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Sample records for model inducing pancreatitis

  1. An experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis

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    Saruc M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature indicates that acute pancreatitis is a complication of massive hemolysis with a prevalence of about 20%. We describe an experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis. Hemolytic anemia was induced in rats by a single ip injection of 60 mg/kg of 20 mg/ml acetylphenylhydrazine (APH in 20% (v/v ethanol on the first experimental day (day 0. One hundred and fifty Wistar albino rats weighing 180-200 g were divided into three groups of 50 animals each: groups 1, 2 and 3 were injected ip with APH, 20% ethanol, and physiological saline, respectively. Ten rats from each group were sacrificed on study days 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Serum amylase, lipase levels and pancreatic tissue tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and platelet-activating factor (PAF contents were determined and a histological examination of the pancreas was performed. No hemolysis or pancreatitis was observed in any of the rats in groups 2 and 3. In group 1, massive hemolysis was observed in 35 (70% of 50 rats, moderate hemolysis in seven (14%, and no hemolysis in eight (16%. Thirty-three of 35 (94.2% rats with massive hemolysis had hyperamylasemia, and 29 of these rats (82.8% had histologically proven pancreatitis. The most severe pancreatitis occurred on day 3, as demonstrated by histology. Tissue TNF-alpha and PAF levels were statistically higher in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. Acute massive hemolysis induced acute pancreatitis, as indicated by histology, in almost 80% of cases. Hemolysis may induce acute pancreatitis by triggering the release of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines.

  2. Cholecystokinin acts as an essential factor in the exacerbation of pancreatic bile duct ligation-induced rat pancreatitis model under non-fasting condition.

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    Yoshinaga, K; Washizuka, M; Segawa, Y

    2000-09-01

    We examined the influence of 2 gut hormones involved in the enhancement of pancreatic exocrine secretion, secretin and cholecystokinin (CCK), in the exacerbation of pancreatitis. We also examined the role of the vagal system, which was considered to be a transmission route for these hormones. Our model of pancreatitis in the rat was prepared by pancreatic bile duct ligation (PBDL), which simultaneously ligated the pancreatic duct and the common bile duct. Serum amylase activity and histopathological changes in the pancreas were used as indices of pancreatitis. We also measured the volume of pancreatic juice, as well as the amylase activity and protein level of the pancreatic juice, as indices of increased pancreatic exocrine secretion. Two gut hormones were given 6 times at 1-h intervals. Administration of secretin (1-3 microg/kg, s.c.) did not influence serum amylase activity in rats with PBDL-induced pancreatitis. However, food stimulation and administration of CCK-8 (1 microg/kg, s.c.) increased serum amylase activity and promoted vacuolation of the pancreatic acinar cells in rats with PBDL-induced pancreatitis. Administration of atropine (3 mg/kg, s.c.) or a CCK1-receptor antagonist, Z-203 (0.1 mg/kg, i.v.), inhibited food-stimulated or CCK-8-induced (1 microg/kg, s.c.) enhancement of pancreatic exocrine secretion and exacerbation after the development of PBDL-induced pancreatitis. These results suggest that not secretin, which regulates the volume of pancreatic juice, but CCK, which regulates the secretion of pancreatic enzymes via the vagal system, plays an essential role in food-stimulated exacerbation after the development of pancreatitis.

  3. Role of bone marrow cells in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a rat model of pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented diet

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    Akita, Shingo; Kubota, Koji [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Kobayashi, Akira, E-mail: kbys@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Misawa, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Akira; Nakata, Takenari; Yokoyama, Takahide [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Takahashi, Masafumi [Center for Molecular Medicine Division of Bioimaging Sciences, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimono, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Miyagawa, Shinichi [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs play a role in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived activated PSCs can produce PDGF and TGF {beta}1. -- Abstract: Bone marrow cell (BMC)-derived myofibroblast-like cells have been reported in various organs, including the pancreas. However, the contribution of these cells to pancreatic fibrosis has not been fully discussed. The present study examined the possible involvement of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) originating from BMCs in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a clinically relevant rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet. BMCs from female transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were transplanted into lethally irradiated male rats. Once chimerism was established, acute pancreatitis was induced by a CDE diet. Chronological changes in the number of PSCs originating from the donor BMCs were examined using double immunofluorescence for GFP and markers for PSCs, such as desmin and alpha smooth muscle actin ({alpha}SMA), 1, 3 and 8 weeks after the initiation of CDE feeding. We also used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate whether the PSCs from the BMCs produce growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF) {beta}1. The percentage of BMC-derived activated PSCs increased significantly, peaking after 1 week of CDE treatment (accounting for 23.3 {+-} 0.9% of the total population of activated PSCs) and then decreasing. These cells produced both PDGF and TGF{beta}1 during the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Our results suggest that PSCs originating from BMCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic injury, at least in part, by producing growth factors in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model.

  4. Orlistat-induced acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis is a rare but important cause of pancreatic injury. Orlistat is a pancreatic lipase inhibitor licensed for the treatment of obesity. We present a case of orlistat- induced mild acute pancreatitis that developed 8 days after starting treatment.

  5. A mouse model of severe acute pancreatitis induced with caerulein and lipopolysaccharide

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    Shi-Ping Ding; Ji-Cheng Li; Chang Jin

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To establish a non-traumatic, easy to induce and reproducible mouse model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP)induced with caerulein and lipopolyasccharide (LPS).METHODS: Thirty-two healthy mature NIH female mice were selected and divided at random into four groups (each of 8 mice), i.e., the control group (NS group), the caerulein group (Ch group), the lipopolysaccharide group (LPS group),and the caerulein+LPS group (Cn+LPS group). Mice were injected intraperitoneally with caerulein only, or LPS only,and caerulein and LPS in combination. All the animals were then killed by neck dislocation three hours after the last intraperitoneal injection. The pancreas and exo-pancreatic organs were then carefully removed for microscopic examination. And the pancreatic acinus was further observed under transmission electron microscope (TEM). Pancreatic weight, serum amylase, serum nitric oxide (NO)concentration, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration of the pancreas were assayed respectively.RESULTS: (1) NS animals displayed normal pancreatic structure both in the exocrine and endocrine. In the LPS group, the pancreas was slightly edematous, with the infiltration of a few inflammatory cells and the necrosis of the adjacent fat tissues. All the animals of the Cn group showed distinct signs of a mild edematous pancreatitis characterized by interstitial edema, infiltration of neutrophil and mononuclear cells, but without obvious parenchyma necrosis and hemorrhage. In contrast, the Cn+LPS groupshowed more diffuse focal areas of nonviable pancreatic and hemorrhage as well as systemic organ dysfunction.According to Schmidt's criteria, the pancreatic histologic score showed that there existed significant difference in the Cn+LPS group in the interstitial edema, inflammatory infiltration,parenchyma necrosis and parenchyma homorrhage in comparison with those of the Cn group, LPS group and NS group (P<0.01 or P<0.05). (2) The ultrasturcture of acinar

  6. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligands in Cigarette Smoke Induce Production of Interleukin-22 to Promote Pancreatic Fibrosis in Models of Chronic Pancreatitis.

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    Xue, Jing; Zhao, Qinglan; Sharma, Vishal; Nguyen, Linh P; Lee, Yvonne N; Pham, Kim L; Edderkaoui, Mouad; Pandol, Stephen J; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2016-12-01

    Cigarette smoke has been identified as an independent risk factor for chronic pancreatitis (CP). Little is known about the mechanisms by which smoking promotes development of CP. We assessed the effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands found in cigarette smoke on immune cell activation in humans and pancreatic fibrosis in animal models of CP. We obtained serum samples from patients with CP treated at Stanford University hospital and healthy individuals (controls) and isolated CD4(+) T cells. Levels of interleukin-22 (IL22) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and smoking histories were collected. T cells from healthy nonsmokers and smokers were stimulated and incubated with AhR agonists (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or benzo[a]pyrene) or antagonists and analyzed by flow cytometry. Mice were given intraperitoneal injections of caerulein or saline, with or without lipopolysaccharide, to induce CP. Some mice were given intraperitoneal injections of AhR agonists at the start of caerulein injection, with or without an antibody against IL22 (anti-IL22) starting 2 weeks after the first caerulein injection, or recombinant mouse IL22 or vehicle (control) intraperitoneally 4 weeks after the first caerulein injection. Mice were exposed to normal air or cigarette smoke for 6 h/d for 7 weeks and expression of AhR gene targets was measured. Pancreata were collected from all mice and analyzed by histology and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Pancreatic stellate cells and T cells were isolated and studied using immunoblot, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent analyses. Mice given AhR agonists developed more severe pancreatic fibrosis (based on decreased pancreas size, histology, and increased expression of fibrosis-associated genes) than mice not given agonists after caerulein injection. In mice given saline instead of caerulein, AhR ligands did not induce fibrosis. Pancreatic T cells

  7. Laser Capture Microdissection of Pancreatic Acinar Cells to Identify Proteomic Alterations in a Murine Model of Caerulein-Induced Pancreatitis.

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    Shapiro, John P; Komar, Hannah M; Hancioglu, Baris; Yu, Lianbo; Jin, Ming; Ogata, Yuko; Hart, Phil A; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Lesinski, Gregory B; Conwell, Darwin L

    2017-04-13

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterized by inflammation and fibrosis of the pancreas, leading to pain, parenchymal damage, and loss of exocrine and endocrine function. There are currently no curative therapies; diagnosis remains difficult and aspects of pathogenesis remain unclear. Thus, there is a need to identify novel biomarkers to improve diagnosis and understand pathophysiology. We hypothesize that pancreatic acinar regions contain proteomic signatures relevant to disease processes, including secreted proteins that could be detected in biofluids. Acini from pancreata of mice injected with or without caerulein were collected using laser capture microdissection followed by mass spectrometry analysis. This protocol enabled high-throughput analysis that captured altered protein expression throughout the stages of CP. Over 2,900 proteins were identified, whereas 331 were significantly changed ≥2-fold by mass spectrometry spectral count analysis. Consistent with pathogenesis, we observed increases in proteins related to fibrosis (e.g., collagen, PCP patients, a significant correlation was observed between proteomic changes in tissue from both the caerulein model and CP patients (r=0.725, PCP.

  8. L-arginine-induced experimental pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Péter Hegyi; Zoltán Rakonczay Jr; Réka Sári; Csaba Góg; János Lonovics; Tamás Takács; László Czakó

    2004-01-01

    Despite medical treatment, the lethality of severe acute pancreatitis is still high (20-30%). Therefore, it is very important to find good animal models to characterise the events of this severe disease. In 1984, Mizunuma et al.developed a new type of experimental necrotizing pancreatitis by intraperitoneal administration of a high dose of L-arginine in rats. This non-invasive model is highly reproducible and produces selective, dose-dependent acinar cell necrosis.Not only is this a good model to study the pathomechanisms of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, but it is also excellent to observe and influence the time course changes of the disease. By writing this review we iluminate some new aspects of cell physiology and pathology of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Unfortunately, the reviews about acute experimental pancreatitis usually did not discuss this model.Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to summarise the observations and address some challenges for the future in L-arginine-induced pancreatitis.

  9. L-arginine-induced experimental pancreatitis

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    Hegyi, Péter; Jr, Zoltán Rakonczay; Sári, Réka; Góg, Csaba; Lonovics, János; Takács, Tamás; Czakó, László

    2004-01-01

    Despite medical treatment, the lethality of severe acute pancreatitis is still high (20%-30%). Therefore, it is very important to find good animal models to characterise the events of this severe disease. In 1984, Mizunuma et al[1] developed a new type of experimental necrotizing pancreatitis by intraperitoneal administration of a high dose of L-arginine in rats. This non-invasive model is highly reproducible and produces selective, dose-dependent acinar cell necrosis. Not only is this a good model to study the pathomechanisms of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, but it is also excellent to observe and influence the time course changes of the disease. By writing this review we iluminate some new aspects of cell physiology and pathology of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Unfortunately, the reviews about acute experimental pancreatitis usually did not discuss this model. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to summarise the observations and address some challenges for the future in L-arginine-induced pancreatitis. PMID:15237423

  10. Metronidazole-induced pancreatitis.

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    O'Halloran, E

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old caucasian lady presented to the Accident & Emergency department complaining of acute onset severe epigastric pain radiating through to the back with associated nausea and vomiting. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made. Symptoms commenced after the third dose of Metronidazole therapy prescribed for a recurrent periodontal abscess. The patient described a similar episode 10 months previously. On neither occasion were any other medications being taken, there was no history of alcohol abuse and no other gastro-intestinal aetiology could be identified on imaging. Symptoms resolved quickly upon discontinuation of the antibiotic agent. We conclude therefore that Metronidazole can reasonably be identified as the only potential causative agent.

  11. Chokeberry Anthocyanin Extract as Pancreatic β-Cell Protectors in Two Models of Induced Oxidative Stress

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    Dumitriţa Rugină

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of a chokeberry anthocyanin extract (CAE on pancreatic β-cells (βTC3 exposed to hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2- and high glucose- (HG- induced oxidative stress conditions. In order to quantify individual anthocyanins high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC coupled to photodiode array (PDA was used. The identification of the fragment ion pattern of anthocyanins was carried out by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS. The results showed that physiologically achievable concentrations of CAE (1, 5, and 10 μM protect βTC3 against H2O2- and HG-induced cytotoxicity. Antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were increased in pancreatic β-cells pretreated with CAE compared to cells exposed to the prooxidant agents. GSH levels initially reduced after exposure to H2O2 and HG were restored by pretreatment with CAE. Insulin secretion in βTC3 cells was enhanced by CAE pretreatment. CAE restored the insulin pool and diminished the intracellular reactive oxygen species level in glucose-induced stress condition in βTC3 cells. These results demonstrate that anthocyanins from CAE were biologically active, showing a secretagogue potential and an antioxidative protection of enzymatic systems, conferring protection against H2O2 and glucose toxicity in βTC3 cells.

  12. Phenethyl isothiocyanate inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in a MIAPaca2 xenograft animal model.

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    Stan, Silvia D; Singh, Shivendra V; Whitcomb, David C; Brand, Randall E

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and it has a poor prognosis that points to an increased need to develop effective chemoprevention strategies for this disease. We examined the ability of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, to inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in a MIAPaca2 xenograft animal model. Exposure to PEITC inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of approximately 7 μmol/L. PEITC treatment induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, downregulated the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, upregulated the proapoptotic protein Bak, and suppressed Notch 1 and 2 levels. In addition, treatment with PEITC induced cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase and led to increased cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation and subdiploid (apoptotic) fraction in pancreatic cancer cells. Oral administration of PEITC suppressed the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in a MIAPaca2 xenograft animal model. Our data show that PEITC exerts its inhibitory effect on pancreatic cancer cells through several mechanisms, including G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis, and supports further investigation of PEITC as a chemopreventive agent for pancreatic cancer.

  13. Experimental Models of Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun, Jong Jin; Lee, Hong Sik

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by interstitial edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, depending on its severity. Regardless of the extent of tissue injury, acute pancreatitis is a completely reversible process with evident normal tissue architecture after recovery. Its pathogenic mechanism has been known to be closely related to intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In contrast to acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis is character...

  14. Effect of Taurine on Acinar Cell Apoptosis and Pancreatic Fibrosis in Dibutyltin Dichloride-induced Chronic Pancreatitis

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    Sawa,Kiminari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between pancreatic fibrosis and apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells has not been fully elucidated. We reported that taurine had an anti-fibrotic effect in a dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC-chronic pancreatitis model. However, the effect of taurine on apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells is still unclear. Therefore, we examined apoptosis in DBTC-chronic pancreatitis and in the AR42J pancreatic acinar cell line with/without taurine. Pancreatic fibrosis was induced by a single administration of DBTC. Rats were fed a taurine-containing diet or a normal diet and were sacrificed at day 5. The AR42J pancreatic acinar cell line was incubated with/without DBTC with taurine chloramines. Apoptosis was determined by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL assay. The expression of Bad and Bcl-2 proteins in the AR42J cells lysates was detected by Western blot analysis. The apoptotic index of pancreatic acinar cells in DBTC-administered rats was significantly increased. Taurine treatment inhibited pancreatic fibrosis and apoptosis of acinar cells induced by DBTC. The number of TUNEL-positive cells in the AR42J pancreatic acinar cell lines was significantly increased by the addition of DBTC. Incubation with taurine chloramines ameliorated these changes. In conclusion, taurine inhibits apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells and pancreatitis in experimental chronic pancreatitis.

  15. Mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Elizabeth Hijona; Angel Cosme; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies ranking 4th among cancer-related death in the western world and in the United States,and potent therapeutic options are lacking.Although during the last few years there have been important advances in the understanding of the molecular events responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer,currently specific mechanisms of treatment resistance remain poorly understood and new effective systemic drugs need to be developed and probed.In vivo models to study pancreatic cancer and approach this issue remain limited and present different molecular features that must be considered in the studies depending on the purpose to fit special research themes.In the last few years,several genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine neoplasia have been developed.These models mimic the disease as they reproduce genetic alterations implicated in the progression of pancreatic cancer.Genetic alterations such as activating mutations in KRas,or TGFb and/or inactivation of tumoral suppressors such as p53,INK4A/ARF BRCA2 and Smad4 are the most common drivers to pancreatic carcinogenesis and have been used to create transgenic mice.These mouse models have a spectrum of pathologic changes,from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to lesions that progress histologically culminating in fully invasive and metastatic disease and represent the most useful preclinical model system.These models can characterize the cellular and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasia and cancer and constitute the best tool to investigate new therapeutic approaches,chemopreventive and/or anticancer treatments.Here,we review and update the current mouse models that reproduce different stages of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and will have clinical relevance in future pancreatic cancer developments.

  16. Alcohol causes a fatty pancreas. A rat model of ethanol-induced pancreatic steatosis.

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    Wilson, J S; Colley, P W; Sosula, L; Pirola, R C; Chapman, B A; Somer, J B

    1982-01-01

    To develop an animal mode of alcoholic pancreatic steatosis, female Wistar rats were pair fed liquid diets, containing ethanol as 36% of calories or an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate for 3 weeks. Electron microscopic examination showed lipid vesicles localized principally at the bases of pancreatic acinar cells in the ethanol-fed rats. Ethanol feeding significantly increased pancreatic content of cholesteryl ester without changing levels of other lipids. Ethanol feeding enhanced labeled acetate, palmitate, oleate, and linoleate incorporation into cholesteryl ester. Therefore, increased esterification of cholesterol may, in part, explain the observed accumulation of cholesteryl ester.

  17. Loperamide-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

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    Halla Vidarsdottir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a common disease leading to hospitalizations, most often caused by gallstones or alcohol. We present a case of a patient diagnosed with acute pancreatitis considered to be due to loperamide treatment for diarrhea.

  18. Intravenous Selenium Modulates L-Arginine-Induced Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

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    Jonathan Hardman

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Oxidative stress is understood to have a critical role in the development of acinar injury in experimental acute pancreatitis. We have previously demonstrated that compound multiple antioxidant therapy ameliorates end-organ damage in the intra-peritoneal L-arginine rat model. As the principal co-factor for glutathione, selenium is a key constituent of multiple antioxidant preparations. Objective The intention of this study was to investigate the effect of selenium on pancreatic and remote organ injury in a wellvalidated experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to one of 3 groups (n=5/group and sacrificed at 72 hours. Acute pancreatitis was induced by 250 mg per 100 g body weight of 20% L-arginine hydrochloride in 0.15 mol/L sodium chloride. Group allocations were: Group 1, control; Group 2, acute pancreatitis; Group 3, selenium. Main outcome measures Serum amylase, anti-oxidant levels, bronchoalveolar lavage protein, lung myeloperoxidase activity, and histological assessment of pancreatic injury. Results L-arginine induced acute pancreatitis characterised by oedema, neutrophil infiltration, acinar cell degranulation and elevated serum amylase. Selenium treatment was associated with reduced pancreatic oedema and inflammatory cell infiltration. Acinar degranulation and dilatation were completely absent. A reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage protein content was also demonstrated. Conclusion Intravenous selenium given 24 hours after induction of experimental acute pancreatitis was associated with a reduction in the histological stigmata of pancreatic injury and a dramatic reduction in broncho-alveolar lavage protein content. Serum selenium fell during the course of experimental acute pancreatitis and this effect was not reversed by exogenous selenium supplementation.

  19. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are

  20. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are consid

  1. Resveratrol induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jia-hua; CHENG Hai-yan; YU Ze-qian; HE Dao-wei; PAN Zheng; YANG De-tong

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers with a very low survival rate of 5 years.Conventional cancer treatments including surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or combinations of these show little effect on this disease. Several proteins have been proved critical to the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer.The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol on apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.Methods Several pancreatic cancer cell lines were screened by resveratrol, and its toxicity was tested by normal pancreatic cells. Western blotting was then performed to analyze the molecular mechanism of resveratrol induced apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cell lines.Results In the screened pancreatic cancer cell lines, capan-2 and colo357 showed high sensitivity to resveratrol induced apoptosis. Resveratrol exhibited insignificant toxicity to normal pancreatic cells. In resveratrol sensitive cells,capan-2 and colo357, the activation of caspase-3 was detected and showed significant caspase-3 activation upon resveratrol treatment; p53 and p21 were also detected up-regulated upon resveratrol treatment.Conclusion Resveratrol provides a promising anti-tumor stratagy to fight against pancreatic cancer.

  2. Experimental Models in Syrian Golden Hamster Replicate Human Acute Pancreatitis.

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    Wang, Yunan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Lu, Guotao; Xu, Pengfei; Qiu, Xu; Chen, Liye; Qi, Rong; Huang, Shouxiong; Li, Weiqin; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George

    2016-06-15

    The hamster has been shown to share a variety of metabolic similarities with humans. To replicate human acute pancreatitis with hamsters, we comparatively studied the efficacy of common methods, such as the peritoneal injections of caerulein, L-arginine, the retrograde infusion of sodium taurocholate, and another novel model with concomitant administration of ethanol and fatty acid. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by serum amylase activity, pathological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and the expression of inflammation factors in pancreas. The results support that the severity of pathological injury is consistent with the pancreatitis induced in mice and rat using the same methods. Specifically, caerulein induced mild edematous pancreatitis accompanied by minimal lung injury, while L-arginine induced extremely severe pancreatic injury including necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. Infusion of Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct induced necrotizing pancreatitis in the head of pancreas and lighter inflammation in the distal region. The severity of acute pancreatitis induced by combination of ethanol and fatty acids was between the extent of caerulein and L-arginine induction, with obvious inflammatory cells infiltration. In view of the advantages in lipid metabolism features, hamster models are ideally suited for the studies of pancreatitis associated with altered metabolism in humans.

  3. Carbofuran-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

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    Rizos E

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Carbamate insecticides are widely used in commercial agriculture and home gardening. A serious side effect of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication is the development of acute pancreatitis. CASE REPORT: A 36-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital with cholinergic crisis and pancreatitis soon after the ingestion of a carbamate insecticide (carbofuran. An abdominal CT scan disclosed pancreatic necrosis with intrapancreatic fluid collection, consistent with the development of a pancreatic pseudocyst in a subsequent CT scan. No predisposing factor for pancreatitis was evident. Pseudocholinesterase levels returned to normal 7 days later and the patient was discharged in good physical condition one month after admission. DISCUSSION: Although acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after organophosphate intoxication, it is quite rare after carbamate ingestion and has not been previously reported after carbofuran intoxication.

  4. Sensitization to and Challenge with Gliadin Induce Pancreatitis and Extrapancreatic Inflammation in HLA-DQ8 Mice: An Animal Model of Type 1 Autoimmune Pancreatitis

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    Moon, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Jihun; Kim, Mi-Young; Park, Do Hyun; Song, Tae Jun; Kim, Sun A; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to establish a pathogenetic mechanism of pancreatitis in celiac disease and IgG4-related disease using gluten-sensitive human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ8 transgenic mice. Methods Transgenic mice expressing HLA-DQ8 genes were utilized. Control mice were not sensitized but were fed gliadin-free rice cereal. Experimental groups consisted of gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice; nonsensitized mice with cerulein hyperstimulation; and gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation. Results Gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation showed significant inflammatory cell infiltrates, fibrosis and acinar atrophy compared with the control mice and the other experimental groups. The immunohistochemical analysis showed greater IgG1-positive plasma cells in the inflammatory infiltrates of gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation compared with the control mice and the other experimental groups. Gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation or gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice showed IgG1-stained inflammatory cell infiltrates in the extrapancreatic organs, including the bile ducts, salivary glands, kidneys, and lungs. Conclusions Gliadin-sensitization and cerulein hyperstimulation of gluten-sensitive HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice resulted in pancreatitis and extrapancreatic inflammation. This animal model suggests that chronic gliadin ingestion in a susceptible individual with the HLA-DQ8 molecule may be associated with pancreatitis and extrapancreatic inflammation. PMID:27114422

  5. Metformin induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role and mechanism of mefformin in inducing apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS: The human pancreatic cancer cell lines ASPC-1, BxPc-3, PANC-1 and SW1990 were exposed to mefformin. The inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation via apoptosis induction and S phase arrest in pancreatic cancer cell lines of mefformin was tested.RESULTS: In each pancreatic cancer cell line tested, metformin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner in MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assays). Flow cytometric analysis showed that metformin reduced the number of cells in G1 and increased the percentage of cells in S phase as well as the apoptotic fraction. Enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (EUSA) showed that metformin induced apaptosis in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. In Western blot studies, metformin induced oly-ADP-ribose polymerase(PARP) cleavage (an indicator of aspase activation) in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. The general caspase inhibitor (VAD-fmk) completely abolished metformin-induced PARP cleavage and apoptosis in ASPC-1 BxPc-3 and PANC-1, the caspase-8 specific inhibitor (IETD-fmk) and the caspase-9 specific inhibitor (LEHD-fmk) only partially abrogated metformin-induced apoptosis and PARP cleavage in BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cells. We also observed that metformin treatment ramatically reduced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinase (P-MAPK) in both a time- and dose-dependent manner in all cell lines tested.CONCLUSION: Metformin significantly inhibits cell proliferation and apoptosis in all pancreatic cell lines. And the metformin-induced apoptosis is associated with PARP leavage, activation of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Hence, both caspase-8 and -9-initiated apoptotic signaling pathways contribute to metforrnin-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cell lines.

  6. Histopathological Sequential Changes in Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwinikumar Kudari

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Experimental models of acute pancreatitis have been developed in order to understand its pathophysiology and extrapancreatic manifestations. Objective The objective of our study was to study sequential changes in the pancreas and distant organs in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis in a rat model. Animals Sixteen male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g. Design The rats were distributed into two groups: induced acute pancreatitis (study group: 8 rats and a control group (8 rats. Within each group, the animals were divided into subgroups: those who were sacrificed early (24 h and 72 h; two each and those who were sacrificed late (120 h and 240 h; two each. Intervention Acute pancreatitis was induced in the rats by multiple intraparenchymal injections of 10% sodium taurocholate solution. In the controls, the same amount of normal saline was injected into the pancreatic parenchyma. Main outcome measures Pathological examination of the pancreas, lungs, kidneys, intestine and liver was done. Results In this model of taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, the early changes observed in the pancreas were focal hemorrhages, parenchymal necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. At 72 hours, the changes observed were acinar necrosis, edema, fibrin deposition and inflammatory cell infiltration. Late changes were fibrinoid necrosis and fibroblast proliferation. In the acute phase, the histological changes in the lungs were congestion, focal pulmonary edema and intraalveolar hemorrhages while, in the late stage, there was persistence of vascular congestion. The changes observed in the kidneys were vacuolization of tubular epithelium in the subcapsular region and areas of hemorrhage in the interstitium. Intestinal changes included degenerative changes in the villous epithelium in the acute phase with normalization of the histology in the late phase. Conclusion Our findings correlate with the clinical observation of multisystem organ failure in

  7. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950347 Pancreatic endorcine response to parenteralnutrition in experimental acute pancreatitis.SUN Xi-aoguang(孙晓光),et al.Dept Nucl Med,ZhongshanHosp,Shanghai Med Univ,Shanghai.Shanghai Med J1995;18(2),74-70.In order to study the pancreatic endocrine responseto parenteral nutrition (PN) in acute pancreatitis,thedisease was induced in dogs by injecting 4% tauro-cholate sodium 0.5ml/kg plus trypsin 0.5mg/kg into the pancreatic duct.Intravenous infusion of PN wasinitiated one hour after the establishment of the dis-

  8. Analysis of the noise-induced bursting-spiking transition in a pancreatic beta-cell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguirre, J.; Mosekilde, Erik; Sanjuan, M.A.F.

    2004-01-01

    A stochastic model of the electrophysiological behavior of the pancreatic beta cell is studied, as a paradigmatic example of a bursting biological cell embedded in a noisy environment. The analysis is focused on the distortion that a growing noise causes to the basic properties of the membrane po...

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing pancreatic cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  10. Elemental diet and bile induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstein, M D; Tonkens, R M

    1976-08-01

    The effectiveness of an elemental diet was investigated as both a prophylactic and therapeutic agent in experimental canine pancreatitis. Pancreatitis was induced by operative injection of a bile -saline solution mixture under pressure retrograde into the main pancreatic duct. In addition to a preinjection control sample, serial biopsies were obtained at 30 minute intervals for 90 minutes after injection and fixed for light and electron microscopic examinations. In addition, preoperative and postoperative blood samples were drawn and analyzed for amylase. After operation, half of the dogs from each original group were fed Vivonex-100, the other half from each group, regular laboratory chow, yielding four ultimate groups based on preoperative and postoperative diets. Successful induction of pancreatitis was evaluated by the difference between preoperative and postoperative amylase values, all of which were significant by group at the p less than 0.01 level. No ultrastructural evidence was found for the modification of zymogen granules with the pretreatment elemental diet nor were differences evident, histologically or ultrastructurally, in the severity of pancreatitis between the pretreated and nonpretreated groups. Finally, gross mortality figures demonstrated no efficacy of elemental diet for pretreatment prophylaxis of acute pancreatitis.

  11. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Xiao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Methods Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0–2 h, Fraction II at 8–10 h, and Fraction III at 11–12 h. Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11–12 h (Fraction IV. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more

  12. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Methods Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0–2 h, Fraction II at 8–10 h, and Fraction III at 11–12 h). Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11–12 h (Fraction IV). Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS); and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous) human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more abundant high molecular

  13. [Acute pancreatitis induced by valproic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomli, R; Nacef, F; Douki, S

    2013-09-01

    We describe the case of an adult man aged 49, without personal antecedents, or family psychiatric history, treated for bipolar disorder since 1995 and stabilised in the last 8 years by valproic acid, who presented in January 2010 an acute drug-induced pancreatitis. Drug-induced pancreatitis has been described since 1955. It may be induced by more than 260 various molecules, as well as by valproic acid, which remains underreported in the literature because there is a problem of imputability. The prevalence of acute drug-induced pancreatitis is set between 1 and 2 %. However, it must remain as an exclusion diagnosis after conducting an exhaustive etiological investigation that will, notably, eliminate bilary and alcoholic causes. The most incriminated drugs are the inhibitors of the conversion enzyme, sulfa drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, diuretics and anticonvulsants, including valproic acid. In Tunisia, the prescription of valproic acid is increasing in bipolar disorder therapy because it is known for its weak toxicity and easy handling. The case of our patient, who suffers from an acute Balthazar stage C pancreatitis with severe evolution after the drug was stopped, the imputability of valproic acid was considered strong and the collegial decision between the surgery, pharmacovigilance and psychiatry services maintained the drug-induced origin and consequently stopped the valproic acid. This case supports the idea that acute pancreatitis may be induced by valproic acid, even after a prescription lasting for a long period of time, it has no predictable factors and is totally independent of the drug-related dose and of depakine blood levels. There are no predictive factors to the present day, but the evolution is generally good except in rare cases where it may be dangerous. This leads us to think of bipolar patients who are found within weak grounds, such as alcoholics, cancer and HIV positive patients. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson

  14. Models of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Markus M; Gorelick, Fred S

    2013-06-01

    Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis have been created to examine mechanisms of pathogenesis, test therapeutic interventions, and study the influence of inflammation on the development of pancreatic cancer. In vitro models can be used to study early stage, short-term processes that involve acinar cell responses. Rodent models reproducibly develop mild or severe disease. One of the most commonly used pancreatitis models is created by administration of supraphysiologic concentrations of caerulein, an ortholog of cholecystokinin. Induction of chronic pancreatitis with factors thought to have a role in human disease, such as combinations of lipopolysaccharide and chronic ethanol feeding, might be relevant to human disease. Models of autoimmune chronic pancreatitis have also been developed. Most models, particularly of chronic pancreatitis, require further characterization to determine which features of human disease they include.

  15. No Effect of Dietary Aspartame or Stevia on Pancreatic Acinar Carcinoma Development, Growth, or Induced Mortality in a Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James; Lagou, Vasiliki; Dresselaers, Tom; van Dongen, Katinka A.; Himmelreich, Uwe; Liston, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has an extremely poor prognosis, largely due to a poor record for early detection. Known risk factors for pancreatic cancer include obesity, diet, and diabetes, implicating glucose consumption and regulation as a key player. The role of artificial sweeteners may therefore be pertinent to disease kinetics. The oncogenic impact of artificial sweeteners is a highly controversial area. Aspartame, one of the most studied food additives, is widely recognized as being generally safe, although there are still specific areas where research is incomplete due to study limitations. Stevia, by contrast, has been the subject of relatively few studies, and the potential health benefits are based on extrapolation rather than direct testing. Here, we used longitudinal tracking of pancreatic acinar carcinoma development, growth, and lethality in a sensitized mouse model. Despite exposure to aspartame and stevia from the in utero stage onward, we found no disease modification activity, in either direction. These results contribute to the data on aspartame and stevia safety, while also reducing confidence in several of the purported health benefits. PMID:28232906

  16. Pancreatic-induced Intramural Duodenal Haematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius K. Ma

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intramural duodenal haematoma (IDH is an uncommon pathology and it is usually related to anticoagulant therapy. Other causes include various pancreatic diseases, connective tissue disease, peptic ulcer disease and pancreaticoduodenal aneurysm. IDH of pancreatic origin has been infrequently reported. The disease course can be life-threatening and serious complications may occur, including gastric outlet obstruction, duodenal perforation and septicaemia. A case of pancreatic-induced IDH is presented, for which pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed as definitive treatment. In general, medical treatment with continuous nasogastric aspiration and total parenteral nutrition is recommended as initial management strategy. Surgical interventions (evacuation of blood clot or surgical resection are reserved for patients in whom medical treatment fails or complications occur.

  17. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuepeng Jin

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP. AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF. The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP.

  18. A piglet with surgically induced exocrine pancreatic insufficiency as an animal model of newborns to study fat digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Kateryna; Pierzynowski, Stefan G; Grujic, Danica; Kirko, Siarhei; Szwiec, Katarzyna; Wang, Jing; Kovalenko, Tetiana; Osadchenko, Iryna; Ushakova, Galyna; Shmigel, Halyna; Fedkiv, Olexandr; Majda, Blanka; Prykhodko, Olena

    2014-12-28

    The maldigestion and malabsorption of fat in infants fed milk formula results due to the minimal production of pancreatic lipase. Thus, to investigate lipid digestion and absorption and mimic the situation in newborns, a young porcine exocrine pancreatic insufficient (EPI) model was adapted and validated in the present study. A total of thirteen EPI pigs, aged 8 weeks old, were randomised into three groups and fed either a milk-based formula or a milk-based formula supplemented with either bacterial or fungal lipase. Digestion and absorption of fat was directly correlated with the addition of lipases as demonstrated by a 30% increase in the coefficient of fat absorption. In comparison to the control group, a 40 and 25% reduction in total fat content and 26 and 45% reduction in n-3 and n-6 fatty acid (FA) content in the stool was observed for lipases 1 and 2, respectively. Improved fat absorption was reflected in the blood levels of lipid parameters. During the experiment, only a very slight gain in body weight was observed in EPI piglets, which can be explained by the absence of pancreatic protease and amylase in the gastrointestinal tract. This is similar to newborn babies that have reduced physiological function of exocrine pancreas. In conclusion, we postulate that the EPI pig model fed with infant formula mimics the growth and lipid digestion and absorption in human neonates and can be used to elucidate further importance of fat and FA in the development and growth of newborns, as well as for testing novel formula compositions.

  19. Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis (Chylomicronemia Syndrome Treated with Supportive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Uysal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia is a rare cause of pancreatitis. In treatment pancreatic rest, lifestyle changes, medications (fibrates, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and nicotinic acid are essential. Many experimental treatment modalities have been reported as insulin and heparin infusion and plasmapheresis. In this study we present the hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis treated with supportive care.

  20. Robust Early Inflammation of the Peri-pancreatic Visceral Adipose Tissue During Diet-Induced Obesity in the KrasG12D Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzer, Kathleen M.; Xu, Mu; Moro, Aune; Dawson, David W.; Du, Lin; Li, Gang; Chang, Hui-Hua; Stark, Alexander P.; Jung, Xiaoman; Hines, O. Joe; Eibl, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Obesity increases the incidence of multiple types of cancer. Our previous work has shown that a high fat, high calorie diet (HFCD) leads to visceral obesity, pancreatic inflammation, and accelerated pancreatic neoplasia in KrasG12D (KC) mice. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of a HFCD on visceral adipose inflammation with emphasis on potential differences between distinct visceral adipose depots. Methods We examined the weight and visceral obesity in both wild-type (WT) and KC mice on either control diet (CD) or HFCD. After three months, mice were sacrificed for histological examination. Multiplex assays were also performed to obtain cytokine profiles between different adipose depots. Results Both WT and KC mice on a HFCD exhibited significantly increased inflammation in the visceral adipose tissue (VAT), particularly in the peri-pancreatic fat (PPF), compared to animals on a CD. This was associated with significantly increased inflammation in the pancreas. Cytokine profiles were different between visceral adipose depots, and between mice on the HFCD and CD. Conclusions Our results clearly demonstrate that a HFCD leads to obesity and inflammation in the VAT, particularly the PPF. These data suggest that obesity-associated inflammation in PPF may accelerate pancreatic neoplasia in KC mouse. PMID:26495779

  1. Tamoxifen-induced hypertriglyceridemia causing acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Kumar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tamoxifen has both antagonistic and agonistic tissue-specific actions. It can have a paradoxical estrogenic effect on lipid metabolism resulting in elevated triglyceride and chylomicron levels. This can cause life-threatening complications like acute pancreatitis. To our knowledge, very few cases of tamoxifen-induced pancreatitis have been reported in the literature. We report a case of severe hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis following tamoxifen use. A 50-year-old diabetic lady was on tamoxifen (20mg/day hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Within 3 months of starting therapy, she developed hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis. Laboratory values include: Serum amylase 778 IU/L, total cholesterol 785 mg/dL, triglycerides 4568 mg/dL and high-density lipoproteins (HDL 12 mg/dL. Tamoxifen was substituted with letrozole and atorvastatin started. There was a prompt reversal of the adverse effects. Effects on lipid profile must be considered while initiating tamoxifen in predisposed individuals as the consequences are life threatening.

  2. Ascaris lumbricoides-Induced Acute Pancreatitis: Diagnosis during EUS for a Suspected Small Pancreatic Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Benedetto Mangiavillano; Silvia Carrara; Maria Chiara Petrone; Paolo Giorgio Arcidiacono; Pier Alberto Testoni

    2009-01-01

    Context Ascaris lumbricoides is the second most common intestinal parasite world-wide and, although the infection can be asymptomatic, in some cases it can present with complications, such as acute pancreatitis. Case report We describe the case of a 37- year-old man, with a history of travelling in Eastern countries who presented with Ascaris lumbricoides-induced acute pancreatitis mimicking a small pancreatic cancer, diagnosed during an upper EUS. The endoscopy revealeda roundworm floating i...

  3. Metronidazole Induced Pancreatitis. A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey KJ

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Pancreatitis is a very rare adverse effect of metronidazole with only six cases of metronidazole-induced pancreatitis reported in the English literature so far. CASE REPORT: We report a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis in a 46-year-old female associated with oral metronidazole therapy and review the literature with regards to metronidazole-induced pancreatitis. We are also highlighting the fact that the time lag between metronidazole exposure and development of pancreatitis is very variable. CONCLUSION: High degree of suspicion is warranted on the part of physicians to diagnose metronidazole induced pancreatitis in patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms after metronidazole exposure. If metronidazole is suspected as the causative agent then it should be discontinued and rechallenge should be avoided.

  4. Preclinical fluorescent mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2007-02-01

    Here we describe our cumulative experience with the development and preclinical application of several highly fluorescent, clinically-relevant, metastatic orthotopic mouse models of pancreatic cancer. These models utilize the human pancreatic cancer cell lines which have been genetically engineered to selectively express high levels of the bioluminescent green fluorescent (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). Fluorescent tumors are established subcutaneously in nude mice, and tumor fragments are then surgically transplanted onto the pancreas. Locoregional tumor growth and distant metastasis of these orthotopic implants occurs spontaneously and rapidly throughout the abdomen in a manner consistent with clinical human disease. Highly specific, high-resolution, real-time visualization of tumor growth and metastasis may be achieved in vivo without the need for contrast agents, invasive techniques, or expensive imaging equipment. We have shown a high correlation between florescent optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in these models. Alternatively, transplantation of RFP-expressing tumor fragments onto the pancreas of GFP-expressing transgenic mice may be used to facilitate visualization of tumor-host interaction between the pancreatic tumor fragments and host-derived stroma and vasculature. Such in vivo models have enabled us to serially visualize and acquire images of the progression of pancreatic cancer in the live animal, and to demonstrate the real-time antitumor and antimetastatic effects of several novel therapeutic strategies on pancreatic malignancy. These fluorescent models are therefore powerful and reliable tools with which to investigate human pancreatic cancer and therapeutic strategies directed against it.

  5. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  6. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Guillén, María José; López-Casas, Pedro Pablo; Sarno, Francesca; Gallardo, Alberto; Álamo, Patricia; Cuevas, Carmen; Hidalgo, Manuel; Galmarini, Carlos María; Allavena, Paola; Avilés, Pablo; Mangues, Ramón

    2016-12-01

    We explored whether the combination of lurbinectedin (PM01183) with the antimetabolite gemcitabine could result in a synergistic antitumor effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) mouse models. We also studied the contribution of lurbinectedin to this synergism. This drug presents a dual pharmacological effect that contributes to its in vivo antitumor activity: (i) specific binding to DNA minor grooves, inhibiting active transcription and DNA repair; and (ii) specific depletion of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We evaluated the in vivo antitumor activity of lurbinectedin and gemcitabine as single agents and in combination in SW-1990 and MIA PaCa-2 cell-line xenografts and in patient-derived PDA models (AVATAR). Lurbinectedin-gemcitabine combination induced a synergistic effect on both MIA PaCa-2 [combination index (CI)=0.66] and SW-1990 (CI=0.80) tumor xenografts. It also induced complete tumor remissions in four out of six patient-derived PDA xenografts. This synergism was associated with enhanced DNA damage (anti-γ-H2AX), cell cycle blockage, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In addition to the enhanced DNA damage, which is a consequence of the interaction of the two drugs with the DNA, lurbinectedin induced TAM depletion leading to cytidine deaminase (CDA) downregulation in PDA tumors. This effect could, in turn, induce an increase of gemcitabine-mediated DNA damage that was especially relevant in high-density TAM tumors. These results show that lurbinectedin can be used to develop 'molecularly targeted' combination strategies.

  7. Contemporary review of drug-induced pancreatitis: A different perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Whitney; Y; Hung; Odaliz; Abreu; Lanfranco

    2014-01-01

    Although gallstone and alcohol use have been consid-ered the most common causes of acute pancreatitis, hundreds of frequently prescribed medications are as-sociated with this disease state. The true incidence is unknown since there are few population based studies available. The knowledge of drug induced acute pan-creatitis is limited by the availability and the quality of the evidence as the majority of data is extrapolated from case reports. Establishing a definitive causal rela-tionship between a drug and acute pancreatitis poses a challenge to clinicians. Several causative agent classifi-cation systems are often used to identify the suspected agents. They require regular updates since new drug induced acute pancreatitis cases are reported continu-ously. In addition, infrequently prescribed medications and herbal medications are often omitted. Furthermore, identification of drug induced acute pancreatitis with new medications often requires accumulation of post market case reports. The unrealistic expectation for a comprehensive list of medications and the multifacto-rial nature of acute pancreatitis call for a different ap-proach. In this article, we review the potential mecha-nisms of drug induced acute pancreatitis and providethe perspective of deductive reasoning in order to allow clinicians to identify potential drug induced acute pan-creatitis with limited data.

  8. Sonoporation with Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT®) induces transient tumour volume reduction in a subcutaneous xenograft model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotopoulis, Spiros; Stigen, Endre; Popa, Mihaela; Safont, Mireia Mayoral; Healey, Andrew; Kvåle, Svein; Sontum, Per; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Gilja, Odd Helge; McCormack, Emmet

    2017-01-10

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the deadliest cancers with survival averaging only 3months if untreated following diagnosis. A major limitation in effectively treating PDAC using conventional and targeted chemotherapeutic agents, is inadequate drug delivery to the target location, predominantly due to a poorly vascularised, desmoplastic tumour microenvironment. Ultrasound in combination with ultrasound contrast agents, i.e., microbubbles, that flow through the vasculature and capillaries can be used to disrupt such mechanical barriers, potentially allowing for a greater therapeutic efficacy. This phenomenon is commonly referred to as sonoporation. In an attempt to improve the efficacy of sonoporation, novel microbubble formulations are being developed to address the limitation of commercially produced clinical diagnostic ultrasound contrast agents. In our work here we evaluate the ability of a novel formulation; namely Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT®) to improve the therapeutic efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel, longitudinally in a xenograft model of PDAC. Results indicated that ACT® bubbles alone demonstrated no observable toxic effects, whilst ACT® in combination with paclitaxel can transiently reduce tumour volumes significantly, three days posttreatment (p=0.0347-0.0458). Quantitative 3D ultrasound validated the calliper measurements. Power Doppler ultrasound imaging indicated that ACT® in combination with paclitaxel was able to transiently sustain peak vasculature percentages as observed in the initial stages of tumour development. Nevertheless, there was no significant difference in tumour vasculature percentage at the end of treatment. The high vascular percentage correlated to the transient decrease and overall inhibition of the tumour volumes. In conclusion, ACT® improves the therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel in a PDAC xenograft model allowing for transient tumour volume reduction and sustained tumour vasculature

  9. Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Pancreatitis. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisato Igarashi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Drug-induced acute pancreatitis is rare but should not be overlooked in a patient who presents with idiopathic acute pancreatitis. More than 100 drugs have been implicated in causing the disease: acetaminophen has been associated with acute pancreatitis in cases where there has been an overdose of drugs; however, the frequency is rare. Case report We report the case of a 35-year-old woman who presented with acute pancreatitis and severe metabolic acidosis after overdosing on a drug containing acetaminophen. She improved dramatically after intensive care; however, she showed recurrent episodes after re-overdosing on the same drug. With her self re-challenge test, she was diagnosed as having acetaminophen-induced pancreatitis and metabolic acidosis. A review of the relevant literature is also presented. Conclusions Drug-induced acute pancreatitis is often challenging for clinicians and a detailed mechanism is unknown. It is very important to rule out drug-induced pancreatitis when treating pancreatitis with an unknown etiology.

  10. Acute pancreatitis-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Yasuhisa; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Kojika, Masahiro; Sato, Hisaho; Suzuki, Keijiro; Matsumoto, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Recent successive reports on acute pancreatitis-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) have revealed that TTP-related microvascular damage is an aggravating factor of acute pancreatitis. Here, we report the case of a 26-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis due to high alcohol consumption. The patient was unconscious as he had taken an overdose of medication, and presented with fever and renal failure due to acute pancreatitis on admission. Although the pancreatitis subsequently improved, the symptoms were still observed; on the next day, he exhibited hemoglobinuria, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Moreover, general blood examinations indicated the presence of schistocytes and reduced activity of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin-like metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motif 13) to 47 %. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with TTP, and plasma exchange was performed. After the development of TTP, the acute pancreatitis recurred, but a severe pathogenesis was prevented by plasma exchange. Thus, ADAMTS13 activity may be useful for predicting a severe pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. In ADAMTS13-deficient cases, plasma exchange may be an effective technique for preventing aggravation of acute pancreatitis.

  11. Silibinin-mediated metabolic reprogramming attenuates pancreatic cancer-induced cachexia and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Surendra K; Dasgupta, Aneesha; Mehla, Kamiya; Gunda, Venugopal; Vernucci, Enza; Souchek, Joshua; Goode, Gennifer; King, Ryan; Mishra, Anusha; Rai, Ibha; Nagarajan, Sangeetha; Chaika, Nina V; Yu, Fang; Singh, Pankaj K

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the US. Cancer-associated cachexia is present in up to 80% of PDAC patients and is associated with aggressive disease and poor prognosis. In the present studies we evaluated an anti-cancer natural product silibinin for its effectiveness in targeting pancreatic cancer aggressiveness and the cachectic properties of pancreatic cancer cells and tumors. Our results demonstrate that silibinin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner and reduces glycolytic activity of cancer cells. Our LC-MS/MS based metabolomics data demonstrates that silibinin treatment induces global metabolic reprogramming in pancreatic cancer cells. Silibinin treatment diminishes c-MYC expression, a key regulator of cancer metabolism. Furthermore, we observed reduced STAT3 signaling in silibinin-treated cancer cells. Overexpression of constitutively active STAT3 was sufficient to substantially revert the silibinin-induced downregulation of c-MYC and the metabolic phenotype. Our in vivo investigations demonstrate that silibinin reduces tumor growth and proliferation in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer and prevents the loss of body weight and muscle. It also improves physical activity including grip strength and latency to fall in tumor-bearing mice. In conclusion, silibinin-induced metabolic reprogramming diminishes cell growth and cachectic properties of pancreatic cancer cells and animal models.

  12. Apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells induced by Triptolide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Xiong Zhou; Xiao-Ling Ding; Jie-Fei Huang; Hong Zhang; Sheng-Bao Wu; Jian-Ping Cheng; Qun Wei

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer ceils induced by Triptolide (TL),and the relationship between this apoptosis and expression of caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.METHODS:Human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was cultured in DIEM media for this study.MTT assay was used to determine the cell growth inhibitory rate in vitro.Flow cytometry and TUNEL assay were used to detect the apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells before and after TL treatment.RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of apoptosis-associated gene caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.RESULTS:TL inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner.TL induced human pancreatic cancer cells to undergo apoptosis with typically apoptotic characteristics.TUNEL assay showed that after the treatment of human pancreatic cancer cells with 40 ng/mL TL for 12 h and 24 h,the apoptotic rates of human pancreatic cancer cells increased significantly.RT-PCR demonstrated that caspase-3 and bax were significantly up-regulated in SW1990 cells treated with TL while bcl-2 mRNA was not.CONCLUSION:TL is able to induce the apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.This apoptosis may be mediated by up-regulating the expression of apoptosisassociated caspase-3 and bax gene.

  13. Proteomic analysis of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and pancreatic carcinoma in rat models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Wang; Hai-Lin Liu; Ya Li; Ping Yuan

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To detect the proteomic variabilities of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and pancreatic carcinoma (PC) induced by 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) in rat models and to identify potential biomarkers. METHODS: Sixty adult male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into three groups. The rats had DMBA implanted into their pancreas for one (n = 20) or two months (n = 20) or assigned to the normal group (n = 20). The rats were killed after one or two months, and were evaluated histopathologically. Three tissue samples from each group of rats with either normal pancreas, PanIN (PanIN-2) or PC were examined by 2D-DIGE. The different expression spot features were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionizationtime of flight/time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) tandem mass spectrometry. The expression of enolase 1, a differentially expressed protein, was identified by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: There was significant difference in the proportions of neoplastic changes between the 1- and 2-mogroups (P = 0.0488). There was an increase in the frequency of adenocarcinomas in the 2-mo group compared with the 1-mo group (P = 0.0309). No neoplastic changes were observed in any of the animals in the normal group. Enolase 1, pancreatic ELA3B, necdin, Hbp23, CHD3, hnRNP A2/B1, Rap80, and Gnb2l1 were up-regulated in the PanIN and PC tissues, and CEL, TPT1, NME2, PCK2, an unnamed protein product, and glycine C-acetyltransferase were down-regulated in the PanIN and PC tissues. The immunohistochemical results showed that enolase 1 expression was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer tissues of rats and humans. CONCLUSION: The pancreatic protein expression changes induced by DMBA suggest potential molecular targets for the early diagnosis and treatment of PC.

  14. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008318 Proteomics of hyperlipidemia-associated pancreatitis using differential gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry: experiment with rats. ZHANG Wei(张伟), et al. Dept Gastroenterol, Shanghai 1st Hosp, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Shanghai 200080. Natl Med J China 2008;88(16):1132-1131.Objective To analyze the injury mechanismof hyperlipidemia-associated acute pancreatitis utilizing pro-teomics.Methods Ten SD rats were fed with high fat feed to establish hyperlipidemic models,and 10 SD rats were fed with normal feed to be used as control group.

  15. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2)-Induced Inflammation in Initiation, Progression, and Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kapil, E-mail: kmehta@mdanderson.org; Han, Amy [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is among the deadliest cancers, with a median survival of six months. It is generally believed that infiltrating PC arises through the progression of early grade pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanINs). In one model of the disease, the K-ras mutation is an early molecular event during progression of pancreatic cancer; it is followed by the accumulation of additional genetic abnormalities. This model has been supported by animal studies in which activated K-ras and p53 mutations produced metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice. According to this model, oncogenic K-ras induces PanIN formation but fails to promote the invasive stage. However, when these mice are subjected to caerulein treatment, which induces a chronic pancreatitis-like state and inflammatory response, PanINs rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma. These results are consistent with epidemiologic studies showing that patients with chronic pancreatitis have a much higher risk of developing PC. In line with these observations, recent studies have revealed elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in early PanINs, and its expression increases even more as the disease progresses. In this review we discuss the implications of increased TG2 expression in initiation, progression, and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha Gupta; Seema Ahmed; Lemuel Shaffer; Paula Cavens; Josef Blankstein

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term an...

  17. Biliopancreatic duct injection of ethanol as an experimental model of acute and chronic pancreatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Ethem; Atalay, Suleyman; Tolan, Huseyin Kerem; Yuksekdag, Sema; Yucel, Metin; Acar, Aylin; Basak, Fatih; Gunes, Pembegul; Bas, Gurhan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we described an easily reproducable experimental pancreatits model induced by biliopancreatic duct injection of ethyl alcohol. Seventy Wistar albino rats were divided equally into seven groups randomly: the control group (group 1), acute pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 2), 48% ethanol (group 3), 80% ethanol (group 4), chronic pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 5), 48% ethanol (group 6) and by 80% ethanol (group 7). Acute pancreatitis groups were sacrified on postoperative day 3, while the control group and chronic pancreatitis groups were killed on postoperative day 7. Histopathologic evaluation was done, and P acute pancreatitis (100%). Inflammatory infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, interstitial edema, and focal necrotic areas were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Similarly, all rats in group 6 developed chronic pancreatitis (100%). Interstitial fibrosis, lymphotic infiltration, ductal dilatation, acinar cell atrophy, periductal hyperplasia were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Mortality was seen only in group 7. The biliopancreatic ductal injection of 48% ethanol induced acute and chronic pancreatitis has 100% success rate.

  18. Lupeol Protects Against Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jun; Bae, Gi-Sang; Choi, Sun Bok; Jo, Il-Joo; Kim, Dong-Goo; Shin, Joon-Yeon; Lee, Sung-Kon; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2015-10-01

    Lupeol is a triterpenoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables and is known to exhibit a wide range of biological activities, including antiinflammatory and anti-cancer effects. However, the effects of lupeol on acute pancreatitis specifically have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated the effects of lupeol on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Acute pancreatitis was induced via an intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 µg/kg). In the lupeol treatment group, lupeol was administered intraperitoneally (10, 25, or 50 mg/kg) 1 h before the first cerulein injection. Blood samples were taken to determine serum cytokine and amylase levels. The pancreas was rapidly removed for morphological examination and used in the myeloperoxidase assay, trypsin activity assay, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In addition, we isolated pancreatic acinar cells using a collagenase method to examine the acinar cell viability. Lupeol administration significantly attenuated the severity of pancreatitis, as was shown by reduced pancreatic edema, and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, lupeol inhibited elevation of digestive enzymes and cytokine levels, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, and interleukin (IL)-6. Furthermore, lupeol inhibited the cerulein-induced acinar cell death. In conclusion, these results suggest that lupeol exhibits protective effects on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

  19. Hipertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañas García, María Dolores; Marchán Carranza, Enrique; Galiana Gómez Del Pulgar, Jesús; Fernández de Bobadilla Pascual, Belén

    2017-09-19

    Hypertrigliceridemia is the third most common cause of acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is 5% in healthy patients and 4% during pregnancy with triglyceride levels >1,000mg/dl. During pregnancy there are changes in the lipid profile that increase between two and four times triglyceride levels. Its increase in excessive form produces an oxidative environment with injury of the endothelium and appearance of complications such as preeclampsia or pancreatitis. We present the case of a pregnant woman with pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models

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    María Virtudes Céspedes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We explored whether the combination of lurbinectedin (PM01183 with the antimetabolite gemcitabine could result in a synergistic antitumor effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA mouse models. We also studied the contribution of lurbinectedin to this synergism. This drug presents a dual pharmacological effect that contributes to its in vivo antitumor activity: (i specific binding to DNA minor grooves, inhibiting active transcription and DNA repair; and (ii specific depletion of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs. We evaluated the in vivo antitumor activity of lurbinectedin and gemcitabine as single agents and in combination in SW-1990 and MIA PaCa-2 cell-line xenografts and in patient-derived PDA models (AVATAR. Lurbinectedin-gemcitabine combination induced a synergistic effect on both MIA PaCa-2 [combination index (CI=0.66] and SW-1990 (CI=0.80 tumor xenografts. It also induced complete tumor remissions in four out of six patient-derived PDA xenografts. This synergism was associated with enhanced DNA damage (anti-γ-H2AX, cell cycle blockage, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In addition to the enhanced DNA damage, which is a consequence of the interaction of the two drugs with the DNA, lurbinectedin induced TAM depletion leading to cytidine deaminase (CDA downregulation in PDA tumors. This effect could, in turn, induce an increase of gemcitabine-mediated DNA damage that was especially relevant in high-density TAM tumors. These results show that lurbinectedin can be used to develop ‘molecularly targeted’ combination strategies.

  1. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Guillén, María José; López-Casas, Pedro Pablo; Sarno, Francesca; Gallardo, Alberto; Álamo, Patricia; Cuevas, Carmen; Hidalgo, Manuel; Galmarini, Carlos María; Allavena, Paola; Avilés, Pablo; Mangues, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We explored whether the combination of lurbinectedin (PM01183) with the antimetabolite gemcitabine could result in a synergistic antitumor effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) mouse models. We also studied the contribution of lurbinectedin to this synergism. This drug presents a dual pharmacological effect that contributes to its in vivo antitumor activity: (i) specific binding to DNA minor grooves, inhibiting active transcription and DNA repair; and (ii) specific depletion of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We evaluated the in vivo antitumor activity of lurbinectedin and gemcitabine as single agents and in combination in SW-1990 and MIA PaCa-2 cell-line xenografts and in patient-derived PDA models (AVATAR). Lurbinectedin-gemcitabine combination induced a synergistic effect on both MIA PaCa-2 [combination index (CI)=0.66] and SW-1990 (CI=0.80) tumor xenografts. It also induced complete tumor remissions in four out of six patient-derived PDA xenografts. This synergism was associated with enhanced DNA damage (anti-γ-H2AX), cell cycle blockage, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In addition to the enhanced DNA damage, which is a consequence of the interaction of the two drugs with the DNA, lurbinectedin induced TAM depletion leading to cytidine deaminase (CDA) downregulation in PDA tumors. This effect could, in turn, induce an increase of gemcitabine-mediated DNA damage that was especially relevant in high-density TAM tumors. These results show that lurbinectedin can be used to develop ‘molecularly targeted’ combination strategies. PMID:27780828

  2. A nuclear import inhibitory peptide ameliorates the severity of Cholecystokinin-induced acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamás Letoha; István Krizbai; Imre Boros; Ern(o) Duda; Erzsébet Kusz; Botond Penke; Csaba Somlai; Tamás Takács; Annamária Szabolcs; Katalin Jármay; Zoltán Rakonczay Jr; Péter Hegyi; Ilona Varga; József Kaszaki

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of our novel cell-permeable nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) inhibitor peptide PN50 in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis. PN50 was produced by conjugating the cell-penetrating penetratin peptide with the nuclear localization signal of the NF-κB p50 subunit.METHODS: Pancreatitis was induced in male Wistar rats by administering 2×100 μg/kg body weight of cholecystokininoctapeptide (CCK) intraperitoneally (IP) at an interval of 1 h. PN50-treated animals received 1 mg/kg of PN50 IP 30 min before or after the CCK injections. The animals were sacrificed 4 h after the first injection of CCK.RESULTS: All the examined laboratory (the pancreatic weight/body weight ratio, serum amylase activity,pancreatic levels of TNF-α and IL-6, degree of lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione levels, NF-κB binding activity, pancreatic and lung myeloperoxidase activity) and morphological parameters of the disease were improved before and after treatment with the PN50 peptide.According to the histological findings, PN50 protected the animals against acute pancreatitis by favoring the induction of apoptotic, as opposed to necrotic acinar cell death associated with severe acute pancreatitis.CONCLUSION: Our study implies that reversible inhibitors of stress-responsive transcription factors like NF-κB might be clinically useful for the suppression of the severity of acute pancreatitis.

  3. CCK1 and CCK2 Receptors Are Expressed on Pancreatic Stellate Cells and Induce Collagen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berna, Marc J.; Seiz, Oliver; Nast, Jan Friso; Benten, Daniel; Bläker, Michael; Koch, Johannes; Lohse, Ansgar W.; Pace, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) can induce acute pancreatitis in rodents through its action on acinar cells. Treatment with CCK, in combination with other agents, represents the most commonly used model to induce experimental chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) are responsible for pancreatic fibrosis and therefore play a predominant role in the genesis of chronic pancreatitis. However, it is not known whether PSC express CCK receptors. Using real time PCR techniques, we demonstrate that CCK1 and CCK2 receptors are expressed on rat PSC. Interestingly both CCK and gastrin significantly induced type I collagen synthesis. Moreover, both inhibit proliferation. These effects are comparable with TGF-β-stimulated PSC. Furthermore, the natural agonists CCK and gastrin induce activation of pro-fibrogenic pathways Akt, ERK, and Src. Using specific CCK1 and CCK2 receptor (CCK2R) inhibitors, we found that Akt activation is mainly mediated by CCK2R. Akt activation by CCK and gastrin could be inhibited by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Activation of ERK and the downstream target Elk-1 could be inhibited by the MEK inhibitor U0126. These data suggest that CCK and gastrin have direct activating effects on PSC, are able to induce collagen synthesis in these cells, and therefore appear to be important regulators of pancreatic fibrogenesis. Furthermore, similar to TGF-β, both CCK and gastrin inhibit proliferation in PSC. PMID:20843811

  4. Loss of Bace1 in mice does not alter the severity of caerulein induced pancreatitis.

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    Mario Heindl

    Full Text Available Beta-site alpha-amyloid protein cleaving enzyme1 (BACE1 plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Additional to its moderate expression in the brain, high levels of BACE1 mRNA were found in the pancreas. Murine Bace1 has been immunohistochemicaly detected at the apical pole of acinar cells within the exocrine pancreas of mice and Bace1 activity was observed in pancreatic juice. In vitro experiments revealed enteropeptidase as a putative substrate for Bace1 suggesting a role in acute pancreatitis.The aim of this study was to address a protective mechanism of Bace1 in acute experimental pancreatitis in mice.Acute experimental pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of caerulein in homozygote Bace1-/- mice and wild type mice. Serum and tissue analyses were carried out after 4 h, 8 h and 24 h. Measurement of plasma amylase and lipase was performed to confirm pancreatitis induction. In order to assess the severity of pancreatitis H&E stained pancreatic sections were examined regarding edema, inflammation and apoptosis. Immunohistochemical detection of myeloperoxidase (MPO positive cells was carried out to further quantify the extent of inflammation. Expression of Bace2 within the pancreas was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR.We demonstrate that total loss of Bace1 in mice leads to no alterations in the course of acute experimental caerulein-pancreatitis. Bace1-/- mice develop a moderate pancreatitis that is comparable in histomorphological and serological features with those seen in wild type mice.We discuss the results in the context of the applied caerulein induced edematous pancreatitis model and possible compensatory mechanisms via Bace2 that might be responsible for the observed results.

  5. Pancreatic Ketoacidosis (Kabadi Syndrome: Ketoacidosis Induced by High Circulating Lipase in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaya M Kabadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ketoacidosis is well established as a metabolic complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes Mellitus (Diabetic Ketoacidosis. It is often an initial presentation of type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents and occasionally in adults. Alternatively, it is induced of an onset of an acute disorder, e. g, sepsis, myocardial infarction, stroke, pregnancy etc. in subjects with type 1 and 2 diabetes. Ketoacidosis is also known to occur following an ethanol binge (Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. Finally, ketonemia with a rare progression to Ketoacidosis is documented to ensue following prolonged starvation. Methods The review of English literature for over 35 years from 01/1980 till 12/2015 for terms, 'ketonemia, ketonuria and ketoacidosis' 'pancreatic lipase' and 'acute pancreatitis'. Results 1 Description of individual patients presented as case reports, 2 Documentation of a series of consecutive subjects hospitalized for management of acute pancreatitis with special attention to establishing the prevalence of the disorder as well as examining the relationship between the severity of the disorder and occurrence of Ketoacidosis, 3 Studies demonstrating the relationship between progressively rising circulating pancreatic lipase concentrations with ketonuria, ketonemia and Ketoacidosis in subjects presenting with acute pancreatitis irrespective of the etiology and documenting resolution of ketonuria, ketonemia and ketoacidosis following the declining serum lipase levels on remission of acute pancreatitis with prompt appropriate therapeutic management thus confirming the pathophysiologic role of elevated circulating pancreatic lipase in this disorder. Conclusion Therefore, it is evident that the disorder ' Pancreatic Ketoacidosis ' (Kabadi Syndrome is a definite serious complication of acute pancreatitis deserving prompt attention and appropriate management.

  6. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Contributes to Pancreatic Tumorigenesis by Inducing Tumor-Related Gene Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Yugo; Kodama, Yuzo; Shimizu, Takahiro; Ota, Yuji; Maruno, Takahisa; Eso, Yuji; Kurita, Akira; Shiokawa, Masahiro; Tsuji, Yoshihisa; Uza, Norimitsu; Matsumoto, Yuko; Masui, Toshihiko; Uemoto, Shinji; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2015-08-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) develops via an accumulation of various gene mutations. The mechanism underlying the mutations in PDAC development, however, is not fully understood. Recent insight into the close association between the mutation pattern of various cancers and specific mutagens led us to investigate the possible involvement of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a DNA editing enzyme, in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Our immunohistochemical findings revealed AID protein expression in human acinar ductal metaplasia, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and PDAC. Both the amount and intensity of the AID protein expression increased with the progression from precancerous to cancerous lesions in human PDAC tissues. To further assess the significance of ectopic epithelial AID expression in pancreatic tumorigenesis, we analyzed the phenotype of AID transgenic (AID Tg) mice. Consistent with our hypothesis that AID is involved in the mechanism of the mutations underlying pancreatic tumorigenesis, we found precancerous lesions developing in the pancreas of AID Tg mice. Using deep sequencing, we also detected Kras and c-Myc mutations in our analysis of the whole pancreas of AID Tg mice. In addition, Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of Kras, c-Myc, and Smad4 mutations, with the typical mutational footprint of AID in precancerous lesions in AID Tg mice separated by laser capture microdissection. Taken together, our findings suggest that AID contributes to the development of pancreatic precancerous lesions by inducing tumor-related gene mutations. Our new mouse model without intentional manipulation of specific tumor-related genes provides a powerful system for analyzing the mutations involved in PDAC.

  7. Plasma miR-216a as a potential marker of pancreatic injury in a rat model of acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Du, Yi-Qi; Li, Lei; Liu, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Guo-Kun; Zhu, Jia-Qi; Man, Xiao-Hua; Gong, Yan-Fang; Xiao, Li-Ning; Zheng, Yong-Zhi; Deng, Shang-Xin; Gu, Jun-Jun; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the potential value and specificity of plasma miR-216a as a marker for pancreatic injury. METHODS: Two rat models were applied in this article: L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis was used as one model to explore the potential value of plasma miR-216a for detection of pancreatic injury; nonlethal sepsis induced in rats by single puncture cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used as the other model to evaluate the specificity of plasma miR-216a compared with two commonly used markers (amylase and lipase) for acute pancreatitis. Plasmas were sampled from rats at indicated time points and total RNA was isolated. Real-Time Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify miR-216a in plasmas. RESULTS: In the acute pancreatitis model, among five time points at which plasmas were sampled, miR-216a concentrations were significantly elevated 24 h after arginine administration and remained significantly increased until 48 h after operation (compared with 0 h time point, P < 0.01, Kruskal-Wallis Test). In the CLP model, plasma amylase and lipase, two commonly used biomarkers for acute pancreatitis, were significantly elevated 24 h after operation (compared with 0 h time point, P < 0.01 and 0.05 respectively, Pairwise Bonferroni corrected t-tests), while miR-216a remained undetectable among four tested time points. CONCLUSION: Our article showed for the first time that plasma miR-216a might serve as a candidate marker of pancreatic injury with novel specificity. PMID:20857533

  8. Hyperlipidemia intensifies cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis associated with activation of protein kinase C in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Jun Wang; Jia-Bang Sun; Fei Li; Shu-Wen Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of hyperlipidemia on acute pancreatitis (AP) and the possible mechanisms.METHODS: Rat models of hyperlipidemia and AP were established by Triton WR1339 and cerulein respectively.Human albumin was used to treat AP complicated by hyperlipidemia. In each group, we compared the histological score, volume of ascites, ratio of pancreatic wet/dry weight, serum amylase (AMY) and pancreatic acinar cell apoptosis. The level of protein kinase C (PKC) membrane translocation in pancreatic tissue was detected by Western blot.RESULTS: In the hyperlipidemia model established by Triton WR1339, triglyceride (TG) increased remarkably and reached its peak 6 h after injection, and most rats developed mild acute pancreatitis. Histological score, volume of ascites, ratio of wet/dry weight and serum AMY in AP animals with hyperlipidemia were obviously higher than those in AP animals (P <0.05) and decreased after albumin therapy but not significantly (P > 0.05). Apoptotic cells detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) increased in AP animals with hyperlipidemia and did not change distinctly after albumin therapy. PKC membrane translocation level increased in AP animals with hyperlipidemia and decreased remarkably after albumin therapy (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: Hyperlipidemia may induce AP or intensify pancreatic injury. Albumin therapy can not alleviate pancreatic lesion effectively. PKC activation may be one mechanism by which AP is intensified by hyperlipidemia.

  9. Peritoneal absorption of pancreatic enzymes in bile-induced acute pancreatitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Y; Hayakawa, T; Kondo, T; Shibata, T; Kishimoto, W

    1990-01-01

    To clarify the contribution of peritoneal absorption of enzyme-rich exudate to the persistent elevation of serum amylase in bile-induced pancreatitis in dogs, serum amylase, lipase and immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) levels were measured during 24 h after induction of pancreatitis with and without peritoneal lavage. The basal level of serum amylase activity (m +/- s.e. = 1291 +/- 111 U/L) reached a plateau at 30 min (2688 +/- 185) after induction of pancreatitis and continued to rise until 24 h (7201 +/- 424). This persistent amylase elevation could be reduced significantly by peritoneal lavage. Serum IRT rose to a peak (378 +/- 103 ng/mL) at 30 min from the basal (20 +/- 5), then decreased until 3 h (211 +/- 34) and maintained a consistent level thereafter. Serum lipase elevation took an intermediate course between the levels of serum amylase and IRT. Intraperitoneal injection of 5 mL pancreatic juice could reproduce similar elevations to those of the respective enzymes, except lipase, seen in pancreatitis. These results suggest that transperitoneal absorption of pancreatic enzymes contributes to the elevation in serum enzymes levels and that rates of peritoneal absorption and serum disappearance differ from enzyme to enzyme.

  10. Obese rats exhibit high levels of fat necrosis and isoprostanes in taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Pereda

    vasoconstriction. Future studies are needed to confirm the translational relevance of the present findings obtained in a rat model of taurocholate-induced pancreatic damage and necrosis.

  11. Dabigatran Potentiates Gemcitabine-Induced Growth Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kun; Damhofer, Helene; Daalhuisen, Joost; ten Brink, Marieke; Richel, Dick J; Spek, C Arnold

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal solid malignancies, with few treatment options. We have recently shown that expression of protease activated receptor (PAR)-1 in the tumor microenvironment drives the progression and induces the chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer. As thrombin is the prototypical PAR-1 agonist, here we address the effects of the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran on pancreatic cancer growth and drug resistance in an orthotropic pancreatic cancer model. We show that dabigatran treatment did not affect primary tumor growth, whereas it significantly increased tumor dissemination throughout the peritoneal cavity. Increased dissemination was accompanied by intratumoral bleeding and increased numbers of aberrant and/or collapsed blood vessels in the primary tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, dabigatran treatment limited primary tumor growth, did not induce bleeding complications and prevented tumor cell dissemination. Dabigatran was, however, not as efficient as genetic ablation of PAR-1 in our previous study, suggesting that thrombin is not the main PAR-1 agonist in the setting of pancreatic cancer. Overall, we show that dabigatran potentiates gemcitabine-induced growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer but does not affect primary tumor growth when used as monotherapy. PMID:28182192

  12. Drug-Induced Acute Pancreatitis and Pseudoaneurysms: An Ominous Combination

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    Diogo Branquinho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of pseudoaneurysms is rare but can be life-threatening complications of acute or chronic pancreatitis, usually due to enzymatic digestion of vessel walls crossing peripancreatic fluid collections. We report the case of a 40 year-old female, with multisystemic lupus and anticoagulated for prior thrombotic events, admitted for probable cyclosporine-induced acute pancreatitis. Hemodynamic instability occurred due to abdominal hemorrhage from two pseudoaneurysms inside an acute peri-pancreatic collection. Selective angiography successfully embolized the gastroduodenal and pancreatoduodenal arteries. The hemorrhage recurred two weeks later and another successful embolization was performed and the patient remains well to date. The decision to restart anticoagulants and to suspend cyclosporine was challenging and required a multidisciplinary approach. Despite rare, bleeding from a pseudoaneurysm should be considered when facing a patient with pancreatitis and sudden signs of hemodynamic instability.

  13. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy causing maternal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hae Rin; Kim, Suk Young; Cho, Yoon Jin; Chon, Seung Joo

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is rare and occurs in approximately 3 in 10,000 pregnancies. It rarely complicates pregnancy, and can occur during any trimester, however over half (52%) of cases occur during the third trimester and during the post-partum period. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, acute pancreatitis caused by hypertriglyceridemia due to increase of estrogen during the gestational period is very unusual, but complication carries a higher risk of morbidity and mortality for both the mother and the fetus. We experienced a case of pregnant woman who died of acute exacerbation of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis at 23 weeks of gestation. We report on progress and management of this case along with literature reviews.

  14. BITC Sensitizes Pancreatic Adenocarcinomas to TRAIL-induced Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, Christina A.; Sahu, Ravi P.; Kulkarni-Datar, Kashmira; Srivastava, Sanjay K.; Brown, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer with a greater than 95% mortality rate and short survival after diagnosis. Chemotherapeutic resistance hinders successful treatment. This resistance is often associated with mutations in codon 12 of the K-Ras gene (K-Ras 12), which is present in over 90% of all pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Codon 12 mutations maintain Ras in a constitutively active state leading to continuous cellular proliferation. Our study determined if TRAIL resistance in pancreatic adenocarcinomas with K-Ras 12 mutations could be overcome by first sensitizing the cells with Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC). BITC is a component of cruciferous vegetables and a cell cycle inhibitor. BxPC3, MiaPaCa2 and Panc-1 human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines were examined for TRAIL resistance. Our studies show BITC induced TRAIL sensitization by dual activation of both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. PMID:20559452

  15. Antitumor alkyl-lysophospholipid analog edelfosine induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer by targeting endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajate, C; Matos-da-Silva, M; Dakir, el-H; Fonteriz, R I; Alvarez, J; Mollinedo, F

    2012-05-24

    Pancreatic cancer remains as one of the most deadly cancers, and responds poorly to current therapies. The prognosis is extremely poor, with a 5-year survival of less than 5%. Therefore, search for new effective therapeutic drugs is of pivotal need and urgency to improve treatment of this incurable malignancy. Synthetic alkyl-lysophospholipid analogs (ALPs) constitute a heterogeneous group of unnatural lipids that promote apoptosis in a wide variety of tumor cells. In this study, we found that the anticancer drug edelfosine was the most potent ALP in killing human pancreatic cancer cells, targeting endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Edelfosine was taken up in significant amounts by pancreatic cancer cells and induced caspase- and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Pancreatic cancer cells show a prominent ER and edelfosine accumulated in this subcellular structure, inducing a potent ER stress response, with caspase-4, BAP31 and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, CHOP/GADD153 upregulation and phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 α-subunit that eventually led to cell death. Oral administration of edelfosine in xenograft mouse models of pancreatic cancer induced a significant regression in tumor growth and an increase in apoptotic index, as assessed by TUNEL assay and caspase-3 activation in the tumor sections. The ER stress-associated marker CHOP/GADD153 was visualized in the pancreatic tumor isolated from edelfosine-treated mice, indicating a strong in vivo ER stress response. These results suggest that edelfosine exerts its pro-apoptotic action in pancreatic cancer cells, both in vitro and in vivo, through its accumulation in the ER, which leads to ER stress and apoptosis. Thus, we propose that the ER could be a key target in pancreatic cancer, and edelfosine may constitute a prototype for the development of a new class of antitumor drugs targeting the ER.

  16. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Guillén, María José; López-Casas, Pedro Pablo; SARNO, Francesca; Gallardo, Alberto; Álamo, Patricia; Cuevas, Carmen; Hidalgo, Manuel; Galmarini, Carlos María; Allavena, Paola; Avilés, Pablo; Mangues, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We explored whether the combination of lurbinectedin (PM01183) with the antimetabolite gemcitabine could result in a synergistic antitumor effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) mouse models. We also studied the contribution of lurbinectedin to this synergism. This drug presents a dual pharmacological effect that contributes to its in vivo antitumor activity: (i) specific binding to DNA minor grooves, inhibiting active transcription and DNA repair; and (ii) specific depleti...

  17. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    María Virtudes Céspedes; María José Guillén; Pedro Pablo López-Casas; Francesca Sarno; Alberto Gallardo; Patricia Álamo; Carmen Cuevas; Manuel Hidalgo; Carlos María Galmarini; Paola Allavena; Pablo Avilés; Ramón Mangues

    2016-01-01

    We explored whether the combination of lurbinectedin (PM01183) with the antimetabolite gemcitabine could result in a synergistic antitumor effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) mouse models. We also studied the contribution of lurbinectedin to this synergism. This drug presents a dual pharmacological effect that contributes to its in vivo antitumor activity: (i) specific binding to DNA minor grooves, inhibiting active transcription and DNA repair; and (ii) specific depletion of tum...

  18. Recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist attenuates the severity of chronic pancreatitis induced by TNBS in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunfang; Shen, Jiaqing; Zhang, Jing; Jia, Zhenyu; He, Zhilong; Zhuang, Xiaohui; Xu, Ting; Shi, Yuqi; Zhu, Shunying; Wu, Mingyuan; Han, Wei

    2015-02-15

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common disease in the department of gastroenterology, with the main symptoms of exocrine and/or endocrine insufficiency and abdominal pain. The pathogenic mechanism of CP is still not fully clarified and the aims of treatment now are to relieve symptoms. In this study, we attempted to find a connection between interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced chronic pancreatitis, and then the therapeutic effect of recombinant IL-1Ra was also detected in the CP model. Chronic pancreatitis was induced by intraductal infusion of TNBS in SD rats followed by a consecutive administration of rIL-1Ra, and the histological changes and collagen content in the pancreas were measured, as well as the abdominal hypersensitivity. We found that rhIL-1Ra could attenuate the severity of chronic pancreatic injury, modulate the extracellular matrix secretion, focal proliferation and apoptosis, and cellular immunity in TNBS-induced CP. Interestingly, rIL-1Ra could also block the pancreatitis-induced referred abdominal hypersensitivity. In conclusion, IL-1Ra may play a protective role in CP and rIL-1Ra would be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of CP, while its possible mechanisms and clinical usage still need further investigation.

  19. Olanzapine-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia Resulting in Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Yadlapalli, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic agent that was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1996 for treatment of psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Since that time, numerous case reports have been published that describe the association of olanzapine and the development of pancreatitis. Furthermore, 3 reports suggest the mechanism of olanzapine-induced hypertriglyceridemia as the etiology of this progression. We report a case of a 36-year-old man who developed necrotizing pancreatitis secondary to olanzapine-induced hypertriglyceridemia. This case, to our knowledge, is the most severe case of this progression and the first case requiring plasmapheresis for acute management.

  20. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis: A case-based review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, S Ian; Edwards, Alun L; Symonds, Christopher J; Beck, Paul L

    2006-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an established cause of pancreatitis. In a case-based approach, we present a review of hypertriglyceridemia and how it can cause pancreatitis. We outline how to investigate and manage such patients. A 35 year old man presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and biochemical evidence of acute pancreatitis. There was no history of alcohol consumption and biliary imaging was normal. The only relevant past medical history was that of mild hyperlipidemia, treated with diet alone. Physical exam revealed epigastric tenderness, right lateral rectus palsy, lipemia retinalis, bitemporal hemianopsia and a delay in the relaxation phase of his ankle reflexes. Subsequent laboratory investigation revealed marked hypertriglyceridemia and panhypopituarism. An enhanced CT scan of the head revealed a large suprasellar mass impinging on the optic chiasm and hypothalamus. The patient was treated supportively; thyroid replacement and lipid lowering agents were started. He underwent a successful resection of a craniopharyngioma. Post-operatively, the patient did well on hormone replacement therapy. He has had no further attacks of pancreatitis. This case highlights many of the factors involved in the regulation of triglyceride metabolism. We review the common causes of hypertriglyceridemia and the proposed mechanisms resulting in pancreatitis. The incidence and management of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis are also discussed. PMID:17131487

  1. The effect of sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, attenuates inflammation and fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Han

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by progressive fibrosis, pain and loss of exocrine and endocrine functions. The long-standing chronic pancreatitis and its associated pancreatic fibrosis are the most common pathogenic events involved in human pancreatic carcinogenesis, but the therapeutic strategies to chronic pancreatitis and the chemoprevention of pancreatic carcinogenesis are very limited. Methods We investigated the effect of sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, on inhibition of chronic pancreatitis in a caerulein induced chronic pancreatitis mouse model. Results Sulindac significantly reduced the severity of chronic pancreatitis including the extent of acini loss, inflammatory cell infiltration and stromal fibrosis. The protein expression of phosphorylation of MEK/ERK was inhibited in the chronic pancreatic tissues by sulindac treatment as measured by Western blot assay. The levels of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and MCP-1 were also significantly decreased with sulindac treatment, as well as the expression of TGF-β, PDGF-β, SHH and Gli in the chronic pancreatic tissue detected by qPCR assay and confirmed by western blot assay. The activation of pancreatic satellet cells was also inhibited by sulindac as measured by the activity of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA in the pancreatic tissue of chronic pancreatitis. Conclusions Sulindac is a promising reagent for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis via inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration and stromal fibrosis, the inhibitory effect of sulindac on chronic pancreatitis may through targeting the activation ERK/MAPK signaling pathway.

  2. Relationship between peritoneal macrophages and inflammatory reaction in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between peritoneal macrophages(PMAs)and inflammatory reaction in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis(SAP).Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control group and SAP group.To induce SAP in rats,40 g/L sodium taurocholate(0.1 mL/100 g)was injected into the pancreatic duct through retrograde exposure of pancreatic bile duct in hepatic porta.One-third of rats were sacrificed at 3,6 or 12 h after modeling.PMAs were extracted,and incubated for 24 h ...

  3. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  4. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970359 CT diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma andchronic pancreatitis. LUAN Baoqing(栾宝庆), et al,Dept Radiol, Beijing Friendship Hosp, Capital Med U-niv, Beijing, 100050. Chin J Radiol 1997; 31(2): 114-118. Objective: To improve the diagnostic accuracy ofpancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Materi-

  5. Effects of dietary fat on virus-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirev, T.; Woutersen, R.A.; Kril, A.

    2002-01-01

    The present study was performed to assess the effects of diets supplemented with low (5%) and high (20%) corn oil on a Pts 56 retrovirus-induced model of pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl. The early microscopic lesions appear after 3 mo after virus treatment and progress over time. Eight to 1

  6. Stanniocalcin 2 alters PERK signalling and reduces cellular injury during cerulein induced pancreatitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DiMattia Gabriel E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stanniocalcin 2 (STC2 is a secreted protein activated by (PKR-like Endoplasmic Reticulum Kinase (PERK signalling under conditions of ER stress in vitro. Over-expression of STC2 in mice leads to a growth-restricted phenotype; however, the physiological function for STC2 has remained elusive. Given the relationship of STC2 to PERK signalling, the objective of this study was to examine the role of STC2 in PERK signalling in vivo. Results Since PERK signalling has both physiological and pathological roles in the pancreas, STC2 expression was assessed in mouse pancreata before and after induction of injury using a cerulein-induced pancreatitis (CIP model. Increased Stc2 expression was identified within four hours of initiating pancreatic injury and correlated to increased activation of PERK signalling. To determine the effect of STC2 over-expression on PERK, mice systemically expressing human STC2 (STC2Tg were examined. STC2Tg pancreatic tissue exhibited normal pancreatic morphology, but altered activation of PERK signalling, including increases in Activating Transcription Factor (ATF 4 accumulation and autophagy. Upon induction of pancreatic injury, STC2Tg mice exhibited limited increases in circulating amylase levels and increased maintenance of cellular junctions. Conclusions This study links STC2 to the pathological activation of PERK in vivo, and suggests involvement of STC2 in responding to pancreatic acinar cell injury.

  7. Casein kinase II inhibition induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Rainer; Saur, Dieter; Fritsch, Ralph; Reichert, Maximilian; Schmid, Roland M; Schneider, Günter

    2007-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death in western civilization. The five-year survival rate is below 1% and of the 10% of patients with resectable disease only around one-fifth survives 5 years. Survival rates have not changed much during the last 20 years, demonstrating the inefficacy of current available therapies. To improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer, there is the need to develop effective non-surgical treatment for this disease. The protein kinase casein kinase II (CK2) is a ubiquitously expressed serine-threonine kinase and its activity is enhanced in all human tumors examined so far. The contribution of CK2 to the tumor maintenance of pancreatic cancer has not been investigated. To investigate the function of CK2 in pancreatic cancer cells we used the CK2 specific inhibitors 5,6-Dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole and Apigenin. Furthermore, we interfered with CK2 expression using CK2 specific siRNAs. Interfering with CK2 function led to a reduction of pancreatic cancer cell viability, which was due to caspase-dependent apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis correlated with a reduced NF-kappaB-dependent transcriptional activity. This study validates CK2 as a molecular drug target in a preclinical in vitro model of pancreatic cancer.

  8. The pancreatitis-associated protein VMP1, a key regulator of inducible autophagy, promotes KrasG12D-mediated pancreatic cancer initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncle, C; Molejon, M I; Lac, S; Tellechea, J I; Lomberk, G; Gramatica, L; Fernandez Zapico, M F; Dusetti, N; Urrutia, R; Iovanna, J L

    2016-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental evidence have firmly established that chronic pancreatitis, in particular in the context of Kras oncogenic mutations, predisposes to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the repertoire of molecular mediators of pancreatitis involved in Kras-mediated initiation of pancreatic carcinogenesis remains to be fully defined. In this study we demonstrate a novel role for vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1), a pancreatitis-associated protein critical for inducible autophagy, in the regulation of Kras-induced PDAC initiation. Using a newly developed genetically engineered model, we demonstrate that VMP1 increases the ability of Kras to give rise to preneoplastic lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs). This promoting effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation is due, at least in part, by an increase in cell proliferation combined with a decrease in apoptosis. Using chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy, we show that this drug antagonizes the effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation. Thus, we conclude that VMP1-mediated autophagy cooperate with Kras to promote PDAC initiation. These findings are of significant medical relevance, molecules targeting autophagy are currently being tested along chemotherapeutic agents to treat PDAC and other tumors in human trials. PMID:27415425

  9. Protective effects of daphnetin on sodium taurocholate‑induced severe acute pancreatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Jiao; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Wang, Li-Kun; Shi, Qiao; Zuo, Teng; Liu, Tian-Yi; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Wei-Xing

    2014-05-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is the sudden onset of pancreatic inflammation, which is characterized by edema, acinar cell necrosis, hemorrhage and severe inflammation of the pancreas and is associated with a high mortality rate. Daphnetin has been shown to alleviate organ injury in a variety of preclinical animal models of coagulation disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of daphnetin on severe acute pancreatitis in a rat model. Severe acute pancreatitis in the rat model was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) into the bile-pancreatic duct. Daphnetin (4 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally at 30 min prior to the infusion of sodium taurocholate. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by various analyses of serum amylase and lipase, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, as well as by histological grading. The levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in the serum were measured by ELISA. The results revealed that the daphnetin-treated SAP rat group (SAP-D) exhibited a lower pathological score of the pancreas compared with the SAP group (SAP). Further analyses demonstrated that the SAP-D group had lower levels of serum amylase, lipase and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-1β, and a decreased MPO activity and MDA content 3, 6 and 12 h subsequent to the infusion of sodium taurocholate compared with the SAP group (SAP). These findings indicated that daphnetin exerted a protective function in the SAP rat model. Therefore, daphnetin may be considered as a potential compound for the therapy and prevention of acute pancreatitis.

  10. In Vivo Imaging Reveals Significant Tumor Vascular Dysfunction and Increased Tumor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Expression Induced by High Single-Dose Irradiation in a Pancreatic Tumor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Azusa; Chen, Yonghong; Bu, Jiachuan; Mujcic, Hilda; Wouters, Bradly G; DaCosta, Ralph S

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effect of high-dose irradiation on pancreatic tumor vasculature and microenvironment using in vivo imaging techniques. A BxPC3 pancreatic tumor xenograft was established in a dorsal skinfold window chamber model and a subcutaneous hind leg model. Tumors were irradiated with a single dose of 4, 12, or 24 Gy. The dorsal skinfold window chamber model was used to assess tumor response, vascular function and permeability, platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium, and tumor hypoxia for up to 14 days after 24-Gy irradiation. The hind leg model was used to monitor tumor size, hypoxia, and vascularity for up to 65 days after 24-Gy irradiation. Tumors were assessed histologically to validate in vivo observations. In vivo fluorescence imaging revealed temporary vascular dysfunction in tumors irradiated with a single dose of 4 to 24 Gy, but most significantly with a single dose of 24 Gy. Vascular functional recovery was observed by 14 days after irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, irradiation with 24 Gy caused platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium within hours to days after irradiation. Vascular permeability was significantly higher in irradiated tumors compared with nonirradiated controls 14 days after irradiation. This observation corresponded with increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in irradiated tumors. In the hind leg model, irradiation with a single dose of 24 Gy led to tumor growth delay, followed by tumor regrowth. Irradiation of the BxPC3 tumors with a single dose of 24 Gy caused transient vascular dysfunction and increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Such biological changes may impact tumor response to high single-dose and hypofractionated irradiation, and further investigations are needed to better understand the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pretreatment with low doses of acenocoumarol inhibits the development of acute ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzecha, Z; Sendur, P; Ceranowicz, P; Dembinski, M; Cieszkowski, J; Kusnierz-Cabala, B; Tomaszewska, R; Dembinski, A

    2015-10-01

    Coagulative disorders are known to occur in acute pancreatitis and are related to the severity of this disease. Various experimental and clinical studies have shown protective and therapeutic effect of heparin in acute pancreatitis. Aim of the present study was to determine the influence of acenocoumarol, a vitamin K antagonist, on the development of acute pancreatitis. Studies were performed on male Wistar rats weighing 250 - 270 g. Acenocoumarol at the dose of 50, 100 or 150 μg/kg/dose or vehicle were administered once a day for 7 days before induction of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion. The severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed after 5-h reperfusion. Pretreatment with acenocoumarol given at the dose of 50 or 100 μg/kg/dose reduced morphological signs of acute pancreatitis. These effects were accompanied with a decrease in the pancreatitis-evoked increase in serum activity of lipase and serum concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β. Moreover, the pancreatitis-evoked reductions in pancreatic DNA synthesis and pancreatic blood flow were partially reversed by pretreatment with acenocoumarol given at the dose of 50 and 100 μg/kg/dose. Administration of acenocoumarol at the dose of 150 μg/kg/dose did not exhibit any protective effect against ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. We concluded that pretreatment with low doses of acenocoumarol reduces the severity of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis.

  12. Acute pancreatitis-induced enzyme release and necrosis are attenuated by IL-1 antagonism through an indirect mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, G; Yang, J; Carter, G; Norman, J

    1997-01-01

    Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1) is a proinflammatory cytokine which is produced within the pancreas during acute pancreatitis reaching levels which are toxic to many cell types. Since antagonism of this cytokine provides dramatic survival benefits during lethal pancreatitis, we hypothesized that IL-1 had direct secretagogue and cytolytic effects within the pancreas. The effect of IL-1 on pancreatic exocrine function and tissue viability was assessed in vivo by blockade of IL-1 with varying doses of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) prior to the induction of either moderate (caerulein-induced) or severe (choline deficient diet-induced) necrotizing pancreatitis. Subsequent in vitro studies were conducted to determine the direct effect of IL-1 on dispersed rat acini prepared through collagenase digestion. Amylase release was measured after a 30-min incubation with varying doses of recombinant IL-1 beta. Viability was determined in the presence of IL-1 via trypan blue exclusion at multiple time points. Blockade of the IL-1 receptor decreased pancreatic amylase release and tissue necrosis in both models of pancreatitis in a dose-dependent fashion (1.0 mg/kg, P = NS; 10 mg/kg, P amylase release and tissue necrosis are significantly attenuated during experimental pancreatitis by IL-1 antagonism. These changes do not appear to be due to the direct action of IL-1 on pancreatic acini and are likely due to more complex interactions between acini and cytokine-producing leukocytes.

  13. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    models that recapitulate the human disease . Therefore, we introduced mutations in the endogenous mouse T7 cationic trypsinogen gene and obtained several...ACCOMPLISHMENTS: What were the major goals of the project? Our original proposal had three specific aims. Aim 1. Identify and biochemically characterize...pancreatitis in mutant mice which do not develop spontaneous disease (strains T7-D23del-Cre, T7-D23del-Neo, T7-K24R-Cre and T7- K24R-Neo), will be

  14. α,β-amyrin, a natural triterpenoid ameliorates L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caroline; Mouro; Melo; Karine; Maria; Martins; Bezerra; Carvalho; Julliana; Catharina; de; Sousa; Neves; Talita; Cavalcante; Morais; Vietla; Satyanarayana; Rao; Flávia; Almeida; Santos; Gerly; Anne; de; Castro; Brito; Mariana; Helena; Chaves

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the benef icial effects of triterpene α,β-amyrin and the underlying mechanisms in an experimental pancreatitis model. METHODS: Acute pancreatitis was induced in five groups of rats (n = 8) by L-arginine (2 × 2.5 g/kg, intraperitoneal, 1 h apart) and 1 h later, they received a single oral dose of α,β-amyrin (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg),methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg) and vehicle (3% Tween 80). A saline (0.9% NaCl) treated group served as a normal control. Efficacy was assessed at 24 h by determination ...

  15. Analyzing electrical activities of pancreatic β cells using mathematical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chae Young; Powell, Trevor; Noma, Akinori

    2011-11-01

    Bursts of repetitive action potentials are closely related to the regulation of glucose-induced insulin secretion in pancreatic β cells. Mathematical studies with simple β-cell models have established the central principle that the burst-interburst events are generated by the interaction between fast membrane excitation and slow cytosolic components. Recently, a number of detailed models have been developed to simulate more realistic β cell activity based on expanded findings on biophysical characteristics of cellular components. However, their complex structures hinder our intuitive understanding of the underlying mechanisms, and it is becoming more difficult to dissect the role of a specific component out of the complex network. We have recently developed a new detailed model by incorporating most of ion channels and transporters recorded experimentally (the Cha-Noma model), yet the model satisfies the charge conservation law and reversible responses to physiological stimuli. Here, we review the mechanisms underlying bursting activity by applying mathematical analysis tools to representative simple and detailed models. These analyses include time-based simulation, bifurcation analysis and lead potential analysis. In addition, we introduce a new steady-state I-V (ssI-V) curve analysis. We also discuss differences in electrical signals recorded from isolated single cells or from cells maintaining electrical connections within multi-cell preparations. Towards this end, we perform simulations with our detailed pancreatic β-cell model.

  16. Ku70 inhibits gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiali; Hui, Pingping; Meng, Wenying; Wang, Na; Xiang, Shihao

    2017-03-18

    The current study focused on the role of Ku70, a DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex protein, in pancreatic cancer cell resistance to gemcitabine. In both established cell lines (Mia-PaCa-2 and PANC-1) and primary human pancreatic cancer cells, shRNA/siRNA-mediated knockdown of Ku70 significantly sensitized gemcitabine-induced cell death and proliferation inhibition. Meanwhile, gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and subsequent pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis were also potentiated with Ku70 knockdown. On the other hand, exogenous overexpression of Ku70 in Mia-PaCa-2 cells suppressed gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and subsequent cell apoptosis. In a severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice Mia-PaCa-2 xenograft model, gemcitabine-induced anti-tumor activity was remarkably pontificated when combined with Ku70 shRNA knockdown in the xenografts. The results of this preclinical study imply that Ku70 might be a primary resistance factor of gemcitabine, and Ku70 silence could significantly chemo-sensitize gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells.

  17. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Herve; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Oehlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H. M.; Molenaar, IQ; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G. J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and

  18. Organoid models of human and mouse ductal pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Hervé; Spector, Mona S; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D; Wilson, John P; Feigin, Michael E; Öhlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H M; Molenaar, I Quintus; Borel Rinkes, Inne H; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D; Pappin, Darryl J; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G J; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and

  19. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Herve; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Oehlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H. M.; Molenaar, IQ; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G. J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and

  20. Organoid models of human and mouse ductal pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Hervé; Spector, Mona S; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D; Wilson, John P; Feigin, Michael E; Öhlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H M; Molenaar, I Quintus; Borel Rinkes, Inne H; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D; Pappin, Darryl J; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G J; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and

  1. Sedum sarmentosum Bunge extract induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells via the hedgehog signaling pathway.

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    Bai, Yongheng; Chen, Bicheng; Hong, Weilong; Liang, Yong; Zhou, Mengtao; Zhou, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Sedum sarmentosum Bunge, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has a wide range of clinical applications including antibiosis, anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation. In the present study, we identified that its extract (SSBE) exerts pancreatic anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. In the cultured pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cell line, SSBE inhibited cell growth in a concentration-dependent manner, and it was accompanied by the downregulated expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In addition, SSBE treatment also increased cellular apoptosis in a mitochondrial-dependent manner. Moreover, SSBE induced p53 expression, reduced c-Myc expression, and inhibited epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The antiproliferative activity of SSBE in the pancreatic cancer cells was found to be closely related to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase by upregulating p21(Waf1/CIP1) expression. Further study showed that this inhibitory effect of SSBE was through downregulation of the activity of the proliferation-related Hedgehog signaling pathway. Exogenous recombinant protein Shh was used to activate Hedgehog signaling, thereby resulting in the abolishment of the SSBE-mediated inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth. In animal xenograft models of pancreatic cancer, activated Hedgehog signaling was also observed compared with the vehicle controls, but was reduced by SSBE administration. As a result, SSBE suppressed the growth of pancreatic tumors. Thus, these findings demonstrate that SSBE has therapeutic potential for pancreatic cancer, and this anticancer effect in pancreatic cancer cells is associated with inhibition of the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

  2. Scrotal Swelling as a Complication of Hydrochlorothiazide Induced Acute Pancreatitis

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    Ivan Nikiforov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Scrotal swelling is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis with few reported cases in the literature. In this case report, we present a 59-year-old male with hydrochlorothiazide induced pancreatitis who developed scrotal swelling. Case Presentation. A 59-year-old male presented to the emergency department with sharp epigastric abdominal pain that radiated to the back and chest. On physical examination, he had abdominal tenderness and distention with hypoactive bowel sounds. Computed tomography (CT scan of the abdomen showed acute pancreatitis. The patient’s condition deteriorated and he was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU. After he improved and was transferred out of the ICU, the patient developed swelling of the scrotum and penis. Ultrasound (US of the scrotum showed large hydrocele bilaterally with no varicoceles or testicular masses. Good blood flow was observed for both testicles. The swelling diminished over the next eight days with the addition of Lasix and the patient was discharged home in stable condition. Conclusion. Scrotal swelling is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. It usually resolves spontaneously with conservative medical management such as diuretics and elevation of the legs.

  3. Obestatin Accelerates the Recovery in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats.

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    Jakub Bukowczan

    Full Text Available Several previous studies have shown that obestatin exhibits protective and regenerative effects in some organs including the stomach, kidney, and the brain. In the pancreas, pretreatment with obestatin inhibits the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, and promotes survival of pancreatic beta cells and human islets. However, no studies investigated the effect of obestatin administration following the onset of experimental acute pancreatitis.The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obestatin therapy in the course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, we tested the influence of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and administration of obestatin on daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion.Acute pancreatitis was induced by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion of the pancreas. Obestatin (8 nmol/kg/dose was administered intraperitoneally twice a day, starting 24 hours after the beginning of reperfusion. The effect of obestatin in the course of necrotizing pancreatitis was assessed between 2 and 14 days, and included histological, functional, and biochemical analyses. Secretory studies were performed on the third day after sham-operation or induction of acute pancreatitis in conscious rats equipped with chronic pancreatic fistula.Treatment with obestatin ameliorated morphological signs of pancreatic damage including edema, vacuolization of acinar cells, hemorrhages, acinar necrosis, and leukocyte infiltration of the gland, and led to earlier pancreatic regeneration. Structural changes were accompanied by biochemical and functional improvements manifested by accelerated normalization of interleukin-1β level and activity of myeloperoxidase and lipase, attenuation of the decrease in pancreatic DNA synthesis, and by an improvement of pancreatic blood flow. Induction of acute pancreatitis by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion significantly decreased daily food intake and

  4. [Study of the Effect of Cholecystokinin-Induced Acute Pancreatitis on the Free-Running Rhythm of Mouse].

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    Li, Yonghong; Yang, Xiaoping; Guo, Panpan; Liu, Yanyou; Yan, Hongli; Li, Shuaizhen; Guan, Junwen

    2016-02-01

    The present paper reports the effect of pancreatitis induced by cholecystokinin (CCK) on free-running rhythm of locomotor activity of the ICR mice, and analyzes the interaction of inflammatory diseases and acute pancreatitis with circadian rhythm system. In the study, the mice were modeled under different phases of acute pancreatitis in DD status (Double Dark, constant dark condition). By comparing of the inflammatory status and the indicators of rhythm before and after modeling of the running wheel activity group and the rest group, it was observed that the rest group showed more possibility of inflammation than the activity group did in ICR mice model of acute pancreatitis. In the rest phase model, the extension of the period is particularly longer. The results presented indicated that CCK-induced acute pancreatitis impacted free activity rhythm of ICR mice. Also in a free running model under different phase, the inflammation severity was proved significantly different. This study provides possible clues for the research of the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis severe tendency.

  5. Recruitment and activation of pancreatic stellate cells from the bone marrow in pancreatic cancer: a model of tumor-host interaction.

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    Christopher J Scarlett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer are characterised by extensive stellate cell mediated fibrosis, and current therapeutic development includes targeting pancreatic cancer stroma and tumor-host interactions. Recent evidence has suggested that circulating bone marrow derived stem cells (BMDC contribute to solid organs. We aimed to define the role of circulating haematopoietic cells in the normal and diseased pancreas. METHODS: Whole bone marrow was harvested from male β-actin-EGFP donor mice and transplanted into irradiated female recipient C57/BL6 mice. Chronic pancreatitis was induced with repeat injections of caerulein, while carcinogenesis was induced with an intrapancreatic injection of dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA. Phenotype of engrafted donor-derived cells within the pancreas was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. RESULTS: GFP positive cells were visible in the exocrine pancreatic epithelia from 3 months post transplantation. These exhibited acinar morphology and were positive for amylase and peanut agglutinin. Mice administered caerulein developed chronic pancreatitis while DMBA mice exhibited precursor lesions and pancreatic cancer. No acinar cells were identified to be donor-derived upon cessation of cerulein treatment, however rare occurrences of bone marrow-derived acinar cells were observed during pancreatic regeneration. Increased recruitment of BMDC was observed within the desmoplastic stroma, contributing to the activated pancreatic stellate cell (PaSC population in both diseases. Expression of stellate cell markers CELSR3, PBX1 and GFAP was observed in BMD cancer-associated PaSCs, however cancer-associated, but not pancreatitis-associated BMD PaSCs, expressed the cancer PaSC specific marker CELSR3. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that BMDC can incorporate into the pancreas and adopt the differentiated state of the exocrine compartment. BMDC that

  6. Loss of Periostin Results in Impaired Regeneration and Pancreatic Atrophy after Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis.

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    Hausmann, Simone; Regel, Ivonne; Steiger, Katja; Wagner, Nadine; Thorwirth, Manja; Schlitter, Anna M; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule periostin (POSTN, encoded by POSTN), which is secreted by activated pancreatic stellate cells, has important functions in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the role of POSTN in acute pancreatitis and subsequent regeneration processes has not been addressed so far. We analyzed the function of POSTN in pancreatic exocrine regeneration after the induction of a severe acute pancreatitis. Postn-deficient mice and wild-type control animals received repetitive cerulein injections, and a detailed histologic analysis of pancreatic tissues was performed. Although there was no difference in pancreatitis severity in the acute inflammatory phase, the recovery of the exocrine pancreas was massively impaired in Postn-deficient mice. Loss of Postn expression was accompanied by strong pancreatic atrophy and acinar-to-adipocyte differentiation, which was also reflected in gene expression patterns. Our data suggest that POSTN is a crucial factor for proper exocrine lineage-specific regeneration after severe acute pancreatitis.

  7. Combination treatment with TRA-8 anti death receptor 5 antibody and CPT-11 induces tumor regression in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosier, Leo Christopher; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Oliver, Patsy G; Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Sellers, Jeffrey C; Grizzle, William E; Wang, Wenquan; Zhou, Tong; Zinn, Kurt R; Long, Joshua W; Vickers, Selwyn M

    2007-09-15

    Evaluate the response of human pancreatic cancer cell lines and orthotopic tumors to TRA-8, an agonistic antibody to death receptor 5, in combination with irinotecan (CPT-11). MIA PaCa-2 and S2VP10 cells were treated with TRA-8 and/or CPT 11. Cell viability was determined by ATP assay. JC-1 mitochondrial depolarization and Annexin V assays confirmed cell death by apoptosis. Immunoblotting was used to evaluate protein changes. MIA PaCa-2 cells were injected into the pancreas of severe combined immunodeficient mice. Mice underwent abdominal ultrasound to quantitate tumor size before and after treatment with twice weekly injections of 200 microg TRA-8 and/or 25 mg/kg CPT-11 for one or two treatment cycles, each lasting 2 weeks. MIA PaCa-2 cells were more sensitive to TRA-8 and showed additive cytotoxicity, whereas S2VP10 cells showed synergistic cytotoxicity when treated with TRA-8 and CPT-11. Cell death occurred via apoptosis with increased cleavage of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 and proapoptotic proteins Bid and poly(ADP)ribose polymerase after combination treatment compared with either agent alone. XIAP and Bcl-XL inhibitors of apoptosis were down-regulated. After a single cycle of in vivo combination therapy, tumor sizes had diminished significantly (PTRA-8; and there was a 50-day increase in survival with combination treatment over untreated controls (P=0.0002), 30 days over TRA-8, and a 36-day increase over CPT-11 monotherapy (P=0.0003). With two cycles of TRA-8/CPT-11 treatment, mean survival time increased significantly (PTRA-8 or CPT-11 (76, 121, or 108 days, respectively). Combination TRA-8 and CPT-11 therapy produced enhanced cytotoxicity and survival in the MIA PaCa-2 orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer.

  8. A case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura induced by acute pancreatitis

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    Arimoto M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Miyoko Arimoto1, Yutaka Komiyama2, Fumiko Okamae1, Akemi Ichibe1, Setsuko Teranishi1, Hirohiko Tokunaga1, Keiko Nakaya3, Michie Fujiwara3, Manabu Yamaoka4, Shuji Onishi4, Rie Miyamoto5, Naoto Nakamichi5, Shosaku Nomura51Blood Transfusion Unit, Kansai Medical University Takii Hospital, 2Department of Clinical Sciences and Laboratory Medicine, Kansai Medical University, 3Clinical Medical Technology Unit, Kansai Medical University Takii Hospital, 4Blood Transfusion Unit, Kansai Medical University Hirakata Hospital, 5First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, JapanAbstract: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a multisystemic microvascular disorder that may be caused by an imbalance between unusually large von Willebrand factor multimers and the cleaving protease ADAMTS13. In acquired TTP, especially in secondary TTP with various underlying diseases, the diagnosis is difficult because there are many cases that do not exhibit severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 or raised levels of ADAMST13 inhibitors. It is well known that collagen disease, malignancy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation can be underlying conditions that induce TTP. However, TTP induced by acute pancreatitis, as experienced by our patient, has rarely been reported. Our patient completely recovered with treatments using steroids and plasma exchange (PE only. In cases where patients develop acute pancreatitis with no apparent causes for hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, the possibility of TTP should be considered. Treatments for TTP including PE should be evaluated as soon as a diagnosis is made.Keywords: thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, ADAMTS13, acute pancreatitis, plasma exchange

  9. Treatment of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis with insulin

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    Erkan, Nazif; Yakan, Savas; Yildirim, Mehmet; Carti, Erdem; Ucar, Deniz; Oymaci, Erkan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertriglyceridaemia (HT)-induced pancreatitis rarely occurs unless triglyceride levels exceed 1000 mg/dl. Hypertriglyceridaemia over 1,000 mg/dl can provoke acute pancreatitis (AP) and its persistence can worsen the clinical outcome. In contrast, a rapid decrease in triglyceride level is beneficial. Insulin-stimulated lipoprotein lipase is known to decrease serum triglyceride levels. However, their efficacy in HT-induced AP is not well documented. Aim To present 12 cases of AP successfully treated by insulin administration. Material and methods Three hundred and forty-three cases of AP were diagnosed at our clinic between 2005 and 2012. Twelve (3.5%) of these cases were HT-induced AP. Twelve patients who suffered HT-induced AP are reported. Initial blood triglyceride levels were above 1000 mg/dl. Besides the usual treatment of AP, insulin was administered intravenously in continuous infusion. The patients’ medical records were retrospectively evaluated in this study. Results Serum triglyceride levels decreased to < 500 mg/dl within 2–3 days. No complications of treatment were seen and good clinical outcome was observed. Conclusions Our results are compatible with the literature. Insulin may be used safely and effectively in HT-induced AP therapy. Administration of insulin is efficient when used to reduce triglyceride levels in patients with HT-induced AP. PMID:25960810

  10. Therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the course of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

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    Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Dembinski, A; Cieszkowski, J; Kusnierz-Cabala, B; Tomaszewska, R; Kuwahara, A; Kato, I

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that pretreatment with ghrelin exhibits protective effect in the gut. Administration of ghrelin reduces gastric mucosal damage, as well as inhibits the development of experimental pancreatitis. However, this protective effect requires administration of ghrelin before gastric or pancreatic damage and thus has a limited clinical value. The aim of present study was to assess the influence of ghrelin administered after development of acute pancreatitis on the course of this disease. Acute pancreatitis was induced by cerulein. Ghrelin was administered twice a day for 1, 2, 4, 6 or 9 days at the dose of 4, 8 or 16 nmol/kg/dose. The first dose of ghrelin was given 24 hours after last injection of cerulein. The severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed between 0 h and 10 days after cessation of cerulein administration. Administration of caerulein led to the development of acute edematous pancreatitis and maximal severity of this disease was observed 24 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Treatment with ghrelin reduced morphological signs of pancreatic damage such as pancreatic edema, leukocyte infiltration and vacuolization of acinar cells, and led to earlier regeneration of the pancreas. Also biochemical indexes of the severity of acute pancreatitis, serum activity of lipase and amylase were significantly reduced in animals treated with ghrelin. These effects were accompanied by an increase in the pancreatic DNA synthesis and a decrease in serum level of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1b. Administration of ghrelin improved pancreatic blood flow in rats with acute pancreatitis. We conclude that: (1) treatment with ghrelin exhibits therapeutic effect in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis; (2) this effect is related, at least in part, to the improvement of pancreatic blood flow, reduction in proinflammatory interleukin-1beta and stimulation of pancreatic cell proliferation.

  11. Mercuric Compounds Induce Pancreatic Islets Dysfunction and Apoptosis in Vivo

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    Yi-Chang Su

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is a toxic heavy metal that is an environmental and industrial pollutant throughout the world. Mercury exposure leads to many physiopathological injuries in mammals. However, the precise toxicological effects of mercury on pancreatic islets in vivo are still unclear. Here, we investigated whether mercuric compounds can induce dysfunction and damage in the pancreatic islets of mice, as well as the possible mechanisms involved in this process. Mice were treated with methyl mercuric chloride (MeHgCl, 2 mg/kg and mercuric chloride (HgCl2, 5 mg/kg for more than 2 consecutive weeks. Our results showed that the blood glucose levels increased and plasma insulin secretions decreased in the mice as a consequence of their exposure. A significant number of TUNEL-positive cells were revealed in the islets of mice that were treated with mercury for 2 consecutive weeks, which was accompanied by changes in the expression of the mRNA of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2, Mcl-1, and Mdm-2 and apoptotic (p53, caspase-3, and caspase-7 genes. Moreover, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA levels increased significantly in the mice after treatment with mercuric compounds for 2 consecutive weeks, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the pancreatic islets also markedly increased. In addition, the mRNA expression of genes related to antioxidation, including Nrf2, GPx, and NQO1, were also significantly reduced in these islets. These results indicate that oxidative stress injuries that are induced by mercuric compounds can cause pancreatic islets dysfunction and apoptosis in vivo.

  12. Prophylactic Administration of Silybin Ameliorates L-Arginine-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

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    Uçmak, Feyzullah; Ekin, Nazım; İbiloğlu, İbrahim; Arslan, Serkan; Kaplan, İbrahim; Şenateş, Ebubekir

    2016-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effect of silybin, a potent antioxidant, on L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in an experimental rat model. Material/Methods Forty female Wistar Albino rats were divided into 5 groups as follows: Group 1 (C): control group (n=8), Group 2 (SL): silybin group (n=8), Group 3 (LA): acute pancreatitis group (n=8), Group 4 (SLLA): prophylaxis group (n=8), and Group 5 (LASL): treatment group (n=8). Group C (control) received 2 intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of physiological saline at an interval of 1 h. Group SL received only a single i.p. injection of silybin. The SLLA group received a single i.p. injection of silybin before the induction of acute pancreatitis with L-arginine, whereas the LASL group received the same injection after the induction of acute pancreatitis with L-arginine. Pancreatic tissues were histopathologically examined. Levels of amylase and oxidative stress markers (total oxidant status and total anti-oxidant status) were determined in the blood samples. Oxidative stress index was calculated. Results In comparison to the LA, the prophylaxis and treatment groups showed significant improvements in serum oxidative stress parameters (p=0.001 and p=0.005, respectively). Histopathological analysis showed that the treatment group had significant improvements in edema scores only (p=0.006), whereas the prophylaxis group had the same improvements in inflammation and necrosis scores as well as in total scores (p=0.004, 0.006, and 0.004, respectively). Conclusions When used for prophylactic rather than therapeutic purposes, silybin ameliorates serum oxidative stress parameters and improves histopathological results via its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:27725627

  13. Severe Acute Pancreatitis Due to Tamoxifen-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia with Positive Rechallenge

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    Jaballah Sakhri

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatitis is a very rare adverse effect of tamoxifen with only six cases of tamoxifen-associated pancreatitis reported in the English literature until now. In these cases, rechallenge with tamoxifen was not carried out. Case report We report a case of recurrent severe acute pancreatitis in a 44-year-old female induced by tamoxifen therapy and review the literature with regards to tamoxifen-associated pancreatitis. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware of the risks of developing severe acute pancreatitis when using tamoxifen therapy. If tamoxifen is suspected as the probable causative agent, rechallenge with this drug should be prohibited.

  14. ANTI CANCER ACTIVITY OF PHYLLANTHUS AMARUS IN AZASERINE INDUCED PANCREATIC CANCER OF WISTAR RATS

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    Ankit Prajapati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. The most common type of pancreatic cancer is adeno-carcinoma. The present experiment was carried out to study histopathological changes occur in pancreas in different groups of azaserine induced pancreatic cancer in Wistar rats with and without the treatment of aqueous and alcoholic extract of Phyllanthus amarus at different doses. Histopathological examination of pancreas of untreated group of rats showed hyperplasia of pancreatic duct, necrosis, fatty changes, haemorrhages between pancreatic cells. The rats treated with Phyllanthus amarus extracts showed no pathological lesions.

  15. Keratins provide virus-dependent protection or predisposition to injury in coxsackievirus-induced pancreatitis

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    DM Toivola, SE Ostrowski

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available DM Toivola1, SE Ostrowski2, H Baribault3, TM Magin4, AI Ramsingh2, MB Omary51Åbo Akademi University, Dept. Biology, BioCity, Turku, Finland and Stanford University School of Medicine and Digestive Disease Center; 2New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, USA; 3Amgen, South San Francisco, CA, USA; 4University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; 5Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Mi, USAAbstract: Keratins 8 and 18 (K8/K18 are the two major intermediate filament proteins in hepatocytes and pancreatic acinar cells. Acinar cell keratins are organized as cytoplasmic and apicolateral filaments. An important role of hepatocyte K8/K18 is to maintain cellular integrity, while this cytoprotective function of K8/K18 is not evident in the pancreas since keratin-deficient mice cope well with pancreatitis models. To further study the roles of keratins in the exocrine pancreas, we used coxsackievirus B4-models, CVB4-V and CVB4-P, to induce severe acute/chronic pancreatitis and acute pancreatitis, respectively, in K8-null (which lack acinar keratins and K18-null (which lack cytoplasmic keratins mice. Despite similar virus titers in all mice, CVB4-V resulted in 40% mortality of the K8-null mice 14 days post-infection compared to no lethality of WT and K18-null mice. In contrast, K8-null mice were far less susceptible to CVB4-P-induced damage as determined by histology and serology analysis, and they recover faster than WT and K18-null mice. After CVB4 virus infection, keratins aggregated during acinar degranulation, and K8/K18 site-specific phosphorylation was observed during degranulation and recovery. Hence, keratins significantly affect CVB4 virulence, positively or negatively, depending on the virus subtype and keratin makeup, in a virus replication-independent manner.Keywords: keratin, pancreatitis, coxsackievirus

  16. Focused ultrasound induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Qian; JIANG Li-xin; HU Bing

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence and mortality rate of pancreatic cancer have increased dramatically in China over recent decades.Focused ultrasound (FU) has been somewhat successful in treating pancreatic cancer.The purpose of this study was to investigate apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells induced by FU.Methods Suspension of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line PaTu 8988t was radiated by FU,using five doses with different radiation parameters and patterns,including one blank control.Temperature increase of the cell suspension was monitored.Cell apoptosis and death after FU radiation was observed using fluorescence microscopy and was tested by flow cytometer at 3,6,12,24,and 48 hours after ultrasound radiation.Results The maximum cell suspension temperatures following five radiation doses were 28°C,(42.20±2.17)°C,(50.80±0.84)°C,(55.80±2.17)°C,and (65.20±3.11)°C; differences between the doses were statistically significant (P <0.05).The apoptosis rate peaked at 24 hours after radiation,at (0.56±0.15)%,(1.28±0.16)%,(1.84±0.29)%,(5.74±1.15)%,and (2.00±0.84)% for the five doses; differences between the doses were statistically significant (P <0.05).Between doses 1-4,cell apoptosis rates increased as the Tmax increased.In dose 5,as the Tmax was above 60°C,the apoptosis rate decreased.Conclusion Sub-threshold thermal exposures of FU radiation with a continuous radiation pattern could result in higher oercentage of apoptosed cells.

  17. In vivo imaging of pancreatic tumours and liver metastases using 7 Tesla MRI in a murine orthotopic pancreatic cancer model and a liver metastases model

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    Hadlich Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of tumour death in the western world. However, appropriate tumour models are scarce. Here we present a syngeneic murine pancreatic cancer model using 7 Tesla MRI and evaluate its clinical relevance and applicability. Methods 6606PDA murine pancreatic cancer cells were orthotopically injected into the pancreatic head. Liver metastases were induced through splenic injection. Animals were analyzed by MRI three and five weeks following injection. Tumours were detected using T2-weighted high resolution sequences. Tumour volumes were determined by callipers and MRI. Liver metastases were analyzed using gadolinium-EOB-DTPA and T1-weighted 3D-Flash sequences. Tumour blood flow was measured using low molecular gadobutrol and high molecular gadolinium-DTPA. Results MRI handling and applicability was similar to human systems, resolution as low as 0.1 mm. After 5 weeks tumour volumes differed significantly (p 3+/-243 mm3 with MRI (mean 918 mm3+/-193 mm3 with MRI being more precise. Histology (n = 5 confirmed MRI tumour measurements (mean size MRI 38.5 mm2+/-22.8 mm2 versus 32.6 mm2+/-22.6 mm2 (histology, p 3+/-56.7 mm3 after 5 weeks. Lymphnodes were also easily identified. Tumour accumulation of gadobutrol was significantly (p Conclusions This model permits monitoring of tumour growth and metastasis formation in longitudinal non-invasive high-resolution MR studies including using contrast agents comparable to human pancreatic cancer. This multidisciplinary environment enables radiologists, surgeons and physicians to further improve translational research and therapies of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Oligonucleotide microarray identifies genes differentially expressed during tumorigenesis of DMBA-induced pancreatic cancer in rats.

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    Jun-Chao Guo

    Full Text Available The extremely dismal prognosis of pancreatic cancer (PC is attributed, at least in part, to lack of early diagnosis. Therefore, identifying differentially expressed genes in multiple steps of tumorigenesis of PC is of great interest. In the present study, a 7,12-dimethylbenzanthraene (DMBA-induced PC model was established in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The gene expression profile was screened using an oligonucleotide microarray, followed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining validation. A total of 661 differentially expressed genes were identified in stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis. According to GO classification, these genes were involved in multiple molecular pathways. Using two-way hierarchical clustering analysis, normal pancreas, acute and chronic pancreatitis, PanIN, early and advanced pancreatic cancer were completely discriminated. Furthermore, 11 upregulated and 142 downregulated genes (probes were found by Mann-Kendall trend Monotone test, indicating homologous genes of rat and human. The qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analysis of CXCR7 and UBe2c, two of the identified genes, confirmed the microarray results. In human PC cell lines, knockdown of CXCR7 resulted in decreased migration and invasion. Collectively, our data identified several promising markers and therapeutic targets of PC based on a comprehensive screening and systemic validation.

  19. Oligonucleotide microarray identifies genes differentially expressed during tumorigenesis of DMBA-induced pancreatic cancer in rats.

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    Guo, Jun-Chao; Li, Jian; Yang, Ying-Chi; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Tai-Ping; Zhao, Yu-Pei

    2013-01-01

    The extremely dismal prognosis of pancreatic cancer (PC) is attributed, at least in part, to lack of early diagnosis. Therefore, identifying differentially expressed genes in multiple steps of tumorigenesis of PC is of great interest. In the present study, a 7,12-dimethylbenzanthraene (DMBA)-induced PC model was established in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The gene expression profile was screened using an oligonucleotide microarray, followed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining validation. A total of 661 differentially expressed genes were identified in stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis. According to GO classification, these genes were involved in multiple molecular pathways. Using two-way hierarchical clustering analysis, normal pancreas, acute and chronic pancreatitis, PanIN, early and advanced pancreatic cancer were completely discriminated. Furthermore, 11 upregulated and 142 downregulated genes (probes) were found by Mann-Kendall trend Monotone test, indicating homologous genes of rat and human. The qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analysis of CXCR7 and UBe2c, two of the identified genes, confirmed the microarray results. In human PC cell lines, knockdown of CXCR7 resulted in decreased migration and invasion. Collectively, our data identified several promising markers and therapeutic targets of PC based on a comprehensive screening and systemic validation.

  20. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Nakagama

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropylamine (BOP into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5’ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  1. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Mami, E-mail: mtakahas@ncc.go.jp; Hori, Mika; Mutoh, Michihiro [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Keiji [Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Yada 52-1, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Nakagama, Hitoshi [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2011-02-09

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5′ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  2. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009216 Relation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate with calcium metabolism in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.SHI Chengxian(石承先),et al.Dept Live Bili Pancre Surg,Guizhou Prov Hosp,Guiyang 550002.World Chin J Digestol,2009;17(6):598-601.

  3. EGR-1/Bax pathway plays a role in vitamin E δ-tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Husain, Kazim; Zhang, Anying; Centeno, Barbara A; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Tong, Zhongsheng; Sebti, Säid M; Malafa, Mokenge P

    2015-08-01

    The anticancer activity of δ-tocotrienol, a bioactive vitamin E present in whole grain cereals, annatto beans and palm fruit, is strongly dependent on its effect on the induction of apoptosis. δ-Tocotrienol-induced apoptosis is associated with consistent induction in the expression of the proapoptotic protein Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax). The molecular mechanism by which δ-tocotrienol regulates Bax expression is unknown. We carried out a DNA microarray study that identified δ-tocotrienol induction of the zinc finger transcription factor EGR-1 in pancreatic cancer cells. Here, we provide evidence linking δ-tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells to EGR-1 regulation of Bax expression. Forced expression of EGR-1 induces Bax expression and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. In contrast, knockdown of δ-tocotrienol-induced EGR-1 by small interfering RNA attenuated δ-tocotrienol-induced Bax expression and reduced δ-tocotrienol-induced apoptosis. Further analyses showed that de novo protein synthesis was not required for δ-tocotrienol-induced EGR-1 expression, suggesting a direct effect of δ-tocotrienol on EGR-1 expression. Furthermore, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that EGR-1 binds to the Bax gene promoter. Finally, δ-tocotrienol treatment induced Bax expression and activated EGR-1 in the pancreatic neoplastic cells of the PDX-Cre Kras genetically engineered model of pancreatic cancer. Our study provides the first evidence for EGR-1 as a direct target of vitamin E δ-tocotrienol, suggesting that EGR-1 may act as a proapoptotic factor in pancreatic cancer cells via induction of Bax. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A mathematical prognosis model for pancreatic cancer patients receiving immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuefang; Xu, Jian-Xin

    2016-10-07

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly types of cancer since it typically spreads rapidly and can seldom be detected in its early stage. Pancreatic cancer therapy is thus a challenging task, and appropriate prognosis or assessment for pancreatic cancer therapy is of critical importance. In this work, based on available clinical data in Niu et al. (2013) we develop a mathematical prognosis model that can predict the overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients who receive immunotherapy. The mathematical model incorporates pancreatic cancer cells, pancreatic stellate cells, three major classes of immune effector cells CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, helper T cells, and two major classes of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). The proposed model describes the dynamic interaction between tumor and immune cells. In order for the model to be able to generate appropriate prognostic results for disease progression, the distribution and stability properties of equilibria in the mathematical model are computed and analysed in absence of treatments. In addition, numerical simulations for disease progression with or without treatments are performed. It turns out that the median overall survival associated with CIK immunotherapy is prolonged from 7 to 13months compared with the survival without treatment, this is consistent with the clinical data observed in Niu et al. (2013). The validity of the proposed mathematical prognosis model is thus verified. Our study confirms that immunotherapy offers a better prognosis for pancreatic cancer patients. As a direct extension of this work, various new therapy methods that are under exploration and clinical trials could be assessed or evaluated using the newly developed mathematical prognosis model.

  5. Canagliflozin-induced pancreatitis: a rare side effect of a new drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhary M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mudit Chowdhary,1 Ahmad A Kabbani,1 Akansha Chhabra21Department of Internal Medicine, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, GA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Acute pancreatitis is most commonly attributed to gallstones, alcohol abuse, and metabolic disorders such as hyperlipidemia and hypercalcemia. Medications are an infrequent yet commonly overlooked etiology of pancreatitis. Although several drugs have been implicated, antidiabetic agents are a rare cause for drug-induced pancreatitis. Canagliflozin is a new drug in the class of SGLT-2 inhibitors used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Serious reported side effects include renal impairment, hyperkalemia, and hypotension. Pancreatitis as a result of canagliflozin, however, is exceedingly rare. Here we describe a case of a 33-year old female who presented with severe acute pancreatitis in the setting of recent initiation of canagliflozin. Given the timing of her presentation and after excluding all other possible etiologies, it was determined that canagliflozin was the likely source of her illness. This case highlights the importance of identifying drug-induced pancreatitis, especially in novel drugs, as it is commonly neglected in patients with multiple medical comorbidities and those taking numerous medications. Prompt identification of drug-induced pancreatitis can improve management as well as decrease morbidity and mortality in these individuals.Keywords: canagliflozin, Invokana, pancreatitis, drug-induced pancreatitis, SGLT-2 inhibitor

  6. Dimethylaminoparthenolide and gemcitabine: a survival study using a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest cancers due to lack of early detection and absence of effective treatments. Gemcitabine, the current standard-of-care chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer, has limited clinical benefit. Treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with gemcitabine has been shown to induce the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) which regulates the expression of genes involved in the inflammatory response and tumorigenesis. It has therefore been proposed that gemcitabine-induced NF-κB activation may result in chemoresistance. We hypothesize that NF-κB suppression by the novel inhibitor dimethylaminoparthenolide (DMAPT) may enhance the effect of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. Methods The efficacy of DMAPT and gemcitabine was evaluated in a chemoprevention trial using the mutant Kras and p53-expressing LSL-KrasG12D/+; LSL-Trp53R172H; Pdx-1-Cre mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Mice were randomized to treatment groups (placebo, DMAPT [40 mg/kg/day], gemcitabine [50 mg/kg twice weekly], and the combination DMAPT/gemcitabine). Treatment was continued until mice showed signs of ill health at which time they were sacrificed. Plasma cytokine levels were determined using a Bio-Plex immunoassay. Statistical tests used included log-rank test, ANOVA with Dunnett’s post-test, Student’s t-test, and Fisher exact test. Results Gemcitabine or the combination DMAPT/gemcitabine significantly increased median survival and decreased the incidence and multiplicity of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The DMAPT/gemcitabine combination also significantly decreased tumor size and the incidence of metastasis to the liver. No significant differences in the percentages of normal pancreatic ducts or premalignant pancreatic lesions were observed between the treatment groups. Pancreata in which no tumors formed were analyzed to determine the extent of pre-neoplasia; mostly normal ducts or low grade pancreatic lesions were

  7. ANTI CANCER ACTIVITY OF PHYLLANTHUS AMARUS IN AZASERINE INDUCED PANCREATIC CANCER OF WISTAR RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Ankit Prajapati; Sunant Raval; TapanVaria

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. The most common type of pancreatic cancer is adeno-carcinoma. The present experiment was carried out to study histopathological changes occur in pancreas in different groups of azaserine induced pancreatic cancer in Wistar rats with and without the treatment of aqueous and alcoholic extract of Phyllanthus amarus at different doses. Histopathological examination of ...

  8. Nifuroxazide-induced acute pancreatitis: a new side-effect for an old drug?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindano, Akilimali; Marot, Liliane; Geubel, André P

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of a middle-aged woman who developed a typical picture of acute pancreatitis together with systemic features of immunoallergy after the intake of two capsules (200 mg) of nifuroxazide. Even if acute pancreatitis is a rare adverse event of nitrofuran derivative therapy, nifuroxazide-induced pancreatitis as not been previously described. As suggested by associated systemic features, the disease is likely of immunoallergic origin.

  9. A Unifying Organ Model of Pancreatic Insulin Secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Gaetano

    Full Text Available The secretion of insulin by the pancreas has been the object of much attention over the past several decades. Insulin is known to be secreted by pancreatic β-cells in response to hyperglycemia: its blood concentrations however exhibit both high-frequency (period approx. 10 minutes and low-frequency oscillations (period approx. 1.5 hours. Furthermore, characteristic insulin secretory response to challenge maneuvers have been described, such as frequency entrainment upon sinusoidal glycemic stimulation; substantial insulin peaks following minimal glucose administration; progressively strengthened insulin secretion response after repeated administration of the same amount of glucose; insulin and glucose characteristic curves after Intra-Venous administration of glucose boli in healthy and pre-diabetic subjects as well as in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Previous modeling of β-cell physiology has been mainly directed to the intracellular chain of events giving rise to single-cell or cell-cluster hormone release oscillations, but the large size, long period and complex morphology of the diverse responses to whole-body glucose stimuli has not yet been coherently explained. Starting with the seminal work of Grodsky it was hypothesized that the population of pancreatic β-cells, possibly functionally aggregated in islets of Langerhans, could be viewed as a set of independent, similar, but not identical controllers (firing units with distributed functional parameters. The present work shows how a single model based on a population of independent islet controllers can reproduce very closely a diverse array of actually observed experimental results, with the same set of working parameters. The model's success in reproducing a diverse array of experiments implies that, in order to understand the macroscopic behaviour of the endocrine pancreas in regulating glycemia, there is no need to hypothesize intrapancreatic pacemakers, influences between different

  10. GEMMs as preclinical models for testing pancreatic cancer therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarthi Gopinathan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic tumour, with a very limited survival rate and currently no available disease-modifying treatments. Despite recent advances in the production of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs, the development of new therapies for pancreatic cancer is still hampered by a lack of reliable and predictive preclinical animal models for this disease. Preclinical models are vitally important for assessing therapies in the first stages of the drug development pipeline, prior to their transition to the clinical arena. GEMMs carry mutations in genes that are associated with specific human diseases and they can thus accurately mimic the genetic, phenotypic and physiological aspects of human pathologies. Here, we discuss different GEMMs of human pancreatic cancer, with a focus on the Lox-Stop-Lox (LSL-KrasG12D; LSL-Trp53R172H; Pdx1-cre (KPC model, one of the most widely used preclinical models for this disease. We describe its application in preclinical research, highlighting its advantages and disadvantages, its potential for predicting clinical outcomes in humans and the factors that can affect such outcomes, and, finally, future developments that could advance the discovery of new therapies for pancreatic cancer.

  11. Inducing a humoral immune response to pancreatic cancer antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Michael; Seifert, Gabriel; Wolff-Vorbeck, Guido; Langenmair, Elia; Hopt, Ulrich T; Wittel, Uwe A

    2016-12-01

    Patients with pancreatic carcinoma have a grim prognosis. Here, we examine the induction of an in vitro antibody response of human B cells to pancreatic carcinoma antigens. Cells of five cultured pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma lines were lysed and their plasma membrane fragments isolated in an aqueous two-phase-system. The plasma membrane fragments were then added to cultures of isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers for 14 days to act as a tumor antigen. Also, we added combinations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-21, anti-CD40 mAb and varying protein concentrations of the plasma membrane fragments to these cultures. We then tested characteristics and binding of resulting IgG and IgM against aforementioned tumor plasma membrane fragments and their respective cells using ELISAs. The combination of IL-2, IL-4 and anti-CD40 mAb elicited IgM production showing significant binding (pBxPC3 plasma membrane fragments showed inhibitory effects on IgG binding BxPC3 antigens (p<0.05). A human anti-tumor antibody formation can be induced in vitro using PANC-1 antigens and B cell stimulating agents. This response has the potential to generate antibodies specific to PANC-1 antigens. PRéCIS: The concept presented is novel and a promising approach to eliciting a specific B cell response to tumor antigen. The method may prove useful in understanding and developing anti-tumor immunity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Establishing a human pancreatic stem cell line and transplanting induced pancreatic islets to reverse experimental diabetes in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Mei; DOU ZhongYing; AN LiLong; YANG XueYi; GE Xin; QIAO Hai; ZHAO Ting; MA XiaoFei; FAN JingZhua; ZHU MengYang

    2008-01-01

    The major obstacle in using pancreatic islet transplantation to cure type Ⅰ and some type Ⅱ diabetes is the shortage of the donors. One of ways to overcome such obstacle is to isolate and clone pancreatic stem cells as "seed cells" and induce their differentiation into functional islets as an abundant trans-plantation source. In this study, a monoclonal human pancreatic stem cell (mhPSC) line was obtained from abortive fetal pancreatic tissues. Pancreatic tissues were taken from abortive fetus by sterile procedures, and digested into single cells and cell clusters with 0.1% type Ⅳ collagenase. Cultured in modified glucose-low DMEM with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), these single cells and cell clusters adhered to culture dishes, and then primary epidermal-like pancreatic stem ceils started to clone. After digesting with 0.25% trypsin and 0.04% EDTA, fibroblasts and other cells were gradually eliminated and epithelioid pancreatic stem cells were gradually purified during generations. Using clone-ring selection, the mhPSCs were obtained. After addition of 10 ng/mL epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cell culture medium, the mhPSCs quickly grew and formed a gravelstone-like monolayer. Continuously proliferated, a mhPSC line, which was derived from a male abortive fetus of 4 months old, has been passed through 50 generations. More than 1×109 mhPSCs were cryo-preserved in liquid nitrogen. Karyotype analysis showed that the chromosome set of the mhPSC line was normal diploid. Immunocytochemistry results demonstrated that the mhPSC line was positive for the pdxl, glucagon, nestin and CK19, and negative for the insulin, CD34, CD44 and CD45 protein expression. RT-PCR revealed further that the mhPSCs expressed transcription factors of the pdx1, glucagon, nestin and CK19. Also, in vitro induced with β-mercaptoethanol, the mhPSCs differentiated into nerve cells that expressed the NF protein. Induced with nicotinamide, the mhPSCs differentiated into functional islet

  13. Establishing a human pancreatic stem cell line and transplanting induced pancreatic islets to reverse experimental diabetes in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The major obstacle in using pancreatic islet transplantation to cure type I and some type II diabetes is the shortage of the donors. One of ways to overcome such obstacle is to isolate and clone pancreatic stem cells as "seed cells" and induce their differentiation into functional islets as an abundant trans-plantation source. In this study, a monoclonal human pancreatic stem cell (mhPSC) line was obtained from abortive fetal pancreatic tissues. Pancreatic tissues were taken from abortive fetus by sterile procedures, and digested into single cells and cell clusters with 0.1% type IV collagenase. Cultured in modified glucose-low DMEM with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), these single cells and cell clusters adhered to culture dishes, and then primary epidermal-like pancreatic stem cells started to clone. After digesting with 0.25% trypsin and 0.04% EDTA, fibroblasts and other cells were gradually eliminated and epithelioid pancreatic stem cells were gradually purified during generations. Using clone-ring selection, the mhPSCs were obtained. After addition of 10 ng/mL epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cell culture medium, the mhPSCs quickly grew and formed a gravelstone-like monolayer. Continuously proliferated, a mhPSC line, which was derived from a male abortive fetus of 4 months old, has been passed through 50 generations. More than 1×109 mhPSCs were cryo-preserved in liquid nitrogen. Karyotype analysis showed that the chromosome set of the mhPSC line was normal diploid. Immunocytochemistry results demonstrated that the mhPSC line was positive for the pdx1, glucagon, nestin and CK19, and negative for the insulin, CD34, CD44 and CD45 protein expression. RT-PCR revealed further that the mhPSCs expressed transcription factors of the pdx1, glucagon, nestin and CK19. Also, in vitro induced with β-mercaptoethanol, the mhPSCs differentiated into nerve cells that expressed the NF protein. Induced with nicotinamide, the mhPSCs differentiated into functional islet

  14. Pegaspargase Induced Hypertriglyceridemia Resulting in Severe Fatal Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Vyas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pegaspargase is used to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL. Pegaspargase definitely has its benefits in treating ALL; however we cannot lose sight of one of its very rare but potentially deadly complications, acute pancreatitis. Clinicians should monitor triglycerides while the patient is on treatment with Pegaspargase and suspect acute pancreatitis if the patient develops abdominal pain. If pancreatitis occurs, therapy should be stopped immediately and not reinstituted. For patients with hypertriglyceridemia without pancreatitis, discontinuation of therapy should be considered.

  15. Ischemic preconditioning inhibits development of edematous cerulein-induced pancreatitis: Involvement of cyclooxygenases and heat shock protein 70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembinski, Artur; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Konturek, Stanislaw J; Dembinski, Marcin; Pawlik, Wieslaw W; Tomaszewska, Romana; Stachura, Jerzy; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata; Naskalski, Jerzy W; Konturek, Peter C

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether ischemic preconditioning (IP) affects the development of edematous cerulein-induced pancreatitis and to assess the role of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), COX-2, and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) in this process. METHODS: In male Wistar rats, IP was performed by clamping of celiac artery (twice for 5 min at 5-min intervals). Thirty minutes after IP or sham operation, acute pancreatitis was induced by cerulein. Activity of COX-1 or COX-2 was inhibited by resveratrol or rofecoxib, respectively (10 mg/kg). RESULTS: IP significantly reduced pancreatic damage in cerulein-induced pancreatitis as demonstrated by the improvement of pancreas histology, reduction in serum lipase and poly-C ribonuclease activity, and serum concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-1β. Also, IP attenuated the pancreatitis-evoked fall in pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic DNA synthesis. Serum level of anti-inflammatory IL-10 was not affected by IP. Cerulein-induced pancreatitis and IP increased the content of HSP 70 in the pancreas. Maximal increase in HSP 70 was observed when IP was combined with cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Inhibition of COXs, especially COX-2, reduced the protective effect of IP in edematous pancreatitis. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that IP reduces pancreatic damage in cerulein-induced pancreatitis and this effect, at least in part, depends on the activity of COXs and pancreatic production of HSP 70. PMID:16273606

  16. Ischemic preconditioning inhibits development of edematous cerulein-induced pancreatitis: Involvement of cyclooxygenases and heat shock protein 70

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zygmunt Warzecha; Jerzy W Naskalski; Peter C Konturek; Artur Dembinski; Piotr Ceranowicz; Stanislaw J Konturek; Marcin Dembinski; Wieslaw W Pawlik; Romana Tomaszewska; Jerzy Stachura; Beata Kusnierz-Cabala

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether ischemic preconditioning (IP)affects the development of edematous cerulein-induced pancreatitis and to assess the role of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), COX-2, and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) in this process.METHODS: In male Wistar rats, IP was performed by damping of celiac artery (twice for 5 min at 5-min intervals).Thirty minutes after IP or sham operation, acute pancreatitis was induced by cerulein. Activity of COX-1 or COX-2 was inhibited by resveratrol or rofecoxib, respectively (10 mg/kg).RESULTS: IP significantly reduced pancreatic damage in cerulein-induced pancreatitis as demonstrated by the improvement of pancreas histology, reduction in serum lipase and poly-C ribonuclease activity, and serum concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-1β.Also, IP attenuated the pancreatitis-evoked fall in pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic DNA synthesis.Serum level of anti-inflammatory IL-10 was not affected by IP. Cerulein-induced pancreatitis and IP increased the content of HSP 70 in the pancreas. Maximal increase in HSP 70 was observed when IP was combined with cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Inhibition of COXs, especially COX-2, reduced the protective effect of IP in edematous pancreatitis.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that IP reduces pancreatic damage in cerulein-induced pancreatitis and this effect, at least in part, depends on the activity of COXs and pancreatic production of HSP 70.

  17. Taraxacum officinale protects against cholecystokinin-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sang-Wan Seo; Hyung-Min Kim; Seung-Heon Hong; Hyun-Na Koo; Hyo-Jin An; Kang-Beom Kwon; Byung-Cheal Lim; Eun-A Seo; Do-Gon Ryu; Goo Moon; Hong-Yeoul Kim

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Taraxacum officinale (TO) has been frequently used as a remedy for inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of TO on cholecystokinin (CCK)-octapeptide-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.METHODS: TO at 10 mg/kg was orally administered, followed by 75 μg/kg CCK octapeptide injected subcutaneously three times after 1, 3 and 5 h. This whole procedure was repeated for 5 d. We determined the pancreatic weight/body weight ratio, the levels of pancreatic HSP60 and HSP72, and the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Repeated CCK octapeptide treatment resulted in typical laboratory and morphological changes of experimentally-induced pancreatitis.RESULTS: TO significantly decreased the pancreatic weight/body weight ratio in CCK octapeptide-induced acute pancreatitis. TO also increased the pancreatic levels of HSP60 and HSP72. Additionally, the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α decreased in the animals treated with TO.CONCLUSION: TO may have a protective effect against CCK octapeptide-induced acute pancreatitis.

  18. Effect of parenteral and early intrajejunal nutrition on pancreatic digestive enzyme synthesis,storage and discharge in dog models of acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan-Long Qin; Zhen-Dong Su; Lei-Guang Hu; Zai-Xian Ding; Qing-Tian Lin

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To study the effect of early intrajejunal nutrition on enzyme-protein synthesis and secretion during acute pancreatitis.METHODS:Fifteen dogs were randomly divided into parenteral nutrition(n = 7)and early intrajejunal nutrition groups(n = 8).An acute pancreatitis model was induced by injecting 5% sodium taurocholate and trypsin into the pancreas via the pancreatic duct.Intrajejunal nutrition was delivered with a catheter via a jejunostomy tube after the model was established for 24 h.On d 1 and 7 and at the beginning of nutritional support,radioactive tracing and electron microscopes were used to evaluate the enzyme-protein synthesis in acinar cells,the subcellular fractionation and the change in zymogen granules after 1.85×106 Bq L-3H phenylalanine was infused at 30,60,120,and 180 min.RESULTS:The 3H radioactivity in pancreatic acinar cells reached its peak level at 60 min,and the contents in the early intrajejunal nutrition group were higher than those in the parenteral nutrition group,which were then decreased.The mean number and area of zymogen granules did not show any significant statistical difference in both groups on d 1 or on d 7(P > 0.05).CONCLUSION:Early intrajejunal nutrition might be effective in dogs with acute pancreatitis.

  19. Are pancreatic autoantibodies associated with azathioprine-induced pancreatitis in Crohn's disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weersma, Rinse K; Batstra, Manou R; Kleibeuker, Jan H; van Dullemen, Hendrik M

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Azathioprine is frequently used in the treatment of Crohn's disease. A severe side effect is acute pancreatitis, which is specific for Crohn's disease. Autoantibodies against exocrine pancreas occur in about 30% of Crohn's disease cases but not in other inflammatory diseases. Pancreatic

  20. Are pancreatic autoantibodies associated with azathioprine-induced pancreatitis in Crohn's disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weersma, Rinse K; Batstra, Manou R; Kleibeuker, Jan H; van Dullemen, Hendrik M

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Azathioprine is frequently used in the treatment of Crohn's disease. A severe side effect is acute pancreatitis, which is specific for Crohn's disease. Autoantibodies against exocrine pancreas occur in about 30% of Crohn's disease cases but not in other inflammatory diseases. Pancreatic aut

  1. Robust Early Inflammation of the Peripancreatic Visceral Adipose Tissue During Diet-Induced Obesity in the KrasG12D Model of Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzer, Kathleen M; Xu, Mu; Moro, Aune; Dawson, David W; Du, Lin; Li, Gang; Chang, Hui-Hua; Stark, Alexander P; Jung, Xiaoman; Hines, Oscar Joe; Eibl, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Obesity increases the incidence of multiple types of cancer. Our previous work has shown that a high-fat, high-calorie diet (HFCD) leads to visceral obesity, pancreatic inflammation, and accelerated pancreatic neoplasia in KrasG12D (KC) mice. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of an HFCD on visceral adipose inflammation with emphasis on potential differences between distinct visceral adipose depots. We examined the weight and visceral obesity in both wild-type and KC mice on either control diet (CD) or HFCD. After 3 months, mice were killed for histological examination. Multiplex assays were also performed to obtain cytokine profiles between different adipose depots. Both wild-type and KC mice on an HFCD exhibited significantly increased inflammation in the visceral adipose tissue, particularly in the peripancreatic fat (PPF), compared with animals on a CD. This was associated with significantly increased inflammation in the pancreas. Cytokine profiles were different between visceral adipose depots and between mice on the HFCD and CD. Our results clearly demonstrate that an HFCD leads to obesity and inflammation in the visceral adipose tissue, particularly the PPF. These data suggest that obesity-associated inflammation in PPF may accelerate pancreatic neoplasia in KC mice.

  2. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G A S; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2014-04-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with 1,10-PT + ethanol and ∼1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I-III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol.

  3. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G. A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with l,10-PT + ethanol and ~1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I—III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol. PMID:24281792

  4. 三硝基苯磺酸诱导的慢性胰腺炎模型在疼痛研究中的应用%Application of trinitrobenze sulfonic acid-induced chronic pancreatitis rat model in pain study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锋; 沈佳庆; 王兴鹏

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the application of chronic pancreatitis (CP) model induced by trinitrobenze sulfonic acid (TNBS) in pain study. Methods CP was induced by intraductual infusion of 2% TNBS in rats. Histopathological examination and serum amylase and lipase measurement were performed for the validation of CP. Pain resulting from CP was studied as abdominal sensitivity to Von Frey Filament stimulation on week 1,2,3 and 4 after the induction of CP. Results Progressive fibrosis and parenchyma injury were observed in tissue sections after 4 weeks of TNBS treatment. Abdominal pain was observed in TNBS treated rats and the severity was increased over time. Conclusion The rat CP model induced by TNBS is suitable in pain study.%目的 探讨三硝基苯磺酸(trinitrobenze sulfonic acid,TNBS)建立的慢性胰腺炎(chronic pancreatitis,CP)模型在CP腹痛研究中的适用性.方法 2% TNBS逆行胆胰管灌注建立大鼠CP模型.观察血清淀粉酶、脂肪酶和组织学以评价造模是否成功.Von Frey Filament测试检测不同时间点(1、2、3和4周)大鼠腹部的阳性反应,进而推测大鼠胰腺疼痛的改变.结果 TNBS处理4周后,大鼠胰腺出现实质损伤和进行性纤维化,具有CP的组织病理学改变.Von Frey Filament检测显示CP造模后,随着时间推移,大鼠腹部阳性反应逐渐增加.结论 TNBS不但适用于CP动物模型的建立,而且还适用于CP疼痛的基础研究.

  5. Pulmonary function changes in rats with taurocholate-induced pancreatitis are attenuated by pretreatment with melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ting-Ywan; Reiter, Russel J; Chen, Kuan-Hao; Leu, Fur-Jiang; Wang, David; Yeh, Diana Y

    2014-03-01

    Melatonin is a free radical scavenger and broad-spectrum antioxidant with immunomodulatory effects. We studied the effects of melatonin on changes in lung function, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and inflammatory cell sequestration in an acute pancreatitis (AP)-associated lung inflammation model. Acute pancreatitis was induced by injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct of rats. Animals were randomized into control, AP, and a melatonin pretreatment (10 mg/kg)/AP group. Functional residual capacity (FRC), lung compliance (Cchord), expiratory flow rate at 50% (FEF50), airway resistance index (RI), and peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) were evaluated. White blood cell count (WBC) and hydrogen peroxide, lung lavage fluid WBC, methylguanidine, protein, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), nitric oxide (NO), and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) levels were determined. Lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, peroxynitrite, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mRNA and protein were measured. AP induction resulted in reductions in FRC, Cchord, FEF50, and PEF, and increase in RI and lung wet-to-dry weight ratio. Blood and lung lavage fluid WBC, lavage fluid LDH, protein, and blood hydrogen peroxide also increased. Levels of hydroxyl radicals, nitric oxide, and LTB4 in lung lavage fluid, inducible NOS mRNA, protein expression, and peroxynitrite in lung tissue also were significantly elevated. Pretreatment with melatonin attenuated obstructive and restrictive ventilatory insufficiency induced by AP. Blood and lavage WBC, lavage LDH and protein, lung edema, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and lipoxygenase pathway derivatives were also significantly attenuated by melatonin. We conclude that melatonin decreases AP-induced obstructive and restrictive lung function changes via its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. An optimised mouse model of chronic pancreatitis with a combination of ethanol and cerulein

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Abbas; Nikkhoo, Bahram; Mokarizadeh, Aram; Rahmani, Mohammad-Reza; Fakhari, Shohreh; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Jalili, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an intractable and multi-factorial disorder. Developing appropriate animal models is an essential step in pancreatitis research, and the best ones are those which mimic the human disorder both aetiologically and pathophysiologically. The current study presents an optimised protocol for creating a murine model of CP, which mimics the initial steps of chronic pancreatitis in alcohol chronic pancreatitis and compares it with two other mouse models treate...

  7. Prediction of Severe Acute Pancreatitis Using a Decision Tree Model Based on the Revised Atlanta Classification of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Yang

    Full Text Available To develop a model for the early prediction of severe acute pancreatitis based on the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis.Clinical data of 1308 patients with acute pancreatitis (AP were included in the retrospective study. A total of 603 patients who were admitted to the hospital within 36 hours of the onset of the disease were included at last according to the inclusion criteria. The clinical data were collected within 12 hours after admission. All the patients were classified as having mild acute pancreatitis (MAP, moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP based on the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis. All the 603 patients were randomly divided into training group (402 cases and test group (201 cases. Univariate and multiple regression analyses were used to identify the independent risk factors for the development of SAP in the training group. Then the prediction model was constructed using the decision tree method, and this model was applied to the test group to evaluate its validity.The decision tree model was developed using creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, and oxygenation index to predict SAP. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of SAP in the training group were 80.9% and 90.0%, respectively, and the sensitivity and specificity in the test group were 88.6% and 90.4%, respectively.The decision tree model based on creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, and oxygenation index is more likely to predict the occurrence of SAP.

  8. L-cysteine administration attenuates pancreatic fibrosis induced by TNBS in rats by inhibiting the activation of pancreatic stellate cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LiJuan Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Recent studies have shown that activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs play a major role in pancreatic fibrogenesis. We aimed to study the effect of L-cysteine administration on fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis (CP induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS in rats and on the function of cultured PSCs. METHODS: CP was induced by TNBS infusion into rat pancreatic ducts. L-cysteine was administrated for the duration of the experiment. Histological analysis and the contents of hydroxyproline were used to evaluate pancreatic damage and fibrosis. Immunohistochemical analysis of α-SMA in the pancreas was performed to detect the activation of PSCs in vivo. The collagen deposition related proteins and cytokines were determined by western blot analysis. DNA synthesis of cultured PSCs was evaluated by BrdU incorporation. We also evaluated the effect of L-cysteine on the cell cycle and cell activation by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. The expression of PDGFRβ, TGFβRII, collagen 1α1 and α-SMA of PSCs treated with different concentrations of L-cysteine was determined by western blot. Parameters of oxidant stress were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nrf2, NQO1, HO-1, IL-1β expression were evaluated in pancreas tissues by qRT-PCR. RESULTS: The inhibition of pancreatic fibrosis by L-cysteine was confirmed by histological observation and hydroxyproline assay. α-SMA, TIMP1, IL-1β and TGF-β1 production decreased compared with the untreated group along with an increase in MMP2 production. L-cysteine suppressed the proliferation and extracellular matrix production of PSCs through down-regulating of PDGFRβ and TGFβRII. Concentrations of MDA+4-HNE were decreased by L-cysteine administration along with an increase in GSH levels both in tissues and cells. In addition, L-cysteine increased the mRNA expression of Nrf2, NQO1 and HO-1 and reduced the expression of IL-1β in L-cysteine treated group when compared with control

  9. Association between probiotics and enteral nutrition in an experimental acute pancreatitis model in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baal, M.C.P.M. van; Rens, M.J. van; Geven, C.B.; Pol, F.M. van de; Brink, I. van den; Hannink, G.J.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Peters, W.H.M.; Rijkers, G.T.; Gooszen, H.G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Recently, a randomized controlled trial showed that probiotic prophylaxis was associated with an increased mortality in enterally fed patients with predicted severe pancreatitis. In a rat model for acute pancreatitis, we investigated whether an association between probiotic

  10. [Role of free radicals on canine bile-induced pancreatitis and effect of superoxide dismutase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) on canine experimental pancreatitis. Pancreatitis was induced by retrograde biliary juice injection (0.5 ml/kg) to accessory pancreatic duct. Twenty-one mongrel dogs were divided into two groups, i.e. control (untreated) group (n = 13) and SOD-treated group (n = 8). In SOD-treated group, SOD 5000 units/kg was administered from celiac artery immediately after onset of pancreatitis. Xanthine oxidase (XOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), phospholipase (PL), and SOD were assayed from pancreatic tissue 1 and 3 hours after onset of pancreatitis. Serum amylase, elastase I, calcium, and WBC were assayed for 7 days after onset of pancreatitis. XOD and MDA levels were increased in untreated group, and not significantly changed in treated group with statistical difference. PL levels were increased after onset of pancreatitis in both groups and SOD levels were not changed even in treated group. No statistical difference was seen in PL and SOD levels between two groups. Increase of XOD levels suggests continuous generating of free radical species from pancreatic tissue, and SOD inhibits this increase. Increase of PL level was not improved by SOD. Serum laboratory findings and survival rates were not improved by SOD treatment.

  11. Therapeutic effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet Buyukberber; M Cemil Savas; Cahit Bagci; Mehmet Koruk; Murat T Gulsen; Ediz Tutar; Tugba Bilgic; Nurdan (O) Ceylan

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic role of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in a rat model of ceruleaninduced acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Seventy male Wistar albino rats were divided into seven groups. Acute edematous pancreatitis was induced by subcutaneous cerulein injection (20 μg/kg) four times at 1-h intervals. CAPE (30 mg/kg) was given by subcutaneous injection at the beginning (CAPE 1 group) and 12 h after the last cerulein injection (CAPE 2 group). Serum amylase, lipase, white blood cell count, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were measured, and pancreatic histopathology was assessed. RESULTS: In the AP group, amylase and lipase levels were found to be elevated and the histopathological evaluation showed massive edema and inflammation of the pancreas, with less fatty necrosis when compared with sham and control groups. Amylase and lipase levels and edema formation decreased significantly in the CAPE therapy groups (P < 0001); especially in the CAPE 2 group, edema was improved nearly completely (P = 0001). Inflammation and fatty necrosis were partially recovered by CAPE treatment. The pathological results and amylase level in the placebo groups were similar to those in the AP group. White blood cell count and TNF-α concentration was nearly the same in the CAPE and placebo groups. CONCLUSION: CAPE may be useful agent in treatment of AP but more experimental and clinical studies are needed to support our observation of beneficial effects of CAPE before clinical usage of this agent.

  12. The Protective Effects of Shen-Fu Injection on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of Shen-Fu injection (SFI on a caerulein-induced rat pancreatitis (AP model. Methods. SFI was given to rats in the SFI treated group through intraperitoneal injection. Blood and pancreas samples were collected for serological and histopathological studies. Results. Our results showed that AP caused significant decrease in tissue glutathione (GSH and serum IL-4 and IL-10, while pancreatic malondialdehyde (MDA and myeloperoxidase (MPO were increased. Furthermore, TNF-α, IL-1β, amylase, and lipase levels were also significantly increased. On the other hand, SFI treatment reserved all these biochemical indices as well as histopathologic alterations that were induced by caerulein. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the SFI protects against caerulein-induced AP in rats via modulation of cytokines, oxidative stress, and Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB activity.

  13. Metamizol Relieves Pain Without Interfering With Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Franziska; Algül, Hana; Thoeringer, Christoph K; Schmid, Roland M; Wolf, Eckhard; Schneider, Marlon R; Dahlhoff, Maik

    2016-04-01

    Animal models are essential to understand the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP) and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Although it has been shown that cerulein-induced AP is associated with pain in experimental animals, most experiments are carried out without any pain-relieving treatment because researchers are apprehensive of an interference of the analgetic agent with AP-associated inflammation. In light of the growing ethical concerns and the legal tightening regarding animal welfare during experiments, this attitude should be changed. Acute pancreatitis was induced by cerulein in the C57BL/6J and FVB/N mouse inbred strains. One group received vehicle only, and the other was treated with metamizol as analgetic agent. Pain sensation and parameters of AP were analyzed as well as the effect of metamizol in the pancreas and its actions in the brain. We report that oral administration of metamizol protects cerulein-treated mice from abdominal pain without influencing the clinical and histopathological course of the disease. In addition, it could be shown that metamizol reduces the central pain response. This study reveals that oral administered metamizol has no influence on the cerulein-induced AP and can be given as an analgesic to increase animal welfare in experiments with induced AP.

  14. Modelling the transition from simple to complex Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neeraj Manhas; James Sneyd; K R Pardasani

    2014-06-01

    A mathematical model is proposed which systematically investigates complex calcium oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells. This model is based on calcium-induced calcium release via inositol trisphosphate receptors (IPR) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) and includes calcium modulation of inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate (IP3) levels through feedback regulation of degradation and production. In our model, the apical and the basal regions are separated by a region containing mitochondria, which is capable of restricting Ca2+ responses to the apical region. We were able to reproduce the observed oscillatory patterns, from baseline spikes to sinusoidal oscillations. The model predicts that calcium-dependent production and degradation of IP3 is a key mechanism for complex calcium oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells. A partial bifurcation analysis is performed which explores the dynamic behaviour of the model in both apical and basal regions.

  15. In vitro models of pancreatic cancer for translational oncology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Georg; Rauenzahn, Sherri; Maitra, Anirban

    2009-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is a disease of near uniform fatality and the overwhelming majority of patients succumb to their advanced malignancy within a few months of diagnosis. Despite considerable advances in our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic carcinogenesis, this knowledge has not yet been fully translated into clinically available treatment strategies that yield significant improvements in disease free or overall survival. Objective Cell line-based in vitro model systems provide powerful tools to identify potential molecular targets for therapeutic intervention as well as for initial pre-clinical evaluation of novel drug candidates. Here we provide a brief overview of recent literature on cell line-based model systems of pancreatic cancer and their application in the search for novel therapeutics against this vicious disease. Conclusion While in vitro models of pancreatic cancer are of tremendous value for genetic studies and initial functional screenings in drug discovery, they carry several imanent drawbacks and are often poor in predicting therapeutic response in humans. Therefore, in most instances they are successfully exploited to generate hypothesis and identify molecular targets for novel therapeutics, which are subsequently subject to further in-depth characterization using more advanced in vivo model systems and clinical trials. PMID:20160967

  16. Protective and curative effects of Cocos nucifera inflorescence on alloxan-induced pancreatic cytotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raveendran S Renjith

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The results obtained in the study indicate the protective and curative effects of CnI on alloxan-induced pancreatic cytotoxicity, which is mediated through the regulation of carbohydrate metabolic enzyme activities and islets cell repair.

  17. Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) Induced Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Signaling Is Essential for Murine Pancreatitis-Associated Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodziak, Dariusz; Dong, Aiwen; Basin, Michael F.; Lowe, Anson W.

    2016-01-01

    A recently published study identified Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) as a regulator of EGFR signaling by promoting receptor presentation from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. AGR2 also promotes tissue regeneration in amphibians and fish. Whether AGR2-induced EGFR signaling is essential for tissue regeneration in higher vertebrates was evaluated using a well-characterized murine model for pancreatitis. The impact of AGR2 expression and EGFR signaling on tissue regeneration was evaluated using the caerulein-induced pancreatitis mouse model. EGFR signaling and cell proliferation were examined in the context of the AGR2-/- null mouse or with the EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG1478. In addition, the Hippo signaling coactivator YAP1 was evaluated in the context of AGR2 expression during pancreatitis. Pancreatitis-induced AGR2 expression enabled EGFR translocation to the plasma membrane, the initiation of cell signaling, and cell proliferation. EGFR signaling and tissue regeneration were partially inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, but absent in the AGR2-/- null mouse. AG1478-treated and AGR2-/- null mice with pancreatitis died whereas all wild-type controls recovered. YAP1 activation was also dependent on pancreatitis-induced AGR2 expression. AGR2-induced EGFR signaling was essential for tissue regeneration and recovery from pancreatitis. The results establish tissue regeneration as a major function of AGR2-induced EGFR signaling in adult higher vertebrates. Enhanced AGR2 expression and EGFR signaling are also universally present in human pancreatic cancer, which support a linkage between tissue injury, regeneration, and cancer pathogenesis. PMID:27764193

  18. Effects of hydrogen sulfide on inflammation in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia Madhav

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrogen sulfide (H2S, a gaseous mediator plays an important role in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. H2S has been extensively studied for its various roles in cardiovascular and neurological disorders. However, the role of H2S in inflammation is still controversial. The current study was aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor in in vivo model of acute pancreatitis in mice. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced in mice by hourly caerulein injections (50 μg/kg for 10 hours. Mice were treated with different dosages of NaHS (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg or 15 mg/kg or with vehicle, distilled water (DW. NaHS or DW was administered 1 h before induction of pancreatitis. Mice were sacrificed 1 h after the last caerulein injection. Blood, pancreas and lung tissues were collected and were processed to measure the plasma amylase, myeloperoxidase (MPO activities in pancreas and lung and chemokines and adhesion molecules in pancreas and lung. Results It was revealed that significant reduction of inflammation, both in pancreas and lung was associated with NaHS 10 mg/kg. Further the anti-inflammatory effects of NaHS 10 mg/kg were associated with reduction of pancreatic and pulmonary inflammatory chemokines and adhesion molecules. NaHS 5 mg/kg did not cause significant improvement on inflammation in pancreas and associated lung injury and NaHS 15 mg/kg did not further enhance the beneficial effects seen with NaHS 10 mg/kg. Conclusion In conclusion, these data provide evidence for anti-inflammatory effects of H2S based on its dosage used.

  19. Exendin-4 protects mitochondria from reactive oxygen species induced apoptosis in pancreatic Beta cells.

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    Zhen Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Mitochondrial oxidative stress is the basis for pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and a common pathway for numerous types of damage, including glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity. We cultivated mice pancreatic β-cell tumor Min6 cell lines in vitro and observed pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and changes in mitochondrial function before and after the addition of Exendin-4. Based on these observations, we discuss the protective role of Exendin-4 against mitochondrial oxidative damage and its relationship with Ca(2+-independent phospholipase A2. METHODS: We established a pancreatic β-cell oxidative stress damage model using Min6 cell lines cultured in vitro with tert-buty1 hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide. We then added Exendin-4 to observe changes in the rate of cell apoptosis (Annexin-V-FITC-PI staining flow cytometry and DNA ladder. We detected the activity of the caspase 3 and 8 apoptotic factors, measured the mitochondrial membrane potential losses and reactive oxygen species production levels, and detected the expression of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO in the cytosol and mitochondria, mitochondrial Ca2-independent phospholipase A2 and Ca(2+-independent phospholipase A2 mRNA. RESULTS: The time-concentration curve showed that different percentages of apoptosis occurred at different time-concentrations in tert-buty1 hydroperoxide- and hydrogen peroxide-induced Min6 cells. Incubation with 100 µmol/l of Exendin-4 for 48 hours reduced the Min6 cell apoptosis rate (p<0.05. The mitochondrial membrane potential loss and total reactive oxygen species levels decreased (p<0.05, and the release of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO from the mitochondria was reduced. The study also showed that Ca(2+-independent phospholipase A2 activity was positively related to Exendin-4 activity. CONCLUSION: Exendin-4 reduces Min6 cell oxidative damage and the cell apoptosis rate, which may be related to Ca(2-independent phospholipase A2.

  20. Effects of S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenab N Sidhapuriwala

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H(2S, a novel gaseous messenger, is synthesized endogenously from L-cysteine by two pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE. S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC is a slow H(2S releasing drug that provides cysteine, a substrate of CSE. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of SPRC in an in vivo model of acute pancreatitis (AP in mice. AP was induced in mice by hourly caerulein injections (50 µg/kg for 10 hours. Mice were treated with SPRC (10 mg/kg or vehicle (distilled water. SPRC was administered either 12 h before or 3 h before the induction of pancreatitis. Mice were sacrificed 1 h after the last caerulein injection. Blood, pancreas and lung tissues were collected and processed to measure the plasma amylase, plasma H(2S, myeloperoxidase (MPO activities and cytokine levels in pancreas and lung. The results revealed that significant reduction of inflammation, both in pancreas and lung was associated with SPRC given 3 h prior to the induction of AP. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of SPRC were associated with reduction of pancreatic and pulmonary pro-inflammatory cytokines and increase of anti-inflammatory cytokine. SPRC administered 12 h before AP induction did not cause significant improvement in pancreatic and lung inflammation. Plasma H(2S concentration showed significant difference in H(2S levels between control, vehicle and SPRC (administered 3 h before AP treatment groups. In conclusion, these data provide evidence for protective effects of SPRC in AP possibly by virtue of its slow release of endogenous H(2S.

  1. Expression of early growth response factor-1 in rats with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan-Bo Gong; Li He; Yang Liu; Xue-Qing Chen; Bo Jiang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the expressions of early growth response factor-1 (Egr-L) and tissue factor (TF) in rats with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and to explore its significance.METHODS: A large dose of cerulein was used to create the experimental acute pancreatitis model in rats. The changes of Egr-1 mRNA and protein in rats were observed during 30 min to 4 h after the treatment and immunohistochemical method was used to observe the localized expression of Egr-1 in tissues. In addition to the mRNA expression of Egr-1 target gene, TF was also observed. A blank control group, and a bombesinadministered group were used for comparison.RESULTS: After the stimulation of a large dose of cerulein,the rats showed typical inflammatory changes of acute pancreatitis. Thirty minutes after the stimulation, the mRNA expression of Egr-1 in the pancreatic tissue reached its peak and then declined, while the expression of Egr-1protein reached its peak 2 h after the stimulation.Histologically, 2 h after the stimulation, almost all pancreatic acinar cells had the expression of Egr-1 protein,which was focused in the nuclei. The mRNA expression of TF occurred 1 h after the stimulation and gradually increased within 4 h. However, a large dose of bombesin only stimulated the pancreatic tissue to produce a little mRNA expression of Egr-1 and no mRNA expression of Egr-1 protein and TF.CONCLUSION: Egr-1 as a pro-inflammatory transcription factor may play an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis by modulating the expression of TF.

  2. Effect of Phyllanthus amarus on serum biochemical changes in azaserine induced pancreatic cancer in Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Prajapati, Ankit S.; Raval, Sunant K; Suprita Sinha; Varia, Tapan N.; Mashiyava, Parimal H.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was performed to investigate the effect of Phyllanthus amarus extracts on serum biochemical changes in azaserine induced pancreatic cancer in Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Pancreatic cancer was developed in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal administration of azaserine (cancer inducer) for 21 days at the concentration of 5 mg/kg body weight. Aqueous and alcoholic extracts were given to rats of different groups as per protocol. Results: The results data revealed that o...

  3. Canagliflozin-induced pancreatitis: a rare side effect of a new drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Kabbani, Ahmad A; Chhabra, Akansha

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is most commonly attributed to gallstones, alcohol abuse, and metabolic disorders such as hyperlipidemia and hypercalcemia. Medications are an infrequent yet commonly overlooked etiology of pancreatitis. Although several drugs have been implicated, antidiabetic agents are a rare cause for drug-induced pancreatitis. Canagliflozin is a new drug in the class of SGLT-2 inhibitors used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Serious reported side effects include renal impairment, hyperkalemia, and hypotension. Pancreatitis as a result of canagliflozin, however, is exceedingly rare. Here we describe a case of a 33-year old female who presented with severe acute pancreatitis in the setting of recent initiation of canagliflozin. Given the timing of her presentation and after excluding all other possible etiologies, it was determined that canagliflozin was the likely source of her illness. This case highlights the importance of identifying drug-induced pancreatitis, especially in novel drugs, as it is commonly neglected in patients with multiple medical comorbidities and those taking numerous medications. Prompt identification of drug-induced pancreatitis can improve management as well as decrease morbidity and mortality in these individuals. PMID:26170677

  4. Canagliflozin-induced pancreatitis: a rare side effect of a new drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Kabbani, Ahmad A; Chhabra, Akansha

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is most commonly attributed to gallstones, alcohol abuse, and metabolic disorders such as hyperlipidemia and hypercalcemia. Medications are an infrequent yet commonly overlooked etiology of pancreatitis. Although several drugs have been implicated, antidiabetic agents are a rare cause for drug-induced pancreatitis. Canagliflozin is a new drug in the class of SGLT-2 inhibitors used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Serious reported side effects include renal impairment, hyperkalemia, and hypotension. Pancreatitis as a result of canagliflozin, however, is exceedingly rare. Here we describe a case of a 33-year old female who presented with severe acute pancreatitis in the setting of recent initiation of canagliflozin. Given the timing of her presentation and after excluding all other possible etiologies, it was determined that canagliflozin was the likely source of her illness. This case highlights the importance of identifying drug-induced pancreatitis, especially in novel drugs, as it is commonly neglected in patients with multiple medical comorbidities and those taking numerous medications. Prompt identification of drug-induced pancreatitis can improve management as well as decrease morbidity and mortality in these individuals.

  5. Oxidative stress plays a role in high glucose-induced activation of pancreatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Gyeong Ryul; Lee, Esder; Chun, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Song, Ki-Ho, E-mail: kihos@catholic.ac.kr

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •High glucose increased production of reactive oxygen species in cultured pancreatic stellate cells. •High glucose facilitated the activation of these cells. •Antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced activation of these cells. -- Abstract: The activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) is thought to be a potential mechanism underlying islet fibrosis, which may contribute to progressive β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Recently, we demonstrated that antioxidants reduced islet fibrosis in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. However, there is no in vitro study demonstrating that high glucose itself can induce oxidative stress in PSCs. Thus, PSCs were isolated and cultured from Sprague Dawley rats, and treated with high glucose for 72 h. High glucose increased the production of reactive oxygen species. When treated with high glucose, freshly isolated PSCs exhibited myofibroblastic transformation. During early culture (passage 1), PSCs treated with high glucose contained an increased number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells. During late culture (passages 2–5), PSCs treated with high glucose exhibited increases in cell proliferation, the expression of fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor, release of interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-β and collagen, and cell migration. Finally, the treatment of PSCs with high glucose and antioxidants attenuated these changes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high glucose increased oxidative stress in primary rat PSCs, thereby facilitating the activation of these cells, while antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced PSC activation.

  6. Intervention of Mirtazapine on gemcitabine-induced mild cachexia in nude mice with pancreatic carcinoma xenografts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Man Jiang; Jian-Hua Wu; Lin Jia

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of Mirtazapine on tumor growth,food intake,body weight,and nutritional status in gemcitabine-induced mild cachexia.METHODS:Fourteen mice with subcutaneous xenografts of a pancreatic cancer cell line (SW1990) were randomly divided into Mirtazapine and control groups.Either Mirtazapine (10 mg/kg) or saline solution was orally fed to the mice every day after tumor implantation.A model of mild cachexia was then established in both groups by intraperitoneal injection of Gemcitabine (50 mg/kg) 10 d,13 d,and 16 d after tumor implantation.Tumor size,food intake,body weight,and nutritional status were measured during the experiment.All mice were sacrificed at day 28.RESULTS:(1) After 7 d of gemcitabine administration,body-weight losses of 5%-7% which suggested mild cachexia were measured; (2) No significant difference in tumor size was detected between the Mirtazapine and control groups (P > 0.05); and (3) During the entire experimental period,food intake and body weight were slightly greater for the Mirtazapine group compared with controls (although these differences were not statistically significant).After 21 d,mice in the Mirtazapine group consumed significantly more food than control mice (3.95 ± 0.14 g vs 3.54 ± 0.10 g,P =0.004).After 25 d,mice in the Mirtazapine group were also significantly heavier than control mice (17.24 ± 0.53 g vs 18.05 ± 0.68 g,P =0.014).CONCLUSION:Mild cachexia model was successfully established by gemcitabine in pancreatic tumor-bearing mice.Mirtazapine can improve gemcitabine-induced mild cachexia in pancreatic tumor-bearing mice.It was believed to provide a potential therapeutic perspective for further studies on cachexia.

  7. Pathophysiology of alcoholic pancreatitis: An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parimal Chowdhury; Priya Gupta

    2006-01-01

    Use of alcohol is a worldwide habit regardless of socioeconomic background. Heavy alcohol consumption is a potential risk factor for induction of pancreatitis. The current review cites the updated literature on the alcohol metabolism, its effects on gastrointestinal and pancreatic function and in causing pancreatic injury, genetic predisposition of alcohol induced pancreatitis. Reports describing prospective mechanisms of action of alcohol activating the signal transduction pathways, induction of oxidative stress parameters through the development of animal models are being presented.

  8. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Froeling, Fieke EM

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas owing to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects 3–9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  9. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Kadaba, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas due to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects between 3 and 9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  10. An Exploratory Study on the Development of an Animal Model of Acute Pancreatitis Following Nicotine Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury P

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is known to be a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis is believed to be a predisposed condition for pancreatic cancer. As of this date, there is no established experimental animal model to conduct detailed studies on these two deadly diseases. Our aim is to establish a rodent model by which we can systematically study the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Methods Adult Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to graded doses of nicotine by various routes for periods of three to 16 weeks. Blood samples were measured for hormonal and metabolic parameters. The pancreas was evaluated for histopathological changes and its function was assessed in isolated pancreatic acini upon stimulation with cholecystokinin (CCK or carbachol (Cch. The pancreatic tissue was evaluated further for oncogene expression. Results Body weight, food and fluid intakes, plasma glucose and insulin levels were significantly reduced in animals with nicotine exposure when compared to control. However, CCK and gastrin levels in the blood were significantly elevated. Pancreatic function was decreased significantly with no alteration in CCK receptor binding. Pancreatic histology revealed vacuolation, swelling, cellular pyknosis and karyorrhexis. Mutant oncogene, H-ras, was overexpressed in nicotine-treated pancreatic tissue. Summary and conclusion The results suggest that alterations in metabolic, hormonal and pathologic parameters following nicotine-treatment appear consistent with diagnostic criteria of human pancreatitis. It is proposed that rats could be considered as a potential animal model to study the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

  11. 吉西他滨致轻度胰腺癌相关恶病质模型的建立%Establishment of Gemcitabine-induced mild cachexia model with pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建华; 贾林; 江舒曼

    2012-01-01

    pancreatic cancer. The optimum dose of Gemcitabine to establish chemotherapy-induced mild cachexia model in pancreatic cancer mouse was intraperitoneal injection Gemcitabine(50 mg/kg) on days 1,4,7.

  12. Changes of cytosolic [Ca2+]i in neutrophils in pancreatic microcirculation of rats with caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis under fluid shear stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Guang Zhou; You-Qin Chen; Xu-Bao Liu; Wei-Ming Hu; Bo-Le Tian; Huai-Qing Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the fluid shear stress induced changes of [Ca2+]i in neutrophils in pancreatic microcirculation of experimental acute pancreatitis (AP).METHODS: Wistar rats (n = 36) were randomized into three groups. A model of AP was established by subcutaneous injection of caerulein. Low-shear 30 viscometer was used to provide steady fluid shear stress on separated neutrophils.The mean fluorescent intensity tested by flow cytometry was used as the indication of [Ca2+]i quantity.RESULTS: Under steady shear, cytosolic [Ca2+]i showed biphasic changes. The shear rate changed from low to high,[Ca2+]i in different groups decreased slightly and then increased gradually to a high level (P<0.05). A close correlation was observed between the cytosolic [Ca2+]i level and the alteration of fluid shear stress in regional microcirculation of AP.CONCLUSION: The increase of [Ca2+]i is highly related to the activation of neutrophils, which contributes to neutrophil adhesion to endothelium in the early phase of AP. The effect of fluid shear stress on [Ca2+]i may play a crucial role in pancreatic microcirculatory failure of AP.

  13. Obesity-Induced Inflammation and Desmoplasia Promote Pancreatic Cancer Progression and Resistance to Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incio, Joao; Liu, Hao; Suboj, Priya; Chin, Shan M; Chen, Ivy X; Pinter, Matthias; Ng, Mei R; Nia, Hadi T; Grahovac, Jelena; Kao, Shannon; Babykutty, Suboj; Huang, Yuhui; Jung, Keehoon; Rahbari, Nuh N; Han, Xiaoxing; Chauhan, Vikash P; Martin, John D; Kahn, Julia; Huang, Peigen; Desphande, Vikram; Michaelson, James; Michelakos, Theodoros P; Ferrone, Cristina R; Soares, Raquel; Boucher, Yves; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2016-08-01

    It remains unclear how obesity worsens treatment outcomes in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In normal pancreas, obesity promotes inflammation and fibrosis. We found in mouse models of PDAC that obesity also promotes desmoplasia associated with accelerated tumor growth and impaired delivery/efficacy of chemotherapeutics through reduced perfusion. Genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of angiotensin-II type-1 receptor reverses obesity-augmented desmoplasia and tumor growth and improves response to chemotherapy. Augmented activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) in obesity is induced by tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN) recruited by adipocyte-secreted IL1β. PSCs further secrete IL1β, and inactivation of PSCs reduces IL1β expression and TAN recruitment. Furthermore, depletion of TANs, IL1β inhibition, or inactivation of PSCs prevents obesity-accelerated tumor growth. In patients with pancreatic cancer, we confirmed that obesity is associated with increased desmoplasia and reduced response to chemotherapy. We conclude that cross-talk between adipocytes, TANs, and PSCs exacerbates desmoplasia and promotes tumor progression in obesity. Considering the current obesity pandemic, unraveling the mechanisms underlying obesity-induced cancer progression is an urgent need. We found that the aggravation of desmoplasia is a key mechanism of obesity-promoted PDAC progression. Importantly, we discovered that clinically available antifibrotic/inflammatory agents can improve the treatment response of PDAC in obese hosts. Cancer Discov; 6(8); 852-69. ©2016 AACR.See related commentary by Bronte and Tortora, p. 821This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 803. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Roles of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction Induced by Lipotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Véret

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in order to maintain glucose homeostasis. However, various environmental stresses such as obesity have been shown to induce loss of secretory responsiveness in pancreatic β cells and pancreatic β cell apoptosis which can favor the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Indeed, elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs have been shown to induce β cell apoptosis. Importantly, the chronic adverse effects of FFAs on β cell function and viability are potentiated in the presence of hyperglycaemia, a phenomenon that has been termed gluco-lipotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of gluco-lipotoxicity in pancreatic β cells are not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that sphingolipid metabolism plays a key role in gluco-lipotoxicity induced apoptosis and loss of function of pancreatic β cells. The present review focuses on how the two main sphingolipid mediators, ceramides and sphingoid base-1-phosphates, regulate the deleterious effects of gluco-lipotoxicity on pancreatic β cells. The review highlights the role of a sphingolipid biostat on the dysregulation of β cell fate and function induced by gluco-lipotoxicity, offering the possibility of new therapeutic targets to prevent the onset of T2D.

  15. Z-360, a novel therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer, prevents up-regulation of ephrin B1 gene expression and phosphorylation of NR2B via suppression of interleukin-1 β production in a cancer-induced pain model in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori Yuko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Z-360 is an orally active cholecystokinin-2 (CCK2/gastrin receptor antagonist currently under development as a therapeutic drug for pancreatic cancer. It was previously reported that Z-360 treatment in combination with gemcitabine prolonged the survival period in a lethal pancreatic cancer xenograft model in mice. In a phase Ib/IIa clinical study, Z-360 treatment displayed a trend of reduced pain in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in combination with gemcitabine including analgesics such as opioids. Here, we investigated the mechanism of analgesic action of Z-360 in a severe cancer-induced pain model in mice, which is considered to be opioid-resistant, by examining ephrin B1 gene expression, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR2B subunit phosphorylation, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β production. Results In a mouse model of cancer-induced pain, ephrin B1 gene expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs and the phosphorylation of NR2B in the spinal cord were induced. Z-360 treatment inhibited both ephrin B1 gene expression and the phosphorylation of NR2B. In addition, IL-1β production increased in the cancer-inoculated hind paw of mice, but could be suppressed by treatment with Z-360. Moreover, we observed that the CCK1 receptor antagonist devazepide similarly suppressed up-regulation of ephrin B1 gene expression and IL-1β production, and that the intraperitoneal injection of sulfated CCK-8 induced the production of IL-1β in the cancer-inoculated region. Conclusions We have identified a novel pain cascade, in which IL-1β production in cancer-inoculated regions induces ephrin B1 gene expression in DRGs and then ephrin B1 enhances the tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B via Eph B receptor in the spinal cord. Notably, Z-360 relieves cancer-induced pain by preventing this pain cascade through the suppression of IL-1β production, likely via the blockade of CCK1 receptor. The pre-clinical results presented here support the analgesic

  16. Gardenia jasminoides protects against cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Won-Seok Jung; Rae-Kil Park; Jong-Suk Kim; Eun-Cheol Kim; Sung-Yeon Hwang; Sung-Joo Park; Ho-Joon Song; Young-Seok Chae; Do-Yun Kim; Sang-Wan Seo; Hee-Je Park; Gi-Sang Bae; Tae-Hyeon Kim; Hyo-Jeong Oh; Ki-Jung Yun

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Gardenia jasminoides (G3) on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) in mice. METHODS: C57BL/6 mice weighing 18-20 g were divided into three groups. (1) Normal saline-treated group, (2) treatment with GJ at a dose of 0.1 g/kg, (3) treatment with GJ at a dose of 1 g/kg. GJ was administered orally (η = 6 per group) for 1 wk. Three hours later, the mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 ug/kg), a stable cholecystokinin (CCK) analogue, every hour for a total of 6h as described previously. The mice were sacrificed at 6 h after completion of cerulein injections. Blood samples were obtained to determine serum amylase, lipase and cytokine levels. The pancreas was rapidly removed for morphologic examination and scoring. A portion of pancreas was stored at -70℃ and prepared for the measurement of tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, an indicator of neutrophil sequestration, and for reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR measurements. RESULTS: Treatment with GJ decreased significantly.

  17. Mechanism(s of Pancreatic Cancer-induced Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh T Chari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available While long-standing diabetes (DM modestly increases the risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PC, there is growing evidence that PC frequently causes DM. Up to 85% of PC patients have DM or hyperglycemia, which frequently manifests in the 2 to 3 years preceding the diagnosis of cancer. Conversely, subjects with new-onset DM have a high probability (5-8 folds higher than the population of being diagnosed with PC within 1-3 years of DM onset. Resection of the PC leads to amelioration of DM. Type 2 DM occurs due to beta cell failure following decades of obesity-associated insulin resistance. As in type 2 DM, beta cell dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance are seen in PC-induced DM (PC-DM. However, in contrast to type 2 DM, onset and progression of glucose intolerance in PC-DM occur in the face of ongoing, often profound, weight loss. The weight loss precedes the development of DM in PC and occurs months before the onset of cancer cachexia.

  18. Spinal toll like receptor 3 is involved in chronic pancreatitis-induced mechanical allodynia of rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Quan-Xing

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms underlying pain in chronic pancreatitis (CP are incompletely understood. Our previous data showed that astrocytes were actively involved. However, it was unclear how astrocytic activation was induced in CP conditions. In the present study, we hypothesized that toll-like receptors (TLRs were involved in astrocytic activation and pain behavior in CP-induced pain. Results To test our hypothesis, we first investigated the changes of TLR2-4 in the rat CP model induced by intrapancreatic infusion of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS. Western blot showed that after TNBS infusion, TLR3, but not TLR2 or TLR4, was increased gradually and maintained at a very high level for up to 5 w, which correlated with the changing course of mechanical allodynia. Double immunostaining suggested that TLR3 was highly expressed on astrocytes. Infusion with TLR3 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASO dose-dependently attenuated CP-induced allodynia. CP-induced astrocytic activation in the spinal cord was also significantly suppressed by TLR3 ASO. Furthermore, real-time PCR showed that IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 were significantly increased in spinal cord of pancreatic rats. In addition, TLR3 ASO significantly attenuated CP-induced up-regulation of IL-1β and MCP-1. Conclusions These results suggest a probable "TLR3-astrocytes-IL-1β/MCP-1" pathway as a positive feedback loop in the spinal dorsal horn in CP conditions. TLR3-mediated neuroimmune interactions could be new targets for treating persistent pain in CP patients.

  19. Acute fulminant drug induced necrotizing pancreatitis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Miramontes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis is a rare adverse event, although it has been reported in association with different drugs, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and analgesic agents commonly used in rheumatology. In different reviews of the pancreotoxicity of drugs, infliximab and etanercept are mentioned among all medications implicated in drug-induced pancreatitis, but clinical cases of acute pancreatitis complicating treatment with these anti-TNF-α agents have been exceptionally reported. We describe a patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with etanercept, who developed an acute fulminant necrotizing pancreatitis that resulted in death. Doctors should pay close attention to patients taking biologic drugs in which a complaint of abdominal pain lasting for several days with no apparent cause may require a prompt referral for medical consultation.

  20. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sukanta; Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-08-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep-tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up.

  1. Somatostatin receptor-1 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E

    2008-11-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

  2. Chemical screen identifies FDA-approved drugs and target pathways that induce precocious pancreatic endocrine differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, Meritxell; Huang, Wei; Yusuff, Shamila; Shim, Joong Sup; Ferrante, Anthony A; Liu, Jun O; Parsons, Michael J

    2011-11-29

    Pancreatic β-cells are an essential source of insulin and their destruction because of autoimmunity causes type I diabetes. We conducted a chemical screen to identify compounds that would induce the differentiation of insulin-producing β-cells in vivo. To do this screen, we brought together the use of transgenic zebrafish as a model of β-cell differentiation, a unique multiwell plate that allows easy visualization of lateral views of swimming larval fish and a library of clinical drugs. We identified six hits that can induce precocious differentiation of secondary islets in larval zebrafish. Three of these six hits were known drugs with a considerable background of published data on mechanism of action. Using pharmacological approaches, we have identified and characterized two unique pathways in β-cell differentiation in the zebrafish, including down-regulation of GTP production and retinoic acid biosynthesis.

  3. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis: A case-based review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S Ian Gan; Alun L Edwards; Christopher J Symonds; Paul L Beck

    2006-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an established cause of pancreatitis. In a case-based approach, we present a review of hypertriglyceridemia andhow it can cause pancreatitis. We outline how to investigate and manage such patients. A 35 year old man presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and biochemical evidence of acute pancreatitis. There was no history of alcohol consumption and biliary imaging was normal. The only relevant past medical history was that of mild hyperlipidemia, treated with diet alone. Physical exam revealed epigastric tenderness, right lateral rectus palsy, lipemia retinalis, bitemporal hemianopsia and a delay in the relaxation phase of his ankle reflexes.Subsequent laboratory investigation revealed marked hypertriglyceridemia and panhypopituarism. An enhanced CT scan of the head revealed a large suprasellar mass impinging on the optic chiasm and hypothalamus. The patient was treated supportively; thyroid replacement and lipid lowering agents were started. He underwent a successful resection of a craniopharyngioma. Postoperatively, the patient did well on hormone replacement therapy. He has had no further attacks of pancreatitis.This case highlights many of the factors involved in the regulation of triglyceride metabolism. We review the common causes of hypertriglyceridemia and the proposed mechanisms resulting in pancreatitis. The incidence and management of hypertriglyceridemiainduced pancreatitis are also discussed.

  4. Lanreotide autogel-induced acute pancreatitis in a patient with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira Lopes da Silva, José Tiago; González Casas, Olga; Bejarano Moguel, Verónica; Lobo Pascua, Maria; López-Santamaría Redondo, Antonio; Cordero Torres, Remigio

    2013-01-01

    Somatostatin and somatostatin analogues are considered very useful for the treatment of hormone producing tumors and acute variceal bleeding. They have also been proposed for the treatment of acute pancreatitis and for the prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis although clinical trials have failed to show any efficacy. The authors report the case of a 45-year-old man, recently diagnosed of acromegaly, which developed an acute pancreatitis shortly after his first injection of lanreotide autogel. The patient developed a severe dilatation of his hypocontractile gallbladder with distension of the intra and extrahepatic biliary ducts, the choledochus and the main pancreatic duct, without lithiasis or other abnormalities at the papilla, which resolved spontaneously in a month. We consider that lanreotide most likely induced a functional spasm of the Sphincter of Oddi, with impairment of the biliary-pancreatic outflow, leading to an acute pancreatitis, and review the literature concerning this drug related pancreatitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  5. TRA-8 anti-DR5 monoclonal antibody and gemcitabine induce apoptosis and inhibit radiologically validated orthotopic pancreatic tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derosier, Leo Christopher; Vickers, Selwyn M; Zinn, Kurt R; Huang, Zhi; Wang, Wenquan; Grizzle, William E; Sellers, Jeffrey; Stockard, Cecil R; Zhou, Tong; Oliver, Patsy G; Arnoletti, Pablo; Lobuglio, Albert F; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate agonistic TRA-8 monoclonal antibody to human death receptor 5 (DR5) and gemcitabine in vitro and in an orthotopic pancreatic cancer model. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were screened for DR5 expression, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis induced by TRA-8, gemcitabine, or gemcitabine and TRA-8. An orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer was established in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Mice were treated with TRA-8, gemcitabine, or a combination for one or two cycles of therapy. Tumor growth (ultrasound) and survival were analyzed. All five pancreatic cancer cell lines showed DR5 protein expression and varying sensitivity to TRA-8-mediated cytotoxicity. MIA PaCa-2 cells were very sensitive to TRA-8, moderately resistant to gemcitabine, with additive cytotoxicity to the combination. S2-VP10 cells were resistant to TRA-8 and sensitive to gemcitabine with synergistic sensitivity to the combination. Combination treatment in vitro produced enhanced caspase-3 and caspase-8 activation. A single cycle of therapy produced comparable efficacy for single-agent TRA-8 and the combination of TRA-8 and gemcitabine, with significant reduction in tumor size and prolonged survival compared with gemcitabine alone or control animals. With two cycles of therapy, TRA-8 and combination therapy produced enhanced inhibition of tumor growth compared with single-agent gemcitabine or untreated animals. However, the combination regimen showed enhanced survival as compared with single-agent TRA-8. Pancreatic cancer cell lines express varying levels of DR5 and differ in their sensitivity to TRA-8 and gemcitabine-induced cytotoxicity. TRA-8 with two cycles of gemcitabine therapy produced the best overall survival.

  6. Methomyl-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Possible Etiological Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannides M

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: N-methyl carbamate insecticides are widely used in homes, gardens and agriculture. They share the capacity to inhibit cholinesterase enzymes with organophosphates and therefore share similar symptomatology during acute and chronic exposures. One of the serious effects of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication is the development of acute pancreatitis and subsequent intrapancreatic fluid formation. CASE REPORT: An 18-year old Caucasian man was admitted to our Intensive Care Unit with cholinergic crisis symptomatology, after the ingestion of an unknown amount of a carbamate insecticide (methomyl. Pseudocholinesterase levels were 2 kU/L on the day of admission (reference range: 5.4-13.2 kU/L. Two days after admission, an abdominal CT scan revealed blurring of the peripancreatic fat planes, inflammation and swelling of the pancreas, and a substantial amount of ascitic fluid in the left anterior pararenal space and pelvis. Paracentesis and analysis of the ascitic fluid demonstrated findings diagnostic of pancreatic ascites. There had been no other evident predisposing factors for acute pancreatitis, other than methomyl intoxication. Eleven days after admission, pseudocholinesterase levels returned to normal, while a new abdominal CT scan revealed the formation of intrapancreatic fluid collection. The patient was discharged in good physical condition two weeks after admission. A follow up abdominal CT scan performed one month later showed a significant reduction in the size of the intrapancreatic fluid. DISCUSSION: Acute pancreatitis is not uncommon after organophosphate intoxication and carbamates share the same risk as organophosphorus pesticides. The development of acute pancreatitis and subsequent intrapancreatic fluid collection after methomyl intoxication has not previously been reported. This is the first case reported of acute pancreatitis and pancreatic ascite formation after anticholinesterase insecticide ingestion.

  7. Implication of EMT Induced by TGF-β1 in Pancreatic Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the implication of EMT induced by TGF-β1 in pancreatic cancer invasion. TGF-β1 expression was determined in 29 cases of human pancreatic carcinoma (PC) by immunohistochemistry and the results were compared with those of pathological examination.Moreover, the effects of TGF-β1 on the phenotype and invasion of pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1were also investigated. TGF-β1 was detected in 12 cases (41.4 %) of PC. Significant correlation was found between the expression of TGF-β1 and lymph node involvement (P=0.047) and the depth of invasion (P=0.035). TGF-β1 obviously promoted EMT of Panc-1 cell lines and their invasion ability was substantially enhanced. TGF-β1 may promote the malignancy of pancreatic cancer by triggering EMT.

  8. Icodextrin-induced acute pancreatitis in a peritoneal dialysis patient: a case report and literature review
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Sofia; Franjul, Rafael; Surana, Sikander; Fogel, Joshua

    2016-11-01

    The 7.5% icodextrin solution is widely used for long-dwell in peritoneal dialysis (PD) regimens as an alternative osmotic agent to glucose. It has been defined as a biocompatible agent because of its iso-osmolarity and is generally safe and well tolerated. Icodextrin and its hydrolyzed metabolites are found in systemic circulation. In serum, icodextrin interferes with amylase determination causing a significantly decreased plasma amylase level making it unreliable for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Lipase measurement provides an alternative and accurate method for diagnosing acute pancreatitis (AP) in patients using icodextrin. Icodextrin-induced acute pancreatitis is not well described. The literature appears limited to two case reports. We describe a case of a man with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on PD who developed acute pancreatitis following icodextrin use. We also provide a novel possible mechanism for understanding how icodextrin causes AP.
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  9. Protective Effect of Pretreatment with Acenocoumarol in Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Warzecha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Coagulation is recognized as a key player in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The aim of the current research was to examine the effect of pretreatment with acenocoumarol on the development of acute pancreatitis (AP evoked by cerulein. Methods: AP was induced in rats by cerulein administered intraperitoneally. Acenocoumarol (50, 100 or 150 µg/kg/dose/day or saline were given once daily for seven days before AP induction. Results: In rats with AP, pretreatment with acenocoumarol administered at the dose of 50 or 100 µg/kg/dose/day improved pancreatic histology, reducing the degree of edema and inflammatory infiltration, and vacuolization of acinar cells. Moreover, pretreatment with acenocoumarol given at the dose of 50 or 100 µg/kg/dose/day reduced the AP-evoked increase in pancreatic weight, serum activity of amylase and lipase, and serum concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β, as well as ameliorated pancreatic DNA synthesis and pancreatic blood flow. In contrast, acenocoumarol given at the dose of 150 μg/kg/dose did not exhibit any protective effect against cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Conclusion: Low doses of acenocoumarol, given before induction of AP by cerulein, inhibit the development of that inflammation.

  10. Protective Effect of Pretreatment with Acenocoumarol in Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzecha, Zygmunt; Sendur, Paweł; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Dembiński, Marcin; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Olszanecki, Rafał; Tomaszewska, Romana; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Coagulation is recognized as a key player in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The aim of the current research was to examine the effect of pretreatment with acenocoumarol on the development of acute pancreatitis (AP) evoked by cerulein. Methods: AP was induced in rats by cerulein administered intraperitoneally. Acenocoumarol (50, 100 or 150 µg/kg/dose/day) or saline were given once daily for seven days before AP induction. Results: In rats with AP, pretreatment with acenocoumarol administered at the dose of 50 or 100 µg/kg/dose/day improved pancreatic histology, reducing the degree of edema and inflammatory infiltration, and vacuolization of acinar cells. Moreover, pretreatment with acenocoumarol given at the dose of 50 or 100 µg/kg/dose/day reduced the AP-evoked increase in pancreatic weight, serum activity of amylase and lipase, and serum concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β, as well as ameliorated pancreatic DNA synthesis and pancreatic blood flow. In contrast, acenocoumarol given at the dose of 150 μg/kg/dose did not exhibit any protective effect against cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Conclusion: Low doses of acenocoumarol, given before induction of AP by cerulein, inhibit the development of that inflammation. PMID:27754317

  11. Melatonin Induces Anti-Inflammatory Effects to Play a Protective Role via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yina; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Qian; Chen, Qinfen; Sun, Yangjie; Jin, Yin; Wu, Jiansheng

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, which is mainly secreted by the pineal gland and released into blood, has anti-inflammatory properties in acute pancreatitis. Many studies show that melatonin can relieve inflammation in taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis. However, the mechanisms of its anti-inflammatory effects are still undefined, especially the relationship between melatonin and endoplasmic reticulum stress. We explored the anti-inflammatory activity of melatonin in AR42J and rat models. The CCK-8 assay was used to assess effects of melatonin on AR42J cell viability. Inflammatory degree and the expressions of endoplasmic reticulum stress related molecules were examined by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting. The degree of inflammation in the tissue was also accessed by pathological grading. Finally, we used the western blotting method to verify apoptosis and autophagy. Endoplasmic reticulum stress was obviously activated in early stage inflammation in AR42J and rat models. Melatonin could induce anti-inflammatory effects via endoplasmic reticulum stress. Melatonin significantly inhibited inflammatory cytokines and the expression of ERS-related molecules. Finally, it played a protective role by promoting apoptosis and autophagy of the cells, which were damaged in the process of inflammatory reaction. Melatonin induces anti-inflammatory effects via endoplasmic reticulum stress in acute pancreatitis to play a protective role. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Melatonin Induces Anti-Inflammatory Effects to Play a Protective Role via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yina Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Melatonin, which is mainly secreted by the pineal gland and released into blood, has anti-inflammatory properties in acute pancreatitis. Many studies show that melatonin can relieve inflammation in taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis. However, the mechanisms of its anti-inflammatory effects are still undefined, especially the relationship between melatonin and endoplasmic reticulum stress. We explored the anti-inflammatory activity of melatonin in AR42J and rat models. Methods: The CCK-8 assay was used to assess effects of melatonin on AR42J cell viability. Inflammatory degree and the expressions of endoplasmic reticulum stress related molecules were examined by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting. The degree of inflammation in the tissue was also accessed by pathological grading. Finally, we used the western blotting method to verify apoptosis and autophagy. Results: Endoplasmic reticulum stress was obviously activated in early stage inflammation in AR42J and rat models. Melatonin could induce anti-inflammatory effects via endoplasmic reticulum stress. Melatonin significantly inhibited inflammatory cytokines and the expression of ERS-related molecules. Finally, it played a protective role by promoting apoptosis and autophagy of the cells, which were damaged in the process of inflammatory reaction. Conclusion: Melatonin induces anti-inflammatory effects via endoplasmic reticulum stress in acute pancreatitis to play a protective role.

  13. Nitric Oxide Is a Mediator of Antiproliferative Effects Induced by Proinflammatory Cytokines on Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Lopez, Laura; Blandino-Rosano, Manuel; Perez-Arana, Gonzalo; Lechuga-Sancho, Alfonso; Aguilar-Diosdado, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in several biological processes. In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), proinflammatory cytokines activate an inducible isoform of NOS (iNOS) in β cells, thus increasing NO levels and inducing apoptosis. The aim of the current study is to determine the role of NO (1) in the antiproliferative effect of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α on cultured islet β cells and (2) during the insulitis stage prior to diabetes onset using the Biobreeding (BB) rat strain as T1DM model. Our results indicate that NO donors exert an antiproliferative effect on β cell obtained from cultured pancreatic islets, similar to that induced by proinflammatory cytokines. This cytokine-induced antiproliferative effect can be reversed by L-NMMA, a general NOS inhibitor, and is independent of guanylate cyclase pathway. Assays using NOS isoform specific inhibitors suggest that the NO implicated in the antiproliferative effect of proinflammatory cytokines is produced by inducible NOS, although not in an exclusive way. In BB rats, early treatment with L-NMMA improves the initial stage of insulitis. We conclude that NO is an important mediator of antiproliferative effect induced by proinflammatory cytokines on cultured β cell and is implicated in β-cell proliferation impairment observed early from initial stage of insulitis. PMID:23840099

  14. Nitric Oxide Is a Mediator of Antiproliferative Effects Induced by Proinflammatory Cytokines on Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Quintana-Lopez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is involved in several biological processes. In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, proinflammatory cytokines activate an inducible isoform of NOS (iNOS in β cells, thus increasing NO levels and inducing apoptosis. The aim of the current study is to determine the role of NO (1 in the antiproliferative effect of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α on cultured islet β cells and (2 during the insulitis stage prior to diabetes onset using the Biobreeding (BB rat strain as T1DM model. Our results indicate that NO donors exert an antiproliferative effect on β cell obtained from cultured pancreatic islets, similar to that induced by proinflammatory cytokines. This cytokine-induced antiproliferative effect can be reversed by L-NMMA, a general NOS inhibitor, and is independent of guanylate cyclase pathway. Assays using NOS isoform specific inhibitors suggest that the NO implicated in the antiproliferative effect of proinflammatory cytokines is produced by inducible NOS, although not in an exclusive way. In BB rats, early treatment with L-NMMA improves the initial stage of insulitis. We conclude that NO is an important mediator of antiproliferative effect induced by proinflammatory cytokines on cultured β cell and is implicated in β-cell proliferation impairment observed early from initial stage of insulitis.

  15. miR-29c suppresses pancreatic cancer liver metastasis in an orthotopic implantation model in nude mice and affects survival in pancreatic cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yongkang; Li, Jianwei; Chen, Zhiyu; Li, Xiaowu; Zheng, Shuguo; Yi, Dong; Zhong, Ai; Chen, Jian

    2015-06-01

    We investigated mechanisms of pancreatic cancer metastasis and defined the biological role of miR-29c in pancreatic cancer metastasis. After two rounds of cell selection in vivo, pancreatic cancer cells with various metastatic potentials derived from spontaneous liver metastases were used as a model of pancreatic cancer to determine the role of miR-29c in pancreatic cancer metastasis. Pancreatic cancer samples were analyzed for miRNA-29c expression, and these levels were associated with survival between groups. miR-29c suppresses cell migration and invasion by targeting the MMP2 3'UTR. Overexpression of miR-29c suppresses pancreatic cancer liver metastasis in a nude mouse orthotopic implantation model. miR-29c expression was associated with metastasis and pancreatic cancer patient survival. miR-29c plays an important role in mediating pancreatic cancer metastasis to the liver by targeting MMP2. Therefore, miR-29c may serve as a novel marker of pancreatic cancer metastasis and possibly as a therapeutic target to treat pancreatic cancer liver metastasis.

  16. Isolation, Culture and Induced Differentiation of Fetal Porcine Islet Derived Pancreatic Stem Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ruo-peng; ZHANG Hui-ru; WANG Yun; QIAO Hai; ZHAO Ting; SHEN Wen-zheng; DOU Zhong-ying

    2007-01-01

    To isolate and culture the porcine pancreatic stem cells and investigate their function, the fetal porcine pancreatic stem cells were isolated by the method of suspending plus adhering culture. The isolated cells were then identified by irnmunohistochemical staining, and their culture viability measured through the MTT method in vitro. This induced them to differentiate into endocrine cells and detect their function. The isolated IPSCS did not express nestin, but expressed CK-19, a marker of ductal epithelia cells and oc-actin, a smooth muscle marker, demonstrating the growth characteristics of ES-like cells, and strong proliferative ability, after 18 passages. They could excrete insulin, and showed ultrastructure changes after being induced. Porcine pancreatic stem cells can be isolated by this method, induced to form islet-like clusters, and can secret insulin.

  17. 不同pH值L-精氨酸诱导小鼠急性胰腺炎模型效果观察%Effect of Acute Pancreatitis Model Induced by Different pH Values of L-arginine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石占利; 陈芝芸; 高凯

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of acute pancreatitis model induced by different pH values of L-arginine. Methods: Seventy BABL/C mice were randomly divided into 3 groups. Two groups were treated with L-arginine solution of pH 11 and pH 8,respectively. L-arginine solutions were intraperitoneally injected 250mg/100g body weight twice at an interval of 1 hour. Another group served as control and was treated with same vol⁃ume of saline. Serum amylase was determined and pancreas pathological score and mortality rate were calculated in all groups at the time of 24 and 48 hours after injection. Results: Compared with the control group, the se⁃rum amylase levels were significantly increased in the pH11 group and pH8 group at the time of 24 and 48 hours(P<0.01). Compared with the pH11 group, the serum amylase levels in the pH8 group were significantly de⁃creased at the time of 24h and 48h(P<0.01), meanwhile, the pancreas pathological score and mortality rate in the pH8 group were also decreased significantly at both time points(P<0.05). Conclusion: The pH value of L-ar⁃ginine solution has a significant impact on the degree of pancreatic injury and animal mortality. The strong alka⁃line of L-arginine which does damage to abdominal organs is an important reason for instability of acute pancre⁃as model.%  目的:观察不同pH值L-精氨酸腹腔注射诱导急性胰腺炎模型的效果.方法:70只BABL/C小鼠,随机分为pH11组、pH8组和对照组,分别采用pH值为11的20%L-精氨酸溶液、pH值为8的20%L-精氨酸溶液、等体积生理盐水,间隔1h 2次小鼠腹腔内注射(250mg/100g体质量)的方法.在24h和48h分别观测三组小鼠的血清淀粉酶、胰腺病理学评分,并统计死亡率.结果:pH11组、pH8组小鼠在24h和48h的血清淀粉酶水平均较对照组显著升高(P<0.05,P<0.01);PH11组较pH8组24h和48h血清淀粉酶水平均升高更明显(P<0.01);pH8组24h和48h胰腺病理评分均较pH11

  18. Bufalin inhibits pancreatic cancer by inducing cell cycle arrest via the c-Myc/NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Xiao, Xiang-Yang; Shou, Qi-Yang; Yan, Jun-Feng; Chen, Long; Fu, Hui-Ying; Wang, Jian-Chao

    2016-12-04

    Bufalin, a cardiotonic steroid isolated from toad venom (bufo gargarizans Cantor or B. melanotictus Schneider), has widely demonstrated antitumor effects and exhibits potential antitumor activity in various human cancer cells lines. The main characteristic of cancers including pancreatic cancer is the ability of uncontrolled proliferation. The aim of this study is to clarify the underlying mechanism by which bufalin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. The effect of bufalin on the suppression of tumor growth in vivo was studied in a bioluminescent mouse model generated using the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3-luc2 and the cytotoxicity was evaluated in BcPc3 and Sw1990 cells with MTT. Flow cytometry and western blotting analyses were utilized to detect the effect of bufalin on the cell cycle and to detect the cell cycle-related proteins, respectively. Then, a luciferase reporter assay was applied to screen the activity of potent transcription factors following bufalin exposure and their expression was detected by western blotting. Bufalin suppressed tumor growth in a bioluminescence mouse model generated using BxPC3-luc2 cells and inhibited cell proliferation in vitro through inducing cell cycle arrest at S phase. Bufalin treatment inhibited cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 expression and therefore increased expression of p27, a regulatory molecular that controls cell cycle transition from S to G2 phase. Furthermore, luciferase reporter screening studies revealed that bufalin inhibited the expression and activity of the transcription factors c-Myc and NF-κB, which might cause cell cycle arrest at S phase and the inhibition of cell proliferation. Taken together, our results indicate that bufalin can inhibit pancreatic cancer by targeting c-Myc, thus suggesting that the mechanism of c-Myc regulation by bufalin might be worthy of further study regarding its potential as a therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  19. Solanine Induces Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hongwei Sun; Chongqing Lv; Longlong Yang; Yingxiu Wang; Qingshun Zhang; Suhui Yu; Hongru Kong; Meng Wang; Jianming Xie; Chunwu Zhang; Mengtao Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptos...

  20. Acute pancreatitis as initial presentation of cocaine-induced vasculitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbameru, Ayorinde; Jandali, Mohammed; Issa, Amer; Quwatli, Waleed; Woodlock, Timothy; Choudhry, Wajid

    2015-03-20

    Levamisole-contaminated cocaine is an increasingly reported cause of vasculitis and immunologic abnormalities in cocaine abusers. The systemic effects of vasculitis are commonly seen in the dermatologic, hematologic and renal systems but rarely the gastrointestinal system. We present an atypical case of cocaine-induced vasculitis presenting initially as an acute pancreatitis and then rapidly progressing to involve multi-organ systems over the next couple of weeks. Internists should recognize that acute pancreatitis can present as an atypical and rare initial systemic manifestation of cocaine-induced vasculitis.

  1. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Capsaicin-Induced Apoptosis of Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengzhang Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin, main pungent ingredient of hot chilli peppers, has been shown to have anticarcinogenic effect on various cancer cells through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic effect of capsaicin on human pancreatic cancer cells in both in vitro and in vivo systems, as well as the possible mechanisms involved. In vitro, treatment of both the pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and SW1990 with capsaicin resulted in cells growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, a marker of the endoplasmic-reticulum-stress- (ERS- mediated apoptosis pathway, by specific siRNA attenuated capsaicin-induced apoptosis both in PANC-1 and SW1990 cells. Moreover, in vivo studies capsaicin effectively inhibited the growth and metabolism of pancreatic cancer and prolonged the survival time of pancreatic cancer xenograft tumor-induced mice. Furthermore, capsaicin increased the expression of some key ERS markers, including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, phosphoprotein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (phosphoPERK, and phosphoeukaryotic initiation factor-2α (phospho-eIF2α, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 and GADD153 in tumor tissues. In conclusion, we for the first time provide important evidence to support the involvement of ERS in the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by capsaicin.

  2. Heparin improves organ microcirculatory disturbances in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Dobosz; Lucjanna Mionskowska; Stanislaw Ha(a); Sebastian Dobrowolski; Dariusz Dymecki; Zdzislaw Wajda

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Microcirculatory disturbances are important early pathophysiological events in various organs during acute pancreatitis. The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in microperfusion of the pancreas, liver, kidney, stomach,colon, skeletal muscle, and to investigate the influence of heparin on the organ microcirculation in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis.METHODS: Acute pancreatitis was induced by 4 intraperitoneal injections of caerulein (Cn) (15 μg/kg). The organ microcirculation was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Serum interleukin 6 and hematocrit levels were analysed.RESULTS: Acute pancreatitis resulted in a significant drop of microperfusion in all examined organs. Heparin administration (2×2.5 mg/kg) improved the microcirculation in pancreas (36.9±4% vs 75.9±10%), liver (56.6±6% vs 75.2±16%), kidney (45.1±6% vs 79.3±5%), stomach (65.2±8% vs78.1±19%), colon (69.8±6% vs102.5±19%),and skeletal muscle (59.2±6% vs 77.9±13%). Heparin treatment lowered IL-6 (359.0±66 U/mL vs288.5±58 U/mL)and hematocrit level (53±4% vs 46±3%).CONCLUSION: Heparin administration has a positive influence on organ microcirculatory disturbances accompanying experimental Ch-induced acute pancreatitis.

  3. An impacted pancreatic stone in the papilla induced acute obstructive cholangitis in a patient with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Kwang-Ho; Kwon, Chang-Il; Yoon, Sang-Wook; Kim, Won Hee; Lee, Jung Min; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hong, Sung Pyo; Park, Pil Won

    2012-03-01

    Obstructive jaundice is very rarely caused by impaction of a pancreatic stone in the papilla. We report here on a case of obstructive jaundice with acute cholangitis that was caused by an impacted pancreatic stone in the papilla in a patient with chronic pancreatitis. A 48-year-old man presented with acute obstructive cholangitis. Abdominal computed tomography with the reconstructed image revealed distal biliary obstruction that was caused by a pancreatic stone in the pancreatic head, and there was also pancreatic ductal dilatation and parenchymal atrophy of the pancreatic body and tail with multiple calcifications. Emergency duodenoscopy revealed an impacted pancreatic stone in the papilla. Precut papillotomy using a needle knife was performed, followed by removal of the pancreatic stone using grasping forceps. After additional sphincterotomy, a large amount of dark-greenish bile juice gushed out. The patient rapidly improved and he has remained well.

  4. Genotype tunes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissue tension to induce matricellular fibrosis and tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laklai, Hanane; Miroshnikova, Yekaterina A; Pickup, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    by increasing matricellular fibrosis and tissue tension. In contrast, epithelial STAT3 ablation attenuated tumor progression by reducing the stromal stiffening and epithelial contractility induced by loss of TGF-β signaling. In PDAC patient biopsies, higher matricellular protein and activated STAT3 were......Fibrosis compromises pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) treatment and contributes to patient mortality, yet antistromal therapies are controversial. We found that human PDACs with impaired epithelial transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling have high epithelial STAT3 activity and develop...... stiff, matricellular-enriched fibrosis associated with high epithelial tension and shorter patient survival. In several KRAS-driven mouse models, both the loss of TGF-β signaling and elevated β1-integrin mechanosignaling engaged a positive feedback loop whereby STAT3 signaling promotes tumor progression...

  5. Acute pancreatitis induced by mycophenolate mofetil in a kidney transplant patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einollahi Behzad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a rare life-threatening complication in patients after kidney transplantation. Here we described a 56-year-old man who had received a living related kidney transplant for an end-stage renal disease. In his regular follow-up, his serum creatinine was gradually increased and he underwent an allograft biopsy, which revealed an interstitial nephritis/tubular atrophy grade II. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF was prescribed to control chronic allograft nephropathy. He presented with complaints of severe abdominal pain, vomiting, loss of appetite and fever requiring hospital admission twelve days later. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed on the basis of laboratory data and imaging findings during hospital admission. There was no history of alcohol consumption in our patient. Unfortunately he died one week later and autopsy findings demonstrated acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The bladder drainage of this patients was normal. Laboratory findings in this patient did not endorse infections and other possibilities regarding the etiology of acute pancreatitis in this patient. Therefore, we concluded that acute pancreatitis in near the patient was induced by drugs and basis on our evidence, MMF is the most important suspect. This study suggests that acute pancreatitis can be considered as a side effect of MMF.

  6. Dihydro-Resveratrol Ameliorates Lung Injury in Rats with Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ze-Si; Ku, Chuen Fai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Shi, Xiao-Ke; Wang, Hong-Qi; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Tsang, Siu Wai; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process originated in the pancreas; however, it often leads to systemic complications that affect distant organs. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is indeed the predominant cause of death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. In this study, we aimed to delineate the ameliorative effect of dihydro-resveratrol, a prominent analog of trans-resveratrol, against acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury and the underlying molecular actions. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats with repetitive injections of cerulein (50 µg/kg/h) and a shot of lipopolysaccharide (7.5 mg/kg). By means of histological examination and biochemical assays, the severity of lung injury was assessed in the aspects of tissue damages, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. When treated with dihydro-resveratrol, pulmonary architectural distortion, hemorrhage, interstitial edema, and alveolar thickening were significantly reduced in rats with acute pancreatitis. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the activity of myeloperoxidase in pulmonary tissues were notably repressed. Importantly, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation was attenuated. This study is the first to report the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol ameliorated acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury via an inhibitory modulation of pro-inflammatory response, which was associated with a suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  7. [Structural alterations in pancreatic islets in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats treated with of bioactive additive on the basis of Gymnema sylvestre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snigur, G L; Samokhina, M P; Pisarev, V B; Spasov, A A; Bulanov, A E

    2008-01-01

    The structural alterations in pancreatic islets in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were studied after the administration of Gymnema sylvestre extract or its composition. Diabetes mellitus was modeled by daily injection of streptozotocin (20 mg/kg for 5 days) and single injection of 0.2 ml of complete Freund's adjuvant, Only the animals with the blood glucose level exceeding 15 mmol/l were included in the experiment. B- and A-endocrinocytes were demonstrated using immunocytochemistry. The proportions of the area of the pancreatic islets, occupied by B- and A-endocrinocytes, as well as the volume fraction of the pancreatic islets within the pancreas, were determined. In the model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, the part of the total islet area occupied by B-endocrinocytes, was diminished in the pancreatic islets located in all the zones of the gland. Prophylactic administration of Gymnema sylvestre extract or its composition tended to restore the area occupied by B-endocrinocytes in the pancreatic islets. These results indicate the equal potency of the composition and extract of Gymnema sylvestre to induce the regeneration of B-endocrinocytes.

  8. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan L. Iovanna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis.

  9. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasseur, Sophie, E-mail: sophie.vasseur@inserm.fr; Tomasini, Richard; Tournaire, Roselyne; Iovanna, Juan L. [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, BP 915,13288 Marseille cedex 9 (France)

    2010-12-16

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis.

  10. Acute Pancreatitis Induced by Methimazole in a Patient With Subclinical Hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Agito MD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report here a unique case of methimazole (MMI-induced pancreatitis. To our knowledge, this is the sixth case reported in the literature and the first diagnosed in a patient with toxic multinodular goiter. A 51-year-old Caucasian female with a history of benign multinodular goiter and subclinical hyperthyroidism was started on MMI 10 mg orally daily. Three weeks later, she developed sharp epigastric pain, diarrhea, lack of appetite, and fever. Her lipase was elevated 5 times the upper limit of normal, consistent with acute pancreatitis. There was no history of hypertriglyceridemia, or alcohol abuse. Abdominal computed tomography was consistent with acute uncomplicated pancreatitis, without evidence of gallstones or tumors. MMI was discontinued, and her hyperthyroid symptoms were managed with propranolol. Her acute episode of pancreatitis quickly resolved clinically and biochemically. One year later, she redeveloped mild clinical symptoms of hyperthyroidism with biochemical evidence of subclinical hyperthyroidism. MMI 10 mg orally daily was restarted. Five days later, she experienced progressive abdominal discomfort. Her lipase was elevated 12 times the upper limit of normal, and the abdominal computed tomography was again compatible with acute uncomplicated pancreatitis. MMI was again discontinued, which was followed by rapid resolution of her pancreatitis. The patient is currently considering undergoing definitive therapy with radioactive iodine ablation. Our case as well as previous case reports in the literature should raise awareness about the possibility of pancreatitis in subjects treated with MMI in the presence of suggestive symptoms. If the diagnosis is confirmed by elevated pancreatic enzymes, the drug should be discontinued.

  11. Acute Pancreatitis Induced by Methimazole in a Patient With Subclinical Hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agito, Katrina; Manni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We report here a unique case of methimazole (MMI)-induced pancreatitis. To our knowledge, this is the sixth case reported in the literature and the first diagnosed in a patient with toxic multinodular goiter. A 51-year-old Caucasian female with a history of benign multinodular goiter and subclinical hyperthyroidism was started on MMI 10 mg orally daily. Three weeks later, she developed sharp epigastric pain, diarrhea, lack of appetite, and fever. Her lipase was elevated 5 times the upper limit of normal, consistent with acute pancreatitis. There was no history of hypertriglyceridemia, or alcohol abuse. Abdominal computed tomography was consistent with acute uncomplicated pancreatitis, without evidence of gallstones or tumors. MMI was discontinued, and her hyperthyroid symptoms were managed with propranolol. Her acute episode of pancreatitis quickly resolved clinically and biochemically. One year later, she redeveloped mild clinical symptoms of hyperthyroidism with biochemical evidence of subclinical hyperthyroidism. MMI 10 mg orally daily was restarted. Five days later, she experienced progressive abdominal discomfort. Her lipase was elevated 12 times the upper limit of normal, and the abdominal computed tomography was again compatible with acute uncomplicated pancreatitis. MMI was again discontinued, which was followed by rapid resolution of her pancreatitis. The patient is currently considering undergoing definitive therapy with radioactive iodine ablation. Our case as well as previous case reports in the literature should raise awareness about the possibility of pancreatitis in subjects treated with MMI in the presence of suggestive symptoms. If the diagnosis is confirmed by elevated pancreatic enzymes, the drug should be discontinued.

  12. The Herbal Medicine Cordyceps sinensis Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Streptozotocin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Cao, Diyong; Liu, Hua; Liu, Xinghai; Mai, Wenli; Lan, Haitao; Huo, Wen; Zheng, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Our previous work found that Cordyceps sinensis (CS) improves the activity and secretory function of pancreatic islet beta cells. The objective was to observe a further possible role of CS in the protection of insulin-secreting cells. A rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was developed with streptozotocin (STZ) and a high-energy fat diet (HFD). CS was administered in the successful model of rats with type 2 diabetes. After 4 weeks, the biochemistry index of blood samples was measured, and pathologic observation was performed by immunohistochemistry. In the rats with type 2 diabetes induced by a HFD and STZ, the levels of fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin were elevated, and the insulin sensitivity index was decreased. Pathologic examination found an increased number of apoptotic cells, an elevated protein expression of pro-apoptotic C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and an increased c-Jun level by means of JNK phosphorylation, responsive to the endoplasmic reticulum stress of islet beta cells. With treatment by CS for 4 weeks, the elevated levels of both fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin in the rats with type 2 diabetes were significantly lower, and the decreased insulin sensitivity index was reversed. Compared to the control rats with type 2 diabetes, CS application significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells and decreased protein expression of both CHOP and c-Jun. The herbal compound CS could protect pancreatic beta cells from the pro-apoptotic endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by HFD-STZ. This suggests an alternative approach to treating type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Establishment of risk model for pancreatic cancer in Chinese Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-Hua Lu; Li Wang; Hui Li; Jia-Ming Qian; Rui-Xue Deng; Lu Zhou

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate risk factors for pancreatic cancer and establish a risk model for Han population.METHODS: This population-based case-control study was carried out from January 2002 to April 2004. One hundred and nineteen pancreatic cancer patients and 238 healthy people completed the questionnaire which was used for risk factor analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratio (ORs), 95%confidence intervals (Cis) and β value, which were further used to establish the risk model.RESULTS: According to the study, people who have smoked more than 17 pack-years had a higher risk to develop pancreatic cancer compared to non-smokers or light smokers (not more than 17 pack-years) (OR 1.98;95% CI 1.11-3.49, P=0.017). More importantly, heavy smokers in men had increased risk for developing pancreatic cancer (OR 2.11; 95%CI 1.18-3.78, P=0.012)than women. Heavy alcohol drinkers (>20 cup-years)had increased risk for pancreatic cancer (OR 3.68;95%CI 1.60-8.44). Daily diet with high meat intak was also linked to pancreatic cancer. Moreover, 18.5% of the pancreatic cancer patients had diabetes mellitus compared to the control group of 5.8% (P= 0.0003). Typical symptoms of pancreatic cancer were anorexia, upper abdominal pain, bloating, jaundice and weight loss. Each risk factor was assigned a value to represent its impor tance associated with pancreatic cancer. Subsequently by adding all the points together, a risk scoring model was established with a value higher than 45 as being at risk to develop pancreatic cancer.CONCLUSION: Smoking, drinking, high meat diet and diabetes are major risk factors for pancreatic cancer. A risk model for pancreatic cancer in Chinese Hah population has been established with an 88.9% sensitivity and a 97.6% specificity.

  14. Caerulin-induced pancreatitis in rats: Histological and genetic expression changes from acute phase to recuperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javier Maga(n)a-Gómez; Guillermo López-Cervantes; Ana María Calderón de la Barca

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the histological and pancreatitis-associated protein mRNA accumulation changes of pancreas from acute phase of caerulin-induced pancreatitis to recuperation in rats.METHODS: Acute pancreatitis was induced by caerulein in male Wistar rats and followed up for 90 d by histologicai and mRNA analyses of pancreas. Pancreases were dissected at 0, 9, 24 h and 3, 5, 15, 30, 60, 90 d post-induction. Edema (E), polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) infiltration, cytoplasmic vacuolization (V), zymogen granule depletion (ZD) and acinar disorganization (AD) were microscopically evaluated. Accumulation of pancreatitisassociated protein (PAP) and L13A mRNAs were quantifled by real-time PCR.RESULTS: The main histological changes appeared at 9 h post-induction for PMN infiltration and cytoplasmic V, while at 24 h and 3 d for E and ZD, respectively. All the parameters were recovered after 5 d, except for ZD which delayed more than 30 d. The main AD was observed after 15 d and values returned to normal after 30 d. Similarly to histological changes, accumulation of the PAP mRNA was increased at 9 h with the highest accumulation at 24 h and differences disappeared after 5 d.CONCLUSION: From the acute phase to recuperation of pancreatitis, regeneration and re-differentiation of pancreas occur and PAP expression is exclusively an acute response of pancreatitis.

  15. Erlotinib-Induced Episcleritis in a Patient with Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Shahrokni

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Erlotinib is a relatively new anilinoquinazoline indicated for treatment of pancreatic cancer in combination with gemcitabine. It is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that specifically targets epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, which is commonly overexpressed and/or mutated in solid tumors. Active competitive inhibition of adenosine triphosphate, inhibits downstream signal transduction of ligand dependent EGFR activation. EGFR kinase inhibitors are less toxic than conventional chemotherapy as they are relatively specific for tumor cells. Common side effects include acneiform (papulopustular rash, diarrhea, edema, pruritus, dry skin and alopecia. Case report This article reports the case of a 55-year-old Caucasian female with recurrent pancreatic cancer who developed episcleritis after seventeen days of treatment with erlotinib. Symptoms completely resolved four weeks after drug discontinuation. Conclusions To our knowledge, erlotinibinduced episcleritis has not been previously described.

  16. Methomyl-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Possible Etiological Association

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannides M; Christodoulides P; Symeonides M; Vounou E; Tsikkos S; Achillews G; Koukouvas M; Makrides C

    2005-01-01

    CONTEXT: N-methyl carbamate insecticides are widely used in homes, gardens and agriculture. They share the capacity to inhibit cholinesterase enzymes with organophosphates and therefore share similar symptomatology during acute and chronic exposures. One of the serious effects of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication is the development of acute pancreatitis and subsequent intrapancreatic fluid formation. CASE REPORT: An 18-year old Caucasian man was admitted to our Intensive Care Unit wi...

  17. Ligustrazine alleviates acute renal injury in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Xin Zhang; Sheng-Chun Dang; Jian-Guo Qu; Xue-Qing Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of ligustrazine, a traditional Chinese medicine, on renal injury in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP).METHODS: A total of 192 rats were randomly divided into three groups: control (C group), ANP without treatment (P group), and ANP treated with ligustrazine (T group). Each group was further divided into 0.5,2, 6, 12 h subgroups. All rats were anesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of sodium pentobarbital.Sodium taurocholate was infused through the pancreatic membrane to induce ANP. T group was infused sodium taurocholate as above, and 0.6% ligustrazine was then administered via the femoral vein. Serum urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) concentrations were measured for the evaluation of renal function. The effects of ligustrazine on the severity of renal injury were assessed by renal function, TXA2/PGI2 and histopathological changes. Renal blood flow was determined by the radioactive microsphere technique (RMT).RESULTS: Compared with control group, the renal blood flow in P group was decreased significantly. Serious renal and pancreatic damages were found in P group, the BUN and Cr levels were elevated significantly, and the ratio of TXA2 to PGI2 was increased at 2, 6 and 12 h. Compared with P group, the blood flow of kidney was elevated significantly at 6 and 12 h after induction of ANP, the renal and pancreatic damages were attenuated, and the BUN and Cr levels were decreased significantly, and the ratio of TXA2 to PGI2 was decreased at 6 and 12 h in T group.CONCLUSION: Microcirculatory disorder (MCD) is an important factor for renal injury in ANP. Ligustrazine can ameliorate the condition of MCD and the damage of pancreas and kidney.

  18. Fatal hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Roerbaek

    2014-01-01

    within 36 h from initial presentation. While second-generation antipsychotics are well known to be causally linked to diabetes and hyperlipidaemia, this is to my knowledge the first-described case of a fatal triad of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly......A 27-year-old man treated with quetiapine for anxiety disorder developed hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was otherwise physically healthy with no family history of hyperlipidaemia. Despite aggressive intensive therapy he died of multiorgan failure...

  19. Effect of melatonin on the severity of L-arginine-induced experimental acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annamaria Szabolcs; Zoltan Rakonczay Jr; Janos Lonovics; Tamas Takacs; Russel J Reiter; Tamas Letoha; Peter Hegyi; Gabor Papai; Ilona Varga; Katalin Jarmay; Jozsef Kaszaki; Reka Sari

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of melatonin pre- and post-treatment on the severity of L-arginine (L-Arg) -induced experimental pancreatitis in rats.METHODS: Male Wistar rats (25) were divided into five groups. Those in group A received two injections of 3.2 g/kg body weight L-Arg i.p. at an interval of 1 h. In group MA, the rats were treated with 50 mg/kg body weight melatonin i.p. 30 min prior to L-Arg administration. In group AM, the rats received the same dose of melatonin 1 h after L-Arg was given. In group M, a single dose of melatonin was administered as described previously. In group C the control animals received physiological saline injections i.p. All rats were exsanguinated 24 h after the second L-Arg injection.RESULTS: L-Arg administration caused severe necrotizing pancreatitis confirmed by the significant elevations in the serum amylase level, the pancreatic weight/body weight ratio (pw/bw), the pancreatic IL-6 content and the myeloperoxidase activity, relative to the control values. Elevation of the serum amylase level was significantly reduced in rats given melatonin following L-Arg compared to rats injected with L-Arg only. The activities of the pancreatic antioxidant enzymes (Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) and catalase (CAT)) were significantly increased 24 h after pancreatitis induction. Melatonin given in advance of L-Arg significantly reduced the pancreatic CAT activity relative to that in the rats treated with L-Arg alone. In the liver, L-Arg significantly increased the lipid peroxidation level, and the glutathione peroxidase and Cu/Zn-SOD activities, whereas the Mn-SOD activity was reduced as compared to the control rats.Melatonin pre-treatment prevented these changes.CONCLUSION: Melatonin is an antioxidant that is able to counteract some of the L-Arg-induced changes during acute pancreatitis, and may therefore be helpful in the supportive therapy of patients with acute necrotizing.pancreatitis.

  20. Gastric variceal bleeding due to pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotto, Antonio; Lieberman, Michael; Pochapin, Mark

    2014-03-24

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is a common clinical scenario. In the upper gastrointestinal tract, gastric varices can be frequently overlooked on endoscopy, particularly if not suspected or volume depleted. We report a case of suspected gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a childhood history of pancreatitis, who also experienced severe epigastric pain while in hospital. After transfer to an academic medical centre, the presence of gastric varices was identified and presumed to be due to splenic vein thrombosis. Pancreatitis is the most common cause of splenic vein thrombosis and accords with the patient's history, even though it occurred many years previously. This case highlights the importance of recognising pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis as a possible aetiology for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  1. Treating Diet-Induced Diabetes and Obesity with Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells and Antidiabetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Bruin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived pancreatic progenitor cells effectively reverse hyperglycemia in rodent models of type 1 diabetes, but their capacity to treat type 2 diabetes has not been reported. An immunodeficient model of type 2 diabetes was generated by high-fat diet (HFD feeding in SCID-beige mice. Exposure to HFDs did not impact the maturation of macroencapsulated pancreatic progenitor cells into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells following transplantation, and the cell therapy improved glucose tolerance in HFD-fed transplant recipients after 24 weeks. However, since diet-induced hyperglycemia and obesity were not fully ameliorated by transplantation alone, a second cohort of HFD-fed mice was treated with pancreatic progenitor cells combined with one of three antidiabetic drugs. All combination therapies rapidly improved body weight and co-treatment with either sitagliptin or metformin improved hyperglycemia after only 12 weeks. Therefore, a stem cell-based therapy may be effective for treating type 2 diabetes, particularly in combination with antidiabetic drugs.

  2. Protective Effect of Tetrandrine on Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-lin Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tet is a type of alkaloid extracted from Stephania tetrandra, and it has recently been demonstrated that Tet can protect against inflammation and free radical injury and inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators. The present study was designed to observe the protective effect of Tet on sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. The rat model of SAP was induced by retrograde bile duct injection of sodium taurocholate and then treated with Verapamil and Tet. The results showed that Tet can reduce NF-κB activation in pancreas issue, inhibit the SAP cascade, and improve SAP through inducing pancreas acinar cell apoptosis and stabilizing intracellular calcium in the pancreas, thus mitigating the damage to the pancreas. Our study revealed that Tet may reduce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS to protect against damage, and these roles may be mediated through the NF-κB pathway to improve the proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory imbalance.

  3. Protective effects of MCP-1 inhibitor on a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Xiong Zhou; Xue-Juan Zhu; Xiao-Ling Ding; Hong Zhang; Jian-Ping Chen; Hui Qiang; Hai-Feng Zhang; Qun Wei

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chemokines and their receptors play key roles in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. This study aimed to establish a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for investigating monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) expression in the pathogenesis of the disease. We assessed the effects of the inhibitor of MCP-1, Bindarit, on SAP and explored the mechanisms underlying SAP. METHODS: Seventy-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a saline control group (group S), an SAP group (group P), and a Bindarit group (group T). The SAP model was induced by retrograde infusion of 4% sodium taurocholate into the bilio-pancreatic duct. Based on the SAP model, Bindarit was injected intraperitoneally in group T, and 0.5%methyl cellulose was injected intraperitoneally in groups S and P. In group S, saline was retrogradely infused into the bili-pancreatic duct. Serum amylase levels and the histological changes in the pancreas were assessed at different time-points in each group. Expression of MCP-1 in serum was measured by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA). MCP-1 protein and mRNA expression levels were detected by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: Serum amylase levels in groups P and T were higher than those in group S. Serum amylase levels were signiifcantly lower in group T than in group P at 6 and 12 hours after operation. The levels of MCP-1 in serum at 6 and 12 hours after operation in group P were signiifcantly higher than in group S, and signiifcantly lower in group T than in group P at 6 and 12 hours after operation. The pathological damage in the pancreas was milder in group T than in group P. MCP-1 protein and mRNA expression levels in the pancreas were higher in groups P and T than in group S. These expression levels were positively correlated with the pathological damage of pancreatic tissues. The activity of MCP-1 in group T was

  4. miR-137 Modulates a Tumor Suppressor Network-Inducing Senescence in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Neault

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Activating K-Ras mutations occurs frequently in pancreatic cancers and is implicated in their development. Cancer-initiating events, such as oncogenic Ras activation, lead to the induction of cellular senescence, a tumor suppressor response. During senescence, the decreased levels of KDM4A lysine demethylase contribute to p53 activation, however, the mechanism by which KDM4A is downregulated is unknown. We show that miR-137 targets KDM4A mRNA during Ras-induced senescence and activates both p53 and retinoblastoma (pRb tumor suppressor pathways. Restoring the KDM4A expression contributed to bypass of miR-137-induced senescence and inhibition of endogenous miR-137 with an miRNA sponge-compromised Ras-induced senescence. miR-137 levels are significantly reduced in human pancreatic tumors, consistent with previous studies revealing a defective senescence response in this cancer type. Restoration of miR-137 expression inhibited proliferation and promoted senescence of pancreatic cancer cells. These results suggest that modulating levels of miR-137 may be important for triggering tumor suppressor networks in pancreatic cancer.

  5. Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegård, Jakob; Mortensen, Frank Viborg; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a putative risk factor for pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the magnitude and temporality of this association. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for observational studies investigating the association between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. We...... computed overall effect estimates (EEs) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a random-effects meta-analytic model. The EEs were stratified by length of follow-up from chronic pancreatitis diagnosis to pancreatic cancer (lag period). Robustness of the results was examined in sensitivity...... analyses. We identified 13 eligible studies. Pooled EEs for pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis were 16.16 (95% CI: 12.59-20.73) for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer within 2 years from their chronic pancreatitis diagnosis. The risk of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic...

  6. Trypsinogen activation in acute and chronic pancreatitis: Is it a prerequisite?

    OpenAIRE

    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2011-01-01

    Trypsinogen activation is sufficient to induce acute pancreatitis in an experimental model. However, whether it is a requirement for the pathogenesis of acute and chronic pancreatitis remains to be explored.

  7. Fasting cycles potentiate the efficacy of gemcitabine treatment in in vitro and in vivo pancreatic cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Tommaso; Panebianco, Concetta; Saracino, Chiara; Pereira, Stephen P.; Graziano, Paolo; Pazienza, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Background/aims Pancreatic cancer (PC) is ranked as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite recent advances in treatment options, a modest impact on the outcome of the disease is observed so far. Short-term fasting cycles have been shown to potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapy against glioma. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of fasting cycles on the efficacy of gemcitabine, a standard treatment for PC patients, in vitro and in an in vivo pancreatic cancer mouse xenograft model. Materials and Methods BxPC-3, MiaPaca-2 and Panc-1 cells were cultured in standard and fasting mimicking culturing condition to evaluate the effects of gemcitabine. Pancreatic cancer xenograft mice were subjected to 24h starvation prior to gemcitabine injection to assess the tumor volume and weight as compared to mice fed ad libitum. Results Fasted pancreatic cancer cells showed increased levels of equilibrative nucleoside transporter (hENT1), the transporter of gemcitabine across the cell membrane, and decreased ribonucleotide reductase M1 (RRM1) levels as compared to those cultured in standard medium. Gemcitabine was more effective in inducing cell death on fasted cells as compared to controls. Consistently, xenograft pancreatic cancer mice subjected to fasting cycles prior to gemcitabine injection displayed a decrease of more than 40% in tumor growth. Conclusion Fasting cycles enhance gemcitabine effect in vitro and in the in vivo PC xenograft mouse model. These results suggest that restrictive dietary interventions could enhance the efficacy of existing cancer treatments in pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:26176887

  8. Ethanol suppresses carbamylcholine-induced intracellular calcium oscillation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Mi Na; Kim, Min Jae; Koong, Hwa Soo; Kim, Dong Kwan; Kim, Se Hoon; Park, Hyung Seo

    2017-09-01

    Oscillation of intracellular calcium levels is closely linked to initiating secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells. Excessive alcohol consumption is known to relate to a variety of disorders in the digestive system, including the exocrine pancreas. In this study, we have investigated the role and mechanism of ethanol on carbamylcholine (CCh)-induced intracellular calcium oscillation in murine pancreatic acinar cells. Ethanol at concentrations of 30 and 100 mM reversibly suppressed CCh-induced Ca(2+) oscillation in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of ethanol has no effect on the store-operated calcium entry induced by 10 μM of CCh. Ethanol significantly reduced the initial calcium peak induced by low concentrations of CCh and therefore, the CCh-induced dose-response curve of the initial calcium peak was shifted to the right by ethanol pretreatment. Furthermore, ethanol significantly dose-dependently reduced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced calcium release from the internal stores in permeabilized acinar cells. These results provide evidence that excessive alcohol intake could impair cytosolic calcium oscillation through inhibiting calcium release from intracellular stores in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. High fat diet and GLP-1 drugs induce pancreatic injury in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouse, Rodney, E-mail: rodney.rouse@fda.hhs.gov; Xu, Lin; Stewart, Sharron; Zhang, Jun

    2014-04-15

    Glucagon Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) drugs are currently used to treat type-2 diabetes. Safety concerns for increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal metaplasia have accompanied these drugs. High fat diet (HFD) is a type-2 diabetes risk factor that may affect the response to GLP-1 drug treatment. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of diet and GLP-1 based drugs on the exocrine pancreas in mice. Experiments were designed in a mouse model of insulin resistance created by feeding a HFD or standard diet (STD) for 6 weeks. The GLP-1 drugs, sitagliptin (SIT) and exenatide (EXE) were administered once daily for additional 6 weeks in both mice fed HFD or STD. The results showed that body weight, blood glucose levels, and serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β, and KC) were significantly greater in HFD mice than in STD mice regardless of GLP-1 drug treatment. The semi-quantitative grading showed that pancreatic changes were significantly greater in EXE and SIT-treated mice compared to control and that HFD exacerbated spontaneous exocrine pancreatic changes seen in saline-treated mice on a standard diet. Exocrine pancreatic changes identified in this study included acinar cell injury (hypertrophy, autophagy, apoptosis, necrosis, and atrophy), vascular injury, interstitial edema and inflammation, fat necrosis, and duct changes. These findings support HFD as a risk factor to increased susceptibility/severity for acute pancreatitis and indicate that GLP-1 drugs cause pancreatic injury that can be exacerbated in a HFD environment.

  10. Met receptor tyrosine kinase signaling induces secretion of the angiogenic chemokine interleukin-8/CXCL8 in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen S Hill

    Full Text Available At diagnosis, the majority of pancreatic cancer patients present with advanced disease when curative resection is no longer feasible and current therapeutic treatments are largely ineffective. An improved understanding of molecular targets for effective intervention of pancreatic cancer is thus urgent. The Met receptor tyrosine kinase is one candidate implicated in pancreatic cancer. Notably, Met is over expressed in up to 80% of invasive pancreatic cancers but not in normal ductal cells correlating with poor overall patient survival and increased recurrence rates following surgical resection. However the functional role of Met signaling in pancreatic cancer remains poorly understood. Here we used RNA interference to directly examine the pathobiological importance of increased Met signaling for pancreatic cancer. We show that Met knockdown in pancreatic tumor cells results in decreased cell survival, cell invasion, and migration on collagen I in vitro. Using an orthotopic model for pancreatic cancer, we provide in vivo evidence that Met knockdown reduced tumor burden correlating with decreased cell survival and tumor angiogenesis, with minimal effect on cell growth. Notably, we report that Met signaling regulates the secretion of the pro-angiogenic chemokine interleukin-8/CXCL8. Our data showing that the interleukin-8 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 are not expressed on pancreatic tumor cells, suggests a paracrine mechanism by which Met signaling regulates interleukin-8 secretion to remodel the tumor microenvironment, a novel finding that could have important clinical implications for improving the effectiveness of treatments for pancreatic cancer.

  11. Effects of insulin on human pancreatic cancer progression modeled in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Michelle T; Lim, Gareth E; Skovsø, Søs; Yang, Yu Hsuan Carol; Albrecht, Tobias; Alejandro, Emilyn U; Hoesli, Corinne A; Piret, James M; Warnock, Garth L; Johnson, James D

    2014-11-06

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most lethal cancers, yet it remains understudied and poorly understood. Hyperinsulinemia has been reported to be a risk factor of pancreatic cancer, and the rapid rise of hyperinsulinemia associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes foreshadows a rise in cancer incidence. However, the actions of insulin at the various stages of pancreatic cancer progression remain poorly defined. Here, we examined the effects of a range of insulin doses on signalling, proliferation and survival in three human cell models meant to represent three stages in pancreatic cancer progression: primary pancreatic duct cells, the HPDE immortalized pancreatic ductal cell line, and the PANC1 metastatic pancreatic cancer cell line. Cells were treated with a range of insulin doses, and their proliferation/viability were tracked via live cell imaging and XTT assays. Signal transduction was assessed through the AKT and ERK signalling pathways via immunoblotting. Inhibitors of AKT and ERK signalling were used to determine the relative contribution of these pathways to the survival of each cell model. While all three cell types responded to insulin, as indicated by phosphorylation of AKT and ERK, we found that there were stark differences in insulin-dependent proliferation, cell viability and cell survival among the cell types. High concentrations of insulin increased PANC1 and HPDE cell number, but did not alter primary duct cell proliferation in vitro. Cell survival was enhanced by insulin in both primary duct cells and HPDE cells. Moreover, we found that primary cells were more dependent on AKT signalling, while HPDE cells and PANC1 cells were more dependent on RAF/ERK signalling. Our data suggest that excessive insulin signalling may contribute to proliferation and survival in human immortalized pancreatic ductal cells and metastatic pancreatic cancer cells, but not in normal adult human pancreatic ductal cells. These data suggest that signalling pathways

  12. Antioxidant activity of chito-oligosaccharides on pancreatic islet cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Peng Yuan; Bing Liu; Chang-Heng Liu; Xiao-Jun Wang; Mian-Song Zhang; Xiu-Mei Meng; Xue-Kui Xia

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the antioxidant activity of chitooligosaccharides (COSs) on pancreatic islet cells in diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin.METHODS: The antioxidant effect of COSs on pancreatic islet cells was detected under optical microscopy and with colorimetric assay and gel electrophoresis. The activities of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity, and content of malondialdehyde in serum and tissue slices of pancreas were examined after 60 d to determine the effect of COSs in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats.RESULTS: COSs can prohibit the apoptosis of pancreatic islet cells. All concentrations of COSs can improve the capability of total antioxidant capacity and activity of superoxide dismutase and decrease the content of malondialdehyde drastically. Morphological investigation in the pancreas showed that COSs have resulted in the reduction of islets, loss of pancreatic cells, and nuclear pyknosis of pancreatic cells.CONCLUSION: COSs possess various biological activities and can be used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  13. α-Mangostin inhibits hypoxia-driven ROS-induced PSC activation and pancreatic cancer cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jianjun; Huo, Xiongwei; Duan, Wanxing; Xu, Qinhong; Li, Rong; Ma, Jiguang; Li, Xuqi; Han, Liang; Li, Wei; Sun, Hao; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong

    2014-05-28

    Recent advances indicating a key role of microenvironment for tumor progression, we investigated the role of PSCs and hypoxia in pancreatic cancer aggressiveness, and examined the potential protective effect of α-mangostin on hypoxia-driven pancreatic cancer progression. Our data indicate that hypoxic PSCs exploit their oxidative stress due to hypoxia to secrete soluble factors favouring pancreatic cancer invasion. α-Mangostin suppresses hypoxia-induced PSC activation and pancreatic cancer cell invasion through the inhibition of HIF-1α stabilization and GLI1 expression. Increased generation of hypoxic ROS is responsible for HIF-1α stabilization and GLI1 upregulation. Therefore, α-mangostin may be beneficial in preventing hypoxia-induced pancreatic cancer progression.

  14. Ablation of sensory neurons in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma slows initiation and progression of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloman, Jami L; Albers, Kathryn M; Li, Dongjun; Hartman, Douglas J; Crawford, Howard C; Muha, Emily A; Rhim, Andrew D; Davis, Brian M

    2016-03-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by an exuberant inflammatory desmoplastic response. The PDAC microenvironment is complex, containing both pro- and antitumorigenic elements, and remains to be fully characterized. Here, we show that sensory neurons, an under-studied cohort of the pancreas tumor stroma, play a significant role in the initiation and progression of the early stages of PDAC. Using a well-established autochthonous model of PDAC (PKC), we show that inflammation and neuronal damage in the peripheral and central nervous system (CNS) occurs as early as the pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) 2 stage. Also at the PanIN2 stage, pancreas acinar-derived cells frequently invade along sensory neurons into the spinal cord and migrate caudally to the lower thoracic and upper lumbar regions. Sensory neuron ablation by neonatal capsaicin injection prevented perineural invasion (PNI), astrocyte activation, and neuronal damage, suggesting that sensory neurons convey inflammatory signals from Kras-induced pancreatic neoplasia to the CNS. Neuron ablation in PKC mice also significantly delayed PanIN formation and ultimately prolonged survival compared with vehicle-treated controls (median survival, 7.8 vs. 4.5 mo; P = 0.001). These data establish a reciprocal signaling loop between the pancreas and nervous system, including the CNS, that supports inflammation associated with oncogenic Kras-induced neoplasia. Thus, pancreatic sensory neurons comprise an important stromal cell population that supports the initiation and progression of PDAC and may represent a potential target for prevention in high-risk populations.

  15. CXCR2 signaling regulates KRAS(G12D)-induced autocrine growth of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Abhilasha; Varney, Michelle; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Ouellette, Michel M.; Batra, Surinder K.; Singh, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of RAS, the master regulator of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), continues to be a challenge. Mutations in various isoforms of RAS gene, including KRAS are known to upregulate CXC chemokines; however, their precise role in KRAS-driven pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this report, we reveal a previously unidentified tumor cell-autonomous role of KRAS(G12D)-induced CXCR2 signaling in mediating growth of neoplastic PDAC cells. Progressively increasing expression of mCXCR2 and its ligands was detected in the malignant ductal cells of Pdx1-cre;LSL-Kras(G12D) mice. Knocking-down CXCR2 in KRAS(G12D)-bearing human pancreatic duct-derived cells demonstrated a significant decrease in the in vitro and in vivo tumor cell proliferation. Furthermore, CXCR2 antagonists showed selective growth inhibition of KRAS(G12D)-bearing cells in vitro. Intriguingly, both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 signaling in KRAS(G12D)-bearing pancreatic ductal cells reduced the levels of KRAS protein, strongly implying the presence of a KRAS-CXCR2 feed-forward loop. Together, these data demonstrate the role of CXCR2 signaling in KRAS(G12D)-induced growth transformation and progression in PDAC. PMID:26771140

  16. Nanotopography Promotes Pancreatic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyung Woo; Cha, Kyoung Je; Han, Jiyou; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-03-22

    Although previous studies suggest that nanotopographical features influence properties and behaviors of stem cells, only a few studies have attempted to derive clinically useful somatic cells from human pluripotent stem cells using nanopatterned surfaces. In the present study, we report that polystyrene nanopore-patterned surfaces significantly promote the pancreatic differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. We compared different diameters of nanopores and showed that 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces highly upregulated the expression of PDX1, a critical transcription factor for pancreatic development, leading to an approximately 3-fold increase in the percentage of differentiating PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitors compared with control flat surfaces. Furthermore, in the presence of biochemical factors, 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces profoundly enhanced the derivation of pancreatic endocrine cells producing insulin, glucagon, or somatostatin. We also demonstrate that nanopore-patterned surface-induced upregulation of PDX1 is associated with downregulation of TAZ, suggesting the potential role of TAZ in nanopore-patterned surface-mediated mechanotransduction. Our study suggests that appropriate cytokine treatments combined with nanotopographical stimulation could be a powerful tool for deriving a high purity of desired cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

  17. Requirement of Nuclear Factor κB for Smac Mimetic–Mediated Sensitization of Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells for Gemcitabine-Induced Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Stadel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Defects in apoptosis contribute to treatment resistance and poor outcome of pancreatic cancer, calling for novel therapeutic strategies. Here, we provide the first evidence that nuclear factor (NF κB is required for Smac mimetic– mediated sensitization of pancreatic carcinoma cells for gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. The Smac mimetic BV6 cooperates with gemcitabine to reduce cell viability and to induce apoptosis. In addition, BV6 significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of several anticancer drugs against pancreatic carcinoma cells, including doxorubicin, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil. Molecular studies reveal that BV6 stimulates NF-κB activation, which is further increased in the presence of gemcitabine. Importantly, inhibition of NF-κB by overexpression of the dominant-negative IκBα superrepressor significantly decreases BV6- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis, demonstrating that NF-κB exerts a proapoptotic function in this model of apoptosis. In support of this notion, inhibition of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα by the TNFα blocking antibody Enbrel reduces BV6- and gemcitabine-induced activation of caspase 8 and 3, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptosis. By demonstrating that BV6 and gemcitabine trigger a NF-κB–dependent, TNFα-mediated loop to activate apoptosis signaling pathways and caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death, our findings have important implications for the development of Smac mimetic–based combination protocols in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Pioglitazone, a specific ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, protects pancreas against acute cerulein-induced pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter C Konturek; Artur Dembinski; Zygmunt Warzecha; Grzegorz Burnat; Piotr Ceranowicz; Eckhart G Hahn; Marcin Dembinski; Romana Tomaszewska; Stanislaw J Konturek

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of pioglitazone, a specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ)ligand, on the development of acute pancreatitis (AP) and on the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in the pancreas.METHODS: AP was induced in rats by subcutaneous infusion of cerulein for 5 h. Pancreatic blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Plasma lipase activity, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-10 were determined.Pancreatic weight and histology were evaluated and pancreatic DNA synthesis and blood flow as well as pancreatic mRNA for IL-1β and HSP70 were assessed in rats treated with pioglitazone alone or in combination with cerulein.RESULTS: Pioglitazone administered (10-100 mg/kg I.g.)30 min before cerulein, attenuated dose-dependently the pancreatic tissue damage in cerulein-induced pancreatitis (CIP) as demonstrated by the improvement of pancreatic histology, reduction in plasma lipase activity,plasma concentration of pro-inflammatory IL-1β and its gene expression in the pancreas and attenuation of the pancreatitis-evoked fall in pancreatic blood flow. CIP increased pancreatic HSP70 mRNA and protein expression in the pancreas and this effect was enhanced by pioglitazone treatment.CONCLUSION: Pioglitazone attenuates CIP and the beneficial effect of this pioglitazone is multifactorial probably due to its anti-inflammatory activities, to the suppression of IL-1β and to the overexpression of HSP70.PPARγ ligands could represent a new therapeutic option in the treatment of AP.

  19. Pioglitazone, a specific ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, protects pancreas against acute cerulein-induced pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, Peter C; Dembinski, Artur; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Burnat, Grzegorz; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Hahn, Eckhart G; Dembinski, Marcin; Tomaszewska, Romana; Konturek, Stanislaw J

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of pioglitazone, a specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) ligand, on the development of acute pancreatitis (AP) and on the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in the pancreas. METHODS: AP was induced in rats by subcutaneous infusion of cerulein for 5 h. Pancreatic blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Plasma lipase activity, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-10 were determined. Pancreatic weight and histology were evaluated and pancreatic DNA synthesis and blood flow as well as pancreatic mRNA for IL-1β and HSP70 were assessed in rats treated with pioglitazone alone or in combination with cerulein. RESULTS: Pioglitazone administered (10-100 mg/kg i.g.) 30 min before cerulein, attenuated dose-dependently the pancreatic tissue damage in cerulein-induced pancreatitis (CIP) as demonstrated by the improvement of pancreatic histology, reduction in plasma lipase activity, plasma concentration of pro-inflammatory IL-1β and its gene expression in the pancreas and attenuation of the pancreatitis-evoked fall in pancreatic blood flow. CIP increased pancreatic HSP70 mRNA and protein expression in the pancreas and this effect was enhanced by pioglitazone treatment. CONCLUSION: Pioglitazone attenuates CIP and the beneficial effect of this pioglitazone is multifactorial probably due to its anti-inflammatory activities, to the suppression of IL-1β and to the overexpression of HSP70. PPARγ ligands could represent a new therapeutic option in the treatment of AP. PMID:16419161

  20. Phloroglucinol Protects INS-1 Pancreatic β-cells Against Glucotoxicity-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Hwa; Han, Ji Sook

    2015-11-01

    Decreasing numbers, and impaired function, of pancreatic β-cells are key factors in the development of type 2 diabetes. This study was designed to investigate whether phloroglucinol protected pancreatic β-cells against glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis using a rat insulinoma cell line (INS-1). High glucose treatment (30 mM) induced INS-1 cell death; however, the level of glucose-induced apoptosis was significantly reduced in cells treated with 100-μM phloroglucinol. Treatment with 10-100-μM phloroglucinol increased cell viability and decreased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and lipid peroxidation dose-dependently in INS-1 cells pretreated with high glucose. Furthermore, phloroglucinol treatment markedly reduced the protein expression of Bax, cytochrome c, and caspase 9, while increasing anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein expression. Cell death type was examined using annexin V/propidium iodide staining, revealing that phloroglucinol markedly reduced high glucose-induced apoptosis. These results demonstrated that phloroglucinol could be useful as a potential therapeutic agent for the protection of pancreatic β-cells against glucose-induced apoptosis.

  1. Heterogeneity in predisposition of hepatic cells to be induced into pancreatic endocrine cells by PDX-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun Lu; Wei-Ping Wang; Xiao-Fei Wang; Zong-Mei Zheng; Ping Chen; Kang-Tao Ma; Chun-Yan Zhou

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The role of Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1(PDX-1) as a major regulator of pancreatic development determines the function and phenotype of β cell. In this study, potential plasticity of liver cells into pancreatic endocrine cells induced by PDX-1 was evaluated.METHODS: Human hepatoma cell line HepG2 was stably transfected with mammalian expression plasmid pcDNA3-PDX encoding human PDX-1 gene. Ectopic expression of PDX-1 and insulin were detected by RT-PCR,Western blot and/or immunostaining. PDX-1+ HepG2 cells were transplanted under renal capsule of STZ-induced diabetic nude mice (n = 16) to examine the inducing effect in vivo.RESULTS: Exogenous PDX-1 transgene was proved to express effectively in HepG2 cell at both mRNA and protein levels. The expression of endogenous insulin and some βcell-specific differentiation markers and transcription factors were not induced in PDX-1+ HepG2 cells. When transplanted under renal capsule of STZ-induced diabetic nude mice, PDX-1+ HepG2 cells did not generate insulinproducing cells. These data indicated that stable transfected PDX-1 could not convert hepatoma cell line HepG2 to pancreatic cells in vitro or in vivo. Mature hepatocytes might need much more complicated or rigorous conditions to be shifted to insulin-producing cells.CONCLUSION: The expression of exogenous PDX-1 is not sufficient to induce relatively mature hepatocytes differentiating into insulin-producing cells.

  2. Paeoniflorin ameliorates acute necrotizing pancreatitis and pancreatitis‑induced acute renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Weixing; Shi, Qiao; Zhao, Liang; Mei, Fangchao; Li, Chen; Zuo, Teng; He, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    Acute renal injury caused by acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) is a common complication that is associated with a high rate of mortality. Paeoniflorin is the active ingredient of paeonia radix and exhibits a number of pharmacological effects, such as anti‑inflammatory, anticancer, analgesic and immunomodulatory effects. The present study detected the potential treatment effects of paeoniflorin on acute renal injury induced by ANP in a rat model. The optimal dose of paeoniflorin for preventing acute renal injury induced by ANP was determined. Then, the possible protective mechanism of paeoniflorin was investigated. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, interleukin (IL)‑1β and IL‑6 were measured with enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay kits. Renal inflammation and apoptosis were measured by immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The expression of nitric oxide in kidney tissues was also evaluated. The p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were measured by western blotting. The results shown that paeoniflorin may ameliorate acute renal injury following ANP in rats by inhibiting inflammatory responses and renal cell apoptosis. These effects may be associated with the p38MAPK and nuclear factor‑κB signal pathway.

  3. Novel pancreatic cancer cell lines derived from genetically engineered mouse models of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma: applications in diagnosis and therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María P Torres

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC remains one of the most lethal human malignancies with poor prognosis. Despite all advances in preclinical research, there have not been significant translation of novel therapies into the clinics. The development of genetically engineered mouse (GEM models that produce spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC have increased our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. Although these PDAC mouse models are ideal for studying potential therapies and specific genetic mutations, there is a need for developing syngeneic cell lines from these models. In this study, we describe the successful establishment and characterization of three cell lines derived from two (PDAC mouse models. The cell line UN-KC-6141 was derived from a pancreatic tumor of a Kras(G12D;Pdx1-Cre (KC mouse at 50 weeks of age, whereas UN-KPC-960 and UN-KPC-961 cell lines were derived from pancreatic tumors of Kras(G12D;Trp53(R172H;Pdx1-Cre (KPC mice at 17 weeks of age. The cancer mutations of these parent mice carried over to the daughter cell lines (i.e. Kras(G12D mutation was observed in all three cell lines while Trp53 mutation was observed only in KPC cell lines. The cell lines showed typical cobblestone epithelial morphology in culture, and unlike the previously established mouse PDAC cell line Panc02, expressed the ductal marker CK19. Furthermore, these cell lines expressed the epithelial-mesenchymal markers E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and also, Muc1 and Muc4 mucins. In addition, these cell lines were resistant to the chemotherapeutic drug Gemcitabine. Their implantation in vivo produced subcutaneous as well as tumors in the pancreas (orthotopic. The genetic mutations in these cell lines mimic the genetic compendium of human PDAC, which make them valuable models with a high potential of translational relevance for examining diagnostic markers and therapeutic drugs.

  4. Bifurcation structure of a model of bursting pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Lading, B.; Yanchuk, S.;

    2001-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional bifurcation studies of a prototypic model of bursting oscillations in pancreatic P-cells reveal a squid-formed area of chaotic dynamics in the parameter plane, with period-doubling bifurcations on one side of the arms and saddle-node bifurcations on the other....... The transition from this structure to the so-called period-adding structure is found to involve a subcritical period-doubling bifurcation and the emergence of type-III intermittency. The period-adding transition itself is not smooth but consists of a saddle-node bifurcation in which (n + 1)-spike bursting...... behavior is born, slightly overlapping with a subcritical period-doubling bifurcation in which n-spike bursting behavior loses its stability....

  5. Solanine Induces Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. Mechanically, solanine promotes the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (MPTP by downregulating the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; thereafter, Cytochrome c and Smac are released from mitochondria into cytosol to process the caspase-3 zymogen into an activated form. Moreover, we found that the expression of tumor metastasis related proteins, MMP-2 and MMP-9, was also decreased in the cells treated with solanine. Therefore, our results suggested that solanine was an effective compound for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Solanine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongwei; Lv, Chongqing; Yang, Longlong; Wang, Yingxiu; Zhang, Qingshun; Yu, Suhui; Kong, Hongru; Wang, Meng; Xie, Jianming; Zhang, Chunwu; Zhou, Mengtao

    2014-01-01

    Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. Mechanically, solanine promotes the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (MPTP) by downregulating the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; thereafter, Cytochrome c and Smac are released from mitochondria into cytosol to process the caspase-3 zymogen into an activated form. Moreover, we found that the expression of tumor metastasis related proteins, MMP-2 and MMP-9, was also decreased in the cells treated with solanine. Therefore, our results suggested that solanine was an effective compound for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  7. MUC1 mucin stabilizes and activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha to regulate metabolism in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaika, Nina V.; Gebregiworgis, Teklab; Lewallen, Michelle E.; Purohit, Vinee; Radhakrishnan, Prakash; Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Bo; Mehla, Kamiya; Brown, Roger B.; Caffrey, Thomas; Yu, Fang; Johnson, Keith R.; Powers, Robert; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Singh, Pankaj K.

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant glucose metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer that facilitates cancer cell survival and proliferation. Here, we demonstrate that MUC1, a large, type I transmembrane protein that is overexpressed in several carcinomas including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, modulates cancer cell metabolism to facilitate growth properties of cancer cells. MUC1 occupies the promoter elements of multiple genes directly involved in glucose metabolism and regulates their expression. Furthermore, MUC1 expression enhances glycolytic activity in pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrate that MUC1 expression enhances in vivo glucose uptake and expression of genes involved in glucose uptake and metabolism in orthotopic implantation models of pancreatic cancer. The MUC1 cytoplasmic tail is known to activate multiple signaling pathways through its interactions with several transcription factors/coregulators at the promoter elements of various genes. Our results indicate that MUC1 acts as a modulator of the hypoxic response in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating the expression/stability and activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). MUC1 physically interacts with HIF-1α and p300 and stabilizes the former at the protein level. By using a ChIP assay, we demonstrate that MUC1 facilitates recruitment of HIF-1α and p300 on glycolytic gene promoters in a hypoxia-dependent manner. Also, by metabolomic studies, we demonstrate that MUC1 regulates multiple metabolite intermediates in the glucose and amino acid metabolic pathways. Thus, our studies indicate that MUC1 acts as a master regulator of the metabolic program and facilitates metabolic alterations in the hypoxic environments that help tumor cells survive and proliferate under such conditions. PMID:22869720

  8. The novel hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-2098 has antitumor effect in pancreatic cancer; possible mechanism through inhibiting VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1α targeted gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Kotaro; Nishioka, Masanori; Imura, Satoru; Batmunkh, Erdenebulgan; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hori, Hitoshi; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2012-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been considered to be a potential therapeutic target, because hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a novel hypoxic cytotoxin, 3-[2-hydroxyethyl(methyl)amino]-2-quinoxalinecarbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (TX-2098) in inhibiting the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), and consequently vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic cancer. The antitumor effects of TX-2098 under hypoxia were tested against various human pancreatic cancer cell lines using WST-8 assay. VEGF protein induced pancreatic cancer was determined on cell-free supernatant by ELISA. Moreover, nude mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically implanted human SUIT-2 were treated with TX-2098. Tumor volume, survival and expression of HIF-1 and associated molecules were evaluated in treatment versus control groups. In vitro, TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of various pancreatic cancer cell lines. In s.c model, tumors from nude mice injected with pancreatic cancer cells and treated with TX-2098 showed significant reductions in volume (P<0.01 versus control). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TX-2098 significantly inhibited mRNA expression of the HIF-1 associated molecules, VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and Aldolase A (P<0.01 versus control). These treatments also prolong the survival in orthotopic models. These results suggest that the effect of TX-2098 in pancreatic cancer might be correlated with the expression of VEGF and HIF-1 targeted molecules.

  9. Autophagy induced by p53-reactivating molecules protects pancreatic cancer cells from apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Claudia; Menegazzi, Marta; Padroni, Chiara; Dando, Ilaria; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Gregorelli, Alex; Costanzo, Chiara; Palmieri, Marta; Donadelli, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    TP53 mutations compromising p53 transcriptional function occur in more than 50 % of human cancers, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and render cancer cells more resistant to conventional therapy. In the last few years, many efforts have been addressed to identify p53-reactivating molecules able to restore the wild-type transcriptionally competent conformation of the mutated proteins. Here, we show that two of these compounds, CP-31398 and RITA, induce cell growth inhibition, apoptosis, and autophagy by activating p53/DNA binding and p53 phosphorylation (Ser15), without affecting the total p53 amount. These effects occur in both wild-type and mutant p53 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, whereas they are much less pronounced in normal human primary fibroblasts. Furthermore, CP-31398 and RITA regulate the axis SESN1-2/AMPK/mTOR by inducing AMPK phosphorylation on Thr172, which has a crucial role in the autophagic response. The protective role of autophagy in cell growth inhibition by CP-31398 and RITA is supported by the finding that the AMPK inhibitor compound C or the autophagy inhibitors chloroquine or 3-methyladenine sensitize both pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines to the apoptotic response induced by p53-reactivating molecules. Our results demonstrate for the first time a survival role for autophagy induced by p53-reactivating molecules, supporting the development of an anti-cancer therapy based on autophagy inhibition associated to p53 activation.

  10. Capsaicin induces cytotoxicity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cells via mitochondrial action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypski, M; Sassek, M; Abdelmessih, S; Mergler, S; Grötzinger, C; Metzke, D; Wojciechowicz, T; Nowak, K W; Strowski, M Z

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin (CAP), the pungent ingredient of chili peppers, inhibits growth of various solid cancers via TRPV1 as well as TRPV1-independent mechanisms. Recently, we showed that TRPV1 regulates intracellular calcium level and chromogranin A secretion in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) cells. In the present study, we characterize the role of the TRPV1 agonist - CAP - in controlling proliferation and apoptosis of pancreatic BON and QGP-1 NET cells. We demonstrate that CAP reduces viability and proliferation, and stimulates apoptotic death of NET cells. CAP causes mitochondrial membrane potential loss, inhibits ATP synthesis and reduces mitochondrial Bcl-2 protein production. In addition, CAP increases cytochrome c and cleaved caspase 3 levels in cytoplasm. CAP reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) acts synergistically with CAP to reduce ROS generation, without affecting CAP-induced toxicity. TRPV1 protein reduction by 75% reduction fails to attenuate CAP-induced cytotoxicity. In summary, these results suggest that CAP induces cytotoxicity by disturbing mitochondrial potential, and inhibits ATP synthesis in NET cells. Stimulation of ROS generation by CAP appears to be a secondary effect, not related to CAP-induced cytotoxicity. These results justify further evaluation of CAP in modulating pancreatic NETs in vivo.

  11. Autophagy protects against cholesterol-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiahua; Kong, Feijuan; Pan, Qianqian; Du, Ying; Ye, Jun; Zheng, Fenping; Li, Hong; Zhou, Jiaqiang

    2017-01-22

    Autophagy is believed to play an important role in maintaining homeostasis in pancreatic β-cells during insulin resistance. This study investigated the role of autophagy in β-cell damage induced by cholesterol and its possible activation mechanism. Rat and mouse pancreatic β-cell lines INS-1 and βTC-6 were incubated with cholesterol alone or in combination with autophagy inhibitors E-64d/Pepstatin A or bafilomycin A1. DAPI staining, western blotting, transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence were conducted to assess the effects of autophagy inhibitors on cholesterol-induced apoptosis and autophagy activity. An increase in FITC-LC3 fluorescence dots, autophagic vacuoles and LC3-II protein indicated that autophagy was activated in cells treated with cholesterol. This was further confirmed by blocking the natural turnover processes in lysosomes and autolysosomes with autophagy inhibitors, suggesting enhanced autophagic activity rather than blockage of autophagy. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy significantly augmented the activation of caspase 3 and the percentage of cholesterol-induced apoptotic nuclei. These results demonstrate that autophagy plays a protective role against cholesterol-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Developing Risk Prediction Models for Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula: a Systematic Review of Methodology and Reporting Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhang; Guo, Ya; Xu, Banghao; Xiao, Kaiyin; Peng, Tao; Peng, Minhao

    2016-04-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula is still a major complication after pancreatic surgery, despite improvements of surgical technique and perioperative management. We sought to systematically review and critically access the conduct and reporting of methods used to develop risk prediction models for predicting postoperative pancreatic fistula. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify articles published before January 1, 2015, which described the development of models to predict the risk of postoperative pancreatic fistula. We extracted information of developing a prediction model including study design, sample size and number of events, definition of postoperative pancreatic fistula, risk predictor selection, missing data, model-building strategies, and model performance. Seven studies of developing seven risk prediction models were included. In three studies (42 %), the number of events per variable was less than 10. The number of candidate risk predictors ranged from 9 to 32. Five studies (71 %) reported using univariate screening, which was not recommended in building a multivariate model, to reduce the number of risk predictors. Six risk prediction models (86 %) were developed by categorizing all continuous risk predictors. The treatment and handling of missing data were not mentioned in all studies. We found use of inappropriate methods that could endanger the development of model, including univariate pre-screening of variables, categorization of continuous risk predictors, and model validation. The use of inappropriate methods affects the reliability and the accuracy of the probability estimates of predicting postoperative pancreatic fistula.

  13. Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells Induce a MyD88-Dependent Stromal Response to Promote a Tumor-Tolerant Immune Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delitto, Daniel; Delitto, Andrea E; DiVita, Bayli B; Pham, Kien; Han, Song; Hartlage, Emily R; Newby, Brittney N; Gerber, Michael H; Behrns, Kevin E; Moldawer, Lyle L; Thomas, Ryan M; George, Thomas J; Brusko, Todd M; Mathews, Clayton E; Liu, Chen; Trevino, Jose G; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M

    2017-02-01

    Cancer cells exert mastery over the local tumor-associated stroma (TAS) to configure protective immunity within the tumor microenvironment. The immunomodulatory character of pancreatic lysates of patients with cancer differs from those with pancreatitis. In this study, we evaluated the cross-talk between pancreatic cancer and its TAS in primary human cell culture models. Upon exposure of TAS to pancreatic cancer cell-conditioned media, we documented robust secretion of IL6 and IL8. This TAS response was MyD88-dependent and sufficient to directly suppress both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation, inducing Th17 polarization at the expense of Th1. We found that patients possessed a similar shift in circulating effector memory Th17:Th1 ratios compared with healthy controls. The TAS response also directly suppressed CD8(+) T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Overall, our results demonstrate how TAS contributes to the production of an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment in pancreatic cancer. Cancer Res; 77(3); 672-83. ©2016 AACR.

  14. Activity of cathepsins in rat's spleen due to experimentally induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, R; Burdan, F; Madej, B; Kiś, G; Szkodziak, P; Burski, K

    The aim of this study was to establish and quantify the changes of the level of cathepsin B, D and L in the spleen during experimental pancreatitis. The experiment was carried out in 115 male Wistar rats, randomly divided into three groups: intact (n = 15), injected with 0.9% NaCl solution into the common bile pancreatic duct (n = 50) and injected with 5% sodium taurocholate into this duct to induce acute pancreatitis (n = 50). After 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours rats were anaesthetised, and blood was taken for amylase determination from the heart, and the spleen was removed. Alpha-amylase level in the blood serum samples was measured by enzymatic method. Cathepsin activity was established by spectrophotometric methods using substrates which form coloured complexes when they react with these proteases. The specific free fraction activity of cathepsin B, D and L in the spleen changed during the course of experiment, but there was no correlation between their activity and the intensity of pancreatitis established by serum amylase level.

  15. Metastasis-Induced Acute Pancreatitis Successfully Treated with Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy in a Patient with Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem Okutur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although involvement of pancreas is a common finding in small cell lung cancer (SCLC, metastasis-induced acute pancreatitis (MIAP is very rare. A 50-year-old female with SCLC who had limited disease and achieved full response after treatment presented with acute pancreatitis during her follow-up. The radiologic studies revealed a small area causing obliteration of the pancreatic duct without mass in the pancreatic neck, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA confirmed the metastasis of SCLC. The patient was treated successfully with systemic chemotherapy and radiotherapy delivered to pancreatic field. In SCLC, cases of MIAP can be encountered with conventional computed tomography with no mass image, and positron emission tomography and EUS-FNA can be useful for diagnosis of such cases. Aggressive systemic and local treatment can prolong survival, especially in patients with good performance status.

  16. Metastasis-Induced Acute Pancreatitis Successfully Treated with Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy in a Patient with Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okutur, Kerem; Bozkurt, Mustafa; Korkmaz, Taner; Karaaslan, Ercan; Guner, Levent; Goksel, Suha; Demir, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Although involvement of pancreas is a common finding in small cell lung cancer (SCLC), metastasis-induced acute pancreatitis (MIAP) is very rare. A 50-year-old female with SCLC who had limited disease and achieved full response after treatment presented with acute pancreatitis during her follow-up. The radiologic studies revealed a small area causing obliteration of the pancreatic duct without mass in the pancreatic neck, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) confirmed the metastasis of SCLC. The patient was treated successfully with systemic chemotherapy and radiotherapy delivered to pancreatic field. In SCLC, cases of MIAP can be encountered with conventional computed tomography with no mass image, and positron emission tomography and EUS-FNA can be useful for diagnosis of such cases. Aggressive systemic and local treatment can prolong survival, especially in patients with good performance status. PMID:26075124

  17. MSX2 overexpression inhibits gemcitabine-induced caspase-3 activity in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shin Hamada; Kennichi Satoh; Kenji Kimura; Atsushi Kanno; Atsushi Masamune; Tooru Shimosegawa

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of MSX2 on gemcitabineinduced caspase-3 activation in pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1.METHODS: Using V5-tagged MSX2 expression vector,stable transfectant of MSX2 was generated from Panc-1cells (Px14 cells). Cell viability under gemcitabine administration was determined by MTT assay relative to control cell line (empty-vector transfected Panc-1 cells;P-3EV cells). Hoechst staining was used for the detection of apoptotic cell. Activation of caspase-3 was assessed using Western blotting analysis and direct measurement of caspase-3 specific activities.RESULTS: MSX2 overexpression in Panc-1 cells resulted in decreased gemcitabine-induced caspase-3 activation and increased cell viability under gemcitabine treatment in Px14 cells.CONCLUSION: MSX2 exerts repressive effects on gemcitabine-induced apoptotic pathway. This novel apoptosis-regulating function of MSX2 may provide a new therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer.

  18. Pancreatic microcirculatory impairment in experimental acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Guang Zhou; You-Dai Chen; Wei Sun; Zhong Chen

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the feature of pancreatic microcirculatoryimpairment, especially the initial changes, in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis (AP).METHODS: The pancreatic microcirculation of caerulein-induced AP model was studied by intravital fluorescencemicroscopy with FITC-labeled erythrocytes (FITC-RBC),scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts,and light microscopy of Chinese ink-injected/cleared tissues.RESULTS: Animals in caerulein-treated group showedhyperamylemia (× 2), pancreatic oedema, infiltration ofinflammatory cells in pancreas. Constrictions of intralobulararteriolar sphincters, presence of vacuoles in all layers ofsphincter, and gross irregularity in capillary network of aciniwere found in the AP specimens. The decrease of pancreaticcapillary blood flow (0.34±0.10 nl @ min-1 vs0.910.06 nl @rain-1 of control, P<0.001), reduction of functional capillarydensity(277± 13 cm-1 vs349±8 cm-1 of control, P<0.001),and irregular intermittent perfusion were observed incaerulein-induced groups.CONCLUSION: Impairment and constriction of pancreaticintralobular arteriolar sphincter are the initial microcirculatorylesions in the early phase of acute pancreatitis, and play akey role in the pancreatic ischaemia and pancreaticmicrovascular failure in acute pancreatitis.

  19. MUC1 enhances invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, L D; Sahraei, M; Subramani, D B; Besmer, D; Nath, S; Tinder, T L; Bajaj, E; Shanmugam, K; Lee, Y Y; Hwang, S I L; Gendler, S J; Mukherjee, P

    2011-03-24

    Increased motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells are associated with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Snai1 and Slug are zinc-finger transcription factors that trigger this process by repressing E-cadherin and enhancing vimentin and N-cadherin protein expression. However, the mechanisms that regulate this activation in pancreatic tumors remain elusive. MUC1, a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein, is associated with the most invasive forms of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDA). In this study, we show that over expression of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer cells triggers the molecular process of EMT, which translates to increased invasiveness and metastasis. EMT was significantly reduced when MUC1 was genetically deleted in a mouse model of PDA or when all seven tyrosines in the cytoplasmic tail of MUC1 were mutated to phenylalanine (mutated MUC1 CT). Using proteomics, RT-PCR and western blotting, we revealed a significant increase in vimentin, Slug and Snail expression with repression of E-Cadherin in MUC1-expressing cells compared with cells expressing the mutated MUC1 CT. In the cells that carried the mutated MUC1 CT, MUC1 failed to co-immunoprecipitate with β-catenin and translocate to the nucleus, thereby blocking transcription of the genes associated with EMT and metastasis. Thus, functional tyrosines are critical in stimulating the interactions between MUC1 and β-catenin and their nuclear translocation to initiate the process of EMT. This study signifies the oncogenic role of MUC1 CT and is the first to identify a direct role of the MUC1 in initiating EMT during pancreatic cancer. The data may have implications in future design of MUC1-targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer.

  20. Glucose-induced lipogenesis in pancreatic beta-cells is dependent on SREBP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Maria B; Fridriksson, Jakob; Madsen, Lise

    2005-01-01

    binding proteins in glucose-induced lipogenesis in the pancreatic beta-cell line INS-1E. We show that glucose induces SREBP-1c expression and SREBP-1 activity independent of insulin secretion and signaling. Using adenoviral expression of SREBP-1c and a SREBP-mutant we show that lipogenic gene expression......, de novo fatty acid synthesis and lipid accumulation are induced primarily through sterol-regulatory elements (SREs) and not E-Boxes. Adenoviral expression of a dominant negative SREBP compromises glucose induction of some lipogenic genes and significantly reduces glucose-induction of de novo fatty...

  1. Zebularine induces long-term survival of pancreatic islet allotransplants in streptozotocin treated diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrietta Nittby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coping with the immune rejection of allotransplants or autologous cells in patients with an active sensitization towards their autoantigens and autoimmunity presently necessitates life-long immune suppressive therapy acting on the immune system as a whole, which makes the patients vulnerable to infections and increases their risk of developing cancer. New technologies to induce antigen selective long-lasting immunosuppression or immune tolerance are therefore much needed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The DNA demethylating agent Zebularine, previously demonstrated to induce expression of the genes for the immunosuppressive enzymes indolamine-2,3-deoxygenase-1 (IDO1 and kynureninase of the kynurenine pathway, is tested for capacity to suppress rejection of allotransplants. Allogeneic pancreatic islets from Lewis rats were transplanted under the kidney capsule of Fischer rats previously made diabetic by a streptozotocin injection (40 mg/kg. One group was treated with Zebularine (225 mg/kg daily for 14 days from day 6 or 8 after transplantation, and a control group received no further treatment. Survival of the transplants was monitored by blood sugar measurements. Rats, normoglycemic for 90 days after allografting, were subjected to transplant removal by nephrectomy to confirm whether normoglycemia was indeed due to a surviving insulin producing transplant, or alternatively was a result of recovery of pancreatic insulin production in some toxin-treated rats. Of 9 Zebularine treated rats, 4 were still normoglycemic after 90 days and became hyperglycemic after nephrectomy. The mean length of normoglycemia in the Zebularine group was 67±8 days as compared to 14±3 days in 9 controls. Seven rats (2 controls and 5 Zebularine treated were normoglycemic at 90 days due to pancreatic recovery as demonstrated by failure of nephrectomy to induce hyperglycemia. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Zebularine treatment in vivo induces a long

  2. Glucocorticoids Inhibit Basal and Hormone-Induced Serotonin Synthesis in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moina Hasni Ebou; Amrit Singh-Estivalet; Jean-Marie Launay; Jacques Callebert; François Tronche; Pascal Ferré; Jean-François Gautier; Ghislaine Guillemain; Bernadette Bréant; Bertrand Blondeau; Jean-Pierre Riveline

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Diabetes is a major complication of chronic Glucocorticoids (GCs) treatment. GCs induce insulin resistance and also inhibit insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Yet, a full understanding of this negative regulation remains to be deciphered. In the present study, we investigated whether GCs could inhibit serotonin synthesis in beta cell since this neurotransmitter has been shown to be involved in the regulation of insulin secretion. To this aim, serotonin synth...

  3. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes, bile-pancreatic secretion and insulo-pancreon-axis interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiscornia, Osvaldo Manuel; Rodríguez, Ricardo Raúl; Sussemil, Carlota; Otero, Graciela; Negri, Gustavo Alberto; Waisman, Hipólito; López Mingorance, Fabiana Norma; Tiscornia Wasserman, Patricia Graciela

    2013-12-01

    The present tests were undertaken in order to analyze in male Wistar rats the changes in the exocrine and endocrine pancreas and on the interactions that normally evolve in the insulo-pancreon-axis. To evaluate this by a single i.p. Boots secretin injection, glycemia (G), amylasemia (A) and lipasemia (L) were determined. In bile-pancreatic secretion, we analyzed, pre and post-secretin, the following parameters: volume (V), bicarbonate output (BO), amylase output (AO) and lipase output (LO). Three groups of tests were done: a) control (C); b) streptozotocin-treated non-diabetic-rats (St-ND) and c) streptozotocin-treated diabetic animals (St-D) which showed morning glycemia values higher than 16.0 mmol/l. Four months later, under Tiopental i.p anesthesia, a bile-pancreatic fistula was done. Following a 30 min basal period, Boots secretin (20 CU/kg) was i.p injected. Bile-pancreatic secretion put in evidence a significant fall of BO in both St-ND and St-D series. In controls, AO revealed a post-secretin increase of 160%, while in the St-D rats showed a depression of 41%. The behavior of L was different, being augmented (+27%) in the C, while in the St-D rats the response was significantly higher (+95%). In bile-pancreatic-secretion, the fall of BO and AO in the St-ND and St-D series in respect to the C, are probably consequence of the diminishing potentiating effects exerted normally by insulin on the secretin-induced water and bicarbonate secretion of the pancreon units. In contrast, the rising of LO in the St-D, an expression of an enhancing pancreocyte's synthesis and secretion of lipase. The blood changes of A (depression) and of L (increase) in respect to the C values, although without reaching significant level, mirror those observed in bile-pancreatic secretion.

  4. Bone morphogenetic protein signaling protects against cerulein-induced pancreatic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuxia Gao

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs have an anti-fibrogenic function in the kidney, lung, and liver. However, their role in chronic pancreatitis (CP is unknown. The aim of this study was to define the anti-fibrogenic role of BMP signaling in the pancreas in vivo under CP induction. Mice with a deletion of BMP type II receptor (BMPR2(+/- were used in this study in comparison with wild-type mice. CP was induced by repetitive cerulein injection intraperitoneally for 4 weeks, and the severity of CP was evaluated. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs were isolated from the mice and treated with BMP2 and TGF-β in vitro, and extracellular matrix protein (ECM production was measured. Smad and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling was also evaluated. BMPR2(+/- mice revealed a greater pancreatic fibrosis, PSC activation and leukocyte infiltration after CP induction compared to wild-type mice (P<0.05. Under CP induction, phospho (pSmad1/5/8 was elevated in wild-type mice and this effect was abolished in BMPR2(+/- mice; pSmad2 and pp38(MAPK were further enhanced in BMPR2(+/- mice compared to wild-type mice (P<0.05. In vitro, BMP2 inhibited TGF-β-induced ECM protein fibronectin production in wild-type PSCs; this effect was abolished in BMPR2(+/- PSCs (P<0.05. In BMPR2(+/- PSCs, pSmad1/5/8 level was barely detectable upon BMP2 stimulation, while pSmad2 level was further enhanced by TGF-β stimulation, compared to wild-type PSCs (P<0.05. BMPR2/Smad1/5/8 signaling plays a protective role against cerulein-induced pancreatic fibrosis by inhibiting Smad2 and p38(MAPK signaling pathways.

  5. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Liu, Wen Wu [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Xiang, Hong Gang [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Fan, Lie Ying [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Shanghai East Hospital, Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200120 (China); Sun, Qiang [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Xu, Xin Yun [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Cai, Jian Mei [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ruan, Can Ping; Su, Ning; Yan, Rong Lin [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Sun, Xue Jun, E-mail: sunxjk@hotmail.com [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wang2929@hotmail.com [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China)

    2010-03-05

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreas were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-{kappa}B activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-{kappa}B activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.

  6. Orlistat-induced acute pancreatitis in a type II diabetic and hypothyroid young woman : A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patralekha Ray Chaudhuri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orlistat is an anti-obesity drug that acts by inhibiting pancreatic and gastric lipase in the gastrointestinal tract. It has been linked to rare instances of acute pancreatitis, some of which have been severe. Case Report: A 31-year-old obese woman was prescribed orlistat 120-mg capsule three times a day with each main meal containing fat for 6 months. She developed acute abdominal pain and vomiting with epigastric tenderness 5 weeks after starting anti-obesity therapy. Serum lipase and computed Tomography (CT scan of the patient suggested the presence of acute pancreatitis. The patient was hospitalized; orlistat was stopped and she was treated symptomatically. A diagnosis of drug-induced pancreatitis was made following exclusion of other possible factors precipitating pancreatitis. Conclusion: This case report suggests that orlistat can trigger drug-induced acute pancreatitis in some cases and clinicians should be vigilant about it. A total of 99 cases of orlistat-related pancreatitis have been reported to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA, but no causative link has been found in the clinical trials. It is therefore not in the list of adverse drug reactions of orlistat.

  7. Phenotypic changes in mouse pancreatic stellate cell Ca2+ signaling events following activation in culture and in a disease model of pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jong Hak; Zhang, Yu; Ji, Baoan; Logsdon, Craig D; Yule, David I

    2011-02-01

    The specific characteristics of intracellular Ca 2+ signaling and the downstream consequences of these events were investigated in mouse pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) in culture and in situ using multiphoton microscopy in pancreatic lobules. PSC undergo a phenotypic transformation from a quiescent state to a myofibroblast-like phenotype in culture. This is believed to parallel the induction of an activated state observed in pancreatic disease such as chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. By day 7 in culture, the complement of cell surface receptors coupled to intracellular Ca 2+ signaling was shown to be markedly altered. Specifically, protease-activated receptors (PAR) 1 and 2, responsive to thrombin and trypsin, respectively, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors were expressed only in activated PSC (aPSC). PAR-1, ATP, and PDGF receptor activation resulted in prominent nuclear Ca 2+ signals. Nuclear Ca 2+ signals and aPSC proliferation were abolished by expression of parvalbumin targeted to the nucleus. In pancreatic lobules, PSC responded to agonists consistent with the presence of only quiescent PSC. aPSC were observed following induction of experimental pancreatitis. In contrast, in a mouse model of pancreatic disease harboring elevated K-Ras activity in acinar cells, aPSC were present under control conditions and their number greatly increased following induction of pancreatitis. These data are consistent with nuclear Ca 2+ signaling generated by agents such as trypsin and thrombin, likely present in the pancreas in disease states, resulting in proliferation of "primed" aPSC to contribute to the severity of pancreatic disease.

  8. Protective efficacy of folic acid and vitamin B12 against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharjee Ankita

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although cigarette smoking is associated with insulin resistance and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, few studies have examined the effect of nicotine on the adult endocrine pancreas. In this study, male Wister rats were treated with nicotine (3 mg/kg body weight/day with or without supplementation of folic acid (36 μg/kg body weight/day or vitamin B12 (0.63 μg/kg body weight/day alone or in combination. Fasting blood glucose, insulin and HBA1C level and different oxidative and anti-oxidative stress parameters were measured and pancreatic tissue sections were stained with eosin-haematoxylene. Data were analysed by nonparametric statistics. The results revealed that nicotine induced prediabetes condition with subsequent damage to pancreatic islets in rats. Nicotine also caused oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue as evidenced by increased nitric oxide and malondialdehyde level and decreased superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione level. Compared to vitamin B12 supplementation, folic acid blunted the nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets with higher efficacy. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination were able to confer significant protection on pancreatic islets against nicotine induced toxicity. These results suggest that supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination may be a possible strategy of detoxification against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat.

  9. Protective efficacy of folic acid and vitamin B12 against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Ankita; Prasad, Shilpi Kumari; Pal, Swagata; Maji, Bithin; Syamal, Alak Kumar; Banerjee, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Although cigarette smoking is associated with insulin resistance and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, few studies have examined the effect of nicotine on the adult endocrine pancreas. In this study, male Wister rats were treated with nicotine (3 mg/kg body weight/ day) with or without supplementation of folic acid (36 μg/kg body weight/day) or vitamin B12 (0.63 μg/kg body weight/day) alone or in combination. Fasting blood glucose, insulin and HBA1C level and different oxidative and anti-oxidative stress parameters were measured and pancreatic tissue sections were stained with eosin-haematoxylene. Data were analysed by nonparametric statistics. The results revealed that nicotine induced prediabetes condition with subsequent damage to pancreatic islets in rats. Nicotine also caused oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue as evidenced by increased nitric oxide and malondialdehyde level and decreased superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione level. Compared to vitamin B12 supplementation, folic acid blunted the nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets with higher efficacy. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination were able to confer significant protection on pancreatic islets against nicotine induced toxicity. These results suggest that supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination may be a possible strategy of detoxification against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat. PMID:27486368

  10. Tenascin-C induces resistance to apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cell through activation of ERK/NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Meiyan; He, Xiaodan; Wei, Wei; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Ti; Shen, Xiaohong

    2015-06-01

    As a glycol-protein located in extracellular matrix (ECM), tenascin-C (TNC) is absent in most normal adult tissues but is highly expressed in the majority of malignant solid tumors. Pancreatic cancer is characterized by an abundant fibrous tissue rich in TNC. Although it was reported that TNC's expression increased in the progression from low-grade precursor lesions to invasive cancer and was associated with tumor differentiation in human pancreatic cancer, studies on the relations between TNC and tumor progression in pancreatic cancer were rare. In this study, we performed an analysis to determine the effects of TNC on modulating cell apoptosis and chemo-resistance and explored its mechanisms involving activation in pancreatic cancer cell. The expressions of TNC, ERK1/2/p-ERK1/2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 were detected by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Then the effects of exogenous and endogenous TNC on the regulation of tumor proliferation, apoptosis and gemcitabine cytotoxicity were investigated. The associations among the TNC knockdown, TNC stimulation and expressions of ERK1/2/NF-κB/p65 and apoptotic regulatory proteins were also analyzed in cell lines. The mechanism of TNC on modulating cancer cell apoptosis and drug resistant through activation of ERK1/2/NF-κB/p65 signals was evaluated. The effect of TNC on regulating cell cycle distribution was also tested. TNC, ERK1/2/p-ERK1/2, and apoptotic regulatory proteins Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 were highly expressed in human pancreatic cancer tissues. In vitro, exogenous TNC promoted pancreatic cancer cell growth also mediates basal as well as starved and drug-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. The effects of TNC on anti-apoptosis were induced by the activation state of ERK1/2/NF-κB/p65 signals in pancreatic cell. TNC phosphorylate ERK1/2 to induce NF-κB/p65 nucleus translocation. The latter contributes to promote Bcl-xL, Bcl-2 protein expressions and reduce caspase activity, which inhibit cell apoptotic

  11. Serotonin promotes acinar dedifferentiation following pancreatitis-induced regeneration in the adult pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saponara, Enrica; Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Bombardo, Marta; Buzzi, Raphael; Silva, Alberto B; Malagola, Ermanno; Tian, Yinghua; Hehl, Adrian B; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seleznik, Gitta M; Zabel, Anja; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The exocrine pancreas exhibits a distinctive capacity for tissue regeneration and renewal following injury. This regenerative ability has important implications for a variety of disorders, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, understanding its underlying mechanisms may help in developing therapeutic interventions. Serotonin has been recognized as a potent mitogen for a variety of cells and tissues. Here we investigated whether serotonin exerts a mitogenic effect in pancreatic acinar cells in three regenerative models, inflammatory tissue injury following pancreatitis, tissue loss following partial pancreatectomy, and thyroid hormone-stimulated acinar proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological techniques were used to modulate serotonin levels in vivo. Acinar dedifferentiation and cell cycle progression during the regenerative phase were investigated over the course of 2 weeks. By comparing acinar proliferation in the different murine models of regeneration, we found that serotonin did not affect the clonal regeneration of mature acinar cells. Serotonin was, however, required for acinar dedifferentiation following inflammation-mediated tissue injury. Specifically, lack of serotonin resulted in delayed up-regulation of progenitor genes and delayed the formation of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and defective acinar cell proliferation. We identified serotonin-dependent acinar secretion as a key step in progenitor-based regeneration, as it promoted acinar cell dedifferentiation and the recruitment of type 2 macrophages. Finally, we identified a regulatory Hes1-Ptfa axis in the uninjured adult pancreas, activated by zymogen secretion. Our findings indicated that serotonin plays a critical role in the regeneration of the adult pancreas following pancreatitis by promoting the dedifferentiation of acinar cells.

  12. Pioglitazone attenuates the severity of sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Xu; Xiao-Jiang Zhou; Ling-Quan Chen; Jiang Chen; Yong Xie; Long-Hua Lv; Xiao-Hua Hou

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of pioglitazone, a specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ)ligand, on development of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the pancreas.METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (160-200 g)were randomly allocated into three groups (n = 18in each group): severe acute pancreatitis group,pioglitazone group, sham group. SAP was induced by retrograde infusion of 1 mL/kg body weight 5% sodium taurocholate (STC) into the biliopancreatic duct of male SD rats. Pioglitazone was injected intraperitoneally two hours piror to STC infusion. Blood and ascites were obtained for detecting amylase and ascitic capacity. Pancreatic wet/dry weight ratio, expression of NF-κB and ICAM-1 in pancreatic tissues were detected by immunohistochemical staining. Pancreatic tissue samples were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE)for routine optic microscopy.RESULTS: Sham group displayed normal pancreatic structure. SAP group showed diffuse hemorrhage,necrosis and severe edema in focal areas of pancreas.There was obvious adipo-saponification in abdominal cavity. Characteristics such as pancreatic hemorrhage,necrosis, severe edema and adipo-saponification were found in pioglitazone group, but the levels of those injuries were lower in pioglitazone group than those in SAP group. The wet/dry pancreatic weight ratio,ascetic capacity, serum and ascitic activities of anylase in the SAP group were significantly higher than those in the sham group and pioglitazone group respectively (6969.50 ± 1368.99 vs 2104.67 ± 377.16, 3.99 ± 1.22 vs 2.48 ± 0.74, P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). According to Kusske criteria, the pancreatic histologic score showed that interstitial edema, inflammatory infiltration,parenchyma necrosis and parenchyma hommorrhage in SAP group significantly differed from those in the sham group and pioglitazone group (7.17 ± 1.83 vs 0.50 ±0.55, 7

  13. Antidiabetic effects of chitooligosaccharides on pancreatic islet cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Liu; Wan-Shun Liu; Bao-Qin Han; Yu-Ying Sun

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of chitooligosaccharides on proliferation of pancreatic islet cells, release of insulin and 2 h plasma glucose in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.METHODS: In vitro, the effect of chitooligosaccharides on proliferation of pancreatic islet cells and release of insulin was detected with optical microscopy, colorimetric assay, and radioimmunoassay respectively. In vivo, the general clinical symptoms, 2 h plasma glucose, urine glucose, oral glucose tolerance were examined after sixty days of feeding study to determine the effect of chitooligosaccharides in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.RESULTS: Chitooligosaccharides could effectively accelerate the proliferation of pancreatic islet cells. Chitooligosaccharides (100 mg/L) had direct and prominent effect on pancreastic β cells and insulin release from islet cells. All concentrations of chitooligosaccharides could improve the general clinical symptoms of diabetic rats, decrease the 2 h plasma glucose and urine glucose, and normalize the disorders of glucose tolerance.CONCLUSION: Chitooligosaccharides possess various biological activities and can be used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  14. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Attenuates Acute Renal Injury in Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis by Inhibiting ROS and NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen (H2, a new antioxidant, was reported to reduce •OH and ONOO− selectively and inhibit certain proinflammatory mediators to product, without disturbing metabolic redox reactions or ROS involved in cell signaling. We herein aim to explore its protective effects on acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanisms. Rats were injected with hydrogen-rich saline (HRS group or normal saline (SO and SAP group through tail intravenously (6 mL/kg and compensated subcutaneously (20 mL/kg after successful modeling. Results showed that hydrogen-rich saline attenuated the following: (1 serum Cr and BUN, (2 pancreatic and renal pathological injuries, (3 renal MDA, (4 renal MPO, (5 serum IL-1β, IL-6, and renal TNF-α, HMGB1, and (6 tyrosine nitration, IκB degradation, and NF-κB activation in renal tissues. In addition, it increased the level of IL-10 and SOD activity in renal tissues. These results proved that hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, presumably because of its detoxification activity against excessive ROS, and inhibits the activation of NF-κB by affecting IκB nitration and degradation. Our findings highlight the potential value of hydrogen-rich saline as a new therapeutic method on acute renal injury in severe acute pancreatitis clinically.

  15. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis by inhibiting ROS and NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiao; Liao, Kang-Shu; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Wang, Wei-Xing; Zuo, Teng; Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Yu, Jia; Guo, Wen-Yi; He, Xiao-Bo; Abliz, Ablikim; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2), a new antioxidant, was reported to reduce (•)OH and ONOO(-) selectively and inhibit certain proinflammatory mediators to product, without disturbing metabolic redox reactions or ROS involved in cell signaling. We herein aim to explore its protective effects on acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanisms. Rats were injected with hydrogen-rich saline (HRS group) or normal saline (SO and SAP group) through tail intravenously (6 mL/kg) and compensated subcutaneously (20 mL/kg) after successful modeling. Results showed that hydrogen-rich saline attenuated the following: (1) serum Cr and BUN, (2) pancreatic and renal pathological injuries, (3) renal MDA, (4) renal MPO, (5) serum IL-1β, IL-6, and renal TNF-α, HMGB1, and (6) tyrosine nitration, IκB degradation, and NF-κB activation in renal tissues. In addition, it increased the level of IL-10 and SOD activity in renal tissues. These results proved that hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, presumably because of its detoxification activity against excessive ROS, and inhibits the activation of NF-κB by affecting IκB nitration and degradation. Our findings highlight the potential value of hydrogen-rich saline as a new therapeutic method on acute renal injury in severe acute pancreatitis clinically.

  16. Nilotinib-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vihang Patel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nilotinib, a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is used for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML; it has been widely used especially for imatinib-resistant CML. Despite being a novel drug in this therapeutic class, it has the potential to be harmful. We present the case of an elderly woman who developed life-threatening acute pancreatitis as an adverse event after having started the drug. There is only one reported case in the literature of nilotinib-induced acute pancreatitis. The purpose of this case report is to educate physicians who prescribe this medication to be aware of potential life-threatening adverse events. As more and more therapies are available, physicians should be aware of potential effects of cancer treatment that could be life-threatening to patients.

  17. Effects of Sesamin on Streptozotocin (STZ-Induced NIT-1 Pancreatic β-Cell Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiang Zhang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of sesamin (SES from sesame meal on NIT-1 pancreatic β-cells damaged by streptozotocin (STZ in vitro was investigated. The cell viability, insulin secretion, the activity of superoxide dismutase(SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GSHpx and the content of reduced glutathione (GSH increased significantly when incubated with SES (400, 200 µg mL−1. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA, nitric oxide (NO production, and the activity of NO synthase (NOS, inducible NOS (iNOS, decreased significantly when incubated with SES. The destructive changes of NIT-1 cells were ameliorated when treated with SES under microscopic observation. These data suggested that SES had obvious protective effect on NIT-1 pancreatic β-cells damaged by STZ, which might be related to its effects of decreasing levels of β-cell-destroying factors such as oxidative stress and NO synthesis.

  18. Propylene Glycol Alginate Sodium Sulfate Alleviates Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis by Modulating the MEK/ERK Pathway in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Yueyue; Li, Linqiang; Liu, Hua; Hu, Liangkai; Dai, Ying; Chen, Jianqing; Xu, Shuqi; Chen, Weimin; Xu, Xiaorong; Xu, Xuanfu

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have focused on the effects of propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate (PSS) against thrombosis, but the anti-inflammatory potential is unknown. Therefore, we specifically focused on the protective effects of PSS on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) using a mouse model, and investigated the mechanism of PSS on autophagy and apoptosis via the Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Cerulein (100 ug/kg) was used to induce AP by ten intraperitoneal injections at hourly intervals in Balb/C mice. Pretreatment with vehicle or PSS was carried out 1 h before the first cerulein injection and two doses (25 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg) of PSS were injected intraperitoneally. The severity of AP was assessed by pathological score, biochemistry, pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and MEK/ERK activity. Furthermore, pancreatic histological scores, serum amylase and lipase activities, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β interleukin (IL)-6 levels, and MPO activity were significantly reduced by PSS via up-regulated MEK/ERK activity. The representative molecules of apoptosis and autophagy, such as Bcl-2, Bax, Lc-3, Beclin-1, P62, were remarkably reduced. Taken together, these results indicate that PSS attenuates pancreas injury by inhibiting autophagy and apoptosis through a mechanism involving the MEK/ERK signaling pathway. PMID:28218693

  19. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis: A rare manifestation of an incomplete "dapsone syndrome"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup K Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced acute pancreatitis (AP is under-reported, and a large number of drugs are listed as offenders, but are often overlooked. Knowledge about the possible association of medications in causing AP is important, and needs a high index of suspicion, especially with drugs that have been reported to be the etiology only rarely. Dapsone, a commonly used drug, can cause various hypersensitivity reactions including AP collectively called "dapsone syndrome." Here, we report dapsone-induced AP in a young man. Our case shows certain dissimilarities like associated acute renal failure and acute hemolysis not previously described.

  20. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its blood vessels. This problem is called acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis affects men more often than women. Certain ... pancreatitis; Pancreas - inflammation Images Digestive system Endocrine glands Pancreatitis, acute - CT scan Pancreatitis - series References Forsmark CE. Pancreatitis. ...

  1. Effect of resveratrol on pancreatic oxygen free radicals in rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Dong Li; Qing-Yong Ma; Chang-An Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic effects of resveratrol (RESV) as a free radical scavenger on experimental severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).METHODS: Seventy-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into sham operation group, SAP group, and resveratrol-treated group. Pancreatitis was induced by intraductal administration of 0.1 mL/kg 4%sodium taurocholate. RESV was given intravenously at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight. All animals were killed at 3, 6, 12 h after induction of the model. Serum amylase, pancreatic superoxide dismutase (SOD),malondialdehyde (MDA), and myeloperoxidase (MPO)were determined. Pathologic changes of the pancreas were observed under optical microscope.RESULTS: The serum amylase, pancreatic MPO and the score of pathologic damage increased after the induction of pancreatitis, early (3, 6 h) SAP samples were characterized by decreased pancreatic SOD and increased pancreatic MDA. Resveratrol exhibited a protective effect against lipid peroxidation in cell membrane caused by oxygen free radicals in the early stage of SAP. This attenuation of the redox state impairment reduced cellular oxidative damage, as reflected by lower serum amylase, less severe pancreatic lesions, normal pancreatic MDA levels, as well as diminished neutrophil infiltration in pancreas.CONCLUSION: RESV may exert its therapeutic effect on SAP by lowering pancreatic oxidative free radicals and reducing pancreatic tissue infiltration of neutrophils.

  2. Elucidation of Molecular Mechanisms of Streptozotocin-Induced Oxidative Stress, Apoptosis, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Rin-5F Pancreatic β-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa M. T. Al Nahdi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptozotocin is a pancreatic beta-cell-specific cytotoxin and is widely used to induce experimental type 1 diabetes in rodent models. The precise molecular mechanism of STZ cytotoxicity is however not clear. Studies have suggested that STZ is preferably absorbed by insulin-secreting β-cells and induces cytotoxicity by producing reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS. In the present study, we have investigated the mechanism of cytotoxicity of STZ in insulin-secreting pancreatic cancer cells (Rin-5F at different doses and time intervals. Cell viability, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial bioenergetics were studied. Our results showed that STZ induces alterations in glutathione homeostasis and inhibited the activities of the respiratory enzymes, resulting in inhibition of ATP synthesis. Apoptosis was observed in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Western blot analysis has also confirmed altered expression of oxidative stress markers (e.g., NOS and Nrf2, cell signaling kinases, apoptotic protein-like caspase-3, PARP, and mitochondrial specific proteins. These results suggest that STZ-induced cytotoxicity in pancreatic cells is mediated by an increase in oxidative stress, alterations in cellular metabolism, and mitochondrial dysfunction. This study may be significant in better understanding the mechanism of STZ-induced β-cell toxicity/resistance and the etiology of type 1 diabetes induction.

  3. Adaptive response of rat pancreatic β-cells to insulin resistance induced by monocrotophos: Biochemical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, Raju; Rajini, Padmanabhan Sharda

    2016-11-01

    Our previous findings clearly suggested the role of duration of exposure to monocrotophos (MCP) in the development of insulin resistance. Rats exposed chronically to MCP developed insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia without overt diabetes. In continuation of this vital observation, we sought to delineate the biochemical mechanisms that mediate heightened pancreatic β-cell response in the wake of MCP-induced insulin resistance in rats. Adult rats were orally administered (0.9 and 1.8mg/kgb.w/d) MCP for 180days. Terminally, MCP-treated rats exhibited glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and potentiation of glucose-induced insulin secretion along with elevated levels of circulating IGF1, free fatty acids, corticosterone, and paraoxonase activity. Biochemical analysis of islet extracts revealed increased levels of insulin, malate, pyruvate and ATP with a concomitant increase in activities of cytosolic and mitochondrial enzymes that are known to facilitate insulin secretion and enhanced shuttle activities. Interestingly, islets from MCP-treated rats exhibited increased insulin secretory potential ex vivo compared to those isolated from control rats. Further, MCP-induced islet hypertrophy was associated with increased insulin-positive cells. Our study demonstrates the impact of the biological interaction between MCP and components of metabolic homeostasis on pancreatic beta cell function/s. We speculate that the heightened pancreatic beta cell function evidenced may be mediated by increased IGF1 and paraoxonase activity, which effectively counters insulin resistance induced by chronic exposure to MCP. Our findings emphasize the need for focused research to understand the confounding environmental risk factors which may modulate heightened beta cell functions in the case of organophosphorus insecticide-induced insulin resistance. Such an approach may help us to explain the sharp increase in the prevalence of type II diabetes worldwide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  4. Relationship between Carbachol Hyperstimulation-induced Pancreatic Intracelluar Trypsinogen and NF-кB Activation in Rats in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunfang JIANG; Hai ZHENG; Sunan LIU; Kaifeng FANG

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between intracelluar trypsinogen activation and NF-r,B activation in rat pancreatic acinar cells induced by M3 cholinergic receptor agonist (carbachoi) hyperstimulation was studied. Rat pancreatic acinar cells were isolated, cultured and treated with carbachol, the active pro- tease inhibitor (pefabloc) and NF-кB inhibitor (PDTC) in vitro. Intracelluar trypsin activity was measured by using a fluorogenie substrate. The activity of NF-кB was monitored by using electro- phoretic mobility shift assay. The results showed that after pretreatment with 2 mmol/L pefabloc, the activities of trypsin and NF-кB in pancreatic acinar cells treated with high concertrations of carbachol (10-3 mol/L) in vitro was significantly decreased as compared with control group (P<0.01). The addi- tion of 10-2mol/L PDTC resulted in a significant decrease of NF-кB activities in pancreatic acinar cells after treated with high concertrations of carbachol (10-3 mol/L) in vitro, but the intracelluar trypsinogen activity was not obviously inhibited (P>0.05). It was concluded that intracelluar trypsi- nogen activation is likely involved in the regulation of high concertrations of carbachol-induced NF-кB activation in pancreatic acinar cells in vitro. NF-кB activation is likely not necessary for high concertrations of carbachol-induced trypsinogen activation in pancreatic acinar cells in vitro.

  5. Myxoma Virus Sensitizes Cancer Cells to Gemcitabine and Is an Effective Oncolytic Virotherapeutic in Models of Disseminated Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wennier, Sonia Tusell; Liu, Jia; Li, Shoudong; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Mona, Mahmoud; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a novel oncolytic virus that has been shown to replicate in pancreatic cancer cells, but its efficacy in animal models of pancreatic cancer has not been determined. The efficacy of MYXV as monotherapy or in combination with gemcitabine was evaluated in intraperitoneal dissemination (IPD) models of pancreatic cancer. The effects of an intact immune system on the efficacy of MYXV therapy was tested by comparing immunodeficient versus immunocompetent murine models and comb...

  6. Mechanism of T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest in Mia-Paca pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Andrew M.; Sarkar, Sibaji; Faller, Douglas V.

    2011-01-01

    DNA oligonucleotides with sequence homology to human telomeric DNA (T-oligo) induce cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis, senescence, or autophagy in a human cancer cell type-specific manner. T-oligo has potential as a new therapeutic strategy in oncology because of its ability to target certain types of tumor cells while sparing normal ones. In the present study, we demonstrate the T-oligo-induced S-phase cell cycle arrest in four pancreatic cancer cell lines. To further contribute to the mechanistic understanding of T-oligo, we also identify cyclin dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) as a functional mediator in the T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest of pancreatic cancer cells. Ectopic expression of a constitutively-active cdk2 mutant abrogates T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest in these tumor cells while knockdown of cdk2 expression alone recapitulates the T-oligo effect. Finally, we demonstrate the dispensability of T-oligo-induced ATM/ATR-mediated DNA damage response-signaling pathways, which have long been considered functional in the T-oligo signaling mechanism. PMID:21898405

  7. Spinal microglia initiate and maintain hyperalgesia in a rat model of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Yi; Lu, Ching-Liang; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lee, I-Hui; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen; Chen, Chun-Chia; Lee, Hsing-Feng; Lin, Han-Chieh; Chang, Full-Young; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2012-01-01

    The chronic, persistent pain associated with chronic pancreatitis (CP) has many characteristics of neuropathic pain, initiated and maintained by the activation of spinal microglia. We investigated whether activated microglia in the thoracic spinal cord contribute to chronic pain in a rat model of CP. CP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by an intraductal injection of 2% trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Hyperalgesia was assessed by the measurement of mechanical sensitivity of the abdomen and nocifensive behavior to electrical stimulation of the pancreas. Three weeks after induction of CP, spinal samples were analyzed by immunostaining and immunoblot analyses for levels of CD11 (a marker of microglia, determined with the antibody OX42) and phosphorylated p38 (P-p38, a marker of activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling). We examined the effects of minocycline (inhibitor of microglia) and fractalkine (microglia-activating factor) on visceral hyperalgesia in rats with CP. Rats with CP had increased sensitivity and nociceptive behaviors to mechanical probing of the abdomen and electrical stimulation of the pancreas. The dorsal horn of the thoracic spinal cords of rats with CP contained activated microglia (based on increased staining with OX42), with an ameboid appearance. Levels of P-p38 increased in rats with CP and colocalized with OX42-positive cells. Intrathecal injection of minocycline reversed and prevented the increase of nocifensive behaviors and levels of P-p38 in rats with CP. Fractalkine induced hyperalgesia in rats without CP, which was blocked by minocycline. Activated spinal microglia have important roles in maintaining and initiating chronic pain in a rat model of CP. Microglia might be a target for treatment of hyperalgesia caused by pancreatic inflammation. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Curcumin enhances recovery of pancreatic islets from cellular stress induced inflammation and apoptosis in diabetic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C., E-mail: parames@jcbose.ac.in

    2015-02-01

    The phytochemical, curcumin, has been reported to play many beneficial roles. However, under diabetic conditions, the detail mechanism of its beneficial action in the glucose homeostasis regulatory organ, pancreas, is poorly understood. The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of curcumin in the pancreatic tissue of STZ induced and cellular stress mediated diabetes in eight weeks old male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Post to diabetes induction, animals were treated with curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanism was determined using various biochemical assays, DNA fragmentation, FACS, histology, immunoblotting and ELISA. Treatment with curcumin reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress related markers. In vivo and in vitro experimental results revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ), reduced level of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) along with enhanced levels of signaling molecules of ER stress dependent and independent apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in STZ administered group. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated all the adverse changes and helps the organ back to its normal physiology. Results suggest that curcumin protects pancreatic beta-cells by attenuating inflammatory responses, and inhibiting ER/mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways of apoptosis and crosstalk between them. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect proposes the possibility of using this molecule as an effective protector in the cellular stress mediated diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • STZ induced cellular stress plays a vital role in pancreatic dysfunction. • Cellular stress causes inflammation, pancreatic islet cell death and diabetes. • Deregulation of Nrf-2

  9. The novel hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-2098 has antitumor effect in pancreatic cancer; possible mechanism through inhibiting VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} targeted gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Kotaro, E-mail: hif.panc@gmail.com [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Nishioka, Masanori; Imura, Satoru; Batmunkh, Erdenebulgan [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Uto, Yoshihiro [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Institute of Socio Technosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Nagasawa, Hideko [Laboratory of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan); Hori, Hitoshi [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Institute of Socio Technosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Shimada, Mitsuo [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan)

    2012-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been considered to be a potential therapeutic target, because hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a novel hypoxic cytotoxin, 3-[2-hydroxyethyl(methyl)amino]-2-quinoxalinecarbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (TX-2098) in inhibiting the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), and consequently vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic cancer. The antitumor effects of TX-2098 under hypoxia were tested against various human pancreatic cancer cell lines using WST-8 assay. VEGF protein induced pancreatic cancer was determined on cell-free supernatant by ELISA. Moreover, nude mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically implanted human SUIT-2 were treated with TX-2098. Tumor volume, survival and expression of HIF-1 and associated molecules were evaluated in treatment versus control groups. In vitro, TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of various pancreatic cancer cell lines. In s.c model, tumors from nude mice injected with pancreatic cancer cells and treated with TX-2098 showed significant reductions in volume (P < 0.01 versus control). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TX-2098 significantly inhibited mRNA expression of the HIF-1 associated molecules, VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and Aldolase A (P < 0.01 versus control). These treatments also prolong the survival in orthotopic models. These results suggest that the effect of TX-2098 in pancreatic cancer might be correlated with the expression of VEGF and HIF-1 targeted molecules. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed and synthesized novel hypoxic cytoxin, TX-2098. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 reduced VEGF protein level than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098

  10. Tetracycline-inducible protein expression in pancreatic cancer cells: Effects of CapG overexpression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah Tonack; Sabina Patel; Mehdi Jalali; Taoufik Nedjadi; Rosalind E Jenkins; Christopher Goldring; John Neoptolemos; Eithne Costello

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To establish stable tetracycline-inducible pancre-atic cancer cell lines.METHODS: Suit-2, MiaPaca-2, and Panc-1 cells were transfected with a second generation reverse tetra-cycline-controlled transactivator protein (rtTA2S-M2), under the control of either a cytomegalovirus (CMV) or a chicken β-actin promoter, and the resulting clones were characterised.RESULTS: Use of the chicken (β-actin) promoter proved superior for both the production and mainte-nance of doxycycline-inducible cell lines. The system proved versatile, enabling transient inducible expression of a variety of genes, including GST-P, CYP2E1, S100A6, and the actin capping protein, CapG. To determine the physiological utility of this system in pancreatic cancer cells, stable inducible CapG expressors were established. Overexpressed CapG was localised to the cytoplasm and the nuclear membrane, but was not observed in the nu-cleus. High CapG levels were associated with enhanced motility, but not with changes to the cell cycle, or cellu-lar proliferation. In CapG-overexpressing cells, the levels and phosphorylation status of other actin-moduating proteins (Cofilin and Ezrin/Radixin) were not altered. However, preliminary analyses suggest that the levels of other cellular proteins, such as ornithine aminotransfer-ase and enolase, are altered upon CapG induction. CONCLUSION: We have generated pancreatic-cancer derived cell lines in which gene expression is fully con-trollable.

  11. Serum canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity in experimentally induced and naturally occurring canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonakis, Mathios E; Xenoulis, Panagiotis G; Theodorou, Konstantina; Siarkou, Victoria I; Steiner, Jörg M; Harrus, Shimon; Leontides, Leonidas; Rallis, Timoleon; Suchodolski, Jan S; Koutinas, Christos K; Koutinas, Alexander F

    2014-03-14

    Ehrlichia canis infection causes multisystemic disease in dogs (canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, CME) which is associated with variable morbidity and mortality. Atypical clinical manifestations, including gastrointestinal signs, may occasionally occur in CME and approximately 10-15% of dogs are presented with historical or clinical evidence of vomiting, diarrhea, and/or abdominal discomfort. The objective of this study was to investigate if there are any alterations in serum canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) in dogs with experimentally induced or naturally occurring monocytic ehrlichiosis. Serum samples from 10 Beagle dogs experimentally infected with E. canis and two healthy uninfected Beagles were serially examined; samples from 20 naturally infected dogs (10 with non-myelosuppressive [NME] and 10 with myelosuppressive [ME] ehrlichiosis) were also examined at a given point in time (cross-sectional sampling). None of the experimentally infected Beagles showed gastrointestinal signs or increased cPLI concentrations prior to or following the artificial infection. Three naturally infected dogs with NME and one with ME demonstrated serum cPLI concentrations in the diagnostic range for pancreatitis (>400 μg/L) without showing gastrointestinal signs. The results of the present study indicated that 4/20 (20%) of dogs naturally infected with E. canis demonstrated increased serum cPLI concentrations consistent with mild and clinically inapparent pancreatitis.

  12. Systematic review of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis: A more virulent etiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Rosalie A; Rejowski, Benjamin J; Cote, Gregory A; Pitt, Henry A; Zyromski, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    We sought to define the severity and natural history of hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis (HTG-AP), specifically whether HTG-AP causes more severe AP than that caused by other etiologies. Systematic review of the English literature. Thirty-four studies (15 countries; 1972-2015) included 1340 HTG-AP patients (weighted mean prevalence of 9%). The median admission triglyceride concentration was 2622 mg/dl (range 1160-9769). Patients with HTG have a 14% weighted mean prevalence of AP. Plasmapheresis decreased circulating triglycerides, but did not conclusively affect AP mortality. Only 7 reports (n = 392 patients) compared severity of HTG-AP to that of AP from other etiologies. Of these, 2 studies found no difference in severity, while 5 suggested that HTG-AP patients may have increased severity compared to AP of other etiology. 1) hypertriglyceridemia is a relatively uncommon (9%) cause of acute pancreatitis; however, patients with hypertriglyceridemia have a high (14%) incidence of acute pancreatitis; 2) plasmapheresis may offer specific therapy unique to this patient population; and 3) data specifically comparing the severity of HTG-AP with AP caused by other etiologies are heterogeneous and scarce. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Changes in the morphology and lability of lysosomal subpopulations in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Nancy; Sánchez-Yagüe, Jesús; Juanes, Pedro P; Pérez, Nieves; Ferreira, Laura; García-Hernández, Violeta; Mangas, Arturo; Calvo, José J; Sánchez-Bernal, Carmen

    2011-02-01

    Lysosomes play an important role in acute pancreatitis (AP). Here we developed a method for the isolation of lysosome subpopulations from rat pancreas and assessed the stability of lysosomal membranes. AP was induced by four subcutaneous injections of 20 μg caerulein/kg body weight at hourly intervals. The animals were killed 9h after the first injection. Marker enzymes [N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), cathepsin B and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)] were assayed in subcellular fractions from control pancreas and in pancreatitis. Lysosomal subpopulations were separated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation and observed by electron microscopy. NAG molecular forms were determined by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. AP was associated with: (i) increases in the specific activity of lysosomal enzymes in the soluble fraction, (ii) changes in the size and alterations in the morphology of the organelles from the lysosomal subpopulations, (iii) the appearance of large vacuoles in the primary and secondary lysosome subpopulations, (iv) the increase in the amount of the NAG form associated with the pancreatic lysosomal membrane as well as its release towards the soluble fraction. Lysosome subpopulations are separated by a combination of differential and Percoll density gradient centrifugations. Primary lysosome membrane stability decreases in AP. Copyright © 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cannabinoids inhibit energetic metabolism and induce AMPK-dependent autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, I; Donadelli, M; Costanzo, C; Dalla Pozza, E; D'Alessandro, A; Zolla, L; Palmieri, M

    2013-06-13

    The anti-tumoral effects of cannabinoids have been described in different tumor systems, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but their mechanism of action remains unclear. We used cannabinoids specific for the CB1 (ACPA) and CB2 (GW) receptors and metabolomic analyses to unravel the potential pathways mediating cannabinoid-dependent inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth. Panc1 cells treated with cannabinoids show elevated AMPK activation induced by a ROS-dependent increase of AMP/ATP ratio. ROS promote nuclear translocation of GAPDH, which is further amplified by AMPK, thereby attenuating glycolysis. Furthermore, ROS determine the accumulation of NADH, suggestive of a blockage in the respiratory chain, which in turn inhibits the Krebs cycle. Concomitantly, inhibition of Akt/c-Myc pathway leads to decreased activity of both the pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2), further downregulating glycolysis, and glutamine uptake. Altogether, these alterations of pancreatic cancer cell metabolism mediated by cannabinoids result in a strong induction of autophagy and in the inhibition of cell growth.

  15. Effect of sugammadex on rocuronium induced changes in pancreatic mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Yıldıray; Tumkaya, Levent; Bostan, Habib; Tomak, Yakup; Altuner, Durdu; Yilmaz, Adnan; Erdivanli, Başar; Bedir, Recep; Yalcin, Alper; Turan, Alparslan

    2015-08-01

    Mast cells play a vital role in hypersensitivity reactions. Rocuronium is known to cause mast cell mobilization, hypersensitivity, and pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sugammadex on pancreatic changes due to rocuronium. A total of 42 Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into six equal groups to receive either rocuronium 1 mg/kg intravenously (i.v., R group), rocuronium 1 mg/kg + sugammadex 16 mg/kg i.v. (RS16 group), rocuronium 1 mg/kg + sugammadex 96 mg/kg i.v. (RS96 group), sugammadex 16 mg/kg (S16), sugammadex 96 mg/kg i.v. (S96 group), or 0.9% sodium chloride (control group). Sugammadex was administered 5s later following rocuronium. In R group, mast count was higher, and the distribution rate of granules and nuclear changes were different compared with other groups. Distribution rate of granules in groups S16 and S96 were similar to the control group and lower compared with other groups. The amount of mast cells and granule density in groups RS16 and RS96 was lower compared with R group. The amount of mast cells in groups RS16 and RS96 was significantly lower compared with other treatment groups. These results suggest that sugammadex may have an inhibitory effect on mobilization and morphological changes in pancreatic mast cells induced by administration of rocuronium and sugammadex in rats. © The Author(s) 2013.

  16. Quercetin sensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through JNK-mediated cFLIP turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hye; Kim, Min Joo; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Son, Jaekyoung

    2016-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising anticancer agent that can selectively kill cancer cells. Nonetheless, many cancers are resistant to TRAIL, and the molecular mechanisms of TRAIL resistance in cancer, particularly pancreatic cancer, are still unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that quercetin, a flavonoid, induces apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Although quercetin alone had no significant cytotoxic effect, when combined with TRAIL, it promoted TRAIL-induced apoptosis that required mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. A BH3-only protein BID knockdown dramatically attenuated TRAIL/quercetin-induced apoptosis. The expression levels of cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (cFLIP) decreased in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of quercetin, and overexpression of cFLIP was able to robustly rescue pancreatic cancer cells from TRAIL/quercetin-induced apoptosis. Additionally, quercetin activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in a dose-dependent manner, which in turn induced the proteasomal degradation of cFLIP, and JNK activation also sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Thus, our results suggest that quercetin induces TRAIL-induced apoptosis via JNK activation-mediated cFLIP turnover. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acinar-to-ductal metaplasia accompanies c-myc-induced exocrine pancreatic cancer progression in transgenic rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippo, Paul J; Sandgren, Eric P

    2012-09-01

    Several important characteristics of exocrine pancreatic tumor pathogenesis remain incompletely defined, including identification of the cell of origin. Most human pancreatic neoplasms are ductal adenocarcinomas. However, acinar cells have been proposed as the source of some ductal neoplasms through a process of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. The oncogenic transcription factor c-myc is associated with human pancreatic neoplasms. Transgenic mice overexpressing c-myc under control of acinar cell-specific elastase (Ela) gene regulatory elements not only develop acinar cell carcinomas but also mixed neoplasms that display both acinar-like neoplastic cells and duct-like neoplastic cells. In this report, we demonstrate that, first, c-myc is sufficient to induce acinar hyperplasia, though neoplastic lesions develop focally. Second, cell proliferation remains elevated in the neoplastic duct cell compartment of mixed neoplasms. Third, the proliferation/apoptosis ratio in cells from all lesion types remains constant, suggesting that differential regulation of these processes is not a feature of cancer progression in this model. Fourth, before the development of mixed neoplasms, there is transcriptional activation of the duct cell-specific cytokeratin-19 gene promoter in multicellular foci of amylase-positive acinar neoplasms. This observation provides direct evidence for metaplasia as the mechanism underlying development of ductal neoplastic cells within the context of an acinar neoplasm and suggests that the stimulus for this transformation acts over a multicellular domain or field within a neoplasm. Finally, focal ductal elements develop in some acinar cell carcinomas in Ela-c-myc transgenic rats, indicating that myc-associated acinar-to-ductal metaplasia is not restricted to the mouse.

  18. High Fat, High Calorie Diet Promotes Early Pancreatic Neoplasia in the Conditional KrasG12D Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, David W.; Hertzer, Kathleen; Moro, Aune; Donald, Graham; Chang, Hui-Hua; Go, Vay Liang; Pandol, Steven J.; Lugea, Aurelia; Gukovskaya, Anna S.; Li, Gang; Hines, Oscar J.; Rozengurt, Enrique; Eibl, Guido

    2013-01-01

    There is epidemiologic evidence that obesity increases the risk of cancers. Several underlying mechanisms, including inflammation and insulin resistance, are proposed. However, the driving mechanisms in pancreatic cancer are poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to develop a model of diet-induced obesity and pancreatic cancer development in a state-of-the-art mouse model, which resembles important clinical features of human obesity, e.g. weight gain and metabolic disturbances. Offspring of Pdx-1-Cre and LSL-KrasG12D mice were allocated to either a diet high in fats and calories (HFCD; ~4,535 kcal/kg; 40% of calories from fats) or control diet (CD; ~3,725 kcal/kg; 12% of calories from fats) for 3 months. Compared to control animals, mice fed the HFCD significantly gained more weight and developed hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, hyperleptinemia, and elevated levels of IGF-1. The pancreas of HFCD-fed animals showed robust signs of inflammation with increased numbers of infiltrating inflammatory cells (macrophages and T-cells), elevated levels of several cytokines and chemokines, increased stromal fibrosis, and more advanced PanIN lesions. Our results demonstrate that a diet high in fats and calories leads to obesity and metabolic disturbances similar to humans and accelerates early pancreatic neoplasia in the conditional KrasG12D mouse model. This model and findings will provide the basis for more robust studies attempting to unravel the mechanisms underlying the cancer-promoting properties of obesity as well as to evaluate dietary- and chemo-preventive strategies targeting obesity-associated pancreatic cancer development. PMID:23943783

  19. Metabolic reprogramming induced by ketone bodies diminishes pancreatic cancer cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Aberrant energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. To fulfill the increased energy requirements, tumor cells secrete cytokines/factors inducing muscle and fat degradation in cancer patients, a condition known as cancer cachexia. It accounts for nearly 20% of all cancer-related deaths. However, the mechanistic basis of cancer cachexia and therapies targeting cancer cachexia thus far remain elusive. A ketogenic diet, a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet that elevates circulating lev...

  20. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andoh Y

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Andoh,1,2 Naohiko Makino,2 Mitsunori Yamakawa11Department of Pathological Diagnostics, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanBackground: It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs among dendritic cells (DCs fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines.Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated.Results: The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1 was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Hamster and Human Pancreatic Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela L. Crowell

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 has been implicated in the development of gastrointestinal malignancies. The aim of the present study was to determine COX-2 expression/activity throughout stages of experimental and human pancreatic neoplasia. COX-2 immunohistochemistry was performed in pancreata of hamsters subjected to the carcinogen N-nitrosobis-(2-oxopropylamine (BOP and in human pancreatic tumors. COX-2 activity was determined by prostaglandin E2 assay in tumor versus matched normal pancreatic tissues. The activity of the COX inhibitor sulindac was tested in the PC-1 hamster pancreatic cancer model. COX-2 expression was elevated in all pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs and adenocarcinomas. In BOP-treated hamsters, there were significant progressive elevations in COX-2 expression throughout pancreatic tumorigenesis. In human samples, peak COX-2 expression occurred in PanIN2 lesions and remained moderately elevated in PanIN3 and adenocarcinoma tissues. COX-2 activity was significantly elevated in hamster and human pancreatic cancers compared to pair-matched normal pancreas. Furthermore, hamster pancreatic tumor engraftment/formation in the PC-1 hamster pancreatic cancer model was reduced 4.9-fold by oral administration of sulindac. Increased COX-2 expression is an early event in pancreatic carcinogeneses. The BOP-induced hamster carcinogenesis model is a representative model used to study the role of COX-2 in well-differentiated pancreatic tumorigenesis. COX inhibitors may have a role in preventing tumor engraftment/formation.

  2. Effects of long term feeding of raw soya bean flour on virus- induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirev, T.; Woutersen, R.A.; Kiril, A.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of a diet enriched with 25% raw soya bean flour (RSF) on the pancreas and on the avian retrovirus Pts 56-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl were studied. It has been shown that prolonged RSF feeding of new-hatched virus-infected and uninfected guinea fowl-poults induced enl

  3. Azathioprine-induced Acute Pancreatitis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases—A Prospective Study on Incidence and Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, Wolfgang; Bokemeyer, Bernd; Bündgens, Burkhard; Büning, Jürgen; Miehlke, Stephan; Hüppe, Dietrich; Maaser, Christian; Klugmann, Tobias; Kruis, Wolfgang; Siegmund, Britta; Helwig, Ulf; Weismüller, Joseph; Drabik, Attyla; Stallmach, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Azathioprine [AZA] is recommended for maintenance of steroid-free remission in inflammatory bowel disease IBD. The aim of this study has been to establish the incidence and severity of AZA-induced pancreatitis, an idiosyncratic and major side effect, and to identify specific risk factors. Methods: We studied 510 IBD patients [338 Crohn’s disease, 157 ulcerative colitis, 15 indeterminate colitis] with initiation of AZA treatment in a prospective multicentre registry study. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in accordance with international guidelines. Results: AZA was continued by 324 [63.5%] and stopped by 186 [36.5%] patients. The most common cause of discontinuation was nausea [12.2%]. AZA-induced pancreatitis occurred in 37 patients [7.3%]. Of these: 43% were hospitalised with a median inpatient time period of 5 days; 10% had peripancreatic fluid collections; 24% had vomiting; and 14% had fever. No patient had to undergo nonsurgical or surgical interventions. Smoking was the strongest risk factor for AZA-induced acute pancreatitis [p < 0.0002] in univariate and multivariate analyses. Conclusions: AZA-induced acute pancreatitis is a common adverse event in IBD patients, but in this study had a mild course in all patients. Smoking is the most important risk factor. PMID:26468141

  4. Dual Effects of β3 Integrin Subunit Expression on Human Pancreatic Cancer Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marchán

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pancreatic cancer, the fifth leading cause of adult cancer death in Western countries, lacks early detection, and displays significant dissemination ability. Accumulating evidence shows that integrin-mediated cell attachment to the extracellular matrix induces phenotypes and signaling pathways that regulate tumor cell growth and migration.

  5. Celecoxib Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis via Cyclooxygen-ase-2 Pathway in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Gaosong; YI Jilin; DI Fang; ZOU Shengquan; LI Xingrui

    2005-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects and mechanisms of celecoxib in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis on human pancreatic carcinoma cells, the anti-proliferative effect was measured by using methabenzthiazuron (MTT) assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by using flow cytometry (FCM), and the PGE2 levels in the supernatant of cultured pancreatic carcinoma cells were quantitated by enzyme-linked immunoabsordent assay (ELISA). Our results showed that celecoxib suppressed the production of PGE2 and inhibited the growth of JF-305 cells, and the anti-proliferative effect of celecoxib could be abolished by addition of PGE2. FCM revealed that celecoxib could inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis by G1-S cell cycle arrest. It was concluded that cyclooxygenase-2 specific inhibitor celecoxib could inhibit proliferation and induced apoptosis of human pancreatic carcinoma cells via suppression of PGE2 production in vitro.

  6. Ca2+ signals induced from calcium stores in pancreatic islet β cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In single rat pancreatic β cells,using fura-2 microfluorometry to measure [Ca2+]i response upon different stimuli,the ways of calcium regulation have been studied.When the extracellular calcium concentration was 2.5 mmol/L,either 60 mmol/L KCl,20 mmol/L D-glucose or 0.1 mmol/L tolbutamide induced increase in [Ca2+]i.Such increase in [Ca2+]i was absent when the same stimuli were applied under zero extracellular calcium.These results indicate that the increase of [Ca2+]i is induced by the activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels in β cells.The manifold forms of [Ca2+]i change induced by glucose imply that the effects of glucose are complex.5 mmol/L caffeine or 5 mmol/L MCh increase the [Ca2+]i ,which is independent of the external calcium,suggesting that [Ca2+]i can be regulated by Ca2+ release from not only the IP3-sensitive but also the ryanodine sensitive calcium stores in β cells.The latency of Ca responses for IP3 pathway (5 s) is faster than that for ryanodine pathway (30 s).It is concluded that there are multiple calcium stores in rat pancreatic β cells.

  7. Isoalantolactone Induces Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma PANC-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Khan, Chuan Ding, Azhar Rasul, Fei Yi, Ting Li, Hongwen Gao, Rong Gao, Lili Zhong, Kun Zhang, Xuedong Fang, Tonghui Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoalantolactone, a sesquiterpene lactone compound possesses antifungal, antibacteria, antihelminthic and antiproliferative activities. In the present study, we found that isoalantolactone inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Further mechanistic studies revealed that induction of apoptosis is associated with increased generation of reactive oxygen species, cardiolipin oxidation, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c and cell cycle arrest at S phase. N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC, a specific ROS inhibitor restored cell viability and completely blocked isoalantolactone-mediated apoptosis in PANC-1 cells indicating that ROS are involved in isoalantolactone-mediated apoptosis. Western blot study showed that isoalantolactone increased the expression of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, Bax, and cleaved caspase-3 and decreased the expression of Bcl-2 in a dose-dependent manner. No change in expression of phosphorylated p38 MAPK and Bax was found when cells were treated with isoalantolactone in the presence of NAC, indicating that activation of these proteins is directly dependent on ROS generation. The present study provides evidence for the first time that isoalantolactone induces ROS-dependent apoptosis through intrinsic pathway. Furthermore, our in vivo toxicity study demonstrated that isoalantolactone did not induce any acute or chronic toxicity in liver and kidneys of CD1 mice at dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. Therefore, isoalantolactone may be a safe chemotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of human pancreatic carcinoma.

  8. Profile of blood glucose and ultrastucture of beta cells pancreatic islet in alloxan compound induced rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Suarsana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, and progressive changes of the structure of pancreatic islet histopathology. The objective of this research was to analyse the glucose level and histophatological feature in pancreatic islet in alloxan compound induced rats. A total of ten male Spraque Dawley rats of 2 months old were used in this study. The rats were divided into two groups: (1 negative control group (K-, and (2 positif induced alloxan group (diabetic group =DM. The rats were induced by a single dose intraperitonial injection of alloxan compound 120 mg/kg of body weight. The treatment was conducted for 28 days. Blood glucose levels of rats were analysed at 0, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days following treatment. At the end of the experiment, rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Pancreas was collected for analysis of histopathological study by Immunohistochemical technique, and ultrastructural study using transmission electron microscope (TEM. The result showed that Langerhans islet of diabetic rat (rat of DM group showed a marked reduction of size, number of Langerhans islet of diabetic rat decrease, and characterized by hyperglycemic condition. By using TEM, beta cells of DM group showed the rupture of mitochondrial membrane, the lost of cisternal structure of inner membrane of mitocondria, reduction of insulin secretory granules, linkage between cells acinar with free Langerhans islet, and the caryopicnotic of nucleus.

  9. Knockdown of GRP78 promotes apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells and attenuates the severity of cerulein and LPS induced pancreatic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a potentially lethal disease characterized by inflammation and parenchymal cell death; also, the severity of AP correlates directly with necrosis and inversely with apoptosis. However, mechanisms of regulating cell death in AP remain unclear. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperone protein GRP78 has anti-apoptotic properties, in addition to modulating ER stress responses. This study used RNA interference (RNAi approach to investigate the potential role of GRP78 in regulating apoptosis during AP. In vitro models of AP were successfully developed by treating AR42J cells with cerulein or cerulein plus lipoplysaccharide (LPS. There was more pancreatic inflammation and less apoptosis with the cerulein plus LPS treatment. Furthermore, knockdown of GRP78 expression markedly promoted apoptosis and reduced necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells. This was accomplished by enhancing the activation of caspases and inhibiting the activity of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP, as well as a receptor interacting protein kinase-1(RIPK1, which is a key mediator of necrosis. This attenuated the severity of pancreatic inflammation, especially after cerulein plus LPS treatment. In conclusion, these findings indicate that GRP78 plays an anti-apoptotic role in regulating the cell death response during AP. Therefore, GRP78 is a potential therapeutic target for AP.

  10. Ligustrazine alleviates gastric mucosal injur y in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Chun Dang; Jian-Xin Zhang; Jian-Guo Qu; Xue-Qing Wang; Xin Fan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) leads to a systemic inlfammatory response characterized by widespread leukocyte activation and, as a consequence, distant organ injury. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between gastric microcirculatory impairment and inlfammatory mediators released in rats and to evaluate the therapeutic effect of ligustrazine extracted from Rhizoma ligusticum wallichii on gastric mucosa injury in a rat model of ANP. METHODS: Ninety-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal control (group C);ANP without treatment (group P); and ANP treated with ligustrazine (group T). The ANP model was induced by injection of 50 g/L sodium taurocholate under the pancreatic membrane (4 ml/kg). Group C was given isovolumetric injection of 9 g/L physiological saline by the same route. Group T was injected with ligustrazine (10 ml/kg) via the portal vein. The radioactive biomicrosphere technique was used to measure the blood lfow 2 and 12 hours after the induction of ANP. Samples of the pancreas and stomach were taken to assess pathological changes by a validated histology score;meanwhile, the levels of serum interleukin-1β(IL-1β) were determined. Gastric tissues were also used to measure the level of myeloperoxidase (MPO), which is expressed intracellularly in the azurophilic granules of neutrophils. RESULTS: Blood lfow in group P was signiifcantly lower than that in group C (P CONCLUSIONS: Decreased gastric blood lfow and increased inlfammatory mediators can be seen early in ANP, and both are important factors for gastric and mucosal injury. Ligustrazine can ameliorate microcirculatory disorder and alleviate the damage to the pancreas and stomach.

  11. [Obesity and pancreatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Gak; Han, Jimin

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is defined as BMI (calculated as weight in kg divided by height in m2) more than 30, and overweight is defined as BMI of 25-29.9. Obesity has been considered as a risk factor for pancreatic diseases, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Severe acute pancreatitis is significantly more frequent in obese patients. Furthermore, obese patients develop systemic and local complications of acute pancreatitis more frequently. The underlying mechanisms are increased inflammation and necrosis from increased amount of intra- and peri-pancreatic fat. In addition, obesity is a poor prognostic factor in acute pancreatitis, and overweight before disease onset appears to be a risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Overweight and/or obesity are associated with greater risk of pancreatic cancer and younger age of onset. Physical activity appears to decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer, especially among those who are overweight. Long-standing diabetes increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. The pathogenic mechanism is that obesity and physical inactivity increase insulin resistance. In a state of hypersinulinemia, increased circulating level of insulin-like growth factor-1 induces cellular proliferation of pancreatic cancer. Obesity is associated with negative prognostic factor and increased mortality in pancreatic cancer. However, there are controversies regarding the effects of obesity on long-term post-operative results in the patient with pancreatic cancer.

  12. Ligustrazine alleviates acute lung injury in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Xin Zhang; Sheng-Chun Dang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Acute necrotizing pancreatitis leads to a systemic inlfammatory response characterized by widespread leukocyte activation and, as a consequence, distant lung injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ligustrazine, extracted from Ligusticum wallichii a traditional Chinese medicine, on lung injury in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). METHODS:A total of 192 rats were randomly divided into three groups: control (C group); ANP without treatment (P group); and ANP treated with ligustrazine (T group). Each group was further divided into 0.5, 2, 6 and 12 hours subgroups. All rats were anesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of sodium pentobarbital. Sodium taurocholate was infused through the pancreatic membrane to induce ANP. For the T group, sodium taurocholate was infused as above, then 0.6%ligustrazine was administered via the femoral vein. The effects of ligustrazine on the severity of lung injury were assessed by lung wet/dry weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histopathological changes. Pulmonary blood lfow was determined by the radioactive microsphere technique (RMT). RESULTS:The blood lfow in the P group was signiifcantly lower than that of the C group, while the blood lfow in the T group was signiifcantly higher than that of the P group but showed no signiifcant difference from the C group. Compared with C group, the lung wet/dry ratios in both the P and T groups were signiifcantly increased, but there was no signiifcant difference between them. The MPO activity in the P group was greatly increased over that of the C group. In the T group, although the MPO activity was also higher than in the C group, it much less increased than in the P group. Moreover, the difference between P and T groups was signiifcant after 0.5 to 12 hours. After induction of the ANP model, the pancreas showed mild edema and congestion;the longer the time, the more severe this became. The pulmonary pathological changes were

  13. HIV-Antiretroviral Therapy Induced Liver, Gastrointestinal, and Pancreatic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela G. Neuman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes possible connections between antiretroviral therapies (ARTs used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and adverse drug reactions (ADRs encountered predominantly in the liver, including hypersensitivity syndrome reactions, as well as throughout the gastrointestinal system, including the pancreas. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has a positive influence on the quality of life and longevity in HIV patients, substantially reducing morbidity and mortality in this population. However, HAART produces a spectrum of ADRs. Alcohol consumption can interact with HAART as well as other pharmaceutical agents used for the prevention of opportunistic infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. Other coinfections that occur in HIV, such as hepatitis viruses B or C, cytomegalovirus, or herpes simplex virus, further complicate the etiology of HAART-induced ADRs. The aspect of liver pathology including liver structure and function has received little attention and deserves further evaluation. The materials used provide a data-supported approach. They are based on systematic review and analysis of recently published world literature (MedLine search and the experience of the authors in the specified topic. We conclude that therapeutic and drug monitoring of ART, using laboratory identification of phenotypic susceptibilities, drug interactions with other medications, drug interactions with herbal medicines, and alcohol intake might enable a safer use of this medication.

  14. Cytosolic Double-Stranded DNA as a Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern Induces the Inflammatory Response in Rat Pancreatic Stellate Cells: A Plausible Mechanism for Tissue Injury-Associated Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of unknown causes. There are many triggers causing pancreatitis, such as alcohol, common bile duct stone, virus and congenital or acquired stenosis of main pancreatic duct, which often involve tissue injuries. Pancreatitis often occurs in sterile condition, where the dead/dying pancreatic parenchymal cells and the necrotic tissues derived from self-digested-pancreas were observed. However, the causal relationship between tissue injury and pancreatitis and how tissue injury could induce the inflammation of the pancreas were not elucidated fully until now. This study demonstrates that cytosolic double-stranded DNA increases the expression of several inflammatory genes (cytokines, chemokines, type I interferon, and major histocompatibility complex in rat pancreatic stellate cells. Furthermore, these increase accompanied the multiple signal molecules genes, such as interferon regulatory factors, nuclear factor-kappa B, low-molecular-weight protein 2, and transporter associated with antigen processing 1. We suggest that this phenomenon is a plausible mechanism that might explain how cell damage of the pancreas or tissue injury triggers acute, chronic, and autoimmune pancreatitis; it is potentially relevant to host immune responses induced during alcohol consumption or other causes.

  15. Attenuation of pancreatitis-induced pulmonary injury by aerosolized hypertonic saline.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, C J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The immunomodulatory effects of hypertonic saline (HTS) provide potential strategies to attenuate inappropriate inflammatory reactions. This study tested the hypothesis that administration of intratracheal aerosolized HTS modulates the development of lung injury in pancreatitis. METHODS: Pancreatitis was induced in 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection of 20% L-arginine (500 mg\\/100 g body weight). At 24 and 48 h, intratracheal aerosolized HTS (7.5% NaCl, 0.5 mL) was administered to 8 rats, while a further 8 received 0.5 mL of aerosolized normal saline (NS). At 72 hours, pulmonary neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity) and endothelial permeability (bronchoalveolar lavage and wet:dry weight ratios) were assessed. In addition, histological assessment of representative lung tissue was performed by a blinded assessor. In a separate experiment, polymorphonucleocytes (PMN) were isolated from human donors, and exposed to increments of HTS. Neutrophil transmigration across an endothelial cell layer, VEGF release, and apoptosis at 1, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h were assessed. RESULTS: Histopathological lung injury scores were significantly reduced in the HTS group (4.78 +\\/- 1.43 vs. 8.64 +\\/- 0.86); p < 0.001). Pulmonary neutrophil sequestration (1.40 +\\/- 0.2) and increased endothelial permeability (6.77 +\\/- 1.14) were evident in the animals resuscitated with normal saline when compared with HTS (0.70 +\\/- 0.1 and 3.57 +\\/- 1.32), respectively; p < 0.04). HTS significantly reduced PMN transmigration (by 97.1, p = 0.002, and induced PMN apoptosis (p < 0.03). HTS did not impact significantly upon neutrophil VEGF release (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Intratracheal aerosolized HTS attenuates the neutrophil-mediated pulmonary insult subsequent to pancreatitis. This may represent a novel therapeutic strategy.

  16. LLL12 inhibits endogenous and exogenous interleukin-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aiguo; Liu, Yan; Li, Pui-Kai; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh

    2011-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most serious types of cancer, with a five-year survival rate at only 6%. There is a critical need to develop more effective treatments for pancreatic cancer. Growing evidence shows that chronic inflammation plays a crucial role in tumor initiation and progression. Here we demonstrated that the endogenous expression of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) correlates with signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation in human pancreatic cancer cells. Inhibition of the endogenous IL-6/STAT3 pathway reduces cell viability. Exogenous IL-6 induces STAT3 phosphorylation, but differently induces phosphorylation of STAT3 upstream kinases, Janus kinase 1(JAK1), JAK2, and tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2). Interestingly, LLL12, a nonpeptide, cell-permeable small molecule, selectively blocked exogenous IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation in both PANC-1 and ASPC-1 pancreatic cancer cell lines independently of the phosphorylation of JAK1, JAK2, and TYK2. These results suggest that the inhibition of endogenous and exogenous IL-6-mediated STAT3 signaling may be a potential therapeutic approach for pancreatic cancer.

  17. Chronic stress accelerates pancreatic cancer growth and invasion: a critical role for beta-adrenergic signaling in the pancreatic microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Le, Caroline P; Pimentel, Matthew A; Shackleford, David; Ferrari, Davide; Angst, Eliane; Hollande, Frédéric; Sloan, Erica K

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells intimately interact with a complex microenvironment that influences pancreatic cancer progression. The pancreas is innervated by fibers of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and pancreatic cancer cells have receptors for SNS neurotransmitters which suggests that pancreatic cancer may be sensitive to neural signaling. In vitro and non-orthotopic in vivo studies showed that neural signaling modulates tumour cell behavior. However the effect of SNS signaling on tumor progression within the pancreatic microenvironment has not previously been investigated. To address this, we used in vivo optical imaging to non-invasively track growth and dissemination of primary pancreatic cancer using an orthotopic mouse model that replicates the complex interaction between pancreatic tumor cells and their microenvironment. Stress-induced neural activation increased primary tumor growth and tumor cell dissemination to normal adjacent pancreas. These effects were associated with increased expression of invasion genes by tumor cells and pancreatic stromal cells. Pharmacological activation of β-adrenergic signaling induced similar effects to chronic stress, and pharmacological β-blockade reversed the effects of chronic stress on pancreatic cancer progression. These findings indicate that neural β-adrenergic signaling regulates pancreatic cancer progression and suggest β-blockade as a novel strategy to complement existing therapies for pancreatic cancer.

  18. Neutrophil depletion-but not prevention of Kupffer cell activation-decreases the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Catherine M Pastor; Alain Vonlaufen; Fabianna Georgi; Antoine Hadengue; Philippe Morel; Jean-Louis Frossard

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether neutrophil depletion and Kupffer cell inhibition might combine their protective effects to decrease the severity of acute pancreatitis.METHODS: Mice had cerulein administration to induce acute pancreatitis and were pretreated with either anti-mouse neutrophil serum or gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) to prevent Kupffer cell activation, or both treatments. Injury was assessed in pancreas and lungs.Myeloperoxidases (MPO) assessed neutrophil infiltration.Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10 were measured in serum,pancreas, lungs and liver.RESULTS: In mice with acute pancreatitis, neutrophil depletion reduced the severity of pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Kupffer cell inactivation by GdCl3 had less protective effect, although IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations were significantly decreased. The protective treatment brought by neutrophil depletion was not enhanced by Kupffer cell inactivation and both treatments did not combine their protective effects.CONCLUSION: Our results confirm the role of activated neutrophils in aggravating organ injury in acute pancreatitis while the role of Kupffer cell activation is less obvious.

  19. MUC1 selectively targets human pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Youp Park

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine whether MUC1 antibody conjugated with a fluorophore could be used to visualize pancreatic cancer. Anti-MUC1 (CT2 antibody was conjugated with 550 nm or 650 nm fluorophores. Nude mouse were used to make subcutaneous and orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. Western blot and flow cytometric analysis confirmed the expression of MUC1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines including BxPC-3 and Panc-1. Immunocytochemistry with fluorophore conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody demonstrated fluorescent areas on the membrane of Panc-1 cancer cells. After injecting the conjugated anti-MUC1 antibodies via the tail vein, subcutaneously transplanted Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumors emitted strong fluorescent signals. In the subcutaneous tumor models, the fluorescent signal from the conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody was noted around the margin of the tumor and space between the cells. The conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody bound the tumor in orthotopically-transplanted Panc-1 and BxPC-3 models enabling the tumors to be imaged. This study showed that fluorophore conjugated anti-MUC1 antibodies could visualize pancreatic tumors in vitro and in vivo and may help to improve the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcohol is a known risk factor for both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Therefore it is recommended that all HP patients ... Pancreatitis Patient Info Animated Pancreas Patient Pancreatic Cancer Chronic Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis Research Research Grant Application Research History Grant ...

  1. Pancreatitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  2. TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK promotes beta cell neogenesis from pancreatic ductal epithelium in adult mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wu

    Full Text Available AIM/HYPOTHESIS: The adult mammalian pancreas has limited ability to regenerate in order to restore adequate insulin production from multipotent progenitors, the identity and function of which remain poorly understood. Here we test whether the TNF family member TWEAK (TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis promotes β-cell neogenesis from proliferating pancreatic ductal epithelium in adult mice. METHODS: C57Bl/6J mice were treated with Fc-TWEAK and pancreas harvested at different time points for analysis by histology and immunohistochemistry. For lineage tracing, 4 week old double transgenic mice CAII-CreER(TM: R26R-eYFP were implanted with tamoxifen pellet, injected with Fc-TWEAK or control Ig twice weekly and analyzed at day 18 for TWEAK-induced duct cell progeny by costaining for insulin and YFP. The effect of TWEAK on pancreatic regeneration was determined by pancytokeratin immunostaining of paraffin embedded sections from wildtype and TWEAK receptor (Fn14 deficient mice after Px. RESULTS: TWEAK stimulates proliferation of ductal epithelial cells through its receptor Fn14, while it has no mitogenic effect on pancreatic α- or β-cells or acinar cells. Importantly, TWEAK induces transient expression of endogenous Ngn3, a master regulator of endocrine cell development, and induces focal ductal structures with characteristics of regeneration foci. In addition, we identify by lineage tracing TWEAK-induced pancreatic β-cells derived from pancreatic duct epithelial cells. Conversely, we show that Fn14 deficiency delays formation of regenerating foci after Px and limits their expansion. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: We conclude that TWEAK is a novel factor mediating pancreatic β-cell neogenesis from ductal epithelium in normal adult mice.

  3. Pancreatic Expression database: a generic model for the organization, integration and mining of complex cancer datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemoine Nicholas R

    2007-11-01

    of genes associated with the progression of cancer, cross-platform meta-analysis, SNP selection for pancreatic cancer association studies, cancer gene promoter analysis as well as mining cancer ontology information. The data model is generic and can be easily extended and applied to other types of cancer. The database is available online with no restrictions for the scientific community at http://www.pancreasexpression.org/.

  4. ROCK signalling induced gene expression changes in mouse pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Nicola; Kalna, Gabriela; Clark, William; Olson, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The RhoA and RhoC GTPases act via the ROCK1 and ROCK2 kinases to promote actomyosin contraction, resulting in directly induced changes in cytoskeleton structures and altered gene transcription via several possible indirect routes. Elevated activation of the Rho/ROCK pathway has been reported in several diseases and pathological conditions, including disorders of the central nervous system, cardiovascular dysfunctions and cancer. To determine how increased ROCK signalling affected gene expression in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we transduced mouse PDAC cell lines with retroviral constructs encoding fusion proteins that enable conditional activation of ROCK1 or ROCK2, and subsequently performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) using the Illumina NextSeq 500 platform. We describe how gene expression datasets were generated and validated by comparing data obtained by RNA-Seq with RT-qPCR results. Activation of ROCK1 or ROCK2 signalling induced significant changes in gene expression that could be used to determine how actomyosin contractility influences gene transcription in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27824338

  5. In vitro fertilization–induced hypertriglyceridemia with secondary acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Michael Issa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In vitro fertilization is becoming more and more popular lately, as such light is to be shed on any possible related complication. One of these complications is the possible hormonal effect on the lipid profile of the patients. Case presentation: We present a case of a 39-year-old woman with no prior or family history of dyslipidemia, who presented with post in vitro fertilization severe hypertriglyceridemia and secondary acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis. Discussion of the case is followed by a brief review of the literature related to in vitro fertilization–induced hypertriglyceridemia. Conclusion: This is, up to our knowledge, the sixth reported case of in vitro fertilization–induced hypertriglyceridemia with secondary acute pancreatitis. This is a serious and life-threatening complication. As such, it might be wise at least in high-risk patients (such as patients with diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovaries syndrome, obesity, and family and personal history of dyslipidemia to screen for lipid abnormalities before initiating in vitro fertilization and monitor these levels afterward.

  6. Chlorella protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced pancreatic β-cell damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Yu; Huang, Pei-Jane; Chao, Che-Yi

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the etiology of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and diabetes. Studies have shown that chlorella could be important in health promotion or disease prevention through its antioxidant capacity. However, whether chlorella has a cytoprotective effect in pancreatic β-cells remains to be elucidated. We investigated the protective effects of chlorella on H2O2-induced oxidative damage in INS-1 (832/13) cells. Chlorella partially restored cell viability after H2O2 toxicity. To further investigate the effects of chlorella on mitochondria function and cellular oxidative stress, we analyzed mitochondria membrane potential, ATP concentrations, and cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Chlorella prevented mitochondria disruption and maintained cellular ATP levels after H2O2 toxicity. It also normalized intracellular levels of ROS to that of control in the presence of H2O2. Chlorella protected cells from apoptosis as indicated by less p-Histone and caspase 3 activation. In addition, chlorella not only enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), but also partially restored the reduced GSIS after H2O2 toxicity. Our results suggest that chlorella is effective in amelioration of cellular oxidative stress and destruction, and therefore protects INS-1 (832/13) cells from H2O2-induced apoptosis and increases insulin secretion. Chlorella should be studied for use in the prevention or treatment of diabetes.

  7. In vitro fertilization–induced hypertriglyceridemia with secondary acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Claire Michael; Abu Khuzam, Rani Hazar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In vitro fertilization is becoming more and more popular lately, as such light is to be shed on any possible related complication. One of these complications is the possible hormonal effect on the lipid profile of the patients. Case presentation: We present a case of a 39-year-old woman with no prior or family history of dyslipidemia, who presented with post in vitro fertilization severe hypertriglyceridemia and secondary acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis. Discussion of the case is followed by a brief review of the literature related to in vitro fertilization–induced hypertriglyceridemia. Conclusion: This is, up to our knowledge, the sixth reported case of in vitro fertilization–induced hypertriglyceridemia with secondary acute pancreatitis. This is a serious and life-threatening complication. As such, it might be wise at least in high-risk patients (such as patients with diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovaries syndrome, obesity, and family and personal history of dyslipidemia) to screen for lipid abnormalities before initiating in vitro fertilization and monitor these levels afterward. PMID:28228964

  8. Niacin-induced hyperglycemia is partially mediated via niacin receptor GPR109a in pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihua; So, Wing Yan; Li, Stephen Y T; Cheng, Qianni; Boucher, Barbara J; Leung, Po Sing

    2015-03-15

    The widely used lipid-lowering drug niacin is reported to induce hyperglycemia during chronic and high-dose treatments, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Recently, the niacin receptor [G-protein-coupled receptor, (GPR) 109a], has been localized to islet cells while its potential role therein remains unclear. We, therefore, aimed at investigating how GPR109a regulates islet beta-cell function and its downstream signaling using high-fat diet-induced obese mice and INS-1E beta cells. Eight-week niacin treatment elevated blood glucose concentration in obese mice with increased areas under the curve at oral glucose and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests. Additionally, niacin treatment significantly decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) but induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg) and GPR109a expression in isolated pancreatic islets; concomitantly, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were transiently increased, with decreases in GSIS, intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), but with increased expression of uncoupling protein 2 (Ucp2), Pparg and Gpr109a in INS-1E cells. Corroborating these findings, the decreases in GSIS, ΔΨm and cAMP production and increases in ROS, Pparg and GPR109a expression were abolished in INS-1E cells by GPR109a knockdown. Our data indicate that niacin-induced pancreatic islet dysfunction is probably modulated through activation of the islet beta-cell GPR109a-induced ROS-PPARγ-UCP2 pathways.

  9. Identification of key transcription factors in caerulein-induced pancreatitis through expression profiling data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dachuan; Wu, Bo; Tong, Danian; Pan, Ye; Chen, Wei

    2015-08-01

    The current study aimed to isolate key transcription factors (TFs) in caerulein-induced pancreatitis, and to identify the difference between wild type and Mist1 knockout (KO) mice, in order to elucidate the contribution of Mist1 to pancreatitis. The gene profile of GSE3644 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database then analyzed using the t-test. The isolated differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were mapped into a transcriptional regulatory network derived from the Integrated Transcription Factor Platform database and in the network, the interaction pairs involving at least one DEG were screened. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the functional enrichment of the target genes. A total of 1,555 and 3,057 DEGs were identified in the wild type and Mist1KO mice treated with caerulein, respectively. DEGs screened in Mist1KO mice were predominantly enriched in apoptosis, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and other cancer-associated pathways. A total of 188 and 51 TFs associated with pathopoiesis were isolated in Mist1KO and wild type mice, respectively. Out of the top 10 TFs (ranked by P-value), 7 TFs, including S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2); minichromosome maintenance complex component 3 (Mcm3); cell division cycle 6 (Cdc6); cyclin B1 (Ccnb1); mutS homolog 6 (Msh6); cyclin A2 (Ccna2); and cyclin B2 (Ccnb2), were expressed in the two types of mouse. These TFs were predominantly involved in phosphorylation, DNA replication, cell division and DNA mismatch repair. In addition, specific TFs, including minichromosome maintenance complex component 7 (Mcm7); lymphoid-specific helicase (Hells); and minichromosome maintenance complex component 6 (Mcm6), that function in the unwinding of DNA were identified to participate in Mist1KO pancreatitis. The DEGs, including Cdc6, Mcm6, Msh6 and Wdr1 are closely associated with the regulation of caerulein-induced pancreatitis. Furthermore, other identified TFs were also involved in this type of

  10. Pristimerin causes G1 arrest, induces apoptosis, and enhances the chemosensitivity to gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwei Wang

    Full Text Available Despite rapid advances in chemotherapy and surgical resection strategies, pancreatic cancer remains the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pristimerin, a quinonemethide triterpenoid compound isolated from Celastraceae and Hippocrateaceae, on inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in three pancreatic cancer cells, BxPC-3, PANC-1 and AsPC-1, in both monotherapy and in combination with gemcitabine. Treatment with pristimerin decreased the cell proliferation of all three pancreatic cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with pristimerin also resulted in G1-phase arrest which was strongly associated with a marked decrease in the level of cyclins (D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinases (cdk2, cdk4 and cdk6 with concomitant induction of WAF1/p21 and KIP1/p27. Pristimerin treatment also resulted in apoptotic cell death, cleavage of caspase-3, modulation in the expressions of Bcl-2 family proteins, inhibition of the translocation and DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. In addition, pristimerin potentiated the growth inhibition and apoptosis inducing effects of gemcitabine in all three pancreatic cancer cells, at least in part, by inhibiting constitutive as well as gemcitabine-induced activation of NF-κB in both its DNA-binding activity and transcriptional activity. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that pristimerin has strong potential for development as a novel agent against pancreatic cancer.

  11. TW-37, a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Bcl-2, Inhibits Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Pancreatic Cancer: Involvement of Notch-1 Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of Bcl-2 family proteins has been found in a variety of aggressive human carcinomas, including pancreatic cancer, suggesting that specific agents targeting Bcl-2 family proteins would be valuable for pancreatic cancer therapy. We have previously reported that TW-37, a small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 family proteins, inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer. However, the precise role and the molecular mechanism of action of TW-37 have not been fully elu...

  12. Ductal pancreatic cancer modeling and drug screening using human pluripotent stem cell and patient-derived tumor organoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Holtzinger, Audrey; Jagan, Ishaan; BeGora, Michael; Lohse, Ines; Ngai, Nicholas; Nostro, Cristina; Wang, Rennian; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Crawford, Howard C.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Kalloger, Steve E.; Renouf, Daniel J.; Connor, Ashton A; Cleary, Sean; Schaeffer, David F.; Roehrl, Michael; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Gallinger, Steven; Keller, Gordon; Muthuswamy, Senthil K.

    2016-01-01

    There are few in vitro models of exocrine pancreas development and primary human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We establish three-dimensional culture conditions to induce the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) into exocrine progenitor organoids that form ductal and acinar structures in culture and in vivo. Expression of mutant KRAS or TP53 in progenitor organoids induces mutation-specific phenotypes in culture and in vivo. Expression of TP53R175H induced cytosolic SOX9 localization. In patient tumors bearing TP53 mutations, SOX9 was cytoplasmic and associated with mortality. Culture conditions are also defined for clonal generation of tumor organoids from freshly resected PDAC. Tumor organoids maintain the differentiation status, histoarchitecture, phenotypic heterogeneity of the primary tumor, and retain patient-specific physiologic changes including hypoxia, oxygen consumption, epigenetic marks, and differential sensitivity to EZH2 inhibition. Thus, pancreatic progenitor organoids and tumor organoids can be used to model PDAC and for drug screening to identify precision therapy strategies. PMID:26501191

  13. Ductal pancreatic cancer modeling and drug screening using human pluripotent stem cell- and patient-derived tumor organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Holtzinger, Audrey; Jagan, Ishaan; BeGora, Michael; Lohse, Ines; Ngai, Nicholas; Nostro, Cristina; Wang, Rennian; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Crawford, Howard C; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Kalloger, Steve E; Renouf, Daniel J; Connor, Ashton A; Cleary, Sean; Schaeffer, David F; Roehrl, Michael; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Gallinger, Steven; Keller, Gordon; Muthuswamy, Senthil K

    2015-11-01

    There are few in vitro models of exocrine pancreas development and primary human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We establish three-dimensional culture conditions to induce the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into exocrine progenitor organoids that form ductal and acinar structures in culture and in vivo. Expression of mutant KRAS or TP53 in progenitor organoids induces mutation-specific phenotypes in culture and in vivo. Expression of TP53(R175H) induces cytosolic SOX9 localization. In patient tumors bearing TP53 mutations, SOX9 was cytoplasmic and associated with mortality. We also define culture conditions for clonal generation of tumor organoids from freshly resected PDAC. Tumor organoids maintain the differentiation status, histoarchitecture and phenotypic heterogeneity of the primary tumor and retain patient-specific physiological changes, including hypoxia, oxygen consumption, epigenetic marks and differences in sensitivity to inhibition of the histone methyltransferase EZH2. Thus, pancreatic progenitor organoids and tumor organoids can be used to model PDAC and for drug screening to identify precision therapy strategies.

  14. SNAIL induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in a human pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC3) and promotes distant metastasis and invasiveness in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Ryohei; Itoh, Shunji; Gui, Ting; Gai, Zhibo; Oikawa, Kosuke; Kawai, Manabu; Tani, Masaji; Yamaue, Hiroki; Muragaki, Yasuteru

    2010-10-01

    SNAIL, a potent repressor of E-cadherin expression, plays a key role in inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in epithelial cells. During EMT, epithelial cells lose cell polarity and adhesion, and undergo drastic morphological changes acquiring highly migratory abilities. Although there is increasing evidence that EMT is involved in the progression of some human cancers, its significance in the progression of pancreatic cancer remains elusive. In Panc-1, a well-known human pancreatic cancer cell line in which EMT is triggered by TGF-β1 treatment, SNAIL and vimentin are highly expressed, whereas E-cadherin expression is scant. In contrast, another human pancreatic cancer cell line, BxPC3, in which SNAIL expression is not detected, has high levels of E-cadherin expression and does not undergo EMT upon TGF-β1 treatment. After transfecting the SNAIL gene into BxPC3, however, the cells undergo EMT with remarkable alterations in cell morphology and molecular expression patterns without the addition of any growth factors. Furthermore, in an orthotopic transplantation model using SCID mice, SNAIL-transfected BxPC3 displayed highly metastatic and invasive activities. In the immunohistochemical analysis of the tumor derived from the SNAIL-expressing BxPC3, alterations suggestive of EMT were observed in the invasive tumor front. SNAIL enabled BxPC3 to undergo EMT, endowing it with a highly malignant potential in vivo. These results indicate that SNAIL-mediated EMT may be relevant in the progression of pancreatic cancer, and SNAIL could be a molecular target for a pancreatic cancer intervention. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Red oil A5 inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mi-Lian Dong; Xian-Zhong Ding; Thomas E. Adrian

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of red oil A5 on pancreatic cancer cells and its possible mechanisms.METHODS: Effect of different concentrations of red oil A5on proliferation of three pancreatic cancer cell lines, AsPC-1,MiaPaCa-2 and S2013, was measured by 3H-methyl thymidine incorporation. Time-dependent effects of 1:32 000 red oil A5 on proliferation of three pancreatic cancer cell lines, were also measured by 3H-methyl thymidine incorporation, and Time-course effects of 1:32 000 red oil A5 on cell number.The cells were counted by Z1-Coulter Counter. Fiowcytometric analysis of cellular DNA content in the control and red oil A5 treated AsPC-1, MiaPaCa-2 and S2013 cells,were stained with propidium iodide. TUNEL assay of red oil A5-induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis was performed.Western blotting of the cytochrome c protein in AsPC-1,MiaPaCa-2 and S2013 cells treated 24 hours with 1:32 000red oil A5 was performed. Proteins in cytosolic fraction and in mitochondria fraction were extracted. Proteins extracted from each sample were electrophoresed on SDS-PAGE gels and then were transferred to nitrocellulose membranes.Cytochrome c was identified using a monoclonal cytochrome c antibody. Western blotting of the caspase-3 protein in AsPC-1, MliaPaCa-2 and S2013 cells treated with 1:32 000 red oil A5 for 24 hours was carried out. Proteins in whole cellular lysates were electrophoresed on SDS-PAGE gels and then transferred to nitrocellulose membranes. Caspase-3 was identified using a specific antibody. Western blotting of polyADP ribose polymerase (PARP) protein in AsPC-1, MiaPaCa2 and S2013 cells treated with 1:32 000 red oil A5 for 24 hours was performed. Proteins in whole cellular lysates were separated by electrophoresis on SDS-PAGE gels and then transferred to nitrocellulose membranes. PARP was identified by using a monoclonal antibody.RESULTS: Red oil A5 caused dose- and time-dependent inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Propidium iodide DNA staining

  16. Roles of Fyn in pancreatic cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Yu; Cai, Lei; Bie, Ping; Wang, Shu-Guang; Jiang, Yan; Dong, Jia-Hong; Li, Xiao-Wu

    2010-02-01

    Src family kinases have been suggested to be associated with the metastasis of tumors, but their related mechanisms remain unclear. The aims of the present study were to assess the possible mechanisms by which the inhibition of Fyn activation regulates pancreatic cancer metastasis. We examined the expressions of Fyn in human pancreatic cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry and systematically investigated the relationship between Fyn expression and pancreatic cancer metastasis. A nude mouse xenograft model induced by BxPC3 cells with or without the inhibition of Fyn activation was used to explore the effect of the inhibition of Fyn on metastasis in vivo. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-labeling assays were used to examine the effect of the inhibition of Fyn on the cell proliferation of BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were performed to explore the possible mechanism of Fyn-induced metastasis. We found that the upregulation of Fyn expression was correlated with human pancreatic cancer metastasis. In BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells, the inhibition of Fyn activation by kinase-dead Fyn transfection decreased liver metastasis in nude mice. Further analyses showed that Fyn activity modulated pancreatic cell metastasis through the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis. Our results suggest a possible mechanism by which Fyn activity regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis that exerts an effect on pancreatic cancer metastasis.

  17. High-fat diet induced insulin resistance in pregnant rats through pancreatic pax6 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Liu, Yunyun; Wang, Hongkun; Xu, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    To explore the changes in pancreas islet function of pregnant rats after consumption of high-fat diet and the underlying mechanism. Thirty pregnant Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: high-fat diet group and normal control group. Twenty days after gestation, fasting blood glucose concentration (FBG) and fasting serum insulin concentration (FINS) were measured. Then, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and insulin release test (IRT) were performed. Finally, all the rats were sacrificed and pancreas were harvested. Insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) were calculated according to FBG and FINS. RT-PCR and Real-time PCR were performed to study the expression of paired box 6 transcription factor (Pax6) and its target genes in pancreatic tissues. The body weight was significantly increased in the high-fat diet group compared with that of normal control rats (Pfat diet group was significantly increased compared with that of normal control rats (6.62 mmol/L vs. 4.96 mmol/L, Pinsulin concentration between the two groups. OGTT and IRT were abnormal in the high-fat diet group. The high-fat diet rats were more prone to impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. The level of the expression of Pax6 transcription factor and its target genes in pancreas, such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 (Pdx1), v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MafA) and glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) were decreased significantly compared with those of normal control group. High-fat diet feeding during pregnancy may induce insulin resistance in maternal rats by inhibiting pancreatic Pax6 and its target genes expression.

  18. Curcumin Inhibits Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. The best chemotherapeutic agent used to treat pancreatic cancer is the gemcitabine. However, gemcitabine treatment is associated with many side effects. Thus novel strategies involving less toxic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer are necessary. Curcumin is one such agent that inhibits the proliferation and angiogenesis of a wide variety of tumor cells, through the modulation of many cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated whether curcumin plays antitumor effects in MIA PaCa-2 cells. In vitro studies showed that curcumin inhibits the proliferation and enhances apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 cells. To test whether the antitumor activity of curcumin is also observed in vivo, we generated an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer by injection of MIA PaCa-2 cells in nude mice. We placed mice on diet containing curcumin at 0.6% for 6 weeks. In these treated mice tumors were smaller with respect to controls and showed a downregulation of the transcription nuclear factor NF-κB and NF-κB-regulated gene products. Overall, our data indicate that curcumin has a great potential in treatment of human pancreatic cancer through the modulation of NF-κB pathway.

  19. Nickel nanowires induced and reactive oxygen species mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleve MG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Md. Zakir Hossain1, Maurice G Kleve21Applied Biosciences (Bionanotechnology Research, Department of Applied Science, 2Molecular Biotechnology and Microscopy Laboratory, Department of Biology, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, Arkansas, USABackground: The ability to evade apoptosis is one of the key properties of cancer. The apoptogenic effect of nickel nanowires (Ni NWs on cancer cell lines has never been adequately addressed. Due to the unique physicochemical characteristics of Ni NWs, we envision the development of a novel anticancer therapeutics specifically for pancreatic cancer. Thus, we investigated whether Ni NWs induce ROS-mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (Panc-1 cells. Methods: In this study Ni NWs were fabricated using the electrodeposition method. Synthesized Ni NWs were physically characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, UV-Vis spectroscopy of NanoDrop 2000 (UV-Vis, magnetization study, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Assessment of morphological apoptotic characteristics by phase contrast microscopy (PCM, Ni-NWs-induced apoptosis staining with ethidium bromide (EB and acridine orange (AO followed by fluorescence microscopy (FM was performed. For molecular biological and biochemical characterization, Panc-1 cell culture and cytotoxic effect of Ni NWs were determined by using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Quantitative apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry staining with propidium iodide through cell cycle arrest and generation of ROS using 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence intensity. In all experiments, Panc-1 cancer cells without any treatment were used as the negative controls.Results: The intracellular uptake of Ni NWs through endocytosis by Panc-1 cells was observed by PCM. EB and AO staining of FM and MTT assay qualitatively and quantitatively confirmed the extent of apoptosis. Flow

  20. Assessment of the protective effects of oral tocotrienols in arginine chronic-like pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ana María; Garcia, Tània; Samper, Esther; Rickmann, Mariana; Vaquero, Eva Cristina; Molero, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Tocotrienols exhibit anti-inflammatory properties over macrophages and promote cytotoxicity in activated pancreatic stellate cells, suggesting that they may limit chronic pancreatitis progression. We aimed to quantitate the effect of oral tocotrienols on a rat model of chronic pancreatic injury. Chronic-like pancreatitis was induced by repeated arginine pancreatitis. Palm oil tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) was given by gavage before and after pancreatitis inductions. Amylase and hydroxyproline were determined in pancreatic homogenates; collagen, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and phosphorylated Smad3 were assessed by Western blotting. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 was measured in plasma. Morphological assessment included light microscopy, fibrosis area fraction, and collagen network fractal analysis. Arginine pancreatitis induced pancreatic atrophy and increased hydroxyproline that ameliorated after TRF. Arginine increased TGF-β1 (185 ± 40 vs. 15 ± 2 ng/ml; P lacunarity 0.63 ± 0.03 vs. 0.40 ± 0.02; P lacunarity (r = 0.88) and both parameters with pancreatic weight (r = -0.91 and -0.79, respectively). TRF administered only before pancreatitis best, but not fully, recapitulated the beneficial effects of TRF. Tocotrienols improve quantitative measures of chronic pancreatic damage. They may be of benefit in human chronic pancreatitis.

  1. Pancreatic and pulmonary mast cells activation during experimental acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inmaculada; Lopez-Font; Sabrina; Gea-Sorlí; Enrique; de-Madaria; Luis; M; Gutiérrez; Miguel; Pérez-Mateo; Daniel; Closa

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To study the activation of pancreatic and pulmonary mast cells and the effect of mast cell inhibition on the activation of peritoneal and alveolar macrophages during acute pancreatitis.METHODS:Pancreatitis was induced by intraductal infusion of 5% sodium taurodeoxycholate in rats.The mast cell inhibitor cromolyn was administered intraperitoneally(i.p.) 30 min before pancreatitis induction.The pancreatic and pulmonary tissue damage was evaluated histologically and mast cells and their state of activation...

  2. Glucose-induced Ca2 + signals in rat pancreatic β cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using microfluorometry to assay intracellular Ca2+ , the influences of varied factors on glucose induced Ca22+ signals, such as glucose-induced initial decline phase (GIDP), Ca2+ oscillation, and Ca2+ release from internal stores, were investigated in single rat pancreatic β cells. Glucose was able to evoke GIDP even at non-stimulus concentration (5 mol/L), which is insufficient to induce Ca2+ spikes. GIDP was dependent on neither membrane depo larization nor extraeellular Ca2+ . However, GIDP was inhibited by thapsigargin, indicating a dependence on Ca2+ up take by Ca22+ stores. The glucose-induced calcium oscillation was inhibited when external Ca2+ was removed. However, thapsigargin could not block the Ca2+ oscillation. These results suggest that maintenance of Ca22+ oscillation requires ex tracellular Ca2+ but not Ca2+ stores. Glucose was able to evoke Ca2+ signals even in the absence of external Ca2+ . The glucose-induced Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores was blocked by TTX. However, TTX had no effect on high K--induced Ca2+ store release, suggesting that membrane depolarization can directly release Ca2+ from some internal Ca2+ stores in β cells.

  3. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  4. Ets-1 as an early response gene against hypoxia-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, N; Xu, C; Zhu, Y-X; Cao, Y; Liu, D-C; Han, X

    2015-02-19

    Hypoxia complicates islet isolation for transplantation and may contribute to pancreatic β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Pancreatic β-cells are susceptible to hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Severe hypoxic conditions during the immediate post-transplantation period are a main non-immune factor leading to β-cell death and islet graft failure. In this study, we identified the transcription factor Ets-1 (v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1) as an early response gene against hypoxia-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells. Hypoxia regulates Ets-1 at multiple levels according to the degree of β-cell oxygen deprivation. Moderate hypoxia promotes Ets-1 gene transcription, whereas severe hypoxia promotes its transactivation activity, as well as its ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation. This degradation causes a relative insufficiency of Ets-1 activity, and limits the transactivation effect of Ets-1 on downstream hypoxic-inducible genes and its anti-apoptotic function. Overexpression of ectopic Ets-1 in MIN6 and INS-1 cells protects them from severe hypoxia-induced apoptosis in a mitochondria-dependent manner, confirming that a sufficient amount of Ets-1 activity is critical for protection of pancreatic β-cells against hypoxic injury. Targeting Ets-1 expression may be a useful strategy for islet graft protection during the immediate post-transplantation period.

  5. 1H-NMR and photochemically-induced dynamic nuclear polarization studies on bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egmond, M.R.; Slotboom, A.J.; Haas, G.H. de; Dijkstra, Klaas; Kaptein, R.

    1980-01-01

    Proton-NMR resonances of trytophan 3 and tyrosine 69 in bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2, its pro-enzyme and in Ala1-transaminated protein were assigned using photochemically-induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) as such or in combination with spin-echo measurements. In addition

  6. Changes in the expression and dynamics of SHP-1 and SHP-2 during cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sarmiento, Nancy; Sánchez-Bernal, Carmen; Ayra, Manuel; Pérez, Nieves; Hernández-Hernández, Angel; Calvo, José J.; Sánchez-Yagüe, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Changes in the expression and dynamics of SHP-1 and SHP-2 during cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats correspondance: Corresponding author. Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular, Edificio Departamental. Lab. 106, Plaza Doctores de la Reina s/n, 37007 Salamanca, Spain. (Sanchez-Yague, Jesus) (Sanchez-Yague, Jesus) Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology--> , University of Salamanca--> -...

  7. 1H-NMR and photochemically-induced dynamic nuclear polarization studies on bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egmond, M.R.; Slotboom, A.J.; Haas, G.H. de; Dijkstra, Klaas; Kaptein, R.

    1980-01-01

    Proton-NMR resonances of trytophan 3 and tyrosine 69 in bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2, its pro-enzyme and in Ala1-transaminated protein were assigned using photochemically-induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) as such or in combination with spin-echo measurements. In addition assig

  8. Extracellular heat-shock protein 70 aggravates cerulein-induced pancreatitis through toll-like receptor-4 in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jun-min; WANG Rong; LIU Hong-xiang; LI Yuan; ZENG Yu-jian; ZHOU Zong-guang; LIU Hai-yi; XU Bing; WANG Ling; ZHOU Bin

    2008-01-01

    Background In patients suffering from acute pancreatitis, the pathogenesis is not completely understood, and several recent studies in vitro suggested that heat shock proteins might play an important role in cell signaling. To investigate the possible role of extracellular heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in pancreatitis, toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4)-deficient and wild-type mice were administered with exogenous Hsp70 during the course of cerulein-induced pancreatitis (CIP).Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced by 5 intraperitoneal injections of cerulein at hourly intervals, and then treated with recombinant Hsp70 through the caudal vein 4 hours after the start of cerulein injections. Subsequently serum amylase and serum cytokines levels were detected. Histologic alteration of the pancreas was evaluated. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a) concentrations and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in both pancreas and lungs were analyzed. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-KB) activation in pancreatic tissue was measured using a sensitive RelA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results Treatment with recombinant Hsp70 to wild-type mice in CIP resulted in significant aggravation of inflammation in pancreas, elevated levels of serum cytokines, up-regulation of pulmonary MPO activity and increase of lung tissues TNF-α concentrations. In contrast, treatment with Hsp70 to TLR4-deficient mice had little effect on serum cytokines levels, pancreatic inflammation, pulmonary MPO activity and TNF-a concentrations.Conclusions The results suggest that extracellular HspTO might induce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)-Iike response in vivo and TLR4 might be involved in the Hsp70-mediated activation of inflammatory reaction in the progression of CIP without infection.

  9. Drug-Induced Acute Pancreatitis Associated with 22-Oxacalcitriol Ointment for Treatment of Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munehiro Sato

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir: Hypercalcemia is usually caused by malignancies or primary hyperparathyroidism, and only rarely by drugs [1]. Hypercalcemia can occasionally cause acute pancreatitis [2]. We herein report a case of severe acute pancreatitis induced by hypercalcemia which developed as a reaction to ointment containing 22- oxacalcitriol, a vitamin D3 analogue. A 72-year-old Japanese man with more than a 50-year history of psoriasis vulgaris developed generalized pustular psoriasis, which was refractory to combination therapy with corticosteroid and 22-oxacalcitriol ointments. He was referred to the Dermatology Dept. for further treatment. The patient’s clinical course is shown in Figure 1. Oral etretinate, an aromatic retinoid, was started, and the 22-oxacalcitriol ointment regimen was increased soon after admission. On hospital day 13, the skin lesions improved, but the patient developed abdominal discomfort and anorexia. As laboratory data showed an increased serum level of calcium (13.2 mg/dL; reference range: 8.7-10.0 mg/dL, the ointment was immediately discontinued.

  10. miR-208-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition of pancreatic cancer cells promotes cell metastasis and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Anan; Shao, Chenghao; Jin, Gang; Liu, Rui; Hao, Jun; Song, Bin; Ouyang, Liu; Hu, Xiangui

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miR-208 in the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells and the underlying molecular mechanism. miR-208 mimic, miR-208 inhibitor and NC were transfected into pancreatic cancer cell line Bxpc3 using liposome. Transwell invasion and scratch assays were used to test cell migratory and invasive abilities. Western blotting and quantitative PCR methods were used to detect E-cadherin, fibronectin and vimentin protein and mRNA expression in pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3 after transfection by miR-208 mimic, miR-208 inhibitor and NC. Transwell invasion and scratch assays showed that after overexpressing miR-208, pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3 exhibited enhanced in vitro migratory and invasive abilities, while after downregulating miR-208 expression, cell migratory and invasive abilities were decreased. Western blotting and quantitative PCR showed that after overexpressing miR-208, expression of E-cadherin, an epithelial cell marker, was decreased and expression of fibronectin and vimentin, interstitial cell markers, was increased in pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3; however, after inhibiting miR-208, increased E-cadherin expression and decreased fibronectin and vimentin expression were observed in pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3. After overexpressing miR-208, p-AKT and p-GSK-3β expression was altered by activating AKT/GSK-3β/snail signaling pathway. miR-208 induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition of pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3 by activating AKT/GSK-3β/snail signaling pathway and thereby promotes cell metastasis and invasion.

  11. Development and histopathological characterization of tumorgraft models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick L Garcia

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the one of the deadliest of all malignancies. The five year survival rate for patients with this disease is 3-5%. Thus, there is a compelling need for novel therapeutic strategies to improve the clinical outcome for patients with pancreatic cancer.  Several groups have demonstrated for other types of solid tumors that early passage human tumor xenograft models can be used to define some genetic and molecular characteristics of specific human tumors. Published studies also suggest that murine tumorgraft models (early passage xenografts derived from direct implantation of primary tumor specimens may be useful in identifying compounds with efficacy against specific tumor types.  Because pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease and few well-characterized model systems are available for translational research, we developed and characterized a panel of pancreatic tumorgraft models for biological evaluation and therapeutic drug testing.  Of the 41 primary tumor specimens implanted subcutaneously into mice, 35 produced viable tumorgraft models.  We document the fidelity of histological and morphological characteristics and of KRAS mutation status among primary (F0, F1, and F2 tumors for the twenty models that have progressed to the F3 generation.  Importantly, our procedures produced a take rate of 85%, higher than any reported in the literature. Primary tumor specimens that failed to produce tumorgrafts were those that either contained <10% tumor cells or that were obtained from significantly smaller primary tumors. In view of the fidelity of characteristics of primary tumor specimens through at least the F2 generation in mice, we propose that these tumorgraft models represent a useful tool for identifying critical characteristics of pancreatic tumors and for evaluating potential therapies. 

  12. Pancreatic stellate cells are an important source of MMP-2 in human pancreatic cancer and accelerate tumor progression in a murine xenograft model and CAM assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderhan, Wilhelm; Diaz, Fredy; Fundel, Martin; Zhou, Shaoxia; Siech, Marco; Hasel, Cornelia; Möller, Peter; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Seufferlein, Thomas; Gress, Thomas; Adler, Guido; Bachem, Max G

    2007-02-01

    The effect of the characteristic desmoplastic reaction of pancreatic cancer on tumor progression is largely unknown. We investigated whether pancreatic stellate cells, which are responsible for the desmoplastic reaction, support tumor progression. Immunohistology revealed that matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), which is suggested to promote pancreatic cancer progression, is present in stellate cells adjacent to cancer cells. In vitro, stellate cells exhibited a much higher basal expression of MMP-2 compared with cancer cells. Panc1-, MiaPaCa2- and SW850-conditioned media stimulated MMP-2 release of stellate cells as detected by zymography. Cancer cells expressed and released basigin [BSG, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), CD147], a glycoprotein that is known to stimulate MMP-2 in mesenchymal cells, as detected by immunostaining, western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Tumor cell-conditioned medium and BSG purified by affinity chromatography from supernatants of cancer cells, but not supernatants depleted from BSG, stimulated expression of MMP-1 and MMP-2 of stellate cells as demonstrated by western blot and zymography. Moreover, the interaction of stellate cells and cancer cells promoted the invasiveness of Panc-1 cells in the chorioallantoic membrane assay and increased the weight of tumors induced by all carcinoma cell lines in nude mice by 2.1-3.7-fold. Our findings support the assumption that the interaction of stellate cells and cancer cells promotes progression of pancreatic cancer.

  13. Study on the immune responses against pancreatic cancer induced by mucin 4 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA co-transfected dendritic cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈江

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-tumor immune response induced by human pancreatic cancer mucin 4mRNA and human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT)mRNA cotransfected dendritic cells(DC),and to provide the experimental evidences for the treatment of pancreatic cancer with multi-epitope loaded DC vaccine.Methods DC were isolated from peripheral DC.

  14. Animal models of pancreatic cancer and their application in clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidenhofer J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Judith Weidenhofer,1,2 Emily K Colvin,3 Danielle R Bond,1,2,4 Christopher J Scarlett2,4 1School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, The University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, 2Cancer Program, Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton, 3Bill Walsh Translational Cancer Research Laboratory, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Royal North Shore Hospital, University of Sydney, St Leonards, 4Pancreatic Cancer Research Group, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, NSW, Australia Abstract: Pancreatic cancer has one of the highest cancer-related mortality rates of all cancers, and despite worldwide efforts to identify new curative treatments, little improvement has been made toward disease-free survival rates. Due to the effect of a heterogeneous disease phenotype in an organ where desmoplastic effects modify tumor behavior and capacity to deliver chemotherapeutics, it is clear that accurate in vivo models are imperative for the understanding of this disease, to identify and test novel therapeutics, and to assist in identifying biomarkers. This review addresses the currently available mouse models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, in particular genetically engineered and patient-derived xenograft models, focusing on their utility in the drug discovery pipeline. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, mouse models, genetically engineered, patient-derived, orthotopic, xenograft

  15. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricci, C.; Mota, C.M.; Moscato, S.; Alessandro, D' D.; Ugel, S.; Sartoris, S.; Bronte, V.; Boggi, U.; Campani, D.; Funel, N.; Moroni, L.; Danti, S.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl alcohol

  16. Pancreatic cancer-induced cachexia is Jak2-dependent in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilabert, Marine; Calvo, Ezequiel; Airoldi, Ana; Hamidi, Tewfik; Moutardier, Vincent; Turrini, Olivier; Iovanna, Juan

    2014-10-01

    Cancer cachexia syndrome is observed in 80% of patients with advanced-stage cancer, and it is one of the most frequent causes of death. Severe wasting accounts for more than 80% in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Here we wanted to define, by using an microarray approach and the Pdx1-cre;LSL-Kras(G12D) ;INK4a/arf(fl/fl) mice model, the pathways involved in muscle, liver, and white adipose tissue wasting. These mice, which develop systematically pancreatic cancer, successfully reproduced many human symptoms afflicted with this disease, and particularly cachexia. Using the profiling analysis of pancreatic cancer-dependent cachectic tissues we found that Jak2/Stat3 pathways, p53 and NFkB results activated. Thus, our interest was focused on the Jak2 pathways because it is pharmacologically targetable with low toxicity and FDA approved drugs are available. Therefore, Pdx1-cre;LSL-Kras(G12D) ;INK4a/arf(fl/fl) mice were treated with the Jak2 inhibitor AG490 compound daily starting at 7 weeks old and for a period of 3 weeks and animals were sacrificed at 10 weeks old. Body weight for control mice was 27.84 ± 2.14 g, for untreated Pdx1-cre;LSL-Kras(G12D) ;INK4a/arf(fl/fl) was 14.97 ± 1.99 g, whereas in animals treated with the AG490 compound the weight loss was significantly less to 24.53 ± 2.04 g. Treatment with AG490 compound was efficient since phosphorylation of Jak2 and circulating interleukin-6 (IL6) levels were significantly reduced in cachectic tissues and in mice respectively. In conclusion, we found that Jak2/Stat3-dependent intracellular pathway plays an essential role since its pharmacological inhibition strongly attenuates cachexia progression in a lethal transgenic pancreatic cancer model.

  17. Mutant KRas-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Acinar Cells Upregulates EGFR Signaling to Drive Formation of Pancreatic Precancerous Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geou-Yarh Liou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of pancreatic cancer requires the acquisition of oncogenic KRas mutations and upregulation of growth factor signaling, but the relationship between these is not well established. Here, we show that mutant KRas alters mitochondrial metabolism in pancreatic acinar cells, resulting in increased generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS. Mitochondrial ROS then drives the dedifferentiation of acinar cells to a duct-like progenitor phenotype and progression to PanIN. This is mediated via the ROS-receptive kinase protein kinase D1 and the transcription factors NF-κB1 and NF-κB2, which upregulate expression of the epidermal growth factor, its ligands, and their sheddase ADAM17. In vivo, interception of KRas-mediated generation of mROS reduced the formation of pre-neoplastic lesions. Hence, our data provide insight into how oncogenic KRas interacts with growth factor signaling to induce the formation of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Glucococorticoid-induced death of pancreatic Beta cells: an organized chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Joselyn; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Cabrera, Mayela; Cabrera, Mayela; Bermúdez, Valmore; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2015-01-31

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are renowned for their pleiotropic effects in all organ systems, their ubiquitous use in numerous clinical settings, and the abundant adverse effects they may exert, particularly in the endocrine-metabolic sphere. Although hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are well-defined GC-induced diabetogenic phenomena, an added component of direct injury to pancreatic β cells (PBC) may also participate in this scenario. Indeed, the apoptotic capacity of GC is widely recognized, and PBC do not escape this situation. No unified pathway has been characterized regarding GC-induced cell death; instead, it appears to depend on the specific machinery of each cell type, determining a great heterogeneity in GC-dependent apoptotic mechanisms among different tissues. In PBC, GC can induce the expression or activation of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, BAD, p38), repress anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2), deactivate pro-survival mechanisms (cAMP-PKA signaling) and sensitize the cell to death induced by oxidative stress, fatty acids, hyperglycemia and cytokines. Although proliferative pathways (TGF-β, H-ras) are activated simultaneously - and an increase in PBC mass may be observed initially - pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative mechanisms appear to eventually overcome their pro-survival counterparts, due to their synergic and aggregative action. Key molecules such as p38 and the cAMP-PKA system may be promising therapeutic targets in the prevention of GC-induced cell death.

  19. Early treatment with mirtazapine improves food intake and nutritional status in a gemcitabine-induced mild cachexia mouse model with pancreatic cancer%米氮平早期干预对轻度胰腺癌恶液质模型进食和营养状况的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建华; 贾林; 江舒曼

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of early treatment with mirtazapine on food intake and nutritional status in a gemcitabine-induced mild cachexia mouse model with pancreatic cancer.METHODS: After a subcutaneous xenograft model of pancreatic cancer was established, 21 xenograft nude mice were randomly and equally divided into control group, early mirtazapine treatment group and late mirtazapine treatment group. The two treatment groups were given 10 mg/(kgd) mirtazapine once daily by oral gavage from day 1 and day 10 after transplantation, respectively. All animals were given 50 mg/kg of gemcitabine i.p. on days 10,13 and 16 after transplantation. All mice were sacrificed on day 28. Body weight, food intake, tumor size, subcutaneous fat, arm circumference and the time-effect relationship were compared among the three groups.RESULTS: There were no significant differences in tumor size, subcutaneous fat and arm circumference among the three groups (all P > 0.05). At week 4, food intake was significantly higher in the early mirtazapine treatment group than in the other two groups (both P 0.05).CONCLUSION: Early treatment with mirtazapine significantly improves food intake in the Gemcitabine-induced mild cachexia mouse model with pancreatic cancer, it can also postpone the processes of cachexia to some extent.%目的:探讨抗抑郁药米氮平早期干预对轻度胰腺癌恶液质模型进食量和营养状况的影响.方法:21只胰腺癌裸鼠皮下移植瘤模型随机分为对照组(A组)、米氮平早期干预组(B组)、米氮平后期治疗组(C组),每组7只.B、C组分别在术后第1天和第10天开始以米氮平10 mg/(kg.d),灌胃,术后第10、13、16天,3组动物分别腹腔注射吉西他滨(50 mg/kg).术后第28天处死裸鼠,比较3组动物体质量、进食量、肿瘤体积、皮下脂肪和臂围的变化.结果:3组胰腺癌移植瘤体积、皮下脂肪和臂围无明显差异(P>0.05).第4周B组进食量显著高于A组和C组(P<0.05)

  20. Changes of serum amylase, its isozyme fractions and amylase-creatinine clearance ratio in dogs with experimentally induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuzawa, M; Morizono, M; Nagata, K; Hayano, S; Sakamoto, H; Yasuda, N; Okamoto, K; Kawasaki, Y; Deguchi, E

    1994-04-01

    To investigate the diagnostic application of amylase to canine pancreatic diseases, serum amylase activities, its isozyme fractions and amylase-creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) were analyzed in normal intact dogs and dogs experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. There was no statistic difference between normal male and female dogs. Amylase specific activities in pancreatic tissue extracts were more than 2,300 times higher than that in serum, and were also higher than those in other tissues; parotid and mandibular salivary glands, lung, heart, liver, spleen, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and kidney. Following the chloroform injection into the pancreatic tissue, WBC increased from 6 to 240 hr and serum glucose significantly increased at 72 and 96 hr, and no urine glucose was detected. BUN as well as serum and urine creatinine showed normal levels. ACCR increased until 96 hr without statistic significance. Serum amylase activities increased significantly after 3 hr and its isozyme was separated into 4 fractions (Amy1-Amy4) in contrast to 3 fractions (Amy2-Amy4) in intact dogs. Since this extra Amy1 seen from 1 hr increasing after 6 hr similarly to other 3 fractions, the evaluation of serum amylase and its isozyme fractions was indicated to be useful for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in dogs.

  1. The necrosome promotes pancreatic oncogenesis via CXCL1 and Mincle-induced immune suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Pergamo, Matthew; Ochi, Atsuo; Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Pansari, Mridul; Rendon, Mauricio; Tippens, Daniel; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle; Miller, George

    2016-04-14

    Neoplastic pancreatic epithelial cells are believed to die through caspase 8-dependent apoptotic cell death, and chemotherapy is thought to promote tumour apoptosis. Conversely, cancer cells often disrupt apoptosis to survive. Another type of programmed cell death is necroptosis (programmed necrosis), but its role in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is unclear. There are many potential inducers of necroptosis in PDA, including ligation of tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), CD95, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, Toll-like receptors, reactive oxygen species, and chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we report that the principal components of the necrosome, receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 and RIP3, are highly expressed in PDA and are further upregulated by the chemotherapy drug gemcitabine. Blockade of the necrosome in vitro promoted cancer cell proliferation and induced an aggressive oncogenic phenotype. By contrast, in vivo deletion of RIP3 or inhibition of RIP1 protected against oncogenic progression in mice and was associated with the development of a highly immunogenic myeloid and T cell infiltrate. The immune-suppressive tumour microenvironment associated with intact RIP1/RIP3 signalling depended in part on necroptosis-induced expression of the chemokine attractant CXCL1, and CXCL1 blockade protected against PDA. Moreover, cytoplasmic SAP130 (a subunit of the histone deacetylase complex) was expressed in PDA in a RIP1/RIP3-dependent manner, and Mincle--its cognate receptor--was upregulated in tumour-infiltrating myeloid cells. Ligation of Mincle by SAP130 promoted oncogenesis, whereas deletion of Mincle protected against oncogenesis and phenocopied the immunogenic reprogramming of the tumour microenvironment that was induced by RIP3 deletion. Cellular depletion suggested that whereas inhibitory macrophages promote tumorigenesis in PDA, they lose their immune-suppressive effects when RIP3 or Mincle is deleted. Accordingly, T cells

  2. Pachymic acid inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo by targeting ER stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shujie; Swanson, Kristen; Eliaz, Isaac; McClintick, Jeanette N; Sandusky, George E; Sliva, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Pachymic acid (PA) is a purified triterpene extracted from medicinal fungus Poria cocos. In this paper, we investigated the anticancer effect of PA on human chemotherapy resistant pancreatic cancer. PA triggered apoptosis in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2. Comparative gene expression array analysis demonstrated that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was induced by PA through activation of heat shock response and unfolded protein response related genes. Induced ER stress was confirmed by increasing expression of XBP-1s, ATF4, Hsp70, CHOP and phospho-eIF2α. Moreover, ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) blocked PA induced apoptosis. In addition, 25 mg kg-1 of PA significantly suppressed MIA PaCa-2 tumor growth in vivo without toxicity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis and expression of ER stress related proteins in tumor tissues. Taken together, growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis by PA in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells were associated with ER stress activation both in vitro and in vivo. PA may be potentially exploited for the use in treatment of chemotherapy resistant pancreatic cancer.

  3. Decoy receptor 3 suppresses FasL-induced apoptosis via ERK1/2 activation in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Xin; Song, Shiduo; Zhang, Lifeng; Zhu, Dongming [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Wang, Zhenxin [Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Chen, Xiaochen [Department of Pathology, The Obstetrics & Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200090 (China); Zhou, Jian, E-mail: zhoujian20150602@126.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2015-08-07

    Resistance to Fas Ligand (FasL) mediated apoptosis plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is reported to interact with FasL and is overexpressed in some malignant tumors. We sought to investigate the role of DcR3 in resistance to FasL in pancreatic cancer. We compared expression of apoptosis related genes between FasL-resistant SW1990 and FasL-sensitive Patu8988 pancreatic cell lines by microarray analysis. We explored the impact of siRNA knockdown of, or exogenous supplementation with, DcR3 on FasL-induced cell growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines and expression of proteins involved in apoptotic signaling. We assessed the level of DcR3 protein and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in tumor and non-tumor tissue samples of 66 patients with pancreatic carcinoma. RNAi knockdown of DcR3 expression in SW1990 cells reduced resistance to FasL-induced apoptosis, and supplementation of Patu8988 with rDcR3 had the opposite effect. RNAi knockdown of DcR3 in SW1990 cells elevated expression of caspase 3, 8 and 9, and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation (P < 0.05), but did not alter phosphorylated-Akt expression. 47 tumor tissue specimens, but only 15 matched non-tumor specimens stained for DcR3 (χ{sup 2} = 31.1447, P < 0.001). The proliferation index of DcR3 positive specimens (14.26  ±  2.67%) was significantly higher than that of DcR3 negative specimens (43.58  ±  7.88%, P < 0.01). DcR3 expression positively correlated with p-ERK1/2 expression in pancreatic cancer tissues (r = 0.607, P < 0.001). DcR3 enhances ERK1/2 phosphorylation and opposes FasL signaling in pancreatic cancer cells. - Highlights: • We investigated the role of DcR3 in FasL resistance in pancreatic cancer. • Knockdown of DcR3 in SW1990 cells reduced resistance to FasL-induced apoptosis. • DcR3 knockdown also elevated caspase expression, and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. • Tumor and non-tumor tissues were collected from 66 pancreatic carcinoma patients

  4. Microencapsulated tumor assay: Evaluation of the nude mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Zhe Ma; Dong-Feng Cheng; Jin-Hua Ye; Yong Zhou; Jia-Xiang Wang; Min-Min Shi; Bao-San Han; Cheng-Hong Peng

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish a more stable and accurate nude mouse model of pancreatic cancer using cancer cell microencapsulation.METHODS: The assay is based on microencapsulation technology, wherein human tumor cells are encapsulated in small microcapsules (approximately 420 μm in diameter) constructed of semipermeable membranes. We implemented two kinds of subcutaneous implantation models in nude mice using the injection of single tumor cells and encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells. The size of subcutaneously implanted tumors was observed on a weekly basis using two methods, and growth curves were generated from these data. The growth and metastasis of orthotopically injected single tumor cells and encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells were evaluated at four and eight weeks postimplantation by positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan and necropsy. The pancreatic tumor samples obtained from each method were then sent for pathological examination. We evaluated differences in the rates of tumor incidence and the presence of metastasis and variations in tumor volume and tumor weight in the cancer microcapsules vs single-cell suspensions.RESULTS: Sequential in vitro observations of the microcapsules showed that the cancer cells in microcapsules proliferated well and formed spheroids at days 4 to 6. Further in vitro culture resulted in bursting of the membrane of the microcapsules and cells deviated outward and continued to grow in flasks. The optimum injection time was found to be 5 d after tumor encapsulation. In the subcutaneous implantation model, there were no significant differences in terms of tumor volume between the encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells and cells alone and rate of tumor incidence. There was a significant difference in the rate of successful implantation between the cancer cell microencapsulation group and the single tumor-cell suspension group (100% vs 71.43%, respectively, P = 0.0489) in the orthotropic implantation model. The former method

  5. Hepatic perfusion changes in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis: Evaluation by perfusion CT

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    Tutcu, Semra [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Serter, Selim, E-mail: serterselim@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Kaya, Yavuz; Kara, Eray [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Nese, Nalan [Department of Pathology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Pekindil, Goekhan [Department of Radiology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Coskun, Teoman [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: It is known that acute pancreatitis may cause secondary changes in several organs. Liver is one of these involved organs. In different experimental studies hepatic damages were shown histopathologically in acute pancreatitis but there are a few studies about perfusion disorders that accompany these histopathologic changes. Perfusion CT (pCT) provides the ability to detect regional and global alterations in organ blood flow. The purpose of the study was to describe hepatic perfusion changes in experimental acute pancreatitis model with pCT. Materials and methods: Forty Sprague-Dawley rats of both genders with average weights of 250 g were used. Rats were randomized into two groups. Twenty rats were in control group and 20 in acute pancreatitis group. pCT was performed. Perfusion maps were formed by processing the obtained images with perfusion CT software. Blood flow (BF) and blood volume (BV) values were obtained from these maps. All pancreatic and liver tissues were taken off with laparotomy and histopathologic investigation was performed. Student's t test was used for statistical analyses. Results: In pCT we found statistically significant increase in blood volume in both lobes of liver and in blood flow in right lobe of the liver (p < 0.01). Although blood flow in left lobe of the liver increased, it did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The quantitative analysis of liver parenchyma with pCT showed that acute pancreatitis causes a significant perfusion changes in the hepatic tissue. Systemic mediators seem to be effective as well as local inflammatory changes in perfusion changes.

  6. Endoscopic pancreatic duct stent placement for inflammatory pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The role of endoscopic therapy in the management of pancreatic diseases is continuously evolving; at present most pathological conditions of the pancreas are successfully treated by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS),or both. Endoscopic placement of stents has played and still plays a major role in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis, pseudocysts, pancreas divisum, main pancreatic duct injuries, pancreatic fistulae, complications of acute pancreatitis, recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis,and in the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis. These stents are currently routinely placed to reduce intraductal hypertension, bypass obstructing stones, restore lumen patency in cases with dominant, symptomatic strictures,seal main pancreatic duct disruption, drain pseudocysts or fluid collections, treat symptomatic major or minor papilla sphincter stenosis, and prevent procedure-induced acute pancreatitis. The present review aims at updating and discussing techniques, indications, and results of endoscopic pancreatic duct stent placement in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the pancreas.

  7. Glycemic control promotes pancreatic beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

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    Eric J Grossman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic beta-cells proliferate following administration of the beta-cell toxin streptozotocin. Defining the conditions that promote beta-cell proliferation could benefit patients with diabetes. We have investigated the effect of insulin treatment on pancreatic beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, and, in addition, report on a new approach to quantify beta-cell regeneration in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic were treated with either syngeneic islets transplanted under the kidney capsule or subcutaneous insulin implants. After either 60 or 120 days of insulin treatment, the islet transplant or insulin implant were removed and blood glucose levels monitored for 30 days. The results showed that both islet transplants and insulin implants restored normoglycemia in the 60 and 120 day treated animals. However, only the 120-day islet and insulin implant groups maintained euglycemia (<200 mg/dl following discontinuation of insulin treatment. The beta-cell was significantly increased in all the 120 day insulin-treated groups (insulin implant, 0.69+/-0.23 mg; and islet transplant, 0.91+/-0.23 mg compared non-diabetic control mice (1.54+/-0.25 mg. We also show that we can use bioluminescent imaging to monitor beta-cell regeneration in living MIP-luc transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results show that insulin treatment can promote beta-cell regeneration. Moreover, the extent of restoration of beta-cell function and mass depend on the length of treatment period and overall level of glycemic control with better control being associated with improved recovery. Finally, real-time bioluminescent imaging can be used to monitor beta-cell recovery in living MIP-luc transgenic mice.

  8. Fisetin averts oxidative stress in pancreatic tissues of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasath, Gopalan Sriram; Sundaram, Chinnakrishnan Shanmuga; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai

    2013-10-01

    Persistent hyperglycemia is associated with chronic oxidative stress which contributes to the development and progression of diabetes-associated complications. The sensitivity of pancreatic β-cells to oxidative stress has been attributed to their low content of antioxidants compared with other tissues. Bioactive compounds with potent antidiabetic properties have been shown to ameliorate hyperglycemia mediated oxidative stress. Recently, we have reported that oral administration of fisetin (10 mg/Kg b.w.), a bioflavonoid found to be present in strawberries, persimmon, to STZ-induced experimental diabetic rats significantly improved normoglycemia. The present study was aimed to evaluate the antioxidant potential of fisetin in both in vitro and in vivo. Diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body weight). Fisetin was administered orally for 30 days. At the end of the study, all animals were killed. Blood samples were collected for the biochemical estimations. The antioxidant status was evaluated. Histological examinations were performed on pancreatic tissues. Fisetin treatment showed a significant decline in the levels of blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), NF-kB p65 unit (in pancreas) and IL-1β (plasma), serum nitric oxide (NO) with an elevation in plasma insulin. The treatment also improved the antioxidant status in pancreas as well as plasma of diabetic rats indicating the antioxidant potential of fisetin. In addition, the results of DPPH and ABTS assays substantiate the free radical scavenging activity of fisetin. Histological studies of the pancreas also evidenced the tissue protective nature of fisetin. It is concluded that, fisetin possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory property and may be considered as an adjunct for the treatment of diabetes.

  9. Cis-hydroxyproline-induced inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth is mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph Mueller; Joerg Emmrich; Robert Jaster; Dagmar Braun; Stefan Liebe; Gisela Sparmann

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the biological effects of cishydroxyproline (CHP) on the rat pancreatic carcinoma cell line DSL6A, and to examine the underlying molecular mechanisms.METHODS: The effect of CHP on DSL6A cell proliferation was assessed by using BrdU incorporation. The expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was characterized by Western blotting and immunofluorescence.Induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was investigated by using RT-PCR and Western blotting for the glucose-related protein-78 (GRP78) and growth arrest and DNA inducible gene (GADD153). Cell viability was determined through measuring the metabolic activity based on the reduction potential of DSL6A cells. Apoptosis was analyzed by detection of caspase-3 activation and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) as well as DNA laddering.RESULTS: In addition to inhibition of proliferation,incubation with CHP induced proteolytic cleavage of FAK and a delocalisation of the enzyme from focal adhesions,followed by a loss of cell adherence. Simultaneously,we could show an increased expression of GRP78 and GADD153, indicating a CHP-mediated activation of the ER stress cascade in the DSL6A cell line. Prolonged incubation of DSL6A cells with CHP finally resulted in apoptotic cell death. Beside L-proline, the inhibition of intracellular proteolysis by addition of a broad spectrum protease inhibitor could abolish the effects of CHP on cellular functions and the molecular processes. In contrast, impeding the activity of apoptosis-executing caspases had no influence on CHP-mediated cell damage.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that the initiation of ER stress machinery by CHP leads to an activation of intracellular proteolytic processes, including caspaseindependent FAK degradation, resulting in damaging pancreatic carcinoma cells.

  10. Relationship between Carbachol Hyperstimulation-Induced Pancreatic Acinar Cellular Injury and Trypsinogen or NF-κB Activation in Rats in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between M3 cholinergic receptor agonist (carbachol) hyperstimulationinduced pancreatic acinar cellular injury and trypsinogen activation or NF-κB activation in rats was studied in vitro. Rat pancreatic acinar cells were isolated, cultured and treated with carbachol, the active protease inhibitor (pefabloc), and NF-κB inhibitor (PDTC) in vitro. Intracellular trypsin activity was measured by using a fluorogenic substrate. The cellular injury was evaluated by measuring the leakage of LDH from pancreatic acinar cells. The results showed that as compared with control group, 10-3 mol/L carbachol induced a significant increase of the intracellular trypsin activity and the leakage of LDH from pancreatic acinar cells. Pretreatment with 2 mmol/L pefabloc could significantly decrease the activity of trypsin and the leakage of LDH from pancreatic acinar cells (P <0.01) following the treatment with a high concentration of carbachol (10-3 mol/L) in vitro. The addition of 10-2 mol/L PDTC didn't result in a significant decrease in the activity of trypsin and the leakage of LDH from pancreatic acinar cells treated with a high concentration of carbachol (10-3 mol/L) in vitro (P>0.05). It was concluded that intracellular trypsinogen activation is likely involved in pancreatic acinar cellular injury induced by carbachol hyperstimulation in vitro. NF-κB activation may not be involved in pancreatic acinar cellular injury induced by carbachol hyperstimulation in vitro.

  11. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Filippo Antonini; Raffaele Pezzilli; Lucia Angelelli; Giampiero Macarri

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been rec-orded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) compared to the general population.Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced,in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic,suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD.Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD.

  12. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  13. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sala Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions.

  14. Gene expression analysis of pancreatic cystic neoplasm in SV40Tag transgenic mice model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Feng; Qiang Sun; Cheng Gao; Juan Dong; Xiao-Luan Wei; Hua Xing; Hou-Da Li

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the gene expression changes in pancreatic cystic neoplasm in SV40Tag transgenic mice model and to provide information about the prevention,clinical diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer.METHODS: Using the pBC-SV40Tag transgenic mice model of pancreatic cystic neoplasm, we studied the gene expression changes by applying high-density microarrays. Validation of part gene expression profiling data was performed using real-time PCR.RESULTS: By using high-density oligonucleotide microarray, of 14113 genes, 453 were increased and 760 decreased in pancreatic cystic neoplasm, including oncogenes, cell-cycle-related genes, signal transduction-related genes, skeleton-related genes and metabolism-related genes. Among these, we confirmed the changes in Igf, Shh and Wnt signal pathways with real-time PCR.The results of real-time PCR showed similar expression changes in gene chip.CONCLUSION: all the altered expression genes are associated with cell cycle, DNA damage and repair, signal pathway, and metabolism. SV40Tag may cooperate with several proteins in promoting tumorigenesis.

  15. Assessing Drug Efficacy in a Miniaturized Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro 3D Cell Culture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelper, Todd B; Lovitt, Carrie J; Avery, Vicky M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to have one of the poorest prognoses among all cancers. The drug discovery efforts for this disease have largely failed, with no significant improvement in survival outcomes for advanced pancreatic cancer patients over the past 20 years. Traditional in vitro cell culture techniques have been used extensively in both basic and early drug discovery; however, these systems offer poor models to assess emerging therapeutics. More predictive cell-based models, which better capture the cellular heterogeneity and complexities of solid pancreatic tumors, are urgently needed not only to improve drug discovery success but also to provide insight into the tumor biology. Pancreatic tumors are characterized by a unique micro-environment that is surrounded by a dense stroma. A complex network of interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) components and the effects of cell-to-cell contacts may enhance survival pathways within in vivo tumors. This biological and physical complexity is lost in traditional cell monolayer models. To explore the predictive potential of a more complex cellular system, a three-dimensional (3D) micro-tumor assay was evaluated. Efficacy of six current chemotherapeutics was determined against a panel of primary and metastatic pancreatic tumor cell lines in a miniaturized ECM-based 3D cell culture system. Suitability for potential use in high-throughput screening applications was assessed, including ascertaining the effects that miniaturization and automation had on assay robustness. Cellular health was determined by utilizing an indirect population-based metabolic activity assay and a direct imaging-based cell viability assay.

  16. Biochemical Characterization and Molecular Modeling of Pancreatic Lipase from a Cartilaginous Fish, the Common Stingray (Dasyatis pastinaca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchaâla, Emna; BouAli, Madiha; Ben Ali, Yassine; Miled, Nabil; Gargouri, Youssef; Fendri, Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    In order to identify fish enzymes displaying novel biochemical properties, we have chosen the common stingray (Dasyatis pastinaca), one of the most primitive living jawed aquatic vertebrates as a starting biological material to purify a lipase. A stingray pancreatic lipase (SPL) was purified from delipidated pancreatic powder. The SPL molecular weight was around 55 kDa which is slightly higher than that of known classical pancreatic lipases (50 kDa). This increase in the molecular weight was due to glycosylation. Like classic pancreatic lipases, SPL was found to be much more active on short-chain triacylglycerols than on long-chain ones. Natural detergents act as inhibitors of the SPL activity. This inhibition can be reversed by the addition of stingray colipase. Starting from total pancreatic messenger RNAs (mRNAs), partial stingray pancreatic lipase complementary DNA (cDNA) was synthesized by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and cloned into the PGEM-T vector. Partial amino acid sequence of the SPL was homologous to that of Japanese eel, porcine, and human pancreatic lipases. A 3D structure model of the sequenced part of SPL was built using the 3D structure of porcine pancreatic lipase as template, since both lipases shared an amino acid sequence identity of 60%.

  17. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma:Correlation with microvessel density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hans U. Kasper; Hella Wolf; Uta Drebber; Helmut K. Wolf; Michael A. Kern

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Cyclooxygenases (COX) are key enzymes for conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is the enzyme responsible for formation of nitric oxide.Both have constitutive and inducible isoforms. The inducible isoforms (iNOS and COX-2) are of great interest as regulators of tumor angiogenesis, tumorigenesis and inflammatory processes. This study was to clarify their role in pancreatic adenocarcinomas.METHODS: We investigated the immunohistochemical iNOS and COX-2 expression in 40 pancreatic ducal adenocarcinomas of different grade and stage. The results were compared with microvessel density and clinicopathological data.RESULTS: Twenty-one (52.5%) of the cases showed iNOS expression, 15 (37.5%) of the cases were positive for COX-2.The immunoreaction was heterogeneously distributed within the tumors. Staining intensity was different between the tumors. No correlation between iNOS and COX-2 expression was seen. There was no relationship with microvessel density.However, iNOS positive tumors developed more often distant metastases and the more malignant tumors showed a higher COX-2 expression. There was no correlation with other clinicopathological data.CONCLUSION: Approximately half of the cases expressed iNOS and COX-2. These two enzymes do not seem to be the key step in angiogenesis or carcinogenesis of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Due to a low prevalence of COX-2expression, chemoprevention of pancreatic carcinomas by COX-2 inhibitors can only achieve a limited success.

  18. Cryptotanshinone suppresses the proliferation and induces the apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells via the STAT3 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuqing; Yang, Bo; Chen, Zhe; Cheng, Rubin

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a challenging disease worldwide. Cryptotanshinone (CPT) is one of the active constituents of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge and exhibits significant antitumor activities in several human cancer cells. However, the efficacy and molecular mechanism of CPT in pancreatic cancer remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the effect of CPT on the proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle of human pancreatic cancer cell BxPC‑3 cells was evaluated. The results demonstrated that CPT inhibited proliferation of the BxPC‑3 cells in a concentration‑dependent manner, and significantly induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. The protein levels of cleaved caspase‑3, caspase‑9 and poly ADP ribose polymerase were upregulated, while the levels of c‑myc, survivin and cyclin D1 were downregulated following treatment with CPT. In addition, CPT decreased the activities of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and several upstream regulatory signaling pathways after 24 h. However, CPT only inhibited the phosphorylation of STAT3 Tyr705 within 30 min, without marked effects on the phosphorylation of the other proteins. These results suggested that the inhibition of STAT3 activity by CPT was directly and independent of the upstream regulators in human pancreatic cancer. The present study demonstrated that CPT exerts anticancer effects by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest via inhibition of the STAT3 signaling pathway in human BxPC-3 cells.

  19. Activator protein 1 promotes gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer by upregulating its downstream target Bim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Wenjing; Du, Yongxing; Zhang, Taiping; You, Lei; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-12-01

    Gemcitabine is a commonly used chemotherapy drug in pancreatic cancer. The function of activator protein 1 (AP-1) is cell-specific, and its function depends on the expression of other complex members. In the present study, we added gemcitabine to the media of Panc-1 and SW1990 cells at clinically achieved concentrations (10 µM). Compared with constitutive c-Fos expression, c-Jun expression increased in a dose-dependent manner upon gemcitabine treatment. c-Jun overexpression increased gemcitabine-induced apoptosis through Bim activation, while cell apoptosis and Bim expression decreased following c-Jun knockdown. Furthermore, gemcitabine-induced apoptosis and Bim levels decreased when c-Jun phosphorylation was blocked by SP600125. Our findings suggest that c-Jun, which is a member of the AP-1 complex, functions in gemcitabine-induced apoptosis by regulating its downstream target Bim in pancreatic cancer cells.

  20. Nicotine induces self-renewal of pancreatic cancer stem cells via neurotransmitter-driven activation of sonic hedgehog signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H; Banerjee, Jheelam; Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2016-01-01

    A small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells with characteristics of stem cells drive tumour initiation, progression and metastasis. A better understanding of the regulation of cancer stem cells may lead to more effective cancer prevention and therapy. We have shown that the proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cell lines is activated by the nicotinic receptor-mediated release of stress neurotransmitters, responses reversed by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). However, the observed cancer inhibiting effects of GABA will only succeed clinically if GABA inhibits pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) in addition to the more differentiated cancer cells that comprise the majority of cancer tissues and cell lines. Using PCSCs isolated from two pancreatic cancer patients by cell sorting and by spheroid formation assay from pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1, we tested the hypothesis that nicotine induces the self-renewal of PCSCs. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) α3, α4, α5 and α7 were expressed and chronic exposure to nicotine increased the protein expression of these receptors. Immunoassays showed that PCSCs produced the stress neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine and the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. Chronic nicotine significantly increased the production of stress neurotransmitters and sonic hedgehog (SHH) while inducing Gli1 protein and decreasing GABA. GABA treatment inhibited the induction of SHH and Gli1. Spheroid formation and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assays showed significant nicotine-induced increases in self renewal and cell proliferation, responses blocked by GABA. Our data suggest that nicotine increases the SHH-mediated malignant potential of PCSCs and that GABA prevents these effects.

  1. Dendritic cells loaded with pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs lysates induce antitumor immune killing effect in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yin

    Full Text Available According to the cancer stem cells (CSCs theory, malignant tumors may be heterogeneous in which a small population of CSCs drive the progression of cancer. Because of their intrinsic abilities, CSCs may survive a variety of treatments and then lead to therapeutic resistance and cancer recurrence. Pancreatic CSCs have been reported to be responsible for the malignant behaviors of pancreatic cancer, including suppression of immune protection. Thus, development of immune strategies to eradicate pancreatic CSCs may be of great value for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we enriched pancreatic CSCs by culturing Panc-1 cells under sphere-forming conditions. Panc-1 CSCs expressed low levels of HLA-ABC and CD86, as measured by flow cytometry analysis. We further found that the Panc-1 CSCs modulate immunity by inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation which is promoted by phytohemagglutinin (PHA and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies. The monocyte derived dendritic cells (DCs were charged with total lysates generated from Panc-1 CSCs obtained from tumor sphere culturing. After co-culturing with lymphocytes at different ratios, the Panc-1 CSCs lysates modified DC effectively promoted lymphocyte proliferation. The activating efficiency reached 72.4% and 74.7% at the ratios of 1∶10 and 1∶20 with lymphocytes. The activated lymphocytes secreted high levels of INF-γ and IL-2, which are strong antitumor cytokines. Moreover, Panc-1 CSCs lysates modified DC induced significant cytotoxic effects of lymphocytes on Panc-1 CSCs and parental Panc-1 cells, respectively, as shown by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay. Our study demonstrates that the development of CSCs-based vaccine is a promising strategy for treating pancreatic cancer.

  2. Honokiol arrests cell cycle, induces apoptosis, and potentiates the cytotoxic effect of gemcitabine in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Arora

    Full Text Available Survival rates for patients with pancreatic cancer are extremely poor due to its asymptomatic progression to advanced and metastatic stage for which current therapies remain largely ineffective. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents and treatment approaches are desired to improve the clinical outcome. In this study, we determined the effects of honokiol, a biologically active constituent of oriental medicinal herb Magnolia officinalis/grandiflora, on two pancreatic cancer cell lines, MiaPaCa and Panc1, alone and in combination with the standard chemotherapeutic drug, gemcitabine. Honokiol exerted growth inhibitory effects on both the pancreatic cancer cell lines by causing cell cycle arrest at G₁ phase and induction of apoptosis. At the molecular level, honokiol markedly decreased the expression of cyclins (D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk2 and Cdk4, and caused an increase in Cdk inhibitors, p21 and p27. Furthermore, honokiol treatment led to augmentation of Bax/Bcl-2 and Bax/Bcl-xL ratios to favor apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. These changes were accompanied by enhanced cytoplasmic accumulation of NF-κB with a concomitant decrease in nuclear fraction and reduced transcriptional activity of NF-κB responsive promoter. This was associated with decreased phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B alpha (IκB-α causing its stabilization and thus increased cellular levels. Importantly, honokiol also potentiated the cytotoxic effects of gemcitabine, in part, by restricting the gemcitabine-induced nuclear accumulation of NF-κB in the treated pancreatic cancer cell lines. Altogether, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, the growth inhibitory effects of honokiol in pancreatic cancer and indicate its potential usefulness as a novel natural agent in prevention and therapy.

  3. Acute pancreatitis induced by paclitaxel and carboplatin therapy in an ovarian cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, D; Yoshida, H; Imai, Y; Fujiwara, K

    2016-01-01

    A 46-year-old female was treated with a regimen of paclitaxel and carboplatin (TC therapy) as adjuvant chemotherapy for Stage IC ovarian adenocarcinoma. There was no severe toxicity except for grade 3 neutropenia during the first four cycles of TC therapy. However, she developed acute pancreatitis at 14 days after fifth cycle. TC therapy is commonly associated with adverse effects such as myelosuppression, hypersensitivity, alopecia, and peripheral neuropathy, but acute pancreatitis has rarely been reported. Ovarian cancer patients often present with nausea and abdominal pain, which are the same symptoms of pancreatitis. It is very important to keep in mind that acute pancreatitis may be concealed in these common symptoms of ovarian cancer during and after TC therapy. Because acute pancreatitis is fatal complication and quitting the drug usually leads to complete cure. The authors report an uncommon case in which TC therapy may have caused acute pancreatitis.

  4. Rolipram and SP600125 suppress the early increase in PTP1B expression during cerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Nancy; Sánchez-Bernal, Carmen; Pérez, Nieves; Sardina, José L; Mangas, Arturo; Calvo, José J; Sánchez-Yagüe, Jesús

    2010-07-01

    To analyze the expression modulation of pancreatic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)1B during the development of cerulein (Cer)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) and the effect of inhibition of type 4 phosphodiesterase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 on its expression levels. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by subcutaneous injections of 20 microg Cer per kilogram body weight at hourly intervals, and the animals were killed at 2, 4, or 9 hours after the first injection. Neutropenia was induced with vinblastine sulfate. Phosphodiesterase and the mitogen-activated protein kinases were inhibited with rolipram and SP600125, respectively, before the induction of AP. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B increases its expression at the levels of both protein and messenger RNA during the early phase of Cer-induced AP. The increase in protein expression persisted along the development of the disease, and neutrophil infiltration seemed to play a central role. Rolipram and SP600125 pretreatments mostly suppressed the increase in the expression of PTP1B during the early phase of AP. Cerulein-induced AP is associated with an increase in the expression of PTP1B in its early phase. An increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels in inflammatory cells and the inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 are able to suppress the increase in PTP1B protein level.

  5. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress T-Cell Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-06-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcomes compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of preinvasive foci. We investigated the effects of radiation therapy in p48(Cre);LSL-Kras(G12D) (KC) and p48(Cre);LSLKras(G12D);LSL-Trp53(R172H) (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from radiation treated invasive and preinvasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8(+) T cells than controls, and greater numbers of CD4(+) T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. A neutralizing antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Radiation treatment causes macrophages

  6. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress Immune Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Ly, Nancy Ngoc Giao; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R.; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcome, compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of pre-invasive foci. Methods We investigated the effects of radiation in p48Cre;LSL-KrasG12D (KC) and p48Cre;LSLKrasG12D;LSL-Trp53R172H (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2–12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from invasive and pre-invasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype, compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8+ T cells than controls and greater numbers of CD4+ T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. An antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Conclusions Radiation exposure causes macrophages in PDAs

  7. Antitumor Effects of Rapamycin in Pancreatic Cancer Cells by Inducing Apoptosis and Autophagy

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    Xi-Jing Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin (Rapa, an inhibitor of mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR, is an immunosuppressive agent that has anti-proliferative effects on some tumors. This study aims to investigate the effects of Rapa suppressing proliferation of pancreatic carcinoma PC-2 cells in vitro and its molecular mechanism involved in antitumor activities. MTT assays showed that the inhibition of proliferation of PC-2 cells in vitro was in a time- and dose-dependent manner. By using transmission electron microscopy, apoptosis bodies and formation of abundant autophagic vacuoles were observed in PC-2 cells after Rapa treatment. Flow cytometry assays also showed Rapa had a positive effect on apoptosis. MDC staining showed that the fluorescent density was higher and the number of MDC-labeled particles in PC-2 cells was greater in the Rapa treatment group than in the control group. RT-PCR revealed that the expression levels of p53, Bax and Beclin 1 were up-regulated in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Beclin 1 was involved in Rapa induced autophagy and Rapa induced apoptosis as well as p53 up-regulation in PC-2 cells. The results demonstrated that Rapa could effectively inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and autophagy in PC-2 cells.

  8. Transduced Tat-DJ-1 protein inhibits cytokines-induced pancreatic RINm5F cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hyo Sang; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Cha, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sang Jin; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2016-01-01

    Loss of pancreatic β-cells by oxidative stress or cytokines is associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). DJ-1 is known to as a multifunctional protein, which plays an important role in cell survival. We prepared cell permeable wild type (WT) and mutant type (M26I) Tat-DJ-1 proteins to investigate the effects of DJ-1 against combined cytokines (IL-1β, IFN-γ and TNF-α)-induced RINm5F cell death. Both Tat-DJ-1 proteins were transduced into RINm5F cells. WT Tat-DJ-1 proteins significantly protected against cell death from cytokines by reducing intracellular toxicities. Also, WT Tat-DJ-1 proteins markedly regulated cytokines-induced pro- and anti-apoptosis proteins. However, M26I Tat-DJ-1 protein showed relatively low protective effects, as compared to WT Tat-DJ-1 protein. Our experiments demonstrated that WT Tat-DJ-1 protein protects against cytokine-induced RINm5F cell death by suppressing intracellular toxicities and regulating apoptosisrelated protein expression. Thus, WT Tat-DJ-1 protein could potentially serve as a therapeutic agent for DM and cytokine related diseases. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 297-302] PMID:26996344

  9. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  10. Adamantyl Retinoid-Related Molecules Induce Apoptosis in Pancreatic Cancer Cells by Inhibiting IGF-1R and Wnt/β-Catenin Pathways

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    Lulu Farhana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic carcinoma has a dismal prognosis as it often presents as locally advanced or metastatic. We have found that exposure to adamantyl-substituted retinoid-related (ARR compounds 3-Cl-AHPC and AHP3 resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in PANC-1, Capan-2, and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cell lines. In addition, AHP3 and 3-Cl-AHPC inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in spheres derived from the CD44+/CD24+ (CD133+/EpCAM+ stem-like cell population isolated from the pancreatic cancer cell lines. 3-Cl-AHPC-induced apoptosis was preceded by decreasing expression of IGF-1R, cyclin D1, β-catenin, and activated Notch-1 in the pancreatic cancer cell lines. Decreased IGF-1R expression inhibited PANC-1 proliferation, enhanced 3-Cl-AHPC-mediated apoptosis, and significantly decreased sphere formation. 3-Cl-AHPC inhibited the Wnt/β-catenin pathway as indicated by decreased β-catenin nuclear localization and inhibited Wnt/β-catenin activation of transcription factor TCF/LEF. Knockdown of β-catenin using sh-RNA also induced apoptosis and inhibited growth in pancreatic cancer cells. Thus, 3-Cl-AHPC and AHP3 induce apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells and cancer stem-like cells and may serve as an important potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  11. KAI1 inhibits HGF-induced invasion of pancreatic cancer by sphingosine kinase activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Liu; Xiao-Zhong Guo; Wei-Wei Zhang; Zhuo-Zhuang Lu; Qun-Wei Zhang; Hai-Feng Duan; d Li-Sheng Wang

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: KAI1/CD82 has been reported to attenuate the process of metastases in a variety of tumors; however, its mechanism of action in invasion has not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the importance of KAI1 in invasion and its correlation with activation of sphingosine kinase (SPK) in human pancreatic cancer PANC1 and Miapaca-2 cell lines. METHODS: The expression of KAI1 in PANC1 and Miapaca-2 cells,whichwasmediatedbyrecombinantadenovirus(Ad-KAI1), was assessed by a flow cytometer and Western blotting. After successful infection was established, in vitro growth curve and invasive ability in Boyden Chamber assay were studied. The presence of KAI1 correlating with c-Met and SPK was detected by co-immunoprecipitationand[γ-32P]ATPincorporation. RESULTS: KAI1 genes had no significant effects on the curve representing cell growth. After infection with the KAI1 gene, decreased invasive ability in the Boyden Chamber assay was observed in PANC1 and Miapaca-2 cells that were induced by hepatocyte growth factor. Over-expression of KAI1 in the cells led to the deactivation of SPK and a decreased level of intracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate. No correlation was observed between c-Met and KAI1 during co-immunoprecipitation. CONCLUSION: The results of this study for the first time demonstrated a regulatory role for KAI1 in SPK activation, which leads to decreased invasive ability in disease progression of human pancreatic cancer.

  12. Three kinds of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides attenuate DDC-induced chronic pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Koukou; Yu, Min; Hu, Yang; Ren, Guangming; Zang, Tingting; Xu, Xiuhong; Qu, Juanjuan

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammation of pancreas characterized by irreversible morphologic change and dysfunction. Patients with chronic pancreatitis often present with abdominal pain, diarrhoea, jaundice, weight loss and the development of diabetes. Polysaccharides of Ganoderma lucidum strain S3 (GLPS3) possess antioxidative and immunomodulatory activities. This study was to characterize chemical structures of GLPS3 and determine their effects on diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC)-induced CP in mice. The total sugar content of GLPS3 from fermentation broth (GLPS3-Ⅰ), cultured mycelia (GLPS3-Ⅱ) and fruiting body (GLPS3-Ⅲ) was 90.4%, 92.2% and 91.8% respectively. GLPS3-Ⅰ, GLPS3-Ⅱ and GLPS3-Ⅲ were composed of Glu:Gal:Ara:Xyl, Glu:Gal:Ara:Xyl:Man:Rha, and Glu:Gal:Xyl:Man:Rha:Fuc, with molar ratio of 2.82: 1.33: 1.26: 0.87, 5.84: 2.23: 0.72:1.38: 1.40: 0.51 and 5.34: 2.72: 1.14: 1.10: 0.33: 0.38, respectively. The antioxidative activity of GLPS3-Ⅱfrom cultured mycelia in vitro is higher than other two polysaccharides. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in serum were increased while the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were reversely decreased by GLPS3 treatment. Serum amylase (AMS) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) changes indicated the therapeutic effects of GLPS3. Moreover, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and interferon-gamma (INF-γ) contents were reduced most by GLPS3-Ⅱ. The results revealed that GLPS3 especially GLPS3-Ⅱfrom cultured mycelia were effective for CP therapy and bioactivity difference might be attributed to monosaccharide composition.

  13. MUC1 enhances tumor progression and contributes towards immunosuppression in a mouse model of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinder, Teresa L.; Subramani, Durai B.; Basu, Gargi D.; Bradley, Judy M.; Schettini, Jorge; Million, Arefayene; Skaar, Todd

    2008-01-01

    MUC1, a membrane tethered mucin glycoprotein, is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in >80% of human ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, the role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has been elusive, partly due to the lack of an appropriate model. We report the characterization of a novel mouse model that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule (PDA.MUC1 mice). Pancreatic tumors arise in an appropriate MUC1-tolerant background within an immune competent host. Significant enhancement in the development of pancreatic intraepithelial pre-neoplastic lesions (PanINs) and progression to adenocarcinoma is observed in PDA.MUC1 mice, possibly due to increased proliferation. Tumors from PDA.MUC1 mice express higher levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and indoleamine 2,3, dioxygenase compared to PDA mice lacking MUC1, especially during early stages of tumor development. The increased pro-inflammatory milieu correlates with an increased percentage of regulatory T cells and myeloid suppressor cells in the pancreatic tumor and tumor draining lymph nodes. Data shows that during pancreatic cancer progression, MUC1-mediated mechanisms enhance the onset and progression of the disease which in turn regulate the immune responses. Thus, the mouse model is ideally-suited for testing novel chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies against pancreatic cancer. PMID:18713982

  14. MUC1 enhances tumor progression and contributes toward immunosuppression in a mouse model of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinder, Teresa L; Subramani, Durai B; Basu, Gargi D; Bradley, Judy M; Schettini, Jorge; Million, Arefayene; Skaar, Todd; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2008-09-01

    MUC1, a membrane tethered mucin glycoprotein, is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in >80% of human ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, the role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has been elusive, partly due to the lack of an appropriate model. We report the characterization of a novel mouse model that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule (PDA.MUC1 mice). Pancreatic tumors arise in an appropriate MUC1-tolerant background within an immune-competent host. Significant enhancement in the development of pancreatic intraepithelial preneoplastic lesions and progression to adenocarcinoma is observed in PDA.MUC1 mice, possibly due to increased proliferation. Tumors from PDA.MUC1 mice express higher levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and IDO compared with PDA mice lacking MUC1, especially during early stages of tumor development. The increased proinflammatory milieu correlates with an increased percentage of regulatory T cells and myeloid suppressor cells in the pancreatic tumor and tumor draining lymph nodes. Data shows that during pancreatic cancer progression, MUC1-mediated mechanisms enhance the onset and progression of the disease, which in turn regulate the immune responses. Thus, the mouse model is ideally suited for testing novel chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies against pancreatic cancer.

  15. Pancreatic Stellate Cells and Pancreatic Carcinoma: An Unholy Alliance

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    Johannes-Matthias Löhr

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the stromal compartment in the development, proliferation, invasion, metastasis and resistance of epithelial cancers has increasingly been recognized in recent decades [1, 2]. This stromal reaction is found in many carcinomas, e.g. in breast, prostate, colon, ovarian and pancreatic cancer. It is made up of stromal cells, endothelial cells, immune cells and extracellular matrix proteins. Moreover, the ECM proteins in the stroma act as a reservoir for growth factors released either by tumor or stromal cells, thus enabling autocrine and paracrine stimulation of the cells within the tumor mass. In this respect, groundbreaking work in solid tumors was done by Mina Bissell with breast carcinoma as her model system [3]. Recently, Vonlaufen et al. have contributed a review on the relationship between activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells which is worth reading [4]. Vonlaufen et al., with their own study [5] and those of some other groups (see their review, convincingly demonstrate a reciprocal influence of both nonepithelial and epithelial constituents of pancreatic carcinoma which works to their mutual benefit. Thus, the coinjection of PSC and pancreatic tumor cells enhances tumor growth and metastasis. In In vitro and animal models, PSCs increase tumor cell proliferation and decrease basal and induced apoptosis of pancreatic tumor cells. On the other hand, pancreatic tumor cells activate PSCs, recruit them to their vicinity and stimulate their proliferation. This review clearly exemplifies the specialized milieu in which both cell types grow to their mutual benefit, thus forming one of the deadliest tumors we know.

  16. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    , pancreatitis develops in the Ist, IVth and Vth type of Frederikson's classification, in rare recessive disorders and other conditions such as hypothyroidism, renal insufficiency, oestrogen substitution and others. In pancreas divisum chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop. In exotic countries tropical pancreatitis is most frequent. It is however similarly as alcoholic pancreatitis primarily chronic. A very serious course is usual in traumatic pancreatitis. Risk factors of pancreatitis after ERCP are in particular undilated biliary pathways, dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi and the use of a needle knife (bistoury). Medicamentous prevention is not substantiated. Drug induced pancreatic damage is much rarer than hepatotoxicity. Pancreatitis is caused most frequently by immunosuppressives, methyldopa, corticoids and oestrogens. The question remains to what extent the course of pancreatitis is influenced by its etiology. Biliary, alcoholic, traumatic and postoperative pancreatitis is usually severe, pancreatitis associated with viroses and induced by drugs is usually mild.

  17. Moscatilin induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells via reactive oxygen species and the JNK/SAPK pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Fang, Yuan; Xu, Xue-Feng; Jin, Da-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Moscatilin is a bibenzyl derivative extracted from the Dendrobium aurantiacum var. denneanum, which has traditionally been used as an immunomodulatory treatment in China. The present study was designed to determine whether moscatilin is a pro-apoptotic agent in pancreatic cancer, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. The apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of moscatilin on pancreatic cancer cells were determined in vitro using biochemical assays, such as the MTT assay, colony formation assay, Hoechst staining and DNA fragmentation assay, and in vivo using Panc-1 pancreatic cancer xenografts. Western blotting was also conducted to evaluate the expression levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax), Bcl2 homologous antagonist killer (Bak), caspase 3, cleaved-caspase 3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinases (SAPK) and JNK/SAPK in response to moscatilin. We used DCFH-DA to detect the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by moscatilin. The present study demonstrated that moscatilin markedly inhibited pancreatic cancer cell viability and induced cell apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Conversely, moscatilin did not affect the cell viability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells at the comparable dosage. Treatment with moscatilin suppressed clonogenicity of Panc-1 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, a decrease in Bcl2 expression, and an increase in the expression levels of Bak and Bax, was detected following treatment with moscatilin, resulting in an increase in the proapoptotic/anti-apoptotic expression ratio (Bax/Bcl2) in Panc-1 cells. Moscatilin also induced activation of the caspase-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In addition, moscatilin enhanced cellular ROS production and induced activation of JNKSAPK signaling pathway. Conversely, pretreatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine or the JNK

  18. Induction of chronic pancreatitis by pancreatic duct ligation activates BMP2, apelin, and PTHrP expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastellini, Cristiana; Han, Song; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Cao, Yanna; Liu, Ka; Gao, Xuxia; Ko, Tien C; Greeley, George H; Falzon, Miriam

    2015-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a devastating disease with no treatments. Experimental models have been developed to reproduce the parenchyma and inflammatory responses typical of human CP. For the present study, one objective was to assess and compare the effects of pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) to those of repetitive cerulein (Cer)-induced CP in mice on pancreatic production of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2), apelin, and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). A second objective was to determine the extent of cross talk among pancreatic BMP2, apelin, and PTHrP signaling systems. We focused on BMP2, apelin, and PTHrP since these factors regulate the inflammation-fibrosis cascade during pancreatitis. Findings showed that PDL- and Cer-induced CP resulted in significant elevations in expression and peptide/protein levels of pancreatic BMP2, apelin, and PTHrP. In vivo mouse and in vitro pancreatic cell culture experiments demonstrated that BMP2 stimulated pancreatic apelin expression whereas apelin expression was inhibited by PTHrP exposure. Apelin or BMP2 exposure inhibited PTHrP expression, and PTHrP stimulated upregulation of gremlin, an endogenous inhibitor of BMP2 activity. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) stimulated PTHrP expression. Together, findings demonstrated that PDL- and Cer-induced CP resulted in increased production of the pancreatic BMP2, apelin, and PTHrP signaling systems and that significant cross talk occurred among pancreatic BMP2, apelin, and PTHrP. These results together with previous findings imply that these factors interact via a pancreatic network to regulate the inflammation-fibrosis cascade during CP. More importantly, this network communicated with TGF-β, a key effector of pancreatic pathophysiology. This novel network may be amenable to pharmacologic manipulations during CP in humans.

  19. Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Models: Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Fetal Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Damasceno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose homeostasis is controlled by endocrine pancreatic cells, and any pancreatic disturbance can result in diabetes. Because 8% to 12% of diabetic pregnant women present with malformed fetuses, there is great interest in understanding the etiology, pathophysiological mechanisms, and treatment of gestational diabetes. Hyperglycemia enhances the production of reactive oxygen species, leading to oxidative stress, which is involved in diabetic teratogenesis. It has also been suggested that maternal diabetes alters embryonic gene expression, which might cause malformations. Due to ethical issues involving human studies that sometimes have invasive aspects and the multiplicity of uncontrolled variables that can alter the uterine environment during clinical studies, it is necessary to use animal models to better understand diabetic pathophysiology. This review aimed to gather information about pathophysiological mechanisms and fetal outcomes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms and factors involved in diabetes, the use of pancreatic regeneration studies is increasing in an attempt to understand the behavior of pancreatic beta cells. In addition, these studies suggest a new preventive concept as a treatment basis for diabetes, introducing therapeutic efforts to minimize or prevent diabetes-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage, and teratogenesis.

  20. Piperine ameliorates the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis by inhibiting the activation of mitogen activated protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Gi-Sang; Kim, Min-Sun; Jeong, Jinsu; Lee, Hye-Youn; Park, Kyoung-Chel; Koo, Bon Soon; Kim, Byung-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Lee, Seung Ho; Hwang, Sung-Yeon; Shin, Yong Kook; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2011-07-01

    Piperine is a phenolic component of black pepper (Piper nigrum) and long pepper (Piper longum), fruits used in traditional Asian medicine. Our previous study showed that piperine inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated whether piperine reduces the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). Administration of piperine reduced histologic damage and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the pancreas and ameliorated many of the examined laboratory parameters, including the pancreatic weight (PW) to body weight (BW) ratio, as well as serum levels of amylase and lipase and trypsin activity. Furthermore, piperine pretreatment reduced the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 during cerulein-induced AP. In accordance with in vivo results, piperine reduced cell death, amylase and lipase activity, and cytokine production in isolated cerulein-treated pancreatic acinar cells. In addition, piperine inhibited the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). These findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of piperine in cerulein-induced AP is mediated by inhibiting the activation of MAPKs. Thus, piperine may have a protective effect against AP.

  1. Zerumbone protects INS-1 rat pancreatic beta cells from high glucose-induced apoptosis through generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changyin; Zou, Shibo; Cui, Zhengjun; Guo, Pengfei; Meng, Qingnan; Shi, Xun; Gao, Ya; Yang, Gaoyuan; Han, Zhaofeng

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effect of zerumbone, a natural sesquiterpene isolated from Zingiber zerumbet Smith, on high glucose-induced cytotoxicity in pancreatic β cells. INS-1 rat pancreatic β cells were treated with 33 mM glucose with or without different concentrations of zerumbone and cell viability and apoptosis were assessed. The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in the action of zerumbone was examined. Notably, zerumbone significantly (P in a concentration-dependent fashion up to 60 μM of zerumbone. Annexin-V/propidium iodide staining analysis showed that zerumbone impaired the apoptotic response of high glucose-treated INS-1 cells, which was coupled with a significant decline in cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9. Pretreatment with the ROS inhibitor N-acetylcysteine abrogated the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK induced by high glucose. Zerumbone significantly (P in high glucose-treated INS-1 cells. Pharmacological activation of p38 and JNK with anisomycin reversed the anti-apoptotic effect of zerumbone. Additionally, simultaneous inhibition of p38 and JNK significantly (P in high glucose-treated INS-1 cells. In conclusion, zerumbone confers protection against high glucose-induced apoptosis of INS-1 pancreatic β cells, largely through interfering with ROS production and p38 and JNK activation. Zerumbone may have potential therapeutic effects against hyperglycemia-induced β cell damage in diabetes.

  2. Statin Pretreatment in Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Jesus de Almeida

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Some authors have found beneficial effect of statins in certain inflammatory conditions, but the effect of statins on acute pancreatitis is not yet defined. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of simvastatin on an experimental model of mild and severe acute pancreatitis. Animals One hundred and one Wistar rats with cerulein or taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis were used in this study. Design The rats were divided into two groups: Group I (n=51 received two previously i.p. injections (18±2 and 3±1 hours of simvastatin (200 μg/kg and Group II (n=50 received two previously i.p. injections of saline. Both groups were subdivided into two subgroups: mild pancreatitis (cerulein-induced; IA, n=10; IIA, n=10 and severe pancreatitis (taurocholateinduced; IB, n=41; IIB, n=40. Main outcome measures The parameters evaluated were: pancreatic vascular permeability, tissue water content, histologic lesion, amylase serum levels in rats with mild pancreatitis (subgroups A; mortality rate, serum levels of IL-6, IL-10, amylase, pulmonary myeloperoxidase activity and ascitic levels of TNF-alpha in rats with severe pancreatitis (subgroups B. Results Serum levels of IL-10 were significantly lower in the simvastatin-treated group as well as the myeloperoxidase activity. There was no significant difference in any of other studied parameters. Conclusion Simvastatin appears to reduce inflammatory cytokines and pulmonary neutrophilic activation in the severe acute pancreatitis model, but there is no significant effect on survival curve, in spite of a clear trend towards a better survival in the simvastatin group.

  3. Involvement of myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate phosphorylation and translocation in cholecystokinin-induced amylase release in rat pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Keitaro; Narita, Takanori; Katsumata-Kato, Osamu; Sugiya, Hiroshi; Seo, Yoshiteru

    2016-03-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a gastrointestinal hormone that induces exocytotic amylase release in pancreatic acinar cells. The activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in the CCK-induced pancreatic amylase release. Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) is a ubiquitously expressed substrate of PKC. MARCKS has been implicated in membrane trafficking in several cell types. The phosphorylation of MARCKS by PKC results in the translocation of MARCKS from the membrane to the cytosol. Here, we studied the involvement of MARCKS in the CCK-induced amylase release in rat pancreatic acini. Employing Western blotting, we detected MARCKS protein in the rat pancreatic acini. CCK induced MARCKS phosphorylation. A PKC-δ inhibitor, rottlerin, inhibited the CCK-induced MARCKS phosphorylation and amylase release. In the translocation assay, we also observed CCK-induced PKC-δ activation. An immunohistochemistry study showed that CCK induced MARCKS translocation from the membrane to the cytosol. When acini were lysed by a detergent, Triton X-100, CCK partially induced displacement of the MARCKS from the GM1a-rich detergent-resistant membrane fractions (DRMs) in which Syntaxin2 is distributed. A MARCKS-related peptide inhibited the CCK-induced amylase release. These findings suggest that MARCKS phosphorylation by PKC-δ and then MARCKS translocation from the GM1a-rich DRMs to the cytosol are involved in the CCK-induced amylase release in pancreatic acinar cells.

  4. p-[{sup 123}I]iodo-l-phenylalanine for detection of pancreatic cancer: basic investigations of the uptake characteristics in primary human pancreatic tumour cells and evaluation in in vivo models of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samnick, Samuel; Hellwig, Dirk; Kirsch, Carl-Martin [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical Center, 66421, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Romeike, Bernd F.M.; Feiden, Wolfgang [Department of Neuropathology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Kubuschok, Boris [Department of Internal Medicine I, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Amon, Michaela; Menger, Michael D. [Department of Clinical Experimental Surgery, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is associated with the worst 5-year survival rate of any human cancer. This high mortality is due, in part, to difficulties in establishing early and accurate diagnosis. Because most tumours share the ability to accumulate amino acids more effectively than normal tissues and any other pathology, assessment of amino acid transport in tumour cells using radiolabelled amino acids has become one of the most promising tools for tumour imaging. This study investigated the potential of p-[{sup 123}I]iodo-l-phenylalanine (IPA) for detection of pancreatic cancer by single-photon emission tomography. IPA affinity for pancreatic tumour was investigated in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma PaCa44 and PanC1 cells, followed by analysis of the underlying mechanisms of tracer accumulation in neoplastic cells. Thereafter, IPA was evaluated for targeting of pancreatic tumours using SCID mice engrafted with primary human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells, as well as in acute inflammation models in immunocompetent mice and rats. IPA accumulated intensively in human pancreatic tumour cells. Radioactivity accumulation in tumour cells following a 30-min incubation at 37 C/pH 7.4 varied from 41% to 58% of the total loaded activity per 10{sup 6} cells. The cellular uptake was temperature and pH dependent and predominantly mediated by specific carriers for neutral amino acids, namely the sodium-independent and l-leucine-preferring (L-system) transporter and the alanine-, serine- and cysteine-preferring (ASC-system) transporter. Protein incorporation was less than 8%. Biodistribution studies showed rapid localization of the tracer to tumours, reaching 10%{+-}2.5% to 15%{+-}3% of the injected dose per gram (I.D./g) in heterotopic tumours compared with 17%{+-}3.5% to 22%{+-}4.3% I.D./g in the orthotopic tumours, at 60 and 240 min post injection of IPA, respectively. In contrast, IPA uptake in the gastrointestinal tract and areas of inflammation remained moderate and decreased

  5. PKCα-induced drug resistance in pancreatic cancer cells is associated with transforming growth factor-β1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ying

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance remains a great challenge in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. The goal of this study was to determine whether TGF-β1 is associated with drug resistance in pancreatic cancer. Methods Pancreatic cancer BxPC3 cells were stably transfected with TGF-β1 cDNA. Cellular morphology and cell cycle were determined and the suppressive subtracted hybridization (SSH assay was performed to identify differentially expressed genes induced by TGF-β1. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to detect expression of TGF-β1-related genes in the cells and tissue samples. After that, the cells were further treated with an anti-cancer drug (e.g., cisplatin after pre-incubated with the recombinant TGF-β1 plus PKCα inhibitor Gö6976. TGF-β1 type II receptor, TβRII was also knocked down using TβRII siRNA to assess the effects of these drugs in the cells. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Results Overexpression of TGF-β1 leads to a markedly increased invasion potential but a reduced growth rate in BxPC3 cells. Recombinant TGF-β1 protein increases expression of PKCα in BxPC3 cells, a result that we confirmed by SSH. Moreover, TGF-β1 reduced the sensitivity of BxPC3 cells to cisplatin treatment, and this was mediated by upregulation of PKCα. However, blockage of PKCα with Gö6976 and TβRII with siRNA reversed the resistance of BxPC3 cells to gemcitabine, even in the presence of TGF-β1. Immunohistochemical data show that pancreatic cancers overexpress TGF-β1 and P-gp relative to normal tissues. In addition, TGF-β1 expression is associated with P-gp and membranous PKCα expression in pancreatic cancer. Conclusions TGF-β1-induced drug resistance in pancreatic cancer cells was associated with PKCα expression. The PKCα inhibitor Gö6976 could be a promising agent to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy.

  6. PKCalpha-induced drug resistance in pancreatic cancer cells is associated with transforming growth factor-beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Yu, Guanzhen; Yu, Danghui; Zhu, Minghua

    2010-08-05

    Drug resistance remains a great challenge in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. The goal of this study was to determine whether TGF-beta1 is associated with drug resistance in pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer BxPC3 cells were stably transfected with TGF-beta1 cDNA. Cellular morphology and cell cycle were determined and the suppressive subtracted hybridization (SSH) assay was performed to identify differentially expressed genes induced by TGF-beta1. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to detect expression of TGF-beta1-related genes in the cells and tissue samples. After that, the cells were further treated with an anti-cancer drug (e.g., cisplatin) after pre-incubated with the recombinant TGF-beta1 plus PKCalpha inhibitor Gö6976. TGF-beta1 type II receptor, TbetaRII was also knocked down using TbetaRII siRNA to assess the effects of these drugs in the cells. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Overexpression of TGF-beta1 leads to a markedly increased invasion potential but a reduced growth rate in BxPC3 cells. Recombinant TGF-beta1 protein increases expression of PKCalpha in BxPC3 cells, a result that we confirmed by SSH. Moreover, TGF-beta1 reduced the sensitivity of BxPC3 cells to cisplatin treatment, and this was mediated by upregulation of PKCalpha. However, blockage of PKCalpha with Gö6976 and TbetaRII with siRNA reversed the resistance of BxPC3 cells to gemcitabine, even in the presence of TGF-beta1. Immunohistochemical data show that pancreatic cancers overexpress TGF-beta1 and P-gp relative to normal tissues. In addition, TGF-beta1 expression is associated with P-gp and membranous PKCalpha expression in pancreatic cancer. TGF-beta1-induced drug resistance in pancreatic cancer cells was associated with PKCalpha expression. The PKCalpha inhibitor Gö6976 could be a promising agent to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy.

  7. PKCα-induced drug resistance in pancreatic cancer cells is associated with transforming growth factor-β1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug resistance remains a great challenge in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. The goal of this study was to determine whether TGF-β1 is associated with drug resistance in pancreatic cancer. Methods Pancreatic cancer BxPC3 cells were stably transfected with TGF-β1 cDNA. Cellular morphology and cell cycle were determined and the suppressive subtracted hybridization (SSH) assay was performed to identify differentially expressed genes induced by TGF-β1. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to detect expression of TGF-β1-related genes in the cells and tissue samples. After that, the cells were further treated with an anti-cancer drug (e.g., cisplatin) after pre-incubated with the recombinant TGF-β1 plus PKCα inhibitor Gö6976. TGF-β1 type II receptor, TβRII was also knocked down using TβRII siRNA to assess the effects of these drugs in the cells. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Results Overexpression of TGF-β1 leads to a markedly increased invasion potential but a reduced growth rate in BxPC3 cells. Recombinant TGF-β1 protein increases expression of PKCα in BxPC3 cells, a result that we confirmed by SSH. Moreover, TGF-β1 reduced the sensitivity of BxPC3 cells to cisplatin treatment, and this was mediated by upregulation of PKCα. However, blockage of PKCα with Gö6976 and TβRII with siRNA reversed the resistance of BxPC3 cells to gemcitabine, even in the presence of TGF-β1. Immunohistochemical data show that pancreatic cancers overexpress TGF-β1 and P-gp relative to normal tissues. In addition, TGF-β1 expression is associated with P-gp and membranous PKCα expression in pancreatic cancer. Conclusions TGF-β1-induced drug resistance in pancreatic cancer cells was associated with PKCα expression. The PKCα inhibitor Gö6976 could be a promising agent to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy. PMID:20684793

  8. Spiclomazine induces apoptosis associated with the suppression of cell viability, migration and invasion in pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Zhao

    Full Text Available The effective treatment for pancreatic carcinoma remains critically needed. Herein, this current study showed that spiclomazine treatment caused a reduction in viability in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines CFPAC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 in vitro. It was notable in this regard that, compared with pancreatic carcinoma cells, normal human embryonic kidney (HEK-293 and liver (HL-7702 cells were more resistant to the antigrowth effect of spiclomazine. Biochemically, spiclomazine treatment regulated the expression of protein levels in the apoptosis related pathways. Consistent with this effect, spiclomazine reduced the mitochondria membrane potential, elevated reactive oxygen species, and activated caspase-3/9. In addition, a key finding from this study was that spiclomazine suppressed migration and invasion of cancer cells through down-regulation of MMP-2/9. Collectively, the proposed studies did shed light on the antiproliferation effect of spiclomazine on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, and further clarified the mechanisms that spiclomazine induced apoptosis associated with the suppression of migration and invasion.

  9. Spiclomazine Induces Apoptosis Associated with the Suppression of Cell Viability, Migration and Invasion in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuojia; Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2013-01-01

    The effective treatment for pancreatic carcinoma remains critically needed. Herein, this current study showed that spiclomazine treatment caused a reduction in viability in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines CFPAC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 in vitro. It was notable in this regard that, compared with pancreatic carcinoma cells, normal human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and liver (HL-7702) cells were more resistant to the antigrowth effect of spiclomazine. Biochemically, spiclomazine treatment regulated the expression of protein levels in the apoptosis related pathways. Consistent with this effect, spiclomazine reduced the mitochondria membrane potential, elevated reactive oxygen species, and activated caspase-3/9. In addition, a key finding from this study was that spiclomazine suppressed migration and invasion of cancer cells through down-regulation of MMP-2/9. Collectively, the proposed studies did shed light on the antiproliferation effect of spiclomazine on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, and further clarified the mechanisms that spiclomazine induced apoptosis associated with the suppression of migration and invasion. PMID:23840452

  10. Effect of HIF-1α on VEGF-C Induced Lymphangiogenesis and Lymph Nodes Metastases of Pancreatic Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Jing; LI Tao; LI Kai; XIONG Jiongxin; YANG Zhiyong; WU Heshui; WANG Chunyou

    2006-01-01

    The effect of hypoxia inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1α) on vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) and the correlation between HIF-1α and lymphangiogenesis and lymph nodes metastases (LNM) in pancreatic cancer were investigated. Immunohistochemical SP method was used to detect the protein expression of HIF-1α and VEGF-C, and Lymphatic vessel density (LVD) was determined by stain of VEGFR-3, collagen type Ⅳ in 75 pancreatic head cancers from regional pancreatectomy (RP) during Dec. 2001 to Dec. 2003. The relationship between HIF-1α and VEGF-C, lymphangiogenesis, LNM was analyzed statistically. The results showed that the positive expression rate of HIF-1α and VEGF-C in pancreatic cancer tissues was 48.00 % (36/75) and 65.33 % (49/75) respectively. In positive group of HIF-1α, the positive rate of VEGF-C and LVD, and LVD rate was 80.56 % (29/36), 13.22±3.76 and 88.89 % (32/36) respectively, and in negative group of HIF-1α,positive rate of VEGF-C and LVD was 51.28 % (20/39), 5.98±2.17 and 66.67 % (26/39) respectively (P<0.01 or P<0.05). It was suggested that HIF-1α could promote the expression of VEGF-C, lymphangiogenesis and LNM in pancreatic cancer.

  11. CCR7 regulates Twist to induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kexin; Xu, Baofeng; Xu, Guangying; Liu, Rui

    2016-01-01

    As reported, the CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) trigger a series of signaling cascades in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of some malignancies. Meanwhile, Twist promotes EMT in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) progression. Here, effects of Twist on CCR7-induced EMT in the PDAC were investigated in detail. The immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of Twist, and then, in vitro assays were applied. The expression rate of Twist was 72.0 % in PDAC samples and closely correlated with tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage and invasion. When PDAC cell line PANC1 was subjected to CCL19 stimulation, the expression of p-ERK, p-AKT, Twist, N-cadherin, MMP9, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was induced, while the GSK1120212, BEZ235, and MK2206 prohibited the increase of Twist and EMT biomarkers. For another thing, the si-Twist treatment attenuated CCL19-stimulated EMT occurrence, migration, and invasion phenotypes of PANC1 cells. In conclusion, CCR7 pathway up-regulates Twist expression via ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling to manage the EMT of PDAC. Our work allows for clinical gene or protein-targeted regimen of PDAC patients in the near future.

  12. Oxidative stress and nitric oxide in rats with alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gülnur Andican; Remisa Gelisgen; Gülden Burcak; Ethem Unal; Osman Baran Tortum; Tayfun Karahasanoglu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Oxygen free radical mediated tissue damage is well established in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP).Whether nitric oxide (NO) plays a deleterious or a protective role is unknown. In alcohol-induced AP, we studied NO, lipooxidative damage and glutathione in pancreas, lung and circulation.METHODS: AP was induced in rats (n = 25) by injection of ethyl alcohol into the common biliary duct. A sham laparatomy was performed in controls (n = 15). After 24 h the animals were killed, blood and tissue sampling were done.RESULTS: Histopathologic evidence confirmed the development of AP. Marked changes were observed in the pulmonary tissue. Compared with controls, the AP group displayed higher values for NO metabolites in pancreas and lungs, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in circulation. Glutathione was lower in pancreas and in circulation. Glutathione and NO were positively correlated in pancreas and lungs of controls but negatively correlated in circulation of experimental group. In the experimental group, plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were negatively correlated with pancreas thiobarbituric acid reactive substances but positively correlated with pancreas NO.CONCLUSION: NO increases in both pancreas and lungs in AP and NO contributes to the pathogenesis of AP under oxidative stress.

  13. p16(Ink4a)-induced senescence of pancreatic beta cells enhances insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helman, Aharon; Klochendler, Agnes; Azazmeh, Narmen; Gabai, Yael; Horwitz, Elad; Anzi, Shira; Swisa, Avital; Condiotti, Reba; Granit, Roy Z; Nevo, Yuval; Fixler, Yaakov; Shreibman, Dorin; Zamir, Amit; Tornovsky-Babeay, Sharona; Dai, Chunhua; Glaser, Benjamin; Powers, Alvin C; Shapiro, A M James; Magnuson, Mark A; Dor, Yuval; Ben-Porath, Ittai

    2016-04-01

    Cellular senescence is thought to contribute to age-associated deterioration of tissue physiology. The senescence effector p16(Ink4a) is expressed in pancreatic beta cells during aging and limits their proliferative potential; however, its effects on beta cell function are poorly characterized. We found that beta cell-specific activation of p16(Ink4a) in transgenic mice enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). In mice with diabetes, this leads to improved glucose homeostasis, providing an unexpected functional benefit. Expression of p16(Ink4a) in beta cells induces hallmarks of senescence--including cell enlargement, and greater glucose uptake and mitochondrial activity--which promote increased insulin secretion. GSIS increases during the normal aging of mice and is driven by elevated p16(Ink4a) activity. We found that islets from human adults contain p16(Ink4a)-expressing senescent beta cells and that senescence induced by p16(Ink4a) in a human beta cell line increases insulin secretion in a manner dependent, in part, on the activity of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ proteins. Our findings reveal a novel role for p16(Ink4a) and cellular senescence in promoting insulin secretion by beta cells and in regulating normal functional tissue maturation with age.

  14. Role of antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant compound probucol in antiradical protection of pancreatic beta-cells during alloxan-induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankin, V Z; Korchin, V I; Konovalova, G G; Lisina, M O; Tikhaze, A K; Akmaev, I G

    2004-01-01

    The severity of disturbances in carbohydrate metabolism in rats with alloxan-induced diabetes depended on activity of antioxidant enzymes in the target organ (pancreas). Damage to the pancreas is related to intensive generation of reactive oxygen species, free radicals, and lipid peroxides. Alloxan-induced diabetes in rats is a free radical disease, which in vivo serves as a useful model for the search for pharmacological preparations with antiradical and antioxidant properties. The antioxidant compound probucol indirectly increased activity of antioxidant enzymes in the pancreas and prevented the development of alloxan-induced diabetes in rats. Our results indicate that different sensitivity of laboratory animals of various species (rats and guinea pigs) to the influence of alloxan is associated with abnormal variations in activity of enzymes utilizing reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides in mammalian pancreatic cells.

  15. Concurrent PEDF deficiency and Kras mutation induce invasive pancreatic cancer and adipose-rich stroma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippo, Paul J; Fitchev, Philip S; Bentrem, David J; Melstrom, Laleh G; Dangi-Garimella, Surabhi; Krantz, Seth B; Heiferman, Michael J; Chung, Chuhan; Adrian, Kevin; Cornwell, Mona L; Flesche, Jan B; Rao, Sambasiva M; Talamonti, Mark S; Munshi, Hidayatullah G; Crawford, Susan E

    2012-10-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a non-inhibitory SERPIN with potent antiangiogenic activity, has been recently implicated in metabolism and adipogenesis, both of which are known to influence pancreatic cancer progression. Increased pancreatic fat in human pancreatic tumour correlates with greater tumour dissemination while PEDF deficiency in mice promotes pancreatic hyperplasia and visceral obesity. Oncogenic Ras, the most common mutation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), has similarly been shown to promote adipogenesis and premalignant lesions. In order to determine whether concurrent loss of PEDF is sufficient to promote adipogenesis and tumorigenesis in the pancreas, the authors ablated PEDF in an EL-Kras(G12D) mouse model of non-invasive cystic papillary neoplasms. EL-Kras(G12D)/PEDF deficient mice developed invasive PDAC associated with enhanced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression and increased peripancreatic fat with adipocyte hypertrophy and intrapancreatic adipocyte infiltration (pancreatic steatosis). In support of increased adipogenesis, the stroma of the pancreas of EL-Kras(G12D)/PEDF deficient mice demonstrated higher tissue levels of two lipid droplet associated proteins, tail-interacting protein 47 (TIP47, perilipin 3) and adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP, Pperilipin 2), while adipose triglyceride lipase, a key factor in lipolysis, was decreased. In patients with PDAC, both tissue and serum levels of PEDF were decreased, stromal TIP47 expression was higher and the tissue VEGF to PEDF ratio was increased (p<0.05). These data highlight the importance of lipid metabolism in the tumour microenvironment and identify PEDF as a critical negative regulator of both adiposity and tumour invasion in the pancreas.

  16. Increased incidence of azathioprine-induced pancreatitis in Crohn's disease compared with other diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weersma, RK; Peters, FTM; Oostenbrug, LE; Van den Berg, AP; Van Haastert, M; Ploeg, RJ; Posthumus, MD; Van der Heide, JJH; Jansen, PLM; Van Dullemen, HM

    2004-01-01

    Background: Azathioprine is widely used in Crohn's disease. A major drawback is the occurrence of side-effects, especially acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis is rarely seen when azathioprine is used for other diseases than Crohn's disease. Aim: To survey side-effects of azathioprine after liver

  17. Increased incidence of azathioprine-induced pancreatitis in Crohn's disease compared with other diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weersma, RK; Peters, FTM; Oostenbrug, LE; Van den Berg, AP; Van Haastert, M; Ploeg, RJ; Posthumus, MD; Van der Heide, JJH; Jansen, PLM; Van Dullemen, HM

    2004-01-01

    Background: Azathioprine is widely used in Crohn's disease. A major drawback is the occurrence of side-effects, especially acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis is rarely seen when azathioprine is used for other diseases than Crohn's disease. Aim: To survey side-effects of azathioprine after liver

  18. Mathematical models of electrical activity of the pancreatic β-cell: a physiological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix-Martínez, Gerardo J; Godínez-Fernández, J Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of the electrical activity of the pancreatic β-cell has been extremely important for understanding the cellular mechanisms involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Several models have been proposed over the last 30 y, growing in complexity as experimental evidence of the cellular mechanisms involved has become available. Almost all the models have been developed based on experimental data from rodents. However, given the many important differences between species, models of human β-cells have recently been developed. This review summarizes how modeling of β-cells has evolved, highlighting the proposed physiological mechanisms underlying β-cell electrical activity.

  19. Effect of resveratrol on activation of nuclear factor kappa-B and inflammatory factors in rat model of acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Meng; Qing-Yong Ma; Xiao-Ping Kou; Jun Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effect of resveratrol on nuclear factor Kappa-B (NF-κB) activation and the inflammatory response in sodium taurocholate-induced pancreatitis in rats.METHODS: Seventy-two male SD rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham operation group (control),severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) group, and severe acute pancreatitis group treated with resveratrol (RES). A SAP model was established by injecting 4% sodium taurocholate 1 mL/kg through puncturing the pancreatic duct. In Res group, Res was given at 30 mg/kg b.m. intraperitoneally after the SAP model was successfully established. Eight animals from each group were sacrificed at 3, 6 and 12 h after modeling. The expression of NF-κB activation of pancreas was detected by immunohistochemical staining, whereas the levels of TNF-α and IL-8 in pancreatic tissues were estimated by radioimmunoassay. The pathological changes of pancreas and lungs were examined microscopically.RESULTS: Much less hyperemia, edema, dust-colored necrotic focus and soaps were noticed in pancreas in RES group than in SAP group. In RES group, hemorrhage,exudates and infiltration of inflammatory cells in pancreas and interstitial edema, destruction of alveolar wall in lung were significantly less than in SAP group. In the SAP group,the activation of NF-κB in pancreatic tissues was enhanced significantly at any measure point compared with control group (64.23±10.72% vs2.56±0.65%, 55.86±11.34% vs 2.32±0.42%, 36.23±2.30% vs 2.40±0.36% ,P <0.01), TNF-α,IL-8 were also increased and reached their peak at 6 h and then declined. The activation of NF-κB and the levels of TNF-α and IL-8 in RES group were significantly lower than those in SAP group (P<0.01): activation (52.63±9.45% vs 64.23±10.72%, 40.52±8.40% vs 55.86±11.34%, 29.83±5.37% vs36.23±2.30%), TN-α (132.76±15.68 pg/mL vs 158.36±12.58 pg/mL, 220.32±23.57 pg/mL vs 247.67± 11.62 pg/mL, 175.68±18.43 pg/mL vs 197.35±12.57 pg/mL) and IL-8 (0.62±0.21

  20. Berberine induces apoptosis via ROS generation in PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2 pancreatic cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.H. [Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, J.H. [Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, E.J. [Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Ansan University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, N. [Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-12

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death. Gemcitabine is widely used as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, but the prognosis is still poor. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from a variety of natural herbs, possesses a variety of pharmacological properties including anticancer effects. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of berberine and compared its use with that of gemcitabine in the pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2. Berberine inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. After berberine treatment, the G1 phase of PANC-1 cells increased by 10% compared to control cells, and the G1 phase of MIA-PaCa2 cells was increased by 2%. Whereas gemcitabine exerts antiproliferation effects through S-phase arrest, our results showed that berberine inhibited proliferation by inducing G1-phase arrest. Berberine-induced apoptosis of PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2 cells increased by 7 and 2% compared to control cells, respectively. Notably, berberine had a greater apoptotic effect in PANC-1 cells than gemcitabine. Upon treatment of PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2 with berberine at a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}), apoptosis was induced by a mechanism that involved the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) rather than caspase 3/7 activation. Our findings showed that berberine had anti-cancer effects and may be an effective drug for pancreatic cancer chemotherapy.

  1. 1H-NMR and photochemically-induced dynamic nuclear polarization studies on bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egmond, M R; Slotboom, A J; De Haas, G H; Dijkstra, K; Kaptein, R

    1980-06-26

    Proton-NMR resonances of trytophan 3 and tyrosine 69 in bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2, its pro-enzyme and in Ala1-transaminated protein were assigned using photochemically-induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) as such or in combination with spin-echo measurements. In addition assignments were made by suppression of cross-relaxation effects using short (0.1 s) high-power laser pulses.

  2. Role of hormonal axis, growth hormone - IGF-1, in the therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the course of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceranowicz, D; Warzecha, Z; Dembinski, A; Ceranowicz, P; Cieszkowski, J; Kusnierz-Cabala, B; Tomaszewska, R; Kuwahara, A; Kato, I

    2010-10-01

    Ghrelin is a ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor and stimulates release of growth hormone (GH). Recent studies have shown that treatment with ghrelin exhibits protective and therapeutic effect in the course of experimental pancreatitis. The aim of present study was to examine the role of GH and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in these effects. Acute pancreatitis was induced by cerulein. Study was performed on pituitary-intact hypophysectomized rats. Ghrelin was administered twice a day at the dose of 8 nmol/kg/dose. IGF-1 was given twice a day at the dose of 20 nmol/kg/dose. The severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed 0 h or 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 days after the last dose of cerulein. Administration of cerulein led to the development of acute edematous pancreatitis. In pituitary-intact rats, treatment with ghrelin reduced biochemical indexes of the severity of acute pancreatitis and morphological signs of pancreatic damage, leading to faster regeneration of the pancreas reduction in serum concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β and decrease in serum activity of amylase and lipase. These effects were accompanied with an improvement of pancreatic blood flow and an increase in pancreatic DNA synthesis. Hypophysectomy delayed the healing of the pancreas and abolished the therapeutic effect of ghrelin. In hypophysectomized rats with pancreatitis, treatment with IGF-1 exhibits therapeutic effect similar to that observed in ghrelin-treated rats with the intact pituitary. We conclude that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in cerulein-induced pancreatitis is indirect and depends on the release of GH and IGF-1.

  3. Alteration of chaperonin60 and pancreatic enzyme in pancreatic acinar cell under pathological condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Yu Li; Moise Bendayan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the changes of chaperonin60 (Cpn60)and pancreatic enzymes in pancreatic acinar cells, and to explore their roles in the development of experimental diabetes and acute pancreatitis (AP).METHODS: Two different pathological models were replicated in Sprague-Dawley rats: streptozotocininduced diabetes and sodium deoxycholate-induced AP. The contents of Cpn60 and pancreatic enzymes in different compartments of the acinar cells were measured by quantitative immunocytochemistry.RESULTS: The levels of Cpn60 significantly increased in diabetes, but decreased in AP, especially in the zymogen granules of the pancreatic acinar cells. The elevation of Cpn60 was accompanied with the increased levels of pancreatic lipase and chymotrypsinogen in diabetes.However, a decreased Cpn60 level was accompanied by high levels of lipase and chymotrypsinogen in AP.The amylase level was markedly reduced in both the pathological conditions.CONCLUSION: The equilibrium between Cpn60 and pancreatic enzymes in the acinar cells breaks in AP, and Cpn60 content decreases, suggesting an insufficient chaperone capacity. This may promote the aggregation and autoactivation of the premature enzymes in the pancreatic acinar cells and play roles in the development of AP.

  4. Noninvasive Assessment of Losartan-Induced Increase in Functional Microvasculature and Drug Delivery in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhya Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Losartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, can reduce desmoplasia and enhance drug delivery and efficacy through improving interstitial transport and vascular perfusion in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC models in mice. The purpose of this study was to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs and micro–positron emission tomography (PET measurements could respectively detect improvements in tumor vascular parameters and drug uptake in orthotopic PDAC in mice treated with losartan. METHOD AND MATERIALS: All experiments were approved by the local Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. FVB mice with orthotopic PDAC were treated daily with an i.p. injection of losartan (70 mg/kg or saline (control vehicle for 5 days. In order to calculate the fractional blood volume, vessel size index, and vessel density index, MRI was performed at 4.7 T following the injection of 3 mg/kg iron ferumoxytol (i.v.. Dynamic PET images were also acquired for 60 minutes using an 18F-5FU tracer dose of 200 μCi and analyzed for time activity curves normalized to muscle. Statistical analyses compared both cohorts using an unpaired two-tailed t test. RESULTS: In comparison to the control treatment, the losartan administration significantly increased the fractional blood volume (mean ± SEM [12.1 ± 1.7 (n = 19 vs 6.7 ± 1.1 (n = 20; P < .02] and vessel size index (128.2 ± 35.6 vs 57.5 ± 18; P < .05. Losartan also induced a significant increase in the intratumoral uptake of 18F-5FU by 53% (P < .0001. CONCLUSION: MRI using FDA-approved MNPs provides a noninvasive, translatable means of assaying microvascular parameters induced by losartan in pancreatic cancer. PET measurements demonstrated that losartan significantly increased the uptake of 18F-5FU.

  5. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V.; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Gerasimenko, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca2+ signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca2+ elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca2+ signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5–10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca2+ release followed by Ca2+ entry and also substantially reduced Ca2+ extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca2+ signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca2+ signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ entry by the Ca2+ channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca2+ entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377732

  6. Polypharmacy and risk of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Dan; Lindblad, Mats; Bexelius, Tomas; Oskarsson, Viktor; Sadr-Azodi, Omid; Ljung, Rickard

    2016-11-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis is receiving increased medical and epidemiological attention. However, as no study has examined the role of polypharmacy per se in the development of acute pancreatitis, we examined the association between polypharmacy and risk of acute pancreatitis. A nationwide case-control study was conducted between 2006 and 2008 of Swedish people aged 40-84 years. The Swedish Patient Register was used to identify 6161 cases of first-episode acute pancreatitis. The Swedish Register of the Total Population was used to randomly select 61 637 controls from the general population using frequency-based density sampling, matched for age, sex, and calendar year. The Swedish Prescribed Drug Register was used to assess polypharmacy, defined as the number of unique drugs prescribed during the last 6 months before the index date (i.e. the date of acute pancreatitis for cases and a random date for controls). Odds ratios (ORs), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), of acute pancreatitis were estimated by unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for matching variables and potential confounding factors. The number of prescribed drugs was associated with a dose-dependent increase in the risk of acute pancreatitis. In the multivariable-adjusted model, compared to those without any prescriptions, the OR was 1.69 (95%CI: 1.55-1.86) for persons with 1-2 drugs, 2.40 (2.20-2.62) for 3-5 drugs, 3.17 (2.88-3.48) for 6-9 drugs, and 4.57 (4.12-5.06) for 10 or more drugs. This population-based case-control study shows a dose-dependent association between increasing polypharmacy and risk of acute pancreatitis. These findings provide further insights into drug-induced pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. CCR2 knockout exacerbates cerulein-induced chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia via decreased GLP-1 receptor expression and insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuji; Kanai, Takanori; Saeki, Keita; Takabe, Miho; Irie, Junichiro; Miyoshi, Jun; Mikami, Yohei; Teratani, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Takahiro; Miyata, Naoteru; Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Yamagishi, Yoshiyuki; Higuchi, Hajime; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Hozawa, Shigenari; Saito, Hidetsugu; Itoh, Hiroshi; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) promotes insulin release; however, the relationship between the GLP-1 signal and chronic pancreatitis is not well understood. Here we focus on chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and its receptor (CCR2) axis, which regulates various immune cells, including macrophages, to clarify the mechanism of GLP-1-mediated insulin secretion in chronic pancreatitis in mice. One and multiple series of repetitive cerulein administrations were used to induce acute and chronic cerulein pancreatitis, respectively. Acute cerulein-administered CCR2-knockout (KO) mice showed suppressed infiltration of CD11b(+)Gr-1(low) macrophages and pancreatic inflammation and significantly upregulated insulin secretion compared with paired wild-type (WT) mice. However, chronic cerulein-administered CCR2-KO mice showed significantly increased infiltration of CD11b(+)/Gr-1(-) and CD11b(+)/Gr-1(high) cells, but not CD11b(+)/Gr-1(low) cells, in pancreas with severe inflammation and significantly decreased insulin secretion compared with their WT counterparts. Furthermore, although serum GLP-1 levels in chronic cerulein-administered WT and CCR2-KO mice were comparably upregulated after cerulein administrations, GLP-1 receptor levels in pancreases of chronic cerulein-administered CCR2-KO mice were significantly lower than in paired WT mice. Nevertheless, a significantly higher hyperglycemia level in chronic cerulein-administered CCR2-KO mice was markedly restored by treatment with a GLP-1 analog to a level comparable to the paired WT mice. Collectively, the CCR2/CCL2 axis-mediated CD11b(+)-cell migration to the pancreas is critically involved in chronic pancreatitis-mediated hyperglycemia through the modulation of GLP-1 receptor expression and insulin secretion.

  8. Targeted radiotherapy with {sup 177} Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M. A de; Pedraza L, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rodriguez C, J. [Faculty of Medicine, UAEM, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ferro F, G. [ININ, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Murphy S, E. [Hospital Santelena, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses and to evaluate {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells, which over-express somatostatin receptors, were injected in athymic mice and 20 days later the mean tumour size was 3.08 square cm (n=3). A mean of 86.3 MBq {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE, was injected in a tail vein and 19 days after therapy the size of the tumours was 0.81 square cm. There was a partial relapse and after 16 days, when sacrificed, the mean tumour size was 8.28 cubic cm. An epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidney of one treated mouse was found. The tumour of the control mouse was 8.61 cubic cm when sacrificed 14 days after tumour induction. Radiotherapy estimates to the tumours was 35.9-39.7 Gy and the tumours might have been completely reduced with a second therapy dose. These preliminary studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that Lu-{sup 177}-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man, considering kidney radiation. (Author)

  9. Targeted radiotherapy with {sup 177} Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez C, J.; Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ferro F, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Murphy S, E. [Hospital Santelena, 06000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for peptide receptor targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses after administration of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE in mice as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells expressing somatostatin receptors, were implanted in athymic mice (n=18) to obtain the {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE biokinetics and dosimetry. To estimate its therapeutic efficacy 87 MBq were injected in a tail vein of 3 mice and 19 days p.i. there were a partial relapse. There was an epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidneys of mouse III. The absorbed dose to tumour, kidney and pancreas was 50.5 {+-} 7.2 Gy, 17.5 {+-} 2.5 Gy and 12.6 {+-} 2.3 Gy respectively. These studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man considering its kidney radiotoxicity. (Author)

  10. Tissue microarrays in pathological examination of apoptotic acinar cells induced by dexamethasone in the pancreas of rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Zhang; Hua Tian; Bei Lu; Li Chen; Ru-Jun Xu; Ke-Yi Wang; Zhi-Wei Wang; Qi-Hui Cheng; Hai-Ping Shen

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The good therapeutic effects of large dose of dexamethasone on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) patients have been proved. This study was designed to investigate the inlfuence of dexamethasone on apoptosis of acinar cells in the pancreas of rats with SAP and the protein expression of the apoptosis-regulating genes Bax and Bcl-2. METHODS: Ninety Sprague-Dawley rats with SAP were randomly divided into a model group and a dexamethasone treated group (45 rats in each group), and another 45 rats formed the sham operation group. Survival rates were calculated and gross pathological changes in the pancreas of each group were observed under a light microscope 3, 6 and 12 hours after operation. Tissue microarray technology was applied to prepare pancreatic tissue sections. The changes in Bax and Bcl-2 protein expression levels of pancreatic tissues from each group were assessed by immunohistochemical staining, and TUNEL staining was used to evaluate changes in apoptosis index. RESULTS: The model and treated groups did not differ in mortality at each time point. The pathological score for the pancreas in the treated group was signiifcantly lower than that in the model group at 3 and 6 hours. The positive rates of Bax protein expression in the head and tail of the pancreas in the treated group at all time points were all markedly higher than those of the model group. The positive rate of Bcl-2 protein expression in the head of the pancreas in the treated group was signiifcantly higher than that of the model group at 3 hours. TUNEL staining showed that the pancreas head and tail apoptosis indices of the treated group were markedly higher than those of the model group after 6 hours. CONCLUSIONS: Apoptosis may be a protective response to pancreatic cell injury. The mechanism of action of dexamethasone in treating SAP may be related to the apoptosis of acinar cells in the pancreas induced by apoptosis-regulating genes such as Bax and Bcl-2. The advantages of tissue

  11. Preparation method of an ideal model of multiple organ injury of rat with severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Zhang; Qian Ye; Xin-Ge Jiang; Mei-Li Ma; Fei-Bo Zhu; Rui-Ping Zhang; Qi-Hui Cheng

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To establish an ideal model of multiple organ injury of rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).METHODS: SAP models were induced by retrograde injection of 0.1 mL/100 g 3.5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct of Sprague-Dawley rats.The plasma and samples of multiple organ tissues of rats were collected at 3, 6 and 12 h after modeling. The ascites volume, ascites/body weight ratio, and contents of amylase, endotoxin, endothelin-1 (ET-1), nitrogen monoxidum (NO), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) in plasma were determined. The histological changes of multiple organs were observed under light microscope.RESULTS: The ascites volume, ascites/body weight ratio, and contents of various inflammatory mediators in blood were higher in the model group than in the sham operation group at all time points [2.38 (1.10), 2.58(0.70), 2.54 (0.71) vs 0.20 (0.04), 0.30 (0.30), 0.22 (0.10)at 3, 6 and 12 h in ascites/body weight ratio; 1582 (284),1769 (362), 1618 (302) (U/L) vs 5303 (1373), 6276(1029), 7538 (2934) (U/L) at 3, 6 and 12 h in Amylase;0.016 (0.005), 0.016 (0.010), 0.014 (0.015) (EU/mL) vs0.053 (0.029), 0.059 (0.037), 0.060 (0.022) (EU/mL)at 3, 6 and 12 h in Endotoxin; 3.900 (3.200), 4.000(1.700), 5.300 (3.000) (ng/L) vs 41.438 (37.721), 92.151(23.119), 65.016 (26.806) (ng/L) at 3, 6 and 12 hin TNF-α, all P < 0.01]. Visible congestion, edema and lamellar necrosis and massive leukocytic infiltration were found in the pancreas of rats of model group. There were also pathological changes of lung, liver, kidney,ileum, lymphonode, thymus, myocardium and brain.CONCLUSION: This rat model features reliability,convenience and a high achievement ratio. Complicated with multiple organ injury, it is an ideal animal model of SAP.

  12. Sesamin Ameliorates Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang; Wang, Guo-Dong; Ma, Ming-Zhe; Deng, Ru-Yuan; Guo, Li-Qun; Zhang, Jun-Xiu; Yang, Jie-Ren; Su, Qing

    2015-06-09

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the direct modulators of β-cells, have been shown to cause insulin-producing β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis through increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Sesamin has been demonstrated to possess antioxidative activity. This study was designed to investigate whether sesamin protects against AGEs-evoked β-cell damage via its antioxidant property. The effects of sesamin were examined in C57BL/6J mice and MIN6 cell line. In in vivo studies, mice were intraperitoneally injected with AGEs (120 mg/kg) and orally treated with sesamin (160 mg/kg) for four weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin releasing tests were performed. Insulin content, ROS generation and β-cell apoptosis in pancreatic islets were also measured. In in vitro studies, MIN6 cells were pretreated with sesamin (50 or 100 μM) and then exposed to AGEs (200 mg/L) for 24 h. Insulin secretion, β-cell death, ROS production as well as expression and activity of NADPH oxidase were determined. Sesamin treatment obviously ameliorated AGE-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro. These effects were associated with decreased ROS production, down-regulated expression of p67(phox) and p22(phox), and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. These results suggest that sesamin protects β-cells from damage caused by AGEs through suppressing NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress.

  13. Pancreatic Kininogenase Ameliorates Renal Fibrosis in Streptozotocin Induced-Diabetic Nephropathy Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: We aimed to evaluate whether pancreatic kininogenase (PKase can relieve renal fibrosis and investigate its mechanisms in diabetic nephropathy (DN rats Methods: We established streptozotocin (STZ induced-DN rats. After treatment with PKase for 4 weeks, urinary weight, urinary protein content and blood glucose concentration were detected, and then renal histopathological changes were examined using Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E and Masson's thrchrome staining. In addition, the expressions of miR-433, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 and antizyme inhibitor 1 (Azin1 were detected by qRT-PCR and/or western blotting. Results: PKase reduced urinary weight, urinary protein contents and blood glucose concentrations. PKase treated DN rats exhibited less renal fibrosis than untreated DN rats (P P P Conclusions: PKase might not only inhibit the development of DN by reducing urinary weight, urinary protein content and blood glucose concentration in DN rats, but also relieve renal fibrosis in DN rats through inhibiting the expression of TGF-β1, and miR-433 and Azin1 might involve in this process.

  14. Sesamin Ameliorates Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Kong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs, the direct modulators of β-cells, have been shown to cause insulin-producing β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis through increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Sesamin has been demonstrated to possess antioxidative activity. This study was designed to investigate whether sesamin protects against AGEs-evoked β-cell damage via its antioxidant property. The effects of sesamin were examined in C57BL/6J mice and MIN6 cell line. In in vivo studies, mice were intraperitoneally injected with AGEs (120 mg/kg and orally treated with sesamin (160 mg/kg for four weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin releasing tests were performed. Insulin content, ROS generation and β-cell apoptosis in pancreatic islets were also measured. In in vitro studies, MIN6 cells were pretreated with sesamin (50 or 100 μM and then exposed to AGEs (200 mg/L for 24 h. Insulin secretion, β-cell death, ROS production as well as expression and activity of NADPH oxidase were determined. Sesamin treatment obviously ameliorated AGE-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro. These effects were associated with decreased ROS production, down-regulated expression of p67phox and p22phox, and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. These results suggest that sesamin protects β-cells from damage caused by AGEs through suppressing NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress.

  15. MUC1 induces drug resistance in pancreatic cancer cells via upregulation of multidrug resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, S; Daneshvar, K; Roy, L D; Grover, P; Kidiyoor, A; Mosley, L; Sahraei, M; Mukherjee, P

    2013-06-17

    MUC1 (CD227), a membrane tethered mucin glycoprotein, is overexpressed in >60% of human pancreatic cancers (PCs), and is associated with poor prognosis, enhanced metastasis and chemoresistance. The objective of this study was to delineate the mechanism by which MUC1 induces drug resistance in human (BxPC3 and Capan-1) and mouse (KCKO, KCM) PC cells. We report that PC cells that express high levels of MUC1 exhibit increased resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs (gemcitabine and etoposide) in comparison with cells that express low levels of MUC1. This chemo resistance was attributed to the enhanced expression of multidrug resistance (MDR) genes including ABCC1, ABCC3, ABCC5 and ABCB1. In particular, levels of MRP1 protein encoded by the ABCC1 gene were significantly higher in the MUC1-high PC cells. In BxPC3 and Capan-1 cells MUC1 upregulates MRP1 via an Akt-dependent pathway, whereas in KCM cells MUC1-mediated MRP1 upregulation is via an Akt-independent mechanism. In KCM, BxPC3 and Capan-1 cells, the cytoplasmic tail motif of MUC1 associates directly with the promoter region of the Abcc1/ABCC1 gene, indicating a possible role of MUC1 acting as a transcriptional regulator of this gene. This is the first report to show that MUC1 can directly regulate the expression of MDR genes in PC cells, and thus confer drug resistance.

  16. Ultrasound-guided direct delivery of 3-bromopyruvate blocks tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shinichi; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Buijs, Manon; Wijlemans, Joost W; Kwak, Byung Kook; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2013-06-01

    Studies in animal models of cancer have demonstrated that targeting tumor metabolism can be an effective anticancer strategy. Previously, we showed that inhibition of glucose metabolism by the pyruvate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), induces anticancer effects both in vitro and in vivo. We have also documented that intratumoral delivery of 3-BrPA affects tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor model of human liver cancer. However, the efficacy of such an approach in a clinically relevant orthotopic tumor model has not been reported. Here, we investigated the feasibility of ultrasound (US) image-guided delivery of 3-BrPA in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer and evaluated its therapeutic efficacy. In vitro, treatment of Panc-1 cells with 3-BrPA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability. The loss of viability correlated with a dose-dependent decrease in the intracellular ATP level and lactate production confirming that disruption of energy metabolism underlies these 3-BrPA-mediated effects. In vivo, US-guided delivery of 3-BrPA was feasible and effective as demonstrated by a marked decrease in tumor size on imaging. Further, the antitumor effect was confirmed by (1) a decrease in the proliferative potential by Ki-67 immunohistochemical staining and (2) the induction of apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphospate nick end labeling staining. We therefore demonstrate the technical feasibility of US-guided intratumoral injection of 3-BrPA in a mouse model of human pancreatic cancer as well as its therapeutic efficacy. Our data suggest that this new therapeutic approach consisting of a direct intratumoral injection of antiglycolytic agents may represent an exciting opportunity to treat patients with pancreas cancer.

  17. Fisetin attenuates cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis through down regulation of JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Il-Joo; Bae, Gi-Sang; Choi, Sun Bok; Kim, Dong-Goo; Shin, Joon-Yeon; Seo, Seung-Hee; Choi, Mee-Ok; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2014-08-15

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a complicated disease which is largely undiscovered. Fisetin, a natural flavonoid from fruits and vegetables, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-cancer activities in various disease models. However, the effects of fisetin on AP have not been determined. Pre- and post- treatment of mice with fisetin reduced the severity of AP and pancreatitis-associated lung injury and inhibited several biochemical parameters (pancreatic weight to body weight ratio, amylase, lipase, and myeloperoxidase activity) and production of inflammatory cytokines. In pancreatic acinar cells, fisetin also inhibited cell death and production of inflammatory cytokines. In addition, fisetin inhibited activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, these results suggest that fisetin exhibits anti-inflammatory effect on AP and could be a beneficial agent in the treatment of AP and its pulmonary complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ferulic acid prevents methylglyoxal-induced protein glycation, DNA damage, and apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sompong, Weerachat; Cheng, Henrique; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2017-02-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) can react with amino acids of proteins to induce protein glycation and consequently the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Previous studies reported that ferulic acid (FA) prevented glucose-, fructose-, and ribose-induced protein glycation. In this study, FA (0.1-1 mM) inhibited MG-induced protein glycation and oxidative protein damage in bovine serum albumin (BSA). Furthermore, FA (0.0125-0.2 mM) protected against lysine/MG-mediated oxidative DNA damage, thereby inhibiting superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical generation during lysine and MG reaction. In addition, FA did not have the ability to trap MG. Finally, FA (0.1 mM) pretreatment attenuated MG-induced decrease in cell viability and prevented MG-induced cell apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells. The results suggest that FA is capable of protecting β-cells from MG-induced cell damage during diabetes.

  19. Apoptosis of pancreatic cancer BXPC-3 cells induced by indole-3-acetic acid in combination with horseradish peroxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Huang; Lu-Sheng Si; Li-Ying Liu; Tu-Sheng Song; Lei Ni; Ling Yang; Xiao-Yan Hu; Jing-Song Hu; Li-Ping Song; Yu Luo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the mechanisms underlying the apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer BXPC-3 cells induced by indole-3-acetic acid (TAA) in combination with horseradish peroxidase (HRP).METHODS: BXPC-3 cells derived from human pancreatic cancer were exposed to 40 or 80 μmol/L IAA and 1.2 μg/mL HRP at different times. Then, MTT assay was used to detect the cell proliferation. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze cell cycle. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferasemediated dUTP nick end labeling assay was used to detect apoptosis. 2,7-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate uptake was measured by confocal microscopy to determine free radicals. Level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured by biochemical methods.RESULTS: IAA/HRP initiated growth inhibition of BXPC-3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry revealed that the cells treated for 48 h were arrested at G1/G0. After exposure to 80 μmol/L IAA plus 1.2 μg/mL HRP for 72 h, the apoptosis rate increased to 72.5‰,which was nine times that of control. Content of MDA and activity of SOD increased respectively after treatment compared to control. Meanwhile, IAA/HRP stimulated the formation of free radicals.CONCLUSION: The combination of IAA and HRP can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic cancer BXPC-3 cells in vitro by inducing apoptosis.

  20. MicroRNA-21 induces 5-fluorouracil resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells by regulating PTEN and PDCD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xueju; Wang, Weibin; Wang, Lanlan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xian; Chen, Mingtai; Wang, Fang; Yu, Jia; Ma, Yanni; Sun, Guotao

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients are often resistant to chemotherapy treatment, which results in poor prognosis. The objective of this study was to delineate the mechanism by which miR-21 induces drug resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human pancreatic cancer cells (PATU8988 and PANC-1). We report that PATU8988 cells resistant to 5-FU express high levels of miR-21 in comparison to sensitive primary PATU8988 cells. Suppression of miR-21 expression in 5-Fu-resistant PATU8988 cells can alleviate its 5-FU resistance. Meanwhile, lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of miR-21 not only conferred resistance to 5-FU but also promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion of PATU8988 and PANC-1 cells. The proresistance effects of miR-21 were attributed to the attenuated expression of tumor suppressor genes, including PTEN and PDCD4. Overexpression of PTEN and PDCD4 antagonized miR-21-induced resistance to 5-FU and migration activity. Our work demonstrates that miR-21 can confer drug resistance to 5-FU in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating the expression of tumor suppressor genes, as the target genes of miR-21, PTEN and PDCD4 can rescue 5-FU sensitivity and the phenotypic characteristics disrupted by miR-21.

  1. Beneficial effect of the bioflavonoid quercetin on cholecystokinin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in isolated rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Heike; Jonas, Ludwig; Wakileh, Michael; Krüger, Burkhard

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is still poorly understood. Thus, a reliable pharmacological therapy is currently lacking. In recent years, an impairment of the energy metabolism of pancreatic acinar cells, caused by Ca(2+)-mediated depolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane and a decreased ATP supply, has been implicated as an important pathological event. In this study, we investigated whether quercetin exerts protection against mitochondrial dysfunction. Following treatment with or without quercetin, rat pancreatic acinar cells were stimulated with supramaximal cholecystokinin-8 (CCK). CCK caused a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP concentration, whereas the mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased. Quercetin treatment before CCK application exerted no protection on MMP but increased ATP to a normal level, leading to a continuous decrease in the dehydrogenase activity. The protective effect of quercetin on mitochondrial function was accompanied by a reduction in CCK-induced changes to the cell membrane. Concerning the molecular mechanism underlying the protective effect of quercetin, an increased AMP/ATP ratio suggests that the AMP-activated protein kinase system may be activated. In addition, quercetin strongly inhibited CCK-induced trypsin activity. The results indicate that the use of quercetin may be a therapeutic strategy for reducing the severity of AP.

  2. Protective effects of Zygophyllum album extract against deltamethrin-induced hyperglycemia and hepato-pancreatic disorders in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriani, Anouar; Hachani, Rafik; Kaabi, Belhassen; Ncir, Marwa; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Allagui, Mohamed Salah

    2016-06-23

    The current study was designed to investigate the possible mechanism involved in hyperglycemia induced by chronic exposure to deltamethrin (DLM) in rat and to assess whether this damage is amenable to modulation by Zygophyllum album. DLM, a synthetic pyrethroid pesticide, was administrated at a dose of 4 mg/kg body mass, during 60 days. Compared with control, DLM showed a significant increase of blood glucose (p ≤ 0.01) and glycosylated hemoglobin levels (p ≤ 0.01) and a clear decrease (p ≤ 0.01) of insulin and total hemoglobin levels. In addition, hepatic glycogen content and the activity of hexokinase decreased (p ≤ 0.01), whereas the activities of glucose-6-phosphatase and glycogen phosphorylase were significantly increased (p ≤ 0.01). Moreover, pan