown that Q′ controls both the critical velocity and the maximum ceiling temperature in the tunnel. Before the fire flame reaches tunnel ceiling (Q′ 1.0), Fr approaches a constant value. This is also a well-known phenomenon in large tunnel fires. Tunnel ceiling temperature shows the opposite trend. Before the fire flame reaches the ceiling, it increases very slowly with the fire size. Once the flame has hit the ceiling of tunnel, temperature rises rapidly with Q′. The good agreement between the current prediction and three different sets of experimental data has demonstrated that the theory has correctly modelled the relation among the heat release rate of fire, ventilation flow and the height of tunnel. From design point of view, the theoretical maximum of critical velocity for a given tunnel can help to prevent oversized ventilation system. -- Highlights: • Fire sizing is an important safety measure in tunnel design. • New measure of fire size a function of HRR of fire, tunnel height and ventilation. • The measure can identify large and small fires. • The characteristics of different fire are consistent with observation in real fires

  15. Modeling of modification experiments involving neutral-gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments involve the injection of neutral gases into the upper atmosphere. Examples are critical velocity experiments, MHD wave generation, ionospheric hole production, plasma striation formation, and ion tracing. Many of these experiments are discussed in other sessions of the Active Experiments Conference. This paper limits its discussion to: (1) the modeling of the neutral gas dynamics after injection, (2) subsequent formation of ionosphere holes, and (3) use of such holes as experimental tools

  16. Fires involving radioactive materials : transference model; operative recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.E.; Puntarulo, L.J.; Canibano, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    In all aspects related to the nuclear activity, the occurrence of an explosion, fire or burst type accident, with or without victims, is directly related to the characteristics of the site. The present work analyses the different parameters involved, describing a transference model and recommendations for evaluation and control of the radiological risk for firemen. Special emphasis is placed on the measurement of the variables existing in this kind of operations

  17. Developing a Fracture Model of the Granite Rocks Around the Research Tunnel at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory in Central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, E.; Hadgu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) is located in Tono area in Central Japan. It is operated by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) with the main purpose of providing scientific basis for the research and development of technologies needed for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in fractured crystalline rocks. The current work is focused on the research and experiments in the tunnel located at 500 m depth. The data collected in the tunnel and exploratory boreholes were shared with the participants of the DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation against EXperiments (DECOVALEX), an international research and model comparison collaboration. This study describes the development of the fracture model representing granite rocks around the research tunnel. The model domain is 100x150x100m with the main experimental part of the tunnel, Closure Test Drift, located approximately in the center. The major input data were the fracture traces measured on the tunnel walls (total of 2,023 fractures), fractures observed in the horizontal borehole parallel to the tunnel, and the packer tests conducted in this borehole and one vertical borehole located within the modeling domain. 78 fractures (the ones with the inflow) in the tunnel were incorporated in the development of the fracture model. Fracture size was derived from the fracture trace analysis. It was shown that the fracture radius followed lognormal distributions. Fracture transmissivity was estimated from an analytical solution of inflow into the tunnel through an individual fracture and the total measured inflow into the tunnel. 16 fractures were incorporated in the model along the horizontal borehole. The packer test data in the different well intervals were used to estimate the range in fracture transmissivity. A relationship between the fracture transmissivity and fracture radius was developed. The fractures in the tunnel and borehole were used to derive fracture orientation and

  18. Model of a tunneling current in a p-n junction based on armchair graphene nanoribbons - an Airy function approach and a transfer matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhendi, Endi; Syariati, Rifki; Noor, Fatimah A.; Khairurrijal; Kurniasih, Neny

    2014-01-01

    We modeled a tunneling current in a p-n junction based on armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) by using an Airy function approach (AFA) and a transfer matrix method (TMM). We used β-type AGNRs, in which its band gap energy and electron effective mass depends on its width as given by the extended Huckel theory. It was shown that the tunneling currents evaluated by employing the AFA are the same as those obtained under the TMM. Moreover, the calculated tunneling current was proportional to the voltage bias and inversely with temperature

  19. Thermal and Pressure Characterization of a Wind Tunnel Force Balance Using the Single Vector System. Experimental Design and Analysis Approach to Model Pressure and Temperature Effects in Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Commo, Sean A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Parker, Peter A,

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel research at NASA Langley Research Center s 31-inch Mach 10 hypersonic facility utilized a 5-component force balance, which provided a pressurized flow-thru capability to the test article. The goal of the research was to determine the interaction effects between the free-stream flow and the exit flow from the reaction control system on the Mars Science Laboratory aeroshell during planetary entry. In the wind tunnel, the balance was exposed to aerodynamic forces and moments, steady-state and transient thermal gradients, and various internal balance cavity pressures. Historically, these effects on force measurement accuracy have not been fully characterized due to limitations in the calibration apparatus. A statistically designed experiment was developed to adequately characterize the behavior of the balance over the expected wind tunnel operating ranges (forces/moments, temperatures, and pressures). The experimental design was based on a Taylor-series expansion in the seven factors for the mathematical models. Model inversion was required to calculate the aerodynamic forces and moments as a function of the strain-gage readings. Details regarding transducer on-board compensation techniques, experimental design development, mathematical modeling, and wind tunnel data reduction are included in this paper.

  20. Aerodynamic characteristics of the modified 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel as measured in a 1/50th-scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian E.; Naumowicz, Tim

    1987-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center were measured by using a 1/50th-scale facility. The model was configured to closely simulate the features of the full-scale facility when it became operational in 1986. The items measured include the aerodynamic effects due to changes in the total-pressure-loss characteristics of the intake and exhaust openings of the air-exchange system, total-pressure distributions in the flow field at locations around the wind tunnel circuit, the locations of the maximum total-pressure contours, and the aerodynamic changes caused by the installation of the acoustic barrier in the southwest corner of the wind tunnel. The model tests reveal the changes in the aerodynamic performance of the 1986 version of the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel compared with the performance of the 1982 configuration.

  1. Wind tunnel and CFD modelling of wind pressures on solar energy systems on flat roofs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, A.J.; Franke, J.; Geurts, C.P.W.; Bentum, van C.A.; Grepinet, F.

    2010-01-01

    Design of solar energy mounting systems requires more knowledge on the wind patterns around these systems. To obtain more insight in the flow patterns, which cause the pressure distributions on the solar energy systems, a wind tunnel test and Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis have been

  2. Toward quantitative prediction of charge mobility in organic semiconductors: tunneling enabled hopping model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hua; Peng, Qian; Wang, Linjun; Li, Haijiao; Liao, Yi; Ma, Zhiying; Shuai, Zhigang

    2012-07-10

    A tunneling-enabled hopping mechanism is proposed, providing a pratical tool to quantitatively assess charge mobility in organic semiconductors. The paradoxical phenomena in TIPS-pentacene is well explained in that the optical probe indicates localized charges while transport measurements show bands of charge. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The Effects of Realistic Geological Heterogeneity on Seismic Modeling: Applications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface Tunnel Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Christopher Scott

    compressional wave energy may be generated within the shear radiation node of the source. Interestingly, in some cases this shear wave may arise as a coherent pulse, which may be used to improve seismic imaging efforts. In the third and fourth chapters, I discuss the results of a numerical analysis and field study of seismic near-surface tunnel detection methods. Detecting unknown tunnels and voids, such as old mine workings or solution cavities in karst terrain, is a challenging prob- lem in geophysics and has implications for geotechnical design, public safety, and domestic security. Over the years, a number of different geophysical methods have been developed to locate these objects (microgravity, resistivity, seismic diffraction, etc.), each with varying results. One of the major challenges facing these methods is understanding the influence of geologic heterogeneity on their results, which makes this problem a natural extension of the modeling work discussed in previous chapters. In the third chapter, I present the results of a numerical study of surface-wave based tunnel detection methods. The results of this analysis show that these methods are capable of detecting a void buried within one wavelength of the surface, with size potentially much less than one wavelength. In addition, seismic surface- wave based detection methods are effective in media with moderate heterogeneity (epsilon < 5 %), and in fact, this heterogeneity may serve to increase the resolution of these methods. In the fourth chapter, I discuss the results of a field study of tunnel detection methods at a site within the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve, near Antioch California. I use a com- bination of surface wave backscattering, 1D surface wave attenuation, and 2D attenuation tomography to locate and determine the condition of two tunnels at this site. These results compliment the numerical study in chapter 3 and highlight their usefulness for detecting tunnels at other sites.

  4. Coarse-Grained Model for Water Involving a Virtual Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mingsen; Shen, Hujun

    2016-02-04

    In this work, we propose a new coarse-grained (CG) model for water by combining the features of two popular CG water models (BMW and MARTINI models) as well as by adopting a topology similar to that of the TIP4P water model. In this CG model, a CG unit, representing four real water molecules, consists of a virtual site, two positively charged particles, and a van der Waals (vdW) interaction center. Distance constraint is applied to the bonds formed between the vdW interaction center and the positively charged particles. The virtual site, which carries a negative charge, is determined by the locations of the two positively charged particles and the vdW interaction center. For the new CG model of water, we coined the name "CAVS" (charge is attached to a virtual site) due to the involvment of the virtual site. After being tested in molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of bulk water at various time steps, under different temperatures and in different salt (NaCl) concentrations, the CAVS model offers encouraging predictions for some bulk properties of water (such as density, dielectric constant, etc.) when compared to experimental ones.

  5. Modeling of nonlinear responses for reciprocal transducers involving polarization switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Wang, Linxiang

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinearities and hysteresis effects in a reciprocal PZT transducer are examined by use of a dynamical mathematical model on the basis of phase-transition theory. In particular, we consider the perovskite piezoelectric ceramic in which the polarization process in the material can be modeled...... by Landau theory for the first-order phase transformation, in which each polarization state is associated with a minimum of the Landau free-energy function. Nonlinear constitutive laws are obtained by using thermodynamical equilibrium conditions, and hysteretic behavior of the material can be modeled...... intrinsically. The time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory is used in the parameter identification involving hysteresis effects. We use the Chebyshev collocation method in the numerical simulations. The elastic field is assumed to be coupled linearly with other fields, and the nonlinearity is in the E-D coupling...

  6. Calculation of a Tunnel Cross Section Subjected to Fire – with a New Advanced Transient Concrete Model for Reinforced Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schneider

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the structural application of a new thermal induced strain model for concrete – the TIS-Model. An advanced transient concrete model (ATCM is applied with the material model of the TIS-Model. The non-linear model comprises thermal strain, elastic strain, plastic strain and transient temperature strains, and load history modelling of restraint concrete structures subjected to fire.The calculations by finite element analysis (FEA were done using the SAFIR structural code. The FEA software was basically new with respect to the material modelling derived to use the new TIS-Model (as a transient model considers thermal induced strain. The equations of the ATCM consider a lot of capabilities, especially for considering irreversible effects of temperature on some material properties. By considering the load history during heating up, increasing load bearing capacity may be obtained due to higher stiffness of the concrete. With this model, it is possible to apply the thermal-physical behaviour of material laws for calculation of structures under extreme temperature conditions.A tunnel cross section designed and built by the cut and cover method is calculated with a tunnel fire curve. The results are compared with the results of a calculation with the model of the Eurocode 2 (EC2-Model. The effect of load history in highly loaded structures under fire load will be investigated.A comparison of this model with the ordinary calculation system of Eurocode 2 (EC2 shows that a better evaluation of the safety level was achieved with the new model. This opens a space for optimizing concrete structure design with transient temperature conditions up to 1000 °C. 

  7. Numerical modeling of the creep behavior of clays with emphasis on tunnels and underground openings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    This report presents an interpretive overview and critical assessment of the state-of-the-art for numerical modeling of the creep behavior of clays. The overview and assessment is focused upon application to underground openings. Field and laboratory observations of time-dependent behavior, constitutive modeling of creep behavior, and numerical implementation of constitutive equations are addressed. A critical assessment of the ability of existing models to predict aspects of creep behavior relevant to waste repository design and suggestions for improved analyses that can be developed with existing technology are provided. Both heuristic and mathematical constitutive models are reviewed. Heuristic models provide a basis for evaluation of the required parameters for the continuum mechanics based mathematical models. The continuum mechanics models are required for numerical analysis. It has been demonstrated that, by using iterative and incremental analysis, virtually any viscous or inviscid continuum mechanics material model can be adapted to consider time-dependent behavior. Available numerical models for numerical analysis of geotechnical problems involving creep deformations are reviewed. Models for thermo-mechanical coupling are also addressed in this review. Cases where creep-inclusive analyses have been applied to analysis of prototype behavior are cited. However, the lack of well documented case histories of time-dependent deformations over significant time spans is identified as a major obstacle to model verification. Recommendations are made for an alternative design approach capable of guaranteeing the very long term mechanical integrity of the liner. 167 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs

  8. Aeroelastic Analysis of a Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents data analysis of a flexible wing wind tunnel model with a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap (VCCTEF) design for drag minimization tested at the University of Washington Aeronautical Laboratory (UWAL). The wind tunnel test was designed to explore the relative merit of the VCCTEF concept for improved cruise efficiency through the use of low-cost aeroelastic model test techniques. The flexible wing model is a 10%-scale model of a typical transport wing and is constructed of woven fabric composites and foam core. The wing structural stiffness in bending is tailored to be half of the stiffness of a Boeing 757-era transport wing while the torsional stiffness is about the same. This stiffness reduction results in a wing tip deflection of about 10% of the wing semi-span. The VCCTEF is a multi-segment flap design having three chordwise camber segments and five spanwise flap sections for a total of 15 individual flap elements. The three chordwise camber segments can be positioned appropriately to create a desired trailing edge camber. Elastomeric material is used to cover the gaps in between the spanwise flap sections, thereby creating a continuous trailing edge. Wind tunnel data analysis conducted previously shows that the VCCTEF can achieve a drag reduction of up to 6.31% and an improvement in the lift-to-drag ratio (L=D) of up to 4.85%. A method for estimating the bending and torsional stiffnesses of the flexible wingUWAL wind tunnel model from static load test data is presented. The resulting estimation indicates that the stiffness of the flexible wing is significantly stiffer in torsion than in bending by as much as 9 to 1. The lift prediction for the flexible wing is computed by a coupled aerodynamic-structural model. The coupled model is developed by coupling a conceptual aerodynamic tool Vorlax with a finite-element model of the flexible wing via an automated geometry deformation tool. Based on the comparison of the lift curve slope

  9. Model Deformation Measurements of Sonic Boom Models in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura K.; Garbeff, Theodore J.; Heineck, James T.

    2015-01-01

    The deformations of two sonic-boom models were measured by stereo photogrammetry during tests in the 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The models were geometrically similar but one was 2.75 times as large as the other. Deformation measurements were made by simultaneously imaging the upper surfaces of the models from two directions by calibrated cameras that were mounted behind windows of the test section. Bending and twist were measured at discrete points using conventional circular targets that had been marked along the leading and trailing edges of the wings and tails. In addition, continuous distributions of bending and twist were measured from ink speckles that had been applied to the upper surfaces of the model. Measurements were made at wind-on (M = 1.6) and wind-off conditions over a range of angles of attack between 2.5 deg. and 5.0 deg. At each condition, model deformation was determined by comparing the wind-off and wind-on coordinates of each measurement point after transforming the coordinates to reference coordinates tied to the model. The necessary transformations were determined by measuring the positions of a set of targets on the rigid center-body of the models whose model-axes coordinates were known. Smoothly varying bending and twist measurements were obtained at all conditions. Bending displacements increased in proportion to the square of the distance to the centerline. Maximum deflection of the wingtip of the larger model was about 5 mm (2% of the semispan) and that of the smaller model was 0.9 mm (1% of the semispan). The change in wing twist due to bending increased in direct proportion to distance from the centerline and reached a (absolute) maximum of about -1? at the highest angle of attack for both models. The measurements easily resolved bending displacements as small as 0.05 mm and bending-induced changes in twist as small as 0.05 deg.

  10. A New Reliability Analysis Model of the Chegongzhuang Heat-Supplying Tunnel Structure Considering the Coupling of Pipeline Thrust and Thermal Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiawen Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the operating Chegongzhuang heat-supplying tunnel in Beijing, the reliability of its lining structure under the action of large thrust and thermal effect is studied. According to the characteristics of a heat-supplying tunnel service, a three-dimensional numerical analysis model was established based on the mechanical tests on the in-situ specimens. The stress and strain of the tunnel structure were obtained before and after the operation. Compared with the field monitoring data, the rationality of the model was verified. After extracting the internal force of the lining structure, the improved method of subset simulation was proposed as the performance function to calculate the reliability of the main control section of the tunnel. In contrast to the traditional calculation method, the analytic relationship between the sample numbers in the subset simulation method and Monte Carlo method was given. The results indicate that the lining structure is greatly influenced by coupling in the range of six meters from the fixed brackets, especially the tunnel floor. The improved subset simulation method can greatly save computation time and improve computational efficiency under the premise of ensuring the accuracy of calculation. It is suitable for the reliability calculation of tunnel engineering, because “the lower the probability, the more efficient the calculation.”

  11. Evaluation of a new method for puff arrival time as assessed through wind tunnel modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chaloupecká, Hana; Jaňour, Zbyněk; Mikšovský, J.; Jurčáková, Klára; Kellnerová, Radka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 111, October (2017), s. 194-210 ISSN 0957-5820 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-18964S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : wind tunnel * short-term gas leakage * puff Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology OBOR OECD: Meteorology and atmospheric sciences Impact factor: 2.905, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0957582017302203

  12. Spin-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Northrop F-5E Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Stanley H.; White, William L.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley spin tunnel to determine the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/20-scale model of the Northrop F-5E airplane. The investigation included erect and inverted spins, a range of center-of- gravity locations and moments of inertia, symmetric and asymmetric store loadings, and a determination of the parachute size required for emergency spin recovery. The effects of increased elevator trailing-edge-up deflections, of leading-edge and trailing-edge flap deflections, and of simulating the geometry of large external stores were also determined.

  13. Modelling and Analysis of the Excavation Phase by the Theory of Blocks Method of Tunnel 4 Kherrata Gorge, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukarm, Riadh; Houam, Abdelkader; Fredj, Mohammed; Boucif, Rima

    2017-12-01

    The aim of our work is to check the stability during excavation tunnel work in the rock mass of Kherrata, connecting the cities of Bejaia to Setif. The characterization methods through the Q system (method of Barton), RMR (Bieniawski classification) allowed us to conclude that the quality of rock mass is average in limestone, and poor in fractured limestone. Then modelling of excavation phase using the theory of blocks method (Software UNWEDGE) with the parameters from the recommendations of classification allowed us to check stability and to finally conclude that the use of geomechanical classification and the theory of blocks can be considered reliable in preliminary design.

  14. V/STOL Tandem Fan transition section model test. [in the Lewis Research Center 10-by-10 foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkin, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    An approximately 0.25 scale model of the transition section of a tandem fan variable cycle engine nacelle was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center 10-by-10 foot wind tunnel. Two 12-inch, tip-turbine driven fans were used to simulate a tandem fan engine. Three testing modes simulated a V/STOL tandem fan airplane. Parallel mode has two separate propulsion streams for maximum low speed performance. A front inlet, fan, and downward vectorable nozzle forms one stream. An auxilliary top inlet provides air to the aft fan - supplying the core engine and aft vectorable nozzle. Front nozzle and top inlet closure, and removal of a blocker door separating the two streams configures the tandem fan for series mode operations as a typical aircraft propulsion system. Transition mode operation is formed by intermediate settings of the front nozzle, blocker door, and top inlet. Emphasis was on the total pressure recovery and flow distortion at the aft fan face. A range of fan flow rates were tested at tunnel airspeeds from 0 to 240 knots, and angles-of-attack from -10 to 40 deg for all three modes. In addition to the model variables for the three modes, model variants of the top inlet were tested in the parallel mode only. These lip variables were: aft lip boundary layer bleed holes, and Three position turning vane. Also a bellmouth extension of the top inlet side lips was tested in parallel mode.

  15. A New Unified Solution for Circular Tunnel Based on a Four-Stage Constitutive Model considering the Intermediate Principal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the triaxial test, the elasto-perfectly plastic strain-softening damage model (EPSDM is proposed as a new four-stage constitutive model. Compared with traditional models, such as the elasto-brittle-plastic model (EBM, elasto-strain-softening model (ESM, elasto-perfectly plastic model (EPM, and elasto-peak plastic-brittle plastic model (EPBM, this model incorporates both the plastic bearing capacity and strain-softening characteristics of rock mass. Moreover, a new closed-form solution of the circular tunnel is presented for the stress and displacement distribution, and a plastic shear strain increment is introduced to define the critical condition where the strain-softening zone begins to occur. The new analysis solution obtained in this paper is a series of results rather than one specific solution; hence, it is suitable for a wide range of rock masses and engineering structures. The numerical simulation has been used to verify the correctness of the EPSDM. The parametric studies are also conducted to investigate the effects of supporting resistance, residual cohesion, dilation angle, strain-softening coefficient, plastic shear strain increment, and yield parameter on the result. It is shown that when the supporting resistance is fully released, both the post-peak failure radii and surface displacement could be summarized as EBM > EPBM > ESM > EPSDM > EPM; the dilation angle in the damage zone had the highest influence on the surface displacement, whereas the dilation angle in the perfectly plastic zone had the lowest influence; the strain-softening coefficient had the most significant effect on the damage zone radii; the EPSDM is recommended as the optimum model for support design and stability evaluation of the circular tunnel excavated in the perfectly plastic strain-softening rock mass.

  16. Tunneling in axion monodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Jon; Cottrell, William; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin,Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-10-06

    The Coleman formula for vacuum decay and bubble nucleation has been used to estimate the tunneling rate in models of axion monodromy in recent literature. However, several of Coleman’s original assumptions do not hold for such models. Here we derive a new estimate with this in mind using a similar Euclidean procedure. We find that there are significant regions of parameter space for which the tunneling rate in axion monodromy is not well approximated by the Coleman formula. However, there is also a regime relevant to large field inflation in which both estimates parametrically agree. We also briefly comment on the applications of our results to the relaxion scenario.

  17. Full-Span Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) Overview and 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel Test. [conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluer, Megan S.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most helicopter data trends cannot be extrapolated to tiltrotors because blade geometry and aerodynamic behavior, as well as rotor and fuselage interactions, are significantly different for tiltrotors. A tiltrotor model has been developed to investigate the aeromechanics of tiltrotors, to develop a comprehensive database for validating tiltrotor analyses, and to provide a research platform for supporting future tiltrotor designs. The Full-Span Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Model (FS TRAM) is a dual-rotor, powered aircraft model with extensive instrumentation for measurement of structural and aerodynamic loads. This paper will present the Full-Span TRAM test capabilities and the first set of data obtained during a 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test conducted in late 2000 at NASA Ames Research Center. The Full-Span TRAM is a quarter-scale representation of the V-22 Osprey aircraft, and a heavily instrumented NASA and U.S. Army wind tunnel test stand. Rotor structural loads are monitored and recorded for safety-of-flight and for information on blade loads and dynamics. Left and right rotor balance and fuselage balance loads are monitored for safety-of-flight and for measurement of vehicle and rotor aerodynamic performance. Static pressure taps on the left wing are used to determine rotor/wing interactional effects and rotor blade dynamic pressures measure blade airloads. All of these measurement capabilities make the FS TRAM test stand a unique and valuable asset for validation of computational codes and to aid in future tiltrotor designs. The Full-Span TRAM was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel from October through December 2000. Rotor and vehicle performance measurements were acquired in addition to wing pressures, rotor acoustics, and Laser Light Sheet (LLS) flow visualization data. Hover, forward flight, and airframe (rotors off) aerodynamic runs were performed. Helicopter-mode data were acquired during angle of attack and thrust sweeps for

  18. First-principles modelling of scanning tunneling microscopy using non-equilibrium Green's functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, H.P.; Rauba, J.M.C.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of electron transport processes in nano-scale architectures plays a crucial role in the development of surface chemistry and nano-technology. Experimentally, an important driving force within this research area has been the concurrent refinements of scanning tunneling microscopy...... into account. As an illustrating example we apply the NEGF-STM method to the Si(001)(2x1):H surface with sub-surface P doping and discuss the results in comparison to the Bardeen and Tersoff-Hamann methods....

  19. Maximum Smoke Temperature in Non-Smoke Model Evacuation Region for Semi-Transverse Tunnel Fire

    OpenAIRE

    B. Lou; Y. Qiu; X. Long

    2017-01-01

    Smoke temperature distribution in non-smoke evacuation under different mechanical smoke exhaust rates of semi-transverse tunnel fire were studied by FDS numerical simulation in this paper. The effect of fire heat release rate (10MW 20MW and 30MW) and exhaust rate (from 0 to 160m3/s) on the maximum smoke temperature in non-smoke evacuation region was discussed. Results show that the maximum smoke temperature in non-smoke evacuation region decreased with smoke exhaust rate. Plug-holing was obse...

  20. A Low-involvement Choice Model for Consumer Panel Data

    OpenAIRE

    Brugha, Cathal; Turley, Darach

    1987-01-01

    The long overdue surge of interest in consumer behaviour texts in low-involvement purchasing has only begun to gather momemtum. It often takes the form of asking whether concepts usually associated with high-involvement purchasing can be applied, albeit in a modified form, to low-involvement purchasing. One such concept is evoked set, that is the range of brands deemed acceptable by a consumer in a particular product area. This has characteristically been associated with consumption involving...

  1. Wind Tunnel Test of a Risk-Reduction Wing/Fuselage Model to Examine Juncture-Flow Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Neuhart, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    A wing/fuselage wind-tunnel model was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel in preparation for a highly-instrumented Juncture Flow Experiment to be conducted in the same facility. This test, which was sponsored by the NASA Transformational Tool and Technologies Project, is part of a comprehensive set of experimental and computational research activities to develop revolutionary, physics-based aeronautics analysis and design capability. The objectives of this particular test were to examine the surface and off-body flow on a generic wing/body combination to: 1) choose a final wing for a future, highly instrumented model, 2) use the results to facilitate unsteady pressure sensor placement on the model, 3) determine the area to be surveyed with an embedded laser-doppler velocimetry (LDV) system, 4) investigate the primary juncture corner- flow separation region using particle image velocimetry (PIV) to see if the particle seeding is adequately entrained and to examine the structure in the separated region, and 5) to determine the similarity of observed flow features with those predicted by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This report documents the results of the above experiment that specifically address the first three goals. Multiple wing configurations were tested at a chord Reynolds number of 2.4 million. Flow patterns on the surface of the wings and in the region of the wing/fuselage juncture were examined using oil- flow visualization and infrared thermography. A limited number of unsteady pressure sensors on the fuselage around the wing leading and trailing edges were used to identify any dynamic effects of the horseshoe vortex on the flow field. The area of separated flow in the wing/fuselage juncture near the wing trailing edge was observed for all wing configurations at various angles of attack. All of the test objectives were met. The staff of the 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel provided outstanding support and delivered

  2. Channel Measurements and Modeling at 6 GHz in the Tunnel Environments for 5G Wireless Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang-de Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Propagation measurements of wireless channels performed in the tunnel environments at 6 GHz are presented in this paper. Propagation characteristics are simulated and analyzed based on the method of shooting and bouncing ray tracing/image (SBR/IM. A good agreement is achieved between the measured results and simulated results, so the correctness of SBR/IM method has been validated. The measured results and simulated results are analyzed in terms of path loss models, received power, root mean square (RMS delay spread, Ricean K-factor, and angle of arrival (AOA. The omnidirectional path loss models are characterized based on close-in (CI free-space reference distance model and the alpha-beta-gamma (ABG model. Path loss exponents (PLEs are 1.50–1.74 in line-of-sight (LOS scenarios and 2.18–2.20 in non-line-of-sight (NLOS scenarios. Results show that CI model with the reference distance of 1 m provides more accuracy and stability in tunnel scenarios. The RMS delay spread values vary between 2.77 ns and 18.76 ns. Specially, the Poisson distribution best fits the measured data of RMS delay spreads for LOS scenarios and the Gaussian distribution best fits the measured data of RMS delay spreads for NLOS scenarios. Moreover, the normal distribution provides good fits to the Ricean K-factor. The analysis of the abovementioned results from channel measurements and simulations may be utilized for the design of wireless communications of future 5G radio systems at 6 GHz.

  3. Evaluation of the source area of rooftop scalar measurements in London, UK using wind tunnel and modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, Aidan; Boon, Alex; Barlow, Janet; Hayden, Paul; Robins, Alan

    2014-05-01

    The source area of an instrument is an estimate of the area of ground over which the measurement is generated. Quantification of the source area of a measurement site provides crucial context for analysis and interpretation of the data. A range of computational models exists to calculate the source area of an instrument, but these are usually based on assumptions which do not hold for instruments positioned very close to the surface, particularly those surrounded by heterogeneous terrain i.e. urban areas. Although positioning instrumentation at higher elevation (i.e. on masts) is ideal in urban areas, this can be costly in terms of installation and maintenance costs and logistically difficult to position instruments in the ideal geographical location. Therefore, in many studies, experimentalists turn to rooftops to position instrumentation. Experimental validations of source area models for these situations are very limited. In this study, a controlled tracer gas experiment was conducted in a wind tunnel based on a 1:200 scale model of a measurement site used in previous experimental work in central London. The detector was set at the location of the rooftop site as the tracer was released at a range of locations within the surrounding streets and rooftops. Concentration measurements are presented for a range of wind angles, with the spread of concentration measurements indicative of the source area distribution. Clear evidence of wind channeling by streets is seen with the shape of the source area strongly influenced by buildings upwind of the measurement point. The results of the wind tunnel study are compared to scalar concentration source areas generated by modelling approaches based on meteorological data from the central London experimental site and used in the interpretation of continuous carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration data. Initial conclusions will be drawn as to how to apply scalar concentration source area models to rooftop measurement sites and

  4. Model-Scale Aerodynamic Performance Testing of Proposed Modifications to the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Coston, Calvin W., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Tests were performed on a 1/20th-scale model of the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel to determine the performance effects of insertion of acoustic baffles in the tunnel inlet, replacement of the existing collector with a new collector design in the open jet test section, and addition of flow splitters to the acoustic baffle section downstream of the test section. As expected, the inlet baffles caused a reduction in facility performance. About half of the performance loss was recovered by addition the flow splitters to the downstream baffles. All collectors tested reduced facility performance. However, test chamber recirculation flow was reduced by the new collector designs and shielding of some of the microphones was reduced owing to the smaller size of the new collector. Overall performance loss in the facility is expected to be a 5 percent top flow speed reduction, but the facility will meet OSHA limits for external noise levels and recirculation in the test section will be reduced.

  5. Thermal conductivity of thin insulating films determined by tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect measurements and finite-element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Torsten; Martens, Ulrike; Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus; Thomas, Andy; Reiss, Günter; Kuschel, Timo

    2018-06-01

    In general, it is difficult to access the thermal conductivity of thin insulating films experimentally by electrical means. Here, we present a new approach utilizing the tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect (TMS) in combination with finite-element modeling (FEM). We detect the laser-induced TMS and the absolute thermovoltage of laser-heated magnetic tunnel junctions with 2.6 nm thin barriers of MgAl2O4 (MAO) and MgO, respectively. A second measurement of the absolute thermovoltage after a dielectric breakdown of the barrier grants insight into the remaining thermovoltage of the stack. Thus, the pure TMS without any parasitic Nernst contributions from the leads can be identified. In combination with FEM via COMSOL, we are able to extract values for the thermal conductivity of MAO (0.7 W (K · m)‑1) and MgO (5.8 W (K · m)‑1), which are in very good agreement with theoretical predictions. Our method provides a new promising way to extract the experimentally challenging parameter of the thermal conductivity of thin insulating films.

  6. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Measurements on the NASA Common Research Model in the NASA 11-ft Transonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James H.

    2011-01-01

    The luminescence lifetime technique was used to make pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) measurements on a 2.7% Common Research Model in the NASA Ames 11ft Transonic Wind Tunnel. PSP data were obtained on the upper and lower surfaces of the wing and horizontal tail, as well as one side of the fuselage. Data were taken for several model attitudes of interest at Mach numbers between 0.70 and 0.87. Image data were mapped onto a three-dimensional surface grid suitable both for comparison with CFD and for integration of pressures to determine loads. Luminescence lifetime measurements were made using strobed LED (light-emitting diode) lamps to illuminate the PSP and fast-framing interline transfer cameras to acquire the PSP emission.

  7. Model for phonon transmission through a NbN grain-size distribution: Comparison with tunneling-spectroscopy observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicault, R.; Joly, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Transport properties of phonons in granular NbN thin film with left-angle 111 right-angle texture are discussed. We propose a model in which each grain has an acoustic resonance when phonons propagate parallel to the film and where a coupling through the amorphous boundaries exists. A statistical study shows that the most homogeneous chains in the grain stack are selected because of the strong efficiency of their transport properties and that they give a fine structure of phonon modes even if the grain-size distribution is quite large. A reasonable agreement is obtained between our tunneling-spectroscopy experiments and the model. A typical experimental result has been fitted using an inelastic phonon-electron-interaction mean free path Λ ph ∼215 nm and a mean grain size d M ∼25.7 nm, the full width at half maximum of the grain distribution being 14 nm

  8. Numerical study of the influence of flow blockage on the aerodynamic coefficients of models in low-speed wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, V. T.; Kalugin, V. T.; Lapygin, V. I.; Khlupnov, A. I.

    2017-11-01

    With the use of ANSYS Fluent software and ANSYS ICEM CFD calculation grid generator, the flows past a wing airfoil, an infinite cylinder, and 3D blunted bodies located in the open and closed test sections of low-speed wind tunnels were calculated. The mathematical model of the flows included the Reynolds equations and the SST model of turbulence. It was found that the ratios between the aerodynamic coefficients in the test section and in the free (unbounded) stream could be fairly well approximated with a piecewise-linear function of the blockage factor, whose value weakly depended on the angle of attack. The calculated data and data gained in the analysis of previously reported experimental studies proved to be in a good agreement. The impact of the extension of the closed test section on the airfoil lift force is analyzed.

  9. Analytical model of surface potential profiles and transfer characteristics for hetero stacked tunnel field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui Fang; Sun, Wen; Han, Xin Feng

    2018-06-01

    An analytical model of surface potential profiles and transfer characteristics for hetero stacked tunnel field-effect transistors (HS-TFETs) is presented for the first time, where hetero stacked materials are composed of two different bandgaps. The bandgap of the underlying layer is smaller than that of the upper layer. Under different device parameters (upper layer thickness, underlying layer thickness, and hetero stacked materials) and temperature, the validity of the model is demonstrated by the agreement of its results with the simulation results. Moreover, the results show that the HS-TFETs can obtain predominant performance with relatively slow changes of subthreshold swing (SS) over a wide drain current range, steep average subthreshold swing, high on-state current, and large on–off state current ratio.

  10. Recognition tunneling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lindsay, S.; He, J.; Sankey, O.; Hapala, Prokop; Jelínek, Pavel; Zhang, P.; Chang, S.; Huang, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 26 (2010), 262001/1-262001/12 ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : STM * tunneling current * molecular electronics * DFT calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.644, year: 2010

  11. Many-body Tunneling and Nonequilibrium Dynamics of Doublons in Strongly Correlated Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, WenJie; Wang, YuanDong; Wei, JianHua; Zhu, ZhenGang; Yan, YiJing

    2017-05-30

    Quantum tunneling dominates coherent transport at low temperatures in many systems of great interest. In this work we report a many-body tunneling (MBT), by nonperturbatively solving the Anderson multi-impurity model, and identify it a fundamental tunneling process on top of the well-acknowledged sequential tunneling and cotunneling. We show that the MBT involves the dynamics of doublons in strongly correlated systems. Proportional to the numbers of dynamical doublons, the MBT can dominate the off-resonant transport in the strongly correlated regime. A T 3/2 -dependence of the MBT current on temperature is uncovered and can be identified as a fingerprint of the MBT in experiments. We also prove that the MBT can support the coherent long-range tunneling of doublons, which is well consistent with recent experiments on ultracold atoms. As a fundamental physical process, the MBT is expected to play important roles in general quantum systems.

  12. Distinction between the Poole-Frenkel and tunneling models of electric-field-stimulated carrier emission from deep levels in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganichev, S. D.; Ziemann, E.; Prettl, W.; Yassievich, I. N.; Istratov, A. A.; Weber, E. R.

    2000-01-01

    The enhancement of the emission rate of charge carriers from deep-level defects in electric field is routinely used to determine the charge state of the defects. However, only a limited number of defects can be satisfactorily described by the Poole-Frenkel theory. An electric field dependence different from that expected from the Poole-Frenkel theory has been repeatedly reported in the literature, and no unambiguous identification of the charge state of the defect could be made. In this article, the electric field dependencies of emission of carriers from DX centers in Al x Ga 1-x As:Te, Cu pairs in silicon, and Ge:Hg have been studied applying static and terahertz electric fields, and analyzed by using the models of Poole-Frenkel and phonon assisted tunneling. It is shown that phonon assisted tunneling and Poole-Frenkel emission are two competitive mechanisms of enhancement of emission of carriers, and their relative contribution is determined by the charge state of the defect and by the electric-field strength. At high-electric field strengths carrier emission is dominated by tunneling independently of the charge state of the impurity. For neutral impurities, where Poole-Frenkel lowering of the emission barrier does not occur, the phonon assisted tunneling model describes well the experimental data also in the low-field region. For charged impurities the transition from phonon assisted tunneling at high fields to Poole-Frenkel effect at low fields can be traced back. It is suggested that the Poole-Frenkel and tunneling models can be distinguished by plotting logarithm of the emission rate against the square root or against the square of the electric field, respectively. This analysis enables one to unambiguously determine the charge state of a deep-level defect. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  13. Visualizing Flutter Mechanism as Traveling Wave Through Animation of Simulation Results for the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christhilf, David M.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that frequency and phasing of structural modes in the presence of airflow play a fundamental role in the occurrence of flutter. Animation of simulation results for the long, slender Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) wind-tunnel model demonstrates that, for the case of mass-ballasted nacelles, the flutter mode can be described as a traveling wave propagating downstream. Such a characterization provides certain insights, such as (1) describing the means by which energy is transferred from the airflow to the structure, (2) identifying airspeed as an upper limit for speed of wave propagation, (3) providing an interpretation for a companion mode that coalesces in frequency with the flutter mode but becomes very well damped, (4) providing an explanation for bursts of response to uniform turbulence, and (5) providing an explanation for loss of low frequency (lead) phase margin with increases in dynamic pressure (at constant Mach number) for feedback systems that use sensors located upstream from active control surfaces. Results from simulation animation, simplified modeling, and wind-tunnel testing are presented for comparison. The simulation animation was generated using double time-integration in Simulink of vertical accelerometer signals distributed over wing and fuselage, along with time histories for actuated control surfaces. Crossing points for a zero-elevation reference plane were tracked along a network of lines connecting the accelerometer locations. Accelerometer signals were used in preference to modal displacement state variables in anticipation that the technique could be used to animate motion of the actual wind-tunnel model using data acquired during testing. Double integration of wind-tunnel accelerometer signals introduced severe drift even with removal of both position and rate biases such that the technique does not currently work. Using wind-tunnel data to drive a Kalman filter based upon fitting coefficients to

  14. Tunnel - history of

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    This book introduces history of tunnel in ancient times, the middle ages and modern times, survey of tunnel and classification of bedrock like environment survey of position, survey of the ground, design of tunnel on basic thing of the design, and design of tunnel of bedrock, analysis of stability of tunnel and application of the data, construction of tunnel like lattice girder and steel fiber reinforced shot crete, and maintenance control and repair of tunnel.

  15. The role of local tunneling states in superconductivity at disordered interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, B.D.; Simanek, E.

    1982-01-01

    The origin of the enhancement of the superconducting transition temperature caused by the presence of disordered interfaces is studied. An enhancement mechanism involving the tunneling of the conduction electrons from metal into the local state coupled to the ''two-level state systems'' in the interfaces region, is considered. In this model, the reduction of the tunneling matrix elements by orthogonality blocking can be avoided. (author)

  16. Comparison of Speed-Up Over Hills Derived from Wind-Tunnel Experiments, Wind-Loading Standards, and Numerical Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei Pirooz, Amir A.; Flay, Richard G. J.

    2018-03-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of the speed-up provided in several wind-loading standards by comparison with wind-tunnel measurements and numerical predictions, which are carried out at a nominal scale of 1:500 and full-scale, respectively. Airflow over two- and three-dimensional bell-shaped hills is numerically modelled using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method with a pressure-driven atmospheric boundary layer and three different turbulence models. Investigated in detail are the effects of grid size on the speed-up and flow separation, as well as the resulting uncertainties in the numerical simulations. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical prediction of speed-up, as well as the wake region size and location, with that according to large-eddy simulations and the wind-tunnel results. The numerical results demonstrate the ability to predict the airflow over a hill with good accuracy with considerably less computational time than for large-eddy simulation. Numerical simulations for a three-dimensional hill show that the speed-up and the wake region decrease significantly when compared with the flow over two-dimensional hills due to the secondary flow around three-dimensional hills. Different hill slopes and shapes are simulated numerically to investigate the effect of hill profile on the speed-up. In comparison with more peaked hill crests, flat-topped hills have a lower speed-up at the crest up to heights of about half the hill height, for which none of the standards gives entirely satisfactory values of speed-up. Overall, the latest versions of the National Building Code of Canada and the Australian and New Zealand Standard give the best predictions of wind speed over isolated hills.

  17. Use of a Scale Model in the Design of Modifications to the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canacci, Victor A.; Gonsalez, Jose C.; Spera, David A.; Burke, Thomas (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Major modifications were made in 1999 to the 6- by 9-Foot (1.8- by 2.7-m) Icing Research tunnel (IRT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center, including replacement of its heat exchanger and associated ducts and turning vanes, and the addition of fan outlet guide vanes (OGV's). A one-tenth scale model of the IRT (designated as the SMIRT) was constructed with and without these modifications and tested to increase confidence in obtaining expected improvements in flow quality around the tunnel loop. The SMIRT is itself an aerodynamic test facility whose flow patterns without modifications have been shown to be accurate, scaled representations of those measured in the IRT prior to the 1999 upgrade program. In addition, tests in the SMIRT equipped with simulated OGV's indicated that these devices in the IRT might reduce flow distortions immediately downstream of the fan by two thirds. Flow quality parameters measured in the SMIRT were projected to the full-size modified IRT, and quantitative estimates of improvements in flow quality were given prior to construction. In this paper, the results of extensive flow quality studies conducted in the SMIRT are documented. Samples of these are then compared with equivalent measurements made in the full-scale IRT, both before and after its configuration was upgraded. Airspeed, turbulence intensity, and flow angularity distributions are presented for cross sections downstream of the drive fan, both upstream and downstream of the replacement flat heat exchanger, in the stilling chamber, in the test section, and in the wakes of the new comer turning vanes with their unique expanding and contracting designs. Lessons learned from these scale-model studies are discussed.

  18. Comparison of two models for phonon assisted tunneling field enhanced emission from defects in Ge measured by DLTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pienaar, J., E-mail: jac_pienaar@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Meyer, W.E.; Auret, F.D.; Coelho, S.M.M. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) was used to measure the field enhanced emission rate from a defect introduced in n-type Ge. The defect was introduced through low energy ({+-}80 eV) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching using Ar. The defect, named EP{sub 0.31}, had an energy level 0.31 eV below the conduction band. Models of Pons and Makram-Ebeid (1979) and Ganichev and Prettl (1997) , which describe emission due to phonon assisted tunneling, were fitted to the observed electric field dependence of the emission rate. The model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid fitted the measured emission rate more accurately than Ganichev and Prettl. However the model of Ganichev and Prettl has only two parameters, while the model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid has four. Both models showed a transition in the dominant emission mechanism from a weak electron-phonon coupling below 152.5 K to a strong electron-phonon coupling above 155 K. After the application of a {chi}{sup 2} goodness of fit test, it was determined that the model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid describes the data well, while that of Ganichev and Prettl does not.

  19. A Wear Rule and Cutter Life Prediction Model of a 20-in. TBM Cutter for Granite: A Case Study of a Water Conveyance Tunnel in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quansheng; Liu, Jianping; Pan, Yucong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Peng, Xingxin; Gong, Qiuming; Du, Lijie

    2017-05-01

    Disc cutter wear is one of the comprehensive results of the rock-machine interaction in tunnel boring machine (TBM) tunneling. The replacement of the disc cutter is a time-consuming and costly activity that can significantly reduce the TBM utilization ( U) and advance rate (AR), and has a major effect on the total time and cost of TBM tunneling projects. Therefore, the importance of predicting the cutter life accurately can never be overemphasized. Most cutter wear prediction models are only suitable for 17-in. or smaller disc cutters. However, use of large-diameter disc cutters has been an irresistible trend for large-section hard rock TBMs. This study attempts to reveal the genuine wear rule of a 20-in. disc cutter and develop a new empirical model for predicting the cutter life in granite based on field data collected from a water conveyance tunnel constructed by the TBM tunneling method in China. The field data including the actual cutter wear and the geological parameters along the studied tunnel were compiled in a special database that was subjected to statistical analysis to reveal the genuine wear rule of a 20-in. disc cutter and develop the reasonable correlations between some common intact rock parameters and the disc cutter life. These equations were developed based on data from massive to very massive granite with a UCS range of 40-100 MPa, which can be applied for the assessment of the cutter life of a 20-in. disc cutter in similar hard rock projects with similar rock strengths and rock abrasivities.

  20. Frequency driven inversion of tunnel magnetoimpedance and observation of positive tunnel magnetocapacitance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parui, Subir; Ribeiro, Mário; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Llopis, Roger; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Sun, Xiangnan; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance for modern computation of non-volatile high-frequency memories makes ac-transport measurements of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) crucial for exploring this regime. Here, we demonstrate a frequency-mediated effect in which the tunnel magnetoimpedance reverses its sign in a classical Co/Al 2 O 3 /NiFe MTJ, whereas we only observe a gradual decrease in the tunnel magnetophase. Such effects are explained by the capacitive coupling of a parallel resistor and capacitor in the equivalent circuit model of the MTJ. Furthermore, we report a positive tunnel magnetocapacitance effect, suggesting the presence of a spin-capacitance at the two ferromagnet/tunnel-barrier interfaces. Our results are important for understanding spin transport phenomena at the high frequency regime in which the spin-polarized charge accumulation due to spin-dependent penetration depth at the two interfaces plays a crucial role.

  1. Frequency driven inversion of tunnel magnetoimpedance and observation of positive tunnel magnetocapacitance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parui, Subir, E-mail: s.parui@nanogune.eu, E-mail: l.hueso@nanogune.eu; Ribeiro, Mário; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Llopis, Roger [CIC nanoGUNE, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar [CIC nanoGUNE, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Sun, Xiangnan [CIC nanoGUNE, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, 100190 Beijing (China); Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E., E-mail: s.parui@nanogune.eu, E-mail: l.hueso@nanogune.eu [CIC nanoGUNE, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2016-08-01

    The relevance for modern computation of non-volatile high-frequency memories makes ac-transport measurements of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) crucial for exploring this regime. Here, we demonstrate a frequency-mediated effect in which the tunnel magnetoimpedance reverses its sign in a classical Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiFe MTJ, whereas we only observe a gradual decrease in the tunnel magnetophase. Such effects are explained by the capacitive coupling of a parallel resistor and capacitor in the equivalent circuit model of the MTJ. Furthermore, we report a positive tunnel magnetocapacitance effect, suggesting the presence of a spin-capacitance at the two ferromagnet/tunnel-barrier interfaces. Our results are important for understanding spin transport phenomena at the high frequency regime in which the spin-polarized charge accumulation due to spin-dependent penetration depth at the two interfaces plays a crucial role.

  2. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - image interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maca, F.

    1998-01-01

    The basic ideas of image interpretation in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy are presented using simple quantum-mechanical models and supplied with examples of successful application. The importance is stressed of a correct interpretation of this brilliant experimental surface technique

  3. Numerical solution of multiband k.p model for tunnelling in type-II heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Botha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new and very general method was developed for calculating the charge and spin-resolved electron tunnelling in type-II heterojunctions. Starting from a multiband k.p description of the bulk energy-band structure, a multiband k.p Riccati equation was derived. The reflection and transmission coefficients were obtained for each channel by integrating the Riccati equation over the entire heterostructure. Numerical instability was reduced through this method, in which the multichannel log-derivative of the envelope function matrix, rather than the envelope function itself, was propagated. As an example, a six-band k.p Hamiltonian was used to calculate the current-voltage characteristics of a 10-nm wide InAs/ GaSb/InAs single quantum well device which exhibited negative differential resistance at room temperature. The calculated current as a function of applied (bias voltage was found to be in semiquantitative agreement with the experiment, a result which indicated that inelastic transport mechanisms do not contribute significantly to the valley currents measured in this particular device.

  4. Kinetics modeling of the drying of sunflower stem (Helianthus annuus L.) in a forced convection tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, R.; Vaca, M.; Terres, H.; Lizardi, A.; Morales, J.; Flores, J.; Chávez, S.

    2015-01-01

    The sunflower is an annual plant native to the Americas. It possesses a large inflorescence (flowering head), and its name is derived from the flower's shape and image, which is often used to capture the sun. The plant has a rough, broad, hairy stem, coarsely toothed, with rough leaves, and circular flower heads. The sunflower seeds are appreciated for their oil, which has become a widespread cooking ingredient. Leaves of the sunflower can be used as cattle feed, while the stems contain a fiber that may be used in paper production. Recently this flower has been used in phytoremediation of soils, contaminated with heavy metals. Sunflower has been probed as an efficient phytoextractor of chromium, lead, aluminum, zinc, cadmium from soil. In this work we present the experimental results of the drying of the sunflower stem, cut in 100 mm longitudinal sections, with diameters in the range of 11-18 mm. The aim was to obtain a dry and easy-to-handle final product, since these plants were originally cultivated in order to extract heavy metals from a polluted soil. The dried stems could then be easily confined or sent to recycle premises to concentrate the metals. The drying process was done in forced convection within a hot air tunnel. The used temperature was 60 °C, the velocity of air was 3 m/s and the required times were 8 hours. The initial average wet mass was 28 g and the final value was 5 g, resulting in the aimed product.

  5. Testing hypotheses involving Cronbach's alpha using marginal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, R.E.; van der Ark, L.A.; Croon, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the statistical testing of three relevant hypotheses involving Cronbach's alpha: one where alpha equals a particular criterion; a second testing the equality of two alpha coefficients for independent samples; and a third testing the equality of two alpha coefficients for dependent

  6. Analyses of turbulent flow fields and aerosol dynamics of diesel engine exhaust inside two dilution sampling tunnels using the CTAG model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan Jason; Yang, Bo; Lipsky, Eric M; Robinson, Allen L; Zhang, K Max

    2013-01-15

    Experimental results from laboratory emission testing have indicated that particulate emission measurements are sensitive to the dilution process of exhaust using fabricated dilution systems. In this paper, we first categorize the dilution parameters into two groups: (1) aerodynamics (e.g., mixing types, mixing enhancers, dilution ratios, residence time); and (2) mixture properties (e.g., temperature, relative humidity, particle size distributions of both raw exhaust and dilution gas). Then we employ the Comprehensive Turbulent Aerosol Dynamics and Gas Chemistry (CTAG) model to investigate the effects of those parameters on a set of particulate emission measurements comparing two dilution tunnels, i.e., a T-mixing lab dilution tunnel and a portable field dilution tunnel with a type of coaxial mixing. The turbulent flow fields and aerosol dynamics of particles are simulated inside two dilution tunnels. Particle size distributions under various dilution conditions predicted by CTAG are evaluated against the experimental data. It is found that in the area adjacent to the injection of exhaust, turbulence plays a crucial role in mixing the exhaust with the dilution air, and the strength of nucleation dominates the level of particle number concentrations. Further downstream, nucleation terminates and the growth of particles by condensation and coagulation continues. Sensitivity studies reveal that a potential unifying parameter for aerodynamics, i.e., the dilution rate of exhaust, plays an important role in new particle formation. The T-mixing lab tunnel tends to favor the nucleation due to a larger dilution rate of the exhaust than the coaxial mixing field tunnel. Our study indicates that numerical simulation tools can be potentially utilized to develop strategies to reduce the uncertainties associated with dilution samplings of emission sources.

  7. Modeling and characterization of double resonant tunneling diodes for application as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehl, Zacharie; Suchet, Daniel; Julian, Anatole; Bernard, Cyril; Miyashita, Naoya; Gibelli, Francois; Okada, Yoshitaka; Guillemolles, Jean-Francois

    2017-02-01

    Double resonant tunneling barriers are considered for an application as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells. Experimental symmetric and asymmetric double resonant tunneling barriers are realized by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by temperature dependent current-voltage measurements. The negative differential resistance signal is enhanced for asymmetric heterostructures, and remains unchanged between low- and room-temperatures. Within Tsu-Esaki description of the tunnel current, this observation can be explained by the voltage dependence of the tunnel transmission amplitude, which presents a resonance under finite bias for asymmetric structures. This effect is notably discussed with respect to series resistance. Different parameters related to the electronic transmission of the structure and the influence of these parameters on the current voltage characteristic are investigated, bringing insights on critical processes to optimize in double resonant tunneling barriers applied to hot carrier solar cells.

  8. Quantum tunneling and field electron emission theories

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Shi-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Quantum tunneling is an essential issue in quantum physics. Especially, the rapid development of nanotechnology in recent years promises a lot of applications in condensed matter physics, surface science and nanodevices, which are growing interests in fundamental issues, computational techniques and potential applications of quantum tunneling. The book involves two relevant topics. One is quantum tunneling theory in condensed matter physics, including the basic concepts and methods, especially for recent developments in mesoscopic physics and computational formulation. The second part is the f

  9. Simulation of hydrogen releases from fuel-cell vehicles in tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houf, William G.; Evans, Greg H.; James, Scott C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Merilo, Erik; Groethe, Mark [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Simulation results for a hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle in a full-scale tunnel have been performed for the case where hydrogen gas is vented from the vehicle as a result of thermal activation of the pressure relief device (PRD). The same modeling approach used in the full-scale tunnel modeling was validated in a scaled model by comparing simulated results with measured results from a series of scaled-tunnel test experiments performed at the SRI Corral Hollow test facility. Results of the simulations were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, a rudimentary risk analysis indicated that the level of potential risk from hydrogen vehicles accidents involving thermally activated PRDs in tunnels does not appear to significantly increase the current level of individual risk to the public from everyday life. (orig.)

  10. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however......, not a sufficient condition in order to establish genuine tunneling as a result of quantum dynamics. This proposition is illustrated for a two-dimensional model potential describing dissociative sticking of N-2 on Ru(s). It is suggested that the remarkable heavy atom tunneling, found in this system, is related...

  11. Kinetics modeling of the drying of sunflower stem (Helianthus annuus L.) in a forced convection tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, R; Vaca, M; Terres, H; Lizardi, A; Morales, J; Flores, J; Chávez, S

    2015-01-01

    The sunflower is an annual plant native to the Americas. It possesses a large inflorescence (flowering head), and its name is derived from the flower's shape and image, which is often used to capture the sun. The plant has a rough, broad, hairy stem, coarsely toothed, with rough leaves, and circular flower heads. The sunflower seeds are appreciated for their oil, which has become a widespread cooking ingredient. Leaves of the sunflower can be used as cattle feed, while the stems contain a fiber that may be used in paper production. Recently this flower has been used in phytoremediation of soils, contaminated with heavy metals. Sunflower has been probed as an efficient phytoextractor of chromium, lead, aluminum, zinc, cadmium from soil. In this work we present the experimental results of the drying of the sunflower stem, cut in 100 mm longitudinal sections, with diameters in the range of 11-18 mm. The aim was to obtain a dry and easy-to-handle final product, since these plants were originally cultivated in order to extract heavy metals from a polluted soil. The dried stems could then be easily confined or sent to recycle premises to concentrate the metals. The drying process was done in forced convection within a hot air tunnel. The used temperature was 60 °C, the velocity of air was 3 m/s and the required times were 8 hours. The initial average wet mass was 28 g and the final value was 5 g, resulting in the aimed product

  12. Torsion-inversion tunneling patterns in the CH-stretch vibrationally excited states of the G12 family of molecules including methylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawadi, Mahesh B; Bhatta, Ram S; Perry, David S

    2013-12-19

    Two torsion-inversion tunneling models (models I and II) are reported for the CH-stretch vibrationally excited states in the G12 family of molecules. The torsion and inversion tunneling parameters, h(2v) and h(3v), respectively, are combined with low-order coupling terms involving the CH-stretch vibrations. Model I is a group theoretical treatment starting from the symmetric rotor methyl CH-stretch vibrations; model II is an internal coordinate model including the local-local CH-stretch coupling. Each model yields predicted torsion-inversion tunneling patterns of the four symmetry species, A, B, E1, and E2, in the CH-stretch excited states. Although the predicted tunneling patterns for the symmetric CH-stretch excited state are the same as for the ground state, inverted tunneling patterns are predicted for the asymmetric CH-stretches. The qualitative tunneling patterns predicted are independent of the model type and of the particular coupling terms considered. In model I, the magnitudes of the tunneling splittings in the two asymmetric CH-stretch excited states are equal to half of that in the ground state, but in model II, they differ when the tunneling rate is fast. The model predictions are compared across the series of molecules methanol, methylamine, 2-methylmalonaldehyde, and 5-methyltropolone and to the available experimental data.

  13. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ... three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men. Early diagnosis and treatment are important ...

  14. Involving stakeholders in building integrated fisheries models using Bayesian methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haapasaari, Päivi Elisabet; Mäntyniemi, Samu; Kuikka, Sakari

    2013-01-01

    the potential of the study to contribute to the development of participatory modeling practices. It is concluded that the subjective perspective to knowledge, that is fundamental in Bayesian theory, suits participatory modeling better than a positivist paradigm that seeks the objective truth. The methodology...

  15. Preliminary wing model tests in the variable density wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Max M

    1926-01-01

    This report contains the results of a series of tests with three wing models. By changing the section of one of the models and painting the surface of another, the number of models tested was increased to five. The tests were made in order to obtain some general information on the air forces on wing sections at a high Reynolds number and in particular to make sure that the Reynolds number is really the important factor, and not other things like the roughness of the surface and the sharpness of the trailing edge. The few tests described in this report seem to indicate that the air forces at a high Reynolds number are not equivalent to respective air forces at a low Reynolds number (as in an ordinary atmospheric wind tunnel). The drag appears smaller at a high Reynolds number and the maximum lift is increased in some cases. The roughness of the surface and the sharpness of the trailing edge do not materially change the results, so that we feel confident that tests with systematic series of different wing sections will bring consistent results, important and highly useful to the designer.

  16. Modeling the cost-benefit of nerve conduction studies in pre-employment screening for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanoff, Bradley; Kymes, Steve

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the costs associated with pre-employment nerve conduction testing as a screening tool for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in the workplace. We used a Markov decision analysis model to compare the costs associated with a strategy of screening all prospective employees for CTS and not hiring those with abnormal nerve conduction, versus a strategy of not screening for CTS. The variables included in our model included employee turnover rate, the incidence of CTS, the prevalence of median nerve conduction abnormalities, the relative risk of developing CTS conferred by abnormal nerve conduction screening, the costs of pre-employment screening, and the worker's compensation costs to the employer for each case of CTS. In our base case, total employer costs for CTS from the perspective of the employer (cost of screening plus costs for workers' compensation associated with CTS) were higher when screening was used. Median costs per employee position over five years were US$503 for the screening strategy versus US$200 for a no-screening strategy. A sensitivity analysis showed that a strategy of screening was cost-beneficial from the perspective of the employer only under a few circumstances. Using Monte Carlo simulation varying all parameters, we found a 30% probability that screening would be cost-beneficial. A strategy of pre-employment screening for CTS should be carefully evaluated for yield and social consequences before being implemented. Our model suggests such screening is not appropriate for most employers.

  17. Automated Boundary Conditions for Wind Tunnel Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2018-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of models tested in wind tunnels require a high level of fidelity and accuracy particularly for the purposes of CFD validation efforts. Considerable effort is required to ensure the proper characterization of both the physical geometry of the wind tunnel and recreating the correct flow conditions inside the wind tunnel. The typical trial-and-error effort used for determining the boundary condition values for a particular tunnel configuration are time and computer resource intensive. This paper describes a method for calculating and updating the back pressure boundary condition in wind tunnel simulations by using a proportional-integral-derivative controller. The controller methodology and equations are discussed, and simulations using the controller to set a tunnel Mach number in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are demonstrated.

  18. Effects of neglecting carrier tunneling on electrostatic potential in calculating direct tunneling gate current in deep submicron MOSFETs

    OpenAIRE

    Hakim, MMA; Haque, A

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the validity of the assumption of neglecting carrier tunneling effects on self-consistent electrostatic potential in calculating direct tunneling gate current in deep submicron MOSFETs. Comparison between simulated and experimental results shows that for accurate modeling of direct tunneling current, tunneling effects on potential profile need to be considered. The relative error in gate current due to neglecting carrier tunneling is higher at higher gate voltages and increases...

  19. Approximate Model Checking of PCTL Involving Unbounded Path Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Samik; Ghosh, Arka P.; He, Ru

    We study the problem of applying statistical methods for approximate model checking of probabilistic systems against properties encoded as PCTL formulas. Such approximate methods have been proposed primarily to deal with state-space explosion that makes the exact model checking by numerical methods practically infeasible for large systems. However, the existing statistical methods either consider a restricted subset of PCTL, specifically, the subset that can only express bounded until properties; or rely on user-specified finite bound on the sample path length. We propose a new method that does not have such restrictions and can be effectively used to reason about unbounded until properties. We approximate probabilistic characteristics of an unbounded until property by that of a bounded until property for a suitably chosen value of the bound. In essence, our method is a two-phase process: (a) the first phase is concerned with identifying the bound k 0; (b) the second phase computes the probability of satisfying the k 0-bounded until property as an estimate for the probability of satisfying the corresponding unbounded until property. In both phases, it is sufficient to verify bounded until properties which can be effectively done using existing statistical techniques. We prove the correctness of our technique and present its prototype implementations. We empirically show the practical applicability of our method by considering different case studies including a simple infinite-state model, and large finite-state models such as IPv4 zeroconf protocol and dining philosopher protocol modeled as Discrete Time Markov chains.

  20. Tunneling technologies for the collider ring tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frobenius, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Texas site chosen for the Superconducting Super Collider has been studied, and it has been determined that proven, conventional technology and accepted engineering practice are suitable for constructing the collider tunnels. The Texas National Research Laboratory Commission report recommended that two types of tunneling machines be used for construction of the tunnels: a conventional hard rock tunnel boring machine (TBM) for the Austin chalk and a double shielded, rotary TBM for the Taylor marl. Since the tunneling machines usually set the pace for the project, efficient planning, operation, and coordination of the tunneling system components will be critical to the schedule and cost of the project. During design, tunneling rate prediction should be refined by focusing on the development of an effective tunneling system and evaluating its capacity to meet or exceed the required schedules. 8 refs., 13 figs

  1. CO and NO2 pollution in a long two-way traffic road tunnel: investigation of NO2/NOx ratio and modelling of NO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrehus, O; Vassbotn, P

    2001-02-01

    The CO, NO and NO2 concentrations, visibility and air flow velocity were measured using continuous analysers in a long Norwegian road tunnel (7.5 km) with traffic in both directions in April 1994 and 1995. The traffic density was monitored at the same time. The NO2 concentration exceeded Norwegian air quality limits for road tunnels 17% of the time in 1994. The traffic through the tunnel decreased from 1994 to 1995, and the mean NO2 concentration was reduced from 0.73 to 0.22 ppm. The ventilation fan control, based on the CO concentration only, was unsatisfactory and the air flow was sometimes low for hours. Models for NO2 concentration based on CO concentration and absolute air flow velocity were developed and tested. The NO2/NOx ratio showed an increase for NOx levels above 2 ppm; a likely explanation for this phenomenon is NO oxidation by O2. Exposure to high NO2 concentrations may represent a health risk for people with respiratory and cardiac diseases. In long road tunnels with two-way traffic, this study indicates that ventilation fan control based on CO concentration should be adjusted for changes in vehicle CO emission and should be supplemented by air flow monitoring to limit the NO2 concentration.

  2. A two-level solvable model involving competing pairing interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dussel, G.G.; Maqueda, E.E.; Perazzo, R.P.J.; Evans, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    A model is considered consisting of nucleons moving in two non-degenerate l-shells and interacting through two pairing residual interactions with (S, T) = (1, 0) and (0, 1). These, together with the single particle hamiltonian induce mutually destructive correlations, giving rise to various collective pictures that can be discussed as representing a two-dimensional space of phases. The model is solved exactly using an O(8)xO(8) group theoretical classification scheme. The transfer of correlated pairs and quartets is also discussed. (orig.)

  3. [The Waste Package Project. Final report, July 1, 1995--February 27, 1996]: Volume 3, Stress study in faulted tunnel models by combined photoelastic measurements and finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Huang, Yuping.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this part of the Nuclear Waste Package Project research at UNLV is to investigate the stresses in a model of a faulted mountain and the effect of the fault on the stability of drifts in a proposed High Level Nuclear Waste Repository. An investigation was performed to develop a proper technique for analyzing the stresses in and around three adjacent scaled tunnel models, along with the stress concentration factors resulting from the existence of a fault that penetrates two of the three tunnels, at an inclined angel of 44 degrees to the horizontal plane. The results and experience gained from this investigation will be used in a future project in which a full-size repository drift and a penetrating fault will be modeled and analyzed

  4. Decay-out from low-lying superdeformed bands in Pb isotopes: Tunneling widths in a two-level mixing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, A.N.; Davidson, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed two-level mixing model of superdeformed decay is applied to evaluate the tunneling width between the superdeformed and normally deformed potential wells in 192 Pb and 194 Pb. Estimates are made of level densities and γ decay widths for levels in the normally deformed well, which are required for evaluation of the model. Experimental quasicontinuum results are used to suggest a spin-dependent reduction of the energy gap in the level spectrum, resulting in approximately constant level densities and decay widths in the normal well over the decay-out region for each isotope. However, it transpires that the model's prediction of the tunneling width is nearly independent of the normally deformed state widths for both isotopes. This observation is used to extract potential barrier heights for the two nuclei that depend mainly on experimentally determined values

  5. Tunnel magnetoresistance in asymmetric double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Useinov, N.Kh.; Petukhov, D.A.; Tagirov, L.R.

    2015-01-01

    The spin-polarized tunnel conductance and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) through a planar asymmetric double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DBMTJ) have been calculated using quasi-classical model. In DBMTJ nanostructure the magnetization of middle ferromagnetic metal layer can be aligned parallel or antiparallel with respect to the fixed magnetizations of the top and bottom ferromagnetic electrodes. The transmission coefficients of an electron to pass through the barriers have been calculated in terms of quantum mechanics. The dependencies of tunnel conductance and TMR on the applied voltage have been calculated in case of non-resonant transmission. Estimated in the framework of our model, the difference between the spin-channels conductances at low voltages was found relatively large. This gives rise to very high magnitude of TMR. - Highlights: • The spin-polarized conductance through the junction is calculated. • Dependencies of the tunnel conductance vs applied bias are shown. • Bias voltage dependence of tunnel magnetoresistance for the structure is shown

  6. Variable Speed Hydrodynamic Model of an Auv Utilizing Cross Tunnel Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    consuming and expensive. The models created are valuable because they save time and resources. These models also provide a cost-effective method for...strategies. Installing and extracting a docking system for testing is time consuming and expensive. The models created are valuable because they save time...80 8.3 Tuning of the Simulated PID Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 9 Behavior and

  7. Introducing an Intervention Model for Fostering Affective Involvement with Persons Who Are Congenitally Deafblind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, M.A.W.; Janssen, M.J.; Ruijssenaars, A.J.J.M.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The article presented here introduces the Intervention Model for Affective Involvement (IMAI), which was designed to train staff members (for example, teachers, caregivers, support workers) to foster affective involvement during interaction and communication with persons who have congenital

  8. Static design of steel-concrete lining for traffic tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtasik, Karel; Mohyla, Marek; Hrubesova, Eva

    2017-09-01

    Article summarizes the results of research focused on the structural design of traffic tunnel linings that have been achieved in the framework of a research project TE01020168 that supports The Technology Agency of Czech Republic. This research aim is to find and develop a process for design structure parameters of tunnel linings. These are now mostly build up by a shotcrete technology. The shotcrete is commonly endorsed either with steel girders or steel fibres. Since the installation a lining structure is loaded while strength and deformational parameters of shotcrete start to rise till the setting time elapses. That’s reason why conventional approaches of reinforced concrete are not suitable. As well as there are other circumstances to step in shown in this article. Problem is solved by 3D analysis using numerical model that takes into account all the significant features of a tunnel lining construction process inclusive the interaction between lining structure with rock massive. Analysis output is a view into development of stress-strain state in respective construction parts of tunnel lining the whole structure around, including impact on stability of rock massive. The proposed method comprises all features involved in tunnel fabrication including geotechnics and construction technologies.

  9. Electron tunneling in proteins program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagras, Muhammad A; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2016-06-05

    We developed a unique integrated software package (called Electron Tunneling in Proteins Program or ETP) which provides an environment with different capabilities such as tunneling current calculation, semi-empirical quantum mechanical calculation, and molecular modeling simulation for calculation and analysis of electron transfer reactions in proteins. ETP program is developed as a cross-platform client-server program in which all the different calculations are conducted at the server side while only the client terminal displays the resulting calculation outputs in the different supported representations. ETP program is integrated with a set of well-known computational software packages including Gaussian, BALLVIEW, Dowser, pKip, and APBS. In addition, ETP program supports various visualization methods for the tunneling calculation results that assist in a more comprehensive understanding of the tunneling process. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Z; Iwinski, E G; Ni, G X; Zhang, L M; Bao, W; Rodin, A S; Lee, Y; Wagner, M; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Goldflam, M D; Thiemens, M; Keilmann, F; Lau, C N; Castro-Neto, A H; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2015-08-12

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At subnanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nanoimaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene, yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers.

  11. Constructing a generalized network design model to study air distribution in ventilation networks in subway with a single-track tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugin, IV

    2018-03-01

    In focus are the features of construction of the generalized design model for the network method to study air distribution in ventilation system in subway with the single-track tunnel. The generalizations, assumptions and simplifications included in the model are specified. The air distribution is calculated with regard to the influence of topology and air resistances of the ventilation network sections. The author studies two variants of the subway line: half-open and closed with dead end on the both sides. It is found that the total air exchange at a subway station depends on the station location within the line. The operating mode of fans remains unaltered in this case. The article shows that elimination of air leakage in the station ventilation room allows an increase in the air flow rate by 7–8% at the same energy consumption by fans. The influence of the stop of a train in the tunnel on the air distribution is illustrated.

  12. Tunnelling in Dante's Inferno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki [Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Manipal University, Dr.T.M.A. Pai Planetarium Building, Madhav Nagar, Manipal, Karnataka 576104 (India); Sperling, Marcus, E-mail: kazuyuki.furuuchi@manipal.edu, E-mail: marcus.sperling@univie.ac.at [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Wien, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Wien (Austria)

    2017-05-01

    We study quantum tunnelling in Dante's Inferno model of large field inflation. Such a tunnelling process, which will terminate inflation, becomes problematic if the tunnelling rate is rapid compared to the Hubble time scale at the time of inflation. Consequently, we constrain the parameter space of Dante's Inferno model by demanding a suppressed tunnelling rate during inflation. The constraints are derived and explicit numerical bounds are provided for representative examples. Our considerations are at the level of an effective field theory; hence, the presented constraints have to hold regardless of any UV completion.

  13. Tunnelling in Dante's Inferno

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki; Sperling, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    We study quantum tunnelling in Dante's Inferno model of large field inflation. Such a tunnelling process, which will terminate inflation, becomes problematic if the tunnelling rate is rapid compared to the Hubble time scale at the time of inflation. Consequently, we constrain the parameter space of Dante's Inferno model by demanding a suppressed tunnelling rate during inflation. The constraints are derived and explicit numerical bounds are provided for representative examples. Our considerations are at the level of an effective field theory; hence, the presented constraints have to hold regardless of any UV completion.

  14. Programmable ferroelectric tunnel memristor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy eQuindeau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report an analogously programmable memristor based on genuine electronic resistive switching combining ferroelectric switching and electron tunneling. The tunnel current through an 8 unit cell thick epitaxial Pb(Zr[0.2]Ti[0.8]O[3] film sandwiched between La[0.7]Sr[0.3]MnO[3] and cobalt electrodes obeys the Kolmogorov-Avrami-Ishibashi model for bidimensional growth with a characteristic switching time in the order of 10^-7 seconds. The analytical description of switching kinetics allows us to develop a characteristic transfer function that has only one parameter viz. the characteristic switching time and fully predicts the resistive states of this type of memristor.

  15. Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

    CERN Multimedia

    Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert

    1981-01-01

    Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

  16. A model of the supplier involvement in the product innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine the product innovation in a supply chain by a supplier and derive a model for a supplier’s product innovation policy. The product innovation of a supplier can contribute to the long-term competitiveness for the supply chain, and as it is for many supply chains a major factor, it should be considered in the development of strategies for a supplier. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of supplier product innovation as a strategic tool to enhance the competitiveness and viability of supply chain. This paper explores the dynamic research performance of a supplier with endogenous time preference under a given arrangement of product innovation. We find that the optimal effort level and the achieved product innovation obey a saddle point path, or show tremendous fluctuations even without introducing the stochastic nature of product innovative activity. We also find that the fluctuation frequency is largely dependent both on the supplier’s characteristics such as supplier’s product innovative ability and on the nature of product innovation process per se. Short-run analyses are also made on the effect of supply chain cooperation in the product innovation process.

  17. One-fiftieth scale model studies of 40-by 80-foot and 80-by 120-foot wind tunnel complex at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gene I.; Rossow, Vernon J.; Vanaken, Johannes M.; Parrish, Cynthia L.

    1987-01-01

    The features of a 1/50-scale model of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex are first described. An overview is then given of some results from the various tests conducted with the model to aid in the design of the full-scale facility. It was found that the model tunnel simulated accurately many of the operational characteristics of the full-scale circuits. Some characteristics predicted by the model were, however, noted to differ from previous full-scale results by about 10%.

  18. Snowdrift – visualisation on an architectural model in wind tunnel testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiebig, Jennifer; Koss, Hans Holger Hundborg

    2016-01-01

    transport and deposition at and around buildings in comparison to the nature phenomenon. Although a number of studies performed the deposition on a test model with different snow substitutes, the scaling of the phenomenon is still not understood or inaccurate. The study is a visual method of the snow...... is an alternative approach hence the model design and the visual effect was primarily considered. Main aspects in the model design were different materials and sizes (matter of scale) which were photographed in picture series and time laps. The method indicates the aerodynamic phenomenon as a visual understanding...

  19. A tight binding model study of tunneling conductance spectra of spin and orbitally ordered CMR manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Saswati; Sahoo, D. D.; Rout, G. C.

    2018-04-01

    We report here a tight binding model for colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) manganites to study the pseudo gap (PG) behavior near Fermi level. In the Kubo-Ohata type DE model, we consider first and second nearest neighbor interactions for transverse spin fluctuations in core band and hopping integrals in conduction band, in the presence of static band Jahn-Teller distortion. The model Hamiltonian is solved using Zubarev's Green's function technique. The electron density of states (DOS) is found out from the Green's functions. We observe clear PG near Fermi level in the electron DOS.

  20. Transport of dangerous goods through road tunnels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N O; Lacroix, Didier; Amundsen, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    A paper which describes the work of an OECD research group. The group has suggested a grouping of dangerous materials, a quantitative risk assessment model and a decision support model which should allow tunnel operators to determine if a given material should be allowed throug a given tunnel...

  1. Application of Geostatistical Modelling to Study the Exploration Adequacy of Uniaxial Compressive Strength of Intact Rock alongthe Behesht-Abad Tunnel Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Doustmohammadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Uniaxial compressive strength (UCS is one of the most significant factors on the stability of underground excavation projects. Most of the time, this factor can be obtained by exploratory boreholes evaluation. Due to the large distance between exploratory boreholes in the majority of geotechnical projects, the application of geostatistical methods has increased as an estimator of rock mass properties. The present paper ties the estimation of UCS values of intact rock to the distance between boreholes of the Behesht-Abad tunnel in central Iran, using SGEMS geostatistical program. Variography showed that UCS estimation of intact rock using geostatistical methods is reasonable. The model establishment and validation was done after assessment that the model was trustworthy. Cross validation proved the high accuracy (98% and reliability of the model to estimate uniaxial compressive strength. The UCS values were then estimated along the tunnel axis. Moreover, using geostatistical estimation led to better identification of the pros and cons of geotechnical explorations in each location of tunnel route.

  2. Results for the hybrid laminar flow control experiment conducted in the NASA Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel on a 7-foot chord model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbitt, Percy J.; Ferris, James C.; Harvey, William D.; Goradia, Suresh H.

    1992-01-01

    A description is given of the development of, and results from, the hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) experiment conducted in the NASA LaRC 8 ft Transonic Pressure Tunnel on a 7 ft chord, 23 deg swept model. The methods/codes used to obtain the contours of the HLFC model surface and to define the suction requirements are outlined followed by a discussion of the model construction, suction system, instrumentation, and some example results from the wind tunnel tests. Included in the latter are the effects of Mach number, suction level, and the extent of suction. An assessment is also given of the effect of the wind tunnel environment on the suction requirements. The data show that, at or near the design Mach number, large extents of laminar flow can be achieved with suction mass flows over the first 25 percent, or less, of the chord. Top surface drag coefficients with suction extending from the near leading edge to 20 percent of the chord were approximately 40 percent lower than those obtained with no suction. The results indicate that HLFC can be designed for transonic speeds with lift and drag coefficients approaching those of LFC designs but with much smaller extents and levels of suction.

  3. Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Digital Control Systems for the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieseman, Carol D.; Christhilf, David; Perry, Boyd, III

    2012-01-01

    An important objective of the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) wind tunnel model program was the demonstration of Flutter Suppression (FS), Gust Load Alleviation (GLA), and Ride Quality Enhancement (RQE). It was critical to evaluate the stability and robustness of these control laws analytically before testing them and experimentally while testing them to ensure safety of the model and the wind tunnel. MATLAB based software was applied to evaluate the performance of closed-loop systems in terms of stability and robustness. Existing software tools were extended to use analytical representations of the S4T and the control laws to analyze and evaluate the control laws prior to testing. Lessons were learned about the complex windtunnel model and experimental testing. The open-loop flutter boundary was determined from the closed-loop systems. A MATLAB/Simulink Simulation developed under the program is available for future work to improve the CPE process. This paper is one of a series of that comprise a special session, which summarizes the S4T wind-tunnel program.

  4. Characteristics of Control Laws Tested on the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christhilf, David M.; Moulin, Boris; Ritz, Erich; Chen, P. C.; Roughen, Kevin M.; Perry, Boyd

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Span Supersonic Transport (S4T) is an aeroelastically scaled wind-tunnel model built to test active controls concepts for large flexible supersonic aircraft in the transonic flight regime. It is one of several models constructed in the 1990's as part of the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. Control laws were developed for the S4T by M4 Engineering, Inc. and by Zona Technologies, Inc. under NASA Research Announcement (NRA) contracts. The model was tested in the NASA-Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) four times from 2007 to 2010. The first two tests were primarily for plant identification. The third entry was used for testing control laws for Ride Quality Enhancement, Gust Load Alleviation, and Flutter Suppression. Whereas the third entry only tested FS subcritically, the fourth test demonstrated closed-loop operation above the open-loop flutter boundary. The results of the third entry are reported elsewhere. This paper reports on flutter suppression results from the fourth wind-tunnel test. Flutter suppression is seen as a way to provide stability margins while flying at transonic flight conditions without penalizing the primary supersonic cruise design condition. An account is given for how Controller Performance Evaluation (CPE) singular value plots were interpreted with regard to progressing open- or closed-loop to higher dynamic pressures during testing.

  5. Carpal tunnel syndrome and the "double crush" hypothesis: a review and implications for chiropractic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Brent S

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Upton and McComas claimed that most patients with carpal tunnel syndrome not only have compressive lesions at the wrist, but also show evidence of damage to cervical nerve roots. This "double crush" hypothesis has gained some popularity among chiropractors because it seems to provide a rationale for adjusting the cervical spine in treating carpal tunnel syndrome. Here I examine use of the concept by chiropractors, summarize findings from the literature, and critique several studies aimed at supporting or refuting the hypothesis. Although the hypothesis also has been applied to nerve compressions other than those leading to carpal tunnel syndrome, this discussion mainly examines the original application – "double crush" involving both cervical spinal nerve roots and the carpal tunnel. I consider several categories: experiments to create double crush syndrome in animals, case reports, literature reviews, and alternatives to the original hypothesis. A significant percentage of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome also have neck pain or cervical nerve root compression, but the relationship has not been definitively explained. The original hypothesis remains controversial and is probably not valid, at least for sensory disturbances, in carpal tunnel syndrome. However, even if the original hypothesis is importantly flawed, evaluation of multiple sites still may be valuable. The chiropractic profession should develop theoretical models to relate cervical dysfunction to carpal tunnel syndrome, and might incorporate some alternatives to the original hypothesis. I intend this review as a starting point for practitioners, educators, and students wishing to advance chiropractic concepts in this area.

  6. In situ stresses in rock masses: methodology for its study in tunnel projects in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madirolas Perez, G.; Perucho Martinez, A.

    2014-01-01

    In situ stress is one of the main factors to be taken into account in the design of tunnels, as it can cause inadmissible stresses and strains leading to high deviations in the budgets. For that reason, the stress state is directly introduced into the numerical models used for the design of tunnels. In Spain, although several tunnels have been carried out with an important overburden in tectonically relevant zones, a quantitative determination of the stresses has not been usually included in civil work projects. Therefore, it is considered necessary to implement a routine procedure of study of civil work projects involving tunnels excavated in rock, and a new detailed methodology is proposed. The challenge is that project managers, who face works in which stresses may play a determinant role, may have a practical reference enabling them to optimize available resources and to include the real stress information in the design of underground works. (Author)

  7. Numerical modeling of water spray suppression of conveyor belt fires in a large-scale tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liming; Smith, Alex C

    2015-05-01

    Conveyor belt fires in an underground mine pose a serious life threat to miners. Water sprinkler systems are usually used to extinguish underground conveyor belt fires, but because of the complex interaction between conveyor belt fires and mine ventilation airflow, more effective engineering designs are needed for the installation of water sprinkler systems. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to simulate the interaction between the ventilation airflow, the belt flame spread, and the water spray system in a mine entry. The CFD model was calibrated using test results from a large-scale conveyor belt fire suppression experiment. Simulations were conducted using the calibrated CFD model to investigate the effects of sprinkler location, water flow rate, and sprinkler activation temperature on the suppression of conveyor belt fires. The sprinkler location and the activation temperature were found to have a major effect on the suppression of the belt fire, while the water flow rate had a minor effect.

  8. Numerical modeling of water spray suppression of conveyor belt fires in a large-scale tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liming; Smith, Alex C.

    2015-01-01

    Conveyor belt fires in an underground mine pose a serious life threat to miners. Water sprinkler systems are usually used to extinguish underground conveyor belt fires, but because of the complex interaction between conveyor belt fires and mine ventilation airflow, more effective engineering designs are needed for the installation of water sprinkler systems. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to simulate the interaction between the ventilation airflow, the belt flame spread, and the water spray system in a mine entry. The CFD model was calibrated using test results from a large-scale conveyor belt fire suppression experiment. Simulations were conducted using the calibrated CFD model to investigate the effects of sprinkler location, water flow rate, and sprinkler activation temperature on the suppression of conveyor belt fires. The sprinkler location and the activation temperature were found to have a major effect on the suppression of the belt fire, while the water flow rate had a minor effect. PMID:26190905

  9. Preliminary modeling for solute transport in a fractured zone at the Korea underground research tunnel (KURT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chung Kyun; Lee, Jaek Wang; Baik, Min Hoon; Jeong, Jong Tae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Migration tests were performed with conservative tracers in a fractured zone that had a single fracture of about 2.5 m distance at the KURT. To interpret the migration of the tracers in the fractured rock, a solute transport model was developed. A two dimensional variable aperture channel model was adopted to describe the fractured path and hydrology, and a particle tracking method was used for solute transport. The simulation tried not only to develop a migration model of solutes for open flow environments but also to produce ideas for a better understanding of solute behaviours in indefinable fracture zones by comparing them to experimental results. The results of our simulations and experiments are described as elution and breakthrough curves, and are quantified by momentum analysis. The main retardation mechanism of nonsorbing tracers, including matrixdiffusion, was investigated.

  10. The Missing Stakeholder Group: Why Patients Should be Involved in Health Economic Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Voorn, George A K; Vemer, Pepijn; Hamerlijnck, Dominique; Ramos, Isaac Corro; Teunissen, Geertruida J; Al, Maiwenn; Feenstra, Talitha L

    2016-04-01

    Evaluations of healthcare interventions, e.g. new drugs or other new treatment strategies, commonly include a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) that is based on the application of health economic (HE) models. As end users, patients are important stakeholders regarding the outcomes of CEAs, yet their knowledge of HE model development and application, or their involvement therein, is absent. This paper considers possible benefits and risks of patient involvement in HE model development and application for modellers and patients. An exploratory review of the literature has been performed on stakeholder-involved modelling in various disciplines. In addition, Dutch patient experts have been interviewed about their experience in, and opinion about, the application of HE models. Patients have little to no knowledge of HE models and are seldom involved in HE model development and application. Benefits of becoming involved would include a greater understanding and possible acceptance by patients of HE model application, improved model validation, and a more direct infusion of patient expertise. Risks would include patient bias and increased costs of modelling. Patient involvement in HE modelling seems to carry several benefits as well as risks. We claim that the benefits may outweigh the risks and that patients should become involved.

  11. Investigation and statistical modeling of InAs-based double gate tunnel FETs for RF performance enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorvasha, S.; Lakshmi, B.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, RF performance analysis of InAs-based double gate (DG) tunnel field effect transistors (TFETs) is investigated in both qualitative and quantitative fashion. This investigation is carried out by varying the geometrical and doping parameters of TFETs to extract various RF parameters, unity gain cut-off frequency (f t), maximum oscillation frequency (f max), intrinsic gain and admittance (Y) parameters. An asymmetric gate oxide is introduced in the gate-drain overlap and compared with that of DG TFETs. Higher ON-current (I ON) of about 0.2 mA and less leakage current (I OFF) of 29 fA is achieved for DG TFET with gate-drain overlap. Due to increase in transconductance (g m), higher f t and intrinsic gain is attained for DG TFET with gate-drain overlap. Higher f max of 985 GHz is obtained for drain doping of 5 × 1017 cm‑3 because of the reduced gate-drain capacitance (C gd) with DG TFET with gate-drain overlap. In terms of Y-parameters, gate oxide thickness variation offers better performance due to the reduced values of C gd. A second order numerical polynomial model is generated for all the RF responses as a function of geometrical and doping parameters. The simulation results are compared with this numerical model where the predicted values match with the simulated values. Project supported by the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India under SERB Scheme (No. SERB/F/2660).

  12. Parents as Role Models: Parental Behavior Affects Adolescents' Plans for Work Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Bettina S.; Freund, Alexandra M.

    2011-01-01

    This study (N = 520 high-school students) investigates the influence of parental work involvement on adolescents' own plans regarding their future work involvement. As expected, adolescents' perceptions of parental work behavior affected their plans for own work involvement. Same-sex parents served as main role models for the adolescents' own…

  13. Seismic prediction ahead of tunnel constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetschny, S.; Bohlen, T.; Nil, D. D.; Giese, R.

    2007-12-01

    To increase safety and efficiency of tunnel constructions, online seismic exploration ahead of a tunnel can become a valuable tool. Within the \\it OnSite project founded by the BMBF (German Ministry of Education and Research) within \\it GeoTechnologien a new forward looking seismic imaging technique is developed to e.g. determine weak and water bearing zones ahead of the constructions. Our approach is based on the excitation and registration of \\it tunnel surface waves. These waves are excited at the tunnel face behind the cutter head of a tunnel boring machine and travel into drilling direction. Arriving at the front face they generate body waves (mainly S-waves) propagating further ahead. Reflected S-waves are back- converted into tunnel surface waves. For a theoretical description of the conversion process and for finding optimal acquisition geometries it is of importance to study the propagation characteristics of tunnel surface waves. 3D seismic finite difference modeling and analytic solutions of the wave equation in cylindric coordinates revealed that at higher frequencies, i.e. if the tunnel diameter is significantly larger than the wavelength of S-waves, these surface waves can be regarded as Rayleigh-waves circulating the tunnel. For smaller frequencies, i.e. when the S-wavelength approaches the tunnel diameter, the propagation characteristics of these surface waves are then similar to S- waves. Field measurements performed by the GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Germany at the Gotthard Base Tunnel (Switzerland) show both effects, i.e. the propagation of Rayleigh- and body-wave like waves along the tunnel. To enhance our understanding of the excitation and propagation characteristics of tunnel surface waves the transition of Rayleigh to tube-waves waves is investigated both analytically and by numerical simulations.

  14. Wind-tunnel investigation of the flow correction for a model-mounted angle of attack sensor at angles of attack from -10 deg to 110 deg. [Langley 12-foot low speed wind tunnel test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moul, T. M.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary wind tunnel investigation was undertaken to determine the flow correction for a vane angle of attack sensor over an angle of attack range from -10 deg to 110 deg. The sensor was mounted ahead of the wing on a 1/5 scale model of a general aviation airplane. It was shown that the flow correction was substantial, reaching about 15 deg at an angle of attack of 90 deg. The flow correction was found to increase as the sensor was moved closer to the wing or closer to the fuselage. The experimentally determined slope of the flow correction versus the measured angle of attack below the stall angle of attack agreed closely with the slope of flight data from a similar full scale airplane.

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Dynamic, 3-Degree-of-Freedom (DOF) Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    position and the interference component engages the model by gripping between the fins identical to Fig. 12. Then the locking bar is pushed upward...eliminates any gimbal-induced flow disturbances. All 3 axes can be locked independently and are instrumented with high-resolution feedback. Experiments...6 Fig. 5 Gimbal assembly with axis locking mechanisms ..................................7 Fig. 6 Cross

  16. Theory of superconducting tunneling without the tunneling Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    When a tunneling barrier is nearly transparent, the standard tunneling (or transfer) Hamiltonian approximation fails. The author describes the theory which is necessary for calculating the tunneling current in these cases, and illustrate it by comparing theory and experiment on superconductor/insulator/superconductor (SIS) junctions have ultra-thin tunnel barriers. This theory accurately explains the subgap structure which appears in the dynamical resistance of such SIS junctions, including many observed details which no previous theory has reproduced. The expression for the current through an SIS junction with an ultrathin barrier is given by I(t) = Re{Sigma/sub n/ J/sub n/ (omega/sub o/)e/sup in omega/o/sup t/} where omega/sub o/ = 2eV/h is the Josephson frequency, V is the bias voltage, and the J/sub n/ are voltage dependent coefficients, one for each positive or negative integer, n, and n=0. The relative sign of the terms involving cos(n omega/sub o/t) and sin(n omega/sub o/t) agrees with experiment, in contrast to previous theories of Josephson tunneling

  17. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot Transonic wind tunnel (IA613A), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e. top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  18. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e., top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  19. Thermal stability analysis and modelling of advanced perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beek, Simon; Martens, Koen; Roussel, Philippe; Wu, Yueh Chang; Kim, Woojin; Rao, Siddharth; Swerts, Johan; Crotti, Davide; Linten, Dimitri; Kar, Gouri Sankar; Groeseneken, Guido

    2018-05-01

    STT-MRAM is a promising non-volatile memory for high speed applications. The thermal stability factor (Δ = Eb/kT) is a measure for the information retention time, and an accurate determination of the thermal stability is crucial. Recent studies show that a significant error is made using the conventional methods for Δ extraction. We investigate the origin of the low accuracy. To reduce the error down to 5%, 1000 cycles or multiple ramp rates are necessary. Furthermore, the thermal stabilities extracted from current switching and magnetic field switching appear to be uncorrelated and this cannot be explained by a macrospin model. Measurements at different temperatures show that self-heating together with a domain wall model can explain these uncorrelated Δ. Characterizing self-heating properties is therefore crucial to correctly determine the thermal stability.

  20. Shock Tunnel Studies of the Hypersonic Flowfield around the Hypervelocity Ballistic Models with Aerospikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakalyani, G.; Saravanan, S.; Jagadeesh, G.

    Reduced drag and aerodynamic heating are the two basic design requirements for any hypersonic vehicle [1]. The flowfield around an axisymmetric blunt body is characterized by a bow shockwave standing ahead of its nose. The pressure and temperature behind this shock wave are very high. This increased pressure and temperature are responsible for the high levels of drag and aerodynamic heating over the body. In the past, there have been many investigations on the use of aerospikes as a drag reduction tool. These studies on spiked bodies aim at reducing both the drag and aerodynamic heating by modifying the hypersonic flowfield ahead of the nose of the body [2]. However, most of them used very simple configurations to experimentally study the drag reduction using spikes at hypersonic speeds [3] and therefore very little experimental data is available for a realistic geometric configuration. In the present study, the standard AGARD Hypervelocity Ballistic model 1 is used as the test model. The addition of the spike to the blunt body significantly alters the flowfield ahead of the nose, leading to the formation of a low pressure conical recirculation region, thus causing a reduction in drag and wall heat flux [4]. In the present investigation, aerodynamic drag force is measured over the Hypervelocity Ballistic model-1, with and without spike, at a flow enthalpy of 1.7 MJ/kg. The experiments are carried out at a Mach number of 8 and at zero angle of attack. An internally mountable accelerometer based 3-component force balance system is used to measure the aerodynamic forces on the model. Also computational studies are carried out to complement the experiments.

  1. Resonant tunneling of electrons in quantum wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krive, I.V.; Shekhter, R.I.; Jonson, M.; Krive, I.V.

    2010-01-01

    We considered resonant electron tunneling in various nanostructures including single wall carbon nanotubes, molecular transistors and quantum wires formed in two-dimensional electron gas. The review starts with a textbook description of resonant tunneling of noninteracting electrons through a double-barrier structure. The effects of electron-electron interaction in sequential and resonant electron tunneling are studied by using Luttinger liquid model of electron transport in quantum wires. The experimental aspects of the problem (fabrication of quantum wires and transport measurements) are also considered. The influence of vibrational and electromechanical effects on resonant electron tunneling in molecular transistors is discussed.

  2. Hybrid inflation exit through tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbrecht, Bjoern; Konstandin, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    For hybrid inflationary potentials, we derive the tunneling rate from field configurations along the flat direction towards the waterfall regime. This process competes with the classically rolling evolution of the scalar fields and needs to be strongly subdominant for phenomenologically viable models. Tunneling may exclude models with a mass scale below 10 12 GeV, but can be suppressed by small values of the coupling constants. We find that tunneling is negligible for those models, which do not require fine tuning in order to cancel radiative corrections, in particular for GUT-scale SUSY inflation. In contrast, electroweak scale hybrid inflation is not viable, unless the inflaton-waterfall field coupling is smaller than approximately 10 -11

  3. Heat transfer in the spin-boson model: a comparative study in the incoherent tunneling regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Dvira

    2014-07-01

    We study the transfer of heat in the nonequilibrium spin-boson model with an Ohmic dissipation. In the nonadiabatic limit we derive a formula for the thermal conductance based on a rate equation formalism at the level of the noninteracting blip approximation, valid for temperatures T>T(K), with T(K) as the Kondo temperature. We evaluate this expression analytically assuming either weak or strong couplings, and demonstrate that our results agree with exact relations. Far-from-equilibrium situations are further examined, showing a close correspondence to the linear response limit.

  4. Introducing an Intervention Model for Fostering Affective Involvement with Persons Who Are Congenitally Deafblind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marga A. W.; Janssen, Marleen J.; Ruijssenaars, Wied A. J. J. M.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The article presented here introduces the Intervention Model for Affective Involvement (IMAI), which was designed to train staff members (for example, teachers, caregivers, support workers) to foster affective involvement during interaction and communication with persons who have congenital deaf-blindness. The model is theoretically underpinned,…

  5. Small--radiation-amplitude dynamical voltage model of an irradiated, externally unbiased Josephson tunnel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAdory, R.T. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A theory is presented for the nonequilibrium voltage states of an irradiated Josephson junction shunted by an external resistor but with no external current or voltage biasing. This device, referred to as a free-running Josephson junction, is modeled in a small--radiation-amplitude, deterministic regime extending the previous work of Shenoy and Agarwal. The time-averaged induced voltage is treated as a dynamical variable, the external radiation is modeled as a current source, and the induced junction-radiation vector potential, with and without a mode structure, is treated to first order in the driving currents. A dynamical equation for the time-averaged induced voltage yields a (nonequilibrium) steady-state relation between the time-averaged induced voltage and the incident radiation amplitude valid for a wide range of voltages, including zero. Regions of bistability occur in the voltage--versus--incident-amplitude curves, some of which are dependent on the external resistor. The zero-voltage state breaks down, as the external radiation amplitude is increased, at a critical value of the incident-radiation amplitude inversely proportional to the external resistance

  6. Evaluation of an Experimental Model for Flat-Fan Nozzles Drift in Wind Tunnel by Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H Fattahi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Each year, millions of liters of toxic liquid, are used to combat with pests and plant diseases in farms. The wide spread use of chemical pesticides causes great environmental hazards. Particles drift is one of the main problems in spraying which results in the contamination of farm lands, humans and animals. Management of particle size is regarded as the main factor in drift control. In this study, the effect of some parameters on the size of deposited particles on non-target areas was studied using statistical method. The effects of nozzle type (orifice size, spraying pressure, spraying boom height and wind speed as effective factors on drift were examined. A horizontal wind tunnel with working section of 0.47 m wide, 0.75 m height and 5.5 m long was used for testing. Experiment was performed in the form of factorial split-plot based on randomized complete block design with two replications. Droplets were measured in the treatment combinations of the type of flat-fan nozzle with three orifice area (11003- 0.87 mm2, 11004-1.18 mm2 and 11006- 1.8 mm2, spraying pressure (150, 275 and 400 kpa, wind speed (1, 2 and 3 m s-1 and the boom height of (0.35, 0.55 and 0.75 m. Water-sensitive papers were used at intervals of 0.8, 1.6 and 2.4 m from the tip of nozzles for detecting droplets size. The factors of pressure, speed and height had positive effects on the droplet size at the desired distance, but the effect of nozzle size on droplet size was negative. In the regression model the coefficients of speed was higher than the others.

  7. Experimental determination of the stress/strain situation in a sheared tunnel model with canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1978-03-01

    A previous report concerned a technical matter which could be of great importance as regards the mechanical strength of canisters embedded in a bentonite/quartz buffer mass, i.e. the effect of a differential movement triggered by a critical deviatoric stress condition. Even if this is extremely unlikeley to occur it was considered to be of importance to verify the theoretical expressions for the maximum bending moment and maximum shear force. A special reason was to test the hypothesis that the contact pressure would soon reach a high value and then stay fairly constant when the displacement increased. The theoretical approach requires that the stress/strain properties of the fill are thoroghly investigated and described in therms of a mathematical model. Experience shows that this may be a tedions and difficult task. (L.E.)

  8. Phase 2 and 3 wind tunnel tests of the J-97 powered, external augmentor V/STOL model. [conducted in Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    Modifications were made to the model to improve longitudinal acceleration capability during transition from hovering to wing borne flight. A rearward deflection of the fuselage augmentor thrust vector is shown to be beneficial in this regard. Other agmentor modifications were tested, notably the removal of both endplates, which improved acceleration performance at the higher transition speeds. The model tests again demonstrated minimal interference of the fuselage augmentor on aerodynamic lift. A flapped canard surface also shows negligible influence on the performance of the wing and of the fuselage augmentor.

  9. Theory of tunneling and photoemission spectroscopy for high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouznetsov, K.; Coffey, L.

    1996-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis is presented of the tunneling conductance and angle-resolved photoemission spectra in high-temperature superconductors. It is shown that unexplained features of the tunneling and photoemission spectra such as broad backgrounds, dips, and asymmetry of the tunneling conductance can arise in a model of spin-fluctuation mediated inelastic tunneling. Effects of directionality in tunneling play an important role in determining the behavior of the tunneling conductance. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  10. Model of Ciliwung River Flood Diversion Tunnel Using HEC-RAS Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugroho Joko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As a coastal city which lies in lowland area, Jakarta is prone to flooding. One major river which flow through Jakarta is Ciliwung River. There are alternatives to reduce flood risk, such as: river capacity improvement, existing natural reservoir and polder system improvement, upstream reservoir construction, city drainage improvement, flood channel construction and flood diversion. This paper presents capacity analysis of a proposed flood diversion of Ciliwung River to Cipinang River. Cipinang River has its downstream end at Eastern Flood Canal (Kanal Banjir Timur, KBT. This diversion is based on the available capacity of KBT. A 1-D numerical hydraulic model using HEC-RAS based on a proposed design is used to assess the performance of the diversion system in any combination of upstream and downstream boundary condition. Simulations were done for steady condition. The results show that capacity of the system can be achieved for certain condition at upstream and downstream boundary. The effects at the downstream reach of Ciliwung and Cipinang River due to the diversion are also obtained.

  11. Development of procedures for the acquisition of metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) parts for use in the CSIR's wind tunnel models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Johnston, C

    2015-11-04

    Full Text Available The first Additive Manufacturing (AM) non-load-bearing, client furnished part was used in the CSIR’s wind tunnels in 2007. The advent of metal-grown materials, and the acquisition of machines to grow them in South Africa, has made it feasible...

  12. The extent to which path-integral models account for evanescent (tunneling) and complex (near-field) waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranfagni, Anedio; Mugnai, Daniela; Cacciari, Ilaria

    2018-05-01

    The usefulness of a stochastic approach in determining time scales in tunneling processes (mainly, but not only, in the microwave range) is reconsidered and compared with a different approach to these kinds of processes, based on Feynman's transition elements. This latter method is found to be particularly suitable for interpreting situations in the near field, as results from some experimental cases considered here.

  13. On the directional selectivity of tunneling experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuermann, G.; Goettingen Univ.

    1981-01-01

    Using realistic parameters in a simplified model the directional selectivity of tunneling experiments is discussed. Although perfect surfaces and barriers are assumed, quasiparticles coming from a wide solid angle may contribute essentially to the tunnel current. This must be taken into consideration in the case of gap anisotropy. (orig.)

  14. In-vehicle nitrogen dioxide concentrations in road tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ashley N.; Boulter, Paul G.; Roddis, Damon; McDonough, Liza; Patterson, Michael; Rodriguez del Barco, Marina; Mattes, Andrew; Knibbs, Luke D.

    2016-11-01

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding in-vehicle concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) during transit through road tunnels in urban environments. Furthermore, previous studies have tended to involve a single vehicle and the range of in-vehicle NO2 concentrations that vehicle occupants may be exposed to is not well defined. This study describes simultaneous measurements of in-vehicle and outside-vehicle NO2 concentrations on a route through Sydney, Australia that included several major tunnels, minor tunnels and busy surface roads. Tests were conducted on nine passenger vehicles to assess how vehicle characteristics and ventilation settings affected in-vehicle NO2 concentrations and the in-vehicle-to-outside vehicle (I/O) concentration ratio. NO2 was measured directly using a cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) technique that gave a high temporal and spatial resolution. In the major tunnels, transit-average in-vehicle NO2 concentrations were lower than outside-vehicle concentrations for all vehicles with cabin air recirculation either on or off. However, markedly lower I/O ratios were obtained with recirculation on (0.08-0.36), suggesting that vehicle occupants can significantly lower their exposure to NO2 in tunnels by switching recirculation on. The highest mean I/O ratios for NO2 were measured in older vehicles (0.35-0.36), which is attributed to older vehicles having higher air exchange rates. The results from this study can be used to inform the design and operation of future road tunnels and modelling of personal exposure to NO2.

  15. Transonic flutter study of a wind-tunnel model of a supercritical wing with/without winglet. [conducted in Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlin, C. L.; Rauch, F. J., Jr.; Waters, C.

    1982-01-01

    The model was a 1/6.5-size, semipan version of a wing proposed for an executive-jet-transport airplane. The model was tested with a normal wingtip, a wingtip with winglet, and a normal wingtip ballasted to simulate the winglet mass properties. Flutter and aerodynamic data were acquired at Mach numbers (M) from 0.6 to 0.95. The measured transonic flutter speed boundary for each wingtip configuration had roughly the same shape with a minimum flutter speed near M=0.82. The winglet addition and wingtip mass ballast decreased the wing flutter speed by about 7 and 5 percent, respectively; thus, the winglet effect on flutter was more a mass effect than an aerodynamic effect.

  16. Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is a continuous flow wind-tunnel facility capable of speeds up to Mach 1.2 at stagnation pressures up to one atmosphere. The TDT...

  17. Quantum theory of tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Razavy, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    In this revised and expanded edition, in addition to a comprehensible introduction to the theoretical foundations of quantum tunneling based on different methods of formulating and solving tunneling problems, different semiclassical approximations for multidimensional systems are presented. Particular attention is given to the tunneling of composite systems, with examples taken from molecular tunneling and also from nuclear reactions. The interesting and puzzling features of tunneling times are given extensive coverage, and the possibility of measurement of these times with quantum clocks are critically examined. In addition by considering the analogy between evanescent waves in waveguides and in quantum tunneling, the times related to electromagnetic wave propagation have been used to explain certain aspects of quantum tunneling times. These topics are treated in both non-relativistic as well as relativistic regimes. Finally, a large number of examples of tunneling in atomic, molecular, condensed matter and ...

  18. Road and Railroad Tunnels

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Tunnels in the United States According to the HSIP Tiger Team Report, a tunnel is defined as a linear underground passageway open at both ends. This dataset is based...

  19. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  20. Tunneling and propping : a justification for pyramidal ownership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riyanto, Y.E.; Toolsema-Veldman, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a formal model of tunneling and propping in a pyramidal ownership structure. Tunneling refers to controlling shareholders shifting resources from one firm to another in the same pyramid. Propping is tunneling that is done to save the receiving firm from bankruptcy. We compare the

  1. Two-dimensional analytical model of double-gate tunnel FETs with interface trapped charges including effects of channel mobile charge carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huifang; Dai, Yuehua

    2017-02-01

    A two-dimensional analytical model of double-gate (DG) tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) with interface trapped charges is proposed in this paper. The influence of the channel mobile charges on the potential profile is also taken into account in order to improve the accuracy of the models. On the basis of potential profile, the electric field is derived and the expression for the drain current is obtained by integrating the BTBT generation rate. The model can be used to study the impact of interface trapped charges on the surface potential, the shortest tunneling length, the drain current and the threshold voltage for varying interface trapped charge densities, length of damaged region as well as the structural parameters of the DG TFET and can also be utilized to design the charge trapped memory devices based on TFET. The biggest advantage of this model is that it is more accurate, and in its expression there are no fitting parameters with small calculating amount. Very good agreements for both the potential, drain current and threshold voltage are observed between the model calculations and the simulated results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61376106), the University Natural Science Research Key Project of Anhui Province (No. KJ2016A169), and the Introduced Talents Project of Anhui Science and Technology University.

  2. Tunneling of self-trapped states and formation of a band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonemitsu, K.

    1993-12-01

    Tunneling of a self-trapped kink and formation of a band are studied semi classically in the one-dimensional extended Peierls-Hubbard model near half filling, considering up to Gaussian fluctuations around imaginary-time-dependent periodic motion of electrons and phonons on the stationary phase of the action derived using Slater determinants. In the strong-coupling limit of both the Holstein and attractive Hubbard models, it reproduces analytically-known effective hopping of a single bipolaron because the tunneling involves only one in this limit. The method gives new results in other general cases and is easily applied to excited or more complex systems. 13 refs, 4 figs

  3. Lessons in the Design and Characterization Testing of the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on some of the more challenging design processes and characterization tests of the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T)-Active Controls Testbed (ACT). The model was successfully tested in four entries in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to satisfy the goals and objectives of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Supersonic Project Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic effort. Due to the complexity of the S4T-ACT, only a small sample of the technical challenges for designing and characterizing the model will be presented. Specifically, the challenges encountered in designing the model include scaling the Technology Concept Airplane to model scale, designing the model fuselage, aileron actuator, and engine pylons. Characterization tests included full model ground vibration tests, wing stiffness measurements, geometry measurements, proof load testing, and measurement of fuselage static and dynamic properties.

  4. Effects of deceptive packaging and product involvement on purchase intention: an elaboration likelihood model perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, H B

    2000-04-01

    From an Elaboration Likelihood Model perspective, it was hypothesized that postexposure awareness of deceptive packaging claims would have a greater negative effect on scores for purchase intention by consumers lowly involved rather than highly involved with a product (n = 40). Undergraduates who were classified as either highly or lowly (ns = 20 and 20) involved with M&Ms examined either a deceptive or non-deceptive package design for M&Ms candy and were subsequently informed of the deception employed in the packaging before finally rating their intention to purchase. As anticipated, highly deceived subjects who were low in involvement rated intention to purchase lower than their highly involved peers. Overall, the results attest to the robustness of the model and suggest that the model has implications beyond advertising effects and into packaging effects.

  5. Tunneling time, exit time and exit momentum in strong field tunnel ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teeny, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. It is still an open question when does the electron tunnel ionize and how long is the duration of tunneling. In this work we solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in one and two dimensions and use ab initio quantum calculations in order to answer these questions. Additionally, we determine the exit momentum of the tunnel ionized electron from first principles. We find out results that are different from the assumptions of the commonly employed two-step model, which assumes that the electron ionizes at the instant of electric field maximum with a zero momentum. After determining the quantum final momentum distribution of tunnel ionized electrons we show that the two-step model fails to predict the correct final momentum. Accordingly we suggest how to correct the two-step model. Furthermore, we determine the instant at which tunnel ionization starts, which turns out to be different from the instant usually assumed. From determining the instant at which it is most probable for the electron to enter the tunneling barrier and the instant at which it exits we determine the most probable time spent under the barrier. Moreover, we apply a quantum clock approach in order to determine the duration of tunnel ionization. From the quantum clock we determine an average tunneling time which is different in magnitude and origin with respect to the most probable tunneling time. By defining a probability distribution of tunneling times using virtual detectors we relate both methods and explain the apparent discrepancy. The results found have in general an effect on the interpretation of experiments that measure the spectra of tunnel ionized electrons, and specifically on the calibration of the so called attoclock experiments, because models with imprecise assumptions are usually employed in order to interpret experimental results.

  6. Tunneling time, exit time and exit momentum in strong field tunnel ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeny, Nicolas

    2016-10-18

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. It is still an open question when does the electron tunnel ionize and how long is the duration of tunneling. In this work we solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in one and two dimensions and use ab initio quantum calculations in order to answer these questions. Additionally, we determine the exit momentum of the tunnel ionized electron from first principles. We find out results that are different from the assumptions of the commonly employed two-step model, which assumes that the electron ionizes at the instant of electric field maximum with a zero momentum. After determining the quantum final momentum distribution of tunnel ionized electrons we show that the two-step model fails to predict the correct final momentum. Accordingly we suggest how to correct the two-step model. Furthermore, we determine the instant at which tunnel ionization starts, which turns out to be different from the instant usually assumed. From determining the instant at which it is most probable for the electron to enter the tunneling barrier and the instant at which it exits we determine the most probable time spent under the barrier. Moreover, we apply a quantum clock approach in order to determine the duration of tunnel ionization. From the quantum clock we determine an average tunneling time which is different in magnitude and origin with respect to the most probable tunneling time. By defining a probability distribution of tunneling times using virtual detectors we relate both methods and explain the apparent discrepancy. The results found have in general an effect on the interpretation of experiments that measure the spectra of tunnel ionized electrons, and specifically on the calibration of the so called attoclock experiments, because models with imprecise assumptions are usually employed in order to interpret experimental results.

  7. Current noise in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Moritz; Grabert, Hermann [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, 79104, Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We study current fluctuations in tunnel junctions driven by a voltage source. The voltage is applied to the tunneling element via an impedance providing an electromagnetic environment of the junction. We use circuit theory to relate the fluctuations of the current flowing in the leads of the junction with the voltage fluctuations generated by the environmental impedance and the fluctuations of the tunneling current. The spectrum of current fluctuations is found to consist of three parts: a term arising from the environmental Johnson-Nyquist noise, a term due to the shot noise of the tunneling current and a third term describing the cross-correlation between these two noise sources. Our phenomenological theory reproduces previous results based on the Hamiltonian model for the dynamical Coulomb blockade and provides a simple understanding of the current fluctuation spectrum in terms of circuit theory and properties of the average current. Specific results are given for a tunnel junction driven through a resonator. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Modeling the Relations among Parental Involvement, School Engagement and Academic Performance of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alwan, Ahmed F.

    2014-01-01

    The author proposed a model to explain how parental involvement and school engagement related to academic performance. Participants were (671) 9th and 10th graders students who completed two scales of "parental involvement" and "school engagement" in their regular classrooms. Results of the path analysis suggested that the…

  9. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Anupam

    2001-02-01

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the space of magnetic fields, known as diabolical points. This phenomena is explained in terms of two approaches, one based on spin-coherent-state path integrals, and the other on a generalization of the phase integral (or WKB) method to difference equations. Explicit formulas for the diabolical points are obtained for a model Hamiltonian.

  10. Tunneling field effect transistor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to the state-of-the art in tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs). Readers will learn the TFETs physics from advanced atomistic simulations, the TFETs fabrication process and the important roles that TFETs will play in enabling integrated circuit designs for power efficiency. · Provides comprehensive reference to tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs); · Covers all aspects of TFETs, from device process to modeling and applications; · Enables design of power-efficient integrated circuits, with low power consumption TFETs.

  11. Integrated tunneling sensor for nanoelectromechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadewasser, S.; Abadal, G.; Barniol, N.

    2006-01-01

    Transducers based on quantum mechanical tunneling provide an extremely sensitive sensor principle, especially for nanoelectromechanical systems. For proper operation a gap between the electrodes of below 1 nm is essential, requiring the use of structures with a mobile electrode. At such small...... distances, attractive van der Waals and capillary forces become sizable, possibly resulting in snap-in of the electrodes. The authors present a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of the interplay between the involved forces and identify requirements for the design of tunneling sensors. Based...... on this analysis, a tunneling sensor is fabricated by Si micromachining technology and its proper operation is demonstrated. (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics....

  12. Examining the effect of adverse geological conditions on jamming of a single shielded TBM in Uluabat tunnel using numerical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohola Hasanpour

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Severe shield jamming events have been reported during excavation of Uluabat tunnel through adverse geological conditions, which resulted in several stoppages at advancing a single shielded tunnel boring machine (TBM. To study the jamming mechanism, three-dimensional (3D simulation of the machine and surrounding ground was implemented using the finite difference code FLAC3D. Numerical analyses were performed for three sections along the tunnel with a higher risk for entrapment due to the combination of overburden and geological conditions. The computational results including longitudinal displacement contours and ground pressure profiles around the shield allow a better understanding of ground behavior within the excavation. Furthermore, they allow realistically assessing the impact of adverse geological conditions on shield jamming. The calculated thrust forces, which are required to move the machine forward, are in good agreement with field observations and measurements. It also proves that the numerical analysis can effectively be used for evaluating the effect of adverse geological environment on TBM entrapments and can be applied to prediction of loads on the shield and pre-estimating of the required thrust force during excavation through adverse ground conditions.

  13. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  14. Proton tunneling in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-01-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  15. Tunneling rates in electron transport through double-barrier molecular junctions in a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazin, G V; Wu, S W; Ho, W

    2005-06-21

    The scanning tunneling microscope enables atomic-scale measurements of electron transport through individual molecules. Copper phthalocyanine and magnesium porphine molecules adsorbed on a thin oxide film grown on the NiAl(110) surface were probed. The single-molecule junctions contained two tunneling barriers, vacuum gap, and oxide film. Differential conductance spectroscopy shows that electron transport occurs via vibronic states of the molecules. The intensity of spectral peaks corresponding to the individual vibronic states depends on the relative electron tunneling rates through the two barriers of the junction, as found by varying the vacuum gap tunneling rate by changing the height of the scanning tunneling microscope tip above the molecule. A simple, sequential tunneling model explains the observed trends.

  16. Evaluation of main control room habitability in Japanese LWR (2). Evaluation for applicability of existing atmospheric dispersion models to building wake dispersion by using wind tunnel experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Ryo; Fujita, Yuko; Yoneda, Jiro; Okabayashi, Kazuki; Tabuse, Shigehiko; Watada, Masayuki

    2009-01-01

    It is necessary to predict the concentration field behind the containment vessel building for the evaluation of main control room habitability in case of the emergency. The concentration field behind the building is very complicated phenomena and the exact prediction of concentration would be very difficult even if philosophical numerical simulation was used. Instead the simple and analytical prediction models (ARCON96, Gifford and Murphy-Campe etc.) have been used for the assessment of main control room habitability. In order to evaluate the previous models, the wind tunnel experiment was carried out. Recent regulatory models of ADMS4 developed by UK-CERC and AERMOD by US-EPA were also compared with this experimental data. Only both the containment vessel and reactor buildings of the typical PWR plant was scaled in 1/200 and the atmospheric stability C-D between C and D of Pasquill-Gifford categories was reproduced as a neutral condition in the wind tunnel experiment. In the wind experiment, the meandering effect for 1 hour was taken into consideration by the so-called overlapping method that a scaled model in the test section of a wind tunnel was rotated. By the rotation of the scaled model, wind directional fluctuations were relatively generated in the test section. The model was rotated at a various speed which was inversely proportional to each frequency of occurrence of a wind direction. Tracer gas was sampled during the rotation of the building model. As a result, we got the 1 hr.-averaged concentration taking a meandering effect into consideration. In this experiment, it is assumed that the frequency distribution of wind direction is Gaussian and horizontal plume width for 1 hr. was expanded to about 1.8 times of plume width based on Pasquill-Gifford chart by 1/5 power law due to the meandering effect. From the experiment, it was found as follows; It seems that meandering effect was not important in the near field behind a building, because strong

  17. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β.

  18. Relationships among Adolescents' Leisure Motivation, Leisure Involvement, and Leisure Satisfaction: A Structural Equation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chieh; Li, Ren-Hau; Chen, Sheng-Hwang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to test a cause-and-effect model of factors affecting leisure satisfaction among Taiwanese adolescents. A structural equation model was proposed in which the relationships among leisure motivation, leisure involvement, and leisure satisfaction were explored. The study collected data from 701 adolescent…

  19. The Role of Student Involvement and Perceptions of Integration in a Causal Model of Student Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph B.; Milem, Jeffrey F.

    1999-01-01

    This study refined and applied an integrated model of undergraduate persistence (accounting for both behavioral and perceptual components) to examine first-year retention at a private, highly selective research university. Results suggest that including behaviorally based measures of involvement improves the model's explanatory power concerning…

  20. A Reformulated Model of Barriers to Parental Involvement in Education: Comment on Hornby and Lafaele (2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weihua; Li, Nan; Sandoval, Jaime Robert

    2018-01-01

    In a 2011 article in this journal, Hornby and Lafaele provided a comprehensive model to understand barriers that may adversely impact effectiveness of parental involvement (PI) in education. The proposed explanatory model provides researchers with a new comprehensive and systematic perspective of the phenomenon in question with references from an…

  1. Adolescents and Music Media: Toward an Involvement-Mediational Model of Consumption and Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Michelle; Rodgers, Kathleen Boyce; Power, Thomas; Austin, Erica Weintraub; Hill, Laura Griner

    2010-01-01

    Using social cognitive theory and structural regression modeling, we examined pathways between early adolescents' music media consumption, involvement with music media, and 3 domains of self-concept (physical appearance, romantic appeal, and global self-worth; N=124). A mediational model was supported for 2 domains of self-concept. Music media…

  2. Implementation of a Particle Image Velocimetry System for Wind Tunnel Flowfield Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Instrumentation Wind tunnel speed was measured by two pitot probes mounted on opposite tunnel walls upstream of the model and above the ground...board. The pitot probes were connected differentially to Scanivalve 1-psi transducers. A secondary measurement of wind tunnel speed was made with the...Manf. Model Range 1 Tunnel Vel (south pitot ) Transducer Scanivalve CR24D 1 psi 2 Tunnel Vel (north pitot ) Transducer Scanivalve CR24D 1 psi 3

  3. Geotechnical aspects of tunnel construction in deep clay formations for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Moor, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    The significant factors affecting the construction of tunnels in deep clay formations for radioactive waste disposal were outlined. Two aspects of tunneling were discussed; the feasibility of tunnel construction and changes in pore water pressure that might occur with time. Some results of model tunnel tests and analyses were presented. (U.K.)

  4. Modeling and optimization of a double-well double-barrier GaN/AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN resonant tunneling diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Gao, Bo; Gong, Min; Shi, Ruiying

    2017-06-01

    The influence of a GaN layer as a sub-quantum well for an AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) on device performance has been investigated by means of numerical simulation. The introduction of the GaN layer as the sub-quantum well turns the dominant transport mechanism of RTD from the 3D-2D model to the 2D-2D model and increases the energy difference between tunneling energy levels. It can also lower the effective height of the emitter barrier. Consequently, the peak current and peak-to-valley current difference of RTD have been increased. The optimal GaN sub-quantum well parameters are found through analyzing the electrical performance, energy band, and transmission coefficient of RTD with different widths and depths of the GaN sub-quantum well. The most pronounced electrical parameters, a peak current density of 5800 KA/cm2, a peak-to-valley current difference of 1.466 A, and a peak-to-valley current ratio of 6.35, could be achieved by designing RTD with the active region structure of GaN/Al0.2Ga0.8 N/GaN/Al0.2Ga0.8 N (3 nm/1.5 nm/1.5 nm/1.5 nm).

  5. Acoustic Modifications of the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel and Test Techniques for High-Speed Research Model Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NFAC 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames is being refurbished with a new, deep acoustic lining in the test section which will make the facility nearly anechoic over a large frequency range. The modification history, key elements, and schedule will be discussed. Design features and expected performance gains will be described. Background noise reductions will be summarized. Improvements in aeroacoustic research techniques have been developed and used recently at NFAC on several wind tunnel tests of High Speed Research models. Research on quiet inflow microphones and struts will be described. The Acoustic Survey Apparatus in the 40x80 will be illustrated. A special intensity probe was tested for source localization. Multi-channel, high speed digital data acquisition is now used for acoustics. And most important, phased microphone arrays have been developed and tested which have proven to be very powerful for source identification and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Use of these tools for the HEAT model will be illustrated. In addition, an acoustically absorbent symmetry plane was built to satisfy the HEAT semispan aerodynamic and acoustic requirements. Acoustic performance of that symmetry plane will be shown.

  6. Wing pressure distributions from subsonic tests of a high-wing transport model. [in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Takallu, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted on a generic, high-wing transport model in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This report contains pressure data that document effects of various model configurations and free-stream conditions on wing pressure distributions. The untwisted wing incorporated a full-span, leading-edge Krueger flap and a part-span, double-slotted trailing-edge flap system. The trailing-edge flap was tested at four different deflection angles (20 deg, 30 deg, 40 deg, and 60 deg). Four wing configurations were tested: cruise, flaps only, Krueger flap only, and high lift (Krueger flap and flaps deployed). Tests were conducted at free-stream dynamic pressures of 20 psf to 60 psf with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.22 x 10(exp 6) to 2.11 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers of 0.12 to 0.20. The angles of attack presented range from 0 deg to 20 deg and were determined by wing configuration. The angle of sideslip ranged from minus 20 deg to 20 deg. In general, pressure distributions were relatively insensitive to free-stream speed with exceptions primarily at high angles of attack or high flap deflections. Increasing trailing-edge Krueger flap significantly reduced peak suction pressures and steep gradients on the wing at high angles of attack. Installation of the empennage had no effect on wing pressure distributions. Unpowered engine nacelles reduced suction pressures on the wing and the flaps.

  7. Reaction of long-lived radicals and vitamin C in γ-irradiated mammalian cells and their model system at 295 K. Tunneling reaction in biological system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takuro; Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Kosugi, Yoshio; Kumada, Takayuki; Koyama, Sinji; Kodama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masami.

    1996-01-01

    When golden hamster embryo (GHE) cells or concentrated albumin solution (0.1 kg dm -3 ) that is a model system of cells is irradiated with γ-rays at 295 K, organic radicals produced can be observed by ESR. The organic radicals survive at both 295 K and 310 K for such a long time as 20 hr. The long-lived radicals in GHE cells and the albumin solution react with vitamin C by the rate constants of 0.007 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and 0.014 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 , respectively. The long-lived radicals in human cells cause gene mutation, which is suppressed by addition of vitamin C. The isotope effect on the rate constant (k) for the reaction of the long-lived radicals and vitamin C has been studied in the albumin solution by use of protonated vitamin C and deuterated vitamin C. The isotope effect (k H /k D ) was more than 20-50 and was interpreted in terms of tunneling reaction. When GHE cells or the aqueous albumin solution (0.1 kg dm -3 ) is irradiated with γ-rays at 295 K, organic radicals produced survive for more than 24 hr at room temperature. Very recently we have found that vitamin C reacts with the long-lived organic radicals in the γ-irradiated albumin solution at high concentration of 0.1 kg dm -3 by the rate constant of 0.014 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . Since most of reactions in biological systems including the reaction of vitamin C are a transfer of a hydrogen atom or a proton that has a large wave character, it is generally expected that the tunneling reaction may play an important role in biological systems at room temperature. The studies of isotope effects on reactions will give an information on the contribution of tunneling reaction. (J.P.N.)

  8. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/28-Scale Model of the North American FJ-4 Airplane with External Fuel Tanks, TED No. NACA AD 3112

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Frederick M.

    1958-01-01

    A supplementary investigation to determine the effect of external fuel tanks on the spin and recovery characteristics of a l/28-scale model of the North American FJ-4 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The model had been extensively tested previously (NACA Research Memorandum SL38A29) and therefore only brief tests were made to evaluate the effect of tank installation. Erect spin tests of the model indicate that flat-type spins-are more prevalent with 200-gallon external fuel tanks than with tanks not installed. The recovery technique determined for spins without tanks, rudder reversal to full against the spin accompanied by simultaneous movement of ailerons to full with the spin, is recommended for spins encountered with external tanks installed. If inverted spins are encountered with external tanks installed, the tanks should be jettisoned and recovery attempted by rudder reversal to full against the spin with ailerons maintained at neutral.

  9. Does Business Model Affect CSR Involvement? A Survey of Polish Manufacturing and Service Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzanna Katarzyna Witek-Hajduk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study explores links between types of business models used by companies and their involvement in CSR. As the main part of our conceptual framework we used a business model taxonomy developed by Dudzik and Witek-Hajduk, which identifies five types of models: traditionalists, market players, contractors, distributors, and integrators. From shared characteristics of the business model profiles, we proposed that market players and integrators will show significantly higher levels of involvement in CSR than the three other classes of companies. Among other things, both market players and integrators relied strongly on building own brand value and fostering harmonious supply channel relations, which served as a rationale for our hypothesis. The data for the study were obtained through a combined CATI and CAWI survey on a group of 385 managers of medium and large enterprises. The sample was representative for the three Polish industries of chemical manufacturing, food production, and retailing. Statistical methods included confirmatory factor analysis and one-way ANOVA with contrasts and post hoc tests. The findings supported our hypothesis, showing that market players and integrators were indeed more engaged in CSR than other groups of firms. This may suggest that managers in control of these companies could bolster the integrity of their business models by increasing CSR involvement. Another important contribution of the study was to propose and validate a versatile scale for assessing CSR involvement, which showed measurement invariance for all involved industries.

  10. Medical staff involvement in nursing homes: development of a conceptual model and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Renée; Rosenthal, Marsha; Wetle, Terrie; Tyler, Denise; Clark, Melissa; Intrator, Orna

    2014-02-01

    Medical staff (physicians, nurse practitioners, physicians' assistants) involvement in nursing homes (NH) is limited by professional guidelines, government policies, regulations, and reimbursements, creating bureaucratic burden. The conceptual NH Medical Staff Involvement Model, based on our mixed-methods research, applies the Donabedian "structure-process-outcomes" framework to the NH, identifying measures for a coordinated research agenda. Quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews conducted with medical directors, administrators and directors of nursing, other experts, residents and family members and Minimum Data Set, the Online Certification and Reporting System and Medicare Part B claims data related to NH structure, process, and outcomes were analyzed. NH control of medical staff, or structure, affects medical staff involvement in care processes and is associated with better outcomes (e.g., symptom management, appropriate transitions, satisfaction). The model identifies measures clarifying the impact of NH medical staff involvement on care processes and resident outcomes and has strong potential to inform regulatory policies.

  11. Customer involvement in greening the supply chain: an interpretive structural modeling methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Luthra, Sunil; Haleem, Abid

    2013-04-01

    The role of customers in green supply chain management needs to be identified and recognized as an important research area. This paper is an attempt to explore the involvement aspect of customers towards greening of the supply chain (SC). An empirical research approach has been used to collect primary data to rank different variables for effective customer involvement in green concept implementation in SC. An interpretive structural-based model has been presented, and variables have been classified using matrice d' impacts croises- multiplication appliqué a un classement analysis. Contextual relationships among variables have been established using experts' opinions. The research may help practicing managers to understand the interaction among variables affecting customer involvement. Further, this understanding may be helpful in framing the policies and strategies to green SC. Analyzing interaction among variables for effective customer involvement in greening SC to develop the structural model in the Indian perspective is an effort towards promoting environment consciousness.

  12. Statistical aspects of carbon fiber risk assessment modeling. [fire accidents involving aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, D.; Miller, D. R.; Soland, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The probabilistic and statistical aspects of the carbon fiber risk assessment modeling of fire accidents involving commercial aircraft are examined. Three major sources of uncertainty in the modeling effort are identified. These are: (1) imprecise knowledge in establishing the model; (2) parameter estimation; and (3)Monte Carlo sampling error. All three sources of uncertainty are treated and statistical procedures are utilized and/or developed to control them wherever possible.

  13. Techniques for extreme attitude suspension of a wind tunnel model in a magnetic suspension and balance system. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David Huw

    1989-01-01

    Although small scale magnetic suspension and balance systems (MSBSs) for wind tunnel use have been in existence for many years, they have not found general application in the production testing of flight vehicles. One reason for this is thought to lie in the relatively limited range of attitudes over which a wind tunnel model may be suspended. Modifications to a small MSBS to permit the suspension and control of axisymmetric models over angles of attack from less than zero to over ninety degrees are reported. Previous work has shown that existing arrangement of ten electromagnets was unable to generate one of the force components needed for control at extreme attitudes. Examination of possible solutions resulted in a simple alteration to rectify this deficiency. To generate the feedback signals to control the suspended model, an optical position sensing system using collimated laser beams and photodiode arrays was installed and tested. An analytical basis was developed for distributing the demands for force and moment needed for model stabilization amonge the electromagnets over the full attitude range. This was implemented by an MSBS control program able to continually adjust the distribution for the instantaneous incidence in accordance with prescheduled data. Results presented demonstrate rotations of models from zero to ninety degrees at rates up to ninety degrees per second, with pitching rates rising to several hundred degrees per second in response to step-change demands. A study of a design for a large MSBS suggests that such a system could be given the capability to control a model in six degrees of freedom over an unlimited angle of attack range.

  14. A predictive analytic model for high-performance tunneling field-effect transistors approaching non-equilibrium Green's function simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, Ramon B.; Appenzeller, Joerg; Ilatikhameneh, Hesameddin; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    A new compact modeling approach is presented which describes the full current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of high-performance (aggressively scaled-down) tunneling field-effect-transistors (TFETs) based on homojunction direct-bandgap semiconductors. The model is based on an analytic description of two key features, which capture the main physical phenomena related to TFETs: (1) the potential profile from source to channel and (2) the elliptic curvature of the complex bands in the bandgap region. It is proposed to use 1D Poisson's equations in the source and the channel to describe the potential profile in homojunction TFETs. This allows to quantify the impact of source/drain doping on device performance, an aspect usually ignored in TFET modeling but highly relevant in ultra-scaled devices. The compact model is validated by comparison with state-of-the-art quantum transport simulations using a 3D full band atomistic approach based on non-equilibrium Green's functions. It is shown that the model reproduces with good accuracy the data obtained from the simulations in all regions of operation: the on/off states and the n/p branches of conduction. This approach allows calculation of energy-dependent band-to-band tunneling currents in TFETs, a feature that allows gaining deep insights into the underlying device physics. The simplicity and accuracy of the approach provide a powerful tool to explore in a quantitatively manner how a wide variety of parameters (material-, size-, and/or geometry-dependent) impact the TFET performance under any bias conditions. The proposed model presents thus a practical complement to computationally expensive simulations such as the 3D NEGF approach

  15. Spin-dependent tunnelling in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Mryasov, Oleg N; LeClair, Patrick R

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of electron tunnelling has been known since the advent of quantum mechanics, but continues to enrich our understanding of many fields of physics, as well as creating sub-fields on its own. Spin-dependent tunnelling (SDT) in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) has recently aroused enormous interest and has developed in a vigorous field of research. The large tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) observed in MTJs garnered much attention due to possible applications in non-volatile random-access memories and next-generation magnetic field sensors. This led to a number of fundamental questions regarding the phenomenon of SDT. In this review article we present an overview of this field of research. We discuss various factors that control the spin polarization and magnetoresistance in MTJs. Starting from early experiments on SDT and their interpretation, we consider thereafter recent experiments and models which highlight the role of the electronic structure of the ferromagnets, the insulating layer, and the ferromagnet/insulator interfaces. We also discuss the role of disorder in the barrier and in the ferromagnetic electrodes and their influence on TMR. (topical review)

  16. Snow and ice blocking of tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lia, Leif

    1998-12-31

    Hydroelectric power development in cold regions causes much concern about operational reliability and dam safety. This thesis studies the temperature distribution in tunnels by means of air temperature measurements in six tunnel spillways and five diversion tunnels. The measurements lasted for two consecutive winters. The air through flow tunnel is used as it causes cooling of both rock and water. In open spillway tunnels, frost reaches the entire tunnel. In spillway tunnels with walls, the frost zones reach about 100 m from the downstream end. In mildly-inclined diversion tunnels, a frost free zone is located in the middle of the tunnel and snow and ice problems were only observed in the inlet and outlet. Severe aufeis is accumulation is observed in the frost zones. The heat transfer from rock to air, water and ice is calculated and used in a prediction model for the calculation of aufeis build-up together with local field observation data. The water penetration of snow plugs is also calculated, based on the heat balance. It takes 20 to 50 days for water to enter the blocked tunnel. The empirical values are 30 to 60 days, but only 1 day if the temperature of the snow pack is 0{sup o}C. Sensitivity analyses are carried out for temperature variations in rock, snow, water and ice. Systematic field observation shows that it is important for hydropower companies to know about the effects of snow and ice blocking in an area. A risk analysis of dam safety is presented for a real case. Finally, the thesis proposes solutions which can reduce the snow and ice problems. 79 refs., 63 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. A dynamic performance model for redox-flow batteries involving soluble species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A.A.; Watt-Smith, M.J.; Walsh, F.C.

    2008-01-01

    A transient modelling framework for a vanadium redox-flow battery (RFB) is developed and experiments covering a range of vanadium concentration and electrolyte flow rate are conducted. The two-dimensional model is based on a comprehensive description of mass, charge and momentum transport and conservation, and is combined with a global kinetic model for reactions involving vanadium species. The model is validated against the experimental data and is used to study the effects of variations in concentration, electrolyte flow rate and electrode porosity. Extensions to the model and future work are suggested

  18. The effect of density-of-state tails on band-to-band tunneling: Theory and application to tunnel field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant, S.; Schenk, A.

    2017-10-01

    It is demonstrated how band tail states in the semiconductor influence the performance of a Tunnel Field Effect Transistor (TFET). As a consequence of the smoothened density of states (DOS) around the band edges, the energetic overlap of conduction and valence band states occurs gradually at the onset of band-to-band tunneling (BTBT), thus degrading the sub-threshold swing (SS) of the TFET. The effect of the band tail states on the current-voltage characteristics is modelled quantum-mechanically based on the idea of zero-phonon trap-assisted tunneling between band and tail states. The latter are assumed to arise from a 3-dimensional pseudo-delta potential proposed by Vinogradov [1]. This model potential allows the derivation of analytical expressions for the generation rate covering the whole range from very strong to very weak localization of the tail states. Comparison with direct BTBT in the one-band effective mass approximation reveals the essential features of tail-to-band tunneling. Furthermore, an analytical solution for the problem of tunneling from continuum states of the disturbed DOS to states in the opposite band is found, and the differences to direct BTBT are worked out. Based on the analytical expressions, a semi-classical model is implemented in a commercial device simulator which involves numerical integration along the tunnel paths. The impact of the tail states on the device performance is analyzed for a nanowire Gate-All-Around TFET. The simulations show that tail states notably impact the transfer characteristics of a TFET. It is found that exponentially decaying band tails result in a stronger degradation of the SS than tail states with a Gaussian decay of their density. The developed model allows more realistic simulations of TFETs including their non-idealities.

  19. Influence of trap-assisted tunneling on trap-assisted tunneling current in double gate tunnel field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Jiang; Yi-Qi, Zhuang; Cong, Li; Ping, Wang; Yu-Qi, Liu

    2016-02-01

    Trap-assisted tunneling (TAT) has attracted more and more attention, because it seriously affects the sub-threshold characteristic of tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET). In this paper, we assess subthreshold performance of double gate TFET (DG-TFET) through a band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) model, including phonon-assisted scattering and acoustic surface phonons scattering. Interface state density profile (Dit) and the trap level are included in the simulation to analyze their effects on TAT current and the mechanism of gate leakage current. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61574109 and 61204092).

  20. Influence of trap-assisted tunneling on trap-assisted tunneling current in double gate tunnel field-effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zhi; Zhuang Yi-Qi; Li Cong; Wang Ping; Liu Yu-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Trap-assisted tunneling (TAT) has attracted more and more attention, because it seriously affects the sub-threshold characteristic of tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET). In this paper, we assess subthreshold performance of double gate TFET (DG-TFET) through a band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) model, including phonon-assisted scattering and acoustic surface phonons scattering. Interface state density profile (D it ) and the trap level are included in the simulation to analyze their effects on TAT current and the mechanism of gate leakage current. (paper)

  1. Models of user involvement in the mental health context: intentions and implementation challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Marianne; Edwards, Adrian

    2013-09-01

    Patient-centered care, shared decision-making, patient participation and the recovery model are models of care which incorporate user involvement and patients' perspectives on their treatment and care. The aims of this paper are to examine these different care models and their association with user involvement in the mental health context and discuss some of the challenges associated with their implementation. The sources used are health policy documents and published literature and research on patient-centered care, shared decision-making, patient participation and recovery. The policy documents advocate that mental health services should be oriented towards patients' or users' needs, participation and involvement. These policies also emphasize recovery and integration of people with mental disorders in the community. However, these collaborative care models have generally been subject to limited empirical research about effectiveness. There are also challenges to implementation of the models in inpatient care. What evidence there is indicates tensions between patients' and providers' perspectives on treatment and care. There are issues related to risk and the person's capacity for user involvement, and concerns about what role patients themselves wish to play in decision-making. Lack of competence and awareness among providers are further issues. Further work on training, evaluation and implementation is needed to ensure that inpatient mental health services are adapting user oriented care models at all levels of services.

  2. Multiscale modeling of current-induced switching in magnetic tunnel junctions using ab initio spin-transfer torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Matthew O. A.; Stamenova, Maria; Sanvito, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    There exists a significant challenge in developing efficient magnetic tunnel junctions with low write currents for nonvolatile memory devices. With the aim of analyzing potential materials for efficient current-operated magnetic junctions, we have developed a multi-scale methodology combining ab initio calculations of spin-transfer torque with large-scale time-dependent simulations using atomistic spin dynamics. In this work we introduce our multiscale approach, including a discussion on a number of possible schemes for mapping the ab initio spin torques into the spin dynamics. We demonstrate this methodology on a prototype Co/MgO/Co/Cu tunnel junction showing that the spin torques are primarily acting at the interface between the Co free layer and MgO. Using spin dynamics we then calculate the reversal switching times for the free layer and the critical voltages and currents required for such switching. Our work provides an efficient, accurate, and versatile framework for designing novel current-operated magnetic devices, where all the materials details are taken into account.

  3. Childhood craniopharyngioma: greater hypothalamic involvement before surgery is associated with higher homeostasis model insulin resistance index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainte-Rose Christian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity seems to be linked to the hypothalamic involvement in craniopharyngioma. We evaluated the pre-surgery relationship between the degree of this involvement on magnetic resonance imaging and insulin resistance, as evaluated by the homeostasis model insulin resistance index (HOMA. As insulin-like growth factor 1, leptin, soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R and ghrelin may also be involved, we compared their plasma concentrations and their link to weight change. Methods 27 children with craniopharyngioma were classified as either grade 0 (n = 7, no hypothalamic involvement, grade 1 (n = 8, compression without involvement, or grade 2 (n = 12, severe involvement. Results Despite having similar body mass indexes (BMI, the grade 2 patients had higher glucose, insulin and HOMA before surgery than the grade 0 (P = 0.02, The data for the whole population before and 6–18 months after surgery showed increases in BMI (P Conclusion The hypothalamic involvement by the craniopharyngioma before surgery seems to determine the degree of insulin resistance, regardless of the BMI. The pre-surgery HOMA values were correlated with the post-surgery weight gain. This suggests that obesity should be prevented by reducing inn secretion in those cases with hypothalamic involvement.

  4. Quantum tunneling of magnetization in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamp, P.C.E.; Barbara, B.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic solids should, under certain circumstances, show macroscopic quantum behavior, in which coherence exists between completely distinct magnetization states, each involving a very large number of spins (∼10 12 spins). This article reviews the recent work in this field, concentrating particularly on macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) of magnetization. The two main phenomena discussed are the tunneling of magnetization in single-domain particles or grains (in which some 10 3 - 10 4 spins rotate together through an energy barrier), and the tunneling of domain walls in films or in bulk magnets; where walls containing ∼10 10 spins may tunnel off a pinning potential, or from one pinning center to another. Some attention is also given to the quantum nucleation of magnetization reversal in a bulk magnet, and to the quantum motion of other magnetic solitons (such as vortices). After a thorough analysis of the basic grain and wall tunneling phenomena, the authors continue on to a discussion of the various dissipative or decoherence mechanisms, which destroy the phase correlations involved in tunneling. The coupling of grain magnetization to phonons, photons, and electrons is shown to have little consequence for weakly-conducting or insulating grains. Domain walls couple to these and also to magnons and impurities or defects; the 3rd order coupling to magnons can have serious effects, but if one uses pure insulators at low temperatures, these can also be ignored

  5. How and Why Fathers Are Involved in Their Children's Education: Gendered Model of Parent Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung won

    2018-01-01

    Accumulating evidence points to the unique contributions fathers make to their children's academic outcomes. However, the large body of multi-disciplinary literature on fatherhood does not address how fathers engage in specific practices relevant to education, while the educational research in the United States focused on parent involvement often…

  6. Quantum tunneling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.S.; Lai, C.H.; Oh, C.H.; Kwek, L.C.

    2004-01-01

    We present a calculation of quantum tunneling time based on the transition duration of wave peak from one side of a barrier to the other. In our formulation, the tunneling time comprises a real and an imaginary part. The real part is an extension of the phase tunneling time with quantum corrections whereas the imaginary time is associated with energy derivatives of the probability amplitudes

  7. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  8. Josephson tunneling and nanosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Ovchinnikov, Yurii; Kresin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Josephson tunneling between nanoclusters is analyzed. The discrete nature of the electronic energy spectra, including their shell ordering, is explicitly taken into account. The treatment considers the two distinct cases of resonant and non-resonant tunneling. It is demonstrated that the current density greatly exceeds the value discussed in the conventional theory. Nanoparticles are shown to be promising building blocks for nanomaterials-based tunneling networks.

  9. About tunnelling times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Recami, E.

    1991-08-01

    In this paper, first we critically analyse the main theoretical definitions and calculations of the sub-barrier tunnelling and reflection times. Secondly, we propose a new, physically sensible definition of such durations, on the basis of a recent general formalism (already tested for other types of quantum collisions). At last, we discuss some results regarding temporal evolution of the tunnelling processes, and in particular the ''particle'' speed during tunnelling. (author). 36 refs, 1 fig

  10. Base pressure and heat transfer tests of the 0.0225-scale space shuttle plume simulation model (19-OTS) in yawed flight conditions in the NASA-Lewis 10x10-foot supersonic wind tunnel (test IH83)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed to determine pressures, heat transfer rates, and gas recovery temperatures in the base region of a rocket firing model of the space shuttle integrated vehicle during simulated yawed flight conditions. First and second stage flight of the space shuttle were simulated by firing the main engines in conjunction with the SRB rocket motors or only the SSME's into the continuous tunnel airstream. For the correct rocket plume environment, the simulated altitude pressures were halved to maintain the rocket chamber/altitude pressure ratio. Tunnel freestream Mach numbers from 2.2 to 3.5 were simulated over an altitude range of 60 to 130 thousand feet with varying angle of attack, yaw angle, nozzle gimbal angle and SRB chamber pressure. Gas recovery temperature data derived from nine gas temperature probe runs are presented. The model configuration, instrumentation, test procedures, and data reduction are described.

  11. Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel advances the study of fundamental flow physics relevant to micro air vehicle (MAV) flight and assesses vehicle performance...

  12. Advanced Macro-Model with Pulse-Width Dependent Switching Characteristic for Spin Transfer Torque Based Magnetic-Tunnel-Junction Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojeong Kim,; Seungjun Lee,; Hyungsoon Shin,

    2010-04-01

    In spin transfer torque (STT)-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), the switching depends on the current pulse-width as well as the magnitude of the switching current. We present an advanced macro-model of an STT-MTJ for a circuit simulator such as HSPICE. The macro-model can simulate the dependence of switching behavior on current pulse-width in an STT-MTJ. An imaginary resistor-capacitor (RC) circuit is adopted to emulate complex timing behavior which cannot be described nicely by existing functions in HSPICE. Simulation results show the resistance-current (R-I) curve and timing behavior is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Application of fuzzy methods in tunnelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudmila Tréfová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Full-face tunnelling machines were used for the tunnel construction in Slovakia for boring of the exploratory galleries of highwaytunnels Branisko and Višňové-Dubná skala. A monitoring system of boring process parameters was installed on the tunnelling machinesand the acquired outcomes were processed by several theoretical approaches. Method IKONA was developed for the determination ofchanges in the rock mass strength characteristics in the line of exploratory gallery. Individual geological sections were evaluated bythe descriptive statistics and the TBM performance was evaluated by the fuzzy method. The paper informs on the procedure of the designof fuzzy models and their verification.

  14. Childhood craniopharyngioma: greater hypothalamic involvement before surgery is associated with higher homeostasis model insulin resistance index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivin, Christine; Busiah, Kanetee; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Recasens, Christophe; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Zerah, Michel; Sainte-Rose, Christian; Brauner, Raja

    2009-01-01

    Background Obesity seems to be linked to the hypothalamic involvement in craniopharyngioma. We evaluated the pre-surgery relationship between the degree of this involvement on magnetic resonance imaging and insulin resistance, as evaluated by the homeostasis model insulin resistance index (HOMA). As insulin-like growth factor 1, leptin, soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R) and ghrelin may also be involved, we compared their plasma concentrations and their link to weight change. Methods 27 children with craniopharyngioma were classified as either grade 0 (n = 7, no hypothalamic involvement), grade 1 (n = 8, compression without involvement), or grade 2 (n = 12, severe involvement). Results Despite having similar body mass indexes (BMI), the grade 2 patients had higher glucose, insulin and HOMA before surgery than the grade 0 (P = 0.02, craniopharyngioma before surgery seems to determine the degree of insulin resistance, regardless of the BMI. The pre-surgery HOMA values were correlated with the post-surgery weight gain. This suggests that obesity should be prevented by reducing inn secretion in those cases with hypothalamic involvement. PMID:19341477

  15. Job involvement of primary healthcare employees: does a service provision model play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Anne M; Laamanen, Ritva; Simonsen-Rehn, Nina; Sundell, Jari; Brommels, Mats; Suominen, Sakari

    2010-05-01

    To investigate whether the development of job involvement of primary healthcare (PHC) employees in Southern Municipality (SM), where PHC services were outsourced to an independent non-profit organisation, differed from that in the three comparison municipalities (M1, M2, M3) with municipal service providers. Also, the associations of job involvement with factors describing the psychosocial work environment were investigated. A panel mail survey 2000-02 in Finland (n=369, response rates 73% and 60%). The data were analysed by descriptive statistics and multivariate linear regression analysis. Despite the favourable development in the psychosocial work environment, job involvement decreased most in SM, which faced the biggest organisational changes. Job involvement decreased also in M3, where the psychosocial work environment deteriorated most. Job involvement in 2002 was best predicted by high baseline level of interactional justice and work control, positive change in interactional justice, and higher age. Also other factors, such as organisational stability, seemed to play a role; after controlling for the effect of the psychosocial work characteristics, job involvement was higher in M3 than in SM. Outsourcing of PHC services may decrease job involvement at least during the first years. A particular service provision model is better than the others only if it is superior in providing a favourable and stable psychosocial work environment.

  16. Strong quasi-particle tunneling study in the paired quantum Hall states

    OpenAIRE

    Nomura, Kentaro; Yoshioka, Daijiro

    2001-01-01

    The quasi-particle tunneling phenomena in the paired fractional quantum Hall states are studied. A single point-contact system is first considered. Because of relevancy of the quasi-particle tunneling term, the strong tunneling regime should be investigated. Using the instanton method it is shown that the strong quasi-particle tunneling regime is described as the weak electron tunneling regime effectively. Expanding to the network model the paired quantum Hall liquid to insulator transition i...

  17. Resonance tunneling electron-vibrational spectroscopy of polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalidchik, F I; Kovalevskii, S A; Balashov, E M

    2017-05-21

    The tunneling spectra of the ordered monolayer films of decamolybdodicobaltate (DMDC) compounds deposited from aqueous solutions on HOPG were measured by scanning tunnel microscopy in air. The DMDC spectra, as well as the tunneling spectra of other polyoxometalates (POMs), exhibit well-defined negative differential resistances (NDRs). The mechanism of formation of these spectral features was established from the collection of revealed NDR dependences on the external varying parameters and found to be common to all systems exhibiting Wannier-Stark localization. A model of biresonance tunneling was developed to provide an explanation for the totality of experimental data, both the literature and original, on the tunneling POM probing. A variant of the tunneling electron-vibrational POM spectroscopy was proposed allowing the determination of the three basic energy parameters-energy gaps between the occupied and unoccupied states, frequencies of the vibrational transitions accompanying biresonance electron-tunneling processes, and electron-vibrational interaction constants on the monomolecular level.

  18. Semiempirical theory of level spacing distribution beyond the Berry-Robnik regime: modeling the localization and the tunneling effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistic, Benjamin; Robnik, Marko

    2010-01-01

    In this work we study the level spacing distribution in the classically mixed-type quantum systems (which are generic), exhibiting regular motion on invariant tori for some initial conditions and chaotic motion for the complementary initial conditions. In the asymptotic regime of the sufficiently deep semiclassical limit (sufficiently small effective Planck constant) the Berry and Robnik (1984 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 17 2413) picture applies, which is very well established. We present a new quasi-universal semiempirical theory of the level spacing distribution in a regime away from the Berry-Robnik regime (the near semiclassical limit), by describing both the dynamical localization effects of chaotic eigenstates, and the tunneling effects which couple regular and chaotic eigenstates. The theory works extremely well in the 2D mixed-type billiard system introduced by Robnik (1983 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 16 3971) and is also tested in other systems (mushroom billiard and Prosen billiard).

  19. Helpful Components Involved in the Cognitive-Experiential Model of Dream Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Hsiu-Lan Shelley; Chen, Shuh-Chi; Lin, Chia-Huei

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the helpful components involved in the Hill's cognitive-experiential dream work model. Participants were 27 volunteer clients from colleges and universities in northern and central parts of Taiwan. Each of the clients received 1-2 sessions of dream interpretations. The cognitive-experiential dream work model…

  20. Predicting Preschoolers' Attachment Security from Fathers' Involvement, Internal Working Models, and Use of Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Lisa A.; Coyl, Diana D.; Freeman, Harry

    2008-01-01

    Associations between preschoolers' attachment security, fathers' involvement (i.e. parenting behaviors and consistency) and fathering context (i.e. fathers' internal working models (IWMs) and use of social support) were examined in a subsample of 102 fathers, taken from a larger sample of 235 culturally diverse US families. The authors predicted…

  1. Model correction factor method for reliability problems involving integrals of non-Gaussian random fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franchin, P.; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Kiureghian, Armen Der

    2002-01-01

    The model correction factor method (MCFM) is used in conjunction with the first-order reliability method (FORM) to solve structural reliability problems involving integrals of non-Gaussian random fields. The approach replaces the limit-state function with an idealized one, in which the integrals ...

  2. Influence of Coherent Tunneling and Incoherent Hopping on the Charge Transfer Mechanism in Linear Donor-Bridge-Acceptor Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangqi; Govind, Niranjan; Ratner, Mark A; Cramer, Christopher J; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-12-17

    The mechanism of charge transfer has been observed to change from tunneling to hopping with increasing numbers of DNA base pairs in polynucleotides and with the length of molecular wires. The aim of this paper is to investigate this transition by examining the population dynamics using a tight-binding Hamiltonian with model parameters to describe a linear donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) system. The model includes a primary vibration and an electron-vibration coupling at each site. A further coupling of the primary vibration with a secondary phonon bath allows the system to dissipate energy to the environment and reach a steady state. We apply the quantum master equation (QME) approach, based on second-order perturbation theory in a quantum dissipative system, to examine the dynamical processes involved in charge-transfer and follow the population transfer rate at the acceptor, ka, to shed light on the transition from tunneling to hopping. With a small tunneling parameter, V, the on-site population tends to localize and form polarons, and the hopping mechanism dominates the transfer process. With increasing V, the population tends to be delocalized and the tunneling mechanism dominates. The competition between incoherent hopping and coherent tunneling governs the mechanism of charge transfer. By varying V and the total number of sites, we also examine the onset of the transition from tunneling to hopping with increasing length.

  3. Wind tunnel experiments of air flow patterns over nabkhas modeled after those from the Hotan River basin,Xinjiang,China(Ⅱ):vegetated

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhizhong LI; Rong MA; ShengLi WU; Janis DALE; Lin GE; Mudan HE; Xiaofeng WANG; Jianhui JIN; Jinwei LIU; Wanjuan LI

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the results of wind tunnel experiments on models of nabkha,based on those studied in the Hotan River basin.Semi-spherical and conical models of nabkhas were constructed at a ratio of 40:1 in light of the on-site observation.Artificial vegetation of simulated Tamarix spp.was put on top of each model.Parameters of the shape,including height,width,and diameter of vegetated semi-spherical and conical nabkha.were measured in the Hotan River basin.Wind tunnel experiments on the semi-spherical and conical nabkha used clean air devoid of additional sediments at five different wind speeds (6-14 m/s)to study the influence of vegetation on airflow patterns.Results of the experiments indicate that vegetation at the top of the nabkhas enhances the surface roughness of the sand mounds,retards airflow over the sand mounds,reduces airflow energy,eliminates erosional pits occurring on the top surface of non-vegetated sand mounds and enhances the range of influence of the vortex that forms on the leeward slope.Vegetation changes the airflow pattern upwind and downwind of the sand mound and reduces the transport of sand away from the nabkha.This entrapment of sediment by the vegetation plays an important role in sustaining the nabkha landscape of the study area.The existence of vegetation makes fine materials in wind-sand flow to possibly deposit,and promotes nabkha formation.The imitative flow patterns Of different morphological nabkhas have also been verified by on-site observation in the river basin.

  4. A Research Framework for Understanding the Practical Impact of Family Involvement in the Juvenile Justice System: The Juvenile Justice Family Involvement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sarah Cusworth; Bishop, Asia S; Pullmann, Michael D; Bauer, Grace

    2015-12-01

    Family involvement is recognized as a critical element of service planning for children's mental health, welfare and education. For the juvenile justice system, however, parents' roles in this system are complex due to youths' legal rights, public safety, a process which can legally position parents as plaintiffs, and a historical legacy of blaming parents for youth indiscretions. Three recent national surveys of juvenile justice-involved parents reveal that the current paradigm elicits feelings of stress, shame and distrust among parents and is likely leading to worse outcomes for youth, families and communities. While research on the impact of family involvement in the justice system is starting to emerge, the field currently has no organizing framework to guide a research agenda, interpret outcomes or translate findings for practitioners. We propose a research framework for family involvement that is informed by a comprehensive review and content analysis of current, published arguments for family involvement in juvenile justice along with a synthesis of family involvement efforts in other child-serving systems. In this model, family involvement is presented as an ascending, ordinal concept beginning with (1) exclusion, and moving toward climates characterized by (2) information-giving, (3) information-eliciting and (4) full, decision-making partnerships. Specific examples of how courts and facilities might align with these levels are described. Further, the model makes predictions for how involvement will impact outcomes at multiple levels with applications for other child-serving systems.

  5. A devolved model for public involvement in the field of mental health research: case study learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moule, Pam; Davies, Rosie

    2016-12-01

    Patient and public involvement in all aspects of research is espoused and there is a continued interest in understanding its wider impact. Existing investigations have identified both beneficial outcomes and remaining issues. This paper presents the impact of public involvement in one case study led by a mental health charity conducted as part of a larger research project. The case study used a devolved model of working, contracting with service user-led organizations to maximize the benefits of local knowledge on the implementation of personalized budgets, support recruitment and local user-led organizations. To understand the processes and impact of public involvement in a devolved model of working with user-led organizations. Multiple data collection methods were employed throughout 2012. These included interviews with the researchers (n = 10) and research partners (n = 5), observation of two case study meetings and the review of key case study documentation. Analysis was conducted in NVivo10 using a coding framework developed following a literature review. Five key themes emerged from the data; Devolved model, Nature of involvement, Enabling factors, Implementation challenges and Impact. While there were some challenges of implementing the devolved model it is clear that our findings add to the growing understanding of the positive benefits research partners can bring to complex research. A devolved model can support the involvement of user-led organizations in research if there is a clear understanding of the underpinning philosophy and support mechanisms are in place. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The effect of asymmetry on resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Calderon, G.

    1986-07-01

    Resonant tunneling experiments on multibarrier coupled heterostructures probe the quasistationary nature of the states of the corresponding one dimensional potential. This work considers the effect of asymmetric one dimensional multibarrier potentials on resonant tunneling. It is shown, by using the properties of the propagator of the system, that this effect may lead to novel resonance phenomena and affects the lifetime of the quasistationary states of the system. The above considerations are illustrated by a simple analytical solvable model. (author)

  7. Scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnig, G.; Rohrer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Based on vacuum tunneling, a novel type of microscope, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was developed. It has an unprecedented resolution in real space on an atomic scale. The authors review the important technical features, illustrate the power of the STM for surface topographies and discuss its potential in other areas of science and technology. (Auth.)

  8. Electron tunneling in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamaraev, K.I.; Khajrutdinov, R.F.; Zhdanov, V.P.; Molin, Yu.N.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical investigations are outlined systematically on electron tunnelling in chemical reactions. Mechanism of electron transport to great distances is shown to be characteristic to chemical compounds of a wide range. The function of tunnel reactions is discussed for various fields of chemistry, including radiation chemistry, electrochemistry, chemistry of solids, chemistry of surface and catalysis

  9. Nonlinear phased analysis of reinforced concrete tunnels under fire exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lilliu, G.; Meda, A.

    2013-01-01

    Fire analysis of precast segmental tunnels involves several problems, mainly related to the soil-structure interaction during fire exposure, coupled with material degradation. Temperature increase in the tunnel is the cause of thermal expansion of the lining, which is resisted by the soil pressure.

  10. Modelling the fathering role: Experience in the family of origin and father involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihić Ivana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presented in this paper deals with the effects of experiences with father in the family of origin on the fathering role in the family of procreation. The results of the studies so far point to great importance of such experiences in parental role modelling, while recent approaches have suggested the concept of introjected notion or an internal working model of the fathering role as the way to operationalise the transgenerational transfer. The study included 247 two-parent couple families whose oldest child attended preschool education. Fathers provided information on self-assessed involvement via the Inventory of father involvement, while both fathers and mothers gave information on introjected experiences from the family of origin via the inventory Presence of the father in the family of origin. It was shown that father’s experiences from the family of origin had significant direct effects on his involvement in child-care. Very important experiences were those of negative emotional exchange, physical closeness and availability of the father, as well as beliefs about the importance of the father as a parent. Although maternal experiences from the family of origin did not contribute significantly to father involvement, shared beliefs about father’s importance as a parent in the parenting alliance had an effect on greater involvement in child-care. The data provide confirmation of the hypotheses on modelling of the fathering role, but also open the issue of the factor of intergenerational maintenance of traditional forms of father involvement in families in Serbia.

  11. Wind-tunnel tests of a 1/4 scale model of the Bell XS-1 transonic airplane. 1: Longitudinal stability and control characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlan, C. J.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Polhamus, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    A 1/4 scale model of the Bell XS-1 transonic aircraft was tested in the Langley 300 mile-per-hour 7 by 10 foot tunnel to determine its low speed longitudinal stability and control characteristics. Pertinent longitudinal flying qualities expected of the XS-1 research airplane were estimated from the results of these tests including the effects of compressibility likely to be encountered at speeds below the force break. It appears that the static longitudinal stability and elevator control power will be adequate, but that the elevator control force gradient in steady flight will be undesirably low for all configurations. It is suggested that a centering spring be incorporated in the elevator control system of the airplane in order to increase the control force gradient in steady flight and in maneuvers.

  12. Effect of nozzle and vertical-tail variables on the performance of a 3-surface F-15 model at transonic Mach numbers. [Langley 16 foot transonic tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergraft, O. C., Jr.; Bare, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16 foot transonic tunnel to determine the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of twin two dimensional nozzles and twin baseline axisymmetric nozzles installed on a fully metric 0.047 scale model of the F-15 three surface configuration (canards, wing, horizontal tails). The effects on performance of two dimensional nozzle in flight thrust reversing, locations and orientation of the vertical tails, and deflections of the horizontal tails were also determined. Test data were obtained at static conditions and at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20 over an angle of attack range from -2 deg to 15 deg. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from jet off to about 6.5.

  13. Histological Observation of Regions around Bone Tunnels after Compression of the Bone Tunnel Wall in Ligament Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Shintaro; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Tanigawa, Naoaki; Miyazaki, Kyosuke; Shioda, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the time-course of influence of compression of bone tunnel wall in ligament reconstruction on tissue around the bone tunnel and to histologically examine the mechanism of preventing the complication of bone tunnel dilation, using rabbit tibia. A model in which the femoral origin of the extensor digitorum longus tendon was cut and inserted into a bone tunnel made proximal to the tibia was prepared in the bilateral hind legs of 20 Japanese white rabbits. In each animal, a tunnel was made using a drill only in the right leg, while an undersized bone tunnel was made by drilling and then dilated by compression using a dilator to the same tunnel size as that in the right leg. Animals were sacrificed at 0, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery (4 animals at each time point). Observation of bone tunnels by X-ray radiography showed osteosclerosis in the 2- and 4-week dilation groups. Osteosclerosis appeared as white lines around the bone tunnel on X-ray radiography. This suggests that dilation promotes callus formation in the bone tunnel wall and prevents the complication of bone tunnel enlargement after ligament reconstruction

  14. Multi-Objective Optimal Design of a Building Envelope and Structural System Using Cyber-Physical Modeling in a Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Whiteman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the use of a cyber-physical systems (CPS “loop-in-the-model” approach to optimally design the envelope and structural system of low-rise buildings subject to wind loads. Both the components and cladding (C&C and the main wind force resisting system (MWFRS are considered through multi-objective optimization. The CPS approach combines the physical accuracy of wind tunnel testing and efficiency of numerical optimization algorithms to obtain an optimal design. The approach is autonomous: experiments are executed in a boundary layer wind tunnel (BLWT, sensor feedback is monitored and analyzed by a computer, and optimization algorithms dictate physical changes to the structural model in the BLWT through actuators. To explore a CPS approach to multi-objective optimization, a low-rise building with a parapet wall of variable height is considered. In the BLWT, servo-motors are used to adjust the parapet to a particular height. Parapet walls alter the location of the roof corner vortices, reducing suction loads on the windward facing roof corners and edges, a C&C design load. At the same time, parapet walls increase the surface area of the building, leading to an increase in demand on the MWFRS. A combination of non-stochastic and stochastic optimization algorithms were implemented to minimize the magnitude of suction and positive pressures on the roof of a low-rise building model, followed by stochastic multi-objective optimization to simultaneously minimize the magnitude of suction pressures and base shear. Experiments were conducted at the University of Florida Experimental Facility (UFEF of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF Natural Hazard Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI program.

  15. Design and theoretical calculation of novel GeSn fully-depleted n-tunneling FET with quantum confinement model for suppression on GIDL effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyu; Hu, Huiyong; Wang, Meng; Miao, Yuanhao; Han, Genquan; Wang, Bin

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, a novel fully-depleted Ge1-xSnx n-Tunneling FET (FD Ge1-xSnx nTFET) with field plate is investigated theoretically based on the experiment previously published. The energy band structures of Ge1-xSnx are calculated by EMP and the band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) parameters of Ge1-xSnx are calculated by Kane's model. The electrical characteristics of FD Ge1-xSnx nTFET and FD Ge1-xSnx nTFET with field plate (FD-FP Ge1-xSnx nTFET) having various Sn compositions are investigated and simulated with quantum confinement model. The results indicated that the GIDL effect is serious in FD Ge1-xSnx nTFET. By employing the field plate structure, the GIDL effect of FD-FP Ge1-xSnx nTFET is suppressed and the off-state current Ioff is decreased more than 2 orders of magnitude having Sn compositions from 0 to 0.06 compared with FD Ge1-xSnx nTFET. The impact of the difference of work function between field plate metal and channel Φfps is also studied. With the optimized Φfps = 0.0 eV, the on-state current Ion = 4.6 × 10-5 A/μm, the off-state current Ioff = 1.6 × 10-13 A/μm and the maximum on/off ration Ion/Ioff = 2.9 × 108 are achieved.

  16. Stereo Photogrammetry Measurements of the Position and Attitude of a Nozzle-Plume/Shock-Wave Interaction Model in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura K.; Drain, Bethany A.; Heineck, James T.; Durston, Donald A.

    2017-01-01

    Stereo photogrammetry was used to measure the position and attitude of a slender body of revolution during nozzle-plume/shock-wave interaction tests in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The model support system was designed to allow the model to be placed at many locations in the test section relative to a pressure rail on one sidewall. It included a streamwise traverse as well as a thin blade that offset the model axis from the sting axis. With these features the support system was more flexible than usual resulting in higher-than-usual uncertainty in the position and attitude of the model. Also contributing to this uncertainty were the absence of a balance, so corrections for sting deflections could not be applied, and the wings-vertical orientation of the model, which precluded using a gravity-based accelerometer to measure pitch angle. Therefore, stereo photogrammetry was chosen to provide independent measures of the model position and orientation. This paper describes the photogrammetry system and presents selected results from the test.

  17. Modelling binaural processes involved in simultaneous reflection masking: limitations of current models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholz, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Masked thresholds were measured for a single test reflection, masked by the direct sound, as a function of the reflection delay. This was done for diotic as well as for dichotic stimulus presentations and all stimuli were presented via headphones. The input signal was a 200-ms long broadband noise......, such as normalized cross-correlation models (e.g., Bernstein et al., 1999, JASA, pp. 870-876), the power-addition model (Zurek, 1979, JASA, pp. 1750-1757), or Equalization-Cancellation-based models (e.g., Breebaart et al., 2001, JASA, pp. 1074-1088), cannot account for the psychoacoustical data. The present talk...

  18. Canadian Whole-Farm Model Holos - Development, Stakeholder Involvement, and Model Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroebel, R.; Janzen, H.; Beauchemin, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's Holos model, based mostly on emission factors, aims to explore the effect of management on Canadian whole-farm greenhouse gas emissions. The model includes 27 commonly grown annual and perennial crops, summer fallow, grassland, and 8 types of tree plantings, along with beef, dairy, sheep, swine and other livestock or poultry operations. Model outputs encompass net emissions of CO2, CH4, and N2O (in CO2 equivalents), calculated for various farm components. Where possible, algorithms are drawn from peer-reviewed publications. For consistency, Holos is aligned with the Canadian sustainability indicator and national greenhouse gas inventory objectives. Although primarily an exploratory tool for research, the model's design makes it accessible and instructive also to agricultural producers, educators, and policy makers. Model development, therefore, proceeds iteratively, with extensive stakeholder feedback from training sessions or annual workshops. To make the model accessible to diverse users, the team developed a multi-layered interface, with general farming scenarios for general use, but giving access to detailed coefficients and assumptions to researchers. The model relies on extensive climate, soil, and agronomic databases to populate regionally-applicable default values thereby minimizing keyboard entries. In an initial application, the model was used to assess greenhouse gas emissions from the Canadian beef production system; it showed that enteric methane accounted for 63% of total GHG emissions and that 84% of emissions originated from the cow-calf herd. The model further showed that GHG emission intensity per kg beef, nationally, declined by 14% from 1981 to 2011, owing to gains in production efficiency. Holos is now being used to consider further potential advances through improved rations or other management options. We are now aiming to expand into questions of grazing management, and are developing a novel carbon

  19. Wind tunnel testing of scaled models of a newly developed Darrieus-style vertical axis wind turbine with auxiliary straight blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scungio, M.; Arpino, F.; Focanti, V.; Profili, M.; Rotondi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Wind tunnel investigations of Darrieus-style VAWT with auxiliary blades have been made. • Results have been compared with those from standard Darrieus VAWT. • Static and dynamic power and torque coefficients were measured and evaluated. • The auxiliary airfoils have demonstrated to give more torque at the lower wind speeds. • The proposed VAWT configuration is able to work in a wide range of wind speeds. - Abstract: Renewable sources of energy, needed because of the increasing price of fossil derivatives, global warming and energy market instabilities, have led to an increasing interest in wind energy. Among the different typologies, small scale Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT) present the greatest potential for off grid power generation at low wind speeds. In the present work, wind tunnel investigations about the performance of an innovative configuration of straight-blades Darrieus-style vertical axis micro wind turbine, specifically developed for small scale energy conversion at low wind speeds, has been made on scaled models. The micro turbine under investigation consists of three pairs of airfoils. Each pair consists of a main and auxiliary airfoil with different chord lengths. A standard Darrieus configuration, consisting of three single airfoils, was also tested for comparison. The experiments were conducted in a closed circuit open chamber wind tunnel facility available at the Laboratory of Industrial Measurements (LaMI) of the University of Cassino and Lazio Meridionale (UNICLAM). Measured data were reported in terms of dimensionless power and torque coefficients for dynamic performance analysis and static torque coefficient for static performance analysis. The adoption of auxiliary airfoils has demonstrated to give more dynamic torque at the lower wind speeds with respect to a standard Darrieus rotor, resulting in better performance for all the wind speeds considered. In terms of dynamic power coefficient, the standard Darrieus

  20. Air quality assessment in Salim Slam Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Fadel, M.; Hashisho, Z.; Saikaly, P.

    1999-01-01

    Full text.Vehicle emissions constitute a serious occupational environmental hazard particularly in confined spaces such as tunnels and underground parking garages. these emissions at elevated concentrations, can cause adverse health effects, which range from nausea and eye irritation to mutagenicity, carcinogenicity and even death. This paper presents an environmental air quality assessment in a tunnel located in a highly congested urban area. For this purpose, air samples were collected and analyzed for the presence of primary air pollutants, priority metals, and volatile organic carbons. Air quality modeling was conducted to simulate variations of pollutant concentrations in the tunnel under worst case scenarios including traffic congestion and no air ventilation. Field measurements and mathematical simulation results were used to develop a strategy for proper air quality management in tunnels

  1. Proton tunnelling in intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsewill, A J [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Johnson, M R [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Trommsdorff, H P [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1997-04-01

    The wavefunctions of particles extend beyond the classically accessible regions of potential energy-surfaces (PES). A manifestation of this partial delocalization is the quantum-mechanical tunneling effect which enables a particle to escape from a metastable potential-well. Tunnelling is most important for the lightest atoms, so that the determination of its contribution to proton transfer, one of the most fundamental chemical reactions, is an important issue. QENS and NMR techniques have been employed to study the motion of protons in the hydrogen bond of benzoic-acid crystals, a system which has emerged as a particularly suitable model since proton transfer occurs in a near symmetric double-well potential. The influence of quantum tunnelling was revealed and investigated in these experiments. This work provides an experimental benchmark for theoretical descriptions of translational proton-tunnelling. (author). 7 refs.

  2. Thermodynamics of phonon-modulated tunneling centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junker, W.; Wagner, M.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years tunneling centers have frequently been used to explain the unusual thermodynamic properties of disordered materials; in these approaches, however, the effect of the tunneling-phonon interaction is neglected. The present study considers the archetype model of phono-assisted tunneling, which is well known from other areas of tunneling physics (quantum diffusion, etc.). It is shown that the full thermodynamic information can be rigorously extracted from a single Green function. An extended factorization procedure beyond Hartree-Fock is introduced, which is checked by sum rules as well as by exact Goldberger-Adams expansions. The phonon-modulated internal energy and specific heat are calculated for different power-law coupling setups

  3. Degree of multicollinearity and variables involved in linear dependence in additive-dominant models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Petrini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the degree of multicollinearity and to identify the variables involved in linear dependence relations in additive-dominant models. Data of birth weight (n=141,567, yearling weight (n=58,124, and scrotal circumference (n=20,371 of Montana Tropical composite cattle were used. Diagnosis of multicollinearity was based on the variance inflation factor (VIF and on the evaluation of the condition indexes and eigenvalues from the correlation matrix among explanatory variables. The first model studied (RM included the fixed effect of dam age class at calving and the covariates associated to the direct and maternal additive and non-additive effects. The second model (R included all the effects of the RM model except the maternal additive effects. Multicollinearity was detected in both models for all traits considered, with VIF values of 1.03 - 70.20 for RM and 1.03 - 60.70 for R. Collinearity increased with the increase of variables in the model and the decrease in the number of observations, and it was classified as weak, with condition index values between 10.00 and 26.77. In general, the variables associated with additive and non-additive effects were involved in multicollinearity, partially due to the natural connection between these covariables as fractions of the biological types in breed composition.

  4. Comprehensive personal witness: a model to enlarge missional involvement of the local church

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hancke, Frans

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the The Split-Level Fellowship, Wesley Baker analysed the role of individual members in the Church. He gave a name to a tragic phenomenon with which Church leaders are familiar. Although true of society in general it is especially true of the church. Baker called the difference between the committed few and the uninvolved many, Factor Beta. This reality triggers the question: Why are the majority of Christians in the world not missionally involved through personal witness and which factors consequently influence personal witness and missional involvement? This article explains how the range of personal witness and missional involvement found in local churches are rooted in certain fundamental factors and conditions which are mutually influencing each other and ultimately contribute towards forming a certain paradigm. This paradigm acts as the basis from which certain behavioural patterns (witness will manifest. The factors influencing witness are either described as accelerators or decelerators and their relativity and mutual relationships are considered. Factors acting as decelerators can severely hamper or even annul witness, while accelerators on the other hand, can have an immensely positive effect to enlarge the transformational influence of witness. In conclusion a transformational model is developed through which paradigms can be influenced and eventually changed. This model fulfils a diagnostic and remedial function and will support local churches to enlarge the individual and corporate missional involvement of believers.

  5. Consumer input into health care: Time for a new active and comprehensive model of consumer involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alix E; Bryant, Jamie; Sanson-Fisher, Rob W; Fradgley, Elizabeth A; Proietto, Anthony M; Roos, Ian

    2018-03-07

    To ensure the provision of patient-centred health care, it is essential that consumers are actively involved in the process of determining and implementing health-care quality improvements. However, common strategies used to involve consumers in quality improvements, such as consumer membership on committees and collection of patient feedback via surveys, are ineffective and have a number of limitations, including: limited representativeness; tokenism; a lack of reliable and valid patient feedback data; infrequent assessment of patient feedback; delays in acquiring feedback; and how collected feedback is used to drive health-care improvements. We propose a new active model of consumer engagement that aims to overcome these limitations. This model involves the following: (i) the development of a new measure of consumer perceptions; (ii) low cost and frequent electronic data collection of patient views of quality improvements; (iii) efficient feedback to the health-care decision makers; and (iv) active involvement of consumers that fosters power to influence health system changes. © 2018 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Portraiture of constructivist parental involvement: A model to develop a community of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignam, Christopher Anthony

    This qualitative research study addressed the problem of the lack of parental involvement in secondary school science. Increasing parental involvement is vital in supporting student academic achievement and social growth. The purpose of this emergent phenomenological study was to identify conditions required to successfully construct a supportive learning environment to form partnerships between students, parents, and educators. The overall research question in this study investigated the conditions necessary to successfully enlist parental participation with students during science inquiry investigations at the secondary school level. One hundred thirteen pairs of parents and students engaged in a 6-week scientific inquiry activity and recorded attitudinal data in dialogue journals, questionnaires, open-ended surveys, and during one-one-one interviews conducted by the researcher between individual parents and students. Comparisons and cross-interpretations of inter-rater, codified, triangulated data were utilized for identifying emergent themes. Data analysis revealed the active involvement of parents in researching with their child during inquiry investigations, engaging in journaling, and assessing student performance fostered partnerships among students, parents, and educators and supported students' social skills development. The resulting model, employing constructivist leadership and enlisting parent involvement, provides conditions and strategies required to develop a community of practice that can help effect social change. The active involvement of parents fostered improved efficacy and a holistic mindset to develop in parents, students, and teachers. Based on these findings, the interactive collaboration of parents in science learning activities can proactively facilitate a community of practice that will assist educators in facilitating social change.

  7. Projection operator method for collective tunneling transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohmura, Toshitake; Ohta, Hirofumi; Hashimoto, Yukio; Maruyama, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Collective tunneling transitions take place in the case that a system has two nearly degenerate ground states with a slight energy splitting, which provides the time scale of the tunneling. The Liouville equation determines the evolution of the density matrix, while the Schroedinger equation determines that of a state. The Liouville equation seems to be more powerful for calculating accurately the energy splitting of two nearly degenerate eigenstates. However, no method to exactly solve the Liouville eigenvalue equation has been established. The usual projection operator method for the Liouville equation is not feasible. We analytically solve the Liouville evolution equation for nuclear collective tunneling from one Hartree minimum to another, proposing a simple and solvable model Hamiltonian for the transition. We derive an analytical expression for the splitting of energy eigenvalues from a spectral function of the Liouville evolution using a half-projected operator method. A full-order analytical expression for the energy splitting is obtained. We define the collective tunneling path of a microscopic Hamiltonian for collective tunneling, projecting the nuclear ground states onto n-particle n-hole state spaces. It is argued that the collective tunneling path sector of a microscopic Hamiltonian can be transformed into the present solvable model Hamiltonian. (author)

  8. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  9. Tunnel magnetoresistance in alumina, magnesia and composite tunnel barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schebaum, Oliver; Drewello, Volker; Auge, Alexander; Reiss, Guenter; Muenzenberg, Markus; Schuhmann, Henning; Seibt, Michael; Thomas, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Using magnetron sputtering, we have prepared Co-Fe-B/tunnel barrier/Co-Fe-B magnetic tunnel junctions with tunnel barriers consisting of alumina, magnesia, and magnesia-alumina bilayer systems. The highest tunnel magnetoresistance ratios we found were 73% for alumina and 323% for magnesia-based tunnel junctions. Additionally, tunnel junctions with a unified layer stack were prepared for the three different barriers. In these systems, the tunnel magnetoresistance ratios at optimum annealing temperatures were found to be 65% for alumina, 173% for magnesia, and 78% for the composite tunnel barriers. The similar tunnel magnetoresistance ratios of the tunnel junctions containing alumina provide evidence that coherent tunneling is suppressed by the alumina layer in the composite tunnel barrier. - Research highlights: → Transport properties of Co-Fe-B/tunnel barrier/Co-Fe-B magnetic tunnel junctions. → Tunnel barrier consists of MgO, Al-Ox, or MgO/Al-Ox bilayer systems. → Limitation of TMR-ratio in composite barrier tunnel junctions to Al-Ox values. → Limitation indicates that Al-Ox layer is causing incoherent tunneling.

  10. An Effect of the Environmental Pollution via Mathematical Model Involving the Mittag-Leffler Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Goswami

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the existing condition estimation of pollution effect on environment is big change for all of us. In this study we develop a new approach to estimate the effect of pollution on environment via mathematical model which involves the generalized Mittag-Leffler function of one variable $E_{\\alpha_{2},\\delta_{1};\\alpha_{3},\\delta_{2}}^{\\gamma_{1},\\alpha_{1}} (z$ which we introduced here.

  11. Aerodynamic results of wind tunnel tests on a 0.010-scale model (32-QTS) space shuttle integrated vehicle in the AEDC VKF-40-inch supersonic wind tunnel (IA61)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daileda, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    Plotted and tabulated aerodynamic coefficient data from a wind tunnel test of the integrated space shuttle vehicle are presented. The primary test objective was to determine proximity force and moment data for the orbiter/external tank and solid rocket booster (SRB) with and without separation rockets firing for both single and dual booster runs. Data were obtained at three points (t = 0, 1.25, and 2.0 seconds) on the nominal SRB separation trajectory.

  12. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  13. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  14. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.; Hanafy, Sherif M.; Huang, Yunsong

    2012-01-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  15. Vacuum phonon tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altfeder, Igor; Voevodin, Andrey A; Roy, Ajit K

    2010-10-15

    Field-induced phonon tunneling, a previously unknown mechanism of interfacial thermal transport, has been revealed by ultrahigh vacuum inelastic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Using thermally broadened Fermi-Dirac distribution in the STM tip as in situ atomic-scale thermometer we found that thermal vibrations of the last tip atom are effectively transmitted to sample surface despite few angstroms wide vacuum gap. We show that phonon tunneling is driven by interfacial electric field and thermally vibrating image charges, and its rate is enhanced by surface electron-phonon interaction.

  16. Estimation in a multiplicative mixed model involving a genetic relationship matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eccleston John A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic models partitioning additive and non-additive genetic effects for populations tested in replicated multi-environment trials (METs in a plant breeding program have recently been presented in the literature. For these data, the variance model involves the direct product of a large numerator relationship matrix A, and a complex structure for the genotype by environment interaction effects, generally of a factor analytic (FA form. With MET data, we expect a high correlation in genotype rankings between environments, leading to non-positive definite covariance matrices. Estimation methods for reduced rank models have been derived for the FA formulation with independent genotypes, and we employ these estimation methods for the more complex case involving the numerator relationship matrix. We examine the performance of differing genetic models for MET data with an embedded pedigree structure, and consider the magnitude of the non-additive variance. The capacity of existing software packages to fit these complex models is largely due to the use of the sparse matrix methodology and the average information algorithm. Here, we present an extension to the standard formulation necessary for estimation with a factor analytic structure across multiple environments.

  17. Solution of the classical Yang–Baxter equation with an exotic symmetry, and integrability of a multi-species boson tunnelling model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Links, Jon, E-mail: jrl@maths.uq.edu.au

    2017-03-15

    Solutions of the classical Yang–Baxter equation provide a systematic method to construct integrable quantum systems in an algebraic manner. A Lie algebra can be associated with any solution of the classical Yang–Baxter equation, from which commuting transfer matrices may be constructed. This procedure is reviewed, specifically for solutions without skew-symmetry. A particular solution with an exotic symmetry is identified, which is not obtained as a limiting expansion of the usual Yang–Baxter equation. This solution facilitates the construction of commuting transfer matrices which will be used to establish the integrability of a multi-species boson tunnelling model. The model generalises the well-known two-site Bose–Hubbard model, to which it reduces in the one-species limit. Due to the lack of an apparent reference state, application of the algebraic Bethe Ansatz to solve the model is prohibitive. Instead, the Bethe Ansatz solution is obtained by the use of operator identities and tensor product decompositions.

  18. Joint release rate estimation and measurement-by-measurement model correction for atmospheric radionuclide emission in nuclear accidents: An application to wind tunnel experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinpeng; Li, Hong; Liu, Yun; Xiong, Wei; Fang, Sheng

    2018-03-05

    The release rate of atmospheric radionuclide emissions is a critical factor in the emergency response to nuclear accidents. However, there are unavoidable biases in radionuclide transport models, leading to inaccurate estimates. In this study, a method that simultaneously corrects these biases and estimates the release rate is developed. Our approach provides a more complete measurement-by-measurement correction of the biases with a coefficient matrix that considers both deterministic and stochastic deviations. This matrix and the release rate are jointly solved by the alternating minimization algorithm. The proposed method is generic because it does not rely on specific features of transport models or scenarios. It is validated against wind tunnel experiments that simulate accidental releases in a heterogonous and densely built nuclear power plant site. The sensitivities to the position, number, and quality of measurements and extendibility of the method are also investigated. The results demonstrate that this method effectively corrects the model biases, and therefore outperforms Tikhonov's method in both release rate estimation and model prediction. The proposed approach is robust to uncertainties and extendible with various center estimators, thus providing a flexible framework for robust source inversion in real accidents, even if large uncertainties exist in multiple factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Digital control of wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, Colin P.; Goodyer, Michael J.; Eskins, Jonathan; Parker, David; Halford, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Digital controllers are being developed for wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance systems, which in turn permit wind tunnel testing of aircraft models free from support interference. Hardware and software features of two existing digital control systems are reviewed. Some aspects of model position sensing and system calibration are also discussed.

  20. Photoelectrical properties of semiconductor tips in scanning tunneling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.W.J.; Jansen, R.; Groeneveld, R.H.M.; Gelder, Van A.P.; Kempen, van H.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a model as well as experiments on the electrical properties of a photoexcited tunnel junction between a metal and a semiconductor material, as is established in a scanning tunneling microscope. The model treats the case in which carrier transport is mediated by capture and relaxation in

  1. Results of investigations of an 0.010-scale 140A/B configuration (model 72-OTS) of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter in the NASA/Langley Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrozzi, M. T.; Milam, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in the NASA/Langley unitary plan wind tunnel on a sting mounted 0.010-scale outer mold line model of the 140A/B configuration of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle. The primary test objectives were to obtain: (1) six component force and moment data for the mated vehicle at subsonic and transonic conditions, (2) effects of configuration build-up, (3) effects of protuberances, ET/orbiter fairings and attach structures, and (4) elevon deflection effects on wing bending moment. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data and base and balance cavity pressures were recorded over Mach numbers of 1.6, 2.0, 2.5, 2.86, 3.9, and 4.63 at a nominal Reynolds number of 20 to the 6th power per foot. Selected configurations were tested at angles of attack and sideslip from -10 deg to +10 deg. For all configurations involving the orbiter, wing bending, and torsion coefficients were measured on the right wing.

  2. Instanton and noninstanton tunneling in periodically perturbed barriers: semiclassical and quantum interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kin'ya; Ikeda, Kensuke S

    2012-11-01

    In multidimensional barrier tunneling, there exist two different types of tunneling mechanisms, instanton-type tunneling and noninstanton tunneling. In this paper we investigate transitions between the two tunneling mechanisms from the semiclassical and quantum viewpoints taking two simple models: a periodically perturbed Eckart barrier for the semiclassical analysis and a periodically perturbed rectangular barrier for the quantum analysis. As a result, similar transitions are observed with change of the perturbation frequency ω for both systems, and we obtain a comprehensive scenario from both semiclassical and quantum viewpoints for them. In the middle range of ω, in which the plateau spectrum is observed, noninstanton tunneling dominates the tunneling process, and the tunneling amplitude takes the maximum value. Noninstanton tunneling explained by stable-unstable manifold guided tunneling (SUMGT) from the semiclassical viewpoint is interpreted as multiphoton-assisted tunneling from the quantum viewpoint. However, in the limit ω→0, instanton-type tunneling takes the place of noninstanton tunneling, and the tunneling amplitude converges on a constant value depending on the perturbation strength. The spectrum localized around the input energy is observed, and there is a scaling law with respect to the width of the spectrum envelope, i.e., the width ∝ℏω. In the limit ω→∞, the tunneling amplitude converges on that of the unperturbed system, i.e., the instanton of the unperturbed system.

  3. RITD – Wind tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukka, Harri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Koryanov, Valeri; Schmidt, Walter; Heilimo, Jyri; Finchenko, Valeri; Martynov, Maxim; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Victor; Arruego, Ignazio

    2015-04-01

    An atmospheric re-entry and descent and landing system (EDLS) concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques is highly promising for the Earth re-entry missions. We developed such EDLS for the Earth re-entry utilizing a concept that was originally developed for Mars. This EU-funded project is called RITD - Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development - and it was to assess the bene¬fits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develope a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. The RITD entry and descent system utilizes an inflatable hypersonic decelerator. Development of such system requires a combination of wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations. This included wind tunnel tests both in transsonic and subsonic regimes. The principal aim of the wind tunnel tests was the determination of the RITD damping factors in the Earth atmosphere and recalculation of the results for the case of the vehicle descent in the Mars atmosphere. The RITD mock-up model used in the tests was in scale of 1:15 of the real-size vehicle as the dimensions were (midsection) diameter of 74.2 mm and length of 42 mm. For wind tunnel testing purposes the frontal part of the mock-up model body was manufactured by using a PolyJet 3D printing technology based on the light curing of liquid resin. The tail part of the mock-up model body was manufactured of M1 grade copper. The structure of the mock-up model placed th center of gravity in the same position as that of the real-size RITD. The wind tunnel test program included the defining of the damping factor at seven values of Mach numbers 0.85; 0.95; 1.10; 1.20; 1.25; 1.30 and 1.55 with the angle of attack ranging from 0 degree to 40 degrees with the step of 5 degrees. The damping characteristics of

  4. Involvement of TRPM2 in a wide range of inflammatory and neuropathic pain mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako So

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests a role of transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2 in immune and inflammatory responses. We previously reported that TRPM2 deficiency attenuated inflammatory and neuropathic pain in some pain mouse models, including formalin- or carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain, and peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain models, while it had no effect on the basal mechanical and thermal nociceptive sensitivities. In this study, we further explored the involvement of TRPM2 in various pain models using TRPM2-knockout mice. There were no differences in the chemonociceptive behaviors evoked by intraplantar injection of capsaicin or hydrogen peroxide between wildtype and TRPM2-knockout mice, while acetic acid-induced writhing behavior was significantly attenuated in TRPM2-knockout mice. In the postoperative incisional pain model, no difference in mechanical allodynia was observed between the two genotypes. By contrast, mechanical allodynia in the monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis pain model and the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model were significantly attenuated in TRPM2-knockout mice. Furthermore, mechanical allodynia in paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy and streptozotocin-induced painful diabetic neuropathy models were significantly attenuated in TRPM2-knockout mice. Taken together, these results suggest that TRPM2 plays roles in a wide range of pathological pain models based on peripheral and central neuroinflammation, rather than physiological nociceptive pain.

  5. Tunnelling without barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution in flat and curved space-time of quantum fields in theories with relative flat potential and its consequences are considered. It is shown that bubble nucleation, a quantum mechanical tunnelling process, may occur in flat space-time, having a bounce solution, even if V(phi) has no barrier. It is shown that bubble nucleation can also occur in curved space-time even though there is no bounce solution in the standard formalism for the bubble nucleation rate in curved space-time. Additionally, bubbles can nucleate during the slow rolling period on the potential in flat and curved space-time, in this case also there is no bounce solution. It is known in the new inflationary scenario that energy density perturbations caused by quantum fluctuations of the scalar field can satisfy the presently observed bounds on density perturbations. Bubble nucleation during the slow rolling period also gives rise to density perturbations. For a model potential density perturbations by bubbles are calculated at the horizon reentering. By applying the bound from the almost isotropic microwave black body radiation on these density perturbations, a constraint on the model potential is obtained. Finally, some further implications on the galaxy formation and applications in more realistic potential are discussed

  6. Wind tunnel tests for a flapping wing model with a changeable camber using macro-fiber composite actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Kwan; Han, Jae-Hung; Kwon, Ki-Jung

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, a biomimetic flexible flapping wing was developed on a real ornithopter scale by using macro-fiber composite (MFC) actuators. With the actuators, the maximum camber of the wing can be linearly changed from −2.6% to +4.4% of the maximum chord length. Aerodynamic tests were carried out in a low-speed wind tunnel to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics, particularly the camber effect, the chordwise flexibility effect and the unsteady effect. Although the chordwise wing flexibility reduces the effective angle of attack, the maximum lift coefficient can be increased by the MFC actuators up to 24.4% in a static condition. Note also that the mean values of the perpendicular force coefficient rise to a value of considerably more than 3 in an unsteady aerodynamic flow region. Additionally, particle image velocimetry (PIV) tests were performed in static and dynamic test conditions to validate the flexibility and unsteady effects. The static PIV results confirm that the effective angle of attack is reduced by the coupling of the chordwise flexibility and the aerodynamic force, resulting in a delay in the stall phenomena. In contrast to the quasi-steady flow condition of a relatively high advance ratio, the unsteady aerodynamic effect due to a leading edge vortex can be found along the wing span in a low advance ratio region. The overall results show that the chordwise wing flexibility can produce a positive effect on flapping aerodynamic characteristics in quasi-steady and unsteady flow regions; thus, wing flexibility should be considered in the design of efficient flapping wings

  7. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  8. INCAS TRISONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin MUNTEANU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The 1.2 m x 1.2 m Trisonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel is the largest of the experimental facilities at the National Institute for Aerospace Research - I.N.C.A.S. "Elie Carafoli", Bucharest, Romania. The tunnel has been designed by the Canadian company DSMA (now AIOLOS and since its commissioning in 1978 has performed high speed aerodynamic tests for more than 120 projects of aircraft, missiles and other objects among which the twin jet fighter IAR-93, the jet trainer IAR-99, the MIG-21 Lancer, the Polish jet fighter YRYDA and others. In the last years the wind tunnel has been used mostly for experimental research in European projects such as UFAST. The high flow quality parameters and the wide range of testing capabilities ensure the competitivity of the tunnel at an international level.

  9. The ISI Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    DP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr dark -star TCP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr dak’star ICMP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr quark MDP /etc/tunnelvisa p zephyr quark ...drax-net-yp 128.9.32.2 1 route add quark -net-yp 128.9.32.3 1 route add vlsi-net-yp 128.9.32.4 1 route add darkstar-net-yp 128.9.32.3 1 route add rocky...TCP /etc/tunnel-visa p zephyr quark ICMP /etc/tunnel-visa p zephyr drax tTI)P /etc/tunnel-visa p zephyr drax TCP /etc/tunnel_visa p zephyr drax ICMP

  10. Water Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility in Pittsburgh, PA, re-creates the conditions found 3,000 meters beneath the ocean’s surface, allowing scientists to study...

  11. Quantum Electron Tunneling in Respiratory Complex I1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    We have simulated the atomistic details of electronic wiring of all Fe/S clusters in complex I, a key enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain. The tunneling current theory of many-electron systems is applied to the broken-symmetry (BS) states of the protein at the ZINDO level. One-electron tunneling approximation is found to hold in electron tunneling between the anti-ferromagnetic binuclear and tetranuclear Fe/S clusters with moderate induced polarization of the core electrons. Calculated tunneling energy is about 3 eV higher than Fermi level in the band gap of the protein, which supports that the mechanism of electron transfer is quantum mechanical tunneling, as in the rest of electron transport chain. Resulting electron tunneling pathways consist of up to three key contributing protein residues between neighboring Fe/S clusters. A distinct signature of the wave properties of electrons is observed as quantum interferences when multiple tunneling pathways exist. In N6a-N6b, electron tunnels along different pathways depending on the involved BS states, suggesting possible fluctuations of the tunneling pathways driven by the local protein environment. The calculated distance dependence of the electron transfer rates with internal water molecules included are in good agreement with a reported phenomenological relation. PMID:21495666

  12. Wind tunnel investigation of a USB-STOL transport semi-span model. 2; CAD sekkei ni yoru USB-STOL ki hansai mokei no fudo shiken. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, H; Okuyama, M; Fujieda, H; Fujita, T; Iwasaki, A [National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-11-01

    The Quiet Short Take-Off and Landing (QSTOL) Experimental Aircraft `ASKA` has been researched and developed by the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL). The `ASKA` was based upon the airframe of the home produced C-1 tactical transport which was modified into the Upper Surface Blowing (USB) -powered high- lift STOL aircraft. The wing configuration, however, was not changed. Therefore, this Experimental Aircraft does not always have the optimum configuration of a USB-type aircraft. So the authors tried to improve the aerodynamic characteristics of the STOL Aircraft. This paper describes the investigations which have been conducted to improve the aerodynamic characteristics of a subsonic jet transport semi-span model with an Upper Surface Blown Flap system which has been newly designed using the NAL STOL-CAD program. The model had an 8.2{degree} swept wing of aspect ratio 10.0 and four turbofan engines with short USB nozzles. The tests were conducted in the NAL 2{times}2m Gust Wind Tunnel with closed section and results were obtained for several flap and slat deflections at jet momentum coefficients from 0 to 1.85. Compared with the aerodynamic characteristics of the `ASKA` model, we determined that the airframe weight can be reduced and the aerodynamic characteristics can be improved significantly. 14 refs., 44 figs.

  13. Output voltage calculations in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with asymmetric voltage behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Mryasov, Oleg; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the asymmetric voltage behavior (AVB) of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) for single and double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) in range of a quasi-classical free electron model. Numerical calculations of the TMR

  14. Simplified Model for the Population Dynamics Involved in a Malaria Crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenfack-Jiotsa, A.; Fotsa-Ngaffo, F.

    2009-12-01

    We adapt a simple model of predator-prey to the population involved in a crisis of malaria. The study is made only in the stream blood inside the human body except for the liver. Particularly we look at the dynamics of the malaria parasites 'merozoites' and their interaction with the blood components, more specifically the red blood cells (RBC) and the immune response grouped under the white blood cells (WBC). The stability analysis of the system reveals an important practical direction to investigate as regards the ratio WBC over RBC since it is a fundamental parameter that characterizes stable regions. The model numerically presents a wide range of possible features of the disease. Even with its simplified form, the model not only recovers well-known results but in addition predicts possible hidden phenomenon and an interesting clinical feature a malaria crisis. (author)

  15. Tunnelling of a molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, P.D.; Bulte, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical description of tunnelling is presented for a one-dimensional system with internal oscillator degrees of freedom. The 'charged diatomic molecule' is frustrated on encountering a barrier potential by its centre of charge not being coincident with its centre of mass, resulting in transitions amongst internal states. In an adiabatic limit, the tunnelling of semiclassical coherent-like oscillator states is shown to exhibit the Hartman and Bueuttiker-Landauer times t H and t BL , with the time dependence of the coherent state parameter for the tunnelled state given by α(t) = α e -iω(t+Δt) , Δt = t H - it BL . A perturbation formalism is developed, whereby the exact transfer matrix can be expanded to any desired accuracy in a suitable limit. An 'intrinsic' time, based on the oscillator transition rate during tunnelling, transmission or reflection, is introduced. In simple situations the resulting intrinsic tunnelling time is shown to vanish to lowest order. In the general case a particular (nonzero) parametrisation is inferred, and its properties discussed in comparison with the literature on tunnelling times for both wavepackets and internal clocks. Copyright (1998) CSIRO Australia

  16. Results of flutter test OS6 obtained using the 0.14-scale wing/elevon model (54-0) in the NASA LaRC 16-foot transonic dynamics wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A 0.14-scale dynamically scaled model of the space shuttle orbiter wing was tested in the Langley Research Center 16-Foot Transonic Dynamics Wind Tunnel to determine flutter, buffet, and elevon buzz boundaries. Mach numbers between 0.3 and 1.1 were investigated. Rockwell shuttle model 54-0 was utilized for this investigation. A description of the test procedure, hardware, and results of this test is presented.

  17. Results of flutter test OS7 obtained using the 0.14-scale space shuttle orbiter fin/rudder model number 55-0 in the NASA LaRC 16-foot transonic dynamics wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A 0.14-scale dynamically scaled model of the space shuttle orbiter vertical tail was tested in a 16-foot transonic dynamic wind tunnel to determine flutter, buffet, and rudder buzz boundaries. Mach numbers between .5 and 1.11 were investigated. Rockwell shuttle model 55-0 was used for this investigation. A description of the test procedure, hardware, and results of this test is presented.

  18. A comparative modeling and molecular docking study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhar, Zeynab; Naiker, Suhashni; Alves, Claudio N; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Lameira, Jeronimo; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Kruger, Hendrik G; Honarparvar, Bahareh

    2016-11-01

    An alarming rise of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and the continuous high global morbidity of tuberculosis have reinvigorated the need to identify novel targets to combat the disease. The enzymes that catalyze the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan in M. tuberculosis are essential and noteworthy therapeutic targets. In this study, the biochemical function and homology modeling of MurI, MurG, MraY, DapE, DapA, Alr, and Ddl enzymes of the CDC1551 M. tuberculosis strain involved in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan cell wall are reported. Generation of the 3D structures was achieved with Modeller 9.13. To assess the structural quality of the obtained homology modeled targets, the models were validated using PROCHECK, PDBsum, QMEAN, and ERRAT scores. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate root mean square deviation (RMSD) and radius of gyration (Rg) of MurI and MurG target proteins and their corresponding templates. For further model validation, RMSD and Rg for selected targets/templates were investigated to compare the close proximity of their dynamic behavior in terms of protein stability and average distances. To identify the potential binding mode required for molecular docking, binding site information of all modeled targets was obtained using two prediction algorithms. A docking study was performed for MurI to determine the potential mode of interaction between the inhibitor and the active site residues. This study presents the first accounts of the 3D structural information for the selected M. tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

  19. Modeling of dengue occurrences early warning involving temperature and rainfall factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prama Setia Putra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand dengue transmission process and its vector dynamics and to develop early warning model of dengue occurrences based on mosquito population and host-vector threshold values considering temperature and rainfall. Methods: To obtain the early warning model, mosquito population and host-vector models are developed initially. Both are developed using differential equations. Basic offspring number (R0m and basic reproductive ratio (R0d which are the threshold values are derived from the models under constant parameters assumption. Temperature and rainfall effects on mosquito and dengue are performed in entomological and disease transmission parameters. Some of parameters are set as functions of temperature or rainfall while other parameters are set to be constant. Hereafter, both threshold values are computed using those parameters. Monthly dengue occurrences data are categorized as zero and one values which one means the outbreak does occur in that month. Logistics regression is chosen to bridge the threshold values and categorized data. Threshold values are considered as the input of early warning model. Semarang city is selected as the sample to develop this early waning model. Results: The derived threshold values which are R 0 m and R 0 d show to have relation that mosquito as dengue vector affects transmission of the disease. Result of the early warning model will be a value between zero and one. It is categorized as outbreak does occur when the value is larger than 0.5 while other is categorized as outbreak does not occur. By using single predictor, the model can perform 68% accuracy approximately. Conclusions: The extinction of mosquitoes will be followed by disease disappearance while mosquitoes existence can lead to disease free or endemic states. Model simulations show that mosquito population are more affected by weather factors than human. Involving weather factors implicitly in the threshold value and linking them

  20. Spin polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczewski, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews tunneling of spin-polarized electrons through molecules positioned between ferromagnetic electrodes, which gives rise to tunneling magnetoresistance. Such measurements yield important insight into the factors governing spin-polarized electron injection into organic semiconductors, thereby offering the possibility to manipulate the quantum-mechanical spin degrees of freedom for charge carriers in optical/electrical devices. In the first section of the chapter a brief description of the Jullière model of spin-dependent electron tunneling is reviewed. Next, a brief description of device fabrication and characterization is presented. The bulk of the review highlights experimental studies on spin-polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions. In addition, some experiments describing spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy on single molecules are mentioned. Finally, some general conclusions and prospectus on the impact of spin-polarized tunneling in molecular junctions are offered.

  1. Asymmetric voltage behavior of the tunnel magnetoresistance in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we study the value of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as a function of the applied voltage in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJs) with the left and right ferromagnetic (FM) layers being pinned and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions (equal barriers and electrodes). DMTJs are modeled as two single barrier junctions connected in series with consecutive tunneling (CST). We investigated the asymmetric voltage behavior of the TMR for the CST in the range of a general theoretical model. Significant asymmetries of the experimental curves, which arise due to different annealing regimes, are mostly explained by different heights of the tunnel barriers and asymmetries of spin polarizations in magnetic layers. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications.

  2. Anomalous Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin Transfer Torque in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Embedded Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Useinov, Arthur; Ye, Lin-Xiu; Useinov, Niazbeck; Wu, Te-Ho; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2015-01-01

    The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with embedded nanoparticles (NPs) was calculated in range of the quantum-ballistic model. The simulation was performed for electron tunneling through the insulating layer with embedded magnetic and non-magnetic NPs within the approach of the double barrier subsystem connected in parallel to the single barrier one. This model can be applied for both MTJs with in-plane magnetization and perpendicular one. We also calculated the in-plane component of the spin transfer torque (STT) versus the applied voltage in MTJs with magnetic NPs and determined that its value can be much larger than in single barrier system (SBS) for the same tunneling thickness. The reported simulation reproduces experimental data of the TMR suppression and peak-like TMR anomalies at low voltages available in leterature. PMID:26681336

  3. Asymmetric voltage behavior of the tunnel magnetoresistance in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the value of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as a function of the applied voltage in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJs) with the left and right ferromagnetic (FM) layers being pinned and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions (equal barriers and electrodes). DMTJs are modeled as two single barrier junctions connected in series with consecutive tunneling (CST). We investigated the asymmetric voltage behavior of the TMR for the CST in the range of a general theoretical model. Significant asymmetries of the experimental curves, which arise due to different annealing regimes, are mostly explained by different heights of the tunnel barriers and asymmetries of spin polarizations in magnetic layers. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications.

  4. Ethics Literacy and "Ethics University": Two Intertwined Models for Public Involvement and Empowerment in Bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strech, Daniel; Hirschberg, Irene; Meyer, Antje; Baum, Annika; Hainz, Tobias; Neitzke, Gerald; Seidel, Gabriele; Dierks, Marie-Luise

    2015-01-01

    Informing lay citizens about complex health-related issues and their related ethical, legal, and social aspects (ELSA) is one important component of democratic health care/research governance. Public information activities may be especially valuable when they are used in multi-staged processes that also include elements of information and deliberation. This paper presents a new model for a public involvement activity on ELSA (Ethics University) and evaluation data for a pilot event. The Ethics University is structurally based on the "patient university," an already established institution in some German medical schools, and the newly developed concept of "ethics literacy." The concept of "ethics literacy" consists of three levels: information, interaction, and reflection. The pilot project consisted of two series of events (lasting 4 days each). The thematic focus of the Ethics University pilot was ELSA of regenerative medicine. In this pilot, the concept of "ethics literacy" could be validated as its components were clearly visible in discussions with participants at the end of the event. The participants reacted favorably to the Ethics University by stating that they felt more educated with regard to the ELSA of regenerative medicine and with regard to their own abilities in normative reasoning on this topic. The Ethics University is an innovative model for public involvement and empowerment activities on ELSA theoretically underpinned by a concept for "ethics literacy." This model deserves further refinement, testing in other ELSA topics and evaluation in outcome research.

  5. Low-speed tests of a high-aspect-ratio, supercritical-wing transport model equipped with a high-lift flap system in the Langley 4- by 7-meter and Ames 12-foot pressure tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.; Kjelgaard, S. O.

    1983-01-01

    The Ames 12-Foot Pressure Tunnel was used to determine the effects of Reynolds number on the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced, high-aspect-ratio, supercritical wing transport model equipped with a full span, leading edge slat and part span, double slotted, trailing edge flaps. The model had a wing span of 7.5 ft and was tested through a free stream Reynolds number range from 1.3 to 6.0 x 10 to 6th power per foot at a Mach number of 0.20. Prior to the Ames tests, an investigation was also conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.3 x 10 to 6th power per foot with the model mounted on an Ames strut support system and on the Langley sting support system to determine strut interference corrections. The data obtained from the Langley tests were also used to compare the aerodynamic charactertistics of the rather stiff, 7.5-ft-span steel wing model tested during this investigation and the larger, and rather flexible, 12-ft-span aluminum-wing model tested during a previous investigation. During the tests in both the Langley and Ames tunnels, the model was tested with six basic wing configurations: (1) cruise; (2) climb (slats only extended); (3) 15 deg take-off flaps; (4) 30 deg take-off flaps; (5) 45 deg landing flaps; and (6) 60 deg landing flaps.

  6. Chiral tunneling in a twisted graphene bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen-Yu; Chu, Zhao-Dong; He, Lin

    2013-08-09

    The perfect transmission in a graphene monolayer and the perfect reflection in a Bernal graphene bilayer for electrons incident in the normal direction of a potential barrier are viewed as two incarnations of the Klein paradox. Here we show a new and unique incarnation of the Klein paradox. Owing to the different chiralities of the quasiparticles involved, the chiral fermions in a twisted graphene bilayer show an adjustable probability of chiral tunneling for normal incidence: they can be changed from perfect tunneling to partial or perfect reflection, or vice versa, by controlling either the height of the barrier or the incident energy. As well as addressing basic physics about how the chiral fermions with different chiralities tunnel through a barrier, our results provide a facile route to tune the electronic properties of the twisted graphene bilayer.

  7. Validating a Model of Motivational Factors Influencing Involvement for Parents of Transition-Age Youth with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Kara A.; Shanley, Lina; Garbacz, S. Andrew; Rowe, Dawn A.; Lindstrom, Lauren; Leve, Leslie D.

    2018-01-01

    Parent involvement is a predictor of postsecondary education and employment outcomes, but rigorous measures of parent involvement for youth with disabilities are lacking. Hirano, Garbacz, Shanley, and Rowe adapted scales based on Hoover-Dempsey and Sandler model of parent involvement for use with parents of youth with disabilities aged 14 to 23.…

  8. An explanatory model of maths achievement:Perceived parental involvement and academic motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Susana; Piñeiro, Isabel; Gómez-Taibo, Mª L; Regueiro, Bibiana; Estévez, Iris; Valle, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    Although numerous studies have tried to explain performance in maths very few have deeply explored the relationship between different variables and how they jointly explain mathematical performance. With a sample of 897 students in 5th and 6th grade in Primary Education and using structural equation modeling (SEM), this study analyzes how the perception of parents’ beliefs is related to children´s beliefs, their involvement in mathematical tasks and their performance. Perceived parental involvement contributes to the motivation of their children in mathematics. Direct supervision of students’ academic work by parents may increase students’ concerns about the image and rating of their children, but not their academic performance. In fact, maths achievement depends directly and positively on the parents’ expectations and children’s maths self-efficacy and negatively on the parents’ help in tasks and performance goal orientation. Perceived parental involvement contributes to children’s motivation in maths essentially conveying confidence in their abilities and showing interest in their progress and schoolwork.

  9. University Physics Students' Use of Models in Explanations of Phenomena Involving Interaction between Metals and Electromagnetic Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfors, Andreas; Ryder, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Examines third year university physics students' use of models when explaining familiar phenomena involving interaction between metals and electromagnetic radiation. Concludes that few students use a single model consistently. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  10. Microscopic tunneling theory of long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, N.; Hattel, Søren A.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1992-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate that the detai......We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate...

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF WIND LOAD APPLIED TO THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURES BY VIRTUE OF ITS SIMULATION IN THE WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroshenko Sergey Aleksandrovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors discuss wind loads applied to a set of two buildings. The wind load is simulated with the help of the wind tunnel. In the Russian Federation, special attention is driven to the aerodynamics of high-rise buildings and structures. According to the Russian norms, identification of aerodynamic coefficients for high-rise buildings, as well as the influence of adjacent buildings and structures, is performed on the basis of models of structures exposed to wind impacts simulated in the wind tunnel. This article deals with the results of the wind tunnel test of buildings. The simulation was carried out with the involvement of a model of two twenty-three storied buildings. The experiment was held in a wind tunnel of the closed type at in the Institute of Mechanics of Moscow State University. Data were compared at the zero speed before and after the experiment. LabView software was used to process the output data. Graphs and tables were developed in the Microsoft Excel package. GoogleSketchUp software was used as a visualization tool. The three-dimensional flow formed in the wind tunnel can't be adequately described by solving the two-dimensional problem. The aerodynamic experiment technique is used to analyze the results for eighteen angles of the wind attack.

  12. Single Electron Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-01-01

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  13. Tunneling cracks in full scale wind turbine blade joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeppe Bjørn; Sørensen, Bent F.; Kildegaard, C.

    2017-01-01

    A novel approach is presented and used in a generic tunneling crack tool for the prediction of crack growth rates for tunneling cracks propagating across a bond-line in a wind turbine blade under high cyclic loadings. In order to test and demonstrate the applicability of the tool, model predictions...

  14. Understanding quantum tunneling using diffusion Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inack, E. M.; Giudici, G.; Parolini, T.; Santoro, G.; Pilati, S.

    2018-03-01

    In simple ferromagnetic quantum Ising models characterized by an effective double-well energy landscape the characteristic tunneling time of path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations has been shown to scale as the incoherent quantum-tunneling time, i.e., as 1 /Δ2 , where Δ is the tunneling gap. Since incoherent quantum tunneling is employed by quantum annealers (QAs) to solve optimization problems, this result suggests that there is no quantum advantage in using QAs with respect to quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations. A counterexample is the recently introduced shamrock model (Andriyash and Amin, arXiv:1703.09277), where topological obstructions cause an exponential slowdown of the PIMC tunneling dynamics with respect to incoherent quantum tunneling, leaving open the possibility for potential quantum speedup, even for stoquastic models. In this work we investigate the tunneling time of projective QMC simulations based on the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) algorithm without guiding functions, showing that it scales as 1 /Δ , i.e., even more favorably than the incoherent quantum-tunneling time, both in a simple ferromagnetic system and in the more challenging shamrock model. However, a careful comparison between the DMC ground-state energies and the exact solution available for the transverse-field Ising chain indicates an exponential scaling of the computational cost required to keep a fixed relative error as the system size increases.

  15. Highly functional tunnelling devices integrated in 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Lars-Erik; Lind, Erik; Lindström, Peter

    2003-01-01

    a new type of tunnelling transistor, namely a resonant-tunnelling permeable base transistor. A simple model based on a piece-wise linear approximation is used in Cadence to describe the current-voltage characteristics of the transistor. This model is further introduced into a small signal equivalent...... simultaneously on both tunnelling structures and the obtained characteristics are the result of the interplay between the two tunnelling structures and the gate. An equivalent circuit model is developed and we show how this interaction influences the current-voltage characteristics. The gate may be used......We present a new technology for integrating tunnelling devices in three dimensions. These devices are fabricated by the combination of the growth of semiconductor heterostructures with the controlled introduction of metallic elements into an epitaxial layer by an overgrowth technique. First, we use...

  16. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in a double magnetic tunnel junction

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Useinov, Niazbeck Kh H; Tagirov, Lenar R.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    We present quasi-classical approach to calculate a spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in double magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJ) FML/I/FMW/I/FMR, where the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer FMW can

  17. Experimental evaluation of blockage ratio and plenum evacuation system flow effects on pressure distribution for bodies of revolution in 0.1 scale model test section of NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed altitude wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Richard R.; Harrington, Douglas E.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the slotted test section of the 0.1-scale model of the proposed Altitude Wind Tunnel to evaluate wall interference effects at tunnel Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.95 on bodies of revolution with blockage rates of 0.43, 3, 6, and 12 percent. The amount of flow that had to be removed from the plenum chamber (which surrounded the slotted test section) by the plenum evacuation system (PES) to eliminate wall interference effects was determined. The effectiveness of tunnel reentry flaps in removing flow from the plenum chamber was examined. The 0.43-percent blockage model was the only one free of wall interference effects with no PES flow. Surface pressures on the forward part of the other models were greater than interference-free results and were not influenced by PES flow. Interference-free results were achieved on the aft part of the 3- and 6-percent blockage models with the proper amount of PES flow. The required PES flow was substantially reduced by opening the reentry flaps.

  18. Theoretical consideration of spin-polarized resonant tunneling in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Haifeng; Zhu Zhengang; Zheng Qingrong; Jin Biao; Wang Zhengchuan; Su Gang

    2004-01-01

    A recent elegant experimental realization [S. Yuasa et al., Science 297 (2002) 234] of the spin-polarized resonant tunneling in magnetic tunnel junctions is interpreted in terms of a two-band model. It is shown that the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) decays oscillatorily with the thickness of the normal metal (NM) layer, being fairly in agreement with the experimental observation. The tunnel conductance is found to decay with slight oscillations with the increase of the NM layer thickness, which is also well consistent with the experiment. In addition, when the magnetizations of both ferromagnet electrodes are not collinearly aligned, TMR is found to exhibit sharp resonant peaks at some particular thickness of the NM layer. The peaked TMR obeys nicely a Gaussian distribution against the relative orientation of the magnetizations

  19. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in double-barrier planar magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, A. N.

    2011-08-24

    We present a theoretical approach to calculate the spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DMTJ), in which the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer can be aligned parallel or antiparallel in relation to the fixed magnetizations of the left and right ferromagnetic electrodes. The electron transport through the DMTJ is considered as a three-dimensional problem, taking into account all transmitting electron trajectories as well as the spin-dependent momentum conservation law. The dependence of the transmission coefficient and spin-polarized currents on the applied voltage is derived as an exact solution to the quantum-mechanical problem for the spin-polarized transport. In the range of the developed physical model, the resonant tunneling, nonresonant tunneling, and enhanced spin filtering can be explained; the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  20. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in double-barrier planar magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, A. N.; Kosel, Jü rgen; Useinov, N. Kh.; Tagirov, L. R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical approach to calculate the spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DMTJ), in which the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer can be aligned parallel or antiparallel in relation to the fixed magnetizations of the left and right ferromagnetic electrodes. The electron transport through the DMTJ is considered as a three-dimensional problem, taking into account all transmitting electron trajectories as well as the spin-dependent momentum conservation law. The dependence of the transmission coefficient and spin-polarized currents on the applied voltage is derived as an exact solution to the quantum-mechanical problem for the spin-polarized transport. In the range of the developed physical model, the resonant tunneling, nonresonant tunneling, and enhanced spin filtering can be explained; the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data.