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Sample records for model intestinal epithelia

  1. Alternative Functional In Vitro Models of Human Intestinal Epithelia

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    Amanda L Kauffman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically relevant sources of absorptive intestinal epithelial cells are crucial for human drug transport studies. Human adenocarcinoma-derived intestinal cell lines, such as Caco-2, offer conveniences of easy culture maintenance and scalability, but do not fully recapitulate in vivo intestinal phenotypes. Additional sources of renewable physiologically relevant human intestinal cells would provide a much needed tool for drug discovery and intestinal physiology. We sought to evaluate and compare two alternative sources of human intestinal cells, commercially available primary human intestinal epithelial cells (hInEpCs and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived intestinal cells to Caco-2, for use in in vitro transwell monolayer intestinal transport assays. To achieve this for iPSC-derived cells, our previously described 3-dimensional intestinal organogenesis method was adapted to transwell differentiation. Intestinal cells were assessed by marker expression through immunocytochemical and mRNA expression analyses, monolayer integrity through Transepithelial Electrical Resistance (TEER measurements and molecule permeability, and functionality by taking advantage the well-characterized intestinal transport mechanisms. In most cases, marker expression for primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells appeared to be as good as or better than Caco-2. Furthermore, transwell monolayers exhibited high TEER with low permeability. Primary hInEpCs showed molecule efflux indicative of P-glycoprotein transport. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells also showed neonatal Fc receptor-dependent binding of immunoglobulin G variants. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived intestinal cells exhibit expected marker expression and demonstrate basic functional monolayer formation, similar to or better than Caco-2. These cells could offer an alternative source of human intestinal cells for understanding normal intestinal epithelial physiology and drug transport.

  2. Phenylbutyrate counteracts Shigella mediated downregulation of cathelicidin in rabbit lung and intestinal epithelia: a potential therapeutic strategy.

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    Protim Sarker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cathelicidins and defensins are endogenous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs that are downregulated in the mucosal epithelia of the large intestine in shigellosis. Oral treatment of Shigella infected rabbits with sodium butyrate (NaB reduces clinical severity and counteracts the downregulation of cathelicidin (CAP-18 in the large intestinal epithelia. AIMS: To develop novel regimen for treating infectious diseases by inducing innate immunity, we selected sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PB, a registered drug for a metabolic disorder as a potential therapeutic candidate in a rabbit model of shigellosis. Since acute respiratory infections often cause secondary complications during shigellosis, the systemic effect of PB and NaB on CAP-18 expression in respiratory epithelia was also evaluated. METHODS: The readouts were clinical outcomes, CAP-18 expression in mucosa of colon, rectum, lung and trachea (immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR and release of the CAP-18 peptide/protein in stool (Western blot. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Significant downregulation of CAP-18 expression in the epithelia of rectum and colon, the site of Shigella infection was confirmed. Interestingly, reduced expression of CAP-18 was also noticed in the epithelia of lung and trachea, indicating a systemic effect of the infection. This suggests a causative link to acute respiratory infections during shigellosis. Oral treatment with PB resulted in reduced clinical illness and upregulation of CAP-18 in the epithelium of rectum. Both PB and NaB counteracted the downregulation of CAP-18 in lung epithelium. The drug effect is suggested to be systemic as intravenous administration of NaB could also upregulate CAP-18 in the epithelia of lung, rectum and colon. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that PB has treatment potential in human shigellosis. Enhancement of CAP-18 in the mucosal epithelia of the respiratory tract by PB or NaB is a novel discovery. This could mediate protection from

  3. Hematopoietic lineage skewing and intestinal epithelia degeneration in aged mice with telomerase RNA component deletion.

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    Chen, Jichun; Bryant, Mark A; Dent, James J; Sun, Yu; Desierto, Marie J; Young, Neal S

    2015-12-01

    A deletion of a telomerase RNA component (Terc(-/-)) in C57BL/6 (B6) mice resulted in hematopoietic lineage skewing with increased neutrophils and CD11b(+) myeloid cells and decreased red blood cells and CD45R(+) B lymphocytes when animals reach ages older than 12 months. There was no decline in bone marrow (BM) c-Kit(+)Sca-1(+)Lin(-) (KSL) cells in old Terc(-/-) mice, and the lineage skewing phenomenon was not transferred when BM cells from old Terc(-/-) donors were transplanted into young B6 recipients. Necropsy and histological examinations found minimal to no change in the lung, spleen and liver but detected severe epithelia degeneration, ulceration and infection in small and large intestines, leading to enteritis, typhlitis and colitis in old Terc(-/-) mice. In a mouse model of dextran-sulfate-sodium-induced typhlitis and colitis, development of intestinal pathology was associated with increases in neutrophils and CD11b(+) myeloid cells and a decrease in CD45R(+) B cells, similar to those observed in old Terc(-/-) mice. Treatment of 11-13 month old Terc(-/-) mice with antibiotic trimethoprim-sulfa water reduced neutrophils and myeloid cells and increased B lymphocytes in the blood, indicating that mitigation of intestinal infection and inflammation could alleviate hematological abnormalities in old Terc(-/-) animals.

  4. Paracellular calcium transport across renal and intestinal epithelia

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    Alexander, R Todd; Rievaj, Juraj; Dimke, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is a key constituent in a myriad of physiological processes from intracellular signalling to the mineralization of bone. As a consequence, Ca(2+) is maintained within narrow limits when circulating in plasma. This is accomplished via regulated interplay between intestinal absorpt...

  5. Acute ethanol administration inhibits Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway in rat intestinal epithelia.

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    Zhou, Chao; Zhao, Ji; Li, Jing; Wang, Haiying; Tang, Chengwei

    2013-05-01

    Excess alcohol intake, as in binge drinking, increases susceptibility to microbial pathogens. Alcohol impairs macrophage function by suppression of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway. This study investigated the effects of acute ethanol intake on the TLR4 pathway in rat intestinal epithelia, which usually encounters luminal antigens at first and participates in the development of intestinal immunity. Twenty Wistar rats were randomly assigned to an ethanol group given ethanol as a 25% (v/v) solution in water at 7.5 g/kg, or a control group given saline, by oral gavage daily for 3 days. The epithelial histology and ultrastructure, the intestinal microflora, peripheral and portal venous plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels, and somatostatin (SST) levels in the peripheral plasma and small intestine were evaluated. Somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2), TLR4, TANK binding kinase-1 (TBK1), activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the intestinal mucosa were assayed. LPS responsiveness with or without SST pretreatment was assayed in vitro by quantification of TLR4, TBK1, activated NF-κB, IFN-γ and TNF-α in isolated intestinal epithelia. Mucosal damage was observed in the ethanol group by light and electron microscopy. Escherichia coli cultures were unchanged in rat intestine of the ethanol group compared with controls, but lactobacilli cultures were reduced (p TNF-α were unchanged in the ethanol group. LPS treatment in vitro up-regulated the level of TLR4, TBK1 and nuclear NF-κB as well as the production of IFN-γ and TNF-α in isolated intestinal epithelia in the control (p inhibited by SST pretreatment (p < 0.05). The peripheral plasma and intestinal levels of SST and the mucosal expression of SSTR2 in the ethanol group were significantly higher than in the control group (p < 0.05). These findings suggest the hyposensitivity of intestinal epithelial TLR4 to LPS induced by acute alcohol abuse

  6. Impaired Cell Volume Regulation in Intestinal Crypt Epithelia of Cystic Fibrosis Mice

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    Valverde, M. A.; O'Brien, J. A.; Sepulveda, F. V.; Ratcliff, R. A.; Evans, M. J.; Colledge, W. H.

    1995-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a disease characterized by abnormalities in the epithelia of the lungs, intestine, salivary and sweat glands, liver, and reproductive systems, often as a result of inadequate hydration of their secretions. The primary defect in cystic fibrosis is the altered activity of a cAMP-activated Cl^- channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. However, it is not clear how a defect in the CFTR Cl^- channel function leads to the observed pathological changes. Although much is known about the structural properties and regulation of the CFTR, little is known of its relationship to cellular functions other than the cAMP-dependent Cl^- secretion. Here we report that cell volume regulation after hypotonic challenge is also defective in intestinal crypt epithelial cells isolated from CFTR -/- mutant mice. Moreover, the impairment of the regulatory volume decrease in CFTR -/- crypts appears to be related to the inability of a K^+ conductance to provide a pathway for the exit of this cation during the volume adjustments. This provides evidence that the lack of CFTR protein may have additional consequences for the cellular function other than the abnormal cAMP-mediated Cl^- secretion.

  7. beta1 integrins are not required for the maintenance of lymphocytes within intestinal epithelia

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    Marsal, Jan; Brakebusch, Cord; Bungartz, Gerd;

    2005-01-01

    beta(1) integrins are thought to play a central role in maintaining lymphocytes within mucosal epithelia via their interactions with extracellular matrix proteins and subepithelial cellular components within and underlying the basement membrane. In the current study type a (CD8alphabeta...

  8. Ultrastructure of the anterior intestinal epithelia of the orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides larvae under different feeding regimes.

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    Primavera-Tirol, Y H; Coloso, R M; Quinitio, G F; Ordonio-Aguilar, R; Laureta, L V

    2014-04-01

    Enterocytes of the anterior to midsection of the intestine in grouper Epinephelus coioides larvae were compared among different treatments: unfed to the point-of-no-return (PNR), fed natural food only, and co-fed natural food and artificial diet. On day 3, the nutritional condition of unfed grouper larvae regressed with its reduced enterocyte heights which were further degraded on day 4, the PNR, when all the enterocytes were in advanced stages of apoptosis. The apoptosis appeared to be internally directed via the mitochondria. Among day 3 fed larvae, enterocyte heights of those fed artificial diet did not differ from those fed natural food only. Dietary phospholipid deficiency was indicated in larvae co-fed artificial diet on day 3 with an unusually large chylomicron opening into the inter-enterocyte space, and on days 6 and 33 by intestinal steatosis. On day 19, scant to absent lipid droplets in enterocytes of larvae disclosed heightened nutritional requirement preparatory to metamorphosis. As observed in unfed day 3 and premetamorphic day 19 E. coioides, larvae undergoing critical periods and starvation during development employ apoptosis to dispose of degenerated enterocytes that are phagocytosed by adjacent healthy enterocytes without causing inflammatory distress. Upon metamorphosis, grouper larval gut develops better immunity fitness with eosinophilic granule cells observed in the intestinal epithelia of day 33 larvae. Future studies on grouper larval nutrition may consider the appropriate dietary phospholipid levels and larval competence to biosynthesize highly unsaturated fatty acid from linoleic acid vis-à-vis the use of plant ingredients in artificial diet formulations. In vivo challenge tests may validate appropriate dietary nutrient supplementation and lead to better feed formulation, matching the varying energetic demands and digestive capacities of developing E. coioides larvae.

  9. Cell Death in the Epithelia of the Intestine and Hepatopancreas in Neocaridina heteropoda (Crustacea, Malacostraca.

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    Lidia Sonakowska

    Full Text Available The endodermal region of the digestive system in the freshwater shrimp Neocaridina heteropoda (Crustacea, Malacostraca consists of a tube-shaped intestine and large hepatopancreas, which is formed by numerous blind-ended tubules. The precise structure and ultrastructure of these regions were presented in our previous studies, while here we focused on the cell death processes and their effect on the functioning of the midgut. We used transmission electron microscopy, light and confocal microscopes to describe and detect cell death, while a quantitative assessment of cells with depolarized mitochondria helped us to establish whether there is the relationship between cell death and the inactivation of mitochondria. Three types of the cell death were observed in the intestine and hepatopancreas-apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. No differences were observed in the course of these processes in males and females and or in the intestine and hepatopancreas of the shrimp that were examined. Our studies revealed that apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy only involves the fully developed cells of the midgut epithelium that have contact with the midgut lumen-D-cells in the intestine and B- and F-cells in hepatopancreas, while E-cells (midgut stem cells did not die. A distinct correlation between the accumulation of E-cells and the activation of apoptosis was detected in the anterior region of the intestine, while necrosis was an accidental process. Degenerating organelles, mainly mitochondria were neutralized and eventually, the activation of cell death was prevented in the entire epithelium due to autophagy. Therefore, we state that autophagy plays a role of the survival factor.

  10. Functional changes with feeding in the gastro-intestinal epithelia of the Burmese python (Python molurus).

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    Helmstetter, Cécile; Reix, Nathalie; T'Flachebba, Mathieu; Pope, Robert K; Secor, Stephen M; Le Maho, Yvon; Lignot, Jean-Hervé

    2009-09-01

    The morphology of the digestive system in fasting and refed Burmese pythons was determined, as well as the localization of the proton (H(+), K(+)-ATPase) and sodium (Na(+), K(+)-ATPase) pumps. In fasting pythons, oxyntopeptic cells located within the fundic glands are typically non-active, with a thick apical tubulovesicular system and numerous zymogen granules. They become active Immediately after feeding but return to a non-active state 3 days after the Ingestion of the prey. The proton pump, expressed throughout the different fasting/feeding states, is either sequestered in the tubulovesicular system in non-active cells or located along the apical digitations extending within the crypt lumen in active cells. The sodium pump is rapidly upregulated in fed animals and is classically located along the baso-lateral membranes of the gastric oxyntopeptic cells. In the Intestine, it is only expressed along the lateral membranes of the enterocytes, i.e., above the lateral spaces and not along the basal side of the cells. Thus, solute transport within the Intestinal lining is mainly achieved through the apical part of the cells and across the lateral spaces while absorbed fat massively crosses the entire height of the cells and flows into the Intercellular spaces. Therefore, in the Burmese python, the gastrointestinal cellular system quickly upregulates after feeding, due to Inexpensive cellular changes, passive mechanisms, and the progressive activation and synthesis of key enzymes such as the sodium pump. This cell plasticity also allows anticipation of the next fasting and feeding periods.

  11. Membrane lipid microenvironment modulates thermodynamic properties of the Na+-K+-ATPase in branchial and intestinal epithelia in euryhaline fish in vivo

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    Mario Diaz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the effects of different native membrane lipid composition on the thermodynamic properties of the Na+-K+-ATPase in different epithelia from the gilthead seabream Sparus aurata. Thermodynamic parameters of activation for the Na+-K+-ATPase, as well as contents of lipid classes and fatty acids from polar lipids were determined for gill epithelia and enterocytes isolated from pyloric caeca, anterior intestine and posterior intestine. Arrhenius analyses of control animals revealed differences in thermal discontinuity values (Td and activation energies determined at both sides of Td between intestinal and gill epithelia. Eyring plots disclosed important differences in enthalpy of activation (H‡ and entropy of activation (S‡ between enterocytes and branchial cells. Induction of n-3 LCPUFA deficiency dramatically altered membrane lipid composition in enterocytes, being the most dramatic changes the increase in 18:1n-9 (oleic acid and the reduction of n-3 LCPUFA (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid. Strikingly, branchial cells were much more resistant to diet-induced lipid alterations than enterocytes, indicating the existence of potent lipostatic mechanisms preserving membrane lipid matrix in gill epithelia. Paralleling lipid alterations, values of Ea1, H‡ and S‡ for the Na+-K+-ATPase were all increased, while Td values vanished, in LCPUFA deficient enterocytes. In turn, Differences in thermodynamic parameters were highly correlated with specific changes in fatty acids, but not with individual lipid classes including cholesterol in vivo. Thus, Td was positively related to 18:1n-9 and negatively to DHA. Td, Ea1 and H‡ were exponentially related to DHA/18:1n-9 ratio. The exponential nature of these relationships highlights the strong impact of subtle changes in the contents of oleic acid and DHA in setting the thermodynamic properties of epithelial Na+-K+-ATPase in vivo. The effects are consistent with physical

  12. Rebamipide ameliorates radiation-induced intestinal injury in a mouse model.

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    Shim, Sehwan; Jang, Hyo-Sun; Myung, Hyun-Wook; Myung, Jae Kyung; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Seung Bum; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Jin, Young-Woo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo

    2017-08-15

    Radiation-induced enteritis is a major side effect in cancer patients undergoing abdominopelvic radiotherapy. Radiation exposure produces an uncontrolled inflammatory cascade and epithelial cell loss leading to impaired epithelial barrier function. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of rebamipide on regeneration of the intestinal epithelia after radiation injury. The abdomens of C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 13Gy of irradiation (IR) and then the mice were treated with rebamipide. Upon IR, intestinal epithelia were destroyed structurally at the microscopic level and bacterial translocation was increased. The intestinal damage reached a maximum level on day 6 post-IR and intestinal regeneration occurred thereafter. We found that rebamipide significantly ameliorated radiation-induced intestinal injury. In mice treated with rebamipide after IR, intestinal barrier function recovered and expression of the tight junction components of the intestinal barrier were upregulated. Rebamipide administration reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) were significantly reduced upon rebamipide administration. Intestinal cell proliferation and β-catenin expression also increased upon rebamipide administration. These data demonstrate that rebamipide reverses impairment of the intestinal barrier by increasing intestinal cell proliferation and attenuating the inflammatory response by inhibiting MMP9 and proinflammatory cytokine expression in a murine model of radiation-induced enteritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Suppressing TGFβ signaling in regenerating epithelia in an inflammatory microenvironment is sufficient to cause invasive intestinal cancer.

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    Oshima, Hiroko; Nakayama, Mizuho; Han, Tae-Su; Naoi, Kuniko; Ju, Xiaoli; Maeda, Yusuke; Robine, Sylvie; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Sato, Toshiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Oshima, Masanobu

    2015-02-15

    Genetic alterations in the TGFβ signaling pathway in combination with oncogenic alterations lead to cancer development in the intestines. However, the mechanisms of TGFβ signaling suppression in malignant progression of intestinal tumors have not yet been fully understood. We have examined Apc(Δ716) Tgfbr2(ΔIEC) compound mutant mice that carry mutations in Apc and Tgfbr2 genes in the intestinal epithelial cells. We found inflammatory microenvironment only in the invasive intestinal adenocarcinomas but not in noninvasive benign polyps of the same mice. We thus treated simple Tgfbr2(ΔIEC) mice with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) that causes ulcerative colitis. Importantly, these Tgfbr2(ΔIEC) mice developed invasive colon cancer associated with chronic inflammation. We also found that TGFβ signaling is suppressed in human colitis-associated colon cancer cells. In the mouse invasive tumors, macrophages infiltrated and expressed MT1-MMP, causing MMP2 activation. These results suggest that inflammatory microenvironment contributes to submucosal invasion of TGFβ signaling-repressed epithelial cells through activation of MMP2. We further found that regeneration was impaired in Tgfbr2(ΔIEC) mice for intestinal mucosa damaged by DSS treatment or X-ray irradiation, resulting in the expansion of undifferentiated epithelial cell population. Moreover, organoids of intestinal epithelial cells cultured from irradiated Tgfbr2(ΔIEC) mice formed "long crypts" in Matrigel, suggesting acquisition of an invasive phenotype into the extracellular matrix. These results, taken together, indicate that a simple genetic alteration in the TGFβ signaling pathway in the inflamed and regenerating intestinal mucosa can cause invasive intestinal tumors. Such a mechanism may play a role in the colon carcinogenesis associated with inflammatory bowel disease in humans.

  14. Expression of Trans- and Paracellular Calcium and Magnesium Transport Proteins in Renal and Intestinal Epithelia During Lactation

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    Beggs, Megan R; Appel, Ida; Svenningsen, Per

    2017-01-01

    Significant alterations in maternal calcium (Ca2+) and magnesium (Mg2+) balance occur during lactation. Ca2+ is the primary divalent cation mobilized into breast milk by demineralization of the skeleton and alterations in intestinal and renal Ca2+ transport. Mg2+ is also concentrated in breast milk......, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. To determine the molecular alterations in Ca2+ and Mg2+ transport in the intestine and kidney during lactation, 3 groups of female mice consisting of either non-pregnant controls, lactating mice, or mice undergoing involution were examined. The fractional...... excretion of Ca2+, but not Mg2+, rose significantly during lactation. Renal 1-alpha hydroxylase and 24-OHase mRNA levels increased markedly as did plasma 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D levels. This was accompanied by significant increases in intestinal expression of Trpv6 and S100g in lactating mice. However...

  15. Basolateral Mg2+ extrusion via CNNM4 mediates transcellular Mg2+ transport across epithelia: a mouse model.

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    Daisuke Yamazaki

    Full Text Available Transcellular Mg(2+ transport across epithelia, involving both apical entry and basolateral extrusion, is essential for magnesium homeostasis, but molecules involved in basolateral extrusion have not yet been identified. Here, we show that CNNM4 is the basolaterally located Mg(2+ extrusion molecule. CNNM4 is strongly expressed in intestinal epithelia and localizes to their basolateral membrane. CNNM4-knockout mice showed hypomagnesemia due to the intestinal malabsorption of magnesium, suggesting its role in Mg(2+ extrusion to the inner parts of body. Imaging analyses revealed that CNNM4 can extrude Mg(2+ by exchanging intracellular Mg(2+ with extracellular Na(+. Furthermore, CNNM4 mutations cause Jalili syndrome, characterized by recessive amelogenesis imperfecta with cone-rod dystrophy. CNNM4-knockout mice showed defective amelogenesis, and CNNM4 again localizes to the basolateral membrane of ameloblasts, the enamel-forming epithelial cells. Missense point mutations associated with the disease abolish the Mg(2+ extrusion activity. These results demonstrate the crucial importance of Mg(2+ extrusion by CNNM4 in organismal and topical regulation of magnesium.

  16. Non-animal models of epithelial barriers (skin, intestine and lung) in research, industrial applications and regulatory toxicology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, S.; Daneshian, M.; Bouwstra, J.A.; Caloni, F.; Constant, S.; Davies, D.E.; Dandekar, G.; Guzman, C.A.; Fabian, E.; Haltner, E.; Hartung, T.; Hasiwa, N.; Hayden, P.; Kandarova, H.; Khare, S.; Krug, H.F.; Kneuer, C.; Leist, M.; Lian, G.; Marx, U.; Metzger, M.; Ott, K.; Prieto, P.; Roberts, M.S.; Roggen, E.L.; Tralau, T.; Braak, van den C.; Walles, H.; Lehr, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Models of the outer epithelia of the human body - namely the skin, the intestine and the lung - have found valid applications in both research and industrial settings as attractive alternatives to animal testing. A variety of approaches to model these barriers are currently employed in such fields,

  17. Non-animal models of epithelial barriers (skin, intestine and lung) in research, industrial applications and regulatory toxicology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, S.; Daneshian, M.; Bouwstra, J.A.; Caloni, F.; Constant, S.; Davies, D.E.; Dandekar, G.; Guzman, C.A.; Fabian, E.; Haltner, E.; Hartung, T.; Hasiwa, N.; Hayden, P.; Kandarova, H.; Khare, S.; Krug, H.F.; Kneuer, C.; Leist, M.; Lian, G.; Marx, U.; Metzger, M.; Ott, K.; Prieto, P.; Roberts, M.S.; Roggen, E.L.; Tralau, T.; Braak, van den C.; Walles, H.; Lehr, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Models of the outer epithelia of the human body - namely the skin, the intestine and the lung - have found valid applications in both research and industrial settings as attractive alternatives to animal testing. A variety of approaches to model these barriers are currently employed in such fields,

  18. Expression and function of the lipocalin-2 (24p3/NGAL receptor in rodent and human intestinal epithelia.

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    Christian Langelueddecke

    Full Text Available The lipocalin 2//NGAL/24p3 receptor (NGAL-R/24p3-R is expressed in rodent distal nephron where it mediates protein endocytosis. The mechanisms of apical endocytosis and transcytosis of proteins and peptides in the intestine are poorly understood. In the present study, the expression and localization of rodent 24p3-R (r24p3-R and human NGAL-R (hNGAL-R was investigated in intestinal segments by immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. r24p3-R/hNGAL-R was also studied in human Caco-2 BBE cells and CHO cells transiently transfected with r24p3-R by immunofluorescence microscopy, RT-PCR and immunoblotting of plasma membrane enriched vesicles (PM. To assay function, endocytosis/transcytosis of putative ligands phytochelatin (PC₃, metallothionein (MT and transferrin (Tf was assayed by measuring internalization of fluorescence-labelled ligands in Caco-2 BBE cells grown on plastic or as monolayers on Transwell inserts. The binding affinity of Alexa 488-PC₃ to colon-like Caco-2 BBE PM was quantified by microscale thermophoresis (MST. r24p3-R/hNGAL-R expression was detected apically in all intestinal segments but showed the highest expression in ileum and colon. Colon-like, but not duodenum-like, Caco-2 BBE cells expressed hNGAL-R on their surface. Colon-like Caco-2 BBE cells or r24p3-R transfected CHO cells internalized fluorescence-labelled PC₃ or MT with half-maximal saturation at submicromolar concentrations. Uptake of PC₃ and MT (0.7 µM by Caco-2 BBE cells was partially blocked by hNGAL (500 pM and an EC₅₀ of 18.6 ± 12.2 nM was determined for binding of Alexa 488-PC₃ to PM vesicles by MST. Transwell experiments showed rapid (0.5-2 h apical uptake and basolateral delivery of fluorescent PC₃/MT/Tf (0.7 µM. Apical uptake of ligands was significantly blocked by 500 pM hNGAL. hNGAL-R dependent uptake was more prominent with MT but transcytosis efficiency was reduced compared to

  19. The TNO gastro-intestinal model (TIM)

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    Minekus, M.

    2015-01-01

    The TNO Gastro–Intestinal Model (TIM) is a multi–compartmental model, designed to realistically simulate conditions in the lumen of the gastro–intestinal tract. TIM is successfully used to study the gastro–intestinal behavior of a wide variety of feed, food and pharmaceutical products. Experiments i

  20. Vertex stability and topological transitions in vertex models of foams and epithelia

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    Spencer, Meryl A; Lubensky, David K

    2016-01-01

    In computer simulations of dry foams and of epithelial tissues, vertex models are often used to describe the shape and motion of individual cells. Although these models have been widely adopted, relatively little is known about their basic theoretical properties. For example, while fourfold vertices in real foams are always unstable, it remains unclear whether a simplified vertex model description has the same behavior. Here, we study vertex stability and the dynamics of T1 topological transitions in vertex models. We show that, when all edges have the same tension, stationary fourfold vertices in these models do indeed always break up. In contrast, when tensions are allowed to depend on edge orientation, fourfold vertices can become stable, as is observed in some biological systems. More generally, our formulation of vertex stability leads to an improved treatment of T1 transitions in simulations and paves the way for studies of more biologically realistic models that couple topological transitions to the dy...

  1. The function of 7D-cadherins: a mathematical model predicts physiological importance for water transport through simple epithelia

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    Walcher Sebastian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 7D-cadherins like LI-cadherin are cell adhesion molecules and represent exceptional members of the cadherin superfamily. Although LI-cadherin was shown to act as a functional Ca2+-dependent adhesion molecule, linking neighboring cells together, and to be dysregulated in a variety of diseases, the physiological role is still enigmatic. Interestingly 7D-cadherins occur only in the lateral plasma membranes of cells from epithelia of water transporting tissues like the gut, the liver or the kidney. Furthermore LI-cadherin was shown to exhibit a highly cooperative Ca2+-dependency of the binding activity. Thus it is tempting to assume that LI-cadherin regulates the water transport through the epithelium in a passive fashion by changing its binding activity in dependence on the extracellular Ca2+. Results We developed a simple mathematical model describing the epithelial lining of a lumen with a content of variable osmolarity covering an interstitium of constant osmolarity. The width of the lateral intercellular cleft was found to influence the water transport significantly. In the case of hypertonic luminal content a narrow cleft is necessary to further increase concentration of the luminal content. If the cleft is too wide, the water flux will change direction and water is transported into the lumen. Electron microscopic images show that in fact areas of the gut can be found where the lateral intercellular cleft is narrow throughout the lateral cell border whereas in other areas the lateral intercellular cleft is widened. Conclusions Our simple model clearly predicts that changes of the width of the lateral intercellular cleft can regulate the direction and efficiency of water transport through a simple epithelium. In a narrow cleft the cells can increase the concentration of osmotic active substances easily by active transport whereas if the cleft is wide, friction is reduced but the cells can hardly build up high osmotic

  2. Sodium recirculation and isotonic transport in toad small intestine

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    Nedergaard, Signe Nielsen; Larsen, Erik Hviid; Ussing, Hans H.

    1999-01-01

    Small intestine; leaky epithelia; solute-coupled water transport; Na*O+ recirculation; lateral intercellular space; flux ratio analysi......Small intestine; leaky epithelia; solute-coupled water transport; Na*O+ recirculation; lateral intercellular space; flux ratio analysi...

  3. The different effects of probiotics treatment on Salmonella-induced interleukin-8 response in intestinal epithelia cells via PI3K/Akt and NOD2 expression.

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    Huang, F-C; Huang, S-C

    2016-11-30

    Salmonella spp. remains a major public health problem for the whole world. Intestinal epithelial cells serve as an essential component of the innate mucosal immune system to defend against Salmonella infection. A substantial amount of evidence has accumulated that probiotics can regulate interleukin 8 (IL-8) involved in innate immunity. However, the exact effect of probiotics on epithelial IL-8 response to Salmonella infection is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the action of probiotics on Salmonella-infected Caco-2 cells and its novel mechanisms. Two probiotic strains were examined for Salmonella-induced IL-8 responses and regulating proteins using Caco-2 cell cultures. We demonstrated probiotic, either Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG or Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis DSM10140, administered before Salmonella infection conferred significantly suppressive effect on Salmonella-induced IL-8 responses in Caco-2 cells, either in secreted protein or mRNA, via the PI3K/Akt signal pathway while probiotic administered after infection enhanced Salmonella-induced IL-8 responses via nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain-containing protein 2 expression in membrane. These findings suggest that the different regulation of probiotics on Salmonella-induced IL-8 responses in Caco-2 cells according to the administered timing supports a rationale for the therapeutic use of probiotics in the treatment of Salmonella colitis and inflammatory bowel disease. This can explain the reported controversial effect of probiotics on these diseases.

  4. Morphological impact of zinc oxide particles on the antibacterial activity and human epithelia toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čepin, Marjeta; Hribar, Gorazd; Caserman, Simon; Orel, Zorica Crnjak

    2015-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticles are utilized in an ever growing number of products and can, therefore, be readily encountered in our everyday life. Human beings' outermost tissues consist of different epithelia and are, therefore, the most exposed to materials from the environment. In this paper, Caco-2 and Calu-3 cell lines were used, having been previously broadly applied for in vitro modelling of intestinal and respiratory epithelia, respectively. The toxicity of synthesized micro-, submicro- and nanoparticulate ZnO on these epithelia was measured and compared to the efficacy of the same ZnO particles as antibacterial agents. An approximately four-fold excess in antibacterial activity of ZnO nanoparticles over ZnO granulate was observed. The results of this paper reveal a sharp distinction between toxic nanoparticulate ZnO and safe ZnO particles of larger sizes in intestinal and airway in vitro epithelial models. In contrast, ZnO of larger particle sizes had only modestly lower antibacterial activity, which can be compensated for with higher dosing. These results show that nanoparticulate ZnO requires critical in vivo assessment before application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Intestinal organoids as model for cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in adult stem cell culture technology have enabled long-term in vitro expansion of intestinal organoids or ‘mini-guts’. In this thesis, we used the organoid model to develop a novel assay to measure function of CFTR, the protein mutated in subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF). This met

  6. Model prodrugs for the intestinal oligopeptide transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C U; Andersen, R; Brodin, Birger

    2001-01-01

    (sigma*) may influence the acid, water or base catalyzed model drug release rates, when released from series of D-Glu-Ala and D-Asp-Ala pro-moieties. Release rates were investigated in both aqueous solutions with varying pH, ionic strength, and buffer concentrations as well as in in vitro biological...... as Taft (sigma*) values, has a significant influence on the release rate of the model drug.......The human intestinal di/tri-peptide carrier, hPepT1, has been suggested as a target for increasing intestinal transport of low permeability compounds by creating prodrugs designed for the transporter. Model ester prodrugs using the stabilized dipeptides D-Glu-Ala and D-Asp-Ala as pro...

  7. From holoprosencephaly to osteopathology: role of multifunctional endocytic receptors in absorptive epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Dominik; Nykjaer, Anders; Willnow, Thomas E

    2003-01-01

    Megalin and cubilin are two multifunctional endocytic receptors expressed in many absorptive epithelia including the yolk sac, the renal proximal tubules, and the intestine. In these tissues, the receptors act in concert to mediate the cellular uptake of a variety of lipoproteins and vitamin/ carrier complexes. Recent studies in animal models and in patients suffering from receptor gene defects have highlighted the crucial role played by the receptors in systemic lipid and vitamin homeostasis, and the severe defects that result from receptor dysfunction. Here, we will review the molecular mechanisms that underlie normal receptor activity and that cause disease in the receptor-deficient organism.

  8. NTPDase2+ cells generate lingual epithelia and papillae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eFeng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The tongue epithelium is one of the most rapidly self-renewing tissues in adult mammals. Multiple stem cell populations are currently believed to exist in tongue epithelia. Keratin 14 (K14 positive cells differentiate into either lingual epithelia or lingual papillae, while ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 2 (NTPDase2 is associated with neural stem cells and astrocyte-like cells ensheathing the migrating neuroblasts. Here, using a transgenic mouse expressing rtTA from the mouse NTPDase2 promoter, we generated an inducible model by treatment with Doxycycline. By immunohistochemical analysis and in situ hybridization, we found exclusive expression of NTPDase2 in lingual epithelia and lingual papillae. Using inducible genetic cell fate mapping, we further showed that the NTPDase2+ cells generated lingual papillae and epithelia in the adult tongue. Finally, building on our previously proposed paradigm of cell migration stream, a model is further described here for lingual epithelia cell genesis. In short, the current results not only extend our understanding of the cell migration stream in lingual epithelia and lingual papillae, but they also support the concept of multiple stem cell populations in lingual epithelia and papillae.

  9. Glucose transport by epithelia prepared from harvested enterocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimura, Yasuhiro; van der Merwe, Marie; Bering, Stine Brandt;

    2015-01-01

    a simple, novel, and reproducible method for preparing functional epithelia using differentiated enterocytes harvested from the small intestine upper villus of adult mice and preterm pigs with and without necrotizing enterocolitis. Concentrative, rheogenic glucose uptake was used as an indicator...... of epithelial function and was demonstrated by cellular accumulation of tracer (14)C D-glucose and Ussing chamber based short-circuit currents. Assessment of the epithelia by light and immunofluorescent microscopy revealed the harvested enterocytes remain differentiated and establish cell-cell connections......, forskolin, and health status exceeding those we have measured using intact tissues. Our findings indicate that epithelia prepared from harvested enterocytes provide an alternative approach for comparative studies of the characteristics of nutrient transport by the upper villus epithelium and the responses...

  10. An organotypic slice model for ex vivo study of neural, immune, and microbial interactions of mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Luke A; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Tobet, Stuart A

    2016-02-15

    Organotypic tissue slices provide seminatural, three-dimensional microenvironments for use in ex vivo study of specific organs and have advanced investigative capabilities compared with isolated cell cultures. Several characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract have made in vitro models for studying the intestine challenging, such as maintaining the intricate structure of microvilli, the intrinsic enteric nervous system, Peyer's patches, the microbiome, and the active contraction of gut muscles. In the present study, an organotypic intestinal slice model was developed that allows for functional investigation across regions of the intestine. Intestinal tissue slices were maintained ex vivo for several days in a physiologically relevant environment that preserved normal enterocyte structure, intact and proliferating crypt cells, submucosal organization, and muscle wall composure. Cell death was measured by a membrane-impermeable DNA binding indicator, ethidium homodimer, and less than 5% of cells were labeled in all regions of the villi and crypt epithelia at 24 h ex vivo. This tissue slice model demonstrated intact myenteric and submucosal neuronal plexuses and functional interstitial cells of Cajal to the extent that nonstimulated, segmental contractions occurred for up to 48 h ex vivo. To detect changes in physiological responses, slices were also assessed for segmental contractions in the presence and absence of antibiotic treatment, which resulted in slices with lesser or greater amounts of commensal bacteria, respectively. Segmental contractions were significantly greater in slices without antibiotics and increased native microbiota. This model renders mechanisms of neuroimmune-microbiome interactions in a complex gut environment available to direct observation and controlled perturbation.

  11. Chemically induced mouse models of intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Stefan; Neufert, Clemens; Weigmann, Benno; Neurath, Markus F

    2007-01-01

    Animal models of intestinal inflammation are indispensable for our understanding of the pathogenesis of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease in humans. Here, we provide protocols for establishing murine 2,4,6-trinitro benzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-, oxazolone- and both acute and chronic dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis, the most widely used chemically induced models of intestinal inflammation. In the former two models, colitis is induced by intrarectal administration of the covalently reactive reagents TNBS/oxazolone, which are believed to induce a T-cell-mediated response against hapten-modified autologous proteins/luminal antigens. In the DSS model, mice are subjected several days to drinking water supplemented with DSS, which seems to be directly toxic to colonic epithelial cells of the basal crypts. The procedures for the hapten models of colitis and acute DSS colitis can be accomplished in about 2 weeks but the protocol for chronic DSS colitis takes about 2 months.

  12. Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  13. The virtual intestine: in silico modeling of small intestinal electrophysiology and motility and the applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Angeli, Timothy R; Cheng, Leo K; O'Grady, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The intestine comprises a long hollow muscular tube organized in anatomically and functionally discrete compartments, which digest and absorb nutrients and water from ingested food. The intestine also plays key roles in the elimination of waste and protection from infection. Critical to all of these functions is the intricate, highly coordinated motion of the intestinal tract, known as motility, which is coregulated by hormonal, neural, electrophysiological and other factors. The Virtual Intestine encapsulates a series of mathematical models of intestinal function in health and disease, with a current focus on motility, and particularly electrophysiology. The Virtual Intestine is being cohesively established across multiple physiological scales, from sub/cellular functions to whole organ levels, facilitating quantitative evaluations that present an integrative in silico framework. The models are also now finding broad physiological applications, including in evaluating hypotheses of slow wave pacemaker mechanisms, smooth muscle electrophysiology, structure-function relationships, and electromechanical coupling. Clinical applications are also beginning to follow, including in the pathophysiology of motility disorders, diagnosing intestinal ischemia, and visualizing colonic dysfunction. These advances illustrate the emerging potential of the Virtual Intestine to effectively address multiscale research challenges in interdisciplinary gastrointestinal sciences.

  14. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

  15. Chemically induced intestinal damage models in zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlers, Stefan H; Flores, Maria Vega; Hall, Christopher J; Okuda, Kazuhide S; Sison, John Oliver; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S

    2013-06-01

    Several intestinal damage models have been developed using zebrafish, with the aim of recapitulating aspects of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These experimentally induced inflammation models have utilized immersion exposure to an array of colitogenic agents (including live bacteria, bacterial products, and chemicals) to induce varying severity of inflammation. This technical report describes methods used to generate two chemically induced intestinal damage models using either dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) or trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Methods to monitor intestinal damage and inflammatory processes, and chemical-genetic methods to manipulate the host response to injury are also described.

  16. Next Generation Respiratory Viral Vaccine System: Advanced and Emerging Bioengineered Human Lung Epithelia Model (HLEM) Organoid Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; Schneider, Sandra L.; MacIntosh, Victor; Gibbons, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and influenza, are the S t" leading cause of United States and worldwide deaths. Newly emerging pathogens signaled the need for an advanced generation of vaccine technology.. Human bronchial-tracheal epithelial tissue was bioengineered to detect, identify, host and study the pathogenesis of acute respiratory viral disease. The 3-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesechymal tissue-like assemblies (HLEM TLAs) share characteristics with human respiratory epithelium: tight junctions, desmosomes, microvilli, functional markers villin, keratins and production of tissue mucin. Respiratory Syntial Virus (RSV) studies demonstrate viral growth kinetics and membrane bound glycoproteins up to day 20 post infection in the human lung-orgainoid infected cell system. Peak replication of RSV occurred on day 10 at 7 log10 particles forming units per ml/day. HLEM is an advanced virus vaccine model and biosentinel system for emergent viral infectious diseases to support DoD global surveillance and military readiness.

  17. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; van der Bij, Hendrik A.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal to

  18. Prolactin and teleost ionocytes: new insights into cellular and molecular targets of prolactin in vertebrate epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breves, Jason P.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide hormone prolactin is a functionally versatile hormone produced by the vertebrate pituitary. Comparative studies over the last six decades have revealed that a conserved function for prolactin across vertebrates is the regulation of ion and water transport in a variety of tissues including those responsible for whole-organism ion homeostasis. In teleost fishes, prolactin was identified as the “freshwater-adapting hormone”, promoting ion-conserving and water-secreting processes by acting on the gill, kidney, gut and urinary bladder. In mammals, prolactin is known to regulate renal, intestinal, mammary and amniotic epithelia, with dysfunction linked to hypogonadism, infertility, and metabolic disorders. Until recently, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms of prolactin action in fishes has been hampered by a paucity of molecular tools to define and study ionocytes, specialized cells that control active ion transport across branchial and epidermal epithelia. Here we review work in teleost models indicating that prolactin regulates ion balance through action on ion transporters, tight-junction proteins, and water channels in ionocytes, and discuss recent advances in our understanding of ionocyte function in the genetically and embryonically accessible zebrafish (Danio rerio). Given the high degree of evolutionary conservation in endocrine and osmoregulatory systems, these studies in teleost models are contributing novel mechanistic insight into how prolactin participates in the development, function, and dysfunction of osmoregulatory systems across the vertebrate lineage.

  19. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, K A; Holoyda, K A; Grant, C N; Levin, D E; Torres, E R; Maxwell, A; Pollack, H A; Moats, R A; Frey, M R; Darehzereshki, A; Al Alam, D; Lien, C; Grikscheit, T C

    2015-08-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation.

  20. Effect of Alemtuzumab on Intestinal Intraepithelial Lymphocytes and Intestinal Barrier Function in Cynomolgus Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-Lin Qu; Ya-Qing Lyu; Hai-Tao Jiang; Ting Shan; Jing-Bin Zhang; Qiu-Rong Li; Jie-Shou Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:Alemtuzumab has been used in organ transplantation and a variety of hematologic malignancies (especially for the treatment of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia).However,serious infectious complications frequently occur after treatment.The reason for increased infections postalemtuzumab treatment is unknown at this stage.We explore the effect ofalemtuzumab on intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and intestinal barrier function in cynomolgus model to explain the reason of infection following alemtuzumab treatment.Methods:Twelve male cynomolguses were randomly assigned to either a treatment or control group.The treatment group received alemtuzumab (3 mg/kg,intravenous injection) while the control group received the same volume of physiological saline.Intestinal IELs were isolated from the control group and the treatment group (on day 9,35,and 70 after treatment) for counting and flow cytometric analysis.Moreover,intestinal permeability was monitored by enzymatic spectrophotometric technique and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results:The numbers of IELs were decreased significantly on day 9 after treatment compared with the control group (0.35 ± 0.07 x 108 and 1.35 ± 0.09 × 108,respectively; P < 0.05) and were not fully restored until day 70 after treatment.There were significant differences among four groups considering IELs subtypes.In addition,the proportion ofapoptotic IELs after alemtuzumab treatment was significantly higher than in the control group (22.01 ± 3.67 and 6.01 ± 1.42,respectively; P < 0.05).Moreover,the concentration of D-lactate and endotoxin was also increased significantly on day 9 after treatment.Conclusions:Alemtuzumab treatment depletes lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and intestine of cynomolgus model.The induction of apoptosis is an important mechanism of lymphocyte depletion after alemtuzumab treatment.Notably,intestinal barrier function may be disrupted after alemtuzumab treatment.

  1. Effect of Alemtuzumab on Intestinal Intraepithelial Lymphocytes and Intestinal Barrier Function in Cynomolgus Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Lin Qu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alemtuzumab has been used in organ transplantation and a variety of hematologic malignancies (especially for the treatment of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, serious infectious complications frequently occur after treatment. The reason for increased infections postalemtuzumab treatment is unknown at this stage. We explore the effect of alemtuzumab on intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs and intestinal barrier function in cynomolgus model to explain the reason of infection following alemtuzumab treatment. Methods: Twelve male cynomolguses were randomly assigned to either a treatment or control group. The treatment group received alemtuzumab (3 mg/kg, intravenous injection while the control group received the same volume of physiological saline. Intestinal IELs were isolated from the control group and the treatment group (on day 9, 35, and 70 after treatment for counting and flow cytometric analysis. Moreover, intestinal permeability was monitored by enzymatic spectrophotometric technique and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The numbers of IELs were decreased significantly on day 9 after treatment compared with the control group (0.35 ± 0.07 × 10 8 and 1.35 ± 0.09 × 10 8 , respectively; P < 0.05 and were not fully restored until day 70 after treatment. There were significant differences among four groups considering IELs subtypes. In addition, the proportion of apoptotic IELs after alemtuzumab treatment was significantly higher than in the control group (22.01 ± 3.67 and 6.01 ± 1.42, respectively; P < 0.05. Moreover, the concentration of D-lactate and endotoxin was also increased significantly on day 9 after treatment. Conclusions: Alemtuzumab treatment depletes lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and intestine of cynomolgus model. The induction of apoptosis is an important mechanism of lymphocyte depletion after alemtuzumab treatment. Notably, intestinal barrier function may be disrupted after

  2. Bioelectric characterization of epithelia from neonatal CFTR knockout ferrets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. Fisher (John); S.R. Tyler (Scott); Y. Zhang (Yulong); B.J. Lee (Ben); X. Liu (Xiaoming); X. Sun (Xinying); H. Sui (Hongshu); B. Liang (Bo); M. Luo (Ma); W. Xie (Weiliang); I. Yi (Iasson); W. Zhou (Weili); Y. Song (Yiqing); N. Keiser (Nicholas); K. Wang (Kai); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); J.F. Engelhardt (John)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening, recessive, multiorgan genetic disorder caused by the loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel function found in many types of epithelia. Animal models that recapitulate the human disease phenotype are critical to un

  3. Models to predict intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Filipa; Andrade, Fernanda; Ferreira, Domingos; Nielsen, Hanne Morck; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of human intestinal absorption is a major goal in the design, optimization, and selection of drugs intended for oral delivery, in particular proteins, which possess intrinsic poor transport across intestinal epithelium. There are various techniques currently employed to evaluate the extension of protein absorption in the different phases of drug discovery and development. Screening protocols to evaluate protein absorption include a range of preclinical methodologies like in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo. It is the careful and critical use of these techniques that can help to identify drug candidates, which most probably will be well absorbed from the human intestinal tract. It is well recognized that the human intestinal permeability cannot be accurately predicted based on a single preclinical method. However, the present social and scientific concerns about the animal well care as well as the pharmaceutical industries need for rapid, cheap and reliable models predicting bioavailability give reasons for using methods providing an appropriate correlation between results of in vivo and in vitro drug absorption. The aim of this review is to describe and compare in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo methods used to predict human intestinal absorption, giving a special attention to the intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

  4. Digestion modeling in the small intestine: impact of dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipoor, M; Barles, G; Georgelin, C; Licois, J R; Lescoat, P

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the modeling of the digestion in the small intestine is developed by investigating specifically the effects of dietary fiber. As our previous model, this new version takes into account the three main phenomena of digestion: transit of the bolus, degradation of feedstuffs and absorption through the intestinal wall. However the two main physiochemical characteristics of dietary fiber, namely viscosity and water holding capacity, lead us to substantially modify our initial model by emphasizing the role of water and its intricated dynamics with dry matter in the bolus. Various numerical simulations given by this new model are qualitatively in agreement with the positive effect of insoluble dietary fiber on the velocity of bolus and on its degradation all along the small intestine. These simulations reproduce the negative effect of soluble dietary fiber on digestion as it has been experimentally observed. Although, this model is generic and contains a large number of parameters but, to the best of our knowledge, it is among the first qualitative dynamical models of fiber influence on intestinal digestion.

  5. Small intestinal model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Sang Hyo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this research is to propose a small intestine model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy. The electrical stimulus can cause contraction of the small intestine and propel the capsule along the lumen. The proposed model considered the drag and friction from the small intestine using a thin walled model and Stokes' drag equation. Further, contraction force from the small intestine was modeled by using regression analysis. From the proposed model, the acceleration and velocity of various exterior shapes of capsule were calculated, and two exterior shapes of capsules were proposed based on the internal volume of the capsules. The proposed capsules were fabricated and animal experiments were conducted. One of the proposed capsules showed an average (SD velocity in forward direction of 2.91 ± 0.99 mm/s and 2.23 ± 0.78 mm/s in the backward direction, which was 5.2 times faster than that obtained in previous research. The proposed model can predict locomotion of the capsule based on various exterior shapes of the capsule.

  6. Tissue engineering of the intestine in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Erik R; Speer, Allison L; Levin, Daniel E; Sala, Frédéric G; Hou, Xiaogang; Torashima, Yasuhiro; Wigfall, Clarence M; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2012-12-01

    Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) has successfully been used to rescue Lewis rats after massive small bowel resection, resulting in return to preoperative weights within 40 days.(1) In humans, massive small bowel resection can result in short bowel syndrome, a functional malabsorptive state that confers significant morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs including parenteral nutrition dependence, liver failure and cirrhosis, and the need for multivisceral organ transplantation.(2) In this paper, we describe and document our protocol for creating tissue-engineered intestine in a mouse model with a multicellular organoid units-on-scaffold approach. Organoid units are multicellular aggregates derived from the intestine that contain both mucosal and mesenchymal elements,(3) the relationship between which preserves the intestinal stem cell niche.(4) In ongoing and future research, the transition of our technique into the mouse will allow for investigation of the processes involved during TESI formation by utilizing the transgenic tools available in this species.(5)The availability of immunocompromised mouse strains will also permit us to apply the technique to human intestinal tissue and optimize the formation of human TESI as a mouse xenograft before its transition into humans. Our method employs good manufacturing practice (GMP) reagents and materials that have already been approved for use in human patients, and therefore offers a significant advantage over approaches that rely upon decellularized animal tissues. The ultimate goal of this method is its translation to humans as a regenerative medicine therapeutic strategy for short bowel syndrome.

  7. A computational model of gastro-intestinal motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K. F.; Goossens, D. J.

    2001-12-01

    A simulated neural network model of a section of enteric nervous system is presented. The network is a layered feed-forward network consisting of integrate and fire units. The network shows the basic form of intestinal motility; a descending wave of relaxation followed by a wave of contraction. It also shows interesting (but not biologically realistic) spontaneous behaviours when no stimulus is present.

  8. Numerical models of laser fusion of intestinal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, John A

    2009-01-01

    Numerical models of continuous wave Tm:YAG thermal fusion in rat intestinal tissues were compared to experiment. Optical and thermal FDM models that included tissue damage based on Arrhenius kinetics were used to predict birefringence loss in collagen as the standard of comparison. The models also predicted collagen shrinkage, jellification and water loss. The inclusion of variable optical and thermal properties is essential to achieve favorable agreement between predicted and measured damage boundaries.

  9. Digestion Modelling in the Small Intestine : Impact of Dietary Fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, Jean-René; Lescoat, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we continue the modelling of the digestion in the small intestine, started in a previous article, by investigating the effects of dietary fibre. We recall that this model aims at taking into account the three main phenomena of the digestion, namely the transit of the bolus, the degradation of feedstuffs and the absorption through the intestinal wall. In order to study the role of dietary fibre on digestion, we model their two principal physiochemical characteristics which interact with the function of the small intestine, i.e. viscosity and water holding capacity. This leads us to consider some features of digestion which have not been taken into account previously, in particular the interrelationship between the evolution of dry matter and water in the bolus. The numerical results are in agreement with the positive effect of insoluble dietary fibre on the velocity of bolus along the small intestine and on its degradation. These results highlight the negative effect of soluble dietary fibre on d...

  10. Experimental models of small intestinal transplantation in rats: orthotopic versus heterotopic model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakao A

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of surgical models of small intestinal transplantation (SITx in rats, namely heterotopic (HIT and orthotopic transplantion (OIT, have been reviewed. In OIT, the small intestine of the recipient is removed and the transplanted intestine replaces it in continuity. On the other hand, in the HIT model, the small intestinal grafts are rendered dysfunctional without alimentary tract continuity. Histological evidence showed that acute rejection appeared earlier in HIT as compared to OIT. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the muscularis externa produced in the chronic rejection process were more pronounced in HIT allografts. The HIT grafts showed severe mucosal atrophy due to the lack of intraluminal trophic factors, because oral feedings can stimulate tropic hormones for mucosal growth, and provide nutrients for enterocytes. Intestinal permeability was consistently higher after HIT than after OIT. The HIT grafts demonstrated less contractility and less response to chemical stimulation than did OIT grafts. The OIT models are advantageous in studies of intraluminal nutrients, and intestinal secretions in these models might modulate the intestinal immune status and possibly delay rejection. The superior intestinal barrier function and the delayed onset of rejection in OIT rats suggest that nutrients and other factors in the succus entericus are important for the maintenance of intestinal graft function.

  11. Foxg1-Cre Mediated Lrp2 Inactivation in the Developing Mouse Neural Retina, Ciliary and Retinal Pigment Epithelia Models Congenital High Myopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Cases

    Full Text Available Myopia is a common ocular disorder generally due to increased axial length of the eye-globe. Its extreme form high myopia (HM is a multifactorial disease leading to retinal and scleral damage, visual impairment or loss and is an important health issue. Mutations in the endocytic receptor LRP2 gene result in Donnai-Barrow (DBS and Stickler syndromes, both characterized by HM. To clearly establish the link between Lrp2 and congenital HM we inactivated Lrp2 in the mouse forebrain including the neural retina and the retinal and ciliary pigment epithelia. High resolution in vivo MRI imaging and ophthalmological analyses showed that the adult Lrp2-deficient eyes were 40% longer than the control ones mainly due to an excessive elongation of the vitreal chamber. They had an apparently normal intraocular pressure and developed chorioretinal atrophy and posterior scleral staphyloma features reminiscent of human myopic retinopathy. Immunomorphological and ultrastructural analyses showed that increased eye lengthening was first observed by post-natal day 5 (P5 and that it was accompanied by a rapid decrease of the bipolar, photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cells, and eventually the optic nerve axons. It was followed by scleral thinning and collagen fiber disorganization, essentially in the posterior pole. We conclude that the function of LRP2 in the ocular tissues is necessary for normal eye growth and that the Lrp2-deficient eyes provide a unique tool to further study human HM.

  12. Foxg1-Cre Mediated Lrp2 Inactivation in the Developing Mouse Neural Retina, Ciliary and Retinal Pigment Epithelia Models Congenital High Myopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obry, Antoine; Santin, Mathieu D.; Ben-Yacoub, Sirine; Pâques, Michel; Amsellem-Levera, Sabine; Bribian, Ana; Simonutti, Manuel; Augustin, Sébastien; Debeir, Thomas; Sahel, José Alain; Christ, Annabel; de Castro, Fernando; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Cosette, Pascal; Kozyraki, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Myopia is a common ocular disorder generally due to increased axial length of the eye-globe. Its extreme form high myopia (HM) is a multifactorial disease leading to retinal and scleral damage, visual impairment or loss and is an important health issue. Mutations in the endocytic receptor LRP2 gene result in Donnai-Barrow (DBS) and Stickler syndromes, both characterized by HM. To clearly establish the link between Lrp2 and congenital HM we inactivated Lrp2 in the mouse forebrain including the neural retina and the retinal and ciliary pigment epithelia. High resolution in vivo MRI imaging and ophthalmological analyses showed that the adult Lrp2-deficient eyes were 40% longer than the control ones mainly due to an excessive elongation of the vitreal chamber. They had an apparently normal intraocular pressure and developed chorioretinal atrophy and posterior scleral staphyloma features reminiscent of human myopic retinopathy. Immunomorphological and ultrastructural analyses showed that increased eye lengthening was first observed by post-natal day 5 (P5) and that it was accompanied by a rapid decrease of the bipolar, photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cells, and eventually the optic nerve axons. It was followed by scleral thinning and collagen fiber disorganization, essentially in the posterior pole. We conclude that the function of LRP2 in the ocular tissues is necessary for normal eye growth and that the Lrp2-deficient eyes provide a unique tool to further study human HM. PMID:26107939

  13. Rebamipide protects small intestinal mucosal injuries caused by indomethacin by modulating intestinal microbiota and the gene expression in intestinal mucosa in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Satoshi; Nakashima, Takako; Osaki, Takako; Uematsu, Naoya; Shibamori, Masafumi; Sakurai, Kazushi; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The effect of rebamipide, a mucosal protective drug, on small intestinal mucosal injury caused by indomethacin was examined using a rat model. Indomethacin administration (10 mg/kg, p.o.) induced intestinal mucosal injury was accompanied by an increase in the numbers of intestinal bacteria particularly Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunum and ileum. Rebamipide (30 and 100 mg/kg, p.o., given 5 times) was shown to inhibit the indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury and decreased the number of Enterococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunal mucosa to normal levels. It was also shown that the detection rate of segmented filamentous bacteria was increased by rebamipide. PCR array analysis of genes related to inflammation, oxidative stress and wound healing showed that indomethacin induced upregulation and downregulation of 14 and 3 genes, respectively in the rat jejunal mucosa by more than 5-fold compared to that of normal rats. Rebamipide suppressed the upregulated gene expression of TNFα and Duox2 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our study confirmed that disturbance of intestinal microbiota plays a crucial role in indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury, and suggests that rebamipide could be used as prophylaxis against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs -induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury, by modulating microbiota and suppressing mucosal inflammation in the small intestine.

  14. Modeling the heterogeneous intestinal absorption of propiverine extended-release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael; Sermsappasuk, Pakawadee; Siegmund, Werner

    2015-08-30

    Propiverine is a widely used antimuscarinic drug with bioavailability that is limited by intestinal first-pass extraction. To study the apparent heterogeneity in intestinal first-pass extraction, we performed a population analysis of oral concentration-time data measured after administration of an extended-release formulation of propiverine in ten healthy subjects. Using an inverse Gaussian function as input model, the assumption that the systemically available fraction increases as a sigmoidal function of time considerably improved the fit. The step-like increase in this fraction at time t=3.7h predicted by the model suggests that propiverine is predominantly absorbed in colon. A nearly perfect correlation was found between the estimates of bioavailability and mean dissolution time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Bacterial translocation and intestinal injury in experimental necrotizing enterocolitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, I; Ozdemir, M; Aktan, M; Aslan, K

    2012-01-01

    To study the occurrence of bacterial translocation and to assess the impact of breastfeeding on bacterial translocation in the animal model of necrotizing enterocolitis. A total of 20 neonate Sprague-Dawley rats were enrolled in the study. Rats were randomly allocated into either control or study group just after birth. Ten newborn rats in the control group were left with their mother to be breast-fed. In contrary, necrotizing enterocolitis group consisted of neonates that were separated from their mothers, housed in an incubator and were gavaged with a special rodent formula three times daily. Survival rates, weight changes, and morphologic scoring obtained after microscopic evaluation were determined as microbiologic evaluation criteria. All the rats in the control group survived, while 1 (10 %) rat died in the necrotizing enterocolitis group. Mortality rates of the two groups were similar. All the formula-fed animals in the necrotizing enterocolitis group had significant weight loss compared to the breast milk-fed rats in the control group (p<0.05). A total of 7 (70 %) and 2 (20 %) E. coli growths were identified in the bowel lumen, liver, and spleen of necrotizing enterocolitis and control groups, respectively. This difference was statistically significant. In peritoneal smear cultures, a total of 3 (30 %) growths were detected in the necrotizing enterocolitis group and 1 (10 %) growth in the control group. As the result of a disturbance in the intestinal flora and impairment of the intestinal barrier in necrotizing enterocolitis, microrganisms in the bowel pass through the intestinal barrier and reach the liver and the spleen via the hematogenous route. This condition is closely related to the impairment of physiological and functional features of the intestinal barrier and is independent from the degree of intestinal injury. Bacterial translocation should be remembered in cases suspected of necrotizing enterocolitis, and a rapid and effective treatment

  16. Structural Design of Oligopeptides for Intestinal Transport Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong-Min; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Koyanagi, Riho; Shen, Weilin; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-03-16

    Glycyl-sarcosine (Gly-Sar) is a well-known model substrate for the intestinal uptake of dipeptides through peptide transporter 1 (PepT1). However, there are no other model peptides larger than tripeptides to evaluate their intestinal transport ability. In this study, we designed new oligopeptides based on the Gly-Sar structure in terms of protease resistance. Gly-Sar-Sar was found to be an appropriate transport model for tripeptides because it does not degrade during the transport across the rat intestinal membrane, while Gly-Gly-Sar was degraded to Gly-Sar during the 60 min transport. Caco-2 cell transport experiments revealed that the designed oligopeptides based on Gly-Sar-Sar showed a significantly (p transport ability by factors of 1/10-, 1/25-, and 1/40-fold for Gly-Sar-Sar, Gly-Sar-Sar-Sar, and Gly-Sar-Sar-Sar-Sar, respectively, compared to Gly-Sar (apparent permeability coefficient: 38.6 ± 11.4 cm/s). Cell experiments also showed that the designed tripeptide and Gly-Sar were transported across Caco-2 cell via PepT1, whereas the tetra- and pentapeptides were transported through the paracellular tight-junction pathway.

  17. Topological defects in epithelia govern cell death and extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Thuan Beng; Doostmohammadi, Amin; Nier, Vincent; Kocgozlu, Leyla; Thampi, Sumesh; Toyama, Yusuke; Marcq, Philippe; Lim, Chwee Teck; Yeomans, Julia M.; Ladoux, Benoit

    2017-04-01

    Epithelial tissues (epithelia) remove excess cells through extrusion, preventing the accumulation of unnecessary or pathological cells. The extrusion process can be triggered by apoptotic signalling, oncogenic transformation and overcrowding of cells. Despite the important linkage of cell extrusion to developmental, homeostatic and pathological processes such as cancer metastasis, its underlying mechanism and connections to the intrinsic mechanics of the epithelium are largely unexplored. We approach this problem by modelling the epithelium as an active nematic liquid crystal (that has a long range directional order), and comparing numerical simulations to strain rate and stress measurements within monolayers of MDCK (Madin Darby canine kidney) cells. Here we show that apoptotic cell extrusion is provoked by singularities in cell alignments in the form of comet-shaped topological defects. We find a universal correlation between extrusion sites and positions of nematic defects in the cell orientation field in different epithelium types. The results confirm the active nematic nature of epithelia, and demonstrate that defect-induced isotropic stresses are the primary precursors of mechanotransductive responses in cells, including YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription factor activity, caspase-3-mediated cell death, and extrusions. Importantly, the defect-driven extrusion mechanism depends on intercellular junctions, because the weakening of cell-cell interactions in an α-catenin knockdown monolayer reduces the defect size and increases both the number of defects and extrusion rates, as is also predicted by our model. We further demonstrate the ability to control extrusion hotspots by geometrically inducing defects through microcontact printing of patterned monolayers. On the basis of these results, we propose a mechanism for apoptotic cell extrusion: spontaneously formed topological defects in epithelia govern cell fate. This will be important in predicting

  18. Models of intestinal infection by Salmonella enterica: introduction of a new neonate mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen causing inflammatory disease in the intestine following diarrhea and is responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Many in vitro investigations using cell culture models are available, but these do not represent the real natural environment present in the intestine of infected hosts. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study the host-pathogen interaction and to unravel the immune responses and cellular processes o...

  19. FASE INTESTINAL DE Trichinella spiralis EN MODELO MURINO Intestinal Trichinella spiralis Phase In Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA ALEJANDRA MORENO GARCÍA

    Full Text Available Trichinella spiralis se encuentra principalmente en el hombre, rata, cerdo, perro; puede infectar a cualquier carnívoro u omnívoro. Cuando la carne o sus derivados están contaminados con larvas infectantes (LI de T. spiralis y son ingeridas éstas pasan al estómago, donde sus cápsulas son disueltas por acción de los jugos gástricos, las larvas son liberadas en pocas horas, después pasan a la porción proximal del intestino delgado, donde se lleva a cabo su desarrollo. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue evaluar la fase intestinal de T. spiralis en un modelo murino. Un lote de 45 ratas Long Evans, se infectaron con aproximadamente 500 LI, y fueron sacrificadas tres diarias por 15 días. Se tomó un segmento de duodeno, yeyuno e íleon y se fijaron en formol al 10% para posteriormente ser procesados en parafina y teñido con hematoxilina-eosina. El resto del intestino delgado fue fraccionado, se incubó a 37 °C por dos horas y el sobrenadante se observó al microscopio de luz. Se encontró que el implante se lleva a cabo a nivel de yeyuno e íleon, que las hembras adultas dan origen aproximadamente 60-80 larvas recién nacidas (LRN, parto vivíparo en un tercio distal y subse-cuentemente son destruidas. Los machos adultos tienen espermatozoides no ciliados.Trichinella spiralis is a parasitic disease in man, rat, pig, but can infect any carnivorous or omnivorous. When the meat or their derivates are contaminated with infective larvae (il of T. spiralis pass to the stomach, their capsules are dissolved by the stomach juice, the larvaes are liberated in few hours, and then they pass to the near portion of the slim intestine in which they develop. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the intestine phase of T. spiralis in a murine model. Fourtyfive Long Evans rats were infected with 500 li approximately, then 3 rats were sacrificed everyday over a period of 15 days. A portion of duodenum, jejune and ileum were fixed in

  20. Toxicity of food-relevant nanoparticles in intestinal epithelial models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Christie

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being incorporated into common consumer products, including in foods and food packaging, for their unique properties at the nanoscale. Food-grade silica and titania are used as anti-caking and whitening agents, respectively, and these particle size distributions are composed of approximately one-third nanoparticles. Zinc oxide and silver nanoparticles can be used for their antimicrobial properties. However, little is known about the interactions of nanoparticles in the body upon ingestion. This study was performed to investigate the role of nanoparticle characteristics including surface chemistry, dissolution, and material type on toxicity to the intestinal epithelium. Only mild acute toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles was observed after 24-hour treatment of intestinal epithelial C2BBe1 cells based on the results of toxicity assays measuring necrosis, apoptosis, membrane damage, and mitochondrial activity. Silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were not observed to be toxic although all nanoparticles were internalized by cells. In vitro digestion of nanoparticles in solutions representing the stomach and intestines prior to treatment of cells did not alter nanoparticle toxicity. Long-term repeated treatment of cells weekly for 24 hours with nanoparticles did not change nanoparticle cytotoxicity or the growth rate of the treated cell populations. Thus, silica, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide nanoparticles were found to induce little toxicity in intestinal epithelial cells. Fluorescent silica nanoparticles were synthesized as a model for silica used in foods that could be tracked in vitro and in vivo. To maintain an exterior of pure silica, a silica shell was hydrolyzed around a core particle of quantum dots or a fluorescent dye electrostatically associated with a commercial silica particle. The quantum dots used were optimized from a previously reported microwave quantum dot synthesis to a quantum yield of 40%. Characterization

  1. Effects of probiotics and antibiotics on the intestinal homeostasis in a computer controlled model of the large intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Ateequr

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infection are frequent complications of broad spectrum antibiotic therapy. Probiotic bacteria are used as therapeutic and preventive agents in these disorders, but the exact functional mechanisms and the mode of action are poorly understood. The effects of clindamycin and the probiotic mixture VSL#3 (containing the 8 bacterial strains Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus consecutively or in combination were investigated and compared to controls without therapy using a standardized human fecal microbiota in a computer-controlled in vitro model of large intestine. Microbial metabolites (short chain fatty acids, lactate, branched chain fatty acids, and ammonia and the intestinal microbiota were analyzed. Results Compared to controls and combination therapy, short chain fatty acids and lactate, but also ammonia and branched chain fatty acids, were increased under probiotic therapy. The metabolic pattern under combined therapy with antibiotics and probiotics had the most beneficial and consistent effect on intestinal metabolic profiles. The intestinal microbiota showed a decrease in several indigenous bacterial groups under antibiotic therapy, there was no significant recovery of these groups when the antibiotic therapy was followed by administration of probiotics. Simultaneous application of anti- and probiotics had a stabilizing effect on the intestinal microbiota with increased bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Conclusions Administration of VSL#3 parallel with the clindamycin therapy had a beneficial and stabilizing effect on the intestinal metabolic homeostasis by decreasing toxic metabolites and protecting the endogenic microbiota from destruction. Probiotics could be a reasonable

  2. [Establishment and evaluation of a dynamic in vitro intestinal absorption model of lipid formulations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Yi, Tao; Di, Huan; Xiao, Lu; He, Ji-Kui

    2011-08-01

    A new dynamic in vitro intestinal absorption model for screening and evaluating lipid formulations was established by means of the characteristics of the intestinal digestion and absorption of the lipid formulations. This model was composed of two systems, including intestinal digestion and the intestinal tissue culture, which drew the evaluation method of intestinal absorption into the in vitro lipolysis model. The influence of several important model parameters such as Ca2+, D-glucose, K+ on the two systems of this model has been investigated. The results showed that increasing of Ca2+ concentration could be significantly conductive to intestinal digestion. The increasing of D-glucose concentration could stepped significantly down the decay of the intestinal activity. K+ was able to maintain intestinal activity, but the influence of different concentration levels on the decay of the intestinal activity was of no significant difference. Thus the model parameters were set up as follows: Ca2+ for 10 mmol x L(-1), D-glucose for 15 mmol x L(-1) and K+ for 5.5 mmol x L(-1). Type I lipid formulation was evaluated with this model, and there was a significant correlation between the absorption curve in vitro and absorption curve in vivo of rats (r = 0.995 6, P lipid formulations.

  3. Establishing Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis infection and intestinal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everman, Jamie L; Ziaie, Navid R; Bechler, Jessica; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2015-09-24

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become a model system for studying the disease interaction between pathogens and the host. To determine whether the transparent nematode could serve as a useful model for Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis (MAH) infection of the intestinal tract, worms were fed MAH and assayed for the effects of the bacterial infection on the worm. It was observed during feeding that viable MAH increases in the intestinal lumen in a time dependent manner. Ingestion of MAH was deemed non-toxic to worms as MAH-fed populations have similar survival curves to those fed E. coli strain OP50. Pulse-chase analysis using E. coli strain OP50 revealed that MAH colonize the intestinal tract, as viable MAH remain within the intestine after the assay. Visualization of intestinal MAH using histology and transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that MAH localizes to the intestinal lumen, as well as establishes direct contact with intestinal epithelium. Bacterial colonization appears to have a detrimental effect on the microvilli of the intestinal epithelial cells. The MAH ΔGPL/4B2 strain with a mutation in glycopeptidolipid production is deficient in binding to human epithelial cells (HEp-2), as well as deficient in its ability to bind to and colonize the intestinal tract of C. elegans as efficiently as wild-type MAH. These data indicate the C. elegans may serve as a useful model system for MAH pathogenesis and in determining the mechanisms used by MAH during infection and colonization of the intestinal epithelium.

  4. Application of a pig ligated intestinal loop model for early Lawsonia intracellularis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup, Torsten Snogdal; Schauser, Kirsten; Agerholm, Jørgen S

    2010-01-01

    -enterocyte interactions. Methods A ligated small intestinal loop model using three different L. intracellularis inocula was applied to 10- 11-week-old pigs. The inocula were 1) wild type bacteria derived from overnight incubation of L. intracellularis bacteria from spontaneous disease, 2) crude vaccine bacteria...... of the initial in vivo interaction between porcine intestinal epithelium and the bacterium is limited. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the usefulness of a ligated small intestinal loop model to study L. intracellularis infections and to obtain information on the very early L. intracellularis...... border. Conclusions The ligated intestinal loop model was useful with respect to maintaining an intact intestinal morphology for up to 6 h. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that L. intracellularis interacts with villus enterocytes within 3 to 6 h after inoculation into intestinal loops...

  5. Application of a pig ligated intestinal loop model for early Lawsonia intracellularis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup, Torsten Snogdal; Schauser, Kirsten Hallundbæk; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen

    2010-01-01

    -enterocyte interactions. METHODS: A ligated small intestinal loop model using three different L. intracellularis inocula was applied to 10-11-week-old pigs. The inocula were 1) wild type bacteria derived from overnight incubation of L. intracellularis bacteria from spontaneous disease, 2) crude vaccine bacteria...... of the initial in vivo interaction between porcine intestinal epithelium and the bacterium is limited. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the usefulness of a ligated small intestinal loop model to study L. intracellularis infections and to obtain information on the very early L. intracellularis...... border. CONCLUSIONS: The ligated intestinal loop model was useful with respect to maintaining an intact intestinal morphology for up to 6 h. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that L. intracellularis interacts with villus enterocytes within 3 to 6 h after inoculation into intestinal loops...

  6. Metabolite Kinetics: The Segregated Flow Model for Intestinal and Whole Body Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Describe Intestinal and Hepatic Glucuronidation of Morphine in Rats In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi Joy; Fan, Jianghong; Chen, Shu; Liu, Lutan; Sun, Huadong; Pang, K Sandy

    2016-07-01

    We used the intestinal segregated flow model (SFM) versus the traditional model (TM), nested within physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, to describe the biliary and urinary excretion of morphine 3β-glucuronide (MG) after intravenous and intraduodenal dosing of morphine in rats in vivo. The SFM model describes a partial (5%-30%) intestinal blood flow perfusing the transporter- and enzyme-rich enterocyte region, whereas the TM describes 100% flow perfusing the intestine as a whole. For the SFM, drugs entering from the circulation are expected to be metabolized to lesser extents by the intestine due to the segregated flow, reflecting the phenomenon of shunting and route-dependent intestinal metabolism. The poor permeability of MG crossing the liver or intestinal basolateral membranes mandates that most of MG that is excreted into bile is hepatically formed, whereas MG that is excreted into urine originates from both intestine and liver metabolism, since MG is effluxed back to blood. The ratio of MG amounts in urine/bile [Formula: see text] for intraduodenal/intravenous dosing is expected to exceed unity for the SFM but approximates unity for the TM. Compartmental analysis of morphine and MG data, without consideration of the permeability of MG and where MG is formed, suggests the ratio to be 1 and failed to describe the kinetics of MG. The observed intraduodenal/intravenous ratio of [Formula: see text] (2.55 at 4 hours) was better predicted by the SFM-PBPK (2.59 at 4 hours) and not the TM-PBPK (1.0), supporting the view that the SFM is superior for the description of intestinal-liver metabolism of morphine to MG. The SFM-PBPK model predicts an appreciable contribution of the intestine to first pass M metabolism.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Intestinal Iron Absorption Using Genetic Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colins, Andrea; Gerdtzen, Ziomara P.; Nuñez, Marco T.; Salgado, J. Cristian

    2017-01-01

    Iron is a trace metal, key for the development of living organisms. Its absorption process is complex and highly regulated at the transcriptional, translational and systemic levels. Recently, the internalization of the DMT1 transporter has been proposed as an additional regulatory mechanism at the intestinal level, associated to the mucosal block phenomenon. The short-term effect of iron exposure in apical uptake and initial absorption rates was studied in Caco-2 cells at different apical iron concentrations, using both an experimental approach and a mathematical modeling framework. This is the first report of short-term studies for this system. A non-linear behavior in the apical uptake dynamics was observed, which does not follow the classic saturation dynamics of traditional biochemical models. We propose a method for developing mathematical models for complex systems, based on a genetic programming algorithm. The algorithm is aimed at obtaining models with a high predictive capacity, and considers an additional parameter fitting stage and an additional Jackknife stage for estimating the generalization error. We developed a model for the iron uptake system with a higher predictive capacity than classic biochemical models. This was observed both with the apical uptake dataset used for generating the model and with an independent initial rates dataset used to test the predictive capacity of the model. The model obtained is a function of time and the initial apical iron concentration, with a linear component that captures the global tendency of the system, and a non-linear component that can be associated to the movement of DMT1 transporters. The model presented in this paper allows the detailed analysis, interpretation of experimental data, and identification of key relevant components for this complex biological process. This general method holds great potential for application to the elucidation of biological mechanisms and their key components in other complex

  8. Precision-cut intestinal slices as an in vitro model to predict NSAID induced intestinal toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; van der Bijl, Henk; Groothuis, Geny; de Graaf, Inge

    2013-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with high prevalence of gastro-intestinal side-effects. In vivo studies suggest that uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation is an important cause of the toxicity and that the toxicity is aggravated by enterohepatic circulation. Precision

  9. Parameterization of small intestinal water volume using PBPK modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Anil; Fotaki, Nikoletta; Edginton, Andrea

    2015-01-25

    To facilitate accurate predictions of oral drug disposition, mechanistic absorption models require optimal parameterization. Furthermore, parameters should maintain a biological basis to establish confidence in model predictions. This study will serve to calculate an optimal parameter value for small intestinal water volume (SIWV) using a model-based approach. To evaluate physiologic fidelity, derived volume estimates will be compared to experimentally-based SIWV determinations. A compartmental absorption and transit (CAT) model, created in Matlab-Simulink®, was integrated with a whole-body PBPK model, developed in PK-SIM 5.2®, to provide predictions of systemic drug disposition. SIWV within the CAT model was varied between 52.5mL and 420mL. Simulations incorporating specific SIWV values were compared to pharmacokinetic data from compounds exhibiting solubility induced non-proportional changes in absorption using absolute average fold-error. Correspondingly, data pertaining to oral administration of acyclovir and chlorothiazide were utilized to derive estimates of SIWV. At 400mg, a SIWV of 116mL provided the best estimates of acyclovir plasma concentrations. A similar SIWV was found to best depict the urinary excretion pattern of chlorothiazide at a dose of 100mg. In comparison, experimentally-based estimates of SIWV within adults denote a central tendency between 86 and 167mL. The derived SIWV (116mL) represents the optimal parameter value within the context of the developed CAT model. This result demonstrates the biological basis of the widely utilized CAT model as in vivo SIWV determinations correspond with model-based estimates.

  10. Digestion of starch in a dynamic small intestinal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime-Fonseca, M R; Gouseti, O; Fryer, P J; Wickham, M S J; Bakalis, S

    2016-12-01

    The rate and extent of starch digestion have been linked with important health aspects, such as control of obesity and type-2 diabetes. In vitro techniques are often used to study digestion and simulated nutrient absorption; however, the effect of gut motility is often disregarded. The present work aims at studying fundamentals of starch digestion, e.g. the effect of viscosity on digestibility, taking into account both biochemical and engineering (gut motility) parameters. New small intestinal model (SIM) that realistically mimics gut motility (segmentation) was used to study digestibility and simulated oligosaccharide bio accessibility of (a) model starch solutions; (b) bread formulations. First, the model was compared with the rigorously mixed stirred tank reactor (STR). Then the effects of enzyme concentration/flow rate, starch concentration, and digesta viscosity (addition of guar gum) were evaluated. Compared to the STR, the SIM showed presence of lag phase when no digestive processes could be detected. The effects of enzyme concentration and flow rate appeared to be marginal in the region of mass transfer limited reactions. Addition of guar gum reduced simulated glucose absorption by up to 45 % in model starch solutions and by 35 % in bread formulations, indicating the importance of chyme rheology on nutrient bioaccessibility. Overall, the work highlights the significance of gut motility in digestive processes and offers a powerful tool in nutritional studies that, additionally to biochemical, considers engineering aspects of digestion. The potential to modulate food digestibility and nutrient bioaccessibility by altering food formulation is indicated.

  11. Intestinal absorption of forsythoside A in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion and in vitro Caco-2 cell models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei ZHOU; Liu-qing DI; Juan WANG; Jin-jun SHAN; Shi-jia LIU; Wen-zheng JU; Bao-chang CAI

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the mechanisms underlying the intestinal absorption of the major bioactive component forsythoside A (FTA) extracted from Forsythiae fructus.Methods:An in vitro Caco-2 cell model and a single-pass intestinal perfusion in situ model in SD rats were used.Results:In the in vitro Caco-2 cell model,the mean apparent permeability value (Papp-value) was 4.15x 107 cm/s in the apical-tobasolateral (AP-BL) direction.At the concentrations of 2.6-10.4 μg/mL,the efflux ratio of FTA in the bi-directional transport experiments was approximately 1.00.After the transport,>96% of the apically loaded FTA was retained on the apical side,while >97% of the basolaterally loaded FTA was retained on the basolateral side.The Papp-values of FTA were inversely correlated with the transepithelial electrical resistance.The paracellular permeability enhancers sodium caprate and EDTA,the P-gp inhibitor verapamil and the multidrug resistance related protein (MRP) inhibitors cyclosporine and MK571 could concentration-dependently increase the Papp-values,while the uptake (OATP) transporter inhibitors diclofenac sodium and indomethacin could concentration-dependently decrease the Papp-values.The intake transporter SGLT1 inhibitor mannitol did not cause significant change in the Papp-values.In the in situ intestinal perfusion model,both the absorption rate constant (Ka) and the effective permeability (Peff-values) following perfusion of FTA 2.6,5.2,and 10.4 μg/mL via the duodenum,jejunum and ileum had no significant difference,although the values were slightly higher for the duodenum as compared to those in the jejunum and ileum.The low,medium and high concentrations of verapamil caused the largest increase in the Peff-values for duodenum,jejunum and ileum,respectively.Sodium caprate,EDTA and cyclosporine resulted in concentration-dependent increase in the Peff-values.Diclofenac sodium and indomethacin caused concentration-dependent decrease in the Peff-values.Mannitol did

  12. Precision-cut intestinal slices : alternative model for drug transport, metabolism, and toxicology research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADME-tox) processes of drugs are of importance and require preclinical investigation intestine in addition to the liver. Various models have been developed for prediction of ADME-tox in the intestine. In this review, pre

  13. Drosophila as a model for intestinal dysbiosis and chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Ah; Lee, Won-Jae

    2014-01-01

    The association between deregulated intestinal microbial consortia and host diseases has been recognized since the birth of microbiology over a century ago. Intestinal dysbiosis refers to a state where living metazoans harbor harmful intestinal microflora. However, there is still an issue of whether causality arises from the host or the microbe because it is unclear whether deregulation of the gut microbiota community is the consequence or cause of the host disease. Recent studies using Drosophila and its simple microbiota have provided a valuable model system for dissecting the molecular mechanisms of intestinal dysbiosis. In this review, we examine recent exciting observations in Drosophila gut-microbiota interactions, particularly the links among the host immune genotype, the microbial community structure, and the host inflammatory phenotype. Future genetic analyses using Drosophila model system will provide a valuable outcome for understanding the evolutionarily conserved mechanisms that underlie intestinal dysbiosis and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  14. Hydroxyethyl starch (HES 130/0.4 impairs intestinal barrier integrity and metabolic function: findings from a mouse model of the isolated perfused small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuk Lung Wong

    Full Text Available The application of hydroxyethyl starch (HES for volume resuscitation is controversially discussed and clinical studies have suggested adverse effects of HES substitution, leading to increased patient mortality. Although, the intestine is of high clinical relevance and plays a crucial role in sepsis and inflammation, information about the effects of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity is very scarce. We therefore evaluated the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity employing an isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine.An isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine was established and intestines were vascularly perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing 3% Albumin (N=7 or 3% HES (130/0.4; N=7. Intestinal metabolic function (galactose uptake, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio, edema formation (wet-to-dry weight ratio, morphology (histological and electron microscopical analysis, fluid shifts within the vascular, lymphatic and luminal compartments, as well as endothelial and epithelial barrier permeability (FITC-dextran translocation were evaluated in both groups.Compared to the Albumin group, HES perfusion did not significantly change the wet-to-dry weight ratio and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio. However, perfusing the small intestine with 3% HES resulted in a significant loss of vascular fluid (p<0.01, an increased fluid accumulation in the intestinal lumen (p<0.001, an enhanced translocation of FITC-dextran from the vascular to the luminal compartment (p<0.001 and a significantly impaired intestinal galactose uptake (p<0.001. Morphologically, these findings were associated with an aggregation of intracellular vacuoles within the intestinal epithelial cells and enlarged intercellular spaces.A vascular perfusion with 3% HES impairs the endothelial and epithelial barrier integrity as well as metabolic function of the small intestine.

  15. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minmin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and cyclooxygenase- (COX- 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models.

  16. Fluid transport phenomena in ocular epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candia, Oscar A; Alvarez, Lawrence J

    2008-03-01

    This article discusses three largely unrecognized aspects related to fluid movement in ocular tissues; namely, (a) the dynamic changes in water permeability observed in corneal and conjunctival epithelia under anisotonic conditions, (b) the indications that the fluid transport rate exhibited by the ciliary epithelium is insufficient to explain aqueous humor production, and (c) the evidence for fluid movement into and out of the lens during accommodation. We have studied each of these subjects in recent years and present an evaluation of our data within the context of the results of others who have also worked on electrolyte and fluid transport in ocular tissues. We propose that (1) the corneal and conjunctival epithelia, with apical aspects naturally exposed to variable tonicities, are capable of regulating their water permeabilities as part of the cell-volume regulatory process, (2) fluid may directly enter the anterior chamber of the eye across the anterior surface of the iris, thereby representing an additional entry pathway for aqueous humor production, and (3) changes in lens volume occur during accommodation, and such changes are best explained by a net influx and efflux of fluid.

  17. Establishing Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis infection and intestinal colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie L. Everman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become a model system for studying the disease interaction between pathogens and the host. To determine whether the transparent nematode could serve as a useful model for Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis (MAH infection of the intestinal tract, worms were fed MAH and assayed for the effects of the bacterial infection on the worm. It was observed during feeding that viable MAH increases in the intestinal lumen in a time dependent manner. Ingestion of MAH was deemed non-toxic to worms as MAH-fed populations have similar survival curves to those fed E. coli strain OP50. Pulse-chase analysis using E. coli strain OP50 revealed that MAH colonize the intestinal tract, as viable MAH remain within the intestine after the assay. Visualization of intestinal MAH using histology and transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that MAH localizes to the intestinal lumen, as well as establishes direct contact with intestinal epithelium. Bacterial colonization appears to have a detrimental effect on the microvilli of the intestinal epithelial cells. The MAH ΔGPL/4B2 strain with a mutation in glycopeptidolipid production is deficient in binding to human epithelial cells (HEp-2, as well as deficient in its ability to bind to and colonize the intestinal tract of C. elegans as efficiently as wild-type MAH. These data indicate the C. elegans may serve as a useful model system for MAH pathogenesis and in determining the mechanisms used by MAH during infection and colonization of the intestinal epithelium.

  18. A Mouse Intra-Intestinal Infusion Model and its Application to the Study of Nanoparticle Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadio, Ana; Amaral, Ana L.; Nunes, Rute; Ricardo, Sara; Sarmento, Bruno; Almeida, Raquel; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; das Neves, José

    2016-01-01

    The oral route is the most preferable one when it comes to drug administration. Different animal models have been used to characterize the fate of potential medicines upon oral delivery but fail to clarify specific events occurring at localized sites of the gastrointestinal tract, particularly at the small intestine. We developed a new mouse intra-intestinal infusion model that enabled the direct administration of substances (such as drugs or nanoparticle drug carriers) in the small intestine through an implanted catheter, which can be maintained for prolonged periods of time. The location of catheter insertion can be previously determined as more proximal or distal, allowing to test specific portions of the intestine. Since the model is presumably able to maintain normal physiological characteristics, namely the mucus coating of the intestinal wall, it allowed studying the distribution of different nanoparticles upon localized intra-intestinal administration. The hereby proposed mouse model has the potential to be useful in other types of studies, namely in clarifying localized processes occurring at specific sites of the intestine. PMID:27965585

  19. Meta-Boolean models of asymmetric division patterns in the C. elegans intestinal lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Sofia; Forchheimer, Robert; Larsson, Jan-Åke

    2013-01-01

    The intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans is derived from 20 cells that are organized into nine intestinal rings. During embryogenesis, three of the rings rotate approximately 90 degrees in a process known as intestinal twist. The underlying mechanisms for this morphological event are not fully known, but it has been demonstrated that both left-right and anterior-posterior asymmetry is required for intestinal twist to occur. We have recently presented a rule-based meta-Boolean tree model intended to describe complex lineages. In this report we apply this model to the E lineage of C. elegans, specifically targeting the asymmetric anterior-posterior division patterns within the lineage. The resulting model indicates that cells with the same factor concentration are located next to each other in the intestine regardless of lineage origin. In addition, the shift in factor concentrations coincides with the boundary for intestinal twist. When modeling lit-1 mutant data according to the same principle, the factor distributions in each cell are altered, yet the concurrence between the shift in concentration and intestinal twist remains. This pattern suggests that intestinal twist is controlled by a threshold mechanism. In the current paper we present the factor concentrations for all possible combinations of symmetric and asymmetric divisions in the E lineage and relate these to the potential threshold by studying existing data for wild-type and mutant embryos. Finally, we discuss how the resulting models can serve as a basis for experimental design in order to reveal the underlying mechanisms of intestinal twist. PMID:24058861

  20. Heparanase Mediates Intestinal Inflammation and Injury in a Mouse Model of Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; He, Ying; Hu, Ziwei; Lu, Siyu; Yin, Xiaohan; Ma, Xiaochun; Lv, Chuanzhu; Jin, Guiyun

    2017-04-01

    Heparanase, a heparan sulfate (HS)-specific endoglycosidase, plays an important role in inflammation and mediates acute pulmonary and renal injuries during sepsis. To explore its role in septic intestinal injury, a non-anticoagulant heparanase inhibitor, N-desulfated/re- N-acetylated heparin (NAH), was administrated to a mouse sepsis model induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Immunohistochemical staining revealed massive shedding of HS from the intestinal mucosal surfaces after CLP, and effective inhibition of heparanase by NAH was confirmed by markedly reduced HS shedding. Following CLP, intestinal expression of heparanase was increased, whereas pretreatment with NAH reduced the sepsis-induced upregulation of heparanase expression. Meanwhile, CLP led to shedding of syndecan-1 and upregulated expression of proteases such as matrix metalloprotease-9 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator in the intestine, whereas NAH markedly suppressed syndecan-1 shedding and protease upregulation following CLP. In addition, pretreatment with NAH attenuated intestinal injury, inhibited neutrophil infiltration and suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6) in the intestine during sepsis, and it also significantly reduced the elevation of inflammatory cytokines in the serum 24 hr after CLP. Our findings demonstrate that the activation of intestinal heparanase contributes to intestinal injury during early sepsis by facilitating the destruction of mucosal epithelial glycocalyx and promoting inflammatory responses.

  1. Mechanical Intestinal Obstruction in a Porcine Model: Effects of Intra-Abdominal Hypertension. A Preliminary Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Correa-Martín

    Full Text Available Mechanical intestinal obstruction is a disorder associated with intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. As the large intestine intraluminal and intra-abdominal pressures are increased, so the patient's risk for intestinal ischaemia. Previous studies have focused on hypoperfusion and bacterial translocation without considering the concomitant effect of intra-abdominal hypertension. The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a mechanical intestinal obstruction model in pigs similar to the human pathophysiology.Fifteen pigs were divided into three groups: a control group (n = 5 and two groups of 5 pigs with intra-abdominal hypertension induced by mechanical intestinal obstruction. The intra-abdominal pressures of 20 mmHg were maintained for 2 and 5 hours respectively. Hemodynamic, respiratory and gastric intramucosal pH values, as well as blood tests were recorded every 30 min.Significant differences between the control and mechanical intestinal obstruction groups were noted. The mean arterial pressure, cardiac index, dynamic pulmonary compliance and abdominal perfusion pressure decreased. The systemic vascular resistance index, central venous pressure, pulse pressure variation, airway resistance and lactate increased within 2 hours from starting intra-abdominal hypertension (p<0.05. In addition, we observed increased values for the peak and plateau airway pressures, and low values of gastric intramucosal pH in the mechanical intestinal obstruction groups that were significant after 3 hours.The mechanical intestinal obstruction model appears to adequately simulate the pathophysiology of intestinal obstruction that occurs in humans. Monitoring abdominal perfusion pressure, dynamic pulmonary compliance, gastric intramucosal pH and lactate values may provide insight in predicting the effects on endorgan function in patients with mechanical intestinal obstruction.

  2. Protective role of adiponectin in a rat model of intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu-Hui; Yang, Yue-Wu; Dai, Hai-Tao; Cai, Song-Wang; Chen, Rui-Han; Ye, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the potential protective role of adiponectin in intestinal ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury. METHODS: A rat model of intestinal I/R injury was established. The serum level of adiponectin in rats with intestinal I/R injury was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were also measured by ELISA. Apoptosis of intestinal cells was detected using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. The production of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and villous injury scores were also measured. RESULTS: Adiponectin was downregulated in the serum of rats with intestinal I/R injury compared with sham rats. No significant changes in the expression of adiponectin receptor 1 and adiponectin receptor 2 were found between sham and I/R rats. Pre-treatment with recombinant adiponectin attenuated intestinal I/R injury. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α, in rats with intestinal I/R injury was reduced by adiponectin pre-treatment. The production of MDA was inhibited, and the release of SOD was restored by adiponectin pre-treatment in rats with intestinal I/R injury. Adiponectin pre-treatment also inhibited cell apoptosis in these rats. Treatment with the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway inhibitor, compound C, or the heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) inhibitor, Snpp, attenuated the protective effects of adiponectin against intestinal I/R injury. CONCLUSION: Adiponectin exhibits protective effects against intestinal I/R injury, which may involve the AMPK/HO-1 pathway. PMID:26715807

  3. Inhibition of cholesterol transport in an intestine cell model by pine-derived phytosterols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jinsoo; Knudsen, Tine A; Nielsen, Anne-Louise; Duelund, Lars; Christensen, Morten; Hervella, Pablo; Needham, David; Mouritsen, Ole G

    2016-10-01

    We have quantified the inhibition of intestinal cholesterol transport by pine-derived phytosterols using an HT29-MTX intestine cell model that forms a mucus layer similar to that in the intestine. An artificial intestinal fluid consisting of digested fat, bile salt, cholesterol, and phytosterols was formulated in order to mimic the conditions in the intestine. The apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of the positive control, i.e., 0.1mM of cholesterol solubilized in the artificial intestine fluid, was found to be 0.33 (±0.17)×10(-6)cm/s. When 0.1mM β-sitosterol was solubilized alongside, Papp was effectively zero, corresponding to a total inhibition of cholesterol transport. A similar strong inhibition was found when commercial pine-derived phytosterols, PinVita™ FSP DuPont, were co-solubilized with cholesterol in the dietary model micelles, leading to Papp=0.06 (±0.06)×10(-6)cm/s, i.e., 5.5 times lower than the cholesterol positive control. Additionally, the effect of potential oral administration formulations generated by the pine-derived phytosterols was also characterized. The formulations were produced as a liquid formulation of the cholesterol-containing artificial intestine fluid. Six liquid formulations were tested of which four displayed a Papp in the range of 0-0.09×10(-6)cm/s. The remaining two formulations did not show any inhibition effect on cholesterol transport and even enhanced cholesterol transport. It was furthermore observed that the phytosterols were found in the collected intestine cells but not transported to the basolateral region in the intestinal cell model system.

  4. P2X receptors in epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipziger, Jens Georg

    2015-01-01

    pathways that inhibit epithelial absorption are currently not well understood. Epithelial P2X7 receptors show pronounced up-regulation during varies diseased states highlighting a role of purinergic signaling in epithelial pathophysiology. Importantly, functional effects of epithelial P2X receptors cover......P2X receptors are ubiquitously expressed in all epithelial tissues but their functional roles are less well studied. Here we review the current state of knowledge by focusing on functional effects of P2X receptor in secretory and in absorptive tissues. In glandular tissue like the parotid gland...... basolateral P2X receptors stimulate ion secretion via an increase of [Ca2+]i. In absorptive epithelia like the renal tubule P2X receptor stimulation mediates the inhibition of NaCl, Mg2+ and water transport in the thick ascending limb and the distal convoluted tubule, respectively. The underlying signaling...

  5. Development of microfluidic cell culture devices towards an in vitro human intestinal barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin

    folds that closely resembled the intestinal villi and formation of a tight barrier. Furthermore, the microelectrodes embedded in the microchip also allow real-time monitoring of the barrier integrity by means of measuring the trans-epithelial electrical resistance. Demonstrations of transport studies...... using different compounds on the in vitro human intestinal model in the microfluidic device showed comparable results with static cultures. In addition, a normal commensal intestinal bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) was successfully co-cultured on the luminal surface of the cultured epithelium...

  6. Glutamate prevents intestinal atrophy via luminal nutrient sensing in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Weidong; Feng, Yongjia; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    Small intestine luminal nutrient sensing may be crucial for modulating physiological functions. However, its mechanism of action is incompletely understood. We used a model of enteral nutrient deprivation, or total parenteral nutrition (TPN), resulting in intestinal mucosal atrophy and decreased...... significantly changed the amount of T1Rs, GLM receptors, and transporters, and GLM prevented these changes. GLM significantly prevented TPN-associated intestinal atrophy (2.5-fold increase in IEC proliferation) and was dependent on up-regulation of the protein kinase pAkt, but independent of T1R3 and mGluR5...

  7. Intestinal inflammation in a murine model of autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Theije, Caroline G.M.; Koelink, Pim J.; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A.H.; Lopes da Silva, Sofia; Korte, S. Mechiel; Olivier, Berend; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a cluster of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impairments in communication, social interest and stereotypical behaviour. Dysfunction of the intestinal tract is reported in patients with ASD and implicated in the development and severity of ASD symptoms.

  8. In silico modelling of the human intestinal microflora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamerman, DJ; Wilkinson, MHF; Sloot, P; Tan, CJK; Dongarra, JJ; Hoekstra, AG

    2002-01-01

    The ecology of the human intestinal microflora and its interaction with the host are poorly understood. Though more and more data are being acquired, in part using modern molecular methods, development of a quantitative theory has not kept pace with this development. This is in part due to the compl

  9. In Silico Modelling of the Human Intestinal Microflora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamerman, Derk Jan; Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2002-01-01

    The ecology of the human intestinal microflora and its interaction with the host are poorly understood. Though more and more data are being acquired, in part using modern molecular methods, development of a quantitative theory has not kept pace with this development. This is in part due to the compl

  10. Mechanisms of intestinal inflammation and development of associated cancers: Lessons learned from mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Aya M.; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately 1/5th of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With regards

  11. A Model of Intestinal Anaphylaxis in Whey Sensitized Balb/c Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kheroua Omar; Kaddouri Hanane; Negaoui Hanane; Saidi Djamel

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Cow’s Milk Allergy (CMA) is a common disease in childhood. Pathophysiological mechanisms involved in gastrointestinal symptoms are relatively poorly understood. Approach: Therefore, an experimental model of intestinal anaphylaxis was needed to approach the problem. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the parenteral sensitization to whey proteins through immune response and local intestine inflammation using a murine m...

  12. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Yan Yeung; Wai-Tao Chan; Chun-Bin Jiang; Mei-Lien Cheng; Chia-Yuan Liu; Szu-Wen Chang; Jen-Shiu Chiang Chiau; Hung-Chang Lee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orall...

  13. Artificial neural network models for prediction of intestinal permeability of oligopeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Min-Kook

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral delivery is a highly desirable property for candidate drugs under development. Computational modeling could provide a quick and inexpensive way to assess the intestinal permeability of a molecule. Although there have been several studies aimed at predicting the intestinal absorption of chemical compounds, there have been no attempts to predict intestinal permeability on the basis of peptide sequence information. To develop models for predicting the intestinal permeability of peptides, we adopted an artificial neural network as a machine-learning algorithm. The positive control data consisted of intestinal barrier-permeable peptides obtained by the peroral phage display technique, and the negative control data were prepared from random sequences. Results The capacity of our models to make appropriate predictions was validated by statistical indicators including sensitivity, specificity, enrichment curve, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (the ROC score. The training and test set statistics indicated that our models were of strikingly good quality and could discriminate between permeable and random sequences with a high level of confidence. Conclusion We developed artificial neural network models to predict the intestinal permeabilities of oligopeptides on the basis of peptide sequence information. Both binary and VHSE (principal components score Vectors of Hydrophobic, Steric and Electronic properties descriptors produced statistically significant training models; the models with simple neural network architectures showed slightly greater predictive power than those with complex ones. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the selection of intestinal barrier-permeable peptides for generating peptide drugs or peptidomimetics.

  14. Development of an advanced intestinal in vitro triple culture permeability model to study transport of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpel, Christa; Teubl, Birgit; Absenger, Markus; Meindl, Claudia; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Leitinger, Gerd; Zimmer, Andreas; Roblegg, Eva

    2014-03-03

    Intestinal epithelial cell culture models, such as Caco-2 cells, are commonly used to assess absorption of drug molecules and transcytosis of nanoparticles across the intestinal mucosa. However, it is known that mucus strongly impacts nanoparticle mobility and that specialized M cells are involved in particulate uptake. Thus, to get a clear understanding of how nanoparticles interact with the intestinal mucosa, in vitro models are necessary that integrate the main cell types. This work aimed at developing an alternative in vitro permeability model based on a triple culture: Caco-2 cells, mucus-secreting goblet cells and M cells. Therefore, Caco-2 cells and mucus-secreting goblet cells were cocultured on Transwells and Raji B cells were added to stimulate differentiation of M cells. The in vitro triple culture model was characterized regarding confluence, integrity, differentiation/expression of M cells and cell surface architecture. Permeability of model drugs and of 50 and 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles was studied. Data from the in vitro model were compared with ex vivo permeability results (Ussing chambers and porcine intestine) and correlated well. Nanoparticle uptake was size-dependent and strongly impacted by the mucus layer. Moreover, nanoparticle permeability studies clearly demonstrated that particles were capable of penetrating the intestinal barrier mainly via specialized M cells. It can be concluded that goblet cells and M cells strongly impact nanoparticle uptake in the intestine and should thus be integrated in an in vitro permeability model. The presented model will be an efficient tool to study intestinal transcellular uptake of particulate systems.

  15. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts

  16. Selective sparing of goblet cells and paneth cells in the intestine of methotrexate-treated rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Verburg (Melissa); I.B. Renes (Ingrid); H.P. Meijer; J.A. Taminiau; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); J. Dekker (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractProliferation, differentiation, and cell death were studied in small intestinal and colonic epithelia of rats after treatment with methotrexate. Days 1-2 after treatment were characterized by decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and decreased numbers and depths

  17. Models of intestinal infection by Salmonella enterica: introduction of a new neonate mouse model [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Schulte

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen causing inflammatory disease in the intestine following diarrhea and is responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Many in vitro investigations using cell culture models are available, but these do not represent the real natural environment present in the intestine of infected hosts. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study the host-pathogen interaction and to unravel the immune responses and cellular processes occurring during infection. An animal model for Salmonella-induced intestinal inflammation relies on the pretreatment of mice with streptomycin. This model is of great importance but still shows limitations to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in the small intestine in vivo. Here, we review the use of mouse models for Salmonella infections and focus on a new small animal model using 1-day-old neonate mice. The neonate model enables researchers to observe infection of both the small and large intestine, thereby offering perspectives for new experimental approaches, as well as to analyze the Salmonella-enterocyte interaction in the small intestine in vivo.

  18. Intestinal tumorigenesis is not affected by progesterone signaling in rodent models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarom Heijmans

    Full Text Available Clinical data suggest that progestins have chemopreventive properties in the development of colorectal cancer. We set out to examine a potential protective effect of progestins and progesterone signaling on colon cancer development. In normal and neoplastic intestinal tissue, we found that the progesterone receptor (PR is not expressed. Expression was confined to sporadic mesenchymal cells. To analyze the influence of systemic progesterone receptor signaling, we crossed mice that lacked the progesterone receptor (PRKO to the Apc(Min/+ mouse, a model for spontaneous intestinal polyposis. PRKO-Apc(Min/+ mice exhibited no change in polyp number, size or localization compared to Apc(Min/+. To examine effects of progestins on the intestinal epithelium that are independent of the PR, we treated mice with MPA. We found no effects of either progesterone or MPA on gross intestinal morphology or epithelial proliferation. Also, in rats treated with MPA, injection with the carcinogen azoxymethane did not result in a difference in the number or size of aberrant crypt foci, a surrogate end-point for adenoma development. We conclude that expression of the progesterone receptor is limited to cells in the intestinal mesenchyme. We did not observe any effect of progesterone receptor signaling or of progestin treatment in rodent models of intestinal tumorigenesis.

  19. Procedures for the preparation and culture of 'reconstructed' rainbow trout branchial epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S P; Fletcher, M; Pärt, P; Wood, C M

    2000-01-01

    Techniques for the in vitro 'reconstruction' of freshwater rainbow trout branchial epithelia using the primary culture of gill cells on permeable polyethylene terephthalate cell culture filter supports are described. Representing models of the freshwater fish gill, epithelia grown by two separate techniques are composed of branchial pavement cells with or without the inclusion of mitochondria-rich (MR) cells. The generation of epithelia consisting of pavement cells only (via a method called single seeded inserts = SSI) involves an initial period of flask culture during which time MR cells, that appear unable to attach to the culture flask base, are excluded from the general cell populace. Alternately, the generation of a heterogeneous epithelia consisting of both pavement cells and MR cells (via a method called double seeded inserts = DSI) is facilitated by the direct seeding of cells into cell culture filter inserts. Critical to this second procedure is the repeat seeding of filter inserts over a two day period. Repeat seeding appears to allow MR cells to nest amongst the attached cell layer generated by the first day's seeding. The use of cell culture filter supports allows free access to both the apical and basolateral compartment of the epithelium and is ideal for experimental manipulation. Cells are grown under symmetrical conditions (apical media/basolateral media) and epithelium growth is measured as a function of transepithelial resistance (TER). When the epithelia exhibit a plateau in growth they can be subjected to asymmetrical conditions (freshwater apical/media basolateral) in order to assess gill cell function as in vivo.

  20. A distinctive electrophysiological signature from the Peyer's patches of rabbit intestine.

    OpenAIRE

    Brayden, D. J.; Baird, A. W.

    1994-01-01

    1. Rabbit small intestinal segments containing Peyer's patches (PP) were examined in Ussing chambers using short-circuit current (Isc) recording. By comparison with control small intestinal mucosal segments, rabbit PP-containing epithelia exhibited decreased basal Isc, increased transepithelial resistance (TER) and unchanged potential difference (PD). 2. Carbachol caused a decrease in Isc in rabbit PP epithelia. Forskolin, dibutyryl cyclic GMP, histamine and the calcium ionophore, A23187, wer...

  1. Smad3 knock-out mice as a useful model to study intestinal fibrogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuliana Zanninelli; Giovanni Latella; Antonella Vetuschi; Roberta Sferra; Angela D'Angelo; Amato Fratticci; Maria Adelaide Continenza; Maria Chiaramonte; Eugenio Gaudio; Renzo Caprilli

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the possible differences in morphology and immunohistochemical expression of CD3,transforming growth factor β1(TGF-β1), Smad7, α-smooth muscle actin (α-Sma), and collagen types Ⅰ-Ⅶ of small and large intestine in Smad3 null and wild-type mice.METHODS: Ten null and ten wild-type adult mice were sacrificed at 4 mo of age and the organs (esophagus, small and large bowel, ureters) were collected for histology(hematoxylin and eosin, Masson thrichrome,silver staining), morphometry and immunohistochemistry analysis. TGF-β1 levels of intestinal tissue homogenates were assessed by ELISA.RESULTS: No macroscopic intestinal lesions were detected both in null and wild-type mice. Histological and morphometric evaluation revealed a significant reduction in muscle layer thickness of small and large intestine in null mice as compared to wild-type mice. Immunohistochemistry evaluation showed a significant increase of CD3+T cell, TGF-β1 and Smad7 staining in the small and large intestine mucosa of Smad3 null mice as compared to wild-type mice. α-Sma and collagen Ⅰ-Ⅶ staining of small and large intestine did not differ between the two groups of mice. TGF-β1 levels of colonic tissue homogenates were significantly higher in null mice than in wild-type mice. In preliminary experiments a significant reduction of TNBS-induced intestinal fibrosis was observed in null mice as compared to wild-type mice.CONCLUSION: Smad3 null mice are a useful model to investigate the in vivo role of the TGF-β/Smad signalling pathway in intestinal inflammation and fibrosis.

  2. Small intestinal mucosa expression of putative chaperone fls485

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raupach Kerstin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maturation of enterocytes along the small intestinal crypt-villus axis is associated with significant changes in gene expression profiles. fls485 coding a putative chaperone protein has been recently suggested as a gene involved in this process. The aim of the present study was to analyze fls485 expression in human small intestinal mucosa. Methods fls485 expression in purified normal or intestinal mucosa affected with celiac disease was investigated with a molecular approach including qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and expression strategies. Molecular data were corroborated with several in situ techniques and usage of newly synthesized mouse monoclonal antibodies. Results fls485 mRNA expression was preferentially found in enterocytes and chromaffine cells of human intestinal mucosa as well as in several cell lines including Rko, Lovo, and CaCo2 cells. Western blot analysis with our new anti-fls485 antibodies revealed at least two fls485 proteins. In a functional CaCo2 model, an increase in fls485 expression was paralleled by cellular maturation stage. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated fls485 as a cytosolic protein with a slightly increasing expression gradient along the crypt-villus axis which was impaired in celiac disease Marsh IIIa-c. Conclusions Expression and synthesis of fls485 are found in surface lining epithelia of normal human intestinal mucosa and deriving epithelial cell lines. An interdependence of enterocyte differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and fls485 chaperone activity might be possible.

  3. Small intestinal mucosa expression of putative chaperone fls485.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinartz, Andrea; Ehling, Josef; Franz, Susanne; Simon, Verena; Bravo, Ignacio G; Tessmer, Claudia; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Lyer, Stefan; Schneider, Ursula; Köster, Jan; Raupach, Kerstin; Kämmerer, Elke; Klaus, Christina; Tischendorf, Jens J W; Kopitz, Jürgen; Alonso, Angel; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2010-03-07

    Maturation of enterocytes along the small intestinal crypt-villus axis is associated with significant changes in gene expression profiles. fls485 coding a putative chaperone protein has been recently suggested as a gene involved in this process. The aim of the present study was to analyze fls485 expression in human small intestinal mucosa. fls485 expression in purified normal or intestinal mucosa affected with celiac disease was investigated with a molecular approach including qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and expression strategies. Molecular data were corroborated with several in situ techniques and usage of newly synthesized mouse monoclonal antibodies. fls485 mRNA expression was preferentially found in enterocytes and chromaffine cells of human intestinal mucosa as well as in several cell lines including Rko, Lovo, and CaCo2 cells. Western blot analysis with our new anti-fls485 antibodies revealed at least two fls485 proteins. In a functional CaCo2 model, an increase in fls485 expression was paralleled by cellular maturation stage. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated fls485 as a cytosolic protein with a slightly increasing expression gradient along the crypt-villus axis which was impaired in celiac disease Marsh IIIa-c. Expression and synthesis of fls485 are found in surface lining epithelia of normal human intestinal mucosa and deriving epithelial cell lines. An interdependence of enterocyte differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and fls485 chaperone activity might be possible.

  4. Application of a pig ligated intestinal loop model for early Lawsonia intracellularis infection

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    Agerholm Jørgen S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine proliferative enteropathy in pigs is caused by the obligate, intracellular bacterium Lawsonia intracellularis. In vitro studies have shown close bacterium-cell interaction followed by cellular uptake of the bacterium within 3 h post inoculation (PI. However, knowledge of the initial in vivo interaction between porcine intestinal epithelium and the bacterium is limited. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the usefulness of a ligated small intestinal loop model to study L. intracellularis infections and to obtain information on the very early L. intracellularis-enterocyte interactions. Methods A ligated small intestinal loop model using three different L. intracellularis inocula was applied to 10-11-week-old pigs. The inocula were 1 wild type bacteria derived from overnight incubation of L. intracellularis bacteria from spontaneous disease, 2 crude vaccine bacteria (Enterisol® Ileitis Vet, and 3 vaccine bacteria propagated in cell culture. The bacteria-enterocyte interaction was visualised using immunohistochemistry on specimens derived 1, 3 and 6 h PI respectively. Results Although at a low level, close contact between bacteria and the enterocyte brush border including intracellular uptake of bacteria in mature enterocytes was seen at 3 and 6 h PI for the vaccine and the propagated vaccine inocula. Interaction between the wild-type bacteria and villus enterocytes was scarce and only seen at 6 h PI, where a few bacteria were found in close contact with the brush border. Conclusions The ligated intestinal loop model was useful with respect to maintaining an intact intestinal morphology for up to 6 h. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that L. intracellularis interacts with villus enterocytes within 3 to 6 h after inoculation into intestinal loops and that the bacterium, as shown for the vaccine bacteria, propagated as well as non-propagated, was able to invade mature enterocytes. Thus, the study demonstrates

  5. Mathematical Modeling of Transport and Degradation of Feedstuffs in the Small Intestine

    CERN Document Server

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, Jean-René; Barles, Guy

    2011-01-01

    We describe a mathematical modeling of the digestion in the small intestine. The main interest of our work is to consider, at the same time, different aspects of the digestion i.e. the transport of the bolus all along the intestine, feedstuffs degradation according to the enzymes and local physical conditions, and nutrients absorption. A system of coupled ordinary differential equations is used to model these phenomena. The major unknowns of this system are the position of the bolus and its composition. This system of equations is solved numerically. We present different numerical computations for the degradation, absorption and transport of the bolus with acceptable accuracy with experimental data. The main feature and interest of this model are its generality. Even if we are at an early stage of development, our approach can be adapted to treat any kind of feedstuffs in any non-ruminant animal to predict the composition and velocity of bolus in the small intestine.

  6. Oral PEG 15-20 protects the intestine against radiation : role of lipid rafts.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valuckaite, V.; Zaborina, O.; Long, J.; Hauer-Jensen, M.; Wang, J.; Holbrook, C.; Zaborin, A.; Drabik, K.; Katdare, M.; Mauceri, H.; Weichselbaum, R.; Firestone, M. A.; Lee, K. Y.; Chang, E. B.; Matthews, J.; Alverdy, J. C.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Arkansas

    2009-12-01

    Intestinal injury following abdominal radiation therapy or accidental exposure remains a significant clinical problem that can result in varying degrees of mucosal destruction such as ulceration, vascular sclerosis, intestinal wall fibrosis, loss of barrier function, and even lethal gut-derived sepsis. We determined the ability of a high-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol-based copolymer, PEG 15-20, to protect the intestine against the early and late effects of radiation in mice and rats and to determine its mechanism of action by examining cultured rat intestinal epithelia. Rats were exposed to fractionated radiation in an established model of intestinal injury, whereby an intestinal segment is surgically placed into the scrotum and radiated daily. Radiation injury score was decreased in a dose-dependent manner in rats gavaged with 0.5 or 2.0 g/kg per day of PEG 15-20 (n = 9-13/group, P < 0.005). Complementary studies were performed in a novel mouse model of abdominal radiation followed by intestinal inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), a common pathogen that causes lethal gut-derived sepsis following radiation. Mice mortality was decreased by 40% in mice drinking 1% PEG 15-20 (n = 10/group, P < 0.001). Parallel studies were performed in cultured rat intestinal epithelial cells treated with PEG 15-20 before radiation. Results demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented radiation-induced intestinal injury in rats, prevented apoptosis and lethal sepsis attributable to P. aeruginosa in mice, and protected cultured intestinal epithelial cells from apoptosis and microbial adherence and possible invasion. PEG 15-20 appeared to exert its protective effect via its binding to lipid rafts by preventing their coalescence, a hallmark feature in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to radiation.

  7. Intestinal flora changes in a mouse model of transverse aortic constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-jie ZHOU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate intestinal microbiota changes of model mice with transverse aortic constriction (TAC to find a new target point for preventing and treating cardiovascular disease. Methods  Twelve C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into TAC model group (group TN and control group (group N of 6 mice each. The group TN received minimally invasive surgery for ligating the aorta to make its constriction to the appropriate degree, while the group N received same operation but no constriction. Faecal samples were collected 22 days after the treatment. Intestinal flora were determined by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and bioinformatics clustering analysis were performed with software of Quantitative Insights into Microbial Ecology. Results  A higher abundance of Parabacteroides and a lower abundances of Lactobacillaceae, Lactobacillus and Cocleatum were present in TAC mice compared with the controls. Conclusion  Intestinal flora changes would take place in the TAC mice. Intestinal flora may be a potential target for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, but further validation should be performed to verify the relationship between those intestinal flora changes and disease progression in animal models. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.10.04

  8. Analysis of the spatial and dynamical properties of a multiscale model of intestinal crypts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antoniotti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The preliminary analyses on a multiscale model of intestinal crypt dynamics are here presented. The model combines a morphological model, based on the Cellular Potts Model (CPM, and a gene regulatory network model, based on Noisy Random Boolean Networks (NRBNs. Simulations suggest that the stochastic differentiation process is itself sufficient to ensure the general homeostasis in the asymptotic states, as proven by several measures.

  9. Defining new criteria for selection of cell-based intestinal models using publicly available databases

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    Christensen Jon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The criteria for choosing relevant cell lines among a vast panel of available intestinal-derived lines exhibiting a wide range of functional properties are still ill-defined. The objective of this study was, therefore, to establish objective criteria for choosing relevant cell lines to assess their appropriateness as tumor models as well as for drug absorption studies. Results We made use of publicly available expression signatures and cell based functional assays to delineate differences between various intestinal colon carcinoma cell lines and normal intestinal epithelium. We have compared a panel of intestinal cell lines with patient-derived normal and tumor epithelium and classified them according to traits relating to oncogenic pathway activity, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and stemness, migratory properties, proliferative activity, transporter expression profiles and chemosensitivity. For example, SW480 represent an EMT-high, migratory phenotype and scored highest in terms of signatures associated to worse overall survival and higher risk of recurrence based on patient derived databases. On the other hand, differentiated HT29 and T84 cells showed gene expression patterns closest to tumor bulk derived cells. Regarding drug absorption, we confirmed that differentiated Caco-2 cells are the model of choice for active uptake studies in the small intestine. Regarding chemosensitivity we were unable to confirm a recently proposed association of chemo-resistance with EMT traits. However, a novel signature was identified through mining of NCI60 GI50 values that allowed to rank the panel of intestinal cell lines according to their drug responsiveness to commonly used chemotherapeutics. Conclusions This study presents a straightforward strategy to exploit publicly available gene expression data to guide the choice of cell-based models. While this approach does not overcome the major limitations of such models

  10. From intestinal permeability to dysmotility: the biobreeding rat as a model for functional gastrointestinal disorders.

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    Tim Vanuytsel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Impaired intestinal barrier function, low-grade inflammation and altered neuronal control are reported in functional gastrointestinal disorders. However, the sequence of and causal relation between these events is unclear, necessitating a spontaneous animal model. The aim of this study was to describe the natural history of intestinal permeability, mucosal and neuromuscular inflammation and nitrergic motor neuron function during the lifetime of the BioBreeding (BB rat. METHODS: Normoglycemic BB-diabetes prone (DP and control rats were sacrificed at different ages and jejunum was harvested to characterize intestinal permeability, inflammation and neuromuscular function. RESULTS: Both structural and functional evidence of increased intestinal permeability was found in young BB-DP rats from the age of 50 days. In older animals, starting in the mucosa from 70 days and in half of the animals also in the muscularis propria from 110 days, an inflammatory reaction, characterized by an influx of polymorphonuclear cells and higher myeloperoxidase activity, was observed. Finally, in animals older than 110 days, coinciding with a myenteric ganglionitis, a loss of nitrergic neurons and motor function was demonstrated. CONCLUSION: In the BB-rat, mucosal inflammatory cell infiltration is preceded by intestinal barrier dysfunction and followed by myenteric ganglionitis and loss of nitrergic function. This sequence supports a primary role for impaired barrier function and provides an insightful model for the pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders.

  11. Oregano Essential Oil Improves Intestinal Morphology and Expression of Tight Junction Proteins Associated with Modulation of Selected Intestinal Bacteria and Immune Status in a Pig Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oregano essential oil (OEO has long been used to improve the health of animals, particularly the health of intestine, which is generally attributed to its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. However, how OEO acts in the intestine of pig is still unclear. This study was aimed at elucidating how OEO promotes the intestinal barrier integrity in a pig model. Pigs were fed a control diet alone or one supplemented with 25 mg/kg of OEO for 4 weeks. The OEO-treated pigs showed decreased (P<0.05 endotoxin level in serum and increased (P<0.05 villus height and expression of occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1 in the jejunum. These results demonstrated that the integrity of intestinal barrier was improved by OEO treatment. The OEO-treated pigs had a lower (P<0.05 population of Escherichia coli in the jejunum, ileum, and colon than the control. This is in accordance with the greater inactivation (P<0.05 of inflammation, which was reflected by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, protein kinase B (Akt, and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB signaling pathways and expression of inflammatory cytokines in the jejunum. Our results show that OEO promotes intestinal barrier integrity, probably through modulating intestinal bacteria and immune status in pigs.

  12. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Fungal Metabolites in Mouse Intestine as Revealed by In vitro Models

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    Dominik Schreiber

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, which include Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory disorders that can affect the whole gastrointestinal tract or the colonic mucosal layer. Current therapies aiming to suppress the exaggerated immune response in IBD largely rely on compounds with non-satisfying effects or side-effects. Therefore, new therapeutical options are needed. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of the fungal metabolites, galiellalactone, and dehydrocurvularin in both an in vitro intestinal inflammation model, as well as in isolated myenteric plexus and enterocyte cells. Administration of a pro-inflammatory cytokine mix through the mesenteric artery of intestinal segments caused an up-regulation of inflammatory marker genes. Treatment of the murine intestinal segments with galiellalactone or dehydrocurvularin by application through the mesenteric artery significantly prevented the expression of pro-inflammatory marker genes on the mRNA and the protein level. Comparable to the results in the perfused intestine model, treatment of primary enteric nervous system (ENS cells from the murine intestine with the fungal compounds reduced expression of cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, and inflammatory enzymes such as COX-2 and iNOS on mRNA and protein levels. Similar anti-inflammatory effects of the fungal metabolites were observed in the human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD-1 after stimulation with IFN-γ (10 ng/ml, TNF-α (10 ng/ml, and IL-1β (5 ng/ml. Our results show that the mesenterially perfused intestine model provides a reliable tool for the screening of new therapeutics with limited amounts of test compounds. Furthermore, we could characterize the anti-inflammatory effects of two novel active compounds, galiellalactone, and dehydrocurvularin which are interesting candidates for studies with chronic animal models of IBD.

  13. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Coyne G; Nickerson, Cheryl A; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and encounters the

  14. Studies of melatonin effects on epithelia using the human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, CWY; Y. Song; Ailenberg, M; Wheeler, M.; Pang, SF; Brown, GM; Silverman, M.

    1997-01-01

    The expression of melatonin receptors (MR) of the Mel(1a) subtype in basolateral membrane of guinea pig kidney proximal tubule suggests that melatonin plays a role in regulating epithelial functions. To investigate the cellular basis of melatonin action on epithelia, we sought to establish an appropriate in vitro culture model. Epithelial cell lines originating from kidneys of dog (MDCK), pig (LLC-PK1), opossum (OK), and human embryo (HEK- 293) were each tested for the presence of MR using 2-...

  15. The small intestine and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): a batch process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Brian C

    2008-11-01

    Faults in a batch process model of the small intestine create the symptoms of all types of irritable bowel syndrome. The model has three sequential processing sections corresponding to the natural divisions of the intestine. It is governed by a brain controller that is divided into four sub-controllers, each with a unique neurotransmitter. Each section has a sub-controller to manage transport. Sensors in the walls of the intestine provide input and output goes to the muscles lining the walls of the intestine. The output controls the speed of the food soup, moves it in both directions, mixes it, controls absorption, and transfers it to the next section at the correct speed (slow). The fourth sub-controller manages the addition of chemicals. It obtains input from the first section of the process via the signalling hormone Cholecystokinin and sends output to the muscles that empty the gall bladder and pancreas. The correct amounts of bile salts and enzymes are then added to the first section. The sub-controllers produce output only when input is received. When output is missing the enteric nervous system applies a default condition. This default condition normally happens when no food is in the intestine. If food is in the intestine and a transport sub-controller fails to provide output then the default condition moves the food soup to the end of that section. The movement is in one direction only (forward), at a speed dependent on the amount and type of fibre present. Cereal, bean and vegetable fibre causes high speeds. This default high speed transport causes irritable bowel syndrome. A barrier is created when a section moving fast at the default speed, precedes a section controlled by a transport sub-controller. Then the sub-controller constricts the intestine to stop the fast flow. The barrier causes constipation, cramping, and bloating. Diarrhoea results when the section terminating the process moves at the fast default speed. Two problems can occur to prevent

  16. Milk with and without lactoferrin can influence intestinal damage in a pig model of malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garas, Lydia C; Feltrin, Cristiano; Hamilton, M Kristina; Hagey, Jill V; Murray, James D; Bertolini, Luciana R; Bertolini, Marcelo; Raybould, Helen E; Maga, Elizabeth A

    2016-02-01

    Malnutrition remains a leading contributor to the morbidity and mortality of children under the age of five worldwide. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood necessitating an appropriate animal model to answer fundamental questions and conduct translational research into optimal interventions. One potential intervention is milk from livestock that more closely mimics human milk by increased levels of bioactive components that can promote a healthy intestinal epithelium. We tested the ability of cow milk and milk from transgenic cows expressing human lactoferrin at levels found in human milk (hLF milk) to mitigate the effects of malnutrition at the level of the intestine in a pig model of malnutrition. Weaned pigs (3 weeks old) were fed a protein and calorie restricted diet for five weeks, receiving cow, hLF or no milk supplementation daily from weeks 3-5. After three weeks, the restricted diet induced changes in growth, blood chemistry and intestinal structure including villous atrophy, increased ex vivo permeability and decreased expression of tight junction proteins. Addition of both cow and hLF milk to the diet increased growth rate and calcium and glucose levels while promoting growth of the intestinal epithelium. In the jejunum hLF milk restored intestinal morphology, reduced permeability and increased expression of anti-inflammatory IL-10. Overall, this pig model of malnutrition mimics salient aspects of the human condition and demonstrates that cow milk can stimulate the repair of damage to the intestinal epithelium caused by protein and calorie restriction with hLF milk improving this recovery to a greater extent.

  17. Intestinal proteomics in pig models of necrotising enterocolitis, short bowel syndrome and intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pingping; Sangild, Per Torp

    2014-10-01

    Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), short bowel syndrome (SBS) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are three conditions associated with intestinal dysfunction in newborn infants, particularly those born preterm. Piglet (Sus scrofa) models have recently been developed for NEC, SBS and IUGR, and tissue proteomic analyses have identified unknown pathways and new prognostic disease markers. Intestinal HSPs, iron metabolism proteins and proteins related to amino acid (e.g. arginine) and glucose metabolism are consistently affected by NEC progression and some of these proteins are also affected by SBS and IUGR. Parallel changes in some plasma and urinary proteins (e.g. haptoglobin, globulins, complement proteins, fatty acid binding proteins) may mirror the intestinal responses and pave the way to biomarker discovery. Explorative non-targeted proteomics provides ideas about the cellular pathways involved in intestinal adaptation during the critical neonatal period. Proteomics, combined with other -omic techniques, helps to get a more holistic picture of intestinal adaptation during NEC, SBS and IUGR. Explorative -omic research methods also have limitations and cannot replace, but only supplement, classical hypothesis-driven research that investigate disease mechanisms using a single or few endpoints.

  18. Functional characterization of folic acid transport in the intestine of the laying hen using the everted intestinal sac model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tactacan, G B; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Karmin, O; House, J D

    2011-01-01

    Absorption at the level of the intestine is likely a primary regulatory mechanism for the deposition of dietary supplemented folic acid into the chicken egg. Therefore, factors affecting the intestinal transport of folic acid in the laying hen may influence the level of egg folate concentrations. To this end, a series of experiments using intestinal everted sacs were conducted to characterize intestinal folic acid absorption processes in laying hens. Effects of naturally occurring folate derivatives (5-methyl and 10-formyltetrahydrofolate) as well as heme on folic acid absorption were also investigated. Folic acid absorption was measured based on the rate of uptake of (3)H-labeled folic acid in the everted sac from various segments of the small and large intestines. Folic acid concentration, incubation length, and pH condition were optimized before the performance of uptake experiments. The distribution profile of folic acid transport along the intestine was highest in the upper half of the small intestine. Maximum uptake rate (nmol·100 g tissue(-1)·min(-1)) was observed in the duodenum (20.6 ± 1.9) and jejunum (22.3 ± 2.0) and decreased significantly in the ileum (15.3 ± 1.1) and cecum (9.3 ± 0.9). Transport increased proportionately (P laying hen. Uptake of folic acid in the cecum raises the likelihood of absorption of bacterial-derived folate.

  19. In Vitro Model Simulating Gastro-Intestinal Digestion in the Pediatric Population (Neonates and Young Infants)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Danna; Berthelsen, Ragna; Sassene, Philip Jonas

    2016-01-01

    , it is important to simulate the gastro-intestinal conditions and processes the drug will encounter upon oral administration. When a drug is administered in the fed state, which is commonly the case for neonates, as they are typically fed every 3 h, the digestion of the milk will affect the composition...... of the fluid available for drug dissolution/solubilization. Therefore, in order to predict the solubilized amount of drug available for absorption, an in vitro model simulating digestion in the gastro-intestinal tract should be utilized. In order to simulate the digestion process and the drug solubilization...

  20. Intestinal inflammation in TNBS sensitized rats as a model of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Selve

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available An enteritis, based on a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, was induced in TNBS (2,4,4-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid sensitized rats by multiple intrajejunal challenge with TNBS via an implanted catheter. This treatment induced chronic inflammation of the distal small intestine characterized by intense hyperaemia, oedema and gut wall thickening as assessed by macroscopic scoring and weighing a defined part of the dissected intestine. Histologically, the inflammatory response included mucosal and submucosal cell infiltration by lymphocytes and histiocytes, transmural granulomatous inflammation with multinucleated cells and activated mesenteric lymph nodes. Ex vivo stimulated release of the inflammatory mediator LTB4 in the dissected part of the intestine was increased following TNBS treatment. Drug treatment with sulphasalazine or 5-aminosalicylic acid improved the enteritis score and attenuated TNBS induced oedema formation and LTB4 production. The applicability and relevance of this new model are discussed with respect to drug development and basic research of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  1. A new in vitro model using small intestinal epithelial cells to enhance infection of Cryptosporidium parvum

    Science.gov (United States)

    To better understand and study the infection of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, a more sensitive in vitro assay is required. In vivo, this parasite infects the epithelial cells of the microvilli layer in the small intestine. While cell infection models using colon,...

  2. A mathematical model representing cellular immune development and response to Salmonella of chicken intestinal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, D.; Bannink, A.; Smits, M.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to create a dynamic mathematical model of the development of the cellular branch of the intestinal immune system of poultry during the first 42 days of life and of its response towards an oral infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. The system elements were

  3. The Mesenteric Lymph Duct Cannulated Rat Model: Application to the Assessment of Intestinal Lymphatic Drug Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevaskis, Natalie L.; Hu, Luojuan; Caliph, Suzanne M.; Han, Sifei; Porter, Christopher J.H.

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal lymphatic system plays key roles in fluid transport, lipid absorption and immune function. Lymph flows directly from the small intestine via a series of lymphatic vessels and nodes that converge at the superior mesenteric lymph duct. Cannulation of the mesenteric lymph duct thus enables the collection of mesenteric lymph flowing from the intestine. Mesenteric lymph consists of a cellular fraction of immune cells (99% lymphocytes), aqueous fraction (fluid, peptides and proteins such as cytokines and gut hormones) and lipoprotein fraction (lipids, lipophilic molecules and apo-proteins). The mesenteric lymph duct cannulation model can therefore be used to measure the concentration and rate of transport of a range of factors from the intestine via the lymphatic system. Changes to these factors in response to different challenges (e.g., diets, antigens, drugs) and in disease (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease, HIV, diabetes) can also be determined. An area of expanding interest is the role of lymphatic transport in the absorption of orally administered lipophilic drugs and prodrugs that associate with intestinal lipid absorption pathways. Here we describe, in detail, a mesenteric lymph duct cannulated rat model which enables evaluation of the rate and extent of lipid and drug transport via the lymphatic system for several hours following intestinal delivery. The method is easily adaptable to the measurement of other parameters in lymph. We provide detailed descriptions of the difficulties that may be encountered when establishing this complex surgical method, as well as representative data from failed and successful experiments to provide instruction on how to confirm experimental success and interpret the data obtained. PMID:25866901

  4. Consensus hologram QSAR modeling for the prediction of human intestinal absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Tiago L; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2012-04-15

    Consistent in silico models for ADME properties are useful tools in early drug discovery. Here, we report the hologram QSAR modeling of human intestinal absorption using a dataset of 638 compounds with experimental data associated. The final validated models are consistent and robust for the consensus prediction of this important pharmacokinetic property and are suitable for virtual screening applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A mechanism-based approach for absorption modeling: the Gastro-Intestinal Transit Time (GITT) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénin, Emilie; Bergstrand, Martin; Standing, Joseph F; Karlsson, Mats O

    2012-06-01

    Absorption models used in the estimation of pharmacokinetic drug characteristics from plasma concentration data are generally empirical and simple, utilizing no prior information on gastro-intestinal (GI) transit patterns. Our aim was to develop and evaluate an estimation strategy based on a mechanism-based model for drug absorption, which takes into account the tablet movement through the GI transit. This work is an extension of a previous model utilizing tablet movement characteristics derived from magnetic marker monitoring (MMM) and pharmacokinetic data. The new approach, which replaces MMM data with a GI transit model, was evaluated in data sets where MMM data were available (felodipine) or not available (diclofenac). Pharmacokinetic profiles in both datasets were well described by the model according to goodness-of-fit plots. Visual predictive checks showed the model to give superior simulation properties compared with a standard empirical approach (first-order absorption rate + lag-time). This model represents a step towards an integrated mechanism-based NLME model, where the use of physiological knowledge and in vitro–in vivo correlation helps fully characterize PK and generate hypotheses for new formulations or specific populations.

  6. A Model of Intestinal Anaphylaxis in Whey Sensitized Balb/c Mice

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    Kheroua Omar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Cow’s Milk Allergy (CMA is a common disease in childhood. Pathophysiological mechanisms involved in gastrointestinal symptoms are relatively poorly understood. Approach: Therefore, an experimental model of intestinal anaphylaxis was needed to approach the problem. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the parenteral sensitization to whey proteins through immune response and local intestine inflammation using a murine model of allergy. Sensitization of Balb/c mice with ß-lactoglobulin (ß-Lg or whey was performed in presence of Alum Al (OH3. Mice were analyzed for ß-Lg or whey specific serum antibodies by ELISA. Local anaphylactic responses were performed in vitro in using chamber by intestine challenge with ß-Lg or whey. Histological study was used to assess gut inflammation. Results: The sensitization induced the production of anti- ß-Lg or anti whey IgG, IgG1, IgG2a and IgE with a high IgG1/IgG2a ratio translating Th2 type response. The addition of ß-Lg or whey to the serosal side of the mouse intestinal epithelium in using chamber produced electrogenic chloride secretion as shown by Isc stimulation. Histological findings were mild with villi atrophy and lymphocyte hyperplasia. Conclusion: After sensitization, the mice became prone to developing anaphylactic response and may be useful experimental model for mechanistic studies of CMA or for hydrolyzed formulae.

  7. Effects of hemin and nitrite on intestinal tumorigenesis in the A/J Min/+ mouse model.

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    Marianne Sødring

    Full Text Available Red and processed meats are considered risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC; however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. One cause for the potential link between CRC and meat is the heme iron in red meat. Two pathways by which heme and CRC promotion may be linked have been suggested: fat peroxidation and N-nitrosation. In the present work we have used the novel A/J Min/+ mouse model to test the effects of dietary hemin (a model of red meat, and hemin in combination with nitrite (a model of processed meat on intestinal tumorigenesis. Mice were fed a low Ca2+ and vitamin D semi-synthetic diet with added hemin and/or nitrite for 8 weeks post weaning, before termination followed by excision and examination of the intestinal tract. Our results indicate that dietary hemin decreased the number of colonic lesions in the A/J Min/+ mouse. However, our results also showed that the opposite occurred in the small intestine, where dietary hemin appeared to stimulate tumor growth. Furthermore, we find that nitrite, which did not have an effect in the colon, appeared to have a suppressive effect on tumor growth in the small intestine.

  8. Generation of a tightly regulated doxycycline-inducible model for studying mouse intestinal biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Sabrina; Franken, Patrick; van Veelen, Wendy; Blonden, Lau; Raghoebir, Lalini; Beverloo, Berna; van Drunen, Ellen; Kuipers, Ernst J; Rottier, Robbert; Fodde, Riccardo; Smits, Ron

    2009-01-01

    To develop a sensitive and inducible system to study intestinal biology, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing the reverse tetracycline transactivator rtTA2-M2 under control of the 12.4 kb murine Villin promoter. The newly generated Villin-rtTA2-M2 mice were then bred with the previously developed tetO-HIST1H2BJ/GFP model to assess inducibility and tissue-specificity. Expression of the histone H2B-GFP fusion protein was observed exclusively upon doxycycline induction and was uniformly distributed throughout the intestinal epithelium. The Villin-rtTA2-M2 was also found to drive transgene expression in the developing mouse intestine. Furthermore, we could detect transgene expression in the proximal tubules of the kidney and in a population of alleged gastric progenitor cells. By administering different concentrations of doxycycline, we show that the Villin-rtTA2-M2 system drives transgene expression in a dosage-dependent fashion. Thus, we have generated a novel doxycycline-inducible mouse model, providing a valuable tool to study the effect of different gene dosages on intestinal physiology and pathology.

  9. Intestine-specific Mttp deletion decreases mortality and prevents sepsis-induced intestinal injury in a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

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    Jessica A Dominguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The small intestine plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of sepsis and has been referred to as the "motor" of the systemic inflammatory response. One proposed mechanism is that toxic gut-derived lipid factors, transported in mesenteric lymph, induce systemic injury and distant organ failure. However, the pathways involved are yet to be defined and the role of intestinal chylomicron assembly and secretion in transporting these lipid factors is unknown. Here we studied the outcome of sepsis in mice with conditional, intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (Mttp-IKO, which exhibit a block in chylomicron assembly together with lipid malabsorption. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mttp-IKO mice and controls underwent intratracheal injection with either Pseudomonas aeruginosa or sterile saline. Mttp-IKO mice exhibited decreased seven-day mortality, with 0/20 (0% dying compared to 5/17 (29% control mice (p<0.05. This survival advantage in Mttp-IKO mice, however, was not associated with improvements in pulmonary bacterial clearance or neutrophil infiltration. Rather, Mttp-IKO mice exhibited protection against sepsis-associated decreases in villus length and intestinal proliferation and were also protected against increased intestinal apoptosis, both central features in control septic mice. Serum IL-6 levels, a major predictor of mortality in human and mouse models of sepsis, were elevated 8-fold in septic control mice but remained unaltered in septic Mttp-IKO mice. Serum high density lipoprotein (HDL levels were reduced in septic control mice but were increased in septic Mttp-IKO mice. The decreased levels of HDL were associated with decreased hepatic expression of apolipoprotein A1 in septic control mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies suggest that strategies directed at blocking intestinal chylomicron secretion may attenuate the progression and improve the outcome of sepsis through effects

  10. Epicatechin Used in the Treatment of Intestinal Inflammatory Disease: An Analysis by Experimental Models

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    Paulo César de Paula Vasconcelos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was pathway of (−-epicatechin (EC in the prevention and treatment of intestine inflammation in acute and chronic rat models. Methods. Intestine inflammation was induced in rats using TNBS. The morphological, inflammatory, immunohistochemical, and immunoblotting characteristics of colon samples were examined. The effects of EC were evaluated in an acute model at doses of 5, 10, 25, and 50 mg/kg by gavage for 5 days. The chronic colitis model was induced 1st day, and treated for 21 days. For the colitis relapse model, the induction was repeated on 14th. Results. EC10 and EC50 effectively reduced the lesion size, as assessed macroscopically; and confirmed by microscopy for EC10. The glutathione levels were higher in EC10 group but decreased COX-2 expression and increased cell proliferation (PC were observed, indicating an anti-inflammatory activity and a proliferation-stimulating effect. In the chronic colitis model, EC10 showed lower macroscopic and microscopic lesion scores and increase in glutathione levels. As in the acute model, a decrease in COX-2 expression and an increase in PC in EC10, the chronic model this increase maybe by the pathway EGF expression. Conclusion. These results confirm the activity of EC as an antioxidant that reduces of the lesion and that has the potential to stimulate tissue healing, indicating useful for preventing and treating intestine inflammation.

  11. Posterior midgut epithelial cells differ in their organization of the membrane skeleton from other drosophila epithelia.

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    Baumann, O

    2001-11-01

    In epithelial cells, the various components of the membrane skeleton are segregated within specialized subregions of the plasma membrane, thus contributing to the development and stabilization of cell surface polarity. It has previously been shown that, in various Drosophila epithelia, the membrane skeleton components ankyrin and alphabeta-spectrin reside at the lateral surface, whereas alphabeta(H)-spectrin is restricted to the apical domain. By use of confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, the present study characterizes the membrane skeleton of epithelial cells in the posterior midgut, leading to a number of unexpected results. First, ankyrin and alphabeta-spectrin are not detected on the entire lateral surface but appear to be restricted to the apicolateral area, codistributing with fasciclin III at smooth septate junctions. The presumptive ankyrin-binding proteins neuroglian and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, however, do not colocalize with ankyrin. Second, alphabeta(H)-spectrin is enriched at the apical domain but is also present in lower amounts on the entire lateral surface, colocalizing apicolaterally with ankyrin/alphabeta-spectrin. Finally, despite the absence of zonulae adherentes, F-actin, beta(H)-spectrin, and nonmuscle myosin-II are enriched in the midlateral region. Thus, the model established for the organization of the membrane skeleton in Drosophila epithelia does not hold for the posterior midgut, and there is quite some variability between the different epithelia with respect to the organization of the membrane skeleton.

  12. Slow spontaneous [Ca2+]i oscillations reflect nucleotide release from renal epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geyti, Christine Stride; Odgaard, Elvin V. P.; Overgaard, Morten Thaarup

    2008-01-01

    nucleotide signalling. In this study, fluo-4 loaded Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells are used as a model for quantification and characterisation of spontaneous [Ca(2+)](i) increases in renal epithelia. Spontaneous [Ca(2+)](i) increases occurred randomly as single cell events. During an observation...

  13. Glucose transport by epithelia prepared from harvested enterocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimura, Yasuhiro; van der Merwe, Marie; Bering, Stine Brandt

    2015-01-01

    , forskolin, and health status exceeding those we have measured using intact tissues. Our findings indicate that epithelia prepared from harvested enterocytes provide an alternative approach for comparative studies of the characteristics of nutrient transport by the upper villus epithelium and the responses...... transporter SGLT-1. Similarly, accumulation of (14)C D-glucose by the epithelia was inhibited by phloridzin, but not phloretin, and was stimulated by pre-exposure to AMP and adenosine, apparently by a microtubule-based mechanism that is disrupted by nocodazole, with the magnitudes of responses to adenosine...

  14. Comparison of Mass Transfer Models for Determination of the Intestinal Permeability

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    P Zakeri-Milani

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: In determination of the permeability of the intestinal wall by external perfusion techniques, several models have been proposed. In the present study three models were used for experimental results that differ in their convection and diffusion assumptions. Material and Methods: Permeability coefficients for 13 compounds (metoprolol, propranolol, naproxen, ketoprofen, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, cimetidine, ranitidine, atenolol, piroxicam, antipyrine, ibuprofen and carbamazepine with known human intestinal permeability values were determined in anaesthetized rats by different mass transfer models and plotted versus the observed human intestinal permeabilities. Results: The calculated dimensionless wall permeability values were in the range of 0.37 - 4.85, 0.38-6.54 and 0.41-16.59 for complete radial mixing, mixing tank and laminar flow models respectively. The results indicated that all of the models work relatively well for our data despite fundamentally different assumptions. The wall permeabilities were in the order laminar flow > mixing tank > complete radial mixing. Conclusion: Although laminar flow model provides the most direct measure of the intrinsic wall permeability, it has limitations for highly permeable drugs such as ibuprofen. The normal physiological hydrodynamics is more complex and more investigation is required to find out the real hydrodynamics.

  15. Understanding how commensal obligate anaerobic bacteria regulate immune functions in the large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Eva; Anderson, Rachel C; Roy, Nicole C

    2014-12-24

    The human gastrointestinal tract is colonised by trillions of commensal bacteria, most of which are obligate anaerobes residing in the large intestine. Appropriate bacterial colonisation is generally known to be critical for human health. In particular, the development and function of the immune system depends on microbial colonisation, and a regulated cross-talk between commensal bacteria, intestinal epithelial cells and immune cells is required to maintain mucosal immune homeostasis. This homeostasis is disturbed in various inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Several in vitro and in vivo studies indicate a role for Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides fragilis, Akkermansia muciniphila and segmented filamentous bacteria in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. These obligate anaerobes are abundant in the healthy intestine but reduced in several inflammatory diseases, suggesting an association with protective effects on human health. However, knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the effects of obligate anaerobic intestinal bacteria remains limited, in part due to the difficulty of co-culturing obligate anaerobes together with oxygen-requiring human epithelial cells. By using novel dual-environment co-culture models, it will be possible to investigate the effects of the unstudied majority of intestinal microorganisms on the human epithelia. This knowledge will provide opportunities for improving human health and reducing the risk of inflammatory diseases.

  16. An analytical solution for the model of drug distribution and absorption in small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyu, Xu

    1990-11-01

    According to the physiological and anatomical characteristics of small intestine, neglecting the effect of its motility on the distribution and absorption of drug and nutrient, Y. Miyamoto et al.[1] proposed a model of two-dimensional laminar flow in a circular porous tube with permeable wall and calculated the concentration profile of drug by numerical analysis. In this paper, we give a steady state analytical solution of the above model including deactivation term. The obtained results are in agreement with the results of their numerical analysis. Moreover the analytical solution presented in this paper reveals the relation among the physiological parameters of the model and describes the basic absorption rule of drug and nutrient through the intestinal wall and hence provides a theoretical basis for determining the permeability and reflection coefficient through in situ experiments.

  17. Evaluation of drug combination for glioblastoma based on an intestine-liver metabolic model on microchip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Mingsha; Mao, Sifeng; Liu, Hanyang; He, Ziyi; Li, Hai-Fang; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2017-08-30

    An intestine-liver-glioblastoma biomimetic system was developed to evaluate the drug combination therapy for glioblastoma. A hollow fiber (HF) was embedded into the upper layer of the microfluidic chip for culturing Caco-2 cells to mimic drug delivery as an artificial intestine. HepG2 cells cultured in the bottom chamber of the chip acted as an artificial liver for metabolizing the drugs. The dual-drug combination to glioblastoma U251 cells was evaluated based on the intestine-liver metabolic model. The drugs, irinotecan (CPT-11), temozolomide (TMZ) and cyclophosphamide (CP), were used to dynamically stimulate the cells by continuous infusion into the intestine unit. After intestine absorption and liver metabolism, the prodrugs were transformed to active metabolites, which induced glioblastoma cells apoptosis. The anticancer activity of the CPT-11 and TMZ combination is significantly enhanced compared to that of the single drug treatments. Combination index (CI) values of the combination groups, CPT-11 and TMZ, CPT-11 and CP, and TMZ and CP, at half maximal inhibitory concentration were 0.137, 0.288, and 0.482, respectively. The results indicated that the CPT-11 and TMZ combination was superior to the CPT-11 and CP group as well as the TMZ and CP group towards the U251 cells. The metabolism mechanism of CPT-11 and TMZ was further studied by coupling with mass spectrometric analysis. The biomimetic model enables the performance of long-term cell co-culture, drug delivery, metabolism and real-time analysis of drug effects, promising systematic in vitro mimicking of physiological and pharmacological processes.

  18. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orally administrated daily saline, probiotic suspension of Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lcr35) or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum (LaBi). Diarrhea score, pro-inflammatory cytokines serum levels, intestinal villus height and crypt depth and total RNA from tissue were assessed. Samples of blood, liver and spleen tissues were assessed for translocation. Results Marked diarrhea developed in the 5-FU groups but was attenuated after oral Lcr35 and LaBi administrations. Diarrhea scores decreased significantly from 2.64 to 1.45 and 0.80, respectively (Pprobiotics administration. We also found TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expressions were up-regulated in intestinal mucositis tissues following 5-FU treatment (TNF-α: 4.35 vs. 1.18, IL-1β: 2.29 vs. 1.07, IL-6: 1.49 vs. 1.02) and that probiotics treatment suppressed this up-regulation (Pprobiotics Lcr35 and LaBi can ameliorate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. This suggests probiotics may serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in the future. PMID:26406888

  19. In Situ Perfusion Model in Rat Colon for Drug Absorption Studies: Comparison with Small Intestine and Caco-2 Cell Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Bermejo, Marival

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to develop and to validate the in situ closed loop perfusion method in rat colon and to compare with small intestine and Caco-2 cell models. Correlations with human oral fraction absorbed (Fa) and human colon fraction absorbed (Fa_colon) were developed to check the applicability of the rat colon model for controlled release (CR) drug screening. Sixteen model drugs were selected and their permeabilities assessed in rat small intestine and colon, and in Caco-2 monolayers. Correlations between colon/intestine/Caco-2 permeabilities versus human Fa and human Fa_colon have been explored to check model predictability and to apply a BCS approach in order to propose a cut off value for CR screening. Rat intestine perfusion with Doluisio's method and single-pass technique provided a similar range of permeabilities demonstrating the possibility of combining data from different laboratories. Rat colon permeability was well correlated with Caco-2 cell-4 days model reflecting a higher paracellular permeability. Rat colon permeabilities were also higher than human colon ones. In spite of the magnitude differences, a good sigmoidal relationship has been shown between rat colon permeabilities and human colon fractions absorbed, indicating that rat colon perfusion can be used for compound classification and screening of CR candidates.

  20. Mouse intestinal villi as a model system for studies of rotavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Santana, Ana Y; Acosta, Orlando

    2010-09-01

    Rotavirus replicates in the mature enterocytes lining the villi of the small intestine and the availability of an in vitro system for culturing these natural target cells would contribute to substantial advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of rotavirus. A novel in vitro system was established for culturing isolated small intestinal villi from suckling mice, and the susceptibility of the villus cells to the wild-type murine rotavirus EDIM-Cambridge (ECwt) infection was assessed by immunocytochemistry staining and ELISA. Cell viability of cultured villi infected by rotavirus was estimated to be higher than 70% 16 h post-infection, whereas the accumulated rotavirus structural and non-structural antigen was found to reach a maximum value at 24 h post-infection. Terminal apoptosis was found in about 65% of villus cells 22 h post-infection as detected with either propidium iodide or Hoechst 33342 staining. Mock-infected villus cells exhibited a slight tendency toward more extensive chromatin fragmentation compared to their rotavirus-infected counterpart, mainly when caspase-3 activity was measured. Examination of villus cells by ELISA indicated that the amount of rotavirus structural antigen accumulated at 12 h post-infection was nearly the same regardless of the intestinal section (duodenum, jejunum and ileum) used. The isolation, culture and infection of small intestinal villi from suckling mice has led to the introduction of a useful model for rotavirus studies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Intestinal flora of animal models of human diseases as an environmental factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, K; Narushima, S

    2005-03-01

    Genetically-engineered animals are known to be useful in clarifying the functions of many genes and as animal models for human diseases. However, it has been widely reported that pathophysiology is not expressed in these animals when they become germfree or SPF animals, i.e., the pathophysiology is not the result of genes alone and a combination of gene function and intestinal flora as an environmental factor are necessary. It is important to determine the roles of each of these two factors by pathophysiological analysis. Gnotobiotic mice were produced by establishment of specified bacterial species in germfree animals to form the intestinal flora of SPF animals and they were placed in barrier facilities. Measures have been taken against infections by bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae. In addition, gnotobiotic mice with a highly normal physiology are required. Analysis of the effects of each bacterial species and combinations of bacteria on in vivo functions, i.e., the cross-talk between the host and intestinal flora, is essential in the creation of better laboratory animals. Monitoring of the intestinal flora, a key factor in the colonies produced, is a topic for future research.

  2. Inflammation and disintegration of intestinal villi in an experimental model for Vibrio parahaemolyticus-induced diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Jennifer M; Rui, Haopeng; Zhou, Xiaohui; Iida, Tetsuya; Kodoma, Toshio; Ito, Susuma; Davis, Brigid M; Bronson, Roderick T; Waldor, Matthew K

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis in many parts of the world, but there is limited knowledge of the pathogenesis of V. parahaemolyticus-induced diarrhea. The absence of an oral infection-based small animal model to study V. parahaemolyticus intestinal colonization and disease has constrained analyses of the course of infection and the factors that mediate it. Here, we demonstrate that infant rabbits oro-gastrically inoculated with V. parahaemolyticus develop severe diarrhea and enteritis, the main clinical and pathologic manifestations of disease in infected individuals. The pathogen principally colonizes the distal small intestine, and this colonization is dependent upon type III secretion system 2. The distal small intestine is also the major site of V. parahaemolyticus-induced tissue damage, reduced epithelial barrier function, and inflammation, suggesting that disease in this region of the gastrointestinal tract accounts for most of the diarrhea that accompanies V. parahaemolyticus infection. Infection appears to proceed through a characteristic sequence of steps that includes remarkable elongation of microvilli and the formation of V. parahaemolyticus-filled cavities within the epithelial surface, and culminates in villus disruption. Both depletion of epithelial cell cytoplasm and epithelial cell extrusion contribute to formation of the cavities in the epithelial surface. V. parahaemolyticus also induces proliferation of epithelial cells and recruitment of inflammatory cells, both of which occur before wide-spread damage to the epithelium is evident. Collectively, our findings suggest that V. parahaemolyticus damages the host intestine and elicits disease via previously undescribed processes and mechanisms.

  3. Three-Dimensional Organotypic Co-Culture Model of Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Macrophages to Study "Salmonella Enterica" Colonization Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Mark; Yang, J; Barilla, J.; Crabbe, A.; Sarker, S. F.; Liu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional/3-D organotypic models of human intestinal epithelium mimic the differentiated form and function of parental tissues often not exhibited by 2-D monolayers and respond to Salmonella in ways that reflect in vivo infections. To further enhance the physiological relevance of 3-D models to more closely approximate in vivo intestinal microenvironments during infection, we developed and validated a novel 3-D intestinal co-culture model containing multiple epithelial cell types and phagocytic macrophages, and applied to study enteric infection by different Salmonella pathovars.

  4. Mucin glycoarray in gastric and gallbladder epithelia

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    Ganesh Iniya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucins are critical cytoprotective glycoproteins and alterations of epithelial gastric mucins have been described in different pathological conditions. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the putative usefulness of mucins in understanding the progression of gastric cancer and gallstone formation in a better perspective. Methods Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric biopsy specimens and surgically resected gallbladder tissue samples were sectioned. Alcian Blue (AB staining was performed to identify sialomucins (staining blue at pH 2.5 and sulfomucins (staining brown at pH 1.0 and then Periodic acid-Schiff's (PAS staining to visualize the neutral mucins (staining magenta. Results In normal gastric and gallbladder mucosae, we found that neutral mucins were predominant, whereas in intestinal metaplasia, gastric carcinoma and stone-containing gallbladder, a significant increase of acidic mucins was found. Conclusion We suggest that the sulfomucins have a greater role in gallstone formation than the neutral mucins and also that the sialomucins and sulfomucins play an important role in cancer progression and metastasis. Our results challenge the glycobiologists to delve deeper in elucidating the role of mucins in gastric malignancy and in gallstone formation.

  5. Emergence and Dynamics of Polar Order in Developing Epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadifar, Reza

    2011-03-01

    Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) is a conserved process in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues, and is fundamental for the coordination of cell behavior and patterning. A well-studied example is the orientational pattern of hairs in the wing of the adult fruit fly Drosophila, which is an important model organism in biology. The Drosophila wing is an epithelium, i.e., a two-dimensional sheet of cells, which grows from a few cells to thousands of cells during the course of development. In the wing epithelium, planar polarity is established by an anisotropic distribution of PCP proteins within cells. The distribution of these proteins in a given cell affects the polarity of neighboring cells, such that at the end of wing development a large-scale PCP orientational order emerges. Here we present a theoretical study of planar polarity in developing epithelia based on a vertex model, which takes into account cell mechanics, cell adhesion, and cell division, combined with experimental results obtained from time-lapse imaging of the wing development. We show that in experiment, polarity order does not develop de novo at the end of wing development, but rather cells are initially polarized at an angle with respect to their final polarity axis. During wing development, the polarity axes of cells reorient towards their final direction. We identify a basic mechanism to generate such a large-scale initial polarization, based on the growth of a small number of cells with an initially random PCP distribution. Finally, we study the effect of shear and oriented cell division on dynamics of PCP order, showing that these two processes can robustly reorient the polarity axes of cells.

  6. The Metabolic Inhibition Model Which Predicts the Intestinal Absorbability and Metabolizability of Drug: Theory and Experiment

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    Mizuma Takashi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal absorption of analgesic peptides (leucine enkephalin and kyotorphin and modified peptides in rat were studied. Although these peptides were not absorbed, the absorbability (absorption clearance of these peptides were increased in the presence of peptidase inhibitors. In order to kinetically analyze these phenomena, we proposed the metabolic inhibition model, which incorporated the metabolic clearance (metabolizability with the absorption clearance. Metabolic activity was determined with intestinal homogenates. The higher the metabolic clearance was, the lower was the absorption clearance. The relationships between the absorption clearance and the metabolic clearance of the experimental data as well as of the theoretical values were hyperbolic. This model predicted the maximum absorption clearances of cellobiose-coupled leucine enkephalin (0.654 &mgr;l/min/cm and kyotorphin (0.247 &mgr;l/min/cm. Details of the experimental methods are described.

  7. Mathematical Homogenization in the Modelling of Digestion in the Small Intestine

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    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, Jean-René; Lescoat, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Digestion in the small intestine is the result of complex mechanical and biological phenomena which can be modelled at different scales. In a previous article, we introduced a system of ordinary differential equations for describing the transport and degradation-absorption processes during the digestion. The present article sustains this simplified model by showing that it can be seen as a macroscopic version of more realistic models including biological phenomena at lower scales. In other words, our simplified model can be considered as a limit of more realistic ones by averaging-homogenization methods on biological processes representation.

  8. CCL25/CCR9 interactions regulate large intestinal inflammation in a murine model of acute colitis.

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    Marc-Andre Wurbel

    Full Text Available CCL25/CCR9 is a non-promiscuous chemokine/receptor pair and a key regulator of leukocyte migration to the small intestine. We investigated here whether CCL25/CCR9 interactions also play a role in the regulation of inflammatory responses in the large intestine.Acute inflammation and recovery in wild-type (WT and CCR9(-/- mice was studied in a model of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis. Distribution studies and phenotypic characterization of dendritic cell subsets and macrophage were performed by flow cytometry. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD scores were assessed and expression of inflammatory cytokines was studied at the mRNA and the protein level.CCL25 and CCR9 are both expressed in the large intestine and are upregulated during DSS colitis. CCR9(-/- mice are more susceptible to DSS colitis than WT littermate controls as shown by higher mortality, increased IBD score and delayed recovery. During recovery, the CCR9(-/- colonic mucosa is characterized by the accumulation of activated macrophages and elevated levels of Th1/Th17 inflammatory cytokines. Activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs accumulate in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs of CCR9(-/- animals, altering the local ratio of DC subsets. Upon re-stimulation, T cells isolated from these MLNs secrete significantly higher levels of TNFα, IFNγ, IL2, IL-6 and IL-17A while down modulating IL-10 production.Our results demonstrate that CCL25/CCR9 interactions regulate inflammatory immune responses in the large intestinal mucosa by balancing different subsets of dendritic cells. These findings have important implications for the use of CCR9-inhibitors in therapy of human IBD as they indicate a potential risk for patients with large intestinal inflammation.

  9. Glutamate prevents intestinal atrophy via luminal nutrient sensing in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Weidong; Feng, Yongjia; Holst, Jens J; Hartmann, Bolette; Yang, Hua; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2014-05-01

    Small intestine luminal nutrient sensing may be crucial for modulating physiological functions. However, its mechanism of action is incompletely understood. We used a model of enteral nutrient deprivation, or total parenteral nutrition (TPN), resulting in intestinal mucosal atrophy and decreased epithelial barrier function (EBF). We examined how a single amino acid, glutamate (GLM), modulates intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) growth and EBF. Controls were chow-fed mice, T1 receptor-3 (T1R3)-knockout (KO) mice, and treatment with the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-5 antagonist MTEP. TPN significantly changed the amount of T1Rs, GLM receptors, and transporters, and GLM prevented these changes. GLM significantly prevented TPN-associated intestinal atrophy (2.5-fold increase in IEC proliferation) and was dependent on up-regulation of the protein kinase pAkt, but independent of T1R3 and mGluR5 signaling. GLM led to a loss of EBF with TPN (60% increase in FITC-dextran permeability, 40% decline in transepithelial resistance); via T1R3, it protected EBF, whereas mGluR5 was associated with EBF loss. GLM led to a decline in circulating glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) during TPN. The decline was regulated by T1R3 and mGluR5, suggesting a novel negative regulator pathway for IEC proliferation not previously described. Loss of luminal nutrients with TPN administration may widely affect intestinal taste sensing. GLM has previously unrecognized actions on IEC growth and EBF. Restoring luminal sensing via GLM could be a strategy for patients on TPN.

  10. Preterm infant gut microbiota affects intestinal epithelial development in a humanized microbiome gnotobiotic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yueyue; Lu, Lei; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C

    2016-09-01

    Development of the infant small intestine is influenced by bacterial colonization. To promote establishment of optimal microbial communities in preterm infants, knowledge of the beneficial functions of the early gut microbiota on intestinal development is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of early preterm infant microbiota on host gut development using a gnotobiotic mouse model. Histological assessment of intestinal development was performed. The differentiation of four epithelial cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells) and tight junction (TJ) formation was examined. Using weight gain as a surrogate marker for health, we found that early microbiota from a preterm infant with normal weight gain (MPI-H) induced increased villus height and crypt depth, increased cell proliferation, increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells, and enhanced TJs compared with the changes induced by early microbiota from a poor weight gain preterm infant (MPI-L). Laser capture microdissection (LCM) plus qRT-PCR further revealed, in MPI-H mice, a higher expression of stem cell marker Lgr5 and Paneth cell markers Lyz1 and Cryptdin5 in crypt populations, along with higher expression of the goblet cell and mature enterocyte marker Muc3 in villus populations. In contrast, MPI-L microbiota failed to induce the aforementioned changes and presented intestinal characteristics comparable to a germ-free host. Our data demonstrate that microbial communities have differential effects on intestinal development. Future studies to identify pioneer settlers in neonatal microbial communities necessary to induce maturation may provide new insights for preterm infant microbial ecosystem therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Mechanisms of regulating cell topology in proliferating epithelia: impact of division plane, mechanical forces, and cell memory.

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    Yingzi Li

    Full Text Available Regulation of cell growth and cell division has a fundamental role in tissue formation, organ development, and cancer progression. Remarkable similarities in the topological distributions were found in a variety of proliferating epithelia in both animals and plants. At the same time, there are species with significantly varied frequency of hexagonal cells. Moreover, local topology has been shown to be disturbed on the boundary between proliferating and quiescent cells, where cells have fewer sides than natural proliferating epithelia. The mechanisms of regulating these topological changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we use a mechanical model to examine the effects of orientation of division plane, differential proliferation, and mechanical forces on animal epithelial cells. We find that regardless of orientation of division plane, our model can reproduce the commonly observed topological distributions of cells in natural proliferating animal epithelia with the consideration of cell rearrangements. In addition, with different schemes of division plane, we are able to generate different frequency of hexagonal cells, which is consistent with experimental observations. In proliferating cells interfacing quiescent cells, our results show that differential proliferation alone is insufficient to reproduce the local changes in cell topology. Rather, increased tension on the boundary, in conjunction with differential proliferation, can reproduce the observed topological changes. We conclude that both division plane orientation and mechanical forces play important roles in cell topology in animal proliferating epithelia. Moreover, cell memory is also essential for generating specific topological distributions.

  12. Mechanisms of regulating cell topology in proliferating epithelia: impact of division plane, mechanical forces, and cell memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingzi; Naveed, Hammad; Kachalo, Sema; Xu, Lisa X; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of cell growth and cell division has a fundamental role in tissue formation, organ development, and cancer progression. Remarkable similarities in the topological distributions were found in a variety of proliferating epithelia in both animals and plants. At the same time, there are species with significantly varied frequency of hexagonal cells. Moreover, local topology has been shown to be disturbed on the boundary between proliferating and quiescent cells, where cells have fewer sides than natural proliferating epithelia. The mechanisms of regulating these topological changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we use a mechanical model to examine the effects of orientation of division plane, differential proliferation, and mechanical forces on animal epithelial cells. We find that regardless of orientation of division plane, our model can reproduce the commonly observed topological distributions of cells in natural proliferating animal epithelia with the consideration of cell rearrangements. In addition, with different schemes of division plane, we are able to generate different frequency of hexagonal cells, which is consistent with experimental observations. In proliferating cells interfacing quiescent cells, our results show that differential proliferation alone is insufficient to reproduce the local changes in cell topology. Rather, increased tension on the boundary, in conjunction with differential proliferation, can reproduce the observed topological changes. We conclude that both division plane orientation and mechanical forces play important roles in cell topology in animal proliferating epithelia. Moreover, cell memory is also essential for generating specific topological distributions.

  13. Apical entry channels in calcium-transporting epithelia.

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    Peng, Ji-Bin; Brown, Edward M; Hediger, Matthias A

    2003-08-01

    The identification of the apical calcium channels CaT1 and ECaC revealed the key molecular mechanisms underlying apical calcium entry in calcium-transporting epithelia. These channels are regulated directly or indirectly by vitamin D and dietary calcium and undergo feedback control by intracellular calcium, suggesting their rate-limiting roles in transcellular calcium transport.

  14. Intestinal absorption and renal reabsorption of calcium throughout postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, Megan R; Alexander, R Todd

    2017-04-01

    Calcium is vital for many physiological functions including bone mineralization. Postnatal deposition of calcium into bone is greatest in infancy and continues through childhood and adolescence until peek mineral density is reached in early adulthood. Thereafter, bone mineral density remains static until it eventually declines in later life. A positive calcium balance, i.e. more calcium absorbed than excreted, is crucial to bone deposition during growth and thus to peek bone mineral density. Dietary calcium is absorbed from the intestine into the blood. It is then filtered by the renal glomerulus and either reabsorbed by the tubule or excreted in the urine. Calcium can be (re)absorbed across intestinal and renal epithelia via both transcellular and paracellular pathways. Current evidence suggests that significant intestinal and renal calcium transport changes occur throughout development. However, the molecular details of these alterations are incompletely delineated. Here we first briefly review the current model of calcium transport in the intestine and renal tubule in the adult. Then, we describe what is known with regard to calcium handling through postnatal development, and how alterations may aid in mediating a positive calcium balance. The role of transcellular and paracellular calcium transport pathways and the contribution of specific intestinal and tubular segments vary with age. However, the current literature highlights knowledge gaps in how specifically intestinal and renal calcium (re)absorption occurs early in postnatal development. Future research should clarify the specific changes in calcium transport throughout early postnatal development including mediators of these alterations enabling appropriate bone mineralization. Impact statement This mini review outlines the current state of knowledge pertaining to the molecules and mechanisms maintaining a positive calcium balance throughout postnatal development. This process is essential to achieving

  15. Effect of Da-Cheng-Qi Decoction on Pancreatitis-Associated Intestinal Dysmotility in Patients and in Rat Models

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    Jianlei Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impairment of intestinal motility and related infectious complications are the predominant clinical phenomenon in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. We aimed to investigate the effects of Da-Cheng-Qi decoction (DCQD on the gastrointestinal injury in SAP patients and the potential mechanism involved in rats. DCQD was enema administered to 70 patients for 7 days in West China Hospital. Mortality and organ failure during admission were observed and blood samples for laboratory analysis were collected. We also experimentally examined plasma inflammatory cytokines in rat serum and carried the morphometric studies of the gut. Intestinal propulsion index and serum and tissue vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP were also detected. Though DCQD did not affect the overall incidence of organ failure, it shortened the average time of paralytic intestinal obstruction and decreased the morbidity of infectious complications in patients with SAP. Compared with untreated rats, the DCQD lowered the levels of proinflammatory cytokine and decreased the mean pathological intestinal lesion scores. The VIP level in intestinal tissue or serum in DCQD group was obviously lowered and intestinal propulsion index was significantly improved. In conclusion, DCQD has good effect on pancreatitis-associated intestinal dysmotility in patients and in rat models.

  16. Progressive Depletion of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum in Epithelial Cells of the Small Intestine in Monosodium Glutamate Mice Model of Obesity

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    Kazuhiko Nakadate

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obesity is a known risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about pathological changes in the small intestine associated with chronic obesity. This study investigated cellular and subcellular level changes in the small intestine of obese mice. In this study, a mouse model of obesity was established by early postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate. Changes in body weight were monitored, and pathological changes in the small intestine were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining and light and electron microscopy. Consequently, obese mice were significantly heavier compared with controls from 9 weeks of age. Villi in the small intestine of obese mice were elongated and thinned. There was reduced hematoxylin staining in the epithelium of the small intestine of obese mice. Electron microscopy revealed a significant decrease in and shortening of rough endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of the small intestine of obese mice compared with normal mice. The decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum in the small intestine epithelial cells of obese mice indicates that obesity starting in childhood influences various functions of the small intestine, such as protein synthesis, and could impair both the defense mechanism against invasion of pathogenic microbes and nutritional absorption.

  17. Progressive Depletion of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum in Epithelial Cells of the Small Intestine in Monosodium Glutamate Mice Model of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakadate, Kazuhiko; Motojima, Kento; Hirakawa, Tomoya; Tanaka-Nakadate, Sawako

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obesity is a known risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about pathological changes in the small intestine associated with chronic obesity. This study investigated cellular and subcellular level changes in the small intestine of obese mice. In this study, a mouse model of obesity was established by early postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate. Changes in body weight were monitored, and pathological changes in the small intestine were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining and light and electron microscopy. Consequently, obese mice were significantly heavier compared with controls from 9 weeks of age. Villi in the small intestine of obese mice were elongated and thinned. There was reduced hematoxylin staining in the epithelium of the small intestine of obese mice. Electron microscopy revealed a significant decrease in and shortening of rough endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of the small intestine of obese mice compared with normal mice. The decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum in the small intestine epithelial cells of obese mice indicates that obesity starting in childhood influences various functions of the small intestine, such as protein synthesis, and could impair both the defense mechanism against invasion of pathogenic microbes and nutritional absorption.

  18. The effects of continuous and intermittent reduced speed modes on renal and intestinal perfusion in an ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzun, Egemen; Chorpenning, Katherine; Liu, Maxine Qun; Bonugli, Katherine; Tamez, Dan; Lenox, Mark; Miller, Matthew W; Fossum, Theresa W

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the continuous-flow output on renal and intestinal microcirculation have not been extensively studied. To address this, the Heartware HVAD pump loaded with continuous and intermittent reduced speed (IRS) modes was implanted in four sheep and then operated at low and high speeds to mimic partial and complete unloading of the left ventricle. Then microsphere and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies were used to assess renal and intestinal tissue perfusion at various pump speeds and flow modes as compared with baseline (pump off). Arterial and venous oxygen (T02) and carbon dioxide (TCO2) contents were measured to assess changes in intestinal metabolism. Renal and intestinal regional blood flows did not produce any significant changes compared with baseline values in either continuous or IRS modes and speeds. The venous TO2 and TCO2 significantly increased in continuous and IRS modes and speeds compared with baseline. Our data suggested that renal and intestinal tissue perfusions were not adversely affected by continuous and IRS modes either in partial or complete unloading. Intestinal venous hyperoxia and increased TCO2 may be the evidence of intestinal arteriovenous shunting along with increased intestinal tissue metabolism. Longer-term studies are warranted in chronic heart failure models.

  19. Modeling the human intestinal mucin (MUC2) C-terminal cystine knot dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivan, Vatsala D; Narpala, Sandeep R; Budil, David E; Sacco, Albert; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2011-11-01

    Intestinal mucus, a viscous secretion that lines the mucosa, is believed to be a barrier to absorption of many therapeutic compounds and carriers, and is known to play an important physiological role in controlling pathogen invasion. Nevertheless, there is as yet no clear understanding of the barrier properties of mucus, such as the nature of the molecular interactions between drug molecules and mucus components as well as those that govern gel formation. Secretory mucins, large and complex glycoprotein molecules, are the principal determinants of the viscoelastic properties of intestinal mucus. Despite the important role that mucins play in controlling transport and in diseases such as cystic fibrosis, their structures remain poorly characterized. The major intestinal secretory mucin gene, MUC2, has been identified and fully sequenced. The present study was undertaken to determine a detailed structure of the cysteine-rich region within the C-terminal end of human intestinal mucin (MUC2) via homology modeling, and explore possible configurations of a dimer of this cysteine-rich region, which may play an important role in governing mucus gel formation. Based on sequence-structure alignments and three-dimensional modeling, a cystine knot tertiary structure homologous to that of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) is predicted at the C-terminus of MUC2. Dimers of this C-terminal cystine knot (CTCK) were modeled using sequence alignment based on HCG and TGF-beta, followed by molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. Results support the formation of a cystine knot dimer with a structure analogous to that of HCG.

  20. Characteristics of Jeffrey fluid model for peristaltic flow of chyme in small intestine with magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Nadeem, S.; Lee, Changhoon

    In the present article we have analyzed the Jeffrey fluid model for the peristaltic flow of chyme in the small intestine. We have formulated the problem using two non-periodic sinusoidal waves of different wavelengths propagating with same speed c along the outer wall of the tube. Governing equations for the problem under consideration have been simplified under the assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximation (such assumptions are consistent since Re (Reynolds number) is very small and long wavelength approximation also exists in the small intestine). Exact solutions have been calculated for velocity and pressure rise. Physical behavior of different parameters of Jeffrey fluid has been presented graphically for velocity, pressure rise, pressure gradient and frictional forces. The trapping phenomenon is also discussed at the end of the article.

  1. Two-Stage Single-Compartment Models to Evaluate Dissolution in the Lower Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markopoulos, Constantinos; Vertzoni, Maria; Symillides, Mira; Kesisoglou, Filippos; Reppas, Christos

    2015-09-01

    The purpose was to propose two-stage single-compartment models for evaluating dissolution characteristics in distal ileum and ascending colon, under conditions simulating the bioavailability and bioequivalence studies in fasted and fed state by using the mini-paddle and the compendial flow-through apparatus (closed-loop mode). Immediate release products of two highly dosed active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), sulfasalazine and L-870,810, and one mesalamine colon targeting product were used for evaluating their usefulness. Change of medium composition simulating the conditions in distal ileum (SIFileum ) to a medium simulating the conditions in ascending colon in fasted state and in fed state was achieved by adding an appropriate solution in SIFileum . Data with immediate release products suggest that dissolution in lower intestine is substantially different than in upper intestine and is affected by regional pH differences > type/intensity of fluid convection > differences in concentration of other luminal components. Asacol® (400 mg/tab) was more sensitive to type/intensity of fluid convection. In all the cases, data were in line with available human data. Two-stage single-compartment models may be useful for the evaluation of dissolution in lower intestine. The impact of type/intensity of fluid convection and viscosity of media on luminal performance of other APIs and drug products requires further exploration.

  2. Williamson Fluid Model for the Peristaltic Flow of Chyme in Small Intestine

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    Sohail Nadeem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical model for the peristaltic flow of chyme in small intestine along with inserted endoscope is considered. Here, chyme is treated as Williamson fluid, and the flow is considered between the annular region formed by two concentric tubes (i.e., outer tube as small intestine and inner tube as endoscope. Flow is induced by two sinusoidal peristaltic waves of different wave lengths, traveling down the intestinal wall with the same speed. The governing equations of Williamson fluid in cylindrical coordinates have been modeled. The resulting nonlinear momentum equations are simplified using long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The resulting problem is solved using regular perturbation method in terms of a variant of Weissenberg number We. The numerical solution of the problem is also computed by using shooting method, and comparison of results of both solutions for velocity field is presented. The expressions for axial velocity, frictional force, pressure rise, stream function, and axial pressure gradient are obtained, and the effects of various emerging parameters on the flow characteristics are illustrated graphically. Furthermore, the streamlines pattern is plotted, and it is observed that trapping occurs, and the size of the trapped bolus varies with varying embedded flow parameters.

  3. Intestinal Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some generally recognized patterns. Symptoms of acute intestinal ischemia Signs and symptoms of acute intestinal ischemia typically ... confusion in older adults Symptoms of chronic intestinal ischemia Signs and symptoms of chronic intestinal ischemia can ...

  4. Modulatory activity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus OLL2838 in a mouse model of intestinal immunopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, Tasuku; Bergamo, Paolo; Maurano, Francesco; D'Arienzo, Rossana; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Bozzella, Giuseppina; Luongo, Diomira; Sashihara, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Takuya; Tanabe, Soichi; Rossi, Mauro

    2015-06-01

    Gut microbiota and probiotic strains play an important role in oral tolerance by modulating regulatory and effector cell components of the immune system. We have previously described the ability of Lactobacilli to influence both the innate and adaptive immunity to wheat gluten, a food antigen, in mouse. In this study, we further explored the immunomodulatory mechanisms elicited in this model by testing three specific probiotic strains, namely L. rhamnosus OLL2838, B. infantis ATCC15697 and S. thermophilus Sfi39. In vitro analysis showed the all tested strains induced maturation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells (DCs). However, only L. rhamnosus induced appreciable levels of IL-10 and nitric oxide productions, whereas S. thermophilus essentially elicited IL-12 and TNF-α. The anti-inflammatory ability of OLL2838 was then tested in vivo by adopting mice that develop a gluten-specific enteropathy. This model is characterized by villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, high levels of intestinal IFN-γ, increased cell apoptosis in lamina propria, and reduced intestinal total glutathione (GSHtot) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity. We found that, following administration of OLL2838, GSHtot and GST activity were enhanced, whereas caspase-3 activity was reduced. On the contrary, this probiotic strain failed in recovering the normal histology and further increased intestinal IFN-γ. Confocal microscopy revealed the inability of the probiotic strain to appropriately interact with enterocytes of the small intestine and with Peyer's patches in treated mice. In conclusion, these data highlighted the potential of L. rhamnosus OLL2838 to recover specific toxicity parameters induced by gluten in enteropathic mice through mechanisms that involve induction of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of the intestinal lumen microbiota in an animal model of colorectal cancer.

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    Qingchao Zhu

    Full Text Available Recent reports have suggested that multiple factors such as host genetics, environment and diet can promote the progression of healthy mucosa towards sporadic colorectal carcinoma. Accumulating evidence has additionally associated intestinal bacteria with disease initiation and progression. In order to examine and analyze the composition of gut microbiota in the absence of confounding influences, we have established an animal model of 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH-induced colon cancer. Using this model, we have performed pyrosequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes in this study to determine the diversity and breadth of the intestinal microbial species. Our findings indicate that the microbial composition of the intestinal lumen differs significantly between control and tumor groups. The abundance of Firmicutes was elevated whereas the abundance of Bacteroidetes and Spirochetes was reduced in the lumen of CRC rats. Fusobacteria was not detected in any of the healthy rats and there was no significant difference in observed Proteobacteria species when comparing the bacterial communities between our two groups. Interestingly, the abundance of Proteobacteria was higher in CRC rats. At the genus level, Bacteroides exhibited a relatively higher abundance in CRC rats compared to controls (14.92% vs. 9.22%, p<0.001. Meanwhile, Prevotella (55.22% vs. 26.19%, Lactobacillus (3.71% vs. 2.32% and Treponema (3.04% vs. 2.43%, were found to be significantly more abundant in healthy rats than CRC rats (p<0.001, respectively. We also demonstrate a significant reduction of butyrate-producing bacteria such as Roseburia and Eubacterium in the gut microbiota of CRC rats. Furthermore, a significant increase in Desulfovibrio, Erysipelotrichaceae and Fusobacterium was also observed in the tumor group. A decrease in probiotic species such as Ruminococcus and Lactobacillus was likewise observed in the tumor group. Collectively, we can conclude that a significant

  6. Specific microbiome changes in a mouse model of parenteral nutrition associated liver injury and intestinal inflammation.

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    J Kirk Harris

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition (PN has been a life-saving treatment in infants intolerant of enteral feedings. However, PN is associated with liver injury (PN Associated Liver Injury: PNALI in a significant number of PN-dependent infants. We have previously reported a novel PNALI mouse model in which PN infusion combined with intestinal injury results in liver injury. In this model, lipopolysaccharide activation of toll-like receptor 4 signaling, soy oil-derived plant sterols, and pro-inflammatory activation of Kupffer cells (KCs played key roles. The objective of this study was to explore changes in the intestinal microbiome associated with PNALI.Microbiome analysis in the PNALI mouse identified specific alterations within colonic microbiota associated with PNALI and further association of these communities with the lipid composition of the PN solution. Intestinal inflammation or soy oil-based PN infusion alone (in the absence of enteral feeds caused shifts within the gut microbiota. However, the combination resulted in accumulation of a specific taxon, Erysipelotrichaceae (23.8% vs. 1.7% in saline infused controls, in PNALI mice. Moreover, PNALI was markedly attenuated by enteral antibiotic treatment, which also was associated with significant reduction of Erysipelotrichaceae (0.6% and a Gram-negative constituent, the S24-7 lineage of Bacteroidetes (53.5% in PNALI vs. 0.8%. Importantly, removal of soy oil based-lipid emulsion from the PN solution resulted in significant reduction of Erysipelotrichaceae as well as attenuation of PNALI. Finally, addition of soy-derived plant sterol (stigmasterol to fish oil-based PN restored Erysipelotrichaceae abundance and PNALI.Soy oil-derived plant sterols and the associated specific bacterial groups in the colonic microbiota are associated with PNALI. Products from these bacteria may directly trigger activation of KCs and promote PNALI. Furthermore, the results indicate that lipid modification of PN solutions may

  7. Analysis of the intestinal lumen microbiota in an animal model of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingchao; Jin, Zhiming; Wu, Wen; Gao, Renyuan; Guo, Bomin; Gao, Zhiguang; Yang, Yongzhi; Qin, Huanlong

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that multiple factors such as host genetics, environment and diet can promote the progression of healthy mucosa towards sporadic colorectal carcinoma. Accumulating evidence has additionally associated intestinal bacteria with disease initiation and progression. In order to examine and analyze the composition of gut microbiota in the absence of confounding influences, we have established an animal model of 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon cancer. Using this model, we have performed pyrosequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes in this study to determine the diversity and breadth of the intestinal microbial species. Our findings indicate that the microbial composition of the intestinal lumen differs significantly between control and tumor groups. The abundance of Firmicutes was elevated whereas the abundance of Bacteroidetes and Spirochetes was reduced in the lumen of CRC rats. Fusobacteria was not detected in any of the healthy rats and there was no significant difference in observed Proteobacteria species when comparing the bacterial communities between our two groups. Interestingly, the abundance of Proteobacteria was higher in CRC rats. At the genus level, Bacteroides exhibited a relatively higher abundance in CRC rats compared to controls (14.92% vs. 9.22%, pmicrobiota of CRC rats. Furthermore, a significant increase in Desulfovibrio, Erysipelotrichaceae and Fusobacterium was also observed in the tumor group. A decrease in probiotic species such as Ruminococcus and Lactobacillus was likewise observed in the tumor group. Collectively, we can conclude that a significant difference in intestinal bacterial flora exists between healthy rats and CRC rats.

  8. Streptomycin treatment alters the intestinal microbiome, pulmonary T cell profile and airway hyperresponsiveness in a cystic fibrosis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazett, Mark; Bergeron, Marie-Eve; Haston, Christina K

    2016-01-12

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator deficient mouse models develop phenotypes of relevance to clinical cystic fibrosis (CF) including airway hyperresponsiveness, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and an altered intestinal microbiome. As dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota has been recognized as an important contributor to many systemic diseases, herein we investigated whether altering the intestinal microbiome of BALB/c Cftr(tm1UNC) mice and wild-type littermates, through treatment with the antibiotic streptomycin, affects the CF lung, intestinal and bone disease. We demonstrate that streptomycin treatment reduced the intestinal bacterial overgrowth in Cftr(tm1UNC) mice and altered the intestinal microbiome similarly in Cftr(tm1UNC) and wild-type mice, principally by affecting Lactobacillus levels. Airway hyperresponsiveness of Cftr(tm1UNC) mice was ameliorated with streptomycin, and correlated with Lactobacillus abundance in the intestine. Additionally, streptomycin treated Cftr(tm1UNC) and wild-type mice displayed an increased percentage of pulmonary and mesenteric lymph node Th17, CD8 + IL-17+ and CD8 + IFNγ+ lymphocytes, while the CF-specific increase in respiratory IL-17 producing γδ T cells was decreased in streptomycin treated Cftr(tm1UNC) mice. Bone disease and intestinal phenotypes were not affected by streptomycin treatment. The airway hyperresponsiveness and lymphocyte profile of BALB/c Cftr(tm1UNC) mice were affected by streptomycin treatment, revealing a potential intestinal microbiome influence on lung response in BALB/c Cftr(tm1UNC) mice.

  9. Curcumin Ingestion Inhibits Mastocytosis and Suppresses Intestinal Anaphylaxis in a Murine Model of Food Allergy.

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    Shannon R M Kinney

    Full Text Available IgE antibodies and mast cells play critical roles in the establishment of allergic responses to food antigens. Curcumin, the active ingredient of the curry spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory properties, and thus may have the capacity to regulate Th2 cells and mucosal mast cell function during allergic responses. We assessed whether curcumin ingestion during oral allergen exposure can modulate the development of food allergy using a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA-induced intestinal anaphylaxis. Herein, we demonstrate that frequent ingestion of curcumin during oral OVA exposure inhibits the development of mastocytosis and intestinal anaphylaxis in OVA-challenged allergic mice. Intragastric (i.g. exposure to OVA in sensitized BALB/c mice induced a robust IgE-mediated response accompanied by enhanced OVA-IgE levels, intestinal mastocytosis, elevated serum mMCP-1, and acute diarrhea. In contrast, mice exposed to oral curcumin throughout the experimental regimen appeared to be normal and did not exhibit intense allergic diarrhea or a significant enhancement of OVA-IgE and intestinal mast cell expansion and activation. Furthermore, allergic diarrhea, mast cell activation and expansion, and Th2 responses were also suppressed in mice exposed to curcumin during the OVA-challenge phase alone, despite the presence of elevated levels of OVA-IgE, suggesting that curcumin may have a direct suppressive effect on intestinal mast cell activation and reverse food allergy symptoms in allergen-sensitized individuals. This was confirmed by observations that curcumin attenuated the expansion of both adoptively transferred bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs, and inhibited their survival and activation during cell culture. Finally, the suppression of intestinal anaphylaxis by curcumin was directly linked with the inhibition of NF-κB activation in curcumin-treated allergic mice, and curcumin inhibited the phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB in BMMCs. In

  10. Blood and small intestine cell kinetics under radiation exposures: Mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, O. A.

    2009-12-01

    Mathematical models which describe the dynamics of two vital body systems (hematopoiesis and small intestinal epithelium) in mammals exposed to acute and chronic radiation are developed. These models, based on conventional biological theories, are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations. Their variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning, that provides successful identification and verification of the models in hand. It is shown that the predictions of the models qualitatively and quantitatively agree with the respective experimental data for small laboratory animals (mice, rats) exposed to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates. The explanation of a number of radiobiological effects, including those of the low-level long-term exposures, is proposed proceeding from the modeling results. All this bears witness to the validity of employment of the developed models, after a proper identification, in investigation and prediction of radiation effects on the hematopoietic and small intestinal epithelium systems in various mammalian species, including humans. In particular, the models can be used for estimating effects of irradiation on astronauts in the long-term space missions, such as Lunar colonies and Mars voyages.

  11. Initiation of an inflammatory response in resident intestinal lamina propria cells -use of a human organ culture model.

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    Jutta Schröder-Braunstein

    Full Text Available Resident human lamina propria immune cells serve as powerful effectors in host defense. Molecular events associated with the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells are largely unknown. Here, we aimed to characterize phenotypic and functional changes induced in these cells at the onset of intestinal inflammation using a human intestinal organ culture model. In this model, healthy human colonic mucosa was depleted of epithelial cells by EDTA treatment. Following loss of the epithelial layer, expression of the inflammatory mediators IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL23A, TNFA, CXCL2, and the surface receptors CD14, TLR2, CD86, CD54 was rapidly induced in resident lamina propria cells in situ as determined by qRT-PCR and immunohistology. Gene microarray analysis of lamina propria cells obtained by laser-capture microdissection provided an overview of global changes in gene expression occurring during the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells. Bioinformatic analysis gave insight into signalling pathways mediating this inflammatory response. Furthermore, comparison with published microarray datasets of inflamed mucosa in vivo (ulcerative colitis revealed a significant overlap of differentially regulated genes underlining the in vivo relevance of the organ culture model. Furthermore, genes never been previously associated with intestinal inflammation were identified using this model. The organ culture model characterized may be useful to study molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in normal mucosa as well as potential alterations of this response in inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Dynamic alteration of the colonic microbiota in intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

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    Fan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R plays an important role in critical illnesses. Gut flora participate in the pathogenesis of the injury. This study is aimed at unraveling colonic microbiota alteration pattern and identifying specific bacterial species that differ significantly as well as observing colonic epithelium change in the same injury model during the reperfusion time course. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE was used to monitor the colonic microbiota of control rats and experimental rats that underwent 0.5 hour ischemia and 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 72 hours following reperfusion respectively. The microbiota similarity, bacterial diversity and species that characterized the dysbiosis were estimated based on the DGGE profiles using a combination of statistical approaches. The interested bacterial species in the gel were cut and sequenced and were subsequently quantified and confirmed with real-time PCR. Meanwhile, the epithelial barrier was checked by microscopy and D-lactate analysis. Colonic flora changed early and differed significantly at 6 hours after reperfusion and then started to recover. The shifts were characterized by the increase of Escherichia coli and Prevotella oralis, and Lactobacilli proliferation together with epithelia healing. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study shows for the first time that intestinal ischemia-reperfusion results in colonic flora dysbiosis that follows epithelia damage, and identifies the bacterial species that contribute most.

  13. Efek Probiotik terhadap Mortalitas, Derajat Inflamasi Intestinal, dan Kadar IgA pada Mencit Model Sepsis

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    Yoseph Indrayanto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis results in changes to the microbiology of the gastrointestinal tract, leading to a loss of commensal flora and an overgrowth of potentially pathogenic bacteria. Administering probiotics to sepsis patients may restore balance to the microbiota and have positive effects on immune function and gastrointestinal structure and function. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of probiotic on mortality, intestinal inflammation and immunoglobulin A (IgA serum level in mice model of sepsis. This study was an experimental research laboratory, with 36 male Balb/C mice were divided into: control, sepsis, and sepsis+probiotic groups. The study was conducted at Histology and Biomedical Laboratory, School of Medicine, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta, in January to April 2012. Sepsis was induced in the male Balb/C mice using an intraperitoneally (i.p injection of cecal inoculum (200 mg/ kgBW, for sepsis mice model and sepsis with probiotic. Control mice were not inoculation during the study. Detection of intestinal inflammation with hematoxylin and eosin (HE staining on 8th day. Mortality perceived until 8th day. IgA serum level measurement with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Two-tailed Fisher exact test for the analysis of mortality, Kruskal-Wallis test for the intestinal inflammation, one way analysis of variance for IgA serum level. Probiotic showed no significantly mortality (10% vs 40%, p=0.065 compared to sepsis group. Probiotic showed significantly decreased intestinal inflammation compared to sepsis group (p<0.001. Control mice showed levels of IgA 35.82±4.55 ng/mL. Probiotic showed significantly increased IgA levels (65.07±34.97 ng/mL vs 6.20±5.80 ng/mL, p<0.001 compared to sepsis group. In conclusions, probiotic decrease intestinal inflammation and mortality, on the other hand increase IgA level in mice model of sepsis.

  14. Research on measurement and modeling of the gastro intestine's frictional characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun Dong; Yan, Guo Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The frictional characteristics of an intestine are required basically for the development of a noninvasive endoscope for the human intestine. The frictional force is tested by measuring the current of the motor hauling the frictional coupons at an even speed. A multifunction data acquisition device with model NI-6008 USB is used and the data process is performed on the Labview software. Two kinds of materials with aluminum and copper are used. The surfaces are designed as triangle, rectangular, cylindrical and plane forms. The tested results indicate that the frictional resistance force includes the nominal frictional force and the visco-adhesive force. When the surface contour changes from the triangle to the rectangular, to the cylindrical and finally to the plane, the nominal frictional coefficients will decrease and the visco-adhesive force will increase. The nominal frictional force is related to the elastic restoring force, the real frictional force and the contact angle. The cohesive force is determined by the contact area and the contact angle. This research will provide some preliminary references to the design and the parameter selection of locomotion devices in the human gastro-intestine.

  15. Colitis promotes adaptation of an intestinal nematode: a Heligmosomoides polygyrus mouse model system.

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    Katarzyna Donskow-Łysoniewska

    Full Text Available The precise mechanism of the very effective therapeutic effect of gastrointestinal nematodes on some autoimmune diseases is not clearly understood and is currently being intensively investigated. Treatment with living helminths has been initiated to reverse intestinal immune-mediated diseases in humans. However, little attention has been paid to the phenotype of nematodes in the IBD-affected gut and the consequences of nematode adaptation. In the present study, exposure of Heligmosomoides polygyrus larvae to the changed cytokine milieu of the intestine during colitis reduced inflammation in an experimental model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS- induced colitis, but increased nematode establishment in the moderate-responder BALB/c mouse strain. We used mass spectrometry in combination with two-dimensional Western blotting to determine changes in protein expression and changes in nematode antigens recognized by IgG1 in mice with colitis. We show that nematode larvae immunogenicity is changed by colitis as soon as 6 days post-infection; IgG1 did not recognize highly conserved proteins Lev-11 (isoform 1 of tropomyosin α1 chain, actin-4 isoform or FTT-2 isoform a (14-3-3 family protein. These results indicate that changes in the small intestine provoked by colitis directly influence the nematode proteome. The unrecognized proteins seem to be key antigenic epitopes able to induce protective immune responses. The proteome changes were associated with weak immune recognition and increased larval adaptation and worm growth, altered localization in the intestine and increased survival of males but reduced worm fecundity. In this report, the mechanisms influencing nematode survival and the consequences of changed immunogenicity that reflect the immune response at the site colonized by the parasite in mice with colitis are described. The results are relevant to the use of live parasites to ameliorate IBD.

  16. Inflammation and disintegration of intestinal villi in an experimental model for Vibrio parahaemolyticus-induced diarrhea.

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    Jennifer M Ritchie

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis in many parts of the world, but there is limited knowledge of the pathogenesis of V. parahaemolyticus-induced diarrhea. The absence of an oral infection-based small animal model to study V. parahaemolyticus intestinal colonization and disease has constrained analyses of the course of infection and the factors that mediate it. Here, we demonstrate that infant rabbits oro-gastrically inoculated with V. parahaemolyticus develop severe diarrhea and enteritis, the main clinical and pathologic manifestations of disease in infected individuals. The pathogen principally colonizes the distal small intestine, and this colonization is dependent upon type III secretion system 2. The distal small intestine is also the major site of V. parahaemolyticus-induced tissue damage, reduced epithelial barrier function, and inflammation, suggesting that disease in this region of the gastrointestinal tract accounts for most of the diarrhea that accompanies V. parahaemolyticus infection. Infection appears to proceed through a characteristic sequence of steps that includes remarkable elongation of microvilli and the formation of V. parahaemolyticus-filled cavities within the epithelial surface, and culminates in villus disruption. Both depletion of epithelial cell cytoplasm and epithelial cell extrusion contribute to formation of the cavities in the epithelial surface. V. parahaemolyticus also induces proliferation of epithelial cells and recruitment of inflammatory cells, both of which occur before wide-spread damage to the epithelium is evident. Collectively, our findings suggest that V. parahaemolyticus damages the host intestine and elicits disease via previously undescribed processes and mechanisms.

  17. Ex vivo perfusion of the isolated rat small intestine as a novel model of Salmonella enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Erin C; Dombrowsky, Heike; Sarau, Jürgen; Braun, Janin; Aepfelbacher, Martin; Lautenschläger, Ingmar; Grassl, Guntram A

    2016-01-15

    Using an ex vivo perfused rat small intestinal model, we examined pathological changes to the tissue, inflammation induction, as well as dynamic changes to smooth muscle activity, metabolic competence, and luminal fluid accumulation during short-term infection with the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica. Although few effects were seen upon Yersinia infection, this system accurately modeled key aspects associated with Salmonella enteritis. Our results confirmed the importance of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1)-encoded type 3 secretion system (T3SS) in pathology, tissue invasion, inflammation induction, and fluid secretion. Novel physiological consequences of Salmonella infection of the small intestine were also identified, namely, SPI-1-dependent vasoconstriction and SPI-1-independent reduction in the digestive and absorptive functions of the epithelium. Importantly, this is the first small animal model that allows for the study of Salmonella-induced fluid secretion. Another major advantage of this model is that one can specifically determine the contribution of resident cell populations. Accordingly, we can conclude that recruited cell populations were not involved in the pathological damage, inflammation induction, fluid accumulation, nutrient absorption deficiency, and vasoconstriction observed. Although fluid loss induced by Salmonella infection is hypothesized to be due to damage caused by recruited neutrophils, our data suggest that bacterial invasion and inflammation induction in resident cell populations are sufficient for fluid loss into the lumen. In summary, this model is a novel and useful tool that allows for detailed examination of the early physiopathological effects of Salmonella infection on the small intestine.

  18. The piglet as a model for studying dietary components in infant diets: effects of galacto-oligosaccharides on intestinal functions.

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    Alizadeh, A; Akbari, P; Difilippo, E; Schols, H A; Ulfman, L H; Schoterman, M H C; Garssen, J; Fink-Gremmels, J; Braber, S

    2016-02-28

    Prebiotic oligosaccharides, including galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), are used in infant formula to mimic human milk oligosaccharides, which are known to have an important role in the development of the intestinal microbiota and the immune system in neonates. The maturation of the intestines in piglets closely resembles that of human neonates and infants. Hence, a neonatal piglet model was used to study the multi-faceted effect of dietary GOS in early life. Naturally farrowed piglets were separated from the mother sow 24-48 h postpartum and received a milk replacer with or without the addition of GOS for 3 or 26 d, whereafter several indicators of intestinal colonisation and maturation were measured. Dietary GOS was readily fermented in the colon, leading to a decreased pH, an increase in butyric acid in caecum digesta and an increase in lactobacilli and bifidobacteria numbers at day 26. Histomorphological changes were observed in the intestines of piglets fed a GOS diet for 3 or 26 d. In turn, differences in the intestinal disaccharidase activity were observed between control and GOS-fed piglets. The mRNA expression of various tight junction proteins was up-regulated in the intestines of piglet fed a GOS diet and was not accompanied by an increase in protein expression. GOS also increased defensin porcine β-defensin-2 in the colon and secretory IgA levels in saliva. In conclusion, by applying a neonatal piglet model, it could be demonstrated that a GOS-supplemented milk replacer promotes the balance of the developing intestinal microbiota, improves the intestinal architecture and seems to stimulate the intestinal defence mechanism.

  19. Postischemic intestinal motility in rat is inversely correlated to length of ischemia. An in vivo animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udassin, R; Eimerl, D; Schiffman, J; Haskel, Y

    1995-05-01

    An inverse correlation between postischemic gastrointestinal motility and the length of intestinal ischemia was found in an animal model. Intestinal ischemia was caused without concurrent laparotomy and for a predetermined time period (ischemia time) by pulling on an external nylon thread that was threaded through a double-lumen catheter. This catheter was passed into the abdominal cavity to encircle the superior mesenteric artery. Gastrointestinal motility was determined by the introduction of a color-marked meal into the animal's stomach and the measurement of the proportionate length of the small bowel filled with it (transit index). This simple and reliable animal model can also be used for the evaluation of techniques and pharmacological manipulations aimed at modulation of the effects of intestinal ischemia on intestinal motility and its consequences.

  20. Lung and Intestine: A Specific Link in an Ulcerative Colitis Rat Model

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    Yuan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To investigate the link and mechanisms between intestine and lung in the ulcerative colitis (UC rat model. Materials and Methods. We used the UC rat model by immunological sensitization combined with local 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS in 50% ethanol enema, observed dynamically animal general state and body weight, examined the histological and functional changes in the colon, lung, liver, and kidney tissues, and detected microvascular endothelium response towards inflammation characterized with the expression of iNOS, TXB2, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A in the colon and lung tissue. Results. Pulmonary function results suggested ventilator disorder, and pathological findings showed interstitial pneumonia. There were no significant changes in the liver and kidney function and histopathology. The colon and lung tissue iNOS, TXB2, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and VEGF-A expression of the model rats was significantly higher than the normal rats at both time points. Conclusions. Our study is the first to demonstrate the close association between the large intestine and lung in the immune-TNBS-ethanol-induced UC rat model. Different organs and tissues with the same embryonic origin may share the same pathological specificities in a disease. The present study provided a new way of thinking for pathological changes in clinical complex diseases manifested with multiorgan damage.

  1. Uric acid metabolism of kidney and intestine in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagura, Michito; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Kumagai, Takanori; Hosoyamada, Makoto; Uchida, Shunya

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is a potential risk factor of the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recently, we reported that intestinal UA excretion might be enhanced via upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (Abcg2) in a 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) rat model. In the present study, we examined the mRNA and protein expressions of UA transporters, URAT1, GLUT9/URATv1, ABCG2 and NPT4 in the kidney and ileum in the same rat model. Additionally, we investigated the Abcg2 mRNA expression of ileum in hyperuricemic rat model by orally administering oxonic acid. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to three groups consisting of Nx group, oxonic acid-treated (Ox) group and sham-operated control group, and sacrificed at 8 weeks. Creatinine and UA were measured and the mRNA expressions of UA transporters in the kidney and intestine were evaluated by a real time PCR. UA transporters in the kidney sections were also examined by immunohistochemistry. Serum creatinine elevated in the Nx group whereas serum UA increased in the Ox group. Both the mRNA expression and the immunohistochemistry of the UA transporters were decreased in the Nx group, suggesting a marginal role in UA elevation in decreased kidney function. In contrast, the mRNA expression of Abcg2 in the ileum significantly increased in the Ox group. These results suggest that the upregulation of Abcg2 mRNA in the ileum triggered by an elevation of serum UA may play a compensatory role in increasing intestinal UA excretion.

  2. Sacral nerve stimulation enhances early intestinal mucosal repair following mucosal injury in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brégeon, Jérémy; Coron, Emmanuel; Da Silva, Anna Christina Cordeiro; Jaulin, Julie; Aubert, Philippe; Chevalier, Julien; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Meurette, Guillaume; Neunlist, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Reducing intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions is recognized as being of major therapeutic interest for various intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability. Here, we report in a pig model that SNS enhances morphological and functional recovery of IEB following mucosal injury induced via 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. These effects are associated with an increased expression of tight junction proteins such as ZO-1 and FAK. These results establish that SNS enhances intestinal barrier repair in acute mucosal injury. They further set the scientific basis for future use of SNS as a complementary or alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of gut disorders with IEB dysfunctions such as inflammatory bowel diseases or irritable bowel syndrome. Intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions, such as increased permeability or altered healing, are central to intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability, but its ability to modulate IEB repair remains unknown. This study aimed to characterize the impact of SNS on mucosal repair following 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced lesions. Six pigs were stimulated by SNS 3 h prior to and 3 h after TNBS enema, while sham animals (n = 8) were not stimulated. The impact of SNS on mucosal changes was evaluated by combining in vivo imaging, histological and functional methods. Biochemical and transcriptomic approaches were used to analyse the IEB and mucosal inflammatory response. We observed that SNS enhanced the recovery from TNBS-induced increase in transcellular permeability. At 24 h, TNBS-induced alterations of mucosal morphology were significantly less in SNS compared with sham animals. SNS reduced TNBS-induced changes in ZO-1 expression and its epithelial pericellular distribution, and also increased pFAK/FAK expression compared with sham. Interestingly, SNS increased the mucosal density of neutrophils

  3. Mangiferin ameliorates the intestinal inflammatory response and the impaired gastrointestinal motility in mouse model of postoperative ileus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Talita Cavalcante; Arruda, Bruno Rodrigues; de Sousa Magalhães, Hebert; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; de Araújo Viana, Daniel; Rao, Vietla Satyanarayana; Santos, Flavia Almeida

    2015-05-01

    Our previous study has shown that mangiferin (MGF), a glucosylxanthone from Mangifera indica, exerts gastrointestinal prokinetic action involving a cholinergic mechanism. Postoperative ileus (POI) is a temporary disturbance in gastrointestinal motility following surgery, and intestinal inflammatory response plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of POI. The present study investigated to know whether MGF having anti-inflammatory and prokinetic actions can ameliorate the intestinal inflammation and impaired gastrointestinal transit seen in the mouse model of POI. Experimental POI was induced in adult male Swiss mice by standardized small intestinal manipulation (IM). Twenty-four hours later, gastrointestinal transit was assessed by charcoal transport. MGF was administered orally 1 h before the measurement of GIT. To evaluate the inflammatory response, plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and chemokine MCP-1, and the myeloperoxidase activity, nitrate/nitrite level, and histological changes of ileum were determined in mice treated or not with MGF. Experimental POI in mice was characterized by decreased gastrointestinal transit and marked intestinal and systemic inflammatory response. MGF treatment led to recovery of the delayed intestinal transit induced by IM. MGF in ileum significantly inhibited the myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, and nitrate/nitrite level and reduced the plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1 as well. MGF treatment ameliorates the intestinal inflammatory response and the impaired gastrointestinal motility in the mouse model of POI.

  4. Endocytic reawakening of motility in jammed epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverno, Chiara; Corallino, Salvatore; Giavazzi, Fabio; Bergert, Martin; Li, Qingsen; Leoni, Marco; Disanza, Andrea; Frittoli, Emanuela; Oldani, Amanda; Martini, Emanuele; Lendenmann, Tobias; Deflorian, Gianluca; Beznoussenko, Galina V.; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ong, Kok Haur; Uroz, Marina; Trepat, Xavier; Parazzoli, Dario; Maiuri, Paolo; Yu, Weimiao; Ferrari, Aldo; Cerbino, Roberto; Scita, Giorgio

    2017-05-01

    Dynamics of epithelial monolayers has recently been interpreted in terms of a jamming or rigidity transition. How cells control such phase transitions is, however, unknown. Here we show that RAB5A, a key endocytic protein, is sufficient to induce large-scale, coordinated motility over tens of cells, and ballistic motion in otherwise kinetically arrested monolayers. This is linked to increased traction forces and to the extension of cell protrusions, which align with local velocity. Molecularly, impairing endocytosis, macropinocytosis or increasing fluid efflux abrogates RAB5A-induced collective motility. A simple model based on mechanical junctional tension and an active cell reorientation mechanism for the velocity of self-propelled cells identifies regimes of monolayer dynamics that explain endocytic reawakening of locomotion in terms of a combination of large-scale directed migration and local unjamming. These changes in multicellular dynamics enable collectives to migrate under physical constraints and may be exploited by tumours for interstitial dissemination.

  5. Different macro- and micro-rheological properties of native porcine respiratory and intestinal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokkasam, Harish; Ernst, Matthias; Guenther, Marco; Wagner, Christian; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-08-20

    Aim of this study was to investigate the similarities and differences at macro- and microscale in the viscoelastic properties of mucus that covers the epithelia of the intestinal and respiratory tract. Natural mucus was collected from pulmonary and intestinal regions of healthy pigs. Macro-rheological investigations were carried out through conventional plate-plate rheometry. Microrheology was investigated using optical tweezers. Our data revealed significant differences both in macro- and micro-rheological properties between respiratory and intestinal mucus.

  6. Model intestinal microflora in computer simulation : A simulation and modeling package for host-microflora interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2002-01-01

    The ecology of the human intestinal microflora and its interaction with the host are poorly understood. Though more and more data are being acquired, in part using modern molecular methods, development of a quantitative theory has not kept pace with this increase in observing power. This is in part

  7. Model intestinal microflora in computer simulation : A simulation and modeling package for host-microflora interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2002-01-01

    The ecology of the human intestinal microflora and its interaction with the host are poorly understood. Though more and more data are being acquired, in part using modern molecular methods, development of a quantitative theory has not kept pace with this increase in observing power. This is in part

  8. Microscopic modeling of País grape seed extract absorption in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Cristian; Roeckel, Marlene; Fernández, Katherina

    2014-02-01

    The concentration profiles and the absorbed fraction (F) of the País grape seed extract in the human small intestine were obtained using a microscopic model simulation that accounts for the extracts' dissolution and absorption. To apply this model, the physical and chemical parameters of the grape seed extract solubility (C s), density (ρ), global mass transfer coefficient between the intestinal and blood content (k) (effective permeability), and diffusion coefficient (D) were experimentally evaluated. The diffusion coefficient (D = 3.45 × 10(-6) ± 5 × 10(-8) cm(2)/s) was approximately on the same order of magnitude as the coefficients of the relevant constituents. These results were chemically validated to discover that only the compounds with low molecular weights diffused across the membrane (mainly the (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin compounds). The model demonstrated that for the País grape seed extract, the dissolution process would proceed at a faster rate than the convective process. In addition, the absorbed fraction was elevated (F = 85.3%). The global mass transfer coefficient (k = 1.53 × 10(-4) ± 5 × 10(-6) cm/s) was a critical parameter in the absorption process, and minor changes drastically modified the prediction of the extract absorption. The simulation and experimental results show that the grape seed extract possesses the qualities of a potential phytodrug.

  9. Mixing and Transport in the Small Intestine: A Lattice-Boltzmann Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banco, Gino; Brasseur, James; Wang, Yanxing; Aliani, Amit; Webb, Andrew

    2007-11-01

    The two primary functions of the small intestine are absorption of nutrients into the blood stream and transport of material along the gut for eventual evacuation. The primary transport mechanism is peristalsis. The time scales for absorption, however, rely on mixing and transport of molecules between the bulk flow and epithelial surface. Two basic motions contribute to mixing: peristalsis and repetitive segmental contraction of short segments of the gut. In this study we evaluate the relative roles of peristalsis vs. segmental contraction on the degree of mixing and time scales of nutrient transport to the epithelium using a two-dimensional model of flow and mixing in the small intestine. The model uses the lattice-Boltzmann framework with second-order moving boundary conditions and passive scalar (Sc = 10). Segmental and peristaltic contractions were parameterized using magnetic resonance imaging data from rat models. The Reynolds numbers (1.9), segment lengths (33 mm), max radii (2.75 mm) and occlusion ratios (0.33) were matched for direct comparison. Mixing is quantified by the rate of dispersion of scalar from an initial concentration in the center of the segment. We find that radial mixing is more rapid with segmental than peristaltic motion, that radial dispersion is much more rapid than axial, and that axial is comparable between the motions.

  10. Effect of Ozone on Intestinal Epithelial Homeostasis in a Rat Model

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    Igor Sukhotnik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The positive effects of ozone therapy have been described in many gastrointestinal disorders. The mechanisms of this positive effect of ozone therapy are poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the use of ozone may potentiate the gut intestinal mucosal homeostasis in a rat model. Methods: Adult rats weighing 250–280 g were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups of 8 rats each: 1 Control rats were given 2 mL of water by gavage and intraperitoneally (IP for 5 days; 2 O3-PO rats were treated with 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture by gavage and 2 mL of water IP for 5 days; 3 O3-IP rats were treated with 2 mL of water by gavage and 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture IP for 5 days. Rats were sacrificed on day 6. Bowel and mucosal weight, mucosal DNA and protein, villus height and crypt depth, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated following sacrifice. Results: The group of O3-IP rats demonstrated a greater jejunal and ileal villus height and crypt depth, a greater enterocyte proliferation index in jejunum, and lower enterocyte apoptosis in ileum compared to control animals. Oral administration of the ozone/oxygen mixture resulted in a less significant effect on cell turnover. Conclusions: Treatment with an ozone/oxygen mixture stimulates intestinal cell turnover in a rat model. Intraperitoneal administration of ozone resulted in a more significant intestinal trophic effect than oral administration.

  11. SURVIVAL OF MICROORGANISMS FROM MODERN PROBIOTICS IN MODEL CONDITIONS OF THE INTESTINE

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    Kabluchko TV

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The staye of intestinal microflora affects the work of the whole organism. When composition of normal ibtestine microflora changes, its restoration is required. In our days a wide variety of probiotic drugs are available on the market which can be used to solve this problem. Most bacteria having probiotic properties represent the families Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, which have poor resistance to acidic content of the stomach and toxic effects of bile salts. Various studies have clearly shown that in a person with normal acidic and bile secretion, the lactobacilli and bifidobacteria are not detected after the passage through the duodenum, i.e., they perish before reaching the small intestines. In this study we compared the survival of different microorganisms which are contained in 9 probiotic drugs in a model of gastric and intestinal environments. Material and methods. In the laboratory of SI: “Mechnikov Institute Microbiology and Immunology, National Ukrainian Academy Medical Sciences" the in vitro experiments have been evaluated to test the ability of different probiotic bacteria which were contained in 9 probiotic drugs to survive the impact of the model environment of the stomach and duodenum. Bacillus coagulans persistence was evaluated under impact of simulated environment of the stomach and duodenum, it also was assessed by the quantity of CFU by incubation on culture medium. The following were studied: Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum , Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium infantis, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. Lactis BB-12, Saccharomyces boulardii, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus clausii, Enterococcus faecium. Microorganisms were incubated for 3 hours in a model environment of the stomach (pepsin 3 g / l, hydrochloric acid of 160 mmol / l, pH 2

  12. Lack of Methylene Blue Staining in Superficial Epithelia as a Possible Marker for Superficial Lateral Spread of Bile Duct Cancer

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    I. Maetani

    1996-01-01

    epithelia. The cancerous epithelia stained significantly less often than either the normal (p = 0.000005 or the metaplastic (p = 0.001 epithelia. Evaluation of methylene blue staining during PTCS revealed that this stain was absorbed by the cholangial epithelia, not superficially stuck to it. The difference in methylene blue staining properties between the cancerous and normal epithelia could be helpful to clarify the boundary of superficial lateral spread of bile duct cancer.

  13. Chicken intestinal development in health and disease : transcriptomic and modeling approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal health is an important condition for sustainable animal production. Since it is known that there is significant variation in intestinal health and functionality, there is much to gain in this respect. However, to fully exploit the biological potential of the animal’s gastro-intestin

  14. Dipeptide model prodrugs for the intestinal oligopeptide transporter. Affinity for and transport via hPepT1 in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C U; Andersen, R; Brodin, Birger

    2001-01-01

    The human intestinal di/tri-peptide carrier, hPepT1, has been suggested as a drug delivery target via increasing the intestinal transport of low permeability compounds by designing peptidomimetic prodrugs. Model ester prodrugs using the stabilized dipeptides D-Glu-Ala and D-Asp-Ala as pro......-moieties for benzyl alcohol have been shown to maintain affinity for hPepT1. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate if modifications of the benzyl alcohol model drug influence the corresponding D-Glu-Ala and D-Asp-Ala model prodrugs' affinity for hPepT1 in Caco-2 cells. A second aim...... was to investigate the transepithelial transport and hydrolysis parameters for D-Asp(BnO)-Ala and D-Glu(BnO)-Ala across Caco-2 cell monolayers. In the present study, all investigated D-Asp-Ala and D-Glu-Ala model prodrugs retained various degrees of affinity for hPepT1 in Caco-2 cells. These affinities are used...

  15. Are there any different effects of Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus and Streptococcus on intestinal sensation, barrier function and intestinal immunity in PI-IBS mouse model?

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    Huan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Research has increasingly suggested that gut flora plays an important role in the development of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS. Studies of the curative effect of probiotics for IBS have usually been positive but not always. However, the differences of treatment effects and mechanisms among probiotic stains, or mixture of them, are not clear. In this study, we compared the effects of different probiotics (Befidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus or mixture of the three on intestinal sensation, barrier function and intestinal immunity in PI-IBS mouse model. METHODS: PI-IBS model was induced by Trichinella spiralis infection in mice. Different probiotics were administered to mice after 8 weeks infection. Visceral sensitivity was measured by scores of abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR and the threshold intensity of colorectal distention. Colonic smooth muscle contractile response was assessed by contraction of the longitudinal muscle strips. Plasma diamine oxidase (DAO and d-lactate were determined by an enzymatic spectrophotometry. Expression of tight junction proteins and cytokines in ileum were measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: Compared to control mice, PI-IBS mice treated either alone with Befidobacterium or Lactobacillus (but not Streptococcus, or the mixture of the three exhibited not only decreased AWR score and contractile response, but also reduced plasma DAO and D-lactate. These probiotic treatments also suppressed the expression of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and IL-17 and promoted the expression of major tight junction proteins claudin-1 and occludin. The mixture of the three probiotic strains performed better than the individual in up-regulating these tight junction proteins and suppressing IL-17 expression. CONCLUSIONS: Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, but not Streptococcus, alleviated visceral hypersensitivity and recovered intestinal barrier function as well as inflammation in PI

  16. Doxycycline protects human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury: Implications from an in-vitro hypoxia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummitzsch, Lars; Zitta, Karina; Berndt, Rouven; Kott, Matthias; Schildhauer, Christin; Parczany, Kerstin; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin

    2017-04-15

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a grave clinical emergency and associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Based on the complex underlying mechanisms, a multimodal pharmacological approach seems necessary to prevent intestinal I/R injury. The antibiotic drug doxycycline, which exhibits a wide range of pleiotropic therapeutic properties, might be a promising candidate for also reducing I/R injury in the intestine. To investigate possible protective effects of doxycycline on intestinal I/R injury, human intestinal CaCo-2 cells were exposed to doxycycline at clinically relevant concentrations. In order to mimic I/R injury, CaCo-2 were thereafter subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation by using our recently described two-enzyme in-vitro hypoxia model. Investigations of cell morphology, cell damage, apoptosis and hydrogen peroxide formation were performed 24h after the hypoxic insult. Hypoxia/reoxygenation injury resulted in morphological signs of cell damage, elevated LDH concentrations in the respective culture media (P<0.001) and increased protein expression of proapoptotic caspase-3 (P<0.05) in the intestinal cultures. These events were associated with increased levels hydrogen peroxide (P<0.001). Preincubation of CaCo-2 cells with different concentrations of doxycycline (5µM, 10µM, 50µM) reduced the hypoxia induced signs of cell damage and LDH release (P<0.001 for all concentrations). The reduction of cellular damage was associated with a reduced expression of caspase-3 (5µM, P<0.01; 10µM, P<0.01; 50µM, P<0.05), while hydrogen peroxide levels remained unchanged. In summary, doxycycline protects human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in-vitro. Further animal and clinical studies are required to prove the protective potential of doxycycline on intestinal I/R injury under in-vivo conditions.

  17. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  18. Intestinal obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paralytic ileus; Intestinal volvulus; Bowel obstruction; Ileus; Pseudo-obstruction - intestinal; Colonic ileus ... objects that are swallowed and block the intestines) Gallstones (rare) Hernias Impacted stool Intussusception (telescoping of 1 ...

  19. Transport and uptake effects of marine complex lipid liposomes in small intestinal epithelial cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Yang, Yu-Hong; Xu, Jie; Wang, Yu-Ming; Xue, Chang-Hu; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, marine complex lipids, including starfish phospholipids (SFP) and cerebrosides (SFC) separated from Asterias amurensis as well as sea cucumber phospholipids (SCP) and cerebrosides (SCC) isolated from Cucumaria frondosa, have received much attention because of their potent biological activities. However, little information is known on the transport and uptake of these lipids in liposome forms in small intestinal cells. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of these complex lipid liposomes on transport and uptake in Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. The results revealed that SFP and SCP contained 42% and 47.9% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), respectively. The average particle sizes of liposomes prepared in this study were from 169 to 189 nm. We found that the transport of the liposomes across the M cell monolayer model was much higher than the Caco-2 cell monolayer model. The liposomes consisting of SFP or SCP showed significantly higher transport and uptake than soy phospholipid (soy-PL) liposomes in both Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. Our results also exhibited that treatment with 1 mM liposomes composed of SFP or SCP for 3 h tended to increase the EPA content in phospholipid fractions of both differentiated Caco-2 and M cells. Moreover, it was also found that the hybrid liposomes consisting of SFP/SFC/cholesterol (Chol) revealed higher transport and uptake across the M cell monolayer in comparison with other liposomes. Furthermore, treatment with SFP/SFC/Chol liposomes could notably decrease the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) values of Caco-2 and M cell monolayers. The present data also showed that the cell viability of differentiated Caco-2 and M cells was not affected after the treatment with marine complex lipids or soy-PL liposomes. Based on the data in this study, it was suggested that marine complex lipid liposomes exhibit prominent transport and uptake in small intestinal epithelial cell models.

  20. The role of the intestinal microvasculature in inflammatory bowel disease: studies with a modified Caco-2 model including endothelial cells resembling the intestinal barrier in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper JY

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Y Kasper,1 Maria Iris Hermanns,1 Christian Cavelius,2 Annette Kraegeloh,2 Thomas Jung,3 Rolf Danzebrink,3 Ronald E Unger,1 Charles James Kirkpatrick1 1Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center, Mainz, 2Leibniz Institute for New Materials, 3NanoGate AG, Goettelborn, Saarbrücken, Germany Abstract: The microvascular endothelium of the gut barrier plays a crucial role during inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We have modified a commonly used intestinal cell model based on the Caco-2 cells by adding microvascular endothelial cells (ISO-HAS-1. Transwell filters were used with intestinal barrier-forming Caco-2 cells on top and the ISO-HAS-1 on the bottom of the filter. The goal was to determine whether this coculture mimics the in vivo situation more closely, and whether the model is suitable to evaluate interactions of, for example, prospective nanosized drug vehicles or contrast agents with this coculture in a physiological and inflamed state as it would occur in inflammatory bowel disease. We monitored the inflammatory responsiveness of the cells (release of IL-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and soluble E-selectin after exposure to inflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β and a nanoparticle (Ba/Gd: coprecipitated BaSO4 and Gd(OH3, generally used as contrast agents. The barrier integrity of the coculture was evaluated via the determination of transepithelial electrical resistance and the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp of NaFITC. The behavior of the coculture Caco-1/ISO-HAS-1 was compared to the respective monocultures Caco-2 and ISO-HAS-1. Based on transepithelial electrical resistance, the epithelial barrier integrity of the coculture remained stable during incubation with all stimuli, whereas the Papp decreased after exposure to the cytokine mixture (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β, and Ba/Gd. Both the endothelial and epithelial monocultures showed a high inflammatory response in

  1. Topological progression in proliferating epithelia is driven by a unique variation in polygon distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sánchez-Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available Morphogenesis is consequence of lots of small coordinated variations that occur during development. In proliferating stages, tissue growth is coupled to changes in shape and organization. A number of studies have analyzed the topological properties of proliferating epithelia using the Drosophila wing disc as a model. These works are based in the existence of a fixed distribution of these epithelial cells according to their number of sides. Cell division, cell rearrangements or a combination of both mechanisms have been proposed to be responsible for this polygonal assembling. Here, we have used different system biology methods to compare images from two close proliferative stages that present high morphological similarity. This approach enables us to search for traces of epithelial organization. First, we show that geometrical and network characteristics of individual cells are mainly dependent on their number of sides. Second, we find a significant divergence between the distribution of polygons in epithelia from mid-third instar larva versus early prepupa. We show that this alteration propagates into changes in epithelial organization. Remarkably, only the variation in polygon distribution driven by morphogenesis leads to progression in epithelial organization. In addition, we identify the relevant features that characterize these rearrangements. Our results reveal signs of epithelial homogenization during the growing phase, before the planar cell polarity pathway leads to the hexagonal packing of the epithelium during pupal stages.

  2. p21 suppresses inflammation and tumorigenesis on pRB-deficient stratified epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Ladera, C; Lara, M F; Garín, M; Ruiz, S; Santos, M; Lorz, C; García-Escudero, R; Martínez-Fernández, M; Bravo, A; Fernández-Capetillo, O; Segrelles, C; Paramio, J M

    2014-09-11

    The retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) controls proliferation and differentiation processes in stratified epithelia. Importantly, and in contrast to other tissues, Rb deficiency does not lead to spontaneous skin tumor formation. As the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 regulates proliferation and differentiation in the absence of pRb, we analyzed the consequences of deleting p21 in pRb-ablated stratified epithelia (hereafter pRb(ΔEpi);p21-/-). These mice display an enhancement of the phenotypic abnormalities observed in pRb(ΔEpi) animals, indicating that p21 partially compensates pRb absence. Remarkably, pRb(ΔEpi);p21-/- mice show an acute skin inflammatory phenotype and develop spontaneous epithelial tumors, particularly affecting tongue and oral tissues. Biochemical analyses and transcriptome studies reveal changes affecting multiple pathways, including DNA damage and p53-dependent signaling responses. Comparative metagenomic analyses, together with the histopathological profiles, indicate that these mice constitute a faithful model for human head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that p21, in conjunction with pRb, has a central role in regulating multiple epithelial processes and orchestrating specific tumor suppressor functions.

  3. Local Treatment with Lactate Prevents Intestinal Inflammation in the TNBS-Induced Colitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraporda, Carolina; Romanin, David E.; Bengoa, Ana A.; Errea, Agustina J.; Cayet, Delphine; Foligné, Benoit; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Garrote, Graciela L.; Abraham, Analía G.; Rumbo, Martín

    2016-01-01

    Lactate has long been considered as a metabolic by-product of cells. Recently, this view has been changed by the observation that lactate can act as a signaling molecule and regulates critical functions of the immune system. We previously identified lactate as the component responsible for the modulation of innate immune epithelial response of fermented milk supernatants in vitro. We have also shown that lactate downregulates proinflammatory responses of macrophages and dendritic cells. So far, in vivo effects of lactate on intestinal inflammation have not been reported. We evaluated the effect of intrarectal administration of lactate in a murine model of colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). The increase in lactate concentration in colon promoted protective effects against TNBS-induced colitis preventing histopathological damage, as well as bacterial translocation and rise of IL-6 levels in serum. Using intestinal epithelial reporter cells, we found that flagellin treatment induced reporter gene expression, which was abrogated by lactate treatment as well as by glycolysis inhibitors. Furthermore, lactate treatment modulated glucose uptake, indicating that high levels of extracellular lactate can impair metabolic reprograming induced by proinflammatory activation. These results suggest that lactate could be a potential beneficial microbiota metabolite and may constitute an overlooked effector with modulatory properties. PMID:28082985

  4. Combined Effects of Lipophilic Phycotoxins (Okadaic Acid, Azapsiracid-1 and Yessotoxin on Human Intestinal Cells Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Jean Ferron

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Phycotoxins are monitored in seafood because they can cause food poisonings in humans. Phycotoxins do not only occur singly but also as mixtures in shellfish. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro toxic interactions of binary combinations of three lipophilic phycotoxins commonly found in Europe (okadaic acid (OA, yessotoxin (YTX and azaspiracid-1 (AZA-1 using the neutral red uptake assay on two human intestinal cell models, Caco-2 and the human intestinal epithelial crypt-like cells (HIEC. Based on the cytotoxicity of individual toxins, we studied the interactions between toxins in binary mixtures using the combination index-isobologram equation, a method widely used in pharmacology to study drug interactions. This method quantitatively classifies interactions between toxins in mixtures as synergistic, additive or antagonistic. AZA-1/OA, and YTX/OA mixtures showed increasing antagonism with increasing toxin concentrations. In contrast, the AZA-1/YTX mixture showed increasing synergism with increasing concentrations, especially for mixtures with high YTX concentrations. These results highlight the hazard potency of AZA-1/YTX mixtures with regard to seafood intoxication.

  5. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) attenuates the inflammatory response in the in vitro intestinal Caco-2 cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollebeeck, Sylvie; Raas, Thomas; Piront, Neil; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Toussaint, Olivier; Larondelle, Yvan; During, Alexandrine

    2011-10-30

    This study aimed to investigate dose effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (0.05-1%) on the intestinal inflammatory response in confluent- and differentiated-Caco-2 cells stimulated with interleukin (IL)-1β or a pro-inflammatory cocktail for 24 h. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity was assayed by incubating inflamed cells with arachidonic acid and then measuring prostaglandin-E(2) (PGE(2)) produced. Soluble mediators (IL-8, IL-6, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and COX-2-derived PGE(2)) were quantified by enzyme immunoassays and mRNA expression of 33 proteins by high throughput TaqMan Low Density Array. Data showed that DMSO decreased induced IL-6 and MCP-1 secretions in a dose-dependent manner (PDMSO dose-dependently reduced COX-2-derived PGE(2) (PDMSO at 0.5% decreased significantly mRNA levels of 14 proteins involved in the inflammatory response (including IL-6, IL-1α, IL-1β, and COX-2). Thus, DMSO at low concentrations (0.1-0.5%) exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in the in vitro intestinal Caco-2 cell model. This point is important to be taken into account when assessing anti-inflammatory properties of bioactive compounds requiring DMSO as vehicle, such as phenolic compounds, in order to avoid miss-interpretation of the results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Profiles of microRNA networks in intestinal epithelial cells in a mouse model of colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juneyoung; Park, Eun Jeong; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Ahmad, Shandar; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Ishii, Ken J; Shimaoka, Motomu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2015-12-09

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) accompany a critical loss of the frontline barrier function that is achieved primarily by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). Although the gene-regulation pathways underlying these host-defense roles of IECs presumably are deranged during IBD pathogenesis, the quantitative and qualitative alterations of posttranscriptional regulators such as microRNAs (miRNAs) within the cells largely remain to be defined. We aimed to uncover the regulatory miRNA-target gene relationships that arise differentially in inflamed small- compared with large-IECs. Whereas IBD significantly increased the expression of only a few miRNA candidates in small-IECs, numerous miRNAs were upregulated in inflamed large-IECs. These marked alterations might explain why the large, as compared with small, intestine is more sensitive to colitis and shows more severe pathology in this experimental model of IBD. Our in-depth assessment of the miRNA-mRNA expression profiles and the resulting networks prompts us to suggest that miRNAs such as miR-1224, miR-3473a, and miR-5128 represent biomarkers that appear in large-IECs upon IBD development and co-operatively repress the expression of key anti-inflammatory factors. The current study provides insight into gene-regulatory networks in IECs through which dynamic rearrangement of the involved miRNAs modulates the gene expression-regulation machinery between maintaining and disrupting gastrointestinal homeostasis.

  7. The Immunosuppressant Mycophenolic Acid Alters Nucleotide and Lipid Metabolism in an Intestinal Cell Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heischmann, Svenja; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk; Leibfritz, Dieter; Christians, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    The study objective was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the negative effects of mycophenolic acid (MPA) on human intestinal cells. Effects of MPA exposure and guanosine supplementation on nucleotide concentrations in LS180 cells were assessed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proteomics analysis was carried out using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture combined with gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and lipidome analysis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Despite supplementation, depletion of guanosine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 and 72 h; 5, 100, and 250 μM MPA) and upregulation of uridine and cytidine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 h; 5 μM MPA) occurred after exposure to MPA. MPA significantly altered 35 proteins mainly related to nucleotide-dependent processes and lipid metabolism. Cross-reference with previous studies of MPA-associated protein changes widely corroborated these results, but showed differences that may be model- and/or method-dependent. MPA exposure increased intracellular concentrations of fatty acids, cholesterol, and phosphatidylcholine (p < 0.01 at 72 h; 100 μM MPA) which corresponded to the changes in lipid-metabolizing proteins. MPA affected intracellular nucleotide levels, nucleotide-dependent processes, expression of structural proteins, fatty acid and lipid metabolism in LS180 cells. These changes may compromise intestinal membrane integrity and contribute to gastrointestinal toxicity. PMID:28327659

  8. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin B; Tebbutt, Niall C; Buchert, Michael; Putoczki, Tracy L; Doggett, Karen; Bao, Shisan; Johnstone, Cameron N; Masson, Frederick; Hollande, Frederic; Burgess, Antony W; Scott, Andrew M; Ernst, Matthias; Heath, Joan K

    2015-08-01

    The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33) is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33(-/-) mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33(-/-) mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33(-/-) mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM) followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33(-/-) mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33(-/-) mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33(-/-) mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms linking intestinal

  9. Role of intestinal barrier in pathogenesis of pigment gallstone in a guinea pig model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Su; Shuo-Dong Wu; Jun-Zhe Jin; Zhen-Hai Zhang; Ying Fan

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The function of the intestinal barrier has drawn more and more attention from researchers in recent years for its important role in many diseases such as burns, wounds, and pancreatitis. In our experimental studies on pigment gallstone, we found potential relationships between the function of the intestinal barrier and pigment gallstone formation. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible action and mechanism of the function of the intestinal barrier in the pathogenesis of pigment gallstone. METHODS:Eighty guinea pigs were divided into a normal group (CON), a pigment gallstone group (PS) and an intestinal mucosa protection group (GLN). Normal forage, pigment gallstone-forming forage and pigment gallstone-forming forage with supplemental intestinal mucosa protector (glutamine) were given to each group. In the gallstone-forming rate, morphology of intestinal mucosa, intestinal permeability, serum endotoxin and biliaryβ-glucuronidase were assessed after 8 weeks. RESULTS: The rate of gallstone-formation was 73.9% in the PS group. Damage of intestinal mucosa, endotoxemia (from 77±43×10-6 EU/L to 1367±525×10-6 EU/L, P CONCLUSIONS: The function of the intestinal barrier is correlated with pigment gallstone formation. Dysfunction of the intestinal barrier function may promote pigment gallstone formation through bacterial translocation, endotoxemia, and biliaryβ-glucuronidase.

  10. Interaction model between capsule robot and intestine based on nonlinear viscoelasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Hao; Tan, Renjia; Li, Hongyi

    2014-03-01

    Active capsule endoscope could also be called capsule robot, has been developed from laboratory research to clinical application. However, the system still has defects, such as poor controllability and failing to realize automatic checks. The imperfection of the interaction model between capsule robot and intestine is one of the dominating reasons causing the above problems. A model is hoped to be established for the control method of the capsule robot in this article. It is established based on nonlinear viscoelasticity. The interaction force of the model consists of environmental resistance, viscous resistance and Coulomb friction. The parameters of the model are identified by experimental investigation. Different methods are used in the experiment to obtain different values of the same parameter at different velocities. The model is proved to be valid by experimental verification. The achievement in this article is the attempted perfection of an interaction model. It is hoped that the model can optimize the control method of the capsule robot in the future.

  11. Two mannose-binding lectin homologues and an MBL-associated serine protease are expressed in the gut epithelia of the urochordate species Ciona intestinalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoedt, Mikkel-ole; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Rasmussen, Karina

    2010-01-01

    interchain disulphide bridges between N-terminal cysteine residues and cysteines located between the neck region and the CRD. RT-PCR showed a tissue specific expression of CioMBL in the gut and by immunohistochemistry analysis we also demonstrated that CioMBL co-localize with an MBL-associated serine...... protease in the epithelia cells lining the stomach and intestine. In conclusion we present two urochordate MBLs and identify an associated serine protease, which support the concept of an evolutionary ancient origin of the lectin complement pathway....

  12. Dynamics of Bacterial Community Composition in the Malaria Mosquito's Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchioffo, Majoline T; Boissière, Anne; Abate, Luc; Nsango, Sandrine E; Bayibéki, Albert N; Awono-Ambéné, Parfait H; Christen, Richard; Gimonneau, Geoffrey; Morlais, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The Anopheles midgut hosts diverse bacterial communities and represents a complex ecosystem. Several evidences indicate that mosquito midgut microbiota interferes with malaria parasite transmission. However, the bacterial composition of salivary glands and ovaries, two other biologically important tissues, has not been described so far. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of the bacterial communities in the mosquito tissues from emerging mosquitoes until 8 days after a blood meal containing Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes and described the temporal colonization of the mosquito epithelia. Bacterial communities were identified in the midgut, ovaries, and salivary glands of individual mosquitoes using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found that the mosquito epithelia share a core microbiota, but some bacteria taxa were more associated with one or another tissue at a particular time point. The bacterial composition in the tissues of emerging mosquitoes varied according to the breeding site, indicating that some bacteria are acquired from the environment. Our results revealed temporal variations in the bacterial community structure, possibly as a result of the mosquito physiological changes. The abundance of Serratia significantly correlated with P. falciparum infection both in the midgut and salivary glands of malaria challenged mosquitoes, which suggests that interactions occur between microbes and parasites. These bacteria may represent promising targets for vector control strategies. Overall, this study points out the importance of characterizing bacterial communities in malaria mosquito vectors.

  13. Slit-Robo Repulsive Signaling Extrudes Tumorigenic Cells from Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughen, John; Igaki, Tatsushi

    2016-12-19

    Cells dynamically interact throughout animal development to coordinate growth and deter disease. For example, cell-cell competition weeds out aberrant cells to enforce homeostasis. In Drosophila, tumorigenic cells mutant for the cell polarity gene scribble (scrib) are actively eliminated from epithelia when surrounded by wild-type cells. While scrib cell elimination depends critically on JNK signaling, JNK-dependent cell death cannot sufficiently explain scrib cell extirpation. Thus, how JNK executed cell elimination remained elusive. Here, we show that repulsive Slit-Robo2-Ena signaling exerts an extrusive force downstream of JNK to eliminate scrib cells from epithelia by disrupting E-cadherin. While loss of Slit-Robo2-Ena in scrib cells potentiates scrib tumor formation within the epithelium, Robo2-Ena hyperactivation surprisingly triggers luminal scrib tumor growth following excess extrusion. This extrusive signaling is amplified by a positive feedback loop between Slit-Robo2-Ena and JNK. Our observations provide a potential causal mechanism for Slit-Robo dysregulation in numerous human cancers.

  14. Human flora-associated (HFA) animals as a model for studying the role of intestinal flora in human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Kikuji

    2005-09-01

    Although the intestinal flora in animals plays an important role in health and disease, there is little direct information regarding the role of the human intestinal flora. By inoculating germfree animals with human faeces, the major components of the human flora can be transferred into the ex-germfree animals, i.e. human flora-associated (HFA) animals. HFA animals therefore provide a stable model for studying the ecosystem and metabolism of the human intestinal flora. Results with HFA animals suggest the role of the human intestinal flora is somewhat different from the role of the animal flora in conventional experimental animals. Studies using HFA animals, therefore, will provide much needed information on the precise role of the intestinal flora in relation to humans. HFA animals also can be used as models to investigate the interactions between the human intestinal flora, host factors, dietary manipulations, and therapeutics, such as probiotics, prebiotics, and antibiotics.

  15. Primary culture of intestinal epithelial cells as a potential model for Toxoplasma gondii enteric cycle studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos de Assis Moura

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary culture of intestinal epithelial cells from domestic cats is an efficient cellular model to study the enteric cycle of Toxoplasma gondii in a definitive host. The parasite-host cell ratio can be pointed out as a decisive factor that determines the intracellular fate of bradyzoites forms. The development of the syncytial-like forms of T. gondii was observed using the 1:20 bradyzoite-host cell ratio, resulting in similar forms described in in vivo systems. This alternative study potentially opens up the field for investigation into the molecular aspects of this interaction. This can contribute to the development of new strategies for intervention of a main route by which toxoplasmosis spreads.

  16. Use of small intestine submucosa in a rat model of acute and chronic rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Stephanie M; Gupta, Rishi R; Van Kleunen, Jonathan; Ramsey, Matthew L; Soslowsky, Louis J; Glaser, David L

    2007-01-01

    Augmentation materials for rotator cuff tears, such as small intestine submucosa (SIS), have been used with the goal of improving outcome. Knowledge is limited on the use of SIS in animal models of acute and chronic rotator cuff tears. We hypothesized that the use of SIS in the surgical management of full thickness supraspinatus tears would improve histologic and biomechanical properties. Results show temporal improvements in several histologic parameters. Both acute and chronic injuries repaired with SIS have similar and increased mechanical properties respectively, compared to those repaired without SIS. In general, acute repairs with SIS were comparable to acute repairs without SIS. In chronic repairs, the use of SIS significantly reduced the cross sectional area of the healing tendon and increased the modulus. These results provide information on the use of SIS for rotator cuff repairs.

  17. A spontaneous animal model of intestinal dysmotility evoked by inflammatory nitrergic dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiro Masaoka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Recent reports indicate the presence of low grade inflammation in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID, in these cases often called "post-inflammatory" FGIDs. However, suitable animal models to study these disorders are not available. The Biobreeding (BB rat consists of a diabetes-resistant (BBDR and a diabetes-prone (BBDP strain. In the diabetes-prone strain, 40-60% of the animals develop diabetes and concomitant nitrergic dysfunction. Our aim was to investigate the occurrence of intestinal inflammation, nitrergic dysfunction and intestinal dysmotility in non-diabetic animals. METHODS: Jejunal inflammation (MPO assay, Hematoxylin&Eosin staining and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS mRNA expression, in vitro jejunal motility (video analysis and myenteric neuronal numbers (immunohistochemistry were assessed in control, normoglycaemic BBDP and diabetic BBDP rats. To study the impact of iNOS inhibition on these parameters, normoglycaemic BBDP rats were treated with aminoguanidine. RESULTS: Compared to control, significant polymorphonuclear (PMN cell infiltration, enhanced MPO activity, increased iNOS mRNA expression and a decreased ratio of nNOS to Hu-C/D positive neurons were observed in both normoglycaemic and diabetic BBDP rats. Aminoguanidine treatment decreased PMN infiltration, iNOS mRNA expression and MPO activity. Moreover, it restored the ratio of nNOS to Hu-C/D positive nerves in the myenteric plexus and decreased the abnormal jejunal elongation and dilation observed in normoglycaemic BBDP rats. CONCLUSIONS: Aminoguanidine treatment counteracts the inflammation-induced nitrergic dysfunction and prevents dysmotility, both of which are independent of hyperglycaemia in BB rats. Nitrergic dysfunction may contribute to the pathophysiology of "low-grade inflammatory" FGIDs. Normoglycaemic BBDP rats may be considered a suitable animal model to study the pathogenesis of FGIDs.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG A-905 treatment reduces intestinal damage in a murine model of irinotecan-induced mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, R W; Pedroso, S H S P; Vieira, A T; Moreira, L M C; França, C S; Cartelle, C T; Arantes, R M E; Generoso, S V; Cardoso, V N; Neves, M J; Nicoli, J R; Martins, F S

    2016-09-01

    Indigenous microbiota plays a crucial role in the development of several intestinal diseases, including mucositis. Gastrointestinal mucositis is a major and serious side effect of cancer therapy, and there is no effective therapy for this clinical condition. However, some probiotics have been shown to attenuate such conditions. To evaluate the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG A-905 (Sc-905), a potential probiotic yeast, we investigated whether pre- or post-treatment with viable or inactivated Sc-905 could prevent weight loss and intestinal lesions, and maintain integrity of the mucosal barrier in a mucositis model induced by irinotecan in mice. Only post-treatment with viable Sc-905 was able to protect mice against the damage caused by chemotherapy, reducing the weight loss, increase of intestinal permeability and jejunal lesions (villous shortening). Besides, this treatment reduced oxidative stress, prevented the decrease of goblet cells and stimulated the replication of cells in the intestinal crypts of mice with experimental mucositis. In conclusion, Sc-905 protects animals against irinotecan-induced mucositis when administered as a post-treatment with viable cells, and this effect seems to be related with the reduction of oxidative stress and preservation of intestinal mucosa.

  19. Effect of erythropoietin on intestinal injury and bacterial translocation in neonatal rat model of necrotizing enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qing CHEN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the influence of erythropoietin (EPO on intestinal histopathological changes and bacterial translocation (BT in neonatal rat model of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC, and explore the protective effect of EPO against NEC. Methods  Seventy-five three-day-old SD rat pups were randomly divided into three groups (25 in each group: normal control group, NEC model group and EPO intervention group. The rat pups in normal control group were placed together with their mothers and breast fed, receiving no other intervention. NEC model group rats were separated from their mothers, housed in an incubator, and gavaged with rat-milk substitute, then experienced hypoxia (breathing 100% nitrogen gas for 90s and cold stress (4℃ for 10min three times daily for 3 days. EPO intervention group rats were fed with the substitute of rat-milk supplemented with 0.1U/ml of EPO, and they were also given hypoxia and cold stress similar to that of the NEC model group. Blood samples were obtained via cardiac puncture, and 2-cm-length of terminal ileum proximal to the ileocecal valve were obtained from the animals on the 4th day. The histopathological changes in terminal ileum were scored after hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining, and the scores ≥2 were defined as NEC. To determine the incidence of bacterial translocation, 16S rRNA real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR was used to detect the bacterial DNA in blood samples. Results  Compared with the NEC model group, the mean rank-sum rate of the intestinal histopathological score (39.4583 vs 53.8696, NEC incidence [25%(6/24 vs 57%(13/23] and bacterial translocation rate [17% (4/24 vs 65%(15/23] in EPO intervention group were significantly lowered (P < 0.05, P < 0.01. Conclusion  Enteral EPO administration is not only effective for reduction of the severity and incidence of NEC, but also for decrease of the bacterial translocation rate in neonatal rat models.

  20. A three-dimensional coculture of enterocytes, monocytes and dendritic cells to model inflamed intestinal mucosa in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Fransisca; Collnot, Eva-Maria; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2010-12-06

    While epithelial cell culture models (e.g., Caco-2 cell line) are widely used to assess the absorption of drug molecules across healthy intestinal mucosa, there are no suitable in vitro models of the intestinal barrier in the state of inflammation. Thus development of novel drugs and formulations for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease is largely bound to animal models. We here report on the development of a complex in vitro model of the inflamed intestinal mucosa, starting with the selection of suitable enterocyte cell line and proinflammatory stimulus and progressing to the setup and characterization of a three-dimensional coculture of human intestinal epithelial cells and immunocompetent macrophages and dendritic cells. In the 3D setup, controlled inflammation can be induced allowing the mimicking of pathophysiological changes occurring in vivo in the inflamed intestine. Different combinations of proinflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, interleukin-1β, interferon-γ) and intestinal epithelial cell lines (Caco-2, HT-29, T84) were evaluated, and only Caco-2 cells were responsive to stimulation, with interleukin-1β being the strongest stimulator. Caco-2 cells responded to the proinflammatory stimulus with a moderate upregulation of proinflammatory markers and a slight, but significant, decrease (20%) of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) indicating changes in the epithelial barrier properties. Setting up the coculture model, macrophages and dendritic cells derived from periphery blood monocytes were embedded in a collagen layer on a Transwell filter insert and Caco-2 cells were seeded atop. Even in the presence of immunocompetent cells Caco-2 cells formed a tight monolayer. Addition of IL-1β increased inflammatory cytokine response more strongly compared to Caco-2 single culture and stimulated immunocompetent cells proved to be highly active in sampling apically applied nanoparticles. Thus

  1. Oral insulin stimulates intestinal epithelial cell turnover following massive small bowel resection in a rat and a cell culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Lulu, Shani; Coran, Arnold G; Shehadeh, Naim; Shamir, Raanan; Mogilner, Jorge G; Sukhotnik, Igor

    2012-02-01

    We have recently reported that oral insulin (OI) stimulates intestinal adaptation after bowel resection and that OI enhances enterocyte turnover in correlation with insulin receptor expression along the villus-crypt axis. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of OI on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis in a rat model of short bowel syndrome (SBS) and in a cell culture model. Caco-2 cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of insulin. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined by FACS cytometry. Cell viability was investigated using the Alamar Blue technique. Male rats were divided into three groups: Sham rats underwent bowel transection, SBS rats underwent a 75% bowel resection, and SBS-OI rats underwent bowel resection and were treated with OI given in drinking water (1 U/ml) from the third postoperative day. Parameters of intestinal adaptation, enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis were determined on day 15. Real time PCR was used to determine the level of bax and bcl-2 mRNA and western blotting was used to determine bax, bcl-2, p-ERK and AKT protein levels. Statistical analysis was performed using the one-way ANOVA test, with P statistically significant. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with insulin resulted in a significant increase in cell proliferation (twofold increase after 24 h and 37% increase after 48 h) and cell viability (in a dose-dependent manner), but did not change cell apoptosis. In a rat model of SBS, treatment with OI resulted in a significant increase in all parameters of intestinal adaptation. Elevated cell proliferation rate in insulin treated rats was accompanied by elevated AKT and p-ERK protein levels. Decreased cell apoptosis in SBS-INS rats corresponded with a decreased bax/bcl-2 ratio. Oral insulin stimulates intestinal epithelial cell turnover after massive small bowel resection in a rat model of SBS and a cell culture model.

  2. Prostaglandin E2 mediates proliferation and chloride secretion in ADPKD cystic renal epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Lee, Kim; Battini, Lorenzo; Flores, Daniel; Gusella, G. Luca; Pao, Alan C.

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contributes to cystogenesis in genetically nonorthologous models of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). However, it remains unknown whether PGE2 induces the classic features of cystic epithelia in genetically orthologous models of ADPKD. We hypothesized that, in ADPKD epithelia, PGE2 induces proliferation and chloride (Cl−) secretion, two archetypal phenotypic features of ADPKD. To test this hypothesis, proliferation and Cl− secretion were measured in renal epithelial cells deficient in polycystin-1 (PC-1). PC-1-deficient cells increased in cell number (proliferated) faster than PC-1-replete cells, and this proliferative advantage was abrogated by cyclooxygenase inhibition, indicating a role for PGE2 in cell proliferation. Exogenous administration of PGE2 increased proliferation of PC-1-deficient cells by 38.8 ± 5.2% (P PGE2-specific E prostanoid (EP) receptor agonists induce intracellular cAMP and downstream β-catenin activation. PGE2 and EP4 receptor agonism (TCS 2510) increased intracellular cAMP concentration and the abundance of active β-catenin in PC-1-deficient cells, suggesting a mechanism for PGE2-mediated proliferation. Consistent with this hypothesis, antagonizing EP4 receptors reverted the growth advantage of PC-1-deficient cells, implicating a central role for the EP4 receptor in proliferation. To test whether PGE2-dependent Cl− secretion is also enhanced in PC-1-deficient cells, we used an Ussing chamber to measure short-circuit current (Isc). Addition of PGE2 induced a fivefold higher increase in Isc in PC-1-deficient cells compared with PC-1-replete cells. This PGE2-induced increase in Isc in PC-1-deficient cells was blocked by CFTR-172 and flufenamic acid, indicating that PGE2 activates CFTR and calcium-activated Cl− channels. In conclusion, PGE2 activates aberrant signaling pathways in PC-1-deficient epithelia that contribute to the proliferative and secretory phenotype characteristic of ADPKD

  3. Gene Expression Analysis of the IPEC-J2 Cell Line: A Simple Model for the Inflammation-Sensitive Preterm Intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støy, Ann Cathrine Findal; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Sangild, Per T.

    2013-01-01

    -related genes in IPEC-J2 cells stimulated for 2 h with milk formula (CELL-FORM), colostrum (CELL-COLOS), or growth medium (CELL-CONTR) and in distal small intestinal tissue samples from preterm pigs fed milk formula (PIG-FORM) or colostrum (PIG-COLOS). High throughput quantitative PCR analysis of 48 genes......The IPEC-J2 cell line was studied as a simple model for investigating responses of the newborn intestinal epithelium to diets. Especially, the small intestine of immature newborns is sensitive to diet-induced inflammation. We investigated gene expression of epithelial- and immune response...... revealed the expression of 22 genes in IPEC-J2 cells and 31 genes in intestinal samples. Principal component analysis (PCA) discriminated the gene expression profile of IPEC-J2 cells from that of intestinal samples. The expression profile of intestinal tissue was separated by PCA into 2 groups according...

  4. Model prodrugs designed for the intestinal peptide transporter. A synthetic approach for coupling of hydroxy-containing compounds to dipeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, G M; Nielsen, C U; Steffansen, B

    2001-01-01

    The human peptide transporter, hPepT1, situated in the small intestine, may be exploited to increase absorption of drugs or model drugs by attaching them to a dipeptide, which is recognised by hPepT1. A synthetic protocol for this kind of model prodrugs was developed, in which model drugs...... intestine and be converted to the parent drug during or after transport into the blood circulation. Therefore, we investigated the influence of the electronegativity of the substituent in the 4-position of the phenyl ring on stability in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 and 7.4, corresponding to pH in jejunum...... and blood, respectively. In addition, the influence of the electronegativity of the substituent on stability upon storage was examined. Model prodrugs containing electron donating substituents in the 4-position of the phenyl ring decomposed upon storage, while model prodrugs containing no substituents...

  5. Zebrafish kruppel-like factor 4a represses intestinal cell proliferation and promotes differentiation of intestinal cell lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chen Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mouse krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4 is a zinc finger-containing transcription factor required for terminal differentiation of goblet cells in the colon. However, studies using either Klf4(-/- mice or mice with conditionally deleted Klf4 in their gastric epithelia showed different results in the role of Klf4 in epithelial cell proliferation. We used zebrafish as a model organism to gain further understanding of the role of Klf4 in the intestinal cell proliferation and differentiation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized the function of klf4a, a mammalian klf4 homologue by antisense morpholino oligomer knockdown. Zebrafish Klf4a shared high amino acid similarities with human and mouse Klf4. Phylogenetic analysis grouped zebrafish Klf4a together with both human and mouse Klf4 in a branch with high bootstrap value. In zebrafish, we demonstrate that Klf4a represses intestinal cell proliferation based on results of BrdU incorporation, p-Histone 3 immunostaining, and transmission electron microscopy analyses. Decreased PepT1 expression was detected in intestinal bulbs of 80- and 102-hours post fertilization (hpf klf4a morphants. Significant reduction of alcian blue-stained goblet cell number was identified in intestines of 102- and 120-hpf klf4a morphants. Embryos treated with γ-secretase inhibitor showed increased klf4a expression in the intestine, while decreased klf4a expression and reduction in goblet cell number were observed in embryos injected with Notch intracellular domain (NICD mRNA. We were able to detect recovery of goblet cell number in 102-hpf embryos that had been co-injected with both klf4a and Notch 1a NICD mRNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides in vivo evidence showing that zebrafih Klf4a is essential for the repression of intestinal cell proliferation. Zebrafish Klf4a is required for the differentiation of goblet cells and the terminal differentiation of enterocytes. Moreover, the regulation of

  6. Rosiglitazone improves intestinal lipoprotein overproduction in the fat-fed Syrian Golden hamster, an animal model of nutritionally-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Nathalie; Naples, Mark; Uffelman, Kristine; Szeto, Linda; Adeli, Khosrow; Lewis, Gary F

    2004-06-01

    We have recently shown that the fructose-fed Syrian Golden hamster, a non-diabetic animal model of nutritionally-induced insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia, is characterized by intestinal lipoprotein overproduction. In order to determine whether intestinal lipoprotein overproduction is specific to fructose feeding or applies generally to other models of insulin resistance, we studied intestinal lipoprotein production and the response to insulin sensitization in the high fat-fed Syrian Golden hamster. Syrian Golden Hamsters were fed either (1). chow (CHOW), (2). 60% fat (FAT) or (3). 60% fat with rosiglitazone, 20 micromol/kg per day (FAT + RSG) for 5 weeks. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp studies confirmed that FAT is a good model of insulin resistance and rosiglitazone treatment resulted in a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity. In addition, there was a significant approx. two- to four-fold increase in intestinal apoB48 particle production in FAT. Rosiglitazone treatment resulted in partial normalization of apoB48-containing intestinal lipoprotein secretion. In summary: (1). the fat-fed Syrian Golden Hamster is a good model of nutritionally-induced insulin resistance, (2). intestinal overproduction of lipoproteins appear to contribute to the hypertriglyceridemia of insulin resistance in this animal model and (3). insulin sensitization with rosiglitazone ameliorates intestinal apoB48 particle overproduction in the fat-fed Syrian Golden Hamster. These data further support the link between insulin resistance and intestinal lipoprotein overproduction.

  7. A Fractional Anomalous Diffusion Model and Numerical Simulation for Sodium Ion Transport in the Intestinal Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a fractional anomalous diffusion model to describe the uptake of sodium ions across the epithelium of gastrointestinal mucosa and their subsequent diffusion in the underlying blood capillaries using fractional Fick’s law. A heterogeneous two-phase model of the gastrointestinal mucosa is considered, consisting of a continuous extracellular phase and a dispersed cellular phase. The main mode of uptake is considered to be a fractional anomalous diffusion under concentration gradient and potential gradient. Appropriate partial differential equations describing the variation with time of concentrations of sodium ions in both the two phases across the intestinal wall are obtained using Riemann-Liouville space-fractional derivative and are solved by finite difference methods. The concentrations of sodium ions in the interstitial space and in the cells have been studied as a function of time, and the mean concentration of sodium ions available for absorption by the blood capillaries has also been studied. Finally, numerical results are presented graphically for various values of different parameters. This study demonstrates that fractional anomalous diffusion model is appropriate for describing the uptake of sodium ions across the epithelium of gastrointestinal mucosa.

  8. Potential model for differential diagnosis between Crohn's disease and primary intestinal lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-Yu; Lin, Yun; Fan, Rong; Hu, Shu-Rong; Cheng, Meng-Meng; Zhang, Mao-Chen; Hong, Li-Wen; Zhou, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Zheng-Ting; Zhong, Jie

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the usefulness of different parameters to differentiate Crohn’s disease (CD) from primary intestinal lymphoma (PIL). METHODS The medical records of 85 patients with CD and 56 patients with PIL were reviewed retrospectively. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, endoscopic, and computed tomographic enterography (CTE) parameters were collected. The univariate value of each parameter was analyzed. A differentiation model was established by pooling all the valuable parameters. Diagnostic efficacy was analyzed, and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted. RESULTS The demographic and clinical parameters that showed significant values for differentiating CD from PIL included age of onset, symptom duration, presence of diarrhea, abdominal mass, and perianal lesions (P 8 mm, aneurysmal dilation, stricture with proximal dilation, “comb sign”, mass showing the “sandwich sign”, and intussusceptions (P < 0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the differentiation model were 91.8%, 96.4%, 93.6%, 97.5%, and 88.5%, respectively. The cutoff value was 0.5. The area under the ROC curve was 0.989. CONCLUSION The differentiation model that integrated the various parameters together may yield a high diagnostic efficacy in the differential diagnosis between CD and PIL. PMID:27895429

  9. Mechanical Elongation of the Small Intestine: Evaluation of Techniques for Optimal Screw Placement in a Rodent Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Hausbrandt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate techniques and establish an optimal method for mechanical elongation of small intestine (MESI using screws in a rodent model in order to develop a potential therapy for short bowel syndrome (SBS. Material and Methods. Adult female Sprague Dawley rats (n=24 with body weight from 250 to 300 g (Σ=283 were evaluated using 5 different groups in which the basic denominator for the technique involved the fixation of a blind loop of the intestine on the abdominal wall with the placement of a screw in the lumen secured to the abdominal wall. Results. In all groups with accessible screws, the rodents removed the implants despite the use of washers or suits to prevent removal. Subcutaneous placement of the screw combined with antibiotic treatment and dietary modifications was finally successful. In two animals autologous transplantation of the lengthened intestinal segment was successful. Discussion. While the rodent model may provide useful basic information on mechanical intestinal lengthening, further investigations should be performed in larger animals to make use of the translational nature of MESI in human SBS treatment.

  10. Identification of glucose-fermenting bacteria present in an in vitro model of the human intestine by RNA-stable isotope probing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egert, M.; Graaf, A.A. de; Maathuis, A.; Waard, P. de; Plugge, C.M.; Smidt, H.; Deutz, N.E.P.; Dijkema, C.; Vos, W.M. de; Venema, K.

    2007-01-01

    16S rRNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolic profiling were used to identify bacteria fermenting glucose under conditions simulating the human intestine. The TIM-2 in vitro model of the human intestine was inoculated with a GI tract mi

  11. Property profiling of biosimilar mucus in a novel mucus-containing in vitro model for assessment of intestinal drug absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Marie; Baldursdóttir, Stefania G; Müllertz, Anette;

    2014-01-01

    comparable to freshly isolated porcine intestinal mucus (PIM). Further, this multicomponent biosimilar mucus mixture was optimized with regards to the lipid content in order to obtain cellular biocompatibility with well-differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers. In contrast, PIM was found to severely disrupt...... of the biorelevance of the Caco-2 cell culture model by application of mucus, resulting in an in vitro model of oral mucosa suitable for future assessment of innovative drug delivery approaches....

  12. Development and application of a mouse intestinal loop model to study the in vivo action of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, Justin A; Robertson, Susan L; Saputo, Juliann; Shrestha, Archana; McClane, Bruce A; Uzal, Francisco A

    2011-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) is responsible for causing the gastrointestinal symptoms of C. perfringens type A food poisoning, the second most commonly identified bacterial food-borne illness in the United States. CPE is produced by sporulating C. perfringens cells in the small intestinal lumen, where it then causes epithelial cell damage and villous blunting that leads to diarrhea and cramping. Those effects are typically self-limiting; however, severe outbreaks of this food poisoning, particularly two occurring in psychiatric institutions, have involved deaths. Since animal models are currently limited for the study of the CPE action, a mouse ligated intestinal loop model was developed. With this model, significant lethality was observed after 2 h in loops receiving an inoculum of 100 or 200 μg of CPE but not using a 50-μg toxin inoculum. A correlation was noted between the overall intestinal histological damage and lethality in mice. Serum analysis revealed a dose-dependent increase in serum CPE and potassium levels. CPE binding to the liver and kidney was detected, along with elevated levels of potassium in the serum. These data suggest that CPE can be absorbed from the intestine into the circulation, followed by the binding of the toxin to internal organs to induce potassium leakage, which can cause death. Finally, CPE pore complexes similar to those formed in tissue culture cells were detected in the intestine and liver, suggesting that (i) CPE actions are similar in vivo and in vitro and (ii) CPE-induced potassium release into blood may result from CPE pore formation in internal organs such as the liver.

  13. Development and Application of a Mouse Intestinal Loop Model To Study the In Vivo Action of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, Justin A.; Robertson, Susan L.; Saputo, Juliann; Shrestha, Archana; McClane, Bruce A.; Uzal, Francisco A.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) is responsible for causing the gastrointestinal symptoms of C. perfringens type A food poisoning, the second most commonly identified bacterial food-borne illness in the United States. CPE is produced by sporulating C. perfringens cells in the small intestinal lumen, where it then causes epithelial cell damage and villous blunting that leads to diarrhea and cramping. Those effects are typically self-limiting; however, severe outbreaks of this food poisoning, particularly two occurring in psychiatric institutions, have involved deaths. Since animal models are currently limited for the study of the CPE action, a mouse ligated intestinal loop model was developed. With this model, significant lethality was observed after 2 h in loops receiving an inoculum of 100 or 200 μg of CPE but not using a 50-μg toxin inoculum. A correlation was noted between the overall intestinal histological damage and lethality in mice. Serum analysis revealed a dose-dependent increase in serum CPE and potassium levels. CPE binding to the liver and kidney was detected, along with elevated levels of potassium in the serum. These data suggest that CPE can be absorbed from the intestine into the circulation, followed by the binding of the toxin to internal organs to induce potassium leakage, which can cause death. Finally, CPE pore complexes similar to those formed in tissue culture cells were detected in the intestine and liver, suggesting that (i) CPE actions are similar in vivo and in vitro and (ii) CPE-induced potassium release into blood may result from CPE pore formation in internal organs such as the liver. PMID:21628512

  14. Changes in Enteric Neurons of Small Intestine in a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Fei, Guijun; Fang, Xiucai; Yang, Xilin; Sun, Xiaohong; Qian, Jiaming; Wood, Jackie D; Ke, Meiyun

    2016-04-30

    Physical and/or emotional stresses are important factors in the exacerbation of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Several lines of evidence support that a major impact of stress on the gastrointestinal tract occurs via the enteric nervous system. We aimed to evaluate histological changes in the submucosal plexus (SMP) and myenteric plexus (MP) of the distal ileum in concert with the intestinal motor function in a rat model of IBS with diarrhea. The rat model was induced by heterotypic chronic and acute stress (CAS). The intestinal transit was measured by administering powdered carbon by gastric gavage. Double immunohistochemical fluorescence staining with whole-mount preparations of SMP and MP of enteric nervous system was used to assess changes in expression of choline acetyltransferase, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or nitric oxide synthase in relation to the pan neuronal marker, anti-Hu. The intestinal transit ratio increased significantly from control values of 50.8% to 60.6% in the CAS group. The numbers of enteric ganglia and neurons in the SMP were increased in the CAS group. The proportions of choline acetyltransferase- and vasoactive intestinal peptide-immunoreactive neurons in the SMP were increased (82.1 ± 4.3% vs. 76.0 ± 5.0%, P = 0.021; 40.5 ± 5.9% vs 28.9 ± 3.7%, P = 0.001), while nitric oxide synthase-immunoreactive neurons in the MP were decreased compared with controls (23.3 ± 4.5% vs 32.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.002). These morphological changes in enteric neurons to CAS might contribute to the dysfunction in motility and secretion in IBS with diarrhea.

  15. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli induce attaching and effacing lesions and hemorrhagic colitis in human and bovine intestinal xenograft models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilach Golan

    2011-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 is an important cause of diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans worldwide. The two major virulence determinants of EHEC are the Shiga toxins (Stx and the type III secretion system (T3SS, including the injected effectors. Lack of a good model system hinders the study of EHEC virulence. Here, we investigated whether bovine and human intestinal xenografts in SCID mice can be useful for studying EHEC and host tissue interactions. Fully developed, germ-free human and bovine small intestine and colon were established by subcutaneous transplantation of human and bovine fetal gut into SCID mice. Xenografts were allowed to develop for 3–4 months and thereafter were infected by direct intraluminal inoculation of Stx-negative derivatives of EHEC O157:H7, strain EDL933. The small intestine and colon xenografts closely mimicked the respective native tissues. Upon infection, EHEC induced formation of typical attaching and effacing lesions and tissue damage that resembled hemorrhagic colitis in colon xenografts. By contrast, xenografts infected with an EHEC mutant deficient in T3SS remained undamaged. Furthermore, EHEC did not attach to or damage the epithelium of small intestinal tissue, and these xenografts remained intact. EHEC damaged the colon in a T3SS-dependent manner, and this model is therefore useful for studying the molecular details of EHEC interactions with live human and bovine intestinal tissue. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Stx and gut microflora are not essential for EHEC virulence in the human gut.

  16. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin B. Williams

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and colitis-associated cancer (CAC. Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33 is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33−/− mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33−/− mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33−/− mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33−/− mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33−/− mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33−/− mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms

  17. Effects of lazaroids on intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flessas, Ioannis I; Papalois, Apostolos E; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Zagouri, Flora; Zografos, George C

    2011-04-01

    Mesenteric ischemia occurs in a number of clinically relevant pathophysiologic processes, including sepsis, hemorrhage, intestinal transplantation, severe burns, and mesenteric thrombosis. The readmission of molecular oxygen into an ischemic tissue promotes the oxidation of resuscitated tissue with certain pathophysiologic mechanisms. Depending on the duration and the intensity of ischemia, reoxygenation of the intestine that has been reperfused may further induce tissue injury. Intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury can accelerate complex processes between the endothelium and different cell types leading to microvascular injury, cellular necrosis, and apoptosis. The injury due to reperfusion is found predominantly in the intestinal mucosa and submucosa, causing endothelial detachment. The 21-aminosteroids (lazaroids) are a family of compounds that inhibit lipid membrane peroxidation. Many of the performed studies show conflicting results, which reflect differences in experimental design, evolving time that (I/R) is induced, total or partial vascular occlusion, dosage of the lazaroid, and the exact period of time that the lazaroid is administered.

  18. Intestinal inflammation in TNBS sensitized rats as a model of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Selve, N.; Wöhrmann, T.

    1992-01-01

    An enteritis, based on a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, was induced in TNBS (2,4,4-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid) sensitized rats by multiple intrajejunal challenge with TNBS via an implanted catheter. This treatment induced chronic inflammation of the distal small intestine characterized by intense hyperaemia, oedema and gut wall thickening as assessed by macroscopic scoring and weighing a defined part of the dissected intestine. Histologically, the inflammatory response included mu...

  19. Intestinal capacity to digest and absorb carbohydrates is maintained in a rat model of cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, E Leonie; Wolters, Henk; Stellaard, Frans; Kuipers, Folkert; Verkade, Henkjan J; Rings, Edmond H H M

    2007-09-01

    Cholestasis is associated with systemic accumulation of bile salts and with deficiency of bile in the intestinal lumen. During the past years bile salts have been identified as signaling molecules that regulate lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism. Bile salts have also been shown to activate signaling routes leading to proliferation, apoptosis, or differentiation. It is unclear, however, whether cholestasis affects the constitution and absorptive capacity of the intestinal epithelium in vivo. We studied small intestinal morphology, proliferation, apoptosis, expression of intestine-specific genes, and carbohydrate absorption in cholestatic (1 wk bile duct ligation), bile-deficient (1 wk bile diversion), and control (sham) rats. Absorptive capacity was assessed by determination of plasma [(2)H]- and [(13)C]glucose concentrations after intraduodenal administration of [(2)H]glucose and naturally enriched [(13)C]sucrose, respectively. Small intestinal morphology, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression of intestinal transcription factors (mRNA levels of Cdx-2, Gata-4, and Hnf-1alpha, and Cdx-2 protein levels) were similar in cholestatic, bile-deficient, and control rats. The (unlabeled) blood glucose response after intraduodenal administration was delayed in cholestatic animals, but the absorption over 180 min was quantitatively similar between the groups. Plasma concentrations of [(2)H]glucose and [(13)C]glucose peaked to similar extents in all groups within 7.5 and 30 min, respectively. Absorption of [(2)H]glucose and [(13)C]glucose in plasma was similar in all groups. The present data indicate that neither accumulation of bile salts in the body, nor their intestinal deficiency, two characteristic features of cholestasis, affect rat small intestinal proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, or its capacity to digest and absorb carbohydrates.

  20. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Buttet

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome (MetS greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD. By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP and blood clearance (ApoC2. These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG, while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the

  1. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  2. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A.; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  3. Intestinal Transportations of Main Chemical Compositions of Polygoni Multiflori Radix in Caco-2 Cell Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context. Polygoni Multiflori Radix (PMR is originated from the root of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. and used in oriental countries for centuries. However, little researches pay close attention to the absorption of its major constituents. Objective. Transepithelial transport of TSG, RL, PL, and four anthraquinones is carried out. Materials and Methods. Caco-2 cell monolayer, which represented a well-established model for the study of intestinal transport of nutrients and xenobiotics, was used in this paper. Results. The apparent permeability coefficients (Papp in the Caco-2 cell monolayers were TSG (2.372 × 10−9 < EG (2.391 × 10−9 < EN (2.483 × 10−9 < PL (4.917 × 10−9 < RN (1.707 × 10−8 < RL (1.778 × 10−8 < AE (1.952 × 10−8. Thus, RN, RL, and AE were considered partly absorbed, while other constituents were hardly absorbed. Discussion and Conclusion. Glycosides showed poor permeabilities than aglycones. In the meantime, TSG and EN gave out poor recovery rates in this assay, which indicated that TSG and EN may accumulate or metabolise in the Caco-2 cells. In silico prediction indicated that Gibbs energy (r=0.751, p<0.05 and heat of form (r=0.701, p<0.05 were strongly positively correlated with Papp.

  4. In vivo perfusion assessment of an anastomosis surgery on porcine intestinal model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Opferman, Justin; Decker, Ryan; Cheon, Gyeong W.; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Anastomosis, the connection of two structures, is a critical procedure for reconstructive surgery with over 1 million cases/year for visceral indication alone. However, complication rates such as strictures and leakage affect up to 19% of cases for colorectal anastomoses and up to 30% for visceral transplantation anastomoses. Local ischemia plays a critical role in anastomotic complications, making blood perfusion an important indicator for tissue health and predictor for healing following anastomosis. In this work, we apply a real time multispectral imaging technique to monitor impact on tissue perfusion due to varying interrupted suture spacing and suture tensions. Multispectral tissue images at 470, 540, 560, 580, 670 and 760 nm are analyzed in conjunction with an empirical model based on diffuse reflectance process to quantify the hemoglobin oxygen saturation within the suture site. The investigated tissues for anastomoses include porcine small (jejunum and ileum) and large (transverse colon) intestines. Two experiments using interrupted suturing with suture spacing of 1, 2, and 3 mm and tension levels from 0 N to 2.5 N are conducted. Tissue perfusion at 5, 10, 20 and 30 min after suturing are recorded and compared with the initial normal state. The result indicates the contrast between healthy and ischemic tissue areas and assists the determination of suturing spacing and tension. Therefore, the assessment of tissue perfusion will permit the development and intra-surgical monitoring of an optimal suture protocol during anastomosis with less complications and improved functional outcome.

  5. Endometriosis intestinal Intestinal endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.I. González

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available La endometriosis es un trastorno ginecológico crónico, benigno y frecuente entre las mujeres en edad fértil, estimándose que existe algún grado de endometriosis hasta en el 15% de las mujeres premenopáusicas, asociándose a historia de infertilidad, antecedente de cesárea, dismenorrea y anormalidad en el sangrado uterino. Se cree que es debida al ascenso por las trompas de Falopio de contenido menstrual (menstruación retrógrada. En la afectación intestinal, el colon es el segmento más frecuentemente afectado, sobre todo a nivel rectosigmodeo. La clínica de presentación es inespecífica, siendo lo más frecuente el dolor abdominal y/o pélvico de tipo cólico que coincide o se exacerba con la menstruación. El diagnóstico diferencial incluye la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal, diverticulitis, colitis isquémica y procesos neoplásicos, siendo el diagnóstico definitivo anatomopatológico. En cuanto al tratamiento, éste dependerá de la clínica y de la edad de la paciente, así como de sus deseos de embarazo.Endometriosis is a chronic, benign gynaecological disorder that is frequent in women of a child-bearing age. It is estimated that there is some degree of endometriosis in as many as 15% of pre-menopausal women, associated with a history of infertility, caesarean antecedents, dysmenorrhoea and abnormality in uterine bleeding. It is believed to be due to the rise of menstrual contents through the Fallopian tubes (retrograde menstruation. In the intestinal affectation, the colon is the segment most frequently affected, above all at the rectosigmoidal level. The clinical features are unspecific, with abdominal pain the most frequent and/or pelvic pain of a cholic type that coincides with, or is exacerbated by, menstruation. Differential diagnosis includes intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis and neoplastic processes, with the definitive diagnosis being anatomopathological. With respect to treatment

  6. The role of the intestinal microvasculature in inflammatory bowel disease: studies with a modified Caco-2 model including endothelial cells resembling the intestinal barrier in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Jennifer Y; Hermanns, Maria Iris; Cavelius, Christian; Kraegeloh, Annette; Jung, Thomas; Danzebrink, Rolf; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    The microvascular endothelium of the gut barrier plays a crucial role during inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We have modified a commonly used intestinal cell model based on the Caco-2 cells by adding microvascular endothelial cells (ISO-HAS-1). Transwell filters were used with intestinal barrier-forming Caco-2 cells on top and the ISO-HAS-1 on the bottom of the filter. The goal was to determine whether this coculture mimics the in vivo situation more closely, and whether the model is suitable to evaluate interactions of, for example, prospective nanosized drug vehicles or contrast agents with this coculture in a physiological and inflamed state as it would occur in inflammatory bowel disease. We monitored the inflammatory responsiveness of the cells (release of IL-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and soluble E-selectin) after exposure to inflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β) and a nanoparticle (Ba/Gd: coprecipitated BaSO4 and Gd(OH)3), generally used as contrast agents. The barrier integrity of the coculture was evaluated via the determination of transepithelial electrical resistance and the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of NaFITC. The behavior of the coculture Caco-1/ISO-HAS-1 was compared to the respective monocultures Caco-2 and ISO-HAS-1. Based on transepithelial electrical resistance, the epithelial barrier integrity of the coculture remained stable during incubation with all stimuli, whereas the Papp decreased after exposure to the cytokine mixture (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β, and Ba/Gd). Both the endothelial and epithelial monocultures showed a high inflammatory response in both the upper and lower transwell-compartments. However, in the coculture, inflammatory mediators were only detected on the epithelial side and not on the endothelial side. Thus in the coculture, based on the Papp, the epithelial barrier appears to prevent a potential inflammatory overreaction in the underlying endothelial cells

  7. Property profiling of biosimilar mucus in a novel mucus-containing in vitro model for assessment of intestinal drug absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boegh, Marie; Baldursdóttir, Stefania G; Müllertz, Anette; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2014-07-01

    Oral delivery of drugs, including peptide and protein therapeutics, can be impeded by the presence of the mucus surface-lining the intestinal epithelium. The aim of the present project was to design and characterize biosimilar mucus compatible with Caco-2 cell monolayers cultured in vitro to establish a more representative in vitro model for the intestinal mucosa. The rheological profile of a biosimilar mucus mixture composed of purified gastric mucin, lipids and protein in buffer was optimized by supplementing with an anionic polymer to display viscoelastic properties and a microstructure comparable to freshly isolated porcine intestinal mucus (PIM). Further, this multicomponent biosimilar mucus mixture was optimized with regard to the lipid content in order to obtain cellular compatibility with well-differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers. In contrast, PIM was found to severely disrupt the Caco-2 cell monolayer. When combined with the Caco-2 cell monolayers, the final biosimilar mucus was found to significantly affect the permeability profiles for hydrophobic and hydrophilic small and large model drug compounds in different ways. In conclusion, the present study describes an improvement of the biorelevance of the Caco-2 cell culture model by application of mucus, resulting in an in vitro model of oral mucosa suitable for future assessment of innovative drug delivery approaches. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Expression of blood group-related glycoconjugates in the junctional and other oral epithelia of rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackenzie, I C; Dabelsteen, Erik; Rittman, G

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The junctional epithelium (JE) attaches the gingiva to the non-vital tooth surface and has other unusual properties which protect the underlying periodontal tissues. The JE differs from other gingival and oral epithelia in its unusual expression of cytokeratins typical of both...... stratifying and of simple epithelia, a phenotypic pattern possibly related to its specialized functions. METHODS: The patterns of differentiation of rodent gingival and other epithelia were examined using monoclonal antibodies against various glycoconjugates which are expressed on epithelial cell surfaces...

  9. Quantification and distribution of big conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels in kidney epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Klaerke, Dan A

    2005-01-01

    channels were determined by a isotope flux assay where up to 44% of the total K+ channel activity could be inhibited by iberiotoxin indicating that BK channels are widely present in kidney epithelia. Consistent with these functional studies, 125I-IbTX-D19Y/Y36F binds to membrane vesicles from outer cortex......, outer medulla and inner medulla with Bmax values (in fmol/mg protein) of 6.8, 2.6 and 21.4, respectively. These studies were performed applying rabbit kidney epithelia tissue. The distinct distribution of BK channels in both rabbit and rat kidney epithelia was confirmed by autoradiography...

  10. Red Chicory (Cichorium intybus L. cultivar as a Potential Source of Antioxidant Anthocyanins for Intestinal Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura D'evoli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fruit- and vegetable-derived foods have become a very significant source of nutraceutical phytochemicals. Among vegetables, red chicory (Cichorium Intybus L. cultivar has gained attention for its content of phenolic compounds, such as the anthocyanins. In this study, we evaluated the nutraceutical effects, in terms of antioxidant, cytoprotective, and antiproliferative activities, of extracts of the whole leaf or only the red part of the leaf of Treviso red chicory (a typical Italian red leafy plant in various intestinal models, such as Caco-2 cells, differentiated in normal intestinal epithelia and undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. The results show that the whole leaf of red chicory can represent a good source of phytochemicals in terms of total phenolics and anthocyanins as well as the ability of these phytochemicals to exert antioxidant and cytoprotective effects in differentiated Caco-2 cells and antiproliferative effects in undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, compared to red chicory whole leaf extracts, the red part of leaf extracts had a significantly higher content of both total phenolics and anthocyanins. The same extracts effectively corresponded to an increase of antioxidant, cytoprotective, and antiproliferative activities. Taken together, these findings suggest that the red part of the leaf of Treviso red chicory with a high content of antioxidant anthocyanins could be interesting for development of new food supplements to improve intestinal health.

  11. Peanut Allergens Alter Intestinal Barrier Permeability and Tight Junction Localisation in Caco-2 Cell Cultures1

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    Dwan B. Price

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Allergen absorption by epithelia may play an important role in downstream immune responses. Transport mechanisms that can bypass Peyer's patches include transcellular and paracellular transport. The capacity of an allergen to cross via these means can modulate downstream processing of the allergen by the immune system. The aim of this study was to investigate allergen-epithelial interactions of peanut allergens with the human intestinal epithelium. Methods: We achieved this using the human Caco-2 cell culture model, exposed to crude peanut extract. Western and immunofluorescence analysis were used to identify the cellular and molecular changes of peanut extract on the intestinal epithelium. Results: Following exposure of Caco-2 cells to peanut extract, binding of the peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 to the apical cellular membrane and transcytosis across the monolayers were observed. Additionally, the co-localisation of the transmembrane tight junction proteins occludin, JAM-A and claudin-1, with the intracellular adhesion protein ZO-1 was modified. Conclusion: Disruption of Caco-2 barrier integrity through tight junction disruption may enable movement of peanut proteins across the intestinal epithelium. This accounts for peanut's increased allergenicity, compared to other food allergens, and provides an explanation for the potency of peanut allergens in immune response elicitation.

  12. Inulin and oligofructose as prebiotics in the prevention of intestinal infections and diseases.

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    Bosscher, D; Van Loo, J; Franck, A

    2006-12-01

    Health and wellbeing are challenged constantly by pathogens. A number of defence mechanisms exist to protect the body from pathogen colonisation and invasion, with an important role to play for the natural intestinal bacterial flora (mainly by bifidobacteria and lactobacilli). The present paper reviews the evidence on the effects of inulin and oligofructose on colonisation and translocation of pathogens and the prevention of intestinal diseases. In vitro experiments have shown that lactic acid-producing bacteria have antagonistic (antibacterial) activity against pathogens partly because of the production of organic acids which are the endproducts of inulin and oligofructose fermentation. In addition, studies with epithelial layers have shown that inulin and oligofructose inhibit pathogen colonisation and that endproducts of their fermentation have the ability to support barrier function. Furthermore, studies in various animal models have shown that inulin and oligofructose accelerate the recovery of beneficial bacteria, slow down pathogen growth, decreasing pathogen colonisation and systemic translocation. Finally, data from human intervention trials either in patients with intestinal disorders or disease, or prone to critical illness, found that inulin and oligofructose restore the balance when the gut microbial community is altered, inhibit the progression of disease or prevent it from relapsing and/or developing. To conclude, the dietary use of inulin and oligofructose offers a promising approach to restore microbial communities and to support barrier function of the epithelia by their prebiotic action. This may offer the host protection against invasion and translocation of pathogens (endogenous and/or exogenous) and in the prevention of gastrointestinal diseases.

  13. Intestinal proteomics in pig models of necrotising enterocolitis, short bowel syndrome and intra-uterine growth restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Pingping; Sangild, Per Torp

    2014-01-01

    Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), short bowel syndrome (SBS) and intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR) are three conditions associated with intestinal dysfunction in newborn infants, particularly those born preterm. Piglet (Sus scrofa) models have recently been developed for NEC, SBS and IUGR, a......, but only supplement, classical hypothesis-driven research that investigate disease mechanisms using a single or few endpoints. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  14. IL-10 Treatment Is Associated with Prohibitin Expression in the Crohn’s Disease Intestinal Fibrosis Mouse Model

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    C. Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prohibitin, which can inhibit oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, has been shown to have significant anti-inflammatory activities. Here, we investigate the effects of altering prohibitin levels in affected tissues in the interleukin-10 knockout (IL-10KO mouse model with intestinal fibrosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of IL-10 on prohibitin and the role of prohibitin in intestinal fibrosis of murine colitis. After the mice were treated with IL-10, prohibitin expression and localization were evaluated in IL-10KO and wild-type (WT, 129/SvEv mice. The colon tissue was then investigated and the potential pathogenic molecular mechanisms were further studied. Fluorescence-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR and immunohistochemistry assays revealed a significant upregulation of prohibitin with IL-10 treatment. Furthermore, IL-10 decreases inflammatory cytokines and TGF-β1 in the IL-10KO model of Crohn’s disease and demonstrates a promising trend in decreasing tissue fibrosis. In conclusion, we hypothesize that IL-10 treatment is associated with increased prohibitin and would decrease inflammation and fibrosis in an animal model of Crohn’s disease. Interestingly, prohibitin may be a potential target for intestinal fibrosis associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD.

  15. Keratin 8 expression in head and neck epithelia

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    Berghaus Alexander

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intermediate filament forming protein keratin 8 (K8 is a tumour-associated antigen, which was shown to be over-expressed in a variety of malignancies. Here, we present a study of K8 expression in squamous epithelia of the head and neck area, including normal mucosa, hyperplastic and dysplastic leukoplakia, carcinomas of different sub-localisations, and lymph node metastases. Methods K8 expression was assessed upon immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies in cryosections of primary tumours of the head and neck area. Results K8 expression was characteristic of transformed tissue and marked early stages of disease, i.e. dysplastic oral leukoplakia, but not normal or hyperplastic epithelium. With the exception of carcinomas of the larynx and the tongue, K8 expression also strictly differentiated carcinomas from normal epithelium of the same origin. Furthermore, K8high was characteristic of cells, which had detached from the sites of primary tumours and had been invading the surrounding tissue at the time point of surgery. Conclusion K8 is an excellent marker for head and neck malignancies, which allows for early detection as well as for visualisation of potentially disseminating tumour cells in vivo.

  16. The apical plasma membrane of chitin-synthesizing epithelia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bernard Moussian

    2013-01-01

    Chitin is the second most abundant polysaccharide on earth.It is produced at the apical side of epidermal,tracheal,fore-,and hindgut epithelial cells in insects as a central component of the protective and supporting extracellular cuticle.Chitin is also an important constituent of the midgut peritrophic matrix that encases the food supporting its digestion and protects the epithelium against invasion by possibly ingested pathogens.The enzyme producing chitin is a glycosyltransferase that resides in the apical plasma membrane forming a pore to extrude the chains of chitin into the extracellular space.The apical plasma membrane is not only a platform for chitin synthases but,probably through its shape and equipment with distinct factors,also plays an important role in orienting and organizing chitin fibers.Here,I review findings on the cellular and molecular constitution of the apical plasma membrane of chitin-producing epithelia mainly focusing on work done in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

  17. Derivation of muscles of the Aristotle's lantern from coelomic epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmatov, Igor Y; Mashanov, Vladimir S; Zueva, Olga R

    2007-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was employed to study structural changes in the lantern muscles occurring during the transition from young to adult in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus. A comparative examination of four major lantern muscles (compass depressors, compass elevators, protractors and retractors) suggests that myogenesis involves four consecutive stages. At the initial stage, the muscles show the organization of a mesentery delimited by pseudostratified coelomic epithelia, which are composed of peritoneal cells spanning the whole height of each epithelium, and myoepithelial cells, which are clustered together to fill the interstices between the basal processes of the peritoneal cells. During the next stage, the clusters of myoepithelial cells partly "sink" into the underlying connective tissue. At the third stage of muscularization, the myoepithelial cells increase in size and further invade the underlying connective tissue so that the myoepithelium splits into an apical peritoneal layer and a deeper mass of myoepithelial cells immersed in the connective tissue. However, these two layers are connected by a continuous basal lamina. This is thus the first description of an intermediate developmental stage between pseudostratified myoepithelim and genuine echinoderm muscles. For such a myoepithelium, we propose the term "immersed myoepithelium". At the most advanced stage of myogenesis, the myocytes detach completely from the epithelium to form subepithelial muscle bundles. Myogenesis in the sea urchin takes a long time during which continuous myogenic differentiation occurs in the coelomic epithelium and the newly formed myocytes and associated neurons penetrate into the underlying connective tissue.

  18. Concord and Niagara Grape Juice and Their Phenolics Modify Intestinal Glucose Transport in a Coupled in Vitro Digestion/Caco-2 Human Intestinal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Sydney; Lim, Jongbin; Chegeni, Mohammad; Wightman, JoLynne D.; Hamaker, Bruce R.; Ferruzzi, Mario G.

    2016-01-01

    While the potential of dietary phenolics to mitigate glycemic response has been proposed, the translation of these effects to phenolic rich foods such as 100% grape juice (GJ) remains unclear. Initial in vitro screening of GJ phenolic extracts from American grape varieties (V. labrusca; Niagara and Concord) suggested limited inhibitory capacity for amylase and α-glucosidase (6.2%–11.5% inhibition; p < 0.05). Separately, all GJ extracts (10–100 µM total phenolics) did reduce intestinal trans-epithelial transport of deuterated glucose (d7-glu) and fructose (d7-fru) by Caco-2 monolayers in a dose-dependent fashion, with 60 min d7-glu/d7-fru transport reduced 10%–38% by GJ extracts compared to control. To expand on these findings by assessing the ability of 100% GJ to modify starch digestion and glucose transport from a model starch-rich meal, 100% Niagara and Concord GJ samples were combined with a starch rich model meal (1:1 and 1:2 wt:wt) and glucose release and transport were assessed in a coupled in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Digestive release of glucose from the starch model meal was decreased when digested in the presence of GJs (5.9%–15% relative to sugar matched control). Furthermore, transport of d7-glu was reduced 10%–38% by digesta containing bioaccessible phenolics from Concord and Niagara GJ compared to control. These data suggest that phenolics present in 100% GJ may alter absorption of monosaccharides naturally present in 100% GJ and may potentially alter glycemic response if consumed with a starch rich meal. PMID:27399765

  19. Concord and Niagara Grape Juice and Their Phenolics Modify Intestinal Glucose Transport in a Coupled in Vitro Digestion/Caco-2 Human Intestinal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Sydney; Lim, Jongbin; Chegeni, Mohammad; Wightman, JoLynne D; Hamaker, Bruce R; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2016-07-05

    While the potential of dietary phenolics to mitigate glycemic response has been proposed, the translation of these effects to phenolic rich foods such as 100% grape juice (GJ) remains unclear. Initial in vitro screening of GJ phenolic extracts from American grape varieties (V. labrusca; Niagara and Concord) suggested limited inhibitory capacity for amylase and α-glucosidase (6.2%-11.5% inhibition; p GJ extracts (10-100 µM total phenolics) did reduce intestinal trans-epithelial transport of deuterated glucose (d7-glu) and fructose (d7-fru) by Caco-2 monolayers in a dose-dependent fashion, with 60 min d7-glu/d7-fru transport reduced 10%-38% by GJ extracts compared to control. To expand on these findings by assessing the ability of 100% GJ to modify starch digestion and glucose transport from a model starch-rich meal, 100% Niagara and Concord GJ samples were combined with a starch rich model meal (1:1 and 1:2 wt:wt) and glucose release and transport were assessed in a coupled in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Digestive release of glucose from the starch model meal was decreased when digested in the presence of GJs (5.9%-15% relative to sugar matched control). Furthermore, transport of d7-glu was reduced 10%-38% by digesta containing bioaccessible phenolics from Concord and Niagara GJ compared to control. These data suggest that phenolics present in 100% GJ may alter absorption of monosaccharides naturally present in 100% GJ and may potentially alter glycemic response if consumed with a starch rich meal.

  20. Contribution of H. pylori and smoking trends to US incidence of intestinal-type noncardia gastric adenocarcinoma: a microsimulation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Yeh

    Full Text Available Although gastric cancer has declined dramatically in the US, the disease remains the second leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. A better understanding of reasons for the decline can provide important insights into effective preventive strategies. We sought to estimate the contribution of risk factor trends on past and future intestinal-type noncardia gastric adenocarcinoma (NCGA incidence.We developed a population-based microsimulation model of intestinal-type NCGA and calibrated it to US epidemiologic data on precancerous lesions and cancer. The model explicitly incorporated the impact of Helicobacter pylori and smoking on disease natural history, for which birth cohort-specific trends were derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES and National Health Interview Survey (NHIS. Between 1978 and 2008, the model estimated that intestinal-type NCGA incidence declined 60% from 11.0 to 4.4 per 100,000 men, <3% discrepancy from national statistics. H. pylori and smoking trends combined accounted for 47% (range = 30%-58% of the observed decline. With no tobacco control, incidence would have declined only 56%, suggesting that lower smoking initiation and higher cessation rates observed after the 1960s accelerated the relative decline in cancer incidence by 7% (range = 0%-21%. With continued risk factor trends, incidence is projected to decline an additional 47% between 2008 and 2040, the majority of which will be attributable to H. pylori and smoking (81%; range = 61%-100%. Limitations include assuming all other risk factors influenced gastric carcinogenesis as one factor and restricting the analysis to men.Trends in modifiable risk factors explain a significant proportion of the decline of intestinal-type NCGA incidence in the US, and are projected to continue. Although past tobacco control efforts have hastened the decline, full benefits will take decades to be realized, and further discouragement of smoking and

  1. A mouse model of acrodermatitis enteropathica: loss of intestine zinc transporter ZIP4 (Slc39a4 disrupts the stem cell niche and intestine integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Geiser

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human Zip4 gene cause acrodermatitis enteropathica, a rare, pseudo-dominant, lethal genetic disorder. We created a tamoxifen-inducible, enterocyte-specific knockout of this gene in mice which mimics this human disorder. We found that the enterocyte Zip4 gene in mice is essential throughout life, and loss-of-function of this gene rapidly leads to wasting and death unless mice are nursed or provided excess dietary zinc. An initial effect of the knockout was the reprogramming of Paneth cells, which contribute to the intestinal stem cell niche in the crypts. Labile zinc in Paneth cells was lost, followed by diminished Sox9 (sex determining region Y-box 9 and lysozyme expression, and accumulation of mucin, which is normally found in goblet cells. This was accompanied by dysplasia of the intestinal crypts and significantly diminished small intestine cell division, and attenuated mTOR1 activity in villus enterocytes, indicative of increased catabolic metabolism, and diminished protein synthesis. This was followed by disorganization of the absorptive epithelium. Elemental analyses of small intestine, liver, and pancreas from Zip4-intestine knockout mice revealed that total zinc was dramatically and rapidly decreased in these organs whereas iron, manganese, and copper slowly accumulated to high levels in the liver as the disease progressed. These studies strongly suggest that wasting and lethality in acrodermatitis enteropathica patients reflects the loss-of-function of the intestine zinc transporter ZIP4, which leads to abnormal Paneth cell gene expression, disruption of the intestinal stem cell niche, and diminished function of the intestinal mucosa. These changes, in turn, cause a switch from anabolic to catabolic metabolism and altered homeostasis of several essential metals, which, if untreated by excess dietary zinc, leads to dramatic weight loss and death.

  2. FETAL METABOLIC PROGRAMMING OF THE SMALL INTESTINE IN A COPENHAGEN SHEEP MODEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axel, Anne Marie Dixen; Khanal, Prabhat; Kongsted, Anna Hauntoft

    Fetal metabolic programming states that early life nutrition is implicated with the risk of later disease development and both under- and overnutrition during gestation might predispose individuals to develop obesity or diabetes later in life. Obesity operations called “gastric bypass” operations...... have shown unexpected involvement of the small intestine in diabetes pathophysiology as it in most cases result in a complete resolution of the diabetes before weight loss. Therefore we hypothesize that the small intestine is a subject of metabolic programming and that this programming can predispose...... effects on gene-expression, however the results vary between genes. These observations suggest that small intestine function has been programmed by the late-gestation Low or High diet at gene expression level, whereas the physiological metabolic functions has mainly been affected by the HCHF diet...

  3. A revised model for electron dosimetry in the human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, N U; Poston, J W

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the absorbed dose was calculated to the small intestine (SI) wall of an adult human from electrons in its lumen contents. The effects on dose due to variations in the lumen radius and wall-thickness also were studied. The SI model was based on values gleaned from anatomic and histologic reviews of the adult human SI. Histologic and radiological analyses of the SI suggested the microscopic intricacy of this walled organ could be avoided for dosimetric purposes and a set of concentric cylinders could be used to model the SI. The model was input into the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) version 4A computational package, which was used to simulate energy deposition in the SI by electrons of fifty discrete energies ranging 10-500 keV. The source electrons as well as all resulting particles, such as knock-on electrons, bremsstrahlung, and electrons created from bremsstrahlung interactions, were transported until the particle energies fell below the 1 keV low-energy cutoff. Detailed physics treatments for secondary photons were made. With a reasonable number of histories, appropriate variance reduction techniques were used to improve the precision of the Monte Carlo calculations. The model used very small tally regions, which ranged in thickness from 0.5 microm to 200 microm depending on the electron energy studied and tally location in the wall. Relative errors associated with these calculations were maintained at less than 5%. The large number of tally results across the wall for each of the energies studied enabled the construction of the energy-specific depth dose curves in the wall. Each of these curves was consistent with the anticipated energy deposition pattern. These curves showed that only a small fraction of the energy absorbed at the contents-mucus interface reaches the stem cell layers because the cells are located deep in the mucosa. This fraction was found to vary from 1.66 x 10(-6) to 1.21 x 10(-1) over the energy range 10-500 keV. These

  4. Patterns of expression of keratin 17 in human epithelia: dependency on cell position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyanovsky, S M; Guelstein, V I; Tchipysheva, T A; Krutovskikh, V A; Bannikov, G A

    1989-07-01

    By immunomorphology, using keratin 17-specific monoclonal antibody, it has been shown that this keratin is expressed only in the basal cells of a group of complex epithelia: glandular epithelium with myoepithelial component, transitional and pseudostratified epithelia. Immunolocalization of keratin 17 provides evidence that the expression of this keratin strongly depends on the cell position within epithelial structures. The topographical character of the keratin expression suggests that these proteins may be implicated in the generation of spatial organization of epithelial tissues.

  5. Antibiotic selection of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 in a mouse intestinal colonization model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boetius Hertz, Frederik; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2014-10-01

    The ability of different antibiotics to select for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli remains a topic of discussion. In a mouse intestinal colonization model, we evaluated the selective abilities of nine common antimicrobials (cefotaxime, cefuroxime, dicloxacillin, clindamycin, penicillin, ampicillin, meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and amdinocillin) against a CTX-M-15-producing E. coli sequence type 131 (ST131) isolate with a fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype. Mice (8 per group) were orogastrically administered 0.25 ml saline with 10(8) CFU/ml E. coli ST131. On that same day, antibiotic treatment was initiated and given subcutaneously once a day for three consecutive days. CFU of E. coli ST131, Bacteroides, and Gram-positive aerobic bacteria in fecal samples were studied, with intervals, until day 8. Bacteroides was used as an indicator organism for impact on the Gram-negative anaerobic population. For three antibiotics, prolonged colonization was investigated with additional fecal CFU counts determined on days 10 and 14 (cefotaxime, dicloxacillin, and clindamycin). Three antibiotics (cefotaxime, dicloxacillin, and clindamycin) promoted overgrowth of E. coli ST131 (P organisms. Only clindamycin treatment resulted in prolonged colonization. The remaining six antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, did not promote overgrowth of E. coli ST131 (P > 0.95), nor did they suppress Bacteroides or Gram-positive organisms. The results showed that antimicrobials both with and without an impact on Gram-negative anaerobes can select for ESBL-producing E. coli, indicating that not only Gram-negative anaerobes have a role in upholding colonization resistance. Other, so-far-unknown bacterial populations must be of importance for preventing colonization by incoming E. coli.

  6. An ex-vivo human intestinal model to study Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra Bansal

    Full Text Available Amoebiasis (a human intestinal infection affecting 50 million people every year is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying human colon invasion by E. histolytica, we have set up an ex vivo human colon model to study the early steps in amoebiasis. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses, we have established that E. histolytica caused the removal of the protective mucus coat during the first two hours of incubation, detached the enterocytes, and then penetrated into the lamina propria by following the crypts of Lieberkühn. Significant cell lysis (determined by the release of lactodehydrogenase and inflammation (marked by the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 beta, interferon gamma, interleukin 6, interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor were detected after four hours of incubation. Entamoeba dispar (a closely related non-pathogenic amoeba that also colonizes the human colon was unable to invade colonic mucosa, lyse cells or induce an inflammatory response. We also examined the behaviour of trophozoites in which genes coding for known virulent factors (such as amoebapores, the Gal/GalNAc lectin and the cysteine protease 5 (CP-A5, which have major roles in cell death, adhesion (to target cells or mucus and mucus degradation, respectively were silenced, together with the corresponding tissue responses. Our data revealed that the signalling via the heavy chain Hgl2 or via the light chain Lgl1 of the Gal/GalNAc lectin is not essential to penetrate the human colonic mucosa. In addition, our study demonstrates that E. histolytica silenced for CP-A5 does not penetrate the colonic lamina propria and does not induce the host's pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion.

  7. Hydrolysis-dependent absorption of disaccharides in the rat small intestine (chronic experiments and mathematical modeling).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromova, L V; Gruzdkov, A A

    1999-06-01

    In order to throw light on the mechanisms responsible for the enzyme-dependent absorption of disaccharides membrane hydrolysis of maltose and trehalose and the absorption of glucose (free and that derived from disaccharides) were studied in isolated loops (20 cm) of the rat small intestine in chronic experiments. The rates of glucose absorption were 0.26-0.81 micromol x min(-1) x cm(-1) when the loop was perfused with a 12.5 to 75.0 mmol/l free glucose solution, which is only insignificantly higher than the rates observed during perfusion with equivalent maltose solutions. The coupling coefficient (the ratio of glucose absorption rate to the rate of disaccharide hydrolysis) decreased from 0.90 to 0.60 with the increasing maltose concentrations in the infusate from 6.25 to 37.5 mmol/l, but remained unchanged (approximately 0.95) within the same range of trehalose concentrations. The permeability of the pre-epithelial barrier was equivalent to that of unstirred water layer of less than 40 microm thickness. Fluid absorption was within the range of 0.73-2.55 microl x min(-1) x cm(-1), and it showed a correlation with the rates of glucose absorption. The results agree with a model developed on the assumption that free glucose and that released from disaccharides share the same membrane transporters. It could be concluded that a close coupling of disaccharide hydrolysis with derived glucose absorption in chronic experiments is achieved mainly due to a high activity of glucose transporters, which are presumably not associated with membrane disaccharidases. The transcellular active transport is a predominant mechanism of disaccharide-derived glucose absorption under conditions close to physiological.

  8. Challenges of culturing human norovirus in three-dimensional organoid intestinal cell culture models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathia Papafragkou

    Full Text Available Human noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Recently, cell culture systems have been described using either human embryonic intestinal epithelial cells (Int-407 or human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2 growing on collagen-I porous micro carrier beads in a rotating bioreactor under conditions of physiological fluid shear. Here, we describe the efforts from two independent laboratories to implement this three dimensional (3D cell culture system for the replication of norovirus. Int-407 and Caco-2 were grown in a rotating bioreactor for up to 28 days. Prior to infection, cells were screened for the presence of microvilli by electron microscopy and stained for junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and β-catenin. Differentiated 3D cells were transferred to 24-well plates and infected with bacteria-free filtrates of various norovirus genotypes (GI.1, GI.3, GI.8, GII.2, GII.4, GII.7, and GII.8. At 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h post inoculation, viral RNA from both cells and supernatants were collected and analyzed for norovirus RNA by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Despite observations of high expression of junction proteins and microvilli development in stained thin sections, our data suggest no significant increase in viral titer based on norovirus RNA copy number during the first 48 h after inoculation for the different samples and virus culture conditions tested. Our combined efforts demonstrate that 3D cell culture models using Int-407 or Caco-2 cells do not support norovirus replication and highlight the complexity and difficulty of developing a reproducible in vitro cell culture system for human norovirus.

  9. Resveratrol efficiently improves pulmonary function via stabilizing mast cells in a rat intestinal injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Weicheng; Hu, Dan; Han, Xue; Wang, Hanbin; Yang, Jianyu; Xu, Yang; Li, Yuantao; Yao, Weifeng; Chen, Chaojin

    2017-09-15

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (IIR) leads to acute lung injury (ALI) distally by aggravating pulmonary oxidative stress. Resveratrol is effective in attenuating ALI through its antioxidant capacity. This study aimed to determine the effects of resveratrol on IIR-induced ALI and to explore the role of mast cells (MCs) activation in a rat model of IIR. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to IIR by occluding the superior mesenteric artery for 60min followed by 4-hour reperfusion. Resveratrol was intraperitoneally injected at a dose of 15mg/kg for 5days before IIR. MCs stabilizer/inhibitor cromolyn sodium and degranulator compound 48/80 were used to explore the interaction between resveratrol and MCs. Lung tissues were collected for pathological detection and MCs staining. Pulmonary protein expression of surfactant protein-C (SP-C), tryptase, p47(phox) and gp91(phox) (two NADPH oxidase subunits), ICAM-1(intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and P-selectin were detected. The levels of oxidative stress markers (SOD, MDA, H2O2 and MPO) and β-hexosaminidase were also measured. At the end of IIR, lung injury was significantly increased and was associated with decreased expression of SP-C and increased lung oxidative stress. Increased inflammation as well as activation of MCs was also observed in the lungs after IIR. All these changes were prevented or reversed by resveratrol pretreatment or MCs inhibition with cromolyn sodium. However, these protective effects of resveratrol or cromolyn sodium were reduced by MCs degranulator compound 48/80. These findings reveal that resveratrol attenuates IIR-induced ALI by reducing NADPH oxidase protein expression and inflammation through stabilizing MCs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. An ex-vivo human intestinal model to study Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Devendra; Ave, Patrick; Kerneis, Sophie; Frileux, Pascal; Boché, Olivier; Baglin, Anne Catherine; Dubost, Geneviève; Leguern, Anne-Sophie; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Bracha, Rivka; Mirelman, David; Guillén, Nancy; Labruyère, Elisabeth

    2009-11-17

    Amoebiasis (a human intestinal infection affecting 50 million people every year) is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying human colon invasion by E. histolytica, we have set up an ex vivo human colon model to study the early steps in amoebiasis. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses, we have established that E. histolytica caused the removal of the protective mucus coat during the first two hours of incubation, detached the enterocytes, and then penetrated into the lamina propria by following the crypts of Lieberkühn. Significant cell lysis (determined by the release of lactodehydrogenase) and inflammation (marked by the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 beta, interferon gamma, interleukin 6, interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor) were detected after four hours of incubation. Entamoeba dispar (a closely related non-pathogenic amoeba that also colonizes the human colon) was unable to invade colonic mucosa, lyse cells or induce an inflammatory response. We also examined the behaviour of trophozoites in which genes coding for known virulent factors (such as amoebapores, the Gal/GalNAc lectin and the cysteine protease 5 (CP-A5), which have major roles in cell death, adhesion (to target cells or mucus) and mucus degradation, respectively) were silenced, together with the corresponding tissue responses. Our data revealed that the signalling via the heavy chain Hgl2 or via the light chain Lgl1 of the Gal/GalNAc lectin is not essential to penetrate the human colonic mucosa. In addition, our study demonstrates that E. histolytica silenced for CP-A5 does not penetrate the colonic lamina propria and does not induce the host's pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion.

  11. [THE EVALUATION OF MICROBIOLOGICAL DISORDERS OF MICROFLORA OF OROPHARYNX AND INTESTINE USING MATHEMATICAL MODELING TECHNIQUE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatevalov, A V; Elkova, E P; Afanasiev, S S; Aleshkin, A V; Mironov, A Yu; Gusarova, M P; Gudova, N V

    2016-02-01

    The analysis was applied to microflora of feces and oropharinx and concentration of volatile fatty acids in saliva from patients of consultative diagnostic center of G.N. Gabrichevskii Moscow research institute of epidemiology and microbiology. The computer classification program is developed on the basis of determining degree of microbiological disorders on the basis of received data and using artificial neural networks and discriminant analysis. The analysis established decreasing of probability of false classification in case of increasing of degree of microbiological disorders of microflora of intestine and absence of such a correlation for microbiological and metabolic disorders of microflora of intestine.

  12. The Effect of Lactulose on the Composition of the Intestinal Microbiota and Short-chain Fatty Acid Production in Human Volunteers and a Computer-controlled Model of the Proximal Large Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.; Nuenen, M.H.M.C. van; Heuvel, E.G. van den; Pool, W.; Vossen, J.M.B.M. van der

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the in vivo effect of lactulose on faecal parameters with the effect in a dynamic, computer-controlled in vitro model of the proximal large intestine (TIM-2). Faecal samples from 10 human volunteers collected before (non-adapted) and after 1 week of

  13. Reprodaetion of an animal model of multiple intestinal injuries mimicking "lethal triad" caused by severe penetrating abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-fei WANG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce an animal model of multi-intestinal injuries with "lethal triad" characterized by low body temperature,acidosis and coagulopathy.Methods Six female domestic outbred pigs were anesthetized,and the carotid artery and jugular vein were cannulated for monitoring the blood pressure and heart rate and for infusion of fluid.The animals were shot with a gun to create a severe penetrating abdominal trauma.Immediately after the shooting,50% of total blood volume(35ml/kg hemorrhage was drawn from the carotid artery in 20min.After a 40min shock period,4h of pre-hospital phase was mimicked by normal saline(NS resuscitation to maintain systolic blood pressure(SBP > 80mmHg or mean arterial pressure(MAP > 60mmHg.When SBP > 80mmHg or MAP > 60mmHg,no fluid infusion or additional bleeding was given.Hemodynamic parameters were recorded,and pathology of myocardium,lung,small intestine and liver was observed.Results There were multiple intestinal perforations(8-10 site injuries/pig leading to intra-abdominal contamination,mesenteric injury(1-2 site injuries/pig resulted in partial intestinal ischemia and intra-abdominal hemorrhage,and no large colon and mesenteric vascular injury.One pig died before the completion of the model establishment(at the end of pre-hospital resuscitation.The typical symptoms of trauma-induced hemorrhagic shock were observed in survival animals.Low temperature(33.3±0.5℃,acidosis(pH=7.242±0.064,and coagulopathy(protrombin time and activated partial thromboplasting time prolonged were observed after pre-hospital resuscitation.Pathology showed that myocardium,lung,small intestine and liver were severely injured.Conclusions A new model,simulating three stages of "traumatic hemorrhagic shock,pre-hospital recovery and hospital treatment" and inducing the "lethal triad" accompanied with abdominal pollution,has been successfully established.This model has good stability and high reproducibility.The survival animals can be

  14. Efeitos hemodinâmicos e metabólicos iniciais da perfusão hipotérmica intestinal in situ.: avaliação de um novo modelo canino de autotransplante intestinal Initial hemodynamic and metabolic effects of intestinal hypothermic perfusion in situ: an alternative model of canine intestinal autotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruy Jorge Cruz Junior

    2004-08-01

    , hemoglobina assim como na temperatura central. CONCLUSÃO: O modelo de autotransplante intestinal é extremamente útil e de fácil execução, para a avaliação inicial de soluções de preservação e/ou drogas antioxidantes, comumente utilizadas no transplante de intestino.Intestinal transplantation is an acceptable therapy for children and adults with short bowel syndrome. The great majority of large animal experimental models of intestinal transplantation are complex and take a lot of time to be performed. In this study, we developed an alternative model of intestinal autotransplantation and evaluate the initial impact of isolated hypothermic intestinal perfusion with Ringer’s lactate solution on hemodynamic and metabolic parameters. METHODS: Six pentobarbital anesthetized mongrel dogs were used in this study (22,8±1,4 Kg. Systemic hemodynamic were evaluated through a Swan-Ganz and arterial catheters; while gastrointestinal tract perfusion by superior mesenteric vein blood flow (SMVBF, ultrasonic flowprobe and intestinal mucosal pCO2 (pCO2-int and pCO2-gap, gas tonometry. Initially, the proximal jejunum and distal ileum were transected; at the basis of the mesentery excepting the superior mesenteric artery and vein. The small bowel was then perfused in situ with cold (4ºC Ringer’s lactate solution for 30 minutes, with an automatic pump. The animals where observed for 120 minutes after reperfusion. Blood samples were collected from thoracic aorta for gas blood analysis. RESULTS: Hypothermic intestinal perfusion induced a partial reduction on SMVBF, only in the first 30 min of reperfusion (398±102,8 to 587±70,9 ml/min and an increase on pCO2-gap (2±2,7 to 29,8±6 mmHg. During the experimental protocol, we did not observe significant alterations on systemic hemodynamic or metabolic parameters (MAP, CO, pH, base excess and hemoglobin levels as well as on central core temperature. CONCLUSION: The model of intestinal transplantation is very useful to test different

  15. Human intestinal P-glycoprotein activity estimated by the model substrate digoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, U L; Hyldahl Olesen, L; Nyvold, Charlotte Guldborg;

    2007-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) plays a part in the intestinal uptake of xenobiotics and has been associated with susceptibility to ulcerative colitis. The aim of this study was to examine Pgp activity in relation to age, gender, medical treatment (rifampicin or ketoconazole) and the multidrug resistance (M...

  16. Of Mice and Mucins: Models for studying the role of mucins in the intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Sluis (Maria)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe small intestine is the major organ for the absorption of nutrients and also secretes enzymes to complete the digestive processes started in the stomach1-5. A 30- 50% loss (remaining length, <75 cm in children and <200 cm in adults) often leads to malabsorption, with resultant severe

  17. Intestinal capacity to digest and absorb carbohydrates is maintained in a rat model of cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, E. Leonie; Wolters, Henk; Stellaard, Frans; Kuipers, Folkert; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Cholestasis is associated with systemic accumulation of bile salts and with deficiency of bile in the intestinal lumen. During the past years bile salts have been identified as signaling molecules that regulate lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism. Bile salts have also been shown to activate signal

  18. Human intestinal flora and the induction of chronic arthritis : studies in an animal model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Severijnen

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe etiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic joint inflammation, is unknown. A microbial involvement is suspected, but no particular microorganism has been incriminated. The human intestinal microflora is an abundant and continuous source of bacterial antigens and may be involved

  19. Electrospun PLGA/gelatin fibrous tubes for the application of biodegradable intestinal stent in rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, So-Ra; Franco, Rose-Ann; Bae, Sang-Ho; Min, Young-Ki; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2013-08-01

    A biodegradable fibrous tube was fabricated by electrospinning method using a combination of Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and gelatin dissolved in trifluoroethanol (TFE). Different ratios of the two polymers (PLGA/Gelatin: 1/9, 3/7, 5/5) were used for electrospinning to determine the optimum condition appropriate for intestinal stent application. Fiber morphology was visualized and analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Characterizations of physical properties were done according to its tensile strength, surface hydrophilicity, swelling ability, and biodegradability. Biocompatibility of the scaffolds was investigated in vitro using IEC-18 (Rat intestinal epithelial cell). Cell proliferation was quantified using MTT assay and cell adhesion behavior was visualized by SEM and confocal laser scanning microscope. PLGA/Gelatin (5/5) was determined to have adequate material properties and sufficient in vitro biocompatibility. This was then implanted in a male Sprague-Dawley rat for 14 days to determine in vivo behavior of the sample. Histological examination on the intestinal tissue surrounding the graft showed normal morphology comparable to non-implanted intestine.

  20. Intestinal tumorigenesis is not affected by progesterone signaling in rodent models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, J.; Muncan, V.; Jacobs, R.J.; de Jonge-Muller, E.S.M.; Graven, L.; Biemond, I.; Ederveen, A.G.; Groothuis, P.G.; Mosselman, S.; Hardwick, J.C.; Hommes, D.W.; van den Brink, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical data suggest that progestins have chemopreventive properties in the development of colorectal cancer. We set out to examine a potential protective effect of progestins and progesterone signaling on colon cancer development. In normal and neoplastic intestinal tissue, we found that the proge

  1. Identification of retinal transformation hot spots in developing Drosophila epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Salzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The retinal determination (RD network is an evolutionarily conserved regulatory circuit that governs early events in the development of eyes throughout the animal kingdom. Ectopic expression of many members of this network leads to the transformation of non-retinal epithelia into eye tissue. An often-overlooked observation is that only particular cell-populations within a handful of tissues are capable of having their primary developmental instructions superseded and overruled. METHODOLOGY/PRELIMINARY FINDINGS: Here we confirm that indeed, only a discrete number of cell populations within the imaginal discs that give rise to the head, antenna, legs, wings and halteres have the cellular plasticity to have their developmental fates altered. In contrast to previous reports, we find that all transformable cell populations do not lie within the TGFbeta or Hedgehog signaling domains. Additionally neither signaling cascade alone is sufficient for non-retinal cell types to be converted into retinal tissue. The transformation "hot spots" that we have identified appear to coincide with several previously defined transdetermination "weak spots", suggesting that ectopic eye formation is less the result of one network overriding the orders of another, as previously thought, but rather is the physical manifestation of redirecting cell populations of enormous cellular plasticity. We also demonstrate that the initiation of eye formation in non-retinal tissues occurs asynchronously compared to that of the normal eye suggesting that retinal development is not under the control of a global developmental clock. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the subregions of non-retinal tissues that are capable of supporting eye formation represent specialized cell-populations that have a different level of plasticity than other cells within these tissues and may be the founder cells of each tissue.

  2. Distribution of Y-receptors in murine lingual epithelia.

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    Maria D Hurtado

    Full Text Available Peptide hormones and their cognate receptors belonging to neuropeptide Y (NPY family mediate diverse biological functions in a number of tissues. Recently, we discovered the presence of the gut satiation peptide YY (PYY in saliva of mice and humans and defined its role in the regulation of food intake and body weight maintenance. Here we report the systematic analysis of expression patterns of all NPY receptors (Rs, Y1R, Y2R, Y4R, and Y5R in lingual epithelia in mice. Using four independent assays, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry and RT PCR, we show that the morphologically different layers of the keratinized stratified epithelium of the dorsal layer of the tongue express Y receptors in a very distinctive yet overlapping pattern. In particular, the monolayer of basal progenitor cells expresses both Y1 and Y2 receptors. Y1Rs are present in the parabasal prickle cell layer and the granular layer, while differentiated keratinocytes display abundant Y5Rs. Y4Rs are expressed substantially in the neuronal fibers innervating the lamina propria and mechanoreceptors. Basal epithelial cells positive for Y2Rs respond robustly to PYY(3-36 by increasing intracellular Ca(2+ suggesting their possible functional interaction with salivary PYY. In taste buds of the circumvallate papillae, some taste receptor cells (TRCs express YRs localized primarily at the apical domain, indicative of their potential role in taste perception. Some of the YR-positive TRCs are co-localized with neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM, suggesting that these TRCs may have synaptic contacts with nerve terminals. In summary, we show that all YRs are abundantly expressed in multiple lingual cell types, including epithelial progenitors, keratinocytes, neuronal dendrites and TRCs. These results suggest that these receptors may be involved in the mediation of a wide variety of functions, including proliferation, differentiation, motility, taste perception

  3. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Jackson, Matthew I; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Combs, Gerald F

    2011-11-01

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability at nutritional doses. In this study, we found that two sources of L-selenomethionine (SeMet) and Se-enriched yeast each increased intracellular Se content more effectively than selenite or methylselenocysteine (SeMSC) in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. Interestingly, SeMSC, SeMet, and digested Se-enriched yeast were transported at comparable efficacy from the apical to basolateral sides, each being about 3-fold that of selenite. In addition, these forms of Se, whether before or after traversing from apical side to basolateral side, did not change the potential to support glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Although selenoprotein P has been postulated to be a key Se transport protein, its intracellular expression did not differ when selenite, SeMSC, SeMet, or digested Se-enriched yeast was added to serum-contained media. Taken together, our data show, for the first time, that the chemical form of Se at nutritional doses can affect the absorptive (apical to basolateral side) efficacy and retention of Se by intestinal cells; but that, these effects are not directly correlated to the potential to support GPx activity.

  4. Hydrodynamic Effects on Drug Dissolution and Deaggregation in the Small Intestine-A Study with Felodipine as a Model Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfors, Lennart; Jonsson, Malin; Weibull, Emelie; Brasseur, James G; Abrahamsson, Bertil

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to understand and predict the influence of hydrodynamic effects in the small intestine on dissolution of primary and aggregated drug particles. Dissolution tests of suspensions with a low-solubility drug, felodipine, were performed in a Couette cell under hydrodynamic test conditions corresponding to the fed small intestine. Dissolution was also performed in the USP II apparatus at two paddle speeds of 25 and 200 rpm and at different surfactant concentrations below critical micelle concentration. The experimental dissolution rates were compared with theoretical calculations. The different levels of shear stress in the in vitro tests did not influence the dissolution of primary or aggregated particles and experimental dissolution rates corresponded very well to calculations. The dissolution rate for the aggregated drug particles increased after addition of surfactant because of deaggregation, but there were still no effect of hydrodynamics. In conclusion, hydrodynamics do not influence dissolution and deaggregation of micronized drug particles in the small intestine of this model drug. Surface tension has a strong effect on the deaggregation and subsequent dissolution. Addition of surfactants at in vivo relevant surface tension levels is thus critical for in vivo predictive in vitro dissolution testing. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  5. Intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of calcium pyruvate in the TNBS model of rat colitis: Comparison with ethyl pyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algieri, F; Rodriguez-Nogales, A; Garrido-Mesa, J; Camuesco, D; Vezza, T; Garrido-Mesa, N; Utrilla, P; Rodriguez-Cabezas, M E; Pischel, I; Galvez, J

    2016-03-01

    Pyruvate is a key intermediate of the carbohydrate metabolism with endogenous scavenger properties. However, it cannot be used in clinics due to its instability. Ethyl pyruvate (EP) has shown better stability as well as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Calcium pyruvate monohydrate (CPM) is another stable pyruvate derivative that could also provide the benefits from calcium, fundamental for bone health. Considering everything, we propose CPM as a therapeutic strategy to treat diseases with an immune component in which there is also a significant dysregulation of the skeletal homeostasis. This could be applicable to inflammatory bowel disease, which is characterized by over-production of pro-inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites that induces intestinal mucosal damage and chronic inflammation, and extra-intestinal symptoms like osteopenia and osteoporosis. The effects of CPM and EP (20, 40 and 100mg/kg) were evaluated on the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) model of colitis in rats, after a 7-day oral treatment, with main focus on colonic histology and inflammatory mediators. Both pyruvates showed intestinal anti-inflammatory effects in the TNBS-induced colitis. They were evident both histologically, with a recovery of the mucosal cytoarchitecture and a reduction of the neutrophil infiltration, and through the profile of inflammatory mediators (IL-1, IL-6, IL-17, IL-23, iNOS). However, CPM appeared to be more effective than ethyl pyruvate. In conclusion, CPM exerts intestinal anti-inflammatory effect on the TNBS-induced colitis in rats, although further experiments are needed to explore its beneficial effects on bone health and osteoporosis.

  6. Computed Tomography Perfusion Imaging Detection of Microcirculatory Dysfunction in Small Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in a Porcine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Shi

    Full Text Available To evaluate multi-slice computed tomography (CT perfusion imaging (CTPI for identifying microcirculatory dysfunction in small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury in a porcine model.Fifty-two pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups: (1 the IR group (n = 24, where intestinal ischemia was induced by separating and clamping the superior mesenteric artery (SMA for 2 h, followed by reperfusion for 1, 2, 3, and 4 h (IR-1h, IR-2h, IR-3h, and IR-4h; n = 6, respectively; (2 the sham-operated (SO group (n = 20, where the SMA was separated without clamping and controlled at postoperative 3, 4, 5, and 6 h (SO-3h, SO-4h, SO-5h, and SO-6h; n = 5, respectively; (3 the ischemia group (n = 4, where the SMA was separated and clamped for 2 h, without reperfusion, and (4 baseline group (n = 4, an additional group that was not manipulated. Small intestinal CTPI was performed at corresponding time points and perfusion parameters were obtained. The distal ileum was resected to measure the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA and superoxide dismutase (SOD and for histopathological examination.The perfusion parameters of the IR groups showed significant differences compared with the corresponding SO groups and the baseline group (before ischemia. The blood flow (BF, blood volume (BV, and permeability surface (PS among the 4 IR groups were significantly different. BF and BV were significantly negatively correlated with MDA, and significantly positively correlated with SOD in the IR groups. Histopathologically, the effects of the 2-h ischemic loops were not significantly exacerbated by reperfusion.CTPI can be a valuable tool for detecting microcirculatory dysfunction and for dynamic monitoring of small intestinal IR injury.

  7. Inhibition of Protease-activated Receptor 1 Ameliorates Intestinal Radiation Mucositis in a Preclinical Rat Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junru; Kulkarni, Ashwini [Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Chintala, Madhu [Schering-Plough Research Institute, Kenilworth, New Jersey (United States); Fink, Louis M. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Hauer-Jensen, Martin, E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu [Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Surgery Service, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, using a specific small-molecule inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling, whether the beneficial effect of thrombin inhibition on radiation enteropathy development is due to inhibition of blood clotting or to cellular (PAR1-mediated) thrombin effects. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent fractionated X-irradiation (5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 9) of a 4-cm small-bowel segment. Early radiation toxicity was evaluated in rats receiving PAR1 inhibitor (SCH602539, 0, 10, or 15 mg/kg/d) from 1 day before to 2 weeks after the end of irradiation. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis was evaluated in animals receiving SCH602539 (0, 15, or 30 mg/kg/d) until 2 weeks after irradiation, or continuously until termination of the experiment 26 weeks after irradiation. Results: Blockade of PAR1 ameliorated early intestinal toxicity, with reduced overall intestinal radiation injury (P=.002), number of myeloperoxidase-positive (P=.03) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive (P=.04) cells, and collagen III accumulation (P=.005). In contrast, there was no difference in delayed radiation enteropathy in either the 2- or 26-week administration groups. Conclusion: Pharmacological blockade of PAR1 seems to reduce early radiation mucositis but does not affect the level of delayed intestinal radiation fibrosis. Early radiation enteropathy is related to activation of cellular thrombin receptors, whereas platelet activation or fibrin formation may play a greater role in the development of delayed toxicity. Because of the favorable side-effect profile, PAR1 blockade should be further explored as a method to ameliorate acute intestinal radiation toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer and to protect first responders and rescue personnel in radiologic/nuclear emergencies.

  8. Rebamipide attenuates 5-Fluorouracil-induced small intestinal mucositis in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jin Hyun; Moon, Won; Park, Jongha; Park, Seun Ja; Song, Geun Am; Han, Seung Hee; Lee, Jong Hun

    2015-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis is one of the most common morbidities in chemotherapy and involves the reactive oxygen species (ROS) system, apoptosis, and inflammatory cytokines. Rebamipide exerts a mucosal-protective effect, mediated through several mechanisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of rebamipide in 5-FU-induced mouse small-intestinal mucositis. BALB/c mice were assigned randomly to four groups; (1) control group (n=10; receiving saline orally for 6 d), (2) rebamipide group (n=10; 150 mg/kg rebamipide for 6 d orally), (3) 5-FU group (n=10; 30 mg/kg 5-FU for 5 d, intraperitoneally (i.p.)), and (4) rebamipide +5-FU group (n=10; 150 mg/kg rebamipide for 6 d orally and 30 mg/kg 5-FU for 5 d, i.p.). Body weights and diarrhea scales were assessed. At day 5, the mice were sacrificed. Small intestinal tissue was used for: (1) hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining for determination of small intestinal villi height, (2) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, (3) immunohistochemistry for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), F4/80, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, (4) measurement of serum and tissue GSH levels, and (5) measurement of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels. Rebamipide attenuated the severity of mucosal injury reflected by body weight changes, degrees of diarrhea, and heights of villi. Rebamipide reduced the expression of iNOS and TGF-β1, apoptosis, macrophage accumulation, serum TNF-α levels, and prevented reductions in serum and tissue glutathione (GSH) levels by 5-FU administration. These results suggest that rebamipide promotes several mechanisms of mucosal protection and attenuated the 5-FU-induced mucosal injury. In conclusion, administration of rebamipide may have significant protective effects against 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis.

  9. Effect of alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate-induced liver injury on intestinal adaptation in a rat model of short bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhotnik, Igor; Razon, Hila; Pollak, Yulia; Hayari, Lili; Bejar, Jacob; Mogilner, Jorge G; Sylvester, Karl G

    2012-02-01

    Progressive hyperbilirubinemia and end-stage liver failure are among the most serious complications of short bowel syndrome (SBS), representing the principle cause of death in a majority of fatal cases. In the current study, we examined the effects of alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury on intestinal adaptation in a rat model of SBS. Male rats were divided into four groups: Sham rats underwent bowel transection (n = 8), Sham liver-injury rats underwent bowel transection and IP injection of ANIT (100 mg/kg, n = 8), SBS rats underwent a 75% bowel resection, and SBS-ANIT rats underwent bowel resection and liver injury similar to group sham-ANIT (n = 8). Fourteen days after intervention, liver biopsies and intestinal samples were obtained and evaluated for liver damage and measures of intestinal adaptation. Real time PCR and Western blotting were used to determine the level of bax and bcl-2 mRNA and protein, and p-ERK protein levels. Statistical analysis was performed using the one-way ANOVA test, with p < 0.05 considered statistically significant. All ANIT-treated animals exhibited histological evidence of liver damage that was associated with the expansion of atypical ductal proliferation near the periportal areas, intense neutrophil infiltration in the liver, increased mitotic activity, Kupfer cells hyperplasia and fatty liver degeneration. ANIT-induced liver damage in bowel resected animals was associated with a significant decrease in all parameters of intestinal adaptation including bowel and mucosal weight in jejunum (twofold decrease) and ileum (twofold decrease), mucosal DNA in jejunum (fourfold decrease), mucosal protein in jejunum (threefold decrease) and ileum (threefold decrease), villus height in jejunum (38%) and ileum (34%), and crypt depth in jejunum (24%) and ileum (30%) compared to SBS animals. Both Sham-ANIT and SBS-ANIT rats demonstrated decreased enterocyte proliferation rates that were accompanied by decreased p-ERK protein

  10. Insights into mechanisms of intestinal segmentation in guinea pigs: a combined computational modeling and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Jordan D; Bornstein, Joel C; Thomas, Evan A

    2008-09-01

    Segmentation in the guinea pig small intestine consists of a number of discrete motor patterns including rhythmic stationary contractions that occur episodically at specific locations along the intestine. The enteric nervous system regulates segmentation, but the exact circuit is unknown. Using simple computer models, we investigated possible circuits. Our computational model simulated the mean neuron firing rate in the feedforward ascending and descending reflex pathways. A stimulus-evoked pacemaker was located in the afferent pathway or in a feedforward pathway. Output of the feedforward pathways was fed into a simple model to determine the response of the muscle. Predictions were verified in vitro by using guinea pig jejunum, in which segmentation was induced with luminal fatty acid. In the computational model, local stimuli produced an oral contraction and anal dilation, similar to in vitro responses to local distension, but did not produce segmentation. When the stimulus was distributed, representing a nutrient load, the result was either a tonic response or globally synchronized oscillations. However, when we introduced local variations in synaptic coupling, stationary contractions occurred around these locations. This predicts that severing the ascending and descending pathways will induce stationary contractions. An acute lesion in our in vitro model significantly increased the number of stationary contractions immediately oral and anal to the lesion. Our results suggest that spatially localized rhythmic contractions arise from a local imbalance between ascending excitatory and descending inhibitory muscle inputs and require a distributed stimulus and a rhythm generator in the afferent pathway.

  11. Enhanced intestinal tumor multiplicity and grade in vivo after HZE exposure: mouse models for space radiation risk estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, Daniela; Datta, Kamal; Doiron, Kathryn; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Fornace, Albert J

    2010-08-01

    Carcinogenesis induced by space radiation is considered a major risk factor in manned interplanetary and other extended missions. The models presently used to estimate the risk for cancer induction following deep space radiation exposure are based on data from A-bomb survivor cohorts and do not account for important biological differences existing between high-linear energy transfer (LET) and low-LET-induced DNA damage. High-energy and charge (HZE) radiation, the main component of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), causes highly complex DNA damage compared to low-LET radiation, which may lead to increased frequency of chromosomal rearrangements, and contribute to carcinogenic risk in astronauts. Gastrointestinal (GI) tumors are frequent in the United States, and colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer accounting for 10% of all cancer deaths. On the basis of the aforementioned epidemiological observations and the frequency of spontaneous precancerous GI lesions in the general population, even a modest increase in incidence by space radiation exposure could have a significant effect on health risk estimates for future manned space flights. Ground-based research is necessary to reduce the uncertainties associated with projected cancer risk estimates and to gain insights into molecular mechanisms involved in space-induced carcinogenesis. We investigated in vivo differential effects of gamma-rays and HZE ions on intestinal tumorigenesis using two different murine models, ApcMin/+ and Apc1638N/+. We showed that gamma- and/or HZE exposure significantly enhances development and progression of intestinal tumors in a mutant-line-specific manner, and identified suitable models for in vivo studies of space radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis.

  12. A new conditional Apc-mutant mouse model for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robanus-Maandag, Els C; Koelink, Pim J; Breukel, Cor; Salvatori, Daniela C F; Jagmohan-Changur, Shantie C; Bosch, Cathy A J; Verspaget, Hein W; Devilee, Peter; Fodde, Riccardo; Smits, Ron

    2010-05-01

    Mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene predispose individuals to familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), characterized by multiple tumours in the large intestine. Most mouse models heterozygous for truncating mutant Apc alleles mimic FAP, however, the intestinal tumours occur mainly in the small intestine. To model large intestinal tumours, we generated a new conditional Apc-mutant allele, Apc(15lox), with exon 15 flanked by loxP sites. Similar survival of Apc(1638N/15lox) and Apc(1638N/+) mice indicated that the normal function of Apc was not impaired by the loxP sites. Deletion of exon 15, encoding nearly all functional Apc domains and containing the polyadenylation signal, resulted in a mutant allele expressing low levels of a 74 kDa truncated Apc protein. Germ line Cre-mediated deletion of exon 15 resulted in Apc(Delta15/+) mice, showing a severe Apc(Min/+)-like phenotype characterized by multiple tumours in the small intestine and early lethality. In contrast, conditional Cre-mediated deletion of exon 15 specifically directed to the epithelia of distal small and large intestine of FabplCre;Apc(15lox/+) mice led to longer survival and to tumours that developed predominantly in the large intestine, mimicking human FAP-associated colorectal cancer and sporadic colorectal cancer. We conclude that the FabplCre;Apc(15lox/+) mouse should be an attractive model for studies on prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer.

  13. Bovine Pericardium Patch Wrapping Intestinal Anastomosis Improves Healing Process and Prevents Leakage in a Pig Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testini, Mario; Gurrado, Angela; Portincasa, Piero; Scacco, Salvatore; Marzullo, Andrea; Piccinni, Giuseppe; Lissidini, Germana; Greco, Luigi; De Salvia, Maria Antonietta; Bonfrate, Leonilde; Debellis, Lucantonio; Sardaro, Nicola; Staffieri, Francesco; Carratù, Maria Rosaria; Crovace, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Failure of intestinal anastomosis is a major complication following abdominal surgery. Biological materials have been introduced as reinforcement of abdominal wall hernia in contaminated setting. An innovative application of biological patch is its use as reinforcement of gastrointestinal anastomosis. The aim of study was to verify whether the bovine pericardium patch improves the healing of anastomosis, when in vivo wrapping the suture line of pig intestinal anastomosis, avoiding leakage in the event of deliberately incomplete suture. Forty-three pigs were randomly divided: Group 1 (control, n = 14): hand-sewn ileo-ileal and colo-colic anastomosis; Group 2 (n = 14): standard anastomosis wrapped by pericardium bovine patch; Group 3 (n = 1) and 4 (n = 14): one suture was deliberately incomplete and also wrapped by patch in the last one. Intraoperative evaluation, histological, biochemical, tensiometric and electrophysiological studies of intestinal specimens were performed at 48 h, 7 and 90 days after. In groups 2 and 4, no leak, stenosis, abscess, peritonitis, mesh displacement or shrinkage were found and adhesion rate decreased compared to control. Biochemical studies showed mitochondrial function improvement in colic wrapped anastomosis. Tensiometric evaluations suggested that the patch preserves the colic contractility similar to the controls. Electrophysiological results demonstrated that the patch also improves the mucosal function restoring almost normal transport properties. Use of pericardium bovine patch as reinforcement of intestinal anastomosis is safe and effective, significantly improving the healing process. Data of prevention of acute peritonitis and leakage in cases of iatrogenic perforation of anastomoses, covered with patch, is unpublished. PMID:24489752

  14. Intestinal adaptation is stimulated by partial enteral nutrition supplemented with the prebiotic short-chain fructooligosaccharide in a neonatal intestinal failure piglet model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, Jennifer L; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul

    2012-01-01

    Butyrate has been shown to stimulate intestinal adaptation when added to parenteral nutrition (PN) following small bowel resection but is not available in current PN formulations. The authors hypothesized that pre- and probiotic administration may be a clinically feasible method to administer...

  15. Human amniotic membrane as an intestinal patch for neomucosal growth in the rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlas, M; Gökçora, H; Erekul, S; Dindar, H; Yücesan, S

    1992-05-01

    This experiment was carried out as a preliminary study, an attempt to grow new intestinal mucosa on human amniotic membrane in the terminal ileum in 37 rabbits. After ketamin sulfate anesthesia at laparatomy, 5-cm ileal defects were patched with human amniotic membrane (5 x 2 cm). These patched intestines were investigated on the first postoperative day and the 2nd, 5th, 10th, and 20th weeks corresponding to 4, 5, 5, 10, and 10 rabbits, respectively. Only three rabbits died in the early postoperative period. There was no evidence of intestinal obstruction or dilatation with barium meal. Microscopically, the neomucosa consisted of a thin layer of columnar epithelial cells at 2 weeks with more maturity of the villi and less irregularity and branching by 20 weeks. All patches were covered with neomucosa commencing at 2 weeks and covering the whole patch area by 20 weeks. This technique's advantages are the large size and the ease of the availability of the human amniotic membrane for neonates at risk without jeopardizing the neonates tissues. It is hoped that this method might be considered when neonatal material is scarce.

  16. Intestinal motility disorder induced by free radicals: a new model mimicking oxidative stress in gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Ilaria; Campolongo, Patrizia; Valeri, Pacifico; Romanelli, Luca; Palmery, Maura

    2002-12-01

    Literature data suggest that the inflamed intestine may be subjected to a considerable oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to simulate the oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal tract and to explore its effect on intestinal motility. This was attained by treating isolated segments from the rabbit jejunum and from the guinea pig ileum with 2,2'-Azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (ABAP), which generates peroxyl radicals by thermal decomposition. Treatment of intestinal segments with ABAP reduced the muscarinic cholinergic response to acetylcholine in both preparations and induced a dose-dependent inhibition of the spontaneous contractions in the jejunum, also in the presence of tetrodotoxin. ABAP was found to inhibit the contractile response induced by BaCl(2) in guinea pig ileum preparations. This effect was not dose-dependent and it was reversed by Bay-K 8644, which activates voltage operated L-type calcium channels. The rapid and reversible effects of ABAP suggest that it might directly affect L-type calcium channels before lipoperoxidation induction. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that ABAP could be a useful tool to simulate early contractility dysfunctions mediated by oxidative stress.

  17. Restoration of intestinal function in an MPTP model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellett, L J; Hung, L W; Munckton, R; Sherratt, N A; Culvenor, J; Grubman, A; Furness, J B; White, A R; Finkelstein, D I; Barnham, K J; Lawson, V A

    2016-07-29

    Patients with Parkinson's disease often experience non-motor symptoms including constipation, which manifest prior to the onset of debilitating motor signs. Understanding the causes of these non-motor deficits and developing disease modifying therapeutic strategies has the potential to prevent disease progression. Specific neuronal subpopulations were reduced within the myenteric plexus of mice 21 days after intoxication by the intraperitoneal administration of MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) and was associated with a reduction in stool frequency, indicative of intestinal dysfunction. Oral administration of the divalent copper complex, Cu(II)(atsm), which has been shown to be neuroprotective and restore motor performance to MPTP lesioned mice, improved stool frequency and was correlated with restoration of neuronal subpopulations in the myenteric plexus of MPTP lesioned mice. Restoration of intestinal function was associated with reduced enteric glial cell reactivity and reduction of markers of inflammation. Therapeutics that have been shown to be neuroprotective in the central nervous system, such as Cu(II)(atsm), therefore also provide symptom relief and are disease modifying in the intestinal tract, suggesting that there is a common cause of Parkinson's disease pathogenesis in the enteric nervous system and central nervous system.

  18. Interleukin-8 responses of multi-layer gingival epithelia to subgingival biofilms: role of the "red complex" species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios N Belibasakis

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal tissues. The Gram-negative anaerobic species Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, (also known as the "red complex" species are highly associated with subgingival biofilms at periodontitis-affected sites. A major chemokine produced by the gingival epithelium in response to biofilm challenge, is interleukin (IL-8. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the relative effect of the "red complex" species as constituents of subgingival biofilms, on the regulation of IL-8 by gingival epithelia. Multi-layered organotypic human gingival epithelial cultures were challenged with a 10-species in vitro subgingival biofilm model, or its 7-species variant, excluding the "red complex". IL-8 gene expression and secretion analyses were performed by qPCR and ELISA, respectively. After 3 h, both biofilms up-regulated IL-8 gene expression, but the presence of the "red complex" resulted in 3-fold greater response. IL-8 secretion was also up-regulated by both biofilms, with no differences between them. After 24 h, the 10-species biofilm reduced IL-8 secretion to 50% of the control, but this was not affected when the "red complex" was absent. In conclusion, as part of biofilms, "red complex" species differentially regulate IL-8 in gingival epithelia, potentially affecting the chemotactic responses of the tissue.

  19. Adult intestinal stem cells: critical drivers of epithelial homeostasis and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Small populations of adult stem cells are responsible for the remarkable ability of the epithelial lining of the intestine to be efficiently renewed and repaired throughout life. The recent discovery of specific markers for these stem cells, together with the development of new technologies to track endogenous stem cell activity in vivo and to exploit their ability to generate new epithelia ex vivo, has greatly improved our understanding of stem cell-driven homeostasis, regeneration and cancer in the intestine. These exciting new insights into the biology of intestinal stem cells have the potential to accelerate the development of stem cell-based therapies and ameliorate cancer treatments.

  20. Genetic and Diet-Induced Obesity Increased Intestinal Tumorigenesis in the Double Mutant Mouse Model Multiple Intestinal Neoplasia X Obese via Disturbed Glucose Regulation and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Thi Ngo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied how spontaneous or carcinogen-induced intestinal tumorigenesis was affected by genetic or diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6J-ApcMin/+ X C57BL/6J-Lepob/+ mice. Obesity was induced by the obese (ob mutation in the lep gene coding for the hormone leptin, or by a 45% fat diet. The effects of obesity were examined on spontaneous intestinal tumors caused by the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc gene and on tumors induced by the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP. F1 ob/ob (homozygous mutated mice had increased body weight (bw and number of spontaneous and PhIP-induced small intestinal tumors (in ApcMin/+ mice, versus ob/wt (heterozygous mutated and wt/wt mice (homozygous wild-type. A 45% fat diet exacerbated bw and spontaneous tumor numbers versus 10% fat, but not PhIP-induced tumors. Except for bw, ob/wt and wt/wt were not significantly different. The obesity caused hyperglucosemia and insulinemia in ob/ob mice. A 45% fat diet further increased glucose, but not insulin. Inflammation was seen as increased TNFα levels in ob/ob mice. Thus the results implicate disturbed glucose regulation and inflammation as mechanisms involved in the association between obesity and intestinal tumorigenesis. Ob/ob mice had shorter lifespan than ob/wt and wt/wt mice.

  1. Efficient delivery of RNA interference oligonucleotides to polarized airway epithelia in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Shyam; Krishnamurthy, Sateesh; Jacobi, Ashley M; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; Behlke, Mark A; Davidson, Beverly L; McCray, Paul B

    2013-07-01

    Polarized and pseudostratified primary airway epithelia present barriers that significantly reduce their transfection efficiency and the efficacy of RNA interference oligonucleotides. This creates an impediment in studies of the airway epithelium, diminishing the utility of loss-of-function as a research tool. Here we outline methods to introduce RNAi oligonucleotides into primary human and porcine airway epithelia grown at an air-liquid interface and difficult-to-transfect transformed epithelial cell lines grown on plastic. At the time of plating, we reverse transfect small-interfering RNA (siRNA), Dicer-substrate siRNA, or microRNA oligonucleotides into cells by use of lipid or peptide transfection reagents. Using this approach we achieve significant knockdown in vitro of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase, IL-8, and CFTR expression at the mRNA and protein levels in 1-3 days. We also attain significant reduction of secreted IL-8 in polarized primary pig airway epithelia 3 days posttransfection and inhibition of CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ conductance in polarized air-liquid interface cultures of human airway epithelia 2 wk posttransfection. These results highlight an efficient means to deliver RNA interference reagents to airway epithelial cells and achieve significant knockdown of target gene expression and function. The ability to reliably conduct loss-of-function assays in polarized primary airway epithelia offers benefits to research in studies of epithelial cell homeostasis, candidate gene function, gene-based therapeutics, microRNA biology, and targeting the replication of respiratory viruses.

  2. Intestinal epithelium is more susceptible to cytopathic injury and altered permeability than the lung epithelium in the context of acute sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Mark W; Bao, Shengying; Knoell, Daren L; Fahy, Ruairi J; Shao, Guohong; Crouser, Elliott D

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial morphology and function are altered in intestinal epithelia during endotoxemia. However, it is unclear whether mitochondrial abnormalities occur in lung epithelial cells during acute sepsis or whether mitochondrial dysfunction corresponds with altered epithelial barrier function. Thus, we hypothesized that the intestinal epithelium is more susceptible to mitochondrial injury than the lung epithelium during acute sepsis and that mitochondrial dysfunction precedes impaired barrier function. Using a resuscitated feline model of Escherichia coli-induced sepsis, lung and ileal tissues were harvested after 6 h for histological and mitochondrial ultrastructural analyses in septic (n = 6) and time-matched controls (n = 6). Human lung epithelial cells (HLEC) and Caco-2 monolayers (n = 5) were exposed to 'cytomix' (TNFα: 40 ng/ml, IL-1β: 20 ng/ml, IFNγ: 10 ng/ml) for 24-72 h, and measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), epithelial permeability and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) were taken. Lung epithelial morphology, mitochondrial ultrastructure and pulmonary gas exchange were unaltered in septic animals compared to matching controls. While histologically intact, ileal epithelia demonstrated marked mitochondrial ultrastructural damage during sepsis. Caco-2 monolayers treated with cytomix showed a significant decrease in mitochondrial ΔΨ within 24 h, which was associated with a progressive reduction in TER and increased epithelial permeability over the subsequent 48 h. In contrast, mitochondrial ΔΨ and epithelial barrier functions were preserved in HLEC following cytomix. These findings indicate that intestinal epithelium is more susceptible to mitochondrial damage and dysfunction than the lung epithelium in the context of sepsis. Early alterations in mitochondrial function portend subsequent epithelial barrier dysfunction.

  3. Resuscitation with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 attenuates intestinal injury in a rabbit model of sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hua Lu

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Fluid resuscitation with 6% HES 130/0.4 protects against intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction in rabbits with sepsis, possibly via mechanisms associated with improving intestinal oxygen metabolism and reducing the release of inflammatory mediators.

  4. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G.; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-06-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies.

  5. Coordinated morphogenesis of epithelia during development of the Caenorhabditis elegans uterine-vulval connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, A P; Sternberg, P W

    1996-01-01

    Development of the nematode egg-laying system requires the formation of a connection between the uterine lumen and the developing vulval lumen, thus allowing a passage for eggs and sperm. This relatively simple process serves as a model for certain aspects of organogenesis. Such a connection demands that cells in both tissues become specialized to participate in the connection, and that the specialized cells are brought in register. A single cell, the anchor cell, acts to induce and to organize specialization of the epidermal and uterine epithelia, and registrates these tissues. The inductions act via evolutionarily conserved intercellular signaling pathways. The anchor cell induces the vulva from ventral epithelial cells via the LIN-3 growth factor and LET-23 transmembrane tyrosine kinase. It then induces surrounding uterine intermediate precursors via the receptor LIN-12, a founding member of the Notch family of receptors. Both signaling pathways are used multiple times during development of Caenorhabditis elegans. The outcome of the signaling is context-dependent. Both inductions are reciprocated. After the anchor cell has induced the vulva, it stretches toward the induced vulval cells. After the anchor cell has induced specialized uterine intermediate precursor cells, it fuses with a subset of their progeny. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8790329

  6. Response of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelia to Alcohol Exposure and Klebsiella pneumoniae Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammeta V. Raju

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse has been associated with increased susceptibility to pulmonary infection. It is not fully defined how alcohol contributes to the host defense compromise. Here primary human airway epithelial cells were cultured at an air-liquid interface to form a differentiated and polarized epithelium. This unique culture model allowed us to closely mimic lung infection in the context of alcohol abuse by basolateral alcohol exposure and apical live bacterial challenge. Application of clinically relevant concentrations of alcohol for 24 h did not significantly alter epithelial integrity or barrier function. When apically challenged with viable Klebsiella pneumoniae, the cultured epithelia had an enhanced tightness which was unaffected by alcohol. Further, alcohol enhanced apical bacterial growth, but not bacterial binding to the cells. The cultured epithelium in the absence of any treatment or stimulation had a base-level IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. Apical bacterial challenge significantly elevated the basolateral secretion of inflammatory cytokines including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and TNF-α. However, alcohol suppressed the observed cytokine burst in response to infection. Addition of adenosine receptor agonists negated the suppression of IL-6 and TNF-α. Thus, acute alcohol alters the epithelial cytokine response to infection, which can be partially mitigated by adenosine receptor agonists.

  7. A mouse model of pathological small intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and shedding induced by systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Williams

    2013-11-01

    The gut barrier, composed of a single layer of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs held together by tight junctions, prevents the entrance of harmful microorganisms, antigens and toxins from the gut lumen into the blood. Small intestinal homeostasis is normally maintained by the rate of shedding of senescent enterocytes from the villus tip exactly matching the rate of generation of new cells in the crypt. However, in various localized and systemic inflammatory conditions, intestinal homeostasis can be disturbed as a result of increased IEC shedding. Such pathological IEC shedding can cause transient gaps to develop in the epithelial barrier and result in increased intestinal permeability. Although pathological IEC shedding has been implicated in the pathogenesis of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. We have therefore developed a murine model to study this phenomenon, because IEC shedding in this species is morphologically analogous to humans. IEC shedding was induced by systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS administration in wild-type C57BL/6 mice, and in mice deficient in TNF-receptor 1 (Tnfr1−/−, Tnfr2 (Tnfr2−/−, nuclear factor kappa B1 (Nfκb1−/− or Nfĸb2 (Nfĸb2−/−. Apoptosis and cell shedding was quantified using immunohistochemistry for active caspase-3, and gut-to-circulation permeability was assessed by measuring plasma fluorescence following fluorescein-isothiocyanate–dextran gavage. LPS, at doses ≥0.125 mg/kg body weight, induced rapid villus IEC apoptosis, with peak cell shedding occurring at 1.5 hours after treatment. This coincided with significant villus shortening, fluid exudation into the gut lumen and diarrhea. A significant increase in gut-to-circulation permeability was observed at 5 hours. TNFR1 was essential for LPS-induced IEC apoptosis and shedding, and the fate of the IECs was also dependent on NFκB, with signaling via NFκB1 favoring cell survival and

  8. Intestinal leiomyoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most often found when a person has an upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy or colonoscopy for another reason. Rarely, these tumors can cause bleeding, blockage or rupture of the intestines If this ...

  9. Intestinal Lymphangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... source and a camera through which a small clipper can be inserted). The tissue that is removed ... can help. Malabsorption Overview of Malabsorption Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome Celiac Disease Intestinal Lymphangiectasia Lactose Intolerance Short Bowel ...

  10. Towards the characterization of an in vitro triple co-culture intestine cell model for permeability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Francisca; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-12-15

    Caco-2 based cell models have been the gold standard in vitro method to study intestinal drug permeability, despite the absence of many important features with major influence in the drug absorption mechanism. In the present work, a triple co-culture comprising Caco-2, HT29-MTX and Raji B cells was established to mimic in a closely way the human intestinal epithelium, presenting the main components in the process of drug absorption, namely the absorptive cells that resemble enterocytes, mucus producers cells and cells able to induce M-cell phenotype on Caco-2 cells. All the three cell lines maintained their function when cultured together with each other being, thus, an asset to new orally administrated drugs development. The seeding ratio of 90:10 between Caco-2 and HT29-MTX showed to be the best to achieve physiological proportions after cells maturation and differentiation in culture. The formation of M-cells phenotype from enterocytes was identified for the first time in a co-culture system comprising Caco-2 and HT29-MTX cells through immunocytochemical techniques. Thus, the triple co-culture model presented in the herein work is a good and reliable alternative to the in vitro methods already existents for the study of drugs permeability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interleukin 13 and serotonin: linking the immune and endocrine systems in murine models of intestinal inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Sharif Shajib

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Infiltration of activated immune cells and increased cytokine production define the immunophenotype of gastrointestinal (GI inflammation. In addition, intestinal inflammation is accompanied by alteration in the numbers of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT synthesizing enterochromaffin (EC cells and in 5-HT amount. It has been established that EC cells express interleukin (IL-13 receptor, additionally IL-13 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-13 mediated 5-HT signaling in pathogenesis of colitis. METHODOLOGY: Colitis was induced in IL-13 deficient (IL-13-/- and wild-type (WT mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS and dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS, as well as in IL-13-/- mice given recombinant mouse IL-13 (rmIL-13 and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HTP, the direct precursor of 5-HT. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS AND CONCLUSION: Elevated colonic IL-13 levels were observed in WT mice receiving DSS in comparison to control. IL-13-/- mice administered DSS exhibited significantly reduced severity of colitis compared to WT mice as reflected by macroscopic and histological damage assessments. Following DSS administration, significantly lower pro-inflammatory cytokine production and fewer infiltrating macrophages were observed in IL-13-/- mice compared to WT. The reduced severity of colitis observed in IL-13-/- mice was also accompanied by down-regulation of EC cell numbers and colonic 5-HT content. In addition, increasing colonic 5-HT content by administration of rmIL-13 or 5-HTP exacerbated severity of DSS colitis in IL-13-/- mice. IL-13-/- mice also exhibited reduced severity of DNBS-induced colitis. These results demonstrate that IL-13 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of experimental colitis and 5-HT is an important mediator of IL-13 driven intestinal inflammation. This study revealed important information on immune-endocrine axis in gut in relation to inflammation which

  12. Ablation of coactivator Med1 switches the cell fate of dental epithelia to that generating hair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keigo Yoshizaki

    Full Text Available Cell fates are determined by specific transcriptional programs. Here we provide evidence that the transcriptional coactivator, Mediator 1 (Med1, is essential for the cell fate determination of ectodermal epithelia. Conditional deletion of Med1 in vivo converted dental epithelia into epidermal epithelia, causing defects in enamel organ development while promoting hair formation in the incisors. We identified multiple processes by which hairs are generated in Med1 deficient incisors: 1 dental epithelial stem cells lacking Med 1 fail to commit to the dental lineage, 2 Sox2-expressing stem cells extend into the differentiation zone and remain multi-potent due to reduced Notch1 signaling, and 3 epidermal fate is induced by calcium as demonstrated in dental epithelial cell cultures. These results demonstrate that Med1 is a master regulator in adult stem cells to govern epithelial cell fate.

  13. Drosophila Stardust interacts with Crumbs to control polarity of epithelia but not neuroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Y; Stronach, B; Perrimon, N; Jan, L Y; Jan, Y N

    2001-12-01

    Establishing cellular polarity is critical for tissue organization and function. Initially discovered in the landmark genetic screen for Drosophila developmental mutants, bazooka, crumbs, shotgun and stardust mutants exhibit severe disruption in apicobasal polarity in embryonic epithelia, resulting in multilayered epithelia, tissue disintegration, and defects in cuticle formation. Here we report that stardust encodes single PDZ domain MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase) proteins that are expressed in all primary embryonic epithelia from the onset of gastrulation. Stardust colocalizes with Crumbs at the apicolateral boundary, although their expression patterns in sensory organs differ. Stardust binds to the carboxy terminus of Crumbs in vitro, and Stardust and Crumbs are mutually dependent in their stability, localization and function in controlling the apicobasal polarity of epithelial cells. However, for the subset of ectodermal cells that delaminate and form neuroblasts, their polarity requires the function of Bazooka, but not of Stardust or Crumbs.

  14. IL-18Rα-deficient CD4+T cells induce intestinal inflammation in the CD45RBhitransfer model of colitis despite impaired innate responsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmkvist, Petra; Pool, Lieneke; Hägerbrand, Karin;

    2016-01-01

    IL-18 has been implicated in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), however its role in the regulation of intestinal CD4+ T-cell function remains unclear. Here we show that murine intestinal CD4+ T cells express high levels of IL-18Rα and provide evidence that IL-18Rα expression is induced on these ce......IL-18 has been implicated in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), however its role in the regulation of intestinal CD4+ T-cell function remains unclear. Here we show that murine intestinal CD4+ T cells express high levels of IL-18Rα and provide evidence that IL-18Rα expression is induced...... on these cells subsequent to their entry into the intestinal mucosa. Using the CD45RBhi T-cell transfer colitis model, we show that IL-18Rα is expressed on IFN-γ+, IL-17+ and IL-17+IFN-γ+ effector CD4+ T cells in the inflamed colonic lamina propria (cLP) and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) and is required...... for the optimal generation and/or maintenance of IFN-γ-producing cells in the cLP. In the steady state and during colitis, TCR-independent cytokine-induced IFN-γ and IL-17 production by intestinal CD4+ T cells was largely IL-18Rα−dependent. Despite these findings however, IL-18Rα−deficient CD4+ T cells induced...

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 protects against bacterial translocation, preserves gut barrier integrity and stimulates the immune system in a murine intestinal obstruction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generoso, Simone V; Viana, Mirelle; Santos, Rosana; Martins, Flaviano S; Machado, José A N; Arantes, Rosa M E; Nicoli, Jacques R; Correia, Maria I T D; Cardoso, Valbert N

    2010-06-01

    Probiotic is a preparation containing microorganisms that confers beneficial effect to the host. This work assessed whether oral treatment with viable or heat-killed yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 prevents bacterial translocation (BT), intestinal barrier integrity, and stimulates the immunity, in a murine intestinal obstruction (IO) model. Four groups of mice were used: mice undergoing only laparotomy (CTL), undergoing intestinal obstruction (IO) and undergoing intestinal obstruction after previous treatment with viable or heat-killed yeast. BT, determined as uptake of (99m)Tc-E. coli in blood, mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen and lungs, was significantly higher in IO group than in CTL group. Treatments with both yeasts reduced BT in blood and all organs investigated. The treatment with both yeasts also reduced intestinal permeability as determined by blood uptake of (99m)Tc-DTPA. Immunological data demonstrated that both treatments were able to significantly increase IL-10 levels, but only viable yeast had the same effect on sIgA levels. Intestinal lesions were more severe in IO group when compared to CTL and yeasts groups. Concluding, both viable and heat-killed cells of yeast prevent BT, probably by immunomodulation and by maintaining gut barrier integrity. Only the stimulation of IgA production seems to depend on the yeast viability.

  16. Effects of Tylosin on Bacterial Mucolysis, Clostridium perfringens Colonization, and Intestinal Barrier Function in a Chick Model of Necrotic Enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, C. T.; van der Klis, J. D.; Deplancke, B.; Anderson, D. B.; Gaskins, H. R.

    2003-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is a worldwide poultry disease caused by the alpha toxin-producing bacterium Clostridium perfringens. Disease risk factors include concurrent coccidial infection and the dietary use of cereal grains high in nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP), such as wheat, barley, rye, and oats. Outbreaks of NE can be prevented or treated by the use of in-feed antibiotics. However, the current debate regarding the prophylactic use of antibiotics in animal diets necessitates a better understanding of factors that influence intestinal colonization by C. perfringens as well as the pathophysiological consequences of its growth. We report a study with a chick model of NE, which used molecular (16S rRNA gene [16S rDNA]) and culture-based microbiological techniques to investigate the impact of the macrolide antibiotic tylosin phosphate (100 ppm) and a dietary NSP (pectin) on the community structure of the small intestinal microbiota relative to colonization by C. perfringens. The effects of tylosin and pectin on mucolytic activity of the microbiota and C. perfringens colonization and their relationship to pathological indices of NE were of particular interest. The data demonstrate that tylosin reduced the percentage of mucolytic bacteria in general and the concentration of C. perfringens in particular, and these responses correlated in a temporal fashion with a reduction in the occurrence of NE lesions and an improvement in barrier function. The presence of pectin did not significantly affect the variables measured. Thus, it appears that tylosin can control NE through its modulation of C. perfringens colonization and the mucolytic activity of the intestinal microbiota. PMID:14506046

  17. Loss of sigma factor RpoN increases intestinal colonization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in an adult mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, W Brian; Richards, Gary P; Boyd, E Fidelma

    2014-02-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of bacterial seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, yet little is known about how this pathogen colonizes the human intestine. The alternative sigma factor RpoN/sigma-54 is a global regulator that controls flagellar synthesis, as well as a wide range of nonflagellar genes. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation in rpoN (VP2670) in V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633, a clinical serogroup O3:K6 isolate, and examined the effects in vivo using a streptomycin-treated mouse model of colonization. We confirmed that deletion of rpoN rendered V. parahaemolyticus nonmotile, and it caused reduced biofilm formation and an apparent defect in glutamine synthetase production. In in vivo competition assays between the rpoN mutant and a wild-type RIMD2210633 strain marked with the β-galactosidase gene lacZ (WBWlacZ), the mutant colonized significantly more proficiently. Intestinal persistence competition assays also demonstrated that the rpoN mutant had enhanced fitness and outcompeted WBWlacZ. Mutants defective in the polar flagellum biosynthesis FliAP sigma factor also outcompeted WBWlacZ but not to the same level as the rpoN mutant, which suggested that lack of motility is not the sole cause of the fitness effect. In an in vitro growth competition assay in mouse intestinal mucus, the rpoN mutant also outcompeted the wild type and exhibited faster doubling times when grown in mucus and on individual components of mucus. Genes in the pathways for the catabolism of mucus sugars also had significantly higher expression levels in a ΔrpoN mutant than in the wild type. These data suggest that in V. parahaemolyticus, RpoN plays an important role in carbon utilization regulation, which may significantly affect host colonization.

  18. Adhesion protein VSIG1 is required for the proper differentiation of glandular gastric epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odgerel Oidovsambuu

    Full Text Available VSIG1, a cell adhesion protein of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is preferentially expressed in stomach, testis, and certain gastric, esophageal and ovarian cancers. Here, we describe the expression patterns of three alternatively spliced isoforms of mouse Vsig1 during pre- and postnatal development of stomach and potential function of Vsig1 in differentiation of gastric epithelia. We show that isoforms Vsig1A and Vsig1B, which differ in the 3'untranslated region, are expressed in the early stages of stomach development. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that VSIG1 is restricted to the adherens junction of the glandular epithelium. The shorter transcript Vsig1C is restricted to the testis, encodes an N-terminal truncated protein and is presumably regulated by an internal promoter, which is located upstream of exon 1b. To determine whether the 5' flanking region of exon 1a specifically targets the expression of Vsig1 to stomach epithelia, we generated and analyzed transgenic mice. The 4.8-kb fragment located upstream of exon 1a was sufficient to direct the expression of the reporter gene to the glandular epithelia of transgenic stomach. To determine the role of VSIG1 during the development of stomach epithelia, an X-linked Vsig1 was inactivated in embryonic stem cells (ESCs. Although Vsig1(-/Y ESCs were only able to generate low coat color chimeric mice, no male chimeras transmitted the targeted allele to their progeny suggesting that the high contribution of Vsig1(-/Y cells leads to the lethality of chimeric embryos. Analysis of chimeric stomachs revealed the differentiation of VSIG1-null cells into squamous epithelia inside the glandular region. These results suggest that VSIG1 is required for the establishment of glandular versus squamous epithelia in the stomach.

  19. Adhesion protein VSIG1 is required for the proper differentiation of glandular gastric epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oidovsambuu, Odgerel; Nyamsuren, Gunsmaa; Liu, Shuai; Göring, Wolfgang; Engel, Wolfgang; Adham, Ibrahim M

    2011-01-01

    VSIG1, a cell adhesion protein of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is preferentially expressed in stomach, testis, and certain gastric, esophageal and ovarian cancers. Here, we describe the expression patterns of three alternatively spliced isoforms of mouse Vsig1 during pre- and postnatal development of stomach and potential function of Vsig1 in differentiation of gastric epithelia. We show that isoforms Vsig1A and Vsig1B, which differ in the 3'untranslated region, are expressed in the early stages of stomach development. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that VSIG1 is restricted to the adherens junction of the glandular epithelium. The shorter transcript Vsig1C is restricted to the testis, encodes an N-terminal truncated protein and is presumably regulated by an internal promoter, which is located upstream of exon 1b. To determine whether the 5' flanking region of exon 1a specifically targets the expression of Vsig1 to stomach epithelia, we generated and analyzed transgenic mice. The 4.8-kb fragment located upstream of exon 1a was sufficient to direct the expression of the reporter gene to the glandular epithelia of transgenic stomach. To determine the role of VSIG1 during the development of stomach epithelia, an X-linked Vsig1 was inactivated in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Although Vsig1(-/Y) ESCs were only able to generate low coat color chimeric mice, no male chimeras transmitted the targeted allele to their progeny suggesting that the high contribution of Vsig1(-/Y) cells leads to the lethality of chimeric embryos. Analysis of chimeric stomachs revealed the differentiation of VSIG1-null cells into squamous epithelia inside the glandular region. These results suggest that VSIG1 is required for the establishment of glandular versus squamous epithelia in the stomach.

  20. Visualization of HIV-1 interactions with penile and foreskin epithelia: clues for female-to-male HIV transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Minh H; Anderson, Meegan R; McRaven, Michael D; Cianci, Gianguido C; McCoombe, Scott G; Kelley, Z L; Gioia, Casey J; Fought, Angela J; Rademaker, Alfred W; Veazey, Ronald S; Hope, Thomas J

    2015-03-01

    To gain insight into female-to-male HIV sexual transmission and how male circumcision protects against this mode of transmission, we visualized HIV-1 interactions with foreskin and penile tissues in ex vivo tissue culture and in vivo rhesus macaque models utilizing epifluorescent microscopy. 12 foreskin and 14 cadaveric penile specimens were cultured with R5-tropic photoactivatable (PA)-GFP HIV-1 for 4 or 24 hours. Tissue cryosections were immunofluorescently imaged for epithelial and immune cell markers. Images were analyzed for total virions, proportion of penetrators, depth of virion penetration, as well as immune cell counts and depths in the tissue. We visualized individual PA virions breaching penile epithelial surfaces in the explant and macaque model. Using kernel density estimated probabilities of localizing a virion or immune cell at certain tissue depths revealed that interactions between virions and cells were more likely to occur in the inner foreskin or glans penis (from local or cadaveric donors, respectively). Using statistical models to account for repeated measures and zero-inflated datasets, we found no difference in total virions visualized at 4 hours between inner and outer foreskins from local donors. At 24 hours, there were more virions in inner as compared to outer foreskin (0.0495 +/- 0.0154 and 0.0171 +/- 0.0038 virions/image, p = 0.001). In the cadaveric specimens, we observed more virions in inner foreskin (0.0507 +/- 0.0079 virions/image) than glans tissue (0.0167 +/- 0.0033 virions/image, pimage, p = 0.099) and to significantly greater mean depths (29.162 +/- 3.908 vs. 12.466 +/- 2.985 μm). Our in vivo macaque model confirmed that virions can breach penile squamous epithelia in a living model. In summary, these results suggest that the inner foreskin and glans epithelia may be important sites for HIV transmission in uncircumcised men.

  1. Mechanical strain determines the axis of planar polarity in ciliated epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Epithelia containing multiciliated cells align beating cilia along a common planar axis specified by the conserved planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Specification of the planar axis is also thought to require a long-range cue to align the axis globally, but the nature of this cue in ciliated and other epithelia remains poorly understood. We examined this issue using the Xenopus larval skin where ciliary flow aligns to the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis. We first show that a planar axis initi...

  2. Cytoskeleton in motion: the dynamics of keratin intermediate filaments in epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windoffer, Reinhard; Beil, Michael; Magin, Thomas M; Leube, Rudolf E

    2011-09-05

    Epithelia are exposed to multiple forms of stress. Keratin intermediate filaments are abundant in epithelia and form cytoskeletal networks that contribute to cell type-specific functions, such as adhesion, migration, and metabolism. A perpetual keratin filament turnover cycle supports these functions. This multistep process keeps the cytoskeleton in motion, facilitating rapid and protein biosynthesis-independent network remodeling while maintaining an intact network. The current challenge is to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of the keratin cycle in relation to actin and microtubule networks and in the context of epithelial tissue function.

  3. Regulation of intracellular Zn homeostasis in two intestinal epithelial cell models at various maturation time points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefeller, Eva-Maria; Bondzio, Angelika; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Martens, Holger; Einspanier, Ralf; Scharfen, Franziska; Zentek, Jürgen; Pieper, Robert; Lodemann, Ulrike

    2015-07-01

    After weaning, piglets are often fed diets supplemented with high concentrations of zinc (Zn) to decrease post-weaning diarrhea. The aim of this study was to elucidate the regulation of Zn homeostasis within intestinal epithelial cells during excessive Zn exposure. High Zn concentrations elevated the intracellular Zn level in IPEC-J2 and Caco-2 cells which was influenced by differentiation status and time of exposure. With increasing Zn concentrations, mRNA and protein levels of metallothionein (MT) and zinc transporter 1 (ZnT1) were upregulated, whereas zinc transporter 4 (ZIP4) expression was downregulated. Metal-regulatory transcription factor-1 (MTF1) mRNA expression was upregulated at high Zn concentrations in IPEC-J2 cells, which corresponded to higher intracellular Zn concentrations. Based on these results, we suggest that intestinal epithelial cells adapt the expression of these genes to the amount of extracellular Zn available in order to maintain Zn homeostasis. Cell line-dependent differences in the regulation of Zn homeostasis were detected.

  4. Ecological modeling from time-series inference: insight into dynamics and stability of intestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R Stein

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota is a microbial ecosystem of crucial importance to human health. Understanding how the microbiota confers resistance against enteric pathogens and how antibiotics disrupt that resistance is key to the prevention and cure of intestinal infections. We present a novel method to infer microbial community ecology directly from time-resolved metagenomics. This method extends generalized Lotka-Volterra dynamics to account for external perturbations. Data from recent experiments on antibiotic-mediated Clostridium difficile infection is analyzed to quantify microbial interactions, commensal-pathogen interactions, and the effect of the antibiotic on the community. Stability analysis reveals that the microbiota is intrinsically stable, explaining how antibiotic perturbations and C. difficile inoculation can produce catastrophic shifts that persist even after removal of the perturbations. Importantly, the analysis suggests a subnetwork of bacterial groups implicated in protection against C. difficile. Due to its generality, our method can be applied to any high-resolution ecological time-series data to infer community structure and response to external stimuli.

  5. Shikonin inhibits intestinal calcium-activated chloride channels and prevents rotaviral diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel CFTR. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K+ channel activity without affecting Na+/K+-ATPase activities. In-vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in-vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte CaCCs, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K+ channel acitivty, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea.

  6. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli, strain LF82 disrupts apical junctional complexes in polarized epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossa Juan C

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although bacteria are implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, mechanisms of intestinal injury and immune activation remain unclear. Identification of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC strains in IBD patients offers an opportunity to characterize the pathogenesis of microbial-induced intestinal inflammation in IBD. Previous studies have focused on the invasive phenotype of AIEC and the ability to replicate and survive in phagocytes. However, the precise mechanisms by which these newly identified microbes penetrate the epithelial lining remain to be clarified. Therefore, the aim of this study was to delineate the effects of AIEC, strain LF82 (serotype O83:H1 on model polarized epithelial monolayers as a contributor to intestinal injury in IBD. Results Infection of T84 and Madin-Darby Canine Kidney-I polarized epithelial cell monolayers with AIEC, strain LF82 led to a reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance and increased macromolecular (10 kilodalton dextran flux. Basolateral AIEC infection resulted in more severe disruption of the epithelial barrier. Increased permeability was accompanied by a redistribution of the tight junction adaptor protein, zonula occludens-1, demonstrated by confocal microscopy and formation of gaps between cells, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. After 4 h of infection of intestine 407 cells, bacteria replicated in the cell cytoplasm and were enclosed in membrane-bound vesicles positive for the late endosomal marker, LAMP1. Conclusion These findings indicate that AIEC, strain LF82 disrupts the integrity of the polarized epithelial cell barrier. This disruption enables bacteria to penetrate into the epithelium and replicate in the host cell cytoplasm. These findings provide important links between microbes related to IBD, the intestinal epithelial cell barrier and disease pathogenesis.

  7. Interaction models of CYP1A1, GSTM1 polymorphisms and tobacco smoking in intestinal gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Shen; Run-Tian Wang; Yao-Chu Xu; Li-Wei Wang; Xin-Ru Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the interaction models of the cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 1A1 Valv ariant and glutathione S-transferase (GST)M1 null polymorphisms with tobacco smoking in the occurrence of intestinal gastric cancer.METHODS: A community-based case-control study was conducted in Yangzhong. Subjects included 114 intestinal types of gastric cancer with endoscopic and pathological diagnosis during January 1997 and December 1998, and 693 controls selected from their spouse, siblings or siblingsin-law who had no history of digestive system cancer.Logistic regression was used to estimate the interaction models.RESULTS: The frequency of the CYP1A1 Val variant allele in cases did not differ from that in controls. The OR of GSTM1 null genotype was 2.0 (95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 1.2-3.1, P<0.01). It showed a significant type 2 form of interaction model when both CYP1A1 Val variant allele and former tobacco smoking existed (i.e., among the multiplicative effects, the disease risk is increased by the tobacco exposure alone but not by the CYP1A1 variant alone). The interaction index γ was 2.8, and OReg (95%CI)was 5.0 (1.9-13.4). GSTM1 null genotype and former tobacco smoking were significant in a type 4 interaction model (i.e.,the disease risk is increased by GSTM1 null genotype or tobacco exposure alone among the multiplicative effects).The interaction index γ and OReg (95%CI) were 3.4 and 8.4 (3.4-20.9), respectively.CONCLUSION: Different interaction models of CYP1A1 Val variant allele and GSTM1 null genotype with tobacco smoking will contribute to understanding carcinogenic mechanism, but there is a need to further investigate in larger scale studies.

  8. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  9. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of an absorbing leaky epithelium is developed for analysis of solute coupled water transport. The non-charged driving solute diffuses into cells and is pumped from cells into the lateral intercellular space (lis). All membranes contain water channels with the solute passing...... concentration of fluid emerging from lis is then significantly larger than the concentration in lis. Thus, in absence of external driving forces the model generates isotonic transport provided a component of the solute flux emerging downstream lis is taken up by cells through the serosal membrane and pumped...... back into lis, i.e., the solute would have to be recirculated. With input variables from toad intestine (Nedergaard, S., E.H. Larsen, and H.H. Ussing, J. Membr. Biol. 168:241-251), computations predict that 60-80% of the pumped flux stems from serosal bath in agreement with the experimental estimate...

  10. Impact of lactic Acid bacteria on dendritic cells from allergic patients in an experimental model of intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Céline; Duez, Catherine; Grangette, Corinne; Pochard, Pierre; Tonnel, André-Bernard; Pestel, Joël

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are Gram positive nonpathogenic commensal organisms present in human gastrointestinal tract. In vivo, LAB are separated from antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DC) by the intestinal epithelial barrier. In this study, the impact of one LAB strain (Lactobacillus casei ATCC393) on human monocyte-derived DC from allergic and healthy donors was assessed by using a polarized epithelium model. Confocal and flow cytometer analyses showed that immature DC efficiently captured FITC-labelled L. casei through the epithelial layer. After interaction with L. casei, DC acquired a partial maturation status (i.e., CD86 and CD54 increase) and increased their interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-12 production. Interestingly, after activation by L. casei in the presence of experimental epithelium, DC from allergic patients instructed autologous naïve CD4(+) T cells to produce more interferon-gamma than without the epithelium. Thus by modulating human DC reactivity, LAB and intestinal epithelium might modify T cell immune response and regulate the development of allergic reaction.

  11. Impact of Lactic Acid Bacteria on Dendritic Cells from Allergic Patients in an Experimental Model of Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Ratajczak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram positive nonpathogenic commensal organisms present in human gastrointestinal tract. In vivo, LAB are separated from antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DC by the intestinal epithelial barrier. In this study, the impact of one LAB strain (Lactobacillus casei ATCC393 on human monocyte-derived DC from allergic and healthy donors was assessed by using a polarized epithelium model. Confocal and flow cytometer analyses showed that immature DC efficiently captured FITC-labelled L. casei through the epithelial layer. After interaction with L. casei, DC acquired a partial maturation status (i.e., CD86 and CD54 increase and increased their interleukin (IL-10 and IL-12 production. Interestingly, after activation by L. casei in the presence of experimental epithelium, DC from allergic patients instructed autologous naïve CD4+ T cells to produce more interferon-γ than without the epithelium. Thus by modulating human DC reactivity, LAB and intestinal epithelium might modify T cell immune response and regulate the development of allergic reaction.

  12. The anti-epileptic drug substance vigabatrin inhibits taurine transport in intestinal and renal cell culture models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Jakob Munk; Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Hansen, Steen H

    2014-01-01

    , such evidence does not preclude the involvement of other transporters. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to investigate if vigabatrin interacts with taurine transport. The uptake of taurine was measured in intestinal human Caco-2 and canine MDCK cell monolayers in the absence or presence of amino...... acids such as GABA and vigabatrin. Vigabatrin inhibits the uptake of taurine in Caco-2 and MDCK cells to 34±3 and 53±2%, respectively, at a concentration of 30mM. In Caco-2 cells the uptake of vigabatrin under neutral pH conditions is concentration-dependent and saturable with a Km-value of 27mM (log......Km is 1.43±0.09). In conclusion, the present study shows that vigabatrin was able to inhibit the uptake of taurine in intestinal and renal cell culture models. Furthermore, uptake of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells under neutral pH conditions was concentration-dependent and saturable and suggesting...

  13. Cooking Has Variable Effects on the Fermentability in the Large Intestine of the Fraction of Meats, Grain Legumes, and Insects That Is Resistant to Digestion in the Small Intestine in an in Vitro Model of the Pig's Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelaert, Christine; Despret, Xavier; Sindic, Marianne; Beckers, Yves; Francis, Frédéric; Portetelle, Daniel; Soyeurt, Hélène; Théwis, André; Bindelle, Jérôme

    2017-01-18

    This study aimed to evaluate the fermentation in the large intestine of indigestible dietary protein sources from animal, insect, and plant origin using an in vitro model of the pig's gastrointestinal tract. Protein sources were used raw and after a cooking treatment. Results showed that the category of the ingredient (meats, insects, or grain legumes) exerts a stronger impact on enzymatic digestibility, fermentation patterns, and bacterial metabolites such as short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) than the cooking treatment. The digestibility and the fermentation characteristics of insects were more affected by the cooking procedure than the other categories. Per gram of consumed food, ingredients from animal origin, namely, meats and insects, were associated with fewer fermentation end-products (gas, H2S, SCFA) than ingredients from plant origin, which is related to their higher small intestinal digestibility.

  14. Arsenic-containing hydrocarbons and arsenic-containing fatty acids: Transfer across and presystemic metabolism in the Caco-2 intestinal barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sören; Raber, Georg; Ebert, Franziska; Taleshi, Mojtaba S; Francesconi, Kevin A; Schwerdtle, Tanja

    2015-10-01

    Arsenic-containing hydrocarbons (AsHCs) and arsenic-containing fatty acids (AsFAs) represent two classes of arsenolipids occurring naturally in marine food. Toxicological data are yet scarce and an assessment regarding the risk to human health has not been possible. Here, we investigated the transfer and presystemic metabolism of five arsenolipids in an intestinal barrier model. Three AsHCs and two AsFAs were applied to the Caco-2 intestinal barrier model. Thereby, the short-chain AsHCs reached up to 50% permeability. Transport is likely to occur via passive diffusion. The AsFAs showed lower intestinal bioavailability, but respective permeabilities were still two to five times higher as compared to arsenobetaine or arsenosugars. Interestingly, AsFAs were effectively biotransformed while passing the in vitro intestinal barrier, whereas AsHCs were transported to the blood-facing compartment essentially unchanged. AsFAs can be presystemically metabolised and the amount of transferred arsenic is lower than that for AsHCs. In contrast, AsHCs are likely to be highly intestinally bioavailable to humans. Since AsHCs exert strong toxicity in vitro and in vivo, toxicity studies with experimental animals as well as a human exposure assessment are needed to assess the risk to human health related to the presence of AsHCs in seafood. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Models for Incretin Research: From the Intestine to the Whole Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Jung Oh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Incretin hormones are produced by enteroendocrine cells (EECs in the intestine in response to ingested nutrient stimuli. The incretin effect is defined as the difference in the insulin secretory response between the oral glucose tolerance test and an isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion study. The pathophysiology of the decreased incretin effect has been studied as decreased incretin sensitivity and/or β-cell dysfunction per se. Interestingly, robust increases in endogenous incretin secretion have been observed in many types of metabolic/bariatric surgery. Therefore, metabolic/bariatric surgery has been extensively studied for incretin physiology, not only the hormones themselves but also alterations in EECs distribution and genetic expression levels of gut hormones. These efforts have given us an enormous understanding of incretin biology from synthesis to in vivo behavior. Further innovative studies are needed to determine the mechanisms and targets of incretin hormones.

  16. In Vivo Models for Incretin Research: From the Intestine to the Whole Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tae Jung

    2016-03-01

    Incretin hormones are produced by enteroendocrine cells (EECs) in the intestine in response to ingested nutrient stimuli. The incretin effect is defined as the difference in the insulin secretory response between the oral glucose tolerance test and an isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion study. The pathophysiology of the decreased incretin effect has been studied as decreased incretin sensitivity and/or β-cell dysfunction per se. Interestingly, robust increases in endogenous incretin secretion have been observed in many types of metabolic/bariatric surgery. Therefore, metabolic/bariatric surgery has been extensively studied for incretin physiology, not only the hormones themselves but also alterations in EECs distribution and genetic expression levels of gut hormones. These efforts have given us an enormous understanding of incretin biology from synthesis to in vivo behavior. Further innovative studies are needed to determine the mechanisms and targets of incretin hormones.

  17. Infliximab's influence on anastomotic strength and degree of inflammation in intestinal surgery in a rabbit model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frostberg, Erik; Ström, Petter; Gerke, Oke;

    2014-01-01

    and conclusions. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a single dose infliximab has an adverse effect on the anastomotic healing process, observed as reduced anastomotic breaking strength and histopathologically verified lower grade of inflammatory response, in the small intestine of a rabbit....... METHODS: Thirty New Zealand rabbits (median weight 2.5 kg) were allocated to treatment with an intravenous bolus of either 10 mg/kg infliximab (n = 15) or placebo (n = 15). One week later all rabbits underwent two separate end-to-end anastomoses in the jejunum under general anesthesia. At postoperative...... day three, the anastomotic breaking strength was determined and histopathological changes were examined. RESULTS: The mean value of anastomotic breaking strength in the placebo group was 1.89 +/- 0.36 N and the corresponding value was 1.81 +/- 0.33 N in the infliximab treated rabbits...

  18. Identification of intestinal bacteria responsible for fermentation of gum arabic in pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Akio; Ushida, Kazunari; Phillips, Glyn O; Ogasawara, Takashi; Sasaki, Yasushi

    2006-09-01

    Acacia spp. produce gum exudates, traditionally called gum arabic or gum acacia, which are widely used in the food industry such as emulsifiers, adhesives, and stabilizers. The traditional gum arabic is highly variable with average molecular weights varying from 300,000-800,000. For this reason a standardized sample was used for the present experiments, based on a specific species of gum arabic (Acacia(sen)SUPER GUMEM2). The literature indicates that gum arabic can be fermented by the intestinal bacteria to short chain fatty acid, particularly propionate. However, the bacteria responsible for the fermentation have not been determined. In this study, we used enrichment culture of pig cecal bacteria from the selected high molecular weight specific gum arabic of (M(W )1.77 x 10(6)). We found Prevotella ruminicola-like bacterium as a predominant bacterium that is most likely to be responsible for fermentation of the gum arabic used to propionate.

  19. Oat consumption reduced intestinal fat deposition and improved health span in Caenorhabditis elegans model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chenfei; Gao, Zhanguo; Greenway, Frank L; Burton, Jeffrey H; Johnson, William D; Keenan, Michael J; Enright, Frederick M; Martin, Roy J; Chu, YiFang; Zheng, Jolene

    2015-09-01

    In addition to their fermentable dietary fiber and the soluble β-glucan fiber, oats have unique avenanthramides that have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that reduce coronary heart disease in human clinical trials. We hypothesized that oat consumption will increase insulin sensitivity, reduce body fat, and improve health span in Caenorhabditis elegans through a mechanism involving the daf-2 gene, which codes for the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1-like receptor, and that hyperglycemia will attenuate these changes. Caenorhabditis elegans wild type (N2) and the null strains sir-2.1, daf-16, and daf-16/daf-2 were fed Escherichia coli (OP50) and oat flakes (0.5%, 1.0%, or 3%) with and without 2% glucose. Oat feeding decreased intestinal fat deposition in N2, daf-16, or daf-16/daf-2 strains (P < .05); and glucose did not affect intestinal fat deposition response. The N2, daf-16, or sir-2.1 mutant increased the pharyngeal pumping rate (P < .05), a surrogate marker of life span, following oat consumption. Oat consumption increased ckr-1, gcy-8, cpt-1, and cpt-2 mRNA expression in both the N2 and the sir-2.1 mutant, with significantly higher expression in sir-2.1 than in N2 (P < .01). Additional glucose further increased expression 1.5-fold of the 4 genes in N2 (P < .01), decreased the expression of all except cpt-1 in the daf-16 mutant, and reduced mRNA expression of the 4 genes in the daf-16/daf-2 mutant (P < .01). These data suggest that oat consumption reduced fat storage and increased ckr-1, gcy-8, cpt-1, or cpt-2 through the sir-2.1 genetic pathway. Oat consumption may be a beneficial dietary intervention for reducing fat accumulation, augmenting health span, and improving hyperglycemia-impaired lipid metabolism.

  20. Role of Mitochondria-rich Cells for Passive Chloride Transport, discussion of Ussing's Contribution to Our Understanding of Shunt Pathways in Epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Kristensen, Poul; Nedergaard, Signe Nielsen

    2001-01-01

    Toad skin, Mitochondria-rich cells, Chloride channels, Epithelial shunt pathways, Leaky epithelia, Recirculation theory of isotonic transport......Toad skin, Mitochondria-rich cells, Chloride channels, Epithelial shunt pathways, Leaky epithelia, Recirculation theory of isotonic transport...

  1. Freshwater sponges have functional, sealing epithelia with high transepithelial resistance and negative transepithelial potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily D M Adams

    Full Text Available Epithelial tissue - the sealed and polarized layer of cells that regulates transport of ions and solutes between the environment and the internal milieu - is a defining characteristic of the Eumetazoa. Sponges, the most ancient metazoan phylum, are generally believed to lack true epithelia, but their ability to occlude passage of ions has never been tested. Here we show that freshwater sponges (Demospongiae, Haplosclerida have functional epithelia with high transepithelial electrical resistance (TER, a transepithelial potential (TEP, and low permeability to small-molecule diffusion. Curiously, the Amphimedon queenslandica sponge genome lacks the classical occluding genes [5] considered necessary to regulate sealing and control of ion transport. The fact that freshwater sponge epithelia can seal suggests that either occluding molecules have been lost in some sponge lineages, or demosponges use novel molecular complexes for epithelial occlusion; if the latter, it raises the possibility that mechanisms for occlusion used by sponges may exist in other metazoa. Importantly, our results imply that functional epithelia evolved either several times, or once, in the ancestor of the Metazoa.

  2. Isoform-specific regulation and localization of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor in human airway epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J D A Excoffon

    Full Text Available Adenovirus is an important respiratory pathogen. Adenovirus fiber from most serotypes co-opts the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR to bind and enter cells. However, CAR is a cell adhesion molecule localized on the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelia. Separation from the lumen of the airways by tight junctions renders airway epithelia resistant to inhaled adenovirus infection. Although a role for CAR in viral spread and egress has been established, the mechanism of initial respiratory infection remains controversial. CAR exists in several protein isoforms including two transmembrane isoforms that differ only at the carboxy-terminus (CAR(Ex7 and CAR(Ex8. We found low-level expression of the CAR(Ex8 isoform in well-differentiated human airway epithelia. Surprisingly, in contrast to CAR(Ex7, CAR(Ex8 localizes to the apical membrane of epithelia where it augments adenovirus infection. Interestingly, despite sharing a similar class of PDZ-binding domain with CAR(Ex7, CAR(Ex8 differentially interacts with PICK1, PSD-95, and MAGI-1b. MAGI-1b appears to stoichiometrically regulate the degradation of CAR(Ex8 providing a potential mechanism for the apical localization of CAR(Ex8 in airway epithelial. In summary, apical localization of CAR(Ex8 may be responsible for initiation of respiratory adenoviral infections and this localization appears to be regulated by interactions with PDZ-domain containing proteins.

  3. Gene Expression and Functional Annotation of the Human Ciliary Body Epithelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.F. Janssen (Sarah); T.G.M.F. Gorgels (Theo); K. Bossers (Koen); J.B. ten Brink (Jacoline); A.H.W. Essing (Anke); M.H. Nagtegaal (Marleen); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); N.M. Jansonius (Nomdo); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The ciliary body (CB) of the human eye consists of the non-pigmented (NPE) and pigmented (PE) neuro-epithelia. We investigated the gene expression of NPE and PE, to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the most important functions of the CB. We also developed molecu

  4. The urokinase receptor homolog Haldisin is a novel differentiation marker of stratum granulosum in squamous epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Kriegbaum, Mette C; Hertz, Emil P;

    2013-01-01

    Several members of the Ly-6/uPAR (LU)-protein domain family are differentially expressed in human squamous epithelia. In some cases, they even play important roles in maintaining skin homeostasis, as exemplified by the secreted single domain member, SLURP-1, the deficiency of which is associated...

  5. Gene Expression and Functional Annotation of the Human Ciliary Body Epithelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Sarah F.; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; Bossers, Koen; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Essing, Anke H. W.; Nagtegaal, Martijn; van der Spek, Peter J.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The ciliary body (CB) of the human eye consists of the non-pigmented (NPE) and pigmented (PE) neuro-epithelia. We investigated the gene expression of NPE and PE, to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the most important functions of the CB. We also developed molecular signatur

  6. cAMP Stimulation of HCO3- Secretion Across Airway Epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welsh MJ

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available To test for the presence of HCO(3(- transport across airway epithelia, we measured short-circuit current in primary cultures of canine and human airway epithelia bathed in a Cl(--free, HCO(3(-/CO(2-buffered solution. cAMP agonists stimulated a secretory current that was likely carried by HCO(3(- because it was absent in HCO(3(--free solutions. In addition, the cAMP-stimulated current was inhibited by the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide, and by the apical addition of a blocker of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, diphenylamine-2-carboxylate. The current was dependent on Na(+ because it was inhibited by removing Na(+ from the submucosal solution and by inhibition of the Na(+-K(+-ATPase with ouabain. The cAMP-stimulated current was absent in cystic fibrosis (CF airway epithelia. These data suggest that cAMP agonists can stimulate HCO(3(- secretion across airway epithelia and that CFTR may provide a conductive pathway for HCO(3(- movement across the apical membrane.

  7. In vitro evaluation of the effect of a high plant protein diet and nucleotide supplementation on intestinal integrity in meagre (Argyrosomus regius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz de Rodrigáñez, M A; Fuentes, J; Moyano, F J; Ribeiro, L

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, the protective effect of nucleotides over damages induced by the consumption of a diet containing a high amount of vegetable ingredients (560 g kg(-1)) in the intestinal epithelia of the meagre (Argyrosomus regius) was assessed by assays performed with an Ussing-type chamber. Two experimental feeds were prepared including or not a commercial mixture of nucleotides (1 g kg(-1)). Nucleotides significantly enhanced fish growth during the experiment. On the other hand, differences in the integrity and functionality of intestinal epithelia were evidenced by a change in the polarity of intestinal trans-epithelial potential. Samples of fish fed on the control diet showed a preferentially secretory short-circuit current, while those of fish receiving the nucleotide-supplemented diet showed a significantly lower and preferentially absorptive negative current. It is concluded that alterations of intestinal physiology juvenile meagre resulting from the intake of high amounts of plant ingredients could be minimized by nucleotide supplementation.

  8. In vitro M-like cells genesis through a tissue-engineered triple-culture intestinal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Francisca; Pereira, Carla; Costa, Joana; Barrias, Cristina; Granja, Pedro L; Sarmento, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    Although fewer in number, M-cells are considered antigen sampling cells, acting as a gateway for antigens from the gut lumen and presenting an impressive aptitude for particle transcytosis. These features make M-cells attractive targets for oral drug delivery studies, but this has been poorly explored. New and reproducible tissue-like in vitro models for studying intestinal sampling and permeability mechanisms are needed. The combination of different cell players in such models offers improved microenvironments with higher physiologic relevance. Here, a tissue-engineered model was established, by co-culturing Caco-2 absorptive cells, HT29-MTX mucus-producing cells and Raji B lymphocytes. After 3 weeks of cell co-culture, the presence of M-like cells was evidenced by the loss of brush-border organization, detected by the lack of microvilli. The triple-culture model showed to be efficient for insulin transport, a process that was influenced by the tightness of junctions between epithelial cells and the presence of mucus and M-like cells. Ultimately, the proposed tissue-engineered model provides a more complete and reliable tool to perform drug permeability tests, as compared to traditional models, and may also find applicability as an in vitro system to study transdifferentiation mechanisms of M cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The ΔF508-CFTR mutation inhibits wild-type CFTR processing and function when co-expressed in human airway epithelia and in mouse nasal mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucker Torry A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rescue or correction of CFTR function in native epithelia is the ultimate goal of CF therapeutics development. Wild-type (WT CFTR introduction and replacement is also of particular interest. Such therapies may be complicated by possible CFTR self-assembly into an oligomer or multimer. Results Surprisingly, functional CFTR assays in native airway epithelia showed that the most common CFTR mutant, ΔF508-CFTR (ΔF-CFTR, inhibits WT-CFTR when both forms are co-expressed. To examine more mechanistically, both forms of CFTR were transfected transiently in varying amounts into IB3-1 CF human airway epithelial cells and HEK-293 human embryonic kidney cells null for endogenous CFTR protein expression. Increasing amounts of ΔF-CFTR inhibited WT-CFTR protein processing and function in CF human airway epithelial cells but not in heterologous HEK-293 cells. Stably expressed ΔF-CFTR in clones of the non-CF human airway epithelial cell line, CALU-3, also showed reduction in cAMP-stimulated anion secretion and in WT-CFTR processing. An ultimate test of this dominant negative-like effect of ΔF-CFTR on WT-CFTR was the parallel study of two different CF mouse models: the ΔF-CFTR mouse and the bitransgenic CFTR mouse corrected in the gut but null in the lung and airways. WT/ΔF heterozygotes had an intermediate phenotype with regard to CFTR agonist responses in in vivo nasal potential difference (NPD recordings and in Ussing chamber recordings of short-circuit current (ISC in vitro on primary tracheal epithelial cells isolated from the same mice. In contrast, CFTR bitransgenic +/− heterozygotes had no difference in their responses versus +/+ wild-type mice. Conclusions Taken altogether, these data suggest that ΔF-CFTR and WT-CFTR co-assemble into an oligomeric macromolecular complex in native epithelia and share protein processing machinery and regulation at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. As a consequence, ΔF-CFTR slows WT

  10. Brewer's yeast cell wall affects microbiota composition and decreases Bacteroides fragilis populations in an anaerobic gut intestinal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashimada, Yutaka; Michinaka, Atsuko; Watanabe, Kentaro; Nishio, Naomichi; Fujii, Toshio

    2011-02-01

    Brewer's yeast cell wall (BYC) has been reported to have prebiotic activity that improves the microbiotal composition of the human gut. To understand the precise effect of BYC on gut microbiota and its metabolism, we used a three-stage continuous-flow reactor system that mimicked the environment of the large intestine. The reactor system was able to maintain the bacterial community stably for a week. The Bacteroides fragilis population decreased drastically after the addition of BYC into this system while the number of Lactobacillus was stably maintained. In addition, propionate and acetate levels increased drastically. This metabolic change correlated with an increase in a number of specific operational taxonomic units annotated to the genus Veillonella and Megasphaella. These results suggest that BYC affects the composition of microbiota in an in vitro model system. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Stimulation of intestinal growth and function with DPP-IV inhibition in a mouse short bowel syndrome model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sueyoshi, Ryo; Ignatoski, Kathleen M Woods; Okawada, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    , and 7 days followed by 23 days washout period. Adaptive response was assessed by morphology, intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation (PCNA), epithelial barrier function (transepithelial resistance), RT-PCR for intestinal transport proteins, GLP-2R, and IGF-1R, and GLP-2 plasma levels. Glucose-stimulated...... sodium transport was assessed for intestinal absorptive function. Seven days of DPP4-I treatment facilitated an increase in GLP-2R levels, intestinal growth, and IEC proliferation. Treatment led to differential effects over time with greater absorptive function early, and enhanced proliferation at later...

  12. Persistent gene expression in mouse nasal epithelia following feline immunodeficiency virus-based vector gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Patrick L; Burnight, Erin R; Hickey, Melissa A; Blissard, Gary W; McCray, Paul B

    2005-10-01

    Gene transfer development for treatment or prevention of cystic fibrosis lung disease has been limited by the inability of vectors to efficiently and persistently transduce airway epithelia. Influenza A is an enveloped virus with natural lung tropism; however, pseudotyping feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentiviral vector with the hemagglutinin envelope protein proved unsuccessful. Conversely, pseudotyping FIV with the envelope protein from influenza D (Thogoto virus GP75) resulted in titers of 10(6) transducing units (TU)/ml and conferred apical entry into well-differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Baculovirus GP64 envelope glycoproteins share sequence identity with influenza D GP75 envelope glycoproteins. Pseudotyping FIV with GP64 from three species of baculovirus resulted in titers of 10(7) to 10(9) TU/ml. Of note, GP64 from Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus resulted in high-titer FIV preparations (approximately 10(9) TU/ml) and conferred apical entry into polarized primary cultures of human airway epithelia. Using a luciferase reporter gene and bioluminescence imaging, we observed persistent gene expression from in vivo gene transfer in the mouse nose with A. californica GP64-pseudotyped FIV (AcGP64-FIV). Longitudinal bioluminescence analysis documented persistent expression in nasal epithelia for approximately 1 year without significant decline. According to histological analysis using a LacZ reporter gene, olfactory and respiratory epithelial cells were transduced. In addition, methylcellulose-formulated AcGP64-FIV transduced mouse nasal epithelia with much greater efficiency than similarly formulated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped FIV. These data suggest that AcGP64-FIV efficiently transduces and persistently expresses a transgene in nasal epithelia in the absence of agents that disrupt the cellular tight junction integrity.

  13. Beta toxin is essential for the intestinal virulence of Clostridium perfringens type C disease isolate CN3685 in a rabbit ileal loop model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeed, Sameera; Uzal, Francisco A; Fisher, Derek J; Saputo, Juliann; Vidal, Jorge E; Chen, Yue; Gupta, Phalguni; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C isolates, which cause enteritis necroticans in humans and enteritis and enterotoxaemias of domestic animals, typically produce (at minimum) beta toxin (CPB), alpha toxin (CPA) and perfringolysin O (PFO) during log-phase growth. To assist development of improved vaccines and therapeutics, we evaluated the contribution of these three toxins to the intestinal virulence of type C disease isolate CN3685. Similar to natural type C infection, log-phase vegetative cultures of wild-type CN3685 caused haemorrhagic necrotizing enteritis in rabbit ileal loops. When isogenic toxin null mutants were prepared using TargeTron technology, even a double cpa/pfoA null mutant of CN3685 remained virulent in ileal loops. However, two independent cpb null mutants were completely attenuated for virulence in this animal model. Complementation of a cpb mutant restored its CPB production and intestinal virulence. Additionally, pre-incubation of wild-type CN3685 with a CPB-neutralizing monoclonal antibody rendered the strain avirulent for causing intestinal pathology. Finally, highly purified CPB reproduced the intestinal damage of wild-type CN3685 and that damage was prevented by pre-incubating purified CPB with a CPB monoclonal antibody. These results indicate that CPB is both required and sufficient for CN3685-induced enteric pathology, supporting a key role for this toxin in type C intestinal pathogenesis.

  14. Cordyceps sinensis preserves intestinal mucosal barrier and may be an adjunct therapy in endotoxin-induced sepsis rat model: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guo-Sheng; Ren, Jian-An; Li, Guan-Wei; Yuan, Yu-Jie; Li, Ning; Li, Jie-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis), a traditional Chinese medicine, exhibits various pharmacological activities such as reparative, antioxidant, and apoptosis inhibitory effects. Intestinal barrier dysfunction plays a vital role in the progression of sepsis. We aimed to explore the effect of C. sinensis on the gut barrier and evaluate its efficacy in sepsis. Methods: A murine model of gut barrier dysfunction was created by intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin. C. sinensis or saline was administered orally after the induction of sepsis. Alterations of intestinal barrier were evaluated and compared in terms of epithelial cell apoptosis, proliferation index (PI), intercellular tight junction (TJ) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Results: C. sinensis significantly decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells and promoted mucosal cells proliferation indicated by enhanced PI and PCNA expression in the intestinal mucosa compared to control group. The TJs between epithelial cells which were disrupted in septic rats were also restored by treatment of C. sinensis. In survival studies, C. sinensis was demonstrated to confer a protection against the lethal effect of sepsis. Conclusion: These results suggest that C. sinensis has gut barrier-protection effect in endotoxin-induced sepsis by promoting the proliferation and inhibiting the apoptosis of intestinal mucosal cells, as well as restoring the TJs of intestinal mucosa. C. sinensis may have the potential to be a useful adjunct therapy for sepsis. PMID:26221273

  15. The intestinal lymph fistula model--a novel approach to study ghrelin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jenny; Tschöp, Matthias H; Aulinger, Benedikt A; Davis, Harold W; Yang, Qing; Liu, Jianhua; Gaylinn, Bruce D; Thorner, Michael O; D'Alessio, David; Tso, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    The orexigenic hormone ghrelin is secreted from the stomach and has been implicated in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. We hypothesized that ghrelin, like other gastrointestinal (GI) hormones, is present in intestinal lymph, and sampling this compartment would provide advantages for studying ghrelin secretion in rodents. Blood and lymph were sampled from catheters in the jugular vein and mesenteric lymph duct before and after intraduodenal (ID) administration of isocaloric Ensure, dextrin, or Liposyn meals or an equal volume of saline in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats. Total ghrelin levels were measured using an established radioimmunoassay. Acyl and des-acyl ghrelin were measured using two-site ELISA. Fasting ghrelin levels in lymph were significantly higher than in plasma (means +/- SE: 3,307.9 +/- 272.9 vs. 2,127.1 +/- 115.0 pg/ml, P = 0.004). Postingestive acyl and des-acyl ghrelin levels were also significantly higher, whereas the ratio of acyl:des-acyl ghrelin was similar in lymph and plasma (0.91 +/- 0.28 vs. 1.20 +/- 0.36, P = 0.76). The principle enzymes responsible for deacylation of ghrelin were lower in lymph than in plasma. Following ID Ensure, maximum ghrelin suppression occurred at 2 h in lymph compared with at 1 h in plasma. The return of suppressed ghrelin levels to baseline was also delayed in lymph. Similarly, dextrin also induced significant suppression of ghrelin (two-way ANOVA: P = 0.02), whereas Liposyn did not (P = 0.32). On the basis of these findings, it appears that intestinal lymph, which includes drainage from the interstitium of the GI mucosa, is enriched in ghrelin. Despite reduced deacylating activity in lymph, there is not a disproportionate amount of acyl ghrelin in this pool. The postprandial dynamics of ghrelin are slower in lymph than plasma, but the magnitude of change is greater. Assessing ghrelin levels in the lymph may be advantageous for studying its secretion and concentrations in the gastric mucosa.

  16. Alcohol dehydrogenase: A potential new marker for diagnosis of intestinal ischemia using rat as a model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Upendra R Gumaste; Mukund M Joshi; Devendra T Mourya; Pradip V Barde; Ghanshyam K Shrivastav; Vikram S Ghole

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Intestinal ischemia (Ii) is an abdominal emergency due to blockade of the superior mesenteric artery resulting in 60-100% mortality if diagnosed late. Changes in several biochemical parameters such as D (-)-lactate, Creatinine kinase isoenzymes and lactate dehydrogenase suggested for early diagnosis, lack specificity and sensitivity. Therefore a biochemical parameter with greater sensitivity needs to be identified.METHODS: Wistar male rats were randomly assigned into two groups; control sham operated (n = 24) and ischemic test (n = 24) group. Superior mesenteric arterial occlusion was performed in the ischemic test group for 1 h. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was estimated in blood from portal vein, right ventricle of heart, dorsal aorta (DA) and inferior vena cava (IVC). The Serum glutamic acid pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) was also estimated in blood from portal vein and right ventricle of heart.RESULTS: A significant increase (P<0.001) in the levels of ADH in both portal blood as well as heart blood of the test group (232.72±99.45 EU and 250.85±95.14 EU, respectively)as compared to the control group (46.39±21.69 EU and 65.38±30.55 EU, respectively) were observed. Similarly,increased levels of ADH were observed in blood samples withdrawn from DA and IVC in test animals (319.52±80.14EU and 363.90±120.68 EU, respectively) as compared to the control group (67.68±63.22 EU and 72.50±58.45 EU,respectively). However, in test animals there was significant increase in SGPT in portal blood (P = 0.054) without much increase in heart blood.CONCLUSION: Significant increase in the levels of ADH in portal and heart blood within 1 h of SMA occlusion without increase in SGPT in heart blood, suggests that the origin of ADH is from ischemic intestine and not from liver. Similarly, raised ADH levels were found in DA and IVC as well. IVC blood does represent peripheral blood sample. A raised level of ADH in test animals confirms it to be a potential marker in the early

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-associated homoserine lactone C12 rapidly activates apoptosis in airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Christian; Fu, Zhu; Patanwala, Maria; Hum, Lauren; Lopez-Guzman, Mirielle; Illek, Beate; Kong, Weidong; Lynch, Susan V; Machen, Terry E

    2012-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) forms biofilms in lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, a process regulated by quorum-sensing molecules including N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (C12). C12 (10-100 µM) rapidly triggered events commonly associated with the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in JME (CF ΔF508CFTR, nasal surface) epithelial cells: depolarization of mitochondrial (mito) membrane potential (Δψ(mito)) and release of cytochrome C (cytoC) from mitos into cytosol and activation of caspases 3/7, 8 and 9. C12 also had novel effects on the endoplasmic reticulum (release of both Ca(2+) and ER-targeted GFP and oxidized contents into the cytosol). Effects began within 5 min and were complete in 1-2 h. C12 caused similar activation of caspases and release of cytoC from mitos in Calu-3 (wtCFTR, bronchial gland) cells, showing that C12-triggered responses occurred similarly in different airway epithelial types. C12 had nearly identical effects on three key aspects of the apoptosis response (caspase 3/7, depolarization of Δψ(mito) and reduction of redox potential in the ER) in JME and CFTR-corrected JME cells (adenoviral expression), showing that CFTR was likely not an important regulator of C12-triggered apoptosis in airway epithelia. Exposure of airway cultures to biofilms from PAO1wt caused depolarization of Δψ(mito) and increases in Ca(cyto) like 10-50 µM C12. In contrast, biofilms from PAO1ΔlasI (C12 deficient) had no effect, suggesting that C12 from P. aeruginosa biofilms may contribute to accumulation of apoptotic cells that cannot be cleared from CF lungs. A model to explain the effects of C12 is proposed. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Propagation of respiratory viruses in human airway epithelia reveals persistent virus-specific signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaidi-Laziosi, Manel; Brito, Francisco; Benaoudia, Sacha; Royston, Léna; Cagno, Valeria; Fernandes-Rocha, Mélanie; Piuz, Isabelle; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Huang, Song; Constant, Samuel; Boldi, Marc-Olivier; Kaiser, Laurent; Tapparel, Caroline

    2017-08-07

    Leading etiologies of acute illnesses, respiratory viruses typically cause self-limited diseases, though severe complications can occur in fragile patients. Rhinoviruses, respiratory enteroviruses, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial viruses and coronaviruses are highly prevalent respiratory pathogens, but due to the lack of reliable animal models, their differential pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. To compare infections by respiratory viruses isolated from clinical specimens using reconstituted human airway epithelia. Tissues were infected with rhinoviruses RV-A55, RV-A49, RV-B48, RV-C8 and RV-C15, respiratory enterovirus EV-D68, influenza virus H3N2, respiratory syncytial virus RSV-B and coronavirus HCoV-OC43. Replication kinetics, cell tropism, impact on tissue integrity and cytokine secretion were compared. Virus adaptation and tissue response were assessed through RNA-sequencing. Rhinoviruses, RSV-B and HCoV-OC43 infected ciliated cells and caused no major cell death while H3N2 and EV-D68 induced ciliated cell loss and tissue integrity disruption. H3N2 was also detected in rare goblet and basal cells. All viruses except RV-B48 and HCoV-OC43 altered cilia beating and MCC. H3N2 was the strongest cytokine-inducer and HCoV-OC43 the weakest. Persistent infection was observed in all cases. RNA-sequencing highlighted perturbation of tissue metabolism and induction of a transient but important immune response at 4-days post-infection. No majority mutations emerged in the viral population. Our results highlight the differential in vitro pathogenesis of respiratory viruses during the acute infection-phase and their ability to persist under immune tolerance. These data help to appreciate the range of disease severity observed in vivo and the occurrence of chronic respiratory infections in immunocompromised hosts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. The influence of nutrients, biliary-pancreatic secretions, and systemic trophic hormones on intestinal adaptation in a Roux-en-Y bypass model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taqi, Esmaeel; Wallace, Laurie E; de Heuvel, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    The signals that govern the upregulation of nutrient absorption (adaptation) after intestinal resection are not well understood. A Gastric Roux-en-Y bypass (GRYB) model was used to isolate the relative contributions of direct mucosal stimulation by nutrients, biliary-pancreatic secretions, and sy...

  20. MODULATION OF THE INTESTINAL MICROFLORA BY THE NONABSORBABLE ANTIBIOTIC VANCOMYCIN LEADS TO A REDUCTION OF THE TUMOR LOAD IN LIVER AND SPLEEN IN A LEUKEMIC RAT MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAENEN, S; HUIGES, W; VEENEMA, B; VANDERWAAIJ, D; HALIE, RM

    1993-01-01

    Based on previous studies where it was shown that non-absorbable antibiotics can influence the normal hematopoiesis via changes in factors related to the intestinal microflora, the influence of vancomycin on the progression of acute myeloid leukemia was investigated in the BNML rat model. Oral vanco

  1. The intestinal barrier in irritable bowel syndrome: subtype-specific effects of the systemic compartment in an in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samefko Ludidi

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a disorder with multifactorial pathophysiology. Intestinal barrier may be altered, especially in diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D. Several mediators may contribute to increased intestinal permeability in IBS.We aimed to assess effects of tryptase and LPS on in vitro permeability using a 3-dimensional cell model after basolateral cell exposure. Furthermore, we assessed the extent to which these mediators in IBS plasma play a role in intestinal barrier function.Caco-2 cells were grown in extracellular matrix to develop into polarized spheroids and were exposed to tryptase (10 - 50 mU, LPS (1 - 50 ng/mL and two-fold diluted plasma samples of 7 patients with IBS-D, 7 with constipation-predominant IBS (IBS-C and 7 healthy controls (HC. Barrier function was assessed by the flux of FITC-dextran (FD4 using live cell imaging. Furthermore, plasma tryptase and LPS were determined.Tryptase (20 and 50 mU and LPS (6.25 - 50 ng/mL significantly increased Caco-2 permeability versus control (all P< 0.05. Plasma of IBS-D only showed significantly elevated median tryptase concentrations (7.1 [3.9 - 11.0] vs. 4.2 [2.2 - 7.0] vs. 4.2 [2.5 - 5.9] μg/mL; P<0.05 and LPS concentrations (3.65 [3.00 - 6.10] vs. 3.10 [2.60-3.80] vs. 2.65 [2.40 - 3.40] EU/ml; P< 0.05 vs. IBS-C and HC. Also, plasma of IBS-D increased Caco-2 permeability versus HC (0.14450 ± 0.00472 vs. 0.00021 ± 0.00003; P < 0.001, which was attenuated by selective inhibition of tryptase and LPS (P< 0.05.Basolateral exposure of spheroids to plasma of IBS-D patients resulted in a significantly increased FD4 permeation, which was partially abolished by selective inhibition of tryptase and LPS. These findings point to a role of systemic tryptase and LPS in the epithelial barrier alterations observed in patients with IBS-D.

  2. Combined effects of fungal alkaloids on intestinal motility in an in vitro rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalziel, J E; Dunstan, K E; Finch, S C

    2013-11-01

    Diarrhea is caused by factors that alter absorption and secretion of water and ions across the intestinal epithelium and disrupt motility. Parasitic infection, stress, poor nutrition, and exposure to plant or fungal toxins predispose livestock to noninfectious diarrhea. This is more prevalent in sheep that graze pastures infected with wild-type endophytic fungus, suggesting the involvement of fungal alkaloids. These increase smooth muscle contraction: ergovaline/ergotamine (ergot alkaloid) activates serotonin (5-HT) receptors, and lolitrem B (indole diterpene) inhibits large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels. Because of their separate mechanisms of action the objective of this study was to investigate whether they act synergistically to increase smooth muscle contraction. Effects of ergotamine (1 µM) and lolitrem B (0.1 µM) on the tension and frequency of spontaneous contractions were investigated in a longitudinal preparation of isolated distal colon. The compounds were dissolved in 0.1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and applied separately or together for 1 h. Ergotamine increased contractile tension compared to the pretreatment control (Pergotamine alone. The increased contractile tension when both compounds were applied together indicates that ergotamine and lolitrem B acted synergistically to increase smooth muscle contraction, suggesting that they would alter motility in vivo.

  3. Lovastatin, but not orlistat, reduces intestinal polyp volume in an ApcMin/+ mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarnicola, Maria; Barone, Michele; Francavilla, Antonio; Tutino, Valeria; Bianco, Giusy; Tafaro, Angela; Minoia, Mario; Polimeno, Lorenzo; Napoli, Anna; Scavo, Maria Principia; Caruso, Maria Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    The statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoAR) and orlistat, an inhibitor of fatty acid synthase (FAS), inhibit tumor cell growth by restricting cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis, respectively. We previously demonstrated that an omega (ω)-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)- or olive oil-enriched diet reduced the polyp number and volume in ApcMin/+ mice. This phenomenon was associated with a significant inhibition of FAS and HMGCoAR, as well as an increase in the estrogen receptor (ER)β/α ratio. Herein, we evaluated the effect of lovastatin and orlistat on polyp development and ER expression in ApcMin/+ mice, in order to confirm previous data obtained with ω‑3-PUFAs and olive oil. As expected, the use of lovastatin and orlistat significantly reduced HMGCoAR and FAS enzymatic activities and gene expression in colonic tissues, but did not affect the number of intestinal polyps, while there was a statistically significant reduction in polyp volume only in the mouse group treated with lovastatin. In the mice receiving orlistat, we observed a significant increase in cell proliferation in the polyp tissue, as well as enhanced expression of ERα. Moreover, the overexpression of ERα was associated with a statistically significant increase in PES1, Shh and Gli1 protein levels, considered ERα-related molecular targets.

  4. Intestinal Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Baccharis dracunculifolia in the Trinitrobenzenesulphonic Acid Model of Rat Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Helena Cestari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Baccharis dracunculifolia DC (Asteraceae is a Brazilian medicinal plant popularly used for its antiulcer and anti-inflammatory properties. This plant is the main botanical source of Brazilian green propolis, a natural product incorporated into food and beverages to improve health. The present study aimed to investigate the chemical profile and intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of B. dracunculifolia extract on experimental ulcerative colitis induced by trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid (TNBS. Colonic damage was evaluated macroscopically and biochemically through its evaluation of glutathione content and its myeloperoxidase (MPO and alkaline phosphatase activities. Additional in vitro experiments were performed in order to test the antioxidant activity by inhibition of induced lipid peroxidation in the rat brain membrane. Phytochemical analysis was performed by HPLC using authentic standards. The administration of plant extract (5 and 50 mg kg−1 significantly attenuated the colonic damage induced by TNBS as evidenced both macroscopically and biochemically. This beneficial effect can be associated with an improvement in the colonic oxidative status, since plant extract prevented glutathione depletion, inhibited lipid peroxidation and reduced MPO activity. Caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, aromadendrin-4-O-methyl ether, 3-prenyl-p-coumaric acid, 3,5-diprenyl-p-coumaric acid and baccharin were detected in the plant extract.

  5. Intestinal Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Baccharis dracunculifolia in the Trinitrobenzenesulphonic Acid Model of Rat Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestari, Sílvia Helena; Bastos, Jairo Kennup; Di Stasi, Luiz Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Baccharis dracunculifolia DC (Asteraceae) is a Brazilian medicinal plant popularly used for its antiulcer and anti-inflammatory properties. This plant is the main botanical source of Brazilian green propolis, a natural product incorporated into food and beverages to improve health. The present study aimed to investigate the chemical profile and intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of B. dracunculifolia extract on experimental ulcerative colitis induced by trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid (TNBS). Colonic damage was evaluated macroscopically and biochemically through its evaluation of glutathione content and its myeloperoxidase (MPO) and alkaline phosphatase activities. Additional in vitro experiments were performed in order to test the antioxidant activity by inhibition of induced lipid peroxidation in the rat brain membrane. Phytochemical analysis was performed by HPLC using authentic standards. The administration of plant extract (5 and 50 mg kg(-1)) significantly attenuated the colonic damage induced by TNBS as evidenced both macroscopically and biochemically. This beneficial effect can be associated with an improvement in the colonic oxidative status, since plant extract prevented glutathione depletion, inhibited lipid peroxidation and reduced MPO activity. Caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, aromadendrin-4-O-methyl ether, 3-prenyl-p-coumaric acid, 3,5-diprenyl-p-coumaric acid and baccharin were detected in the plant extract.

  6. Oat consumption reduced intestinal fat deposition and improved health span in Caenorhabditis elegans model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chenfei; Gao, Zhanguo; Greenway, Frank L.; Burton, Jeffrey H.; Johnson, William D.; Keenan, Michael J.; Enright, Frederick M.; Martin, Roy J.; Chu, YiFang; Zheng, Jolene

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their fermentable dietary fiber and the soluble β-glucan fiber, oats have unique avenanthramides that have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that reduce coronary heart disease in human clinical trials. We hypothesized that oat consumption will increase insulin sensitivity, reduce body fat, and improve health span in Caenorhabditis elegans through a mechanism involving the daf-2 gene, which codes for the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1–like receptor, and that hyperglycemia will attenuate these changes. Caenorhabditis elegans wild type (N2) and the null strains sir-2.1, daf-16, and daf-16/daf-2 were fed Escherichia coli (OP50) and oat flakes (0.5%, 1.0%, or 3%) with and without 2% glucose. Oat feeding decreased intestinal fat deposition in N2, daf-16, or daf-16/daf-2 strains (P oat consumption. Oat consumption increased ckr-1, gcy-8, cpt-1, and cpt-2 mRNA expression in both the N2 and the sir-2.1 mutant, with significantly higher expression in sir-2.1 than in N2 (P oat consumption reduced fat storage and increased ckr-1, gcy-8, cpt-1, or cpt-2 through the sir-2.1 genetic pathway. Oat consumption may be a beneficial dietary intervention for reducing fat accumulation, augmenting health span, and improving hyperglycemia-impaired lipid metabolism. PMID:26253816

  7. Efficacy and safety of small intestinal submucosa in dural defect repair in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shu-Kun; Guo, Jin-Hai; Wang, Zhu-le; Zhang, Yi; Tu, Yun-Hu; Wu, Shi-Zhou; Huang, Fu-Guo; Xie, Hui-Qi

    2017-04-01

    Dural defects are a common problem, and inadequate dural closure can lead to complications. Several types of dural substitute materials have recently been discarded or modified owing to poor biocompatibility or mechanical properties and adverse reactions. The small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a promising material used in a variety of applications. Based on the limitations of previous studies, we conducted an animal study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the SIS in preclinical trials. Twenty-four male beagle dogs were subjected to surgical resection to produce dural defects. SIS or autologous dural mater was patched on the dural defect. Gross and histological evaluations were carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the therapy. Our findings demonstrated that the SIS, which stimulated connective and epithelial tissue responses for dural regeneration and functional recovery without immunological rejection, could provide prolonged defect repair and prevent complications. The mechanical properties of the SIS could be adjusted by application of multiple layers, and the biocompatibility of the material was appropriate. Thus, our data suggested that this material may represent an alternative option for clinical treatment of dural defects.

  8. Effect of hypertonic saline resuscitation on heme oxygenase-1 mRNA expression and apoptosis of the intestinal mucosa in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yuan-qiang; GU Lin-hui; HUANG Wei-dong; MOU Han-zhou

    2010-01-01

    Background Massive blood loss due to trauma is the leading cause of death in trauma patients and military combatants. The fluid category of resuscitation for hypotensive trauma patients is open to debate. This study was conducted to investigate the early effects of hypertonic and isotonic saline solutions on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA expression and apoptosis in the intestinal mucosa of rats with hemorrhagic shock.Methods A model of severe hemorrhagic shock was established in 21 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into sham, normal saline resuscitation (NS), and hypertonic saline resuscitation (HTS) groups, with 7 in each group. We assessed and compared the HO-1 mRNA expression and apoptosis in the small intestinal mucosa of rats after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation using the SYBR Green I fluorescence quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, fluorescein-iso-thiocyanate-annexin V/propidium iodide double staining, and flow cytometry.Results In the early stage of hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation, marked apoptosis occurred in the small intestinal mucosa from both the NS and HTS groups. The apoptotic rate in the NS group was higher than that in the HTS group (P <0.01). Among the three groups, HO-1 mRNA mucosa from the HTS group had the highest level of expression; however, the differences were not significant. There was a significant negative correlation between HO-1 mRNA expression and apoptosis in the small intestinal mucosa from the NS and HTS groups after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation.Conclusions In this rat model of severe hemorrhagic shock, HTS resuscitation with a small volume is more effective than NS resuscitation in reducing apoptosis of the intestinal mucosa. Further, HO-1 mRNA over-expression in the intestinal mucosa may be one of the molecular mechanisms of HTS in the resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock.

  9. Immediate expression of c-fos and c-jun mRNA in a model of intestinal autotransplantation and ischemia-reperfusion in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria Mercês; Tannuri, Ana Cristina Aoun; Coelho, Maria Cecilia Mendonça; de Oliveira Gonçalves, Josiane; Serafini, Suellen; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Tannuri, Uenis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury occurs in several clinical conditions and after intestinal transplantation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenomena of apoptosis and cell proliferation in a previously described intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury autograft model using immunohistochemical markers. The molecular mechanisms involved in ischemia-reperfusion injury repair were also investigated by measuring the expression of the early activation genes c-fos and c-jun, which induce apoptosis and cell proliferation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty adult male Wistar rats were subjected to surgery for a previously described ischemia-reperfusion model that preserved the small intestine, the cecum and the ascending colon. Following reperfusion, the cecum was harvested at different time points as a representative segment of the intestine. The rats were allocated to the following four subgroups according to the reperfusion time: subgroup 1: 5 min; subgroup 2: 15 min; subgroup 3: 30 min; and subgroup 4: 60 min. A control group of cecum samples was also collected. The expression of c-fos, c-jun and immunohistochemical markers of cell proliferation and apoptosis (Ki67 and TUNEL, respectively) was studied. RESULTS: The expression of both c-fos and c-jun in the cecum was increased beginning at 5 min after ischemia-reperfusion compared with the control. The expression of c-fos began to increase at 5 min, peaked at 30 min, and exhibited a declining tendency at 60 min after reperfusion. A progressive increase in c-jun expression was observed. Immunohistochemical analyses confirmed these observations. CONCLUSION: The early activation of the c-fos and c-jun genes occurred after intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury, and these genes can act together to trigger cell proliferation and apoptosis. PMID:26039956

  10. Effects of the 2,4-D herbicide on gills epithelia and liver of the fish Poecilia vivipara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana F. Vigário

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, usually named 2,4-D is one of the most widely used herbicides in the world. Acute toxicity of 2,4-D herbicide was investigated through its effects on guppies (Poecilia vivipara Bloch et Schneider 1801. Fish were exposed to the herbicide at concentrations of 10, 20 and 40µl per liter of water for 24 hours to determine its effects on gills and liver epithelia. The estimated LC50 was 34.64µl of 2,4-D per liter of water. Histochemical analyses and Feulgen's reaction were conducted to detect glycoconjugates and DNA, respectively, in gills and liver epithelia. Histochemistry revealed qualitative variations of glycoconjugates present on mucous cells and granules. The four types of mucous cells contained neutral granules, acids, or both. Increasing amounts of syalomucins were observed from the control group to the group exposed to the highest concentration of 2,4-D, suggesting increased mucous viscosity and the formation of plaques that could inhibit gas exchange and osmoregulation. Lamellar fusion observed in the group exposed to 40µl of 2,4-D suggests a defense mechanism. Hepatocytes showed vacuolization in the 10 and 20µl/L groups. The 40 µl/L group showed normal hepatocytes as well as changed ones, many Ito cells, micronuclei, and nuclear swelling. These effects may be associated with toxicity or adaptative processes to cellular stress. The data from this study indicates the importance of assessing similar risks to aquatic species and suggests that Poecilia vivipara is an adequate biological model for analysis of environmental contamination.

  11. Utilization of the serosal scarification model of postoperative intestinal adhesion formation to investigate potential adhesion-preventing substances in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, E R; Livesey, M A; Barker, I K; Hurtig, M B; Conlon, P D

    1996-01-01

    A rabbit serosal scarification model was utilized to compare the ability of four drugs, previously administered peri-operatively to horses undergoing exploratory celiotomy, to prevent the development of postoperative intestinal adhesions. The substances compared were 32% Dextran 70 (7 mL/kg), 1% sodium carboxymethylcellulose (7 mL/kg), trimethoprim-sulfadiazine (30 mg/kg), and flunixin meglumine (1 mg/kg). The first two were administered intra-abdominally following surgery, while the latter two were administered systemically in the peri-operative period. Fibrous adhesions were evident in all animals in the untreated serosal scarification group. No significant difference in the number of animals with adhesions was found between the untreated control group and any treatment group, nor among the treatment groups. Microscopic examination of adhesions collected at postmortem examination revealed fibers consistent with cotton, surrounded by a giant-cell reaction and ongoing acute inflammation. The source of the fibers was likely the cotton laparotomy sponges used to scarify the intestinal surface, since the pattern in the granuloma and sponge fibers appeared similar under polarized light. Though consistent intestinal adhesion formation was produced in the rabbit, the presence of foreign body granulomas may prevent consideration of this model for future research. The drugs tested were ineffective in preventing the formation of postoperative small intestinal adhesions in this model. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8904667

  12. The effect of bovine colostrum products on intestinal dysfunction and inflammation in a preterm pig model of necrotizing enterocolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støy, Ann Cathrine Findal

    was used to investigate the effect of BC products on intestinal structure, digestive and absorptive functions, microbiota, plasma and tissue proteins and tissue gene expression levels of inflammatory markers. In Study I, the aim was to investigate if BC could correct intestinal dysfunction and reduce...... formula. All three BC products maintained trophic and anti-inflammatory effects on the immature pig intestine. A simple and standardized system was required to investigate the effects of milk formula versus BC on intestinal epithelial cells. In Study III, the IPEC-J2 cell line was evaluated as an in vitro...... formula or colostrum were included for comparison. This study showed that careful considerations must be made prior to gene expression analysis of diet-induced responses in IPEC-J2 cells as a system for the premature intestine, since no dietinduced effects in the IPEC-J2 cells were detected. C...

  13. Study of Intestinal Absorption of Emodin in One-way Intestinal Perfusion Rat Model%在体单向肠灌流模型研究大黄素的大鼠肠吸收特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳; 王平; 王进荣; 于宜平; 孟宪丽

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究大黄素在大鼠不同肠段的吸收特性,以及P-糖蛋白(P-gp)和多药耐药相关蛋白(MRP2)对大黄素肠吸收的影响.方法 采用大鼠在体单向肠灌流模型,HPLC法测定肠灌流液中大黄素的浓度,计算不含抑制剂药物组及含抑制剂药物组大黄素的吸收速率常数(Ka)和表观吸收系数(Papp).结果 十二指肠段吸收能力显著强于其他肠段(P<0.05);大黄素在回肠、结肠、空肠段之间的吸收差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);加入P-gp 抑制剂后,大黄素肠吸收的Ka、Papp 值与不合抑制剂组比较差异也没有统计学意义(P>0.05);加入高、中浓度MRP2抑制剂后,大黄素肠吸收的Ka、Papp 值与不含抑制剂组比较,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.01),且有剂量依赖性.结论 大黄素在大鼠体内的主要吸收部位为十二指肠.大黄素的肠吸收过程不受P-gp的外排影响,但受到MRP2的肠道外排转运影响,大黄素可能为MRP2的底物.%Objective To investigate the absorption characteristic of emodin in rats intestine and to observe the impact of P-glycoprotein(P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein( MRP2) on intestinal absorption of emodin. Methods The rat one-way intestinal perfusion model was used. The concentration of emodin was determined by RP-HPLC. The absorption rate constant(Kα) and the apparent absorption coefficient(Papp) in each intestinal section were calculated in rats with or without P-gp inhibilor(verapamil hydrochloride) or MRP2 inhibitor(indomethacin). Results The value of Ka and Papp in the duodenum was signifcantly higher than in other intestinal sections(P 0.05). Compared with the group without inhibitor, the value of Ka and Papp had signifcantly increased(P 0.05) affter adding the inhibitor of P-gp. Conclusion The main absorption position of emodin is in the duodenum of rats. P-gp has no effect on the intestinal absorption of emodin, but MRP2 can promote the intestinal absorption of

  14. Yoghurt consumption regulates the immune cells implicated in acute intestinal inflammation and prevents the recurrence of the inflammatory process in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Silvina; Perdigon, Gabriela; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra

    2011-05-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, two forms of inflammatory bowel disease, are important problems in industrialized countries. The complete etiology of these two diseases is still unknown but likely involves genetic, environmental, and immunological factors. The aim of the present work was to determine whether the anti-inflammatory effects reported for yoghurt in acute trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced intestinal inflammation in mice also could prevent or attenuate the recurrent intestinal inflammation, thus maintaining remission. The innate response also was evaluated through participation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and the analysis of T-cell populations to determine the effects of yoghurt in an acute inflammatory bowel disease model. Yoghurt exerted a beneficial effect on acute intestinal inflammation by regulating T-cell expansion and modulating the expression of TLRs, with decrease of TLR4(+) and increase of TLR9(+) cells. The anti-inflammatory effect of yoghurt also was demonstrated in a recurrent inflammation model. Yoghurt administration during the remission phase prevented the recurrence of inflammation without producing undesirable side effects. The yoghurt effect may be mediated by increased interleukin 10 production and changes in intestinal microbiota.

  15. Evidence from Animal Models: Is a Restricted or Conventional Intestinal Microbiota Composition Predisposing to Risk for High-LET Radiation Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Irene; Schiestl, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal microbiota affect cell responses to ionizing radiation at the molecular level and can be linked to the development of the immune system, controlled cell death or apoptosis. We have developed a microbiota mouse model and report here that high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induced the repair of chromosomal DNA lesions more efficiently in conventional than in restricted intestinal microbiota mice. Based on different phylotype densities after whole-body irradiation, bacterial indicator phylotypes were found to be more abundant in restricted in microbiota than in conventional microbiota. Genotoxic phenotypes of irradiated restricted and conventional microbiota mice were compared with ataxia telangiectasia-deficient restricted and conventional microbiota mice, respectively. Those indicator phylotypes, including Bacteroides (Gram-negative bacterium cTPY-13), Barnesiella intestinihominis and others, which were identified in nonirradiated restricted microbiota mice, increase in radiation-exposed conventional microbiota along with a reduction of persistent DNA double-strand breaks in blood lymphocytes. The dynamic change of phylotype abundances elucidated a feedback mechanism and effect of intestinal microbiota composition on the adaptive response to high-LET radiation. Several other bacterial phylotypes ( Helicobacter hepaticus , Helicobacter spp and others) were found to be more abundant in conventional than restricted microbiota. In this commentary, mouse models used in cancer research and radiotherapy for the study on the effects of intestinal microbiota composition on normal tissue radiation response are characterized and discussed. Highlights of this commentary: 1. Restricted microbiota phylotypes were correlated with persistent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and were found to orchestrate onco-protective controlled cell death after radiation; 2. Restricted microbiota composition reduced proinflammatory extracellular-stimulated immune responses, but

  16. Intestinal cellular localization of PCNA protein and CYP1A mRNA in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. exposed to a model toxicant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsvik Pål A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to examine the intestinal cellular localization of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and cytochrome P450 A1 (CYP1A expression in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. exposed to a model toxicant. The stress response was induced by intraperitoneal injection of four salmon with a single dose (50 mg/kg of the CYP1A inducer β-naphthoflavone (BNF and intestinal tissue (mid and distal intestine; MI and DI was sampled seven days later. Samples for histology and gene transcription analysis were collected from four exposed fish and four control fish. PCNA was assessed by immunohistochemistry, CYP1A mRNA was studied by in situ hybridization (ISH and finally the transcription of five genes was quantified by real-time quantitative RT-PCR (real-time RT-PCR; two detoxifying genes (CYP1A and glutathione S-transferase; GST, a stress marker gene (heat shock protein 70; HSP70, PCNA and a gene marker of apoptosis (caspase 6A. Results PCNA protein and CYP1A mRNA were successfully localized in the intestinal cells (MI of both experimental groups. At the cellular level, BNF significantly lowered intestinal cell proliferation and increased the CYP1A mRNA levels compared to the control group. The real-time RT-PCR data, which showed an increased mRNA expression both in the MI and DI of 139- and 62-fold, respectively, confirmed the increased cellular CYP1A mRNA levels detected using ISH. HSP70 expression was also up-regulated in the exposed fish. The other examined genes did not show any differential regulation in the experimental fish group. Conclusion This study showed that CYP1A mRNA had a specific intestinal cellular transcription pattern in Atlantic salmon exposed to BNF. At the cellular level CYP1A mRNA expression was always observed at or around the cell nucleus close to the basolateral cell membrane and at the tissue level CYP1A mRNA expression was most frequently observed in the basal and apex area of the intestinal

  17. Claudin-3 expression in radiation-exposed rat models: A potential marker for radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Sehwan; Lee, Jong-geol; Bae, Chang-hwan; Lee, Seung Bum [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo [Laboratory of Experimental Pathology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Sook [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pathology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sunhoo, E-mail: sunhoo@kcch.re.kr [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pathology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Irradiation increased intestinal bacterial translocation, accompanied by claudin protein expression in rats. • Neurotensin decreased the bacterial translocation and restored claudin-3 expression. • Claudin-3 can be used as a marker in evaluating radiation induced intestinal injury. - Abstract: The molecular events leading to radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure are not well known. The influence of the expression of claudin proteins in the presence and absence of neurotensin was investigated in radiation-exposed rat intestinal epithelium. Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, irradiation, and irradiation + neurotensin groups, and bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph node and expression of claudins were determined. Irradiation led to intestinal barrier failure as demonstrated by significant bacterial translocation. In irradiated terminal ilea, expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 was significantly decreased, and claudin-2 expression was increased. Administration of neurotensin significantly reduced bacterial translocation and restored the structure of the villi as seen by histologic examination. Among the three subtype of claudins, only claudin-3 expression was restored. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of neurotensin on the disruption of the intestinal barrier is associated with claudin-3 alteration and that claudin-3 could be used as a marker in evaluating radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  18. A reaction–diffusion mechanism influences cell lineage progression as a basis for formation, regeneration, and stability of intestinal crypts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lei

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colon crypts, a single sheet of epithelia cells, consist of a periodic pattern of stem cells, transit-amplifying cells, and terminally differentiated cells that constantly renew and turnover. Experimental evidence suggests that Wnt signaling promotes and regulates stem cell division, differentiation, and possible cell migrations while intestinal BMP signaling inhibits stem cell self-renewal and repression in crypt formation. As more molecular details on Wnt and BMP in crypts are being discovered, little is still known about how complex interactions among Wnt, BMP, and different types of cells, and surrounding environments may lead to de novo formation of multiple crypts or how such interactions affect regeneration and stability of crypts. Results We present a mathematical model that contains Wnt and BMP, a cell lineage, and their feedback regulations to study formation, regeneration, and stability of multiple crypts. The computational explorations and linear stability analysis of the model suggest a reaction–diffusion mechanism, which exhibits a short-range activation of Wnt plus a long-range inhibition with modulation of BMP signals in a growing tissue of cell lineage, can account for spontaneous formation of multiple crypts with the spatial and temporal pattern observed in experiments. Through this mechanism, the model can recapitulate some distinctive and important experimental findings such as crypt regeneration and crypt multiplication. BMP is important in maintaining stability of crypts and loss of BMP usually leads to crypt multiplication with a fingering pattern. Conclusions The study provides a mechanism for de novo formation of multiple intestinal crypts and demonstrates a synergetic role of Wnt and BMP in regeneration and stability of intestinal crypts. The proposed model presents a robust framework for studying spatial and temporal dynamics of cell lineages in growing tissues driven by multiple signaling

  19. Comparison of ion transport by cultured secretory and absorptive canine airway epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boucher, R C; Larsen, Erik Hviid

    1988-01-01

    The use of primary cell culture techniques to predict the function of native respiratory epithelia was tested in studies of dog airway epithelia. Epithelial cells from Cl- secretory (tracheal) and Na+ absorptive (bronchial) airway regions were isolated by enzymatic digestion, plated on collagen...... sensitive to amiloride but insensitive to bumetanide. As compared with the trachea, the bronchial (absorptive) epithelium is characterized by 1) a large amiloride-sensitive cellular conductance and 2) a relatively depolarized basolateral membrane. We conclude that this primary cell culture technique...... matrices, and maintained in serum-free, hormone-supplemented media. Transepithelial and intracellular studies showed that both the tracheal and bronchial culture preparations exhibited bioelectric parameters quantitatively similar to those of intact tissues. Similar to the native tissue, the tracheal...

  20. Castration-induced expression of caspase-1 in epithelia of accessory sex organs in male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masao Izawa; Mitunori Kimura; Tomiko Yamada; Makoto Saji

    2001-01-01

    Aim: As an attempt to clarify the molecular basis of castration-induced apoptosis, this study was undertaken to demonstrate the expression of caspase-1 in male accessory sex organs of rats. Methods and results: cDNA of rat caspase-1 was cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction from the ventral prostates. The open reading frame predicts 402 amino acids, which shows more than 91% and 63 % identity to those of mouse and human, respec tively. Northern analyses demonstrated the presence of castration-induced up-regulation of the 1.6 kb transcript in the ventral prostate and the seminal vesicles. Finally, the authors demonstrated the caspase-1 transcripts in the epithelia of these tissues by in situ hybridization analyses. Conclusion: Castration induces the expression of caspase-1 tran scripts in the epithelia of ventral prostate and seminal vesicle. These observations suggest a possible role of caspase-1 in apoptosis in male accessory sex organs.

  1. Protective effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on epithelial barrier disruption caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunpeng; Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Weina; Ma, Xianyong; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuefen; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-04-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) play an important role in maintaining the mucosal barrier function and gastrointestinal health of animals. Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) was reported to protect the intestinal barrier function of early-weaned piglets against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 challenge; however, the underlying cellular mechanism of this protection was unclear. Here, an established intestinal porcine epithelia cell (IPEC-J2) model was used to investigate the protective effects and related mechanisms of L. plantarum on epithelial barrier damages induced by ETEC K88. Epithelial permeability, expression of inflammatory cytokines, and abundance of TJ proteins, were determined. Pre-treatment with L. plantarum for 6h prevented the reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) (Pplantarum were higher (Pplantarum was shown to regulate proteins of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. These results indicated that L. plantarum may improve epithelial barrier function by maintenance of TEER, inhibiting the reduction of TJ proteins, and reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines induced by ETEC K88, possibly through modulation of TLRs, NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

  2. Distribution of the aquaporin CHIP in secretory and resorptive epithelia and capillary endothelia.

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, S.; B. L. Smith; Christensen, E I; Agre, P

    1993-01-01

    The existence of water-selective channels has been postulated to explain the high water permeability of erythrocytes and certain epithelial cells. The aquaporin CHIP (channel-forming integral membrane protein of 28 kDa), a molecular water channel, is abundant in erythrocytes and water-permeable segments of the nephron. To determine whether CHIP may mediate transmembrane water movement in other water-permeable epithelia, membranes of multiple organs were studied by immunoblotting, immunohistoc...

  3. Tgf-beta downregulation of distinct chloride channels in cystic fibrosis-affected epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Sun

    Full Text Available The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and Calcium-activated Chloride Conductance (CaCC each play critical roles in maintaining normal hydration of epithelial surfaces including the airways and colon. TGF-beta is a genetic modifier of cystic fibrosis (CF, but how it influences the CF phenotype is not understood.We tested the hypothesis that TGF-beta potently downregulates chloride-channel function and expression in two CF-affected epithelia (T84 colonocytes and primary human airway epithelia compared with proteins known to be regulated by TGF-beta.TGF-beta reduced CaCC and CFTR-dependent chloride currents in both epithelia accompanied by reduced levels of TMEM16A and CFTR protein and transcripts. TGF-beta treatment disrupted normal regulation of airway-surface liquid volume in polarized primary human airway epithelia, and reversed F508del CFTR correction produced by VX-809. TGF-beta effects on the expression and activity of TMEM16A, wtCFTR and corrected F508del CFTR were seen at 10-fold lower concentrations relative to TGF-beta effects on e-cadherin (epithelial marker and vimentin (mesenchymal marker expression. TGF-beta downregulation of TMEM16A and CFTR expression were partially reversed by Smad3 and p38 MAPK inhibition, respectively.TGF-beta is sufficient to downregulate two critical chloride transporters in two CF-affected tissues that precedes expression changes of two distinct TGF-beta regulated proteins. Our results provide a plausible mechanism for CF-disease modification by TGF-beta through effects on CaCC.

  4. BMP4 Signaling is Involved in the Generation of Inner Ear Sensory Epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Yucheng; Zhao Yanling; Wang Zhengmin; Corrales Carleton E; Li Huawei; Liu Hong; Heller Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The robust expression of BMP4 in the incipient sensory organs of the inner ear suggests possible roles for this signaling protein during induction and development of auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia. Homozygous BMP4-/- animals die before the inner ear's sensory organs develop, which precludes determining the role of BMP4 in these organs with simple gene knockout experiments. Results Here we use a chicken otocyst culture system to perform quantitative studies on th...

  5. Plasticity within stem cell hierarchies in mammalian epithelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetteh, Paul W; Farin, Henner F; Clevers, Hans

    Tissue homeostasis and regeneration are fueled by resident stem cells that have the capacity to self-renew, and to generate all the differentiated cell types that characterize a particular tissue. Classical models of such cellular hierarchies propose that commitment and differentiation occur

  6. Plasticity within stem cell hierarchies in mammalian epithelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetteh, Paul W; Farin, Henner F; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis and regeneration are fueled by resident stem cells that have the capacity to self-renew, and to generate all the differentiated cell types that characterize a particular tissue. Classical models of such cellular hierarchies propose that commitment and differentiation occur unidire

  7. Resveratrol inhibits rhinovirus replication and expression of inflammatory mediators in nasal epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastromarino, Paola; Capobianco, Daniela; Cannata, Federica; Nardis, Chiara; Mattia, Elena; De Leo, Alessandra; Restignoli, Rossella; Francioso, Antonio; Mosca, Luciana

    2015-11-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV), the cause of common colds, are the most frequent precipitants of acute exacerbation of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, as well as causes of other serious respiratory diseases. No vaccine or antiviral agents are available for the prevention or treatment of HRV infection. Resveratrol exerts antiviral effect against different DNA and RNA viruses. The antiviral effect of a new resveratrol formulation containing carboxymethylated glucan was analyzed in H1HeLa cell monolayers and ex vivo nasal epithelia infected with HRV-16. Virus yield was evaluated by plaque assay and expression of viral capsid proteins by Western blot. IL-10, IFN-β, IL-6, IL-8 and RANTES levels were evaluated by ELISA assay. ICAM-1 was assessed by Western blot and immunofluorescence. Resveratrol exerted a high, dose-dependent, antiviral activity against HRV-16 replication and reduced virus-induced secretion of IL-6, IL-8 and RANTES to levels similar to that of uninfected nasal epithelia. Basal levels of IL-6 and RANTES were also significantly reduced in uninfected epithelia confirming an anti-inflammatory effect of the compound. HRV-induced expression of ICAM-1 was reversed by resveratrol. Resveratrol may be useful for a therapeutic approach to reduce HRV replication and virus-induced cytokine/chemokine production.

  8. Ultrastructural aspects of otoliths and sensory epithelia of fish inner ear exposed to hypergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsch, M.; Nindl, G.; Anken, R. H.; Körtje, K. H.; Rahmann, H.

    The present electron microscopical investigations were directed to the question, whether alterations in the gravitational force might induce structural changes in the morphology of otoliths or/and inner ear sensory epithelia of developing and adult swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) that had been kept either under long-term moderate hypergravity (8 days; 3g) or under short-time extreme hypergravity (10 minutes up to 9g). The otoliths of adult and neonate swordtail fish were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Macular epithelia of adult fish were examined both by SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The saccular otoliths (sagittae) of normally hatched adult fish revealed an enormous inter- (and even intra-; i.e. left vs. right) individual diversity in shape and size, whereas the otoliths of utricles (lapilli) and lagenae (asterisci) seemed to be more constant regarding morphological parameters. The structural diversity of juvenile otoliths was found to be less prominent as compared to the adults, differing from the latter regarding their peculiar crystalline morphology. Qualitative differences in the fine structure (SEM) of otoliths taken from adult and larval animals kept under 3g in comparison to 1g controls could not be observed. The SEM and TEM investigations of sensory epithelia also did not reveal any effects due to 3g stimulation. Even extreme hypergravity (more than 7g) for 10 minutes did not result in distinct pathological changes.

  9. Characterization of intestinal absorption of C-glycoside flavonoid vicenin-2 from Lychnophora ericoides leafs in rats by nonlinear mixed effects modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela A. Buqui

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractVicenin-2 (apigenin-6,8-di-C-β-d-glucopyranoside is present in hydroalcoholic extracts of the Brazilian species Lychnophora ericoides Mart., Asteraceae, leaves, and the biological effects of this compound have been demonstrated including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-tumor effects in rat models. Given the potential of this compound as a pharmacological agent, the aims of this investigation were to evaluate the extent of intestinal absorption of vicenin-2, and to determine the intestinal permeation profile using an in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion technique. A validated HPLC–UV method was applied to measure the amount of unabsorbed vicenin-2 in the gut after an oral administration of 180 mg kg-1 in five rats. A nonlinear mixed effects model was used to determine the absorption pharmacokinetic parameters assuming a first order absorption and active secretion processes for this compound, wherein the active secretion was characterized by a zero-order process. The population pharmacokinetic parameters obtained were 0.274 min-1 for the first-order absorption rate constant, 16.3% min-1 for the zero-order rate constant; the final percentage of the original dose that was absorbed in vivo was 40.2 ± 2.5%. These parameters indicated that vicenin-2 was rapidly absorbed in the small intestine. In contrast to literature information indicating no absorption of vicenin-2 in Caco-2 cells, our results suggested that vicenin-2 can be absorbed in the small intestine of rats. The finding supports further investigation of vicenin-2 as a viable oral phytopharmaceutical agent for digestive diseases.

  10. Clostridium difficile colonization and antibiotics response in PolyFermS continuous model mimicking elderly intestinal fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Fehlbaum

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium difficile (CD, a spore-forming and toxin-producing bacterium, is the main cause for antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the elderly. Here we investigated CD colonization in novel in vitro fermentation models inoculated with immobilized elderly fecal microbiota and the effects of antibiotic treatments. Methods Two continuous intestinal PolyFermS models inoculated with different immobilized elder microbiota were used to investigate selected factors of colonization of CD in proximal (PC, model 1 and transverse-distal (TDC, model 1 and 2 colon conditions. Colonization of two CD strains of different PCR ribotypes, inoculated as vegetative cells (ribotype 001, model 1 or spores (ribotypes 001 and 012, model 2, was tested. Treatments with two antibiotics, ceftriaxone (daily 150 mg L−1 known to induce CD infection in vivo or metronidazole (twice daily 333 mg L−1 commonly used to treat CD, were investigated in TDC conditions (model 2 for their effects on gut microbiota composition (qPCR, 16S pyrosequencing and activity (HPLC, CD spore germination and colonization, and cytotoxin titer (Vero cell assay. Results CD remained undetected after inoculating vegetative cells in PC reactors of model 1, but was shown to colonize TDC reactors of both models, reaching copy numbers of up to log10 8 mL−1 effluent with stable production of toxin correlating with CD cell numbers. Ceftriaxone treatment in TDC reactors showed only small effects on microbiota composition and activity and did not promote CD colonization compared to antibiotic-free control reactor. In contrast, treatment with metronidazole after colonization of CD induced large modifications in the microbiota and decreased CD numbers below the detection limit of the specific qPCR. However, a fast CD recurrence was measured only 2 days after cessation of metronidazole treatment. Conclusions Using our in vitro fermentation models, we demonstrated that stable CD

  11. Fishing for Intestinal Cancer Models: Unraveling Gastrointestinal Homeostasis and Tumorigenesis in Zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faro, A.; Boj, S.F.; Clevers, H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Zebrafish has proven to be a highly versatile model for comprehensive studies of gene function in development. Given that the molecular pathways involved in epithelial carcinogenesis appear to be conserved across vertebrates, zebrafish is now considered as a valid model to study tumor biolo

  12. Dietary intervention with green dwarf banana flour (Musa sp AAA) prevents intestinal inflammation in a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid model of rat colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarminio, Viviane; Fruet, Andrea C; Witaicenis, Aline; Rall, Vera L M; Di Stasi, Luiz C

    2012-03-01

    Dietary products are among the therapeutic approaches used to modify intestinal microflora and to promote protective effects during the intestinal inflammatory process. Because the banana plant is rich in resistant starch, which is used by colonic microbiota for the anaerobic production of the short-chain fatty acids that serve as a major fuel source for colonocytes: first, green dwarf banana flour produces protective effects on the intestinal inflammation acting as a prebiotic and, second, combination of this dietary supplementation with prednisolone presents synergistic effects. For this, we used the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis. Our results revealed that the protective effect produced by a combination of 10% green dwarf banana flour with prednisolone was more pronounced than those promoted by a single administration of prednisolone or a diet containing 10% or 20% banana flour. This beneficial effect was associated with an improvement in the colonic oxidative status because the banana flour diet prevented the glutathione depletion and inhibited myeloperoxidase activity and lipid peroxidation. In addition, the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity was associated with an inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity, a reduction in macroscopic and microscopic scores, and an extension of the lesions. In conclusion, the dietary use of the green dwarf banana flour constitutes an important dietary supplement and complementary medicine product to prevention and treatment of human inflammatory bowel disease.

  13. Effect of a cocoa diet on the small intestine and gut-associated lymphoid tissue composition in an oral sensitization model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps-Bossacoma, Mariona; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Franch, Àngels; Untersmayr, Eva; Castell, Margarida

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have attributed to the cocoa powder the capacity to attenuate the immune response in a rat oral sensitization model. To gain a better understanding of cocoa-induced mechanisms at small intestinal level, 3-week-old female Lewis rats were fed either a standard diet or a diet containing 10% cocoa for 4 weeks with or without concomitant oral sensitization with ovalbumin (OVA). Thereafter, we evaluated the lymphocyte composition of the Peyer's patches (PPL), small intestine epithelium (IEL) and lamina propria (LPL). Likewise, gene expression of several immune molecules was quantified in the small intestine. Moreover, histological samples were used to evaluate the proportion of goblet cells, IgA+ cells and granzyme+cells as well. In cocoa-fed animals, we identified a five-time reduction in the percentage of IgA+ cells in intestinal tissue together with a decreased proportion of TLR4+ IEL. Analyzing the lymphocyte composition, almost a double proportion of TCRγδ+cells and an increase of NK cell percentage in PPL and IEL were found. In addition, a rise in CD25+, CD103+ and CD62L- cell proportions was observed in CD4+ PPL from cocoa-fed animals, along with a decrease in gene expression of CD11b, CD11c and IL-10. These results suggest that changes in PPL and IEL composition and in the gene expression induced by the cocoa diet could be involved, among other mechanisms, on its tolerogenic effect.

  14. Visualization of HIV-1 interactions with penile and foreskin epithelia: clues for female-to-male HIV transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh H Dinh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available To gain insight into female-to-male HIV sexual transmission and how male circumcision protects against this mode of transmission, we visualized HIV-1 interactions with foreskin and penile tissues in ex vivo tissue culture and in vivo rhesus macaque models utilizing epifluorescent microscopy. 12 foreskin and 14 cadaveric penile specimens were cultured with R5-tropic photoactivatable (PA-GFP HIV-1 for 4 or 24 hours. Tissue cryosections were immunofluorescently imaged for epithelial and immune cell markers. Images were analyzed for total virions, proportion of penetrators, depth of virion penetration, as well as immune cell counts and depths in the tissue. We visualized individual PA virions breaching penile epithelial surfaces in the explant and macaque model. Using kernel density estimated probabilities of localizing a virion or immune cell at certain tissue depths revealed that interactions between virions and cells were more likely to occur in the inner foreskin or glans penis (from local or cadaveric donors, respectively. Using statistical models to account for repeated measures and zero-inflated datasets, we found no difference in total virions visualized at 4 hours between inner and outer foreskins from local donors. At 24 hours, there were more virions in inner as compared to outer foreskin (0.0495 +/- 0.0154 and 0.0171 +/- 0.0038 virions/image, p = 0.001. In the cadaveric specimens, we observed more virions in inner foreskin (0.0507 +/- 0.0079 virions/image than glans tissue (0.0167 +/- 0.0033 virions/image, p<0.001, but a greater proportion was seen penetrating uncircumcised glans tissue (0.0458 +/- 0.0188 vs. 0.0151 +/- 0.0100 virions/image, p = 0.099 and to significantly greater mean depths (29.162 +/- 3.908 vs. 12.466 +/- 2.985 μm. Our in vivo macaque model confirmed that virions can breach penile squamous epithelia in a living model. In summary, these results suggest that the inner foreskin and glans epithelia may be important sites

  15. Intestinal Coccidia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Ggaravi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal Coccidia are a subclass of Apicomplexa phylum. Eucoccidida are facultative heteroxenous, but some of them are monoxenous. They have sexual and asexual life cycle. Some coccidia are human pathogens, for example: Cryptosporidium: Cryptosporidiums has many species that are mammalian intestinal parasites.C. Parvum specie is a human pathogenic protozoa. Cryptosporidum has circle or ellipse shapes and nearly 4-6 mm. It is transmitted in warm seasons. Oocyst is obtained insexual life cycle that has 20% thin layer and 80% thick layer. Oocyst with thick layer is able to live a long time in nature. They are the third or forth of gastroentritis disease that have digestive disorder like anorexia, nausea, persistent diarrhoea, malabsorption and leanness. The disease forms choronic and acute stages and it is able to kill the immunodeficiency cases. Sometimes it has HIV symptoms similar to pneumonia and respiratory track infection. Laboratory diagnosis is based on Oocyst finding in stool exam and that shitter floatation and Cr (KOH2 are the best methods. Modified zyh-lnelson and fleocroum are the best staining methods too. This parasite is transmitted by zoonotic and Antroponotic origin. Molecular studies have shown two Genotypes (I&II. Genotype I is aquatic and II is zoonotic. The prevalence rate is 3% in infants and 10% in calves. Cyclospora: This parasite is novel and is bigger than cryptosporidium.It isn't known a clear life cycle but is transmitted by water, vegetables and fruits as raspberries. and mulberries. Human is a specific host. When a parasite is in the intestine it causes inflammatory reaction in Entrocyte.The patient shows watery diarrhoea with nausea, vomitting, pain, Stomach cramp, anorexia, malabsorption and cachexia. The disease period is 3 monthes in immunodeficiency cases but it is selflimited in normal cases. Autofluorescence characteristic is differential diagnosis, prevalence rate of disease is unknown. Isospora: This

  16. Administration of a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor enhances the intestinal adaptation in a mouse model of short bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okawada, Manabu; Holst, Jens Juul; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces small intestine mucosal epithelial cell proliferation and may have benefit for patients who suffer from short bowel syndrome. However, glucagon-like peptide-2 is inactivated rapidly in vivo by dipeptidyl peptidase IV. Therefore, we hypothesized that selectively...... inhibiting dipeptidyl peptidase IV would prolong the circulating life of glucagon-like peptide-2 and lead to increased intestinal adaptation after development of short bowel syndrome....

  17. 大鼠在体单向肠灌流模型研究肉桂酸肠道吸收特性%Study of intestinal absorption of cinnamic acid in one-way intestinal perfusion rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨本坤; 王素军; 曾洁; 钟运鸣; 臧林泉

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the absorption characteristic of cinnamic acid in rat intestine and the influence of transporter protein on cinnamic acid absorption. Methods One-way intestinal perfusion rat model was established. HPLC was used to measure the content of cinnamon acid in intestine. The absorption rate constant (Ka) and the apparent absorption coefficient ( Peff) were obtained to analyze the absorption kinetics of cinnamon acid. Results The values of Ka and Peff of cinnamic acid in three different regions of rat intestine showed duodenum > jejunum > ileum. The values of Ka and Peff in the same region with different concentrations of cinnamic acid did not show a statistical difference. The values of Ka and Peff of cinnamic acid did not change when treated with MRP2 inhibitor (domethacin) in jejunum, but which significantly increased when treated with Pgp inhibitor ( verapamil hydrochloride) in duodenum. Conclusion Duodenum and jejunum may be the main sites of cinnamic acid absorption, by which mechanism is related to passive diffusion influenced by Pgp,but not MRP2.%目的 研究肉桂酸在大鼠肠道的吸收部位和吸收机制,以及转运蛋白对肉桂酸肠道吸收的影响.方法 建立在体单向肠灌流模型,采用HPLC法测定肉桂酸在肠道中的浓度变化,通过吸收速度常数(Ka)和表观吸收系数(Peff)来研究肉桂酸的吸收动力学特征.结果 肉桂酸在各个肠段的Ka和Peff结果为十二指肠>空肠>回肠,十二指肠和空肠的Ka和Peff值显著性高于回肠(P<0.05),不同浓度肉桂酸在同一肠段的Ka和Peff值差异无统计学意义,加入MRP2抑制剂(吲哚美辛)后Ka和Peff值差异亦无统计学意义,但加入Pgp抑制剂(盐酸维拉帕米)后其值则显著性增加.结论 十二指肠、空肠是肉桂酸吸收的主要部位,吸收机制为被动转运,肠道转运受Pgp转运蛋白的影响,但不受MRP2转运蛋白的影响.

  18. Cadmium induced oxidative stress in kidney epithelia cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henning F.

    2007-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an important industrial and environmental pollutant. In humans exposed to Cd via oral and/or pulmonary routes, the kidney is by far the primary organ affected adversely by Cd. It have been estimated that 7% of the human population may develop renal dysfunction from Cd exposure....... To elucidate the effect of cadmium on epithelial cells from the distal part of the kidney, A6 cells were used, since this cell model exhibits the morphological and functional properties of the mammalian distal epithelium. Although ROS have been implicated in Cd induced kidney toxicity, the mechanism...

  19. Early-life stress origins of gastrointestinal disease: animal models, intestinal pathophysiology, and translational implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Calvin S; Medland, Julia E; Moeser, Adam J

    2015-12-15

    Early-life stress and adversity are major risk factors in the onset and severity of gastrointestinal (GI) disease in humans later in life. The mechanisms by which early-life stress leads to increased GI disease susceptibility in adult life remain poorly understood. Animal models of early-life stress have provided a foundation from which to gain a more fundamental understanding of this important GI disease paradigm. This review focuses on animal models of early-life stress-induced GI disease, with a specific emphasis on translational aspects of each model to specific human GI disease states. Early postnatal development of major GI systems and the consequences of stress on their development are discussed in detail. Relevant translational differences between species and models are highlighted.

  20. Endurance exercise training programs intestinal lipid metabolism in a rat model of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu‐Han; Linden, Melissa A.; Gordon, Alicia; Scott Rector, R.; Buhman, Kimberly K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Endurance exercise has been shown to improve metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes; however, the physiological and molecular mechanisms for these benefits are not completely understood. Although endurance exercise has been shown to decrease lipogenesis, promote fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and increase mitochondrial biosynthesis in adipose tissue, muscle, and liver, its effects on intestinal lipid metabolism remain unknown. The absorptive cells of the small intestine, enterocytes, mediate the highly efficient absorption and processing of nutrients, including dietary fat for delivery throughout the body. We investigated how endurance exercise altered intestinal lipid metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes using Otsuka Long‐Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. We assessed mRNA levels of genes associated with intestinal lipid metabolism in nonhyperphagic, sedentary Long‐Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats (L‐Sed), hyperphagic, sedentary OLETF rats (O‐Sed), and endurance exercised OLETF rats (O‐EndEx). O‐Sed rats developed hyperphagia‐induced obesity (HIO) and type 2 diabetes compared with L‐Sed rats. O‐EndEx rats gained significantly less weight and fat pad mass, and had improved serum metabolic parameters without change in food consumption compared to O‐Sed rats. Endurance exercise resulted in dramatic up‐regulation of a number of genes in intestinal lipid metabolism and mitochondrial content compared with sedentary rats. Overall, this study provides evidence that endurance exercise programs intestinal lipid metabolism, likely contributing to its role in improving metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25602012

  1. Pacific oyster-derived polysaccharides attenuate allergen-induced intestinal inflammation in a murine model of food allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Hsiang Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oyster-derived polysaccharides (OPS have been shown to modulate the T helper (Th1/Th2 immunobalance toward the Th1-dominant direction in antigen-primed splenocytes. In the present study, we hypothesized that OPS might attenuate intestinal inflammation associated with food allergy, a Th2-dominant immune disorder. BALB/c mice were sensitized twice with ovalbumin (OVA absorbed to alum and then repeatedly challenged with intragastric OVA to induce intestinal allergic responses. The mice were administered by gavage with OPS and/or vehicle (distilled water once/d during the two sensitization phases, and once every other day during the challenge phase. Administration with OPS attenuated OVA challenge-elicited diarrhea, and the infiltration of mast cells in the intestine. OPS demonstrated a protective effect on the reduced ratio of villus length over crypt depth of the intestine in allergic mice. Furthermore, OPS administration markedly attenuated the intestinal expression of the Th2 signature cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4. Collectively, these results demonstrated the in vivo antiallergic activity of OPS, which is associated with the suppression of allergen-induced intestinal Th2 responses and mast cell activation.

  2. Dietary Fiber Intake Regulates Intestinal Microflora and Inhibits Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Shi, Lei; Pang, Wenhui; Liu, Wenwen; Li, Jianfeng; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Guanggang

    2016-01-01

    Recently, academic studies suggest that global growth of airway allergic disease has a close association with dietary changes including reduced consumption of fiber. Therefore, appropriate dietary fiber supplementation might be potential to prevent airway allergic disease (AAD). We investigated whether dietary fiber intake suppressed the induction of AAD and tried to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms. The control mice and AAD model mice fed with 4% standard-fiber chow, while low-fiber group of mice fed with a 1.75% low-fiber chow. The two fiber-intervened groups including mice, apart from a standard-fiber diet, were also intragastric (i.g.) administrated daily with poorly fermentable cellulose or readily fermentable pectin (0.4% of daily body weight), respectively. All animals except normal mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce airway allergic inflammation. Hallmarks of AAD were examined by histological analysis and ELISA. The variation in intestinal bacterial composition was assessed by qualitative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) content in fecal samples using real-time PCR. Low-fiber diet aggravated inflammatory response in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice, whereas dietary fiber intake significantly suppressed the allergic responses, attenuated allergic symptoms of nasal rubbing and sneezing, decreased the pathology of eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell metaplasia in the nasal mucosa and lung, inhibited serum OVA-specific IgE levels, and lowered the levels of Th2 cytokines in NALF and BALF, but, increased Th1 (IFN-γ) cytokines. Additionally, dietary fiber intake also increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and decreased Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Levels of probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, were upgraded significantly. Long-term deficiency of dietary fiber intake increases the susceptibility to AAD, whereas proper fiber supplementation promotes effectively the

  3. Dietary Fiber Intake Regulates Intestinal Microflora and Inhibits Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Recently, academic studies suggest that global growth of airway allergic disease has a close association with dietary changes including reduced consumption of fiber. Therefore, appropriate dietary fiber supplementation might be potential to prevent airway allergic disease (AAD.We investigated whether dietary fiber intake suppressed the induction of AAD and tried to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms.The control mice and AAD model mice fed with 4% standard-fiber chow, while low-fiber group of mice fed with a 1.75% low-fiber chow. The two fiber-intervened groups including mice, apart from a standard-fiber diet, were also intragastric (i.g. administrated daily with poorly fermentable cellulose or readily fermentable pectin (0.4% of daily body weight, respectively. All animals except normal mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA to induce airway allergic inflammation. Hallmarks of AAD were examined by histological analysis and ELISA. The variation in intestinal bacterial composition was assessed by qualitative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA content in fecal samples using real-time PCR.Low-fiber diet aggravated inflammatory response in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice, whereas dietary fiber intake significantly suppressed the allergic responses, attenuated allergic symptoms of nasal rubbing and sneezing, decreased the pathology of eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell metaplasia in the nasal mucosa and lung, inhibited serum OVA-specific IgE levels, and lowered the levels of Th2 cytokines in NALF and BALF, but, increased Th1 (IFN-γ cytokines. Additionally, dietary fiber intake also increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and decreased Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Levels of probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, were upgraded significantly.Long-term deficiency of dietary fiber intake increases the susceptibility to AAD, whereas proper fiber supplementation promotes

  4. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of heparan sulphate binding proteins of Entamoeba histolytica in a guinea pig model of intestinal amoebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Upninder; Khurana, Sumeeta; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Dubey, M L

    2013-11-01

    Entamoeba histolytica infection is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality in the form of intestinal and extraintestinal amoebiasis. No vaccine is yet available for amoebiasis. Heparan Sulphate Binding Proteins (HSBPs) from E. histolytica were evaluated for immunogenicity and protective efficacy in a Guinea pig model. Animals were immunized subcutaneously with 30μg of HSBP by three weekly inoculations. The immunogenicity of HSBP was determined by antibody response (IgG, IgM and IgA), splenocyte proliferation assay and in vitro direct amoebicidal assay with splenic lymphocytes and monocytes from vaccinated and control animals. The efficacy of the vaccine was evaluated by challenge infection to vaccinated and control animals by intra-caecal inoculation of E. histolytica trophozoites and comparing gross and histopathological findings in caeca of these animals. HSBP was found to induce specific anti-amoebic response as seen by specific antibody production and direct amoebicidal activity of splenocytes. The vaccine also showed partial protection against challenge infection in vaccinated animals as shown by mild/absent lesions and histopathological findings.

  5. Effects of fractionated abdominal irradiation on small intestinal motility. Studies in a novel in vitro animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, R.; Frisby, C.; Horowitz, M. [Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia). Dept. of Medicine; Schirmer, M.; Yeoh, E. [Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Blackshaw, A. [Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia). Dept. of Gastrointestinal Medicine; Langman, J.; Rowland, R. [Division of Tissue Pathology, Inst. of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Disordered small intestinal motility occurs frequently during acute radiation enteritis. However, the characteristics and time course of the motor dysfunction are poorly defined. These parameters were assessed in a novel animal model of radiation enteritis. Ileal pressures were recorded in vitro with perfused microanometric catheter using an arterially perfused ileal loop in 22 ferrets following fractionated abdominal irradiation (9 doses 2.50 Gz thrice weekly for 3 weeks). Tissue damage was graded histologically. Studies were performed 3 to 29 days after irradiation. Tissue from 7 control animals was also studied. All treated animals developed diarrhoea. Histology showed changes consistent with mild to moderate radiation enteritis. Following irradiation, there was an initial increase in frequency followed by a non-significant reduction in the frequency, but not the amplitude of ileal pressure waves. The frequency of pressure waves showed an inverse relationship with time after radiation (r=-0.634, p<0.002). There was no relationship between motility and histology. We conclude that abdominal irradiation is associated with a time-dependent reduction in ileal motility which does not correlate with light microscopic changes. (orig.).

  6. Effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating intestinal hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yanqin; Liu, Ying; Tong, Jingjing; Qian, Wei; Hou, Xiaohua

    2010-06-25

    Trimebutine maleate, which modulates the calcium and potassium channels, relieves abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. However, its effect on postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome is not clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating colonic hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. Mice infected up to 8 weeks with T. spiralis underwent abdominal withdrawal reflex to colorectal distention to evaluate the visceral sensitivity at different time points. Tissues were examined for histopathology scores. Colonic longitudinal muscle strips were prepared in the organ bath under basal condition or to be stimulated by acetylcholine and potassium chloride, and consecutive concentrations of trimebutine maleate were added to the bath to record the strip responses. Significant inflammation was observed in the intestines of the mice infected 2 weeks, and it resolved in 8 weeks after infection. Visceral hyperalgesia and colonic muscle hypercontractility emerged after infection, and trimebutine maleate could effectively reduce the colonic hyperreactivity. Hypercontractility of the colonic muscle stimulated by acetylcholine and high K(+) could be inhibited by trimebutine maleate in solution with Ca(2+), but not in Ca(2+) free solution. Compared with 8-week postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome group, 2-week acute infected strips were much more sensitive to the stimulators and the drug trimebutine maleate. Trimebutine maleate was effective in reducing the colonic muscle hypercontractility of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome mice. The findings may provide evidence for trimebutine maleate to treat postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome patients effectively.

  7. In vitro solubility, dissolution and permeability studies combined with semi-mechanistic modeling to investigate the intestinal absorption of desvenlafaxine from an immediate- and extended release formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franek, F; Jarlfors, A; Larsen, F; Holm, P; Steffansen, B

    2015-09-18

    Desvenlafaxine is a biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) class 1 (high solubility, high permeability) and biopharmaceutical drug disposition classification system (BDDCS) class 3, (high solubility, poor metabolism; implying low permeability) compound. Thus the rate-limiting step for desvenlafaxine absorption (i.e. intestinal dissolution or permeation) is not fully clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dissolution and/or intestinal permeability rate-limit desvenlafaxine absorption from an immediate-release formulation (IRF) and Pristiq(®), an extended release formulation (ERF). Semi-mechanistic models of desvenlafaxine were built (using SimCyp(®)) by combining in vitro data on dissolution and permeation (mechanistic part of model) with clinical data (obtained from literature) on distribution and clearance (non-mechanistic part of model). The model predictions of desvenlafaxine pharmacokinetics after IRF and ERF administration were compared with published clinical data from 14 trials. Desvenlafaxine in vivo dissolution from the IRF and ERF was predicted from in vitro solubility studies and biorelevant dissolution studies (using the USP3 dissolution apparatus), respectively. Desvenlafaxine apparent permeability (Papp) at varying apical pH was investigated using the Caco-2 cell line and extrapolated to effective intestinal permeability (Peff) in human duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon. Desvenlafaxine pKa-values and octanol-water partition coefficients (Do:w) were determined experimentally. Due to predicted rapid dissolution after IRF administration, desvenlafaxine was predicted to be available for permeation in the duodenum. Desvenlafaxine Do:w and Papp increased approximately 13-fold when increasing apical pH from 5.5 to 7.4. Desvenlafaxine Peff thus increased with pH down the small intestine. Consequently, desvenlafaxine absorption from an IRF appears rate-limited by low Peff in the upper small intestine, which "delays" the predicted

  8. Difficulties, guidelines and review of developing an acute rejection model after rat intestinal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Ane Miren; Santamaria, Monica; Hernandez-Oliveros, Francisco; Guerra, Laura; Lopez, Sergio; Stringa, Pablo; Vallejo, Maria Teresa; Largo, Carlota; Encinas, Jose Luis; Garcia de Las Heras, Maria Soledad; Lopez-Santamaria, Manuel; Tovar, Juan Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Experimental small bowel transplantation (SBT) in rats has been proven to be a useful tool for the study of ischemia-reperfusion and immunological aspects related to solid organ transplantation. However, the model is not completely refined, specialized literature is scarce and complex technical details are typically omitted or confusing. Most studies related to acute rejection (AR) use the orthotopic standard, with small sample sizes due to its high mortality, whereas those studying chronic rejection (CR) use the heterotopic standard, which allows longer term survival but does not exactly reflect the human clinical scenario. Various animal strains have been used, and the type of rejection and the timing of its analysis differ among authors. The double purpose of this study was to develop an improved unusual AR model of SBT using the heterotopic technique, and to elaborate a guide useful to implement experimental models for studying AR. We analyzed the model's technical details and expected difficulties in overcoming the learning curve for such a complex microsurgical model, identifying the potential problem areas and providing a step-by-step protocol and reference guide for future surgeons interested in the topic. We also discuss the historic and more recent options in the literature.

  9. Functional Intestinal Bile Acid 7α-Dehydroxylation by Clostridium scindens Associated with Protection from Clostridium difficile Infection in a Gnotobiotic Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Nicolas; Desharnais, Lyne; Beutler, Markus; Brugiroux, Sandrine; Terrazos, Miguel A.; Menin, Laure; Schürch, Christian M.; McCoy, Kathy D.; Kuehne, Sarah A.; Minton, Nigel P.; Stecher, Bärbel; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids, important mediators of lipid absorption, also act as hormone-like regulators and as antimicrobial molecules. In all these functions their potency is modulated by a variety of chemical modifications catalyzed by bacteria of the healthy gut microbiota, generating a complex variety of secondary bile acids. Intestinal commensal organisms are well-adapted to normal concentrations of bile acids in the gut. In contrast, physiological concentrations of the various intestinal bile acid species play an important role in the resistance to intestinal colonization by pathogens such as Clostridium difficile. Antibiotic therapy can perturb the gut microbiota and thereby impair the production of protective secondary bile acids. The most important bile acid transformation is 7α-dehydroxylation, producing deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA). The enzymatic pathway carrying out 7α-dehydroxylation is restricted to a narrow phylogenetic group of commensal bacteria, the best-characterized of which is Clostridium scindens. Like many other intestinal commensal species, 7-dehydroxylating bacteria are understudied in vivo. Conventional animals contain variable and uncharacterized indigenous 7α-dehydroxylating organisms that cannot be selectively removed, making controlled colonization with a specific strain in the context of an undisturbed microbiota unfeasible. In the present study, we used a recently established, standardized gnotobiotic mouse model that is stably associated with a simplified murine 12-species “oligo-mouse microbiota” (Oligo-MM12). It is representative of the major murine intestinal bacterial phyla, but is deficient for 7α-dehydroxylation. We find that the Oligo-MM12 consortium carries out bile acid deconjugation, a prerequisite for 7α-dehydroxylation, and confers no resistance to C. difficile infection (CDI). Amendment of Oligo-MM12 with C. scindens normalized the large intestinal bile acid composition by reconstituting 7

  10. Evaluation of the passage of Lactobacillus gasseri K7 and bifidobacteria from the stomach to intestines using a single reactor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Ah Ueli

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probiotic bacteria are thought to play an important role in the digestive system and therefore have to survive the passage from stomach to intestines. Recently, a novel approach to simulate the passage from stomach to intestines in a single bioreactor was developed. The advantage of this automated one reactor system was the ability to test the influence of acid, bile salts and pancreatin. Lactobacillus gasseri K7 is a strain isolated from infant faeces with properties making the strain interesting for cheese production. In this study, a single reactor system was used to evaluate the survival of L. gasseri K7 and selected bifidobacteria from our collection through the stomach-intestine passage. Results Initial screening for acid resistance in acidified culture media showed a low tolerance of Bifidobacterium dentium for this condition indicating low survival in the passage. Similar results were achieved with B. longum subsp. infantis whereas B. animalis subsp. lactis had a high survival. These initial results were confirmed in the bioreactor model of the stomach-intestine passage. B. animalis subsp. lactis had the highest survival rate (10% attaining approximately 5 × 106 cfu ml-1 compared to the other tested bifidobacteria strains which were reduced by a factor of up to 106. Lactobacillus gasseri K7 was less resistant than B. animalis subsp. lactis but survived at cell concentrations approximately 1000 times higher than other bifidobacteria. Conclusion In this study, we were able to show that L. gasseri K7 had a high survival rate in the stomach-intestine passage. By comparing the results with a previous study in piglets we could confirm the reliability of our simulation. Of the tested bifidobacteria strains, only B. animalis subsp. lactis showed acceptable survival for a successful passage in the simulation system.

  11. Intestinal myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U S Udgaonkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intestinal myiasis is a condition when the fly larvae inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and are passed out in faeces. This type of infestation results when eggs or larvae of the fly, deposited on food are inadvertently taken by man. They survive the unfavourable conditions within the gastrointestinal tract and produce disturbances, which may vary from mild to severe. The condition is not uncommon and is often misdiagnosed as pinworm infestation. Correct diagnosis by the clinical microbiologist is important to avoid unnecessary treatment. Materials and Methods: We had 7 cases of intestinal myiasis. In 2 cases the larvae were reared to adult fly in modified meat and sand medium (developed by Udgaonkar. This medium is simple and can be easily prepared in the laboratory. Results: Of the 7 larvae, 5 were Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis, 1 Megaselia species and 1 was identified as Muscina stabulans. Conclusions: S. haemorrhoidalis was the commonest maggot involved. A high index of suspicion is required for clinical diagnosis when the patient complains of passing wriggling worms in faeces for a long period without any response to antihelminthics. The reason for long duration of illness and recurrence of infestation is baffling. The nearest to cure was colonic wash. We feel prevention is of utmost importance, which is to avoid eating food articles with easy access to flies.

  12. Development of an in vivo model for study of intestinal invasion by Salmonella enterica in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Søren; Christensen, J.P.; Chadfield, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    An in vivo loop test model for the investigation of the invasiveness of Salmonella enterica in chickens was developed. Ten jejunal loops were made in 10- to 12-week-old Lohman Brown chickens under isofluoran anaesthesia. Salmonella at 5.0 x 10(7) CFU was inoculated into each loop and left for 2 h......, followed by a 1-h incubation with gentamicin in order to kill noninvading bacteria. After euthanasia, Salmonella invasiveness was measured as tissue-associated counts relative to a reference strain. The ability of Salmonella invasion was 1 log(10) CFU higher per 42-mm(2) mucosal tissue in the anterior than...... in the posterior part of jejunum. A statistically significant (P model was shown to be able to show small differences in invasive capability and allows...

  13. Assessment and modulation of acamprosate intestinal absorption: comparative studies using in situ, in vitro (CACO-2 cell monolayers) and in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zornoza, Teodoro; Cano-Cebrián, María José; Nalda-Molina, Ricardo; Guerri, Consuelo; Granero, Luis; Polache, Ana

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the intestinal absorption mechanism of acamprosate and to attempt to improve the bioavailability (BA) of the drug through modulation of its intestinal absorption using two enhancers (polysorbate 80 and sodium caprate) based on in situ, in vitro and in vivo models and comparing the results obtained. Intestinal transport of the drug, in the absence and in presence of polysorbate 80 (0.06, 0.28 and 9.6 mM) or sodium caprate (13 and 16 mM) was measured by using an in situ rat gut technique and Caco-2 cell monolayers. Additionally, the effect of sodium caprate on drug oral bioavailability, measured as urinary recovery, was quantified by performing in vivo experiments with the rat as animal model. Only sodium caprate was able to increase the absorption rate constant (ka) of acamprosate in the mid-intestine of the rats from 0.29 +/- 0.07 h-1 in the absence of the promoter to 0.51 +/- 0.19 h-1 in the presence of C10 16 mM, along with the apparent permeability (Papp) obtained in Caco-2 cells (around two-fold). However, the drug bioavailability in rats (around 20%) did not improve in the presence of any of the concentrations tested (13, 16 and 50 mM). It is concluded that acamprosate absorption likely occurs via paracellular pathway and can be enhanced by sodium caprate in situ and in vitro but not in vivo-thus suggesting that although in situ and in vitro studies could be useful in early screening to select a potential promoter, in vivo studies in animal models are necessary to confirm the utility of the enhancer and to determine the influence of physiological variables.

  14. Early weaning stress induces chronic functional diarrhea, intestinal barrier defects, and increased mast cell activity in a porcine model of early life adversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, C S; Medland, J E; Mackey, E; Edwards, L L; Bagley, K D; DeWilde, M P; Williams, K J; Moeser, A J

    2017-06-01

    Early life adversity (ELA) is a risk factor for development of gastrointestinal disorders later in life. The underlying mechanisms through which ELA and sex interact to influence disease susceptibility remains poorly understood. Utilizing a porcine early weaning stress (EWS) model to mimic ELA, we investigated the long-term effects of EWS on functional diarrhea, ileal permeability, mast cell activity and mast cell relationship with enteric ganglia. Juvenile and adult EWS pigs exhibited chronic, functional diarrhea (EWS 43.6% vs late wean control(LWC) 4.8%, P<.0001), increased intestinal permeability (2 fold increase EWS vs LWC, P<.0001), and mast cell numbers (at 7 weeks and 20 weeks ~1.6 fold increase EWS vs LWC, P<.05). Compared with EWS male castrates (Male-C), females EWS pigs exhibited more frequent diarrhea (58.8% vs 29.9%, P=.0016), and increased intestinal permeability (1-2 fold higher in EWS females, P<.001). Increased mast cell numbers and their enhanced co-localization with neuronal ganglia were observed in both Male-C and female EWS pigs; however, female pigs exhibited greater release of mast cell tryptase upon activation with c48/80 (~1.5 fold increase, P<.05), compared with Male-C pigs. These data demonstrate that pigs exposed to ELA exhibit increased vulnerability to functional diarrhea, intestinal permeability and mast cell activity. Further, these studies also showed that EWS female and Male-C pigs exhibited dimorphic responses to EWS with female piglets exhibited greater susceptibility and severity of diarrhea, intestinal permeability and mast cell tryptase release. Together, these findings mimic some of the key pathophysiologic findings in human functional GI disorders functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) suggesting that the EWS porcine model could be a valuable preclinical translational model for FGID research associated with ELA. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde on tight junction integrity: in vitro study in a three dimensional intestinal epithelial cell culture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhaseen Elamin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal barrier dysfunction and translocation of endotoxins are involved in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Exposure to ethanol and its metabolite, acetaldehyde at relatively high concentrations have been shown to disrupt intestinal epithelial tight junctions in the conventional two dimensional cell culture models. The present study investigated quantitatively and qualitatively the effects of ethanol at concentrations detected in the blood after moderate ethanol consumption, of its metabolite acetaldehyde and of the combination of both compounds on intestinal barrier function in a three-dimensional cell culture model. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Caco-2 cells were grown in a basement membrane matrix (Matrigel™ to induce spheroid formation and were then exposed to the compounds at the basolateral side. Morphological differentiation of the spheroids was assessed by immunocytochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. The barrier function was assessed by the flux of FITC-labeled dextran from the basal side into the spheroids' luminal compartment using confocal microscopy. Caco-2 cells grown on Matrigel assembled into fully differentiated and polarized spheroids with a central lumen, closely resembling enterocytes in vivo and provide an excellent model to study epithelial barrier functionality. Exposure to ethanol (10-40 mM or acetaldehyde (25-200 µM for 3 h, dose-dependently and additively increased the paracellular permeability and induced redistribution of ZO-1 and occludin without affecting cell viability or tight junction-encoding gene expression. Furthermore, ethanol and acetaldehyde induced lysine residue and microtubules hyperacetylation. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that ethanol at concentrations found in the blood after moderate drinking and acetaldehyde, alone and in combination, can increase the intestinal epithelial permeability. The data also point to the involvement of protein hyperacetylation in

  16. Organ Culture as a Model System for Studies on Enterotoxin Interactions with the Intestinal Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Ulver Spangsberg; Hansen, Gert H; Danielsen, E Michael

    2016-01-01

    Studies on bacterial enterotoxin-epithelium interactions require model systems capable of mimicking the events occurring at the molecular and cellular levels during intoxication. In this chapter, we describe organ culture as an often neglected alternative to whole-animal experiments or enterocyte-like cell lines. Like cell culture, organ culture is versatile and suitable for studying rapidly occurring events, such as enterotoxin binding and uptake. In addition, it is advantageous in offering an epithelium with more authentic permeability/barrier properties than any cell line, as well as a subepithelial lamina propria, harboring the immune cells of the gut mucosa.

  17. Organ Culture as a Model System for Studies on Enterotoxin Interactions with the Intestinal Epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Ulver Spangsberg; Hansen, Gert H; Danielsen, E Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies on bacterial enterotoxin-epithelium interactions require model systems capable of mimicking the events occurring at the molecular and cellular levels during intoxication. In this chapter, we describe organ culture as an often neglected alternative to whole-animal experiments or enterocyte......-like cell lines. Like cell culture, organ culture is versatile and suitable for studying rapidly occurring events, such as enterotoxin binding and uptake. In addition, it is advantageous in offering an epithelium with more authentic permeability/barrier properties than any cell line, as well...... as a subepithelial lamina propria, harboring the immune cells of the gut mucosa....

  18. Emu Oil Combined with Lyprinol™ Reduces Small Intestinal Damage in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashtoub, Suzanne; Lampton, Lorrinne S; Eden, Georgina L; Cheah, Ker Y; Lymn, Kerry A; Bajic, Juliana E; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is characterized by inflammation and ulcerating lesions lining the alimentary tract. Emu Oil and Lyprinol™ have independently demonstrated their therapeutic potential in intestinal inflammatory disorders, including mucositis. We investigated Emu Oil and Lyprinol™ in combination for their further potential to alleviate chemotherapy-induced mucositis in rats. Rats were gavaged with (1 ml) water, Olive Oil, Emu Oil + Olive Oil, Lyprinol™ + Olive Oil or Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ from Days 0 to 7, injected with saline (control) or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) on Day 5 and euthanized on Day 8. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (indicative of acute inflammation), histological severity scores, and intestinal architecture were quantified. Myeloperoxidase activity was significantly increased in the jejunum and ileum following 5-FU, compared to saline controls. Both Olive Oil and Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ significantly reduced jejunal MPO levels (1.8-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively), whereas only Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ significantly decreased ileal MPO levels, relative to 5-FU controls. All oil treatments decreased histological severity scores in the jejunum and ileum, and normalized crypt depth in the mid small intestine, relative to 5-FU controls. Emu Oil combined with Lyprinol™ partially reduced acute small intestinal inflammation. Isolating bioactive constituents of these naturally sourced oils could provide a more targeted strategy to protect against intestinal mucositis.

  19. Effects of Onion (Allium cepa L. Extract Administration on Intestinal α-Glucosidases Activities and Spikes in Postprandial Blood Glucose Levels in SD Rats Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Ho Kim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Diets high in calories and sweetened foods with disaccharides frequently lead to exaggerated postprandial spikes in blood glucose. This state induces immediate oxidant stress and free radicals which trigger oxidative stress-linked diabetic complications. One of the therapeutic approaches for decreasing postprandial hyperglycemia is to retard absorption of glucose by the inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes,α-amylase and α-glucosidases, in the digestive organs. Therefore, the inhibitory activity of Korean onion (Allium cepa L. extract against rat intestinal α-glucosidases, such as sucrase, maltase, and porcine pancreatic α-amylase were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The content of quercetin in ethyl alcohol extract of onion skin (EOS was 6.04 g/100 g dried weight of onion skin. The in vitro half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50 of EOS and quercetin, a major phenolic in onion, on rat intestinal sucrase were 0.40 and 0.11 mg/mL, respectively. The postprandial blood glucose lowering effects of EOS and quercetin were compared to a known type 2 diabetes drug (Acarbose, a strong α-glucosidase inhibitor in the Sprague-Dawley (SD rat model. In rats fed on sucrose, EOS significantly reduced the blood glucose spike after sucrose loading. The area under the blood glucose-time curve (AUClast in EOS-treated SD rats (0.5 g-EOS/kg was significantly lower than in untreated SD rats (259.6 ± 5.1 vs. 283.1 ± 19.2 h·mg/dL. The AUClast in quercetin-treated SD rats (0.5 g-quercetin/kg was similar to in EOS-treated group (256.1 ± 3.2 vs. 259.6 ± 5.1 h·mg/dL. Results from this study indicates that although quercetin does have blood glucose lowering potential via α-glucosidase inhibition, there are other bioactive compounds present in onion skin. Furthermore, the effects of two weeks administration of EOS in a high carbohydrate-dietary mixture (Pico 5053 on sucrase and maltase activities in intestine were evaluated in SD rat model

  20. Establishment of heterotopic intestinal xenotransplantation model from pig to cynomolgus%猪到食蟹猴异位小肠移植模型的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚丹华; 李幼生; 王剑; 毛琦; 郭明晓; 张少一; 孔文成; 任乐乐; 黎介寿

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the procedures for establishing a stable model of intestinal xenotransplantation from pig to cynomolgus, with the purpose of providing a good experimental tool for the xenograft rejection study in intestinal xenotransplantation. Methods White wild-type pigs were used as donor and cynomolguses used as recipients. The procedure of segmental heterotopic intestinal xenotransplantation in recipients was performed as following: the donor`s anterior mesenteric artery was anastomosed end-to-side to the recipient`s infrarenal abdominal aorta, and the donor`s tributary of anterior mesenteric venous was anastomosed end-to-side to the recipient`s infrarenal inferior vena cave. Subsequently, both the proximal and distant ends of the graft intestine were stayed ligated. Results Segmental intestinal xenotransplantation was performed in 5 cynomolguses, with an average graft intestine length of (52.0 ± 5.7) cm. The success rate of vascular anastomosis was 100%, and the intestinal xenograft survival was 152±72(55~245) minutes. Conclusions A stable, repeatable model of segmental intestinal xenotransplantation from pig to cynomolgus was established, which would provide an ideal tool for further research on intestinal xenotransplantation from transgenic pig to cynomolgus.%目的:探讨稳定的猪到食蟹猴异位小肠移植模型建立方法,为异种小肠移植排斥反应的研究提供良好的实验工具。方法分别以白色杂种猪和食蟹猴做供、受体,采用供体小肠的肠系膜前动、静脉分别与受体肾下腹主动脉和肾下下腔静脉行端侧吻合,供体远、近端肠管结扎的方式建立异种节段性小肠移植模型。结果共行猪到食蟹猴异种节段小肠移植5例,移植肠肠长度为(52.0±5.7) cm,血管吻合成功率为100%,移植肠存活时间为(152±72) min(55~245 min)。结论本研究建立了猪到食蟹猴的异位小肠移植模型,模型稳定,可复性强,为进一步

  1. Psidium guajava leaf extract prevents intestinal colonization of Citrobacter rodentium in the mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrheal diseases are the second highest cause of mortality of children under 5 years worldwide. There is a continuous search for developing a cost-effective treatment for diarrhea as the present ones are facing challenges. Medicinal plants can be explored further as an alternative treatment for diarrhea. Psidium guajava leaves have been used as an antidiarrheal globally. Citrobacter rodentium, a common mouse pathogen, is known to mimic the pathogenecity of enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic E. coli. It can thus present an effective model to study infectious diarrhea. In the present study, the P. guajava leaf extract was tested for its efficacy in treating infectious diarrhea using a C. rodentium mouse model. The mice in the test group (treated with P. guajava leaf extract showed quicker clearance of infection as compared with the control group. The bacterial load in the fecal sample of the mice in the test group was high on Day 4 as compared with that in the control group, suggesting a flush out of the bacteria. In the test group, 6/7 (85.71% mice showed clearance of infection by Day 19. The control group continued to show infection till Day 29. P. guajava leaf extract thus has the potential for use in the treatment of infectious diarrhea.

  2. Prebiotic effect of fructooligosaccharide in the simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (SHIME® model).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivieri, Katia; Morales, Martha L Villarreal; Saad, Susana M I; Adorno, Maria A Tallarico; Sakamoto, Isabel Kimiko; Rossi, Elizeu A

    2014-08-01

    Maintaining "gut health" is a goal for scientists throughout the world. Therefore, microbiota management models for testing probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics have been developed. The SHIME(®) model was used to study the effect of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) on the fermentation pattern of the colon microbiota. Initially, an inoculum prepared from human feces was introduced into the reactor vessels and stabilized over 2 weeks using a culture medium. This stabilization period was followed by a 2-week control period during which the microbiota was monitored. The microbiota was then subjected to a 4-week treatment period by adding 5 g/day-1 FOS to vessel one (the "stomach" compartment). Plate counts, Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), short-chain fatty acid (SCFA), and ammonium analyses were used to observe the influence of FOS treatment in simulated colon compartments. A significant increase (P<.01) in the Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. populations was observed during the treatment period. The DGGE obtained showed the overall microbial community was changed in the ascending colon compartment of the SHIME reactor. FOS induced increase of the SCFA concentration (P<.05) during the treatment period, mainly due to significant increased levels of acetic and butyric acids. However, ammonium concentrations increased during the same period (P<.01). This study indicates the usefulness of in vitro methods that simulate the colon region as part of research towards the improvement of human health.

  3. MicroRNAs control intestinal epithelial differentiation, architecture, and barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lindsay B; Schug, Jonathan; Vourekas, Anastassios; McKenna, Jaime B; Bramswig, Nuria C; Friedman, Joshua R; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2010-11-01

    Whereas the importance of microRNA (miRNA) for the development of several tissues is well established, its role in the intestine is unknown. We aimed to quantify the complete miRNA expression profile of the mammalian intestinal mucosa and to determine the contribution of miRNAs to intestinal homeostasis using genetic means. We determined the miRNA transcriptome of the mouse intestinal mucosa using ultrahigh throughput sequencing. Using high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP), we identified miRNA-messenger RNA target relationships in the jejunum. We employed gene ablation of the obligatory miRNA-processing enzyme Dicer1 to derive mice deficient for all miRNAs in intestinal epithelia. miRNA abundance varies dramatically in the intestinal mucosa, from 1 read per million to 250,000. Of the 453 miRNA families identified, mmu-miR-192 is the most highly expressed in both the small and large intestinal mucosa, and there is a 53% overlap in the top 15 expressed miRNAs between the 2 tissues. The intestinal epithelium of Dicer1(loxP/loxP);Villin-Cre mutant mice is disorganized, with a decrease in goblet cells, a dramatic increase in apoptosis in crypts of both jejunum and colon, and accelerated jejunal cell migration. Furthermore, intestinal barrier function is impaired in Dicer1-deficient mice, resulting in intestinal inflammation with lymphocyte and neutrophil infiltration. Our list of miRNA-messenger RNA targeting relationships in the small intestinal mucosa provides insight into the molecular mechanisms behind the phenotype of Dicer1 mutant mice. We have identified all intestinal miRNAs and shown using gene ablation of Dicer1 that miRNAs play a vital role in the differentiation and function of the intestinal epithelium. Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A new model of reverse cholesterol transport: enTICEing strategies to stimulate intestinal cholesterol excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Ryan E; Brown, J Mark

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the largest cause of mortality in most developed countries. Although recent failed clinical trials and Mendelian randomization studies have called into question the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) hypothesis, it remains well accepted that stimulating the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) can prevent or even regress atherosclerosis. The prevailing model for RCT is that cholesterol from the artery wall must be delivered to the liver where it is secreted into bile before leaving the body through fecal excretion. However, many studies have demonstrated that RCT can proceed through a non-biliary pathway known as transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE). The goal of this review is to discuss the current state of knowledge of the TICE pathway, with emphasis on points of therapeutic intervention.

  5. Increased intestinal protein permeability in a model of lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, R C; Mizer, L A; Weisbrode, S E; Dorinsky, P M

    1991-11-01

    Multiple nonpulmonary organ failure is a frequent complication of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and contributes significantly to the high mortality rate associated with this disorder. Although previous studies suggest that systemic organ injury may be an integral component of ARDS, little is known about the specific functional alterations that occur in these target organs. The present study was designed, therefore, to test the hypothesis that endothelial damage, as assessed by microvascular permeability changes, develops in systemic organs in a model of acute lung injury. To test this postulate, the microvascular permeability for total protein was estimated using the steady-state relationship between the lymph (CL) to plasma (Cp) protein concentration ratio (i.e., CL/Cp) and lymph flow in autoperfused cat ileum preparations. Specifically, CL/Cp was measured in five cats, 2 h after acute lung injury was induced by intravenously administered phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), 15 micrograms/kg, and the results were compared with those of seven time-matched control animals. Prior to PMA infusion, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio was 451 +/- 28 in both groups and remained unchanged (486 +/- 26) in the control group. By contrast, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio fell to 275 +/- 95 after PMA infusion (p less than 0.05). In addition, whereas CL/Cp was 0.099 +/- 0.008 in the control animals, it increased to 0.36 +/- 0.06 in the PMA-injured animals (p less than 0.01). In summary, this study demonstrated that in this model of acute lung injury produced by PMA-induced activation of circulating inflammatory cells, both acute lung injury and systemic organ injury (i.e., morphologic and permeability alterations) occurred.

  6. The Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus on the Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contraction through PKC/MLCK/MLC Signaling Pathway in TBI Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Sun

    Full Text Available Clinical studies have shown that probiotics influence gastrointestinal motility. However, the molecular mechanisms by which probiotic Lactobacillus modulates intestinal motility in traumatic brain injury (TBI mouse model have not been explored. In the present study, we provided evidence showing that treatment of TBI mice with Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly improved the terminal ileum villus morphology, restored the impaired interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC and the disrupted ICC networks after TBI, and prevented TBI-mediated inhibition of contractile activity in intestinal smooth muscle. Mechanistically, the decreased concentration of MLCK, phospho-MLC20 and phospho-MYPT1 and increased concentration of MLCP and PKC were observed after TBI, and these events mediated by TBI were efficiently prevented by Lactobacillus acidophilus application. These findings may provide a novel mechanistic basis for the application of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the treatment of TBI.

  7. The Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus on the Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contraction through PKC/MLCK/MLC Signaling Pathway in TBI Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Hu, Chen; Fang, Huan; Zhu, Lina; Gao, Ning; Zhu, Jingci

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that probiotics influence gastrointestinal motility. However, the molecular mechanisms by which probiotic Lactobacillus modulates intestinal motility in traumatic brain injury (TBI) mouse model have not been explored. In the present study, we provided evidence showing that treatment of TBI mice with Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly improved the terminal ileum villus morphology, restored the impaired interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and the disrupted ICC networks after TBI, and prevented TBI-mediated inhibition of contractile activity in intestinal smooth muscle. Mechanistically, the decreased concentration of MLCK, phospho-MLC20 and phospho-MYPT1 and increased concentration of MLCP and PKC were observed after TBI, and these events mediated by TBI were efficiently prevented by Lactobacillus acidophilus application. These findings may provide a novel mechanistic basis for the application of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the treatment of TBI.

  8. Altered gut microbiome in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness causes neuroinflammation and intestinal injury via leaky gut and TLR4 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhasson, Firas; Das, Suvarthi; Seth, Ratanesh; Dattaroy, Diptadip; Chandrashekaran, Varun; Ryan, Caitlin N; Chan, Luisa S; Testerman, Traci; Burch, James; Hofseth, Lorne J; Horner, Ronnie; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Lasley, Stephen M; Chatterjee, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    Many of the symptoms of Gulf War Illness (GWI) that include neurological abnormalities, neuroinflammation, chronic fatigue and gastrointestinal disturbances have been traced to Gulf War chemical exposure. Though the association and subsequent evidences are strong, the mechanisms that connect exposure to intestinal and neurological abnormalities remain unclear. Using an established rodent model of Gulf War Illness, we show that chemical exposure caused significant dysbiosis in the gut that included increased abundance of phylum Firmicutes and Tenericutes, and decreased abundance of Bacteroidetes. Several gram negative bacterial genera were enriched in the GWI-model that included Allobaculum sp. Altered microbiome caused significant decrease in tight junction protein Occludin with a concomitant increase in Claudin-2, a signature of a leaky gut. Resultant leaching of gut caused portal endotoxemia that led to upregulation of toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in the small intestine and the brain. TLR4 knock out mice and mice that had gut decontamination showed significant decrease in tyrosine nitration and inflammatory mediators IL1β and MCP-1 in both the small intestine and frontal cortex. These events signified that gut dysbiosis with simultaneous leaky gut and systemic endotoxemia-induced TLR4 activation contributes to GW chemical-induced neuroinflammation and gastrointestinal disturbances.

  9. [FREE CONSUMPTION OF GLUCOSE SOLUTION BY RATS AS A CRITERION FOR EVALUATION ITS ABSORPTION IN THE SMALL INTESTINE (Experimental study and mathematical modeling)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzdkov, A A; Gromova, L V; Dmitrieva, Yu V; Alekseeva, A S

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the work is to analyze the relationship between consumption of glucose solution by rats and its absorption, and to use this fact for assessment of the absorptive capacity of the small intestine in non anesthetized animals in vivo. Consumption of glucose solution (200 g/l) by fasted rats was recorded in the control, and after administration of phloridzin--inhibitor of glucose active transport- or 3 hours after the restriction stress. On the mathematical model we studied the relative role of factors that can influence the temporal dynamics of glucose consumption by rats. The rate of glucose consumption was observed being decreased in the presence of phloridzin (1 mM), and be increased after the stress. The results of modeling are consistent with the experimental data and show that the rate of consumption of glucose solutions considerably more depends on the transport activity of the small intestine than on glucose concentration in the solution, or on the substrate regulation of the stomach emptying. Analysis of dynamics of consumption of glucose solution by intact rats may be considered as one of promising approaches to assessing the absorptive capacity of the small intestine under natural conditions.

  10. Altered gut microbiome in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness causes neuroinflammation and intestinal injury via leaky gut and TLR4 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattaroy, Diptadip; Chandrashekaran, Varun; Ryan, Caitlin N.; Chan, Luisa S.; Testerman, Traci; Burch, James; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Horner, Ronnie; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Lasley, Stephen M.; Chatterjee, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    Many of the symptoms of Gulf War Illness (GWI) that include neurological abnormalities, neuroinflammation, chronic fatigue and gastrointestinal disturbances have been traced to Gulf War chemical exposure. Though the association and subsequent evidences are strong, the mechanisms that connect exposure to intestinal and neurological abnormalities remain unclear. Using an established rodent model of Gulf War Illness, we show that chemical exposure caused significant dysbiosis in the gut that included increased abundance of phylum Firmicutes and Tenericutes, and decreased abundance of Bacteroidetes. Several gram negative bacterial genera were enriched in the GWI-model that included Allobaculum sp. Altered microbiome caused significant decrease in tight junction protein Occludin with a concomitant increase in Claudin-2, a signature of a leaky gut. Resultant leaching of gut caused portal endotoxemia that led to upregulation of toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in the small intestine and the brain. TLR4 knock out mice and mice that had gut decontamination showed significant decrease in tyrosine nitration and inflammatory mediators IL1β and MCP-1 in both the small intestine and frontal cortex. These events signified that gut dysbiosis with simultaneous leaky gut and systemic endotoxemia-induced TLR4 activation contributes to GW chemical-induced neuroinflammation and gastrointestinal disturbances. PMID:28328972

  11. Intestinal sugar transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie A Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Carbohydrates are an important component of the diet.The carbohydrates that we ingest range from simple monosaccharides (glucose, fructose and galactose) to disaccharides (lactose, sucrose) to complex polysaccharides. Most carbohydrates are digested by salivary and pancreatic amylases, and are further broken down into monosaccharides by enzymes in the brush border membrane (BBM) of enterocytes. For example, lactase-phloridzin hydrolase and sucraseisomaltase are two disaccharidases involved in the hydrolysis of nutritionally important disaccharides. Once monosaccharides are presented to the BBM, mature enterocytes expressing nutrient transporters transport the sugars into the enterocytes. This paper reviews the early studies that contributed to the development of a working model of intestinal sugar transport, and details the recent advances made in understanding the process by which sugars are absorbed in the intestine.

  12. Anti-inflammatory intestinal activity of Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae) in TNBS colitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Ana Beatriz Albino; Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Martín, Antonio Ramón; Luiz-Ferreira, Anderson; Trigo, José Roberto; Vilegas, Wagner; dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner; Souza-Brito, Alba Regina Monteiro; de la Lastra, Catalina Alarcón

    2013-03-07

    In Brazilian traditional medicine, Arctium lappa (Asteraceae), has been reported to relieve gastrointestinal symptoms. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the lactone sesquiterpene onopordopicrin enriched fraction (ONP fraction) from Arctium lappa in an experimental colitis model induced by 2,4,6 trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and performed experiments to elucidate the underlying action mechanisms involved in that effect. ONP fraction (25 and 50 mg/kg/day) was orally administered 48, 24 and 1 h prior to the induction of colitis and 24 h after. The inflammatory response was assessed by gross appearance, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels and a histological study of the lesions. We determined cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 protein expressions by western blotting and immunohistochemistry assays. TNBS group was characterized by increased colonic wall thickness, edema, diffuse inflammatory cell infiltration, increased MPO activity and TNF-α levels. On the contrary, ONP fraction (25 and 50 mg/kg) treatment significantly reduced the macroscopic inflammation scores (pArctium lappa exert marked protective effects in acute experimental colitis, confirming and justifying, at least in part, the popular use of this plant to treat gastrointestinal diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Study on the Mechanism of Intestinal Absorption of Epimedins A, B and C in the Caco-2 Cell Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epimedium spp. is commonly used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Epimedins A, B, and C are three major bioactive flavonoids found in Epimedium spp. that share similar chemical structures. In this study, the intestinal absorption mechanism of these three compounds was investigated using the Caco-2 cell monolayer model in both the apical-to-basolateral (A-B and the basolateral-to-apical (B-A direction. The absorption permeability (PAB of epimedins A, B, and C were extremely low and increased as the concentration of the epimedins increased from 5 to 20 μM, but, at 40 μM, the PAB values were reduced. Meanwhile, the amount of transported compounds increased in a time-dependent manner. The PAB of epimedins A and C were significantly increased and efflux ratios decreased in the presence of verapamil (an inhibitor of P-glycoprotein and dipyridamole (an inhibitor of breast cancer resistance protein while, in the presence of MK571 (an inhibitor of multidrug resistance proteins, the absorption of epimedins A and C did not change significantly, indicating that P-gp and BCRP might be involved in the transport of epimedins A and C. The PAB of epimedin B significantly increased while its secretory permeability (PBA significantly decreased in the presence of dipyridamole, indicating that BCRP might be involved in the transport of epimedin B. No obvious changes in the transport of epimedin B were observed in the presence of verapamil and MK571. In summary, our results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that poor bioavailability of these three prenylated flavonoids is the result of poor intrinsic permeability and efflux by apical efflux transporters.

  14. The effects of physical and psychological stress on the gastro-intestinal tract: lessons from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Javier R; Leza, Juan C; Menchén, Luis

    2008-06-01

    Physical and psychological stresses are widely accepted as triggers and / or modifiers of the clinical course of diverse gastrointestinal disorders such as peptic ulcer, irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease. Growing experimental evidence from a variety of models such as immobilization, thermal injury or early maternal deprivation in laboratory animals uniformly supports the ability of stress to induce the development of gastric ulcers, altered gastrointestinal motility and ion secretion, and increased intestinal permeability leading to the passage of antigens to the lamina propria and bacterial translocation. Stress can also synergize with other pathogenic factors such as Helicobacter pylori, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or colitis-inducing chemicals to produce gastrointestinal disease. The brain-gut axis provides the anatomical basis through emotions and environmental influences modulate the gastrointestinal function through the regulation of gastrointestinal immune system and mucosal inflammation; in this sense, mucosal mast cells - at cellular level - and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) - at molecular level - seem to play a crucial role. On the other hand, an array of adaptive responses have been evolved in order to maintain the homeostasis and to ensure the survival of the individual. In the gut mucosa anti-inflammatory pathways counteract the deleterious effect of the stressful stimuli on the gastrointestinal homeostasis. In the present review we discuss the several experimental approaches used to mimic human stressful events or chronic stress in laboratory animals, the evidence of stress-induced gastrointestinal inflammation and dysfunction derived from them, and the involved cellular and molecular mechanisms that are being discovered during the last years.

  15. Mechanisms of nanoparticle internalization and transport across an intestinal epithelial cell model: effect of size and surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannunah, Azzah M; Vllasaliu, Driton; Lord, Jennie; Stolnik, Snjezana

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of nanoparticle size (50 and 100 nm) and surface charge on their interaction with Caco-2 monolayers as a model of the intestinal epithelium, including cell internalization pathways and the level of transepithelial transport. Initially, toxicity assays showed that cell viability and cell membrane integrity were dependent on the surface charge and applied mass, number, and total surface area of nanoparticles, as tested in two epithelial cell lines, colon carcinoma Caco-2 and airway Calu-3. This also identified suitable nanoparticle concentrations for subsequent cell uptake experiments. Nanoparticle application at doses below half maximal effective concentration (EC₅₀) revealed that the transport efficiency (ratio of transport to cell uptake) across Caco-2 cell monolayers is significantly higher for negatively charged nanoparticles compared to their positively charged counterparts (of similar size), despite the higher level of internalization of positively charged systems. Cell internalization pathways were hence probed using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors aiming to establish whether the discrepancy in transport efficiency is due to different uptake and transport pathways. Vesicular trans-monolayer transport for both positively and negatively charged nanoparticles was confirmed via inhibition of dynamin (by dynasore) and microtubule network (via nocodazole), which significantly reduced the transport of both nanoparticle systems. For positively charged nanoparticles a significant decrease in internalization and transport (46% and 37%, respectively) occurred in the presence of a clathrin pathway inhibitor (chlorpromazine), macropinocytosis inhibition (42%; achieved by 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyi)-amiloride), and under cholesterol depletion (38%; via methyl-β-cyclodextrin), but remained unaffected by the inhibition of lipid raft associated uptake (caveolae) by genistein. On the contrary, the most prominent reduction in

  16. Imaging of intestinal lymphocyte homing by means of pinhole SPECT in a TNBS colitis mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennink, Roelof J. E-mail: r.bennink@amc.uva.nl; Montfrans, Catherine van; Jonge, Wouter J. de; Bruin, Kora de; Deventer, Sander J. van; Velde, Anje A. te

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: The increasing knowledge of the molecular basis of leukocyte trafficking results in the development of novel anti-inflammatory strategies for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). For optimal evaluation of therapy efficacy, information about inflammatory activity in bowel segments or lymphocyte recirculation and kinetics in the follow-up of experimental treatment for IBD is needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate a non-invasive scintigraphic technique, able to assess lymphocyte trafficking in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced mouse colitis model of IBD. Methods: TNBS sensitized and non-sensitized murine total splenocytes were labeled in vitro with {sup 111}In-oxine and injected into either control or TNBS colitis BALB/c mice. Biodistribution and specific radioactive uptake, representing transferred cells, were determined by serial dedicated animal planar scintigraphy and pinhole SPECT of the abdomen 4, 24 and 48h post injection of labeled cells. In addition, the severity of inflammation was. Results: Migration of {sup 111}In labeled splenocytes to the colon increased in time and was maximal at 48h after administration. The highest specific radioactive uptake ratio in the colon after 48h was observed in mice with TNBS colitis that received TNBS sensitized lymphocytes. Histological scoring confirmed the presence of colitis in the TNBS treated groups. Conclusion: Homing of TNBS-sensitized lymphocytes can be assessed in vivo by means of dedicated animal pinhole SPECT. Generally, this technique enables serial measurement of specific cell trafficking with potential of in vivo evaluation of novel anti-inflammatory strategies in inflammatory bowel disease.

  17. Targeted deletion of Atg5 reveals differential roles of autophagy in keratin K5-expressing epithelia

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    Sukseree, Supawadee [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok (Thailand); Rossiter, Heidemarie; Mildner, Michael [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Pammer, Johannes [Institute of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Buchberger, Maria; Gruber, Florian [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Watanapokasin, Ramida [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok (Thailand); Tschachler, Erwin [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Eckhart, Leopold, E-mail: leopold.eckhart@meduniwien.ac.at [Research Division of Biology and Pathobiology of the Skin, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated mice lacking Atg5 and autophagy in keratin K5-positive epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suppression of autophagy in thymic epithelium was not associated with signs of autoimmunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy was required for normal terminal differentiation of preputial gland cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy-deficient cells of the preputial glands degraded nuclear DNA prematurely. -- Abstract: Autophagy contributes to the homeostasis of many tissues, yet its role in epithelia is incompletely understood. A recent report proposed that Atg5-dependent autophagy in thymic epithelial cells is essential for their function in the negative selection of self-reactive T-cells and, thus, for the suppression of tissue inflammation. Here we crossed mice carrying floxed alleles of the Atg5 gene with mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the keratin K5 promoter to suppress autophagy in all K5-positive epithelia. The efficiency of autophagy abrogation was confirmed by immunoanalyses of LC3, which was converted to the autophagy-associated LC3-II form in normal but not Atg5-deficient cells, and of p62, which accumulated in Atg5-deficient cells. Mice carrying the epithelium-specific deletion of Atg5 showed normal weight gain, absence of tissue inflammation, and a normal morphology of the thymic epithelium. By contrast, autophagy-deficient epithelial cells of the preputial gland showed aberrant eosinophilic staining in histology and premature degradation of nuclear DNA during terminal differentiation. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that autophagy is dispensable for the suppression of autoimmunity by thymic epithelial cells but essential for normal differentiation of the preputial gland in mice.

  18. Pleiotropic action of aldosterone in epithelia mediated by transcription and post-transcription mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrey, F; Pearce, D; Pfeiffer, R; Spindler, B; Mastroberardino, L; Summa, V; Zecevic, M

    2000-04-01

    The aldosterone-induced increase in sodium reabsorption across tight epithelia can be divided schematically into two functional phases: an early regulatory phase starting after a lag period of 20 to 60 minutes, during which the pre-existing transport machinery is activated, and a late phase (>2.5 h), which can be viewed as an anabolic action leading to a further amplification/differentiation of the Na+ transport machinery. At the transcriptional level, both early and late responses are initiated during the lag period, but the functional impact of newly synthesized regulatory proteins is faster than that of the structural ones. K-Ras2 and SGK were identified as the first early aldosterone-induced regulatory proteins in A6 epithelia. Their mRNAs also were shown to be regulated in vivo by aldosterone, and their expression (constitutively active K-Ras2 and wild-type SGK) was shown to increase the function of ENaC coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes. Recently, aldosterone was also shown to act on transcription factors in A6 epithelia: It down-regulates the mRNAs of the proliferation-promoting c-Myc, c-Jun, and c-Fos by a post-transcriptional mechanism, whereas it up-regulates that of Fra-2 (c-Fos antagonist) at the transcriptional level. Together, these new data illustrate the complexity of the regulatory network controlled by aldosterone and support the view that its early action is mediated by the induction of key regulatory proteins such as K-Ras2 and SGK. These early induced proteins are sites of convergence for different regulatory inputs, and thus, their aldosterone-regulated expression level tunes the impact of other regulatory cascades on sodium transport. This suggests mechanisms for the escape from aldosterone action.

  19. Anandamide induces sperm release from oviductal epithelia through nitric oxide pathway in bovines.

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    Claudia Osycka-Salut

    Full Text Available Mammalian spermatozoa are not able to fertilize an egg immediately upon ejaculation. They acquire this ability during their transit through the female genital tract in a process known as capacitation. The mammalian oviduct acts as a functional sperm reservoir providing a suitable environment that allows the maintenance of sperm fertilization competence until ovulation occurs. After ovulation, spermatozoa are gradually released from the oviductal reservoir in the caudal isthmus and ascend to the site of fertilization. Capacitating-related changes in sperm plasma membrane seem to be responsible for sperm release from oviductal epithelium. Anandamide is a lipid mediator that participates in the regulation of several female and male reproductive functions. Previously we have demonstrated that anandamide was capable to release spermatozoa from oviductal epithelia by induction of sperm capacitation in bovines. In the present work we studied whether anandamide might exert its effect by activating the nitric oxide (NO pathway since this molecule has been described as a capacitating agent in spermatozoa from different species. First, we demonstrated that 1 µM NOC-18, a NO donor, and 10 mM L-Arginine, NO synthase substrate, induced the release of spermatozoa from the oviductal epithelia. Then, we observed that the anandamide effect on sperm oviduct interaction was reversed by the addition of 1 µM L-NAME, a NO synthase inhibitor, or 30 µg/ml Hemoglobin, a NO scavenger. We also demonstrated that the induction of bull sperm capacitation by nanomolar concentrations of R(+-methanandamide or anandamide was inhibited by adding L-NAME or Hemoglobin. To study whether anandamide is able to produce NO, we measured this compound in both sperm and oviductal cells. We observed that anandamide increased the levels of NO in spermatozoa, but not in oviductal cells. These findings suggest that anandamide regulates the sperm release from oviductal epithelia probably by

  20. Development of epithelia in the ectopic transplant of the fetal rat epiglottis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulisić, Sandra Marinović; Jurić-Lekić, Gordana; Bulić-Jakus, Floriana; Radujković, Vedran; Parcetić, Ida; Vlahović, Maja; Katusić, Ana; Sincić, Nino; Serman, Ljiljana

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic in situ development is strictly regulated within the specific microenvironment of developing tissues. However, for regenerative medicine purposes (supplementation of damaged tissues/organs), transplantation to ectopic sites has been considered. To investigate developmental potential of fetal epiglottic epithelia at an ectopic site, fetal epiglottis was transplanted under the kidney capsule and its development compared to fetal and adult epiglottis. Seventeen-day-old Fischer rat epiglottides were microsurgically isolated under a dissecting microscope and transplanted under the kidney capsule of adult males. After 14 days, classic histology and immunohistochemical detection of the Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) were done in isolated and accordingly fixed transplants. The 17-day-old fetal epiglottis and adult epiglottis were processed in the same way. The 17-day-old fetal epiglottides were covered with immature epithelium expressing PCNA in almost all cells. Adult epiglottis was covered with two types of epithelia (stratified squamous epithelium and ciliated pseudostratified epithelium). In the stratified squamous epithelium PCNA was abundantly expressed in the basal cell layer and absent from more superficial and more differentiated cells. Transplants survived well during the experimental period. On their surface ciliated pseudostratified epithelium could be easily recognized, but squamous epithelium was almost absent. PCNA was expressed in basal cells of the ciliated pseudostratified epithelium and was absent from the more differentiated superficial cells. It seems that at this ectopic site further differentiation of the epiglottic epithelia can proceed but differentiation of squamous epithelium seems not to be favored. It seems that this ectopic site is optimal for further differentiation of the epiglottic epithelium towards ciliated pseudostratified epithelium.

  1. Expression and localization of aqua-glyceroporins AQP3 and AQP9 in rat oral epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Marlene; Hashimoto, Sadamitsu; Enokiya, Yasunobu; Matsuki-Fukushima, Miwako; Sasaki, Hodaka; Sakurai, Kaoru; Shimono, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of small integral membrane proteins made up of 6 hydrophobic, a-helical, membrane-spanning domains surrounding a highly selective aqueous pore. AQP3, AQP7, and AQP9, termed aqua-glyceroporins, are known to be involved in the transport of water, glycerol, and other small molecules. In this study, we investigated the expression and localization of aqua-glyceroporins in rat oral stratified squamous epithelia of the palate, the buccal mucosa, the inferior aspect of the tongue, and the oral floor by using RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, and immunogold electron microscopy. AQP3 and AQP9 mRNAs were expressed in whole oral epithelium. Immunostaining for AQP3 was recognized in each type of epithelium. The results suggest that AQP3 synthesis begins predominantly in the cytoplasm of the basal cells. During the process of epithelial cell differentiation, AQP3 protein appears to accumulate and be transported to the plasma membrane, from where it is incorporated into the cornified or surface layers. The intracellular localization of AQP3 appears to correlate with the differentiation of keratinocytes, suggesting that it acts as an enhancer of the physiological permeability barrier together with membrane coating granules. The distribution pattern of AQP9 was limited to the marginal areas of the basal and suprabasal layers, which was different from that of AQP3. This difference in distribution between AQP3 and AQP9 suggests that AQP9 in rat oral epithelia acts as a channel by facilitating glycerol uptake from the blood through the endothelial cells of the capillary vessels to the oral stratified squamous epithelium. AQP3 and AQP9 facilitate both transcellular osmotic water flow and glycerol transport as pore-like passive transporters in the keratinocytes of oral epithelia, and may play a key role in not only hydration and the permeability barrier, but also cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, development, and wound healing by generating ATP.

  2. Dietary intervention with narrow-leaved cattail rhizome flour (Typha angustifolia L.) prevents intestinal inflammation in the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid model of rat colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruet, Andréa Costa; Seito, Leonardo Noboru; Rall, Vera Lúcia Mores; Di Stasi, Luiz Claudio

    2012-05-04

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammation of the intestinal epithelium that is driven by the intestinal immune system, oxidative stress and the loss of tolerance to the luminal microbiota. The use of dietary products containing ingredients such as fibres and carbohydrates and/or antioxidant compounds have been used as a therapeutic strategy for intestinal diseases because these products are considered effective in the modulation of the immune system and colonic microbiota. We investigated the beneficial effects of cattail rhizome flour (Typha angustifolia L.) in the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis. In addition, we investigated the effects of cattail rhizome flour on the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of prednisolone, which is a reference drug that is used for treatment of human IBD. The present study included the preparation of flour from rhizomes of cattail (Typha angustifolia L.); an evaluation of the qualitative phytochemical profile of cattail rhizomes; an evaluation of the efficacy of cattail rhizome flour in TNBS-induced rat colitis; an evaluation of the synergistic effects of cattail rhizome flour on the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of prednisolone; and macroscopic, clinical, biochemical, histopathological and microbiological studies to assess the healing effects of cattail rhizome flour and its synergistic effects in TNBS-induced rat colitis. The data were analysed by ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and χ(2) tests. We tested several concentrations of cattail rhizome flour and found that dietary supplementation with 10% cattail rhizome flour showed the best effects at reducing the extension of the lesion, the colon weight ratio, adherences to adjacent organs and diarrhoea. These effects were related to inhibition of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activities and an attenuation of glutathione (GSH) depletion. The 10% cattail rhizome flour was as effective as prednisolone, and no synergistic

  3. Dietary intervention with narrow-leaved cattail rhizome flour (Typha angustifolia L. prevents intestinal inflammation in the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid model of rat colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fruet Andréa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic inflammation of the intestinal epithelium that is driven by the intestinal immune system, oxidative stress and the loss of tolerance to the luminal microbiota. The use of dietary products containing ingredients such as fibres and carbohydrates and/or antioxidant compounds have been used as a therapeutic strategy for intestinal diseases because these products are considered effective in the modulation of the immune system and colonic microbiota. We investigated the beneficial effects of cattail rhizome flour (Typha angustifolia L. in the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS model of rat colitis. In addition, we investigated the effects of cattail rhizome flour on the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of prednisolone, which is a reference drug that is used for treatment of human IBD. Methods The present study included the preparation of flour from rhizomes of cattail (Typha angustifolia L.; an evaluation of the qualitative phytochemical profile of cattail rhizomes; an evaluation of the efficacy of cattail rhizome flour in TNBS-induced rat colitis; an evaluation of the synergistic effects of cattail rhizome flour on the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of prednisolone; and macroscopic, clinical, biochemical, histopathological and microbiological studies to assess the healing effects of cattail rhizome flour and its synergistic effects in TNBS-induced rat colitis. The data were analysed by ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and χ2 tests. Results We tested several concentrations of cattail rhizome flour and found that dietary supplementation with 10% cattail rhizome flour showed the best effects at reducing the extension of the lesion, the colon weight ratio, adherences to adjacent organs and diarrhoea. These effects were related to inhibition of myeloperoxidase (MPO and alkaline phosphatase (AP activities and an attenuation of glutathione (GSH depletion. The 10% cattail rhizome flour was

  4. Neuropeptide S receptor 1 expression in the intestine and skin--putative role in peptide hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundman, L; Saarialho-Kere, U; Vendelin, J; Lindfors, K; Assadi, G; Kaukinen, K; Westerholm-Ormio, M; Savilahti, E; Mäki, M; Alenius, H; D'Amato, M; Pulkkinen, V; Kere, J; Saavalainen, P

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) was recently found to be genetically associated with inflammatory bowel disease in addition to asthma and related traits. Epithelia of several organs express NPSR1 isoforms A and B, including the intestine and the skin, and NPSR1 appears to be upregulated in inflammation. In this study, we used cell lines and tissue samples to characterize the expression of NPSR1 and its ligand neuropeptide S (NPS) in inflammation. We used polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to investigate the expression of NPS and NPSR1 in intestinal diseases, such as celiac disease and food allergy, and in cutaneous inflammatory disorders. We found that NPSR1-A was expressed by the enteroendocrine cells of the gut. Overall, the expression pattern of NPS was similar to its receptor suggesting an autocrine mechanism. In an NPSR1-A overexpressing cell model, stimulation with NPS resulted in a dose-dependent upregulation of glycoprotein hormone, alpha polypeptide (CGA), tachykinin 1 (TAC1), neurotensin (NTS) and galanin (GAL) encoding peptide hormones secreted by enteroendocrine cells. Because NPSR1 was also expressed in macrophages, neutrophils, and intraepithelial lymphocytes, we demonstrated that stimulation with the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma increased NPSR1 expression in the THP-1 monocytic cells. In conclusion, similar to other neuropeptides and their receptors, NPSR1 signalling might play a dual role along the gut-brain axis. The NPS/NPSR1 pathway may participate in the regulation of the peptide hormone production in enteroendocrine cells of the small intestine.

  5. Bacterial translocation in an experimental intestinal obstruction model: C-reactive protein reliability? Translocação bacteriana no modelo experimental de obstrução intestinal: A proteína C-reativa é confiável?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Ibrahim El-Awady

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial translocation occurs in preseptic conditions such as intestinal obstruction through unclear mechanism. The C-reactive protein is an acute phase reactant and a marker of ischemia. METHODS: 45 albino male rats were divided into 3 groups each 15 rats. GI control, GII simple intestinal-obstruction and GIII strangulated obstruction. Outcome measures were: (1 Bacteriologic count and typing for intestinal contents, intestinal wall, liver, mesenteric lymph nodes and blood (cardiac and portal (2 Histopathologic: mucosal injury score, inflammatory cell infiltrate in the wall, MLN, liver, (3 Biochemical: serum CRP, IL-10, mucosal stress pattern (glutathione peroxidase-malonyldialdhyde tissue levels. RESULTS: (1 Intestinal obstruction associates with BT precursors (Bact-overgrowth, mucosal-acidosis, immuno-incomptence, (2 Bacterial translocation (frequency and density was found higher in strangulated I.O, that was mainly enteric (aerobic and anaerobic and mostly E.coli, (3 The pathogen commonality supports the gut origin hypothesis but the systemic inflammatory response goes with the cytokine generating one. (4 The CRP median values for GI, II, III were 0.5, 6.9, 8.5 mg/L, for BT +ve 8 mg/L and 0.75 mg/L for BT -ve rats. CONCLUSION: Bacterial translocation occurs bi-directional (systemic-portal in intestinal obstruction and the resultant inflammatory response pathogenesis is mostly 3 hit model. The CRP is a non selective marker of suspected I.O cases. However, it is a reliable marker of BT, BT density and vascular compromise during I.O.OBJETIVO: Translocação bacteriana ocorre em condições pré-sépticas como na obstrução intestinal por mecanismo não esclarecido. A proteína C-reativa é um marcador de ischemia em fase aguda. A proposição é investigar os possíveis efeitos da obstrução intestinal no equilíbrio ecológico microbiano. MÉTODOS: 45 ratos machos albinos foram distribuídos em três grupos de 15 ratos. GI

  6. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts support in vitro and in vivo growth of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Lahar

    Full Text Available The intestinal crypt-niche interaction is thought to be essential to the function, maintenance, and proliferation of progenitor stem cells found at the bases of intestinal crypts. These stem cells are constantly renewing the intestinal epithelium by sending differentiated cells from the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn to the villus tips where they slough off into the intestinal lumen. The intestinal niche consists of various cell types, extracellular matrix, and growth factors and surrounds the intestinal progenitor cells. There have recently been advances in the understanding of the interactions that regulate the behavior of the intestinal epithelium and there is great interest in methods for isolating and expanding viable intestinal epithelium. However, there is no method to maintain primary human small intestinal epithelium in culture over a prolonged period of time. Similarly no method has been published that describes isolation and support of human intestinal epithelium in an in vivo model. We describe a technique to isolate and maintain human small intestinal epithelium in vitro from surgical specimens. We also describe a novel method to maintain human intestinal epithelium subcutaneously in a mouse model for a prolonged period of time. Our methods require various growth factors and the intimate interaction between intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs and the intestinal epithelial cells to support the epithelial in vitro and in vivo growth. Absence of these myofibroblasts precluded successful maintenance of epithelial cell formation and proliferation beyond just a few days, even in the presence of supportive growth factors. We believe that the methods described here can be used to explore the molecular basis of human intestinal stem cell support, maintenance, and growth.

  7. Aberrant cytological localization of p16 and CDK4 in colorectal epithelia in the normal adenoma carcinoma sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Po Zhao; Xin Mao; Ian C Talbot

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the correlation between the patterns of subcellular expression of p16 and CDK4 in colorectal epithelia in the normal-adenoma-carcinoma sequence.METHODS: Paraffin sections of 43 cases of normal colorectal epithelia and corresponding adenomas as well as carcinomas were analysed immunocytochemically for subcellular expression of p16 and CDK4 proteins.RESULTS: Most carcinomas showed more cytoplasmic overexpression for p16 and CDK4 than the adenomas from which they arised or the adjacent normal mucosa.Most normal or non-neoplastic epithelia showed more p16 and CDK4 expression in the nucleus than their adjacent adenomas and carcinomas. There was a significant difference between the subcellular expression pattern of p16 and CDK4 in normal-adenoma-carcinoma sequence epithelia (P < 0.001). Neither p16 nor CDK4 subcellular patterns correlated with histological grade or Dukes' stage.CONCLUSION: Interaction of expression of p16 and CDK4 plays an important role in the Rb/p16 pathway.Overexpression of p16 and CDK4 in the cytoplasm, as well as loss expression of p16 in the nucleus might be important in the evolution of colorectal carcinoma from adenoma and, of adenoma from normal epithelia.

  8. Lipid digestion of protein stabilized emulsions investigated in a dynamic in vitro gastro-intestinal model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbig, A.; Silletti, E.; Aken, G.A. van; Oosterveld, A.; Minekus, M.; Hamer, R.J.; Gruppen, H.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of gastric passage of protein stabilized emulsions, i.e., whey protein isolate (WPI) and lysozyme, under dynamic in vitro conditions on both the gastric and intestinal lipolysis. Emulsions were prepared at neutral pH to enable an opposite surface charge. Experiment

  9. Lipid Digestion of Protein Stabilized Emulsions Investigated in a Dynamic In Vitro Gastro-Intestinal Model System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbig, A.; Silletti, E.; Aken, van G.A.; Oosterveld, A.; Minekus, M.; Hamer, R.J.; Gruppen, H.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of gastric passage of protein stabilized emulsions, i.e., whey protein isolate (WPI) and lysozyme, under dynamic in vitro conditions on both the gastric and intestinal lipolysis. Emulsions were prepared at neutral pH to enable an opposite surface charge. Experiment

  10. The Intestine Plays a Substantial Role in Human Vitamin B6 Metabolism : A Caco-2 Cell Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albersen, Monique; Bosma, Marjolein; Knoers, Nine V. V. A. M.; de Ruiter, Berna H. B.; Diekman, Eugene F.; de Ruijter, Jessica; Visser, Wouter F.; de Koning, Tom J.; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vitamin B6 is present in various forms (vitamers) in the diet that need to be metabolized to pyridoxal phosphate (PLP), the active cofactor form of vitamin B6. In literature, the liver has been reported to be the major site for this conversion, whereas the exact role of the intestine rem

  11. Vasoactive intestinal peptide/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor relative expression in salivary glands as one endogenous modulator of acinar cell apoptosis in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauk, V; Calafat, M; Larocca, L; Fraccaroli, L; Grasso, E; Ramhorst, R; Leirós, C Pérez

    2011-12-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by a progressive oral and ocular dryness that correlates poorly with the autoimmune damage of the glands. It has been proposed that a loss of homeostatic equilibrium in the glands is partly responsible for salivary dysfunction with acinar cells involved actively in the pathogenesis of SS. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome develops secretory dysfunction and early loss of glandular homeostatic mechanisms, with mild infiltration of the glands. Based on the vasodilator, prosecretory and trophic effects of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on acini as well as its anti-inflammatory properties we hypothesized that the local expression of VIP/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC) system in salivary glands could have a role in acinar cell apoptosis and macrophage function thus influencing gland homeostasis. Here we show a progressive decline of VIP expression in submandibular glands of NOD mice with no changes in VPAC receptor expression compared with normal mice. The deep loss of endogenous VIP was associated with a loss of acinar cells through apoptotic mechanisms that could be induced further by tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and reversed by VIP through a cyclic adenosine-5'-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. The clearance of apoptotic acinar cells by macrophages was impaired for NOD macrophages but a shift from inflammatory to regulatory phenotype was induced in macrophages during phagocytosis of apoptotic acinar cells. These results support that the decline in endogenous VIP/VPAC local levels might influence the survival/apoptosis intracellular set point in NOD acinar cells and their clearance, thus contributing to gland homeostasis loss.

  12. Evaluation of the intestinal transport of a phenylethanoid glycoside-rich extract from Cistanche deserticola across the Caco-2 cell monolayer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gao

    Full Text Available Phenylethanoid glycosides (PhGs, a class of polyphenolic compounds, are considered one of major bioactive constituents of Cistanche deserticola Y.C. Ma (CD, whose extract is orally used in traditional Chinese medicine. Although previous pharmacological studies have reported that PhGs exert many activities, their intestinal transport profiles have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the intestinal permeability of a PhG-rich extract (PRE from CD as an integrated system in the Caco-2 cell monolayer model using a bioassay system. The results showed that PRE is primarily transported via poorly absorbed passive diffusion down a concentration gradient without efflux, which provides the pharmacokinetic basis for the clinical application of PhGs in CD. We also determined the intestinal permeability of three major PhGs [acteoside (AC, isoacteoside (IS and echinacoside (EC] by HLPC. Furthermore, we developed a novel HPLC-fluorescence detection method to accurately determine the flux amount of AC and IS. As expected, the transport characteristics of the three PhGs are consistent with those of PRE, indicating that the present bioassay system is appropriate and reliable for the evaluation of the transport characteristics of active ingredient groups (AIG in PRE. Moreover, this system may also be suitable for other plant extracts given appropriate bioactivity.

  13. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Spray-Dried Plasma Is Mediated by a Reduction in Mucosal Lymphocyte Activation and Infiltration in a Mouse Model of Intestinal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Miró, Lluïsa; Amat, Concepció; Polo, Javier; Moretó, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    Spray-dried preparations from porcine and bovine plasma can alleviate mucosal inflammation in experimental models and improve symptoms in patients with enteropathy. In rodents, dietary supplementation with porcine spray-dried plasma (SDP) attenuates intestinal inflammation and improves the epithelial barrier function during intestinal inflammation induced by Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB). The aim of this study was to discern the molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of SDP. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with 8% SDP or control diet (based on milk proteins) for two weeks, from weaning until day 33. On day 32, the mice were given a SEB dose (i.p., 25 µg/mouse) or vehicle. SEB administration increased cell recruitment to mesenteric lymph nodes and the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes and SDP prevented these effects). SDP supplementation increased the expression of interleukin 10 (IL-10) or transforming growth factor- β (TGF-β) compared to the SEB group. The SEB challenge increased six-fold the expression of mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 (MAdCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1); and these effects were attenuated by SDP supplementation. SEB also augmented NF-κB phosphorylation, an effect that was prevented by dietary SDP. Our results indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of SDP involve the regulation of transcription factors and adhesion molecules that reduce intestinal cell infiltration and the degree of the inflammatory response. PMID:27782068

  14. Transport of sennosides and sennidines from Cassia angustifolia and Cassia senna across Caco-2 monolayers--an in vitro model for intestinal absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltenberger, B; Avula, B; Ganzera, M; Khan, I A; Stuppner, H; Khan, S I

    2008-05-01

    Laxative effects of Senna preparations are mainly mediated by rheinanthrone, a metabolite formed in the intestinal flora from dianthrones. Nevertheless, it was not clear whether dianthrones are bioavailable at all and contribute to the overall effects of this important medicinal plant. Using the Caco-2 human colonic cell line as an in vitro model of the human intestinal mucosal barrier, the bioavailability of dianthrones was studied in apical to basolateral (absorptive) and basolateral to apical (secretive) direction. Permeability coefficients (P(c)) and percent transport were calculated based on quantitations by HPLC. From the data obtained it was concluded that sennosides A and B, as well as their aglycones sennidine A and B are transported through the Caco-2 monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner and their transport was linear with time. The absorption in apical to basolateral direction was poor and P(c) values were comparable to mannitol. The transport was higher in the secretory direction, indicating a significant efflux (e.g. by efflux pumps) of the (poorly) absorbed compounds in the intestinal lumen again. Our findings support the general understanding that the laxative effects of Senna are explainable mainly by metabolites and not by the natively present dianthrones.

  15. Modified Dietary Fiber from Cassava Pulp and Assessment of Mercury Bioaccessibility and Intestinal Uptake Using an In Vitro Digestion/Caco-2 Model System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachenpukdee, Natta; Santerre, Charles R; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Oonsivilai, Ratchadaporn

    2016-07-01

    The ability of modified dietary fiber (MDF) generated from cassava pulp to modulate the bioaccessibility and intestinal absorption of heavy metals may be helpful to mitigate health risk associated with select foods including select fish high in methyl mercury. Using a coupled in vitro digestion/Caco-2 human intestinal cell model, the reduction of fish mercury bioaccessibility and intestinal uptake by MDF was investiaged. MDF was prepared from cassava pulp, a byproduct of tapioca production. The highest yield (79.68%) of MDF was obtained by enzymatic digestion with 0.1% α-amylase (w/v), 0.1% amyloglucosidase (v/v) and 1% neutrase (v/v). MDF and fish tissue were subjected to in vitro digestion and