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Sample records for model inducing pancreatitis

  1. Refinement of Canine Pancreatitis Model: Inducing Pancreatitis by Using Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    OpenAIRE

    Ruben, Dawn S; Scorpio, Diana G; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2009-01-01

    The causes and treatments of pancreatitis have been studied in diverse species, but the canine pancreatitis model has been used most often due to its similarities to the condition in humans. Although pancreatitis in dogs can be induced readily by numerous methods, managing these dogs can be difficult because they often develop severe abdominal pain, vomiting, inappetance, and lethargy. In an effort to study pancreatitis, we performed a pilot study to determine whether an endoscopic pancreatic...

  2. Refinement of canine pancreatitis model: inducing pancreatitis by using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, Dawn S; Scorpio, Diana G; Gabrielson, K L; Simon, B W; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2009-02-01

    The causes and treatments of pancreatitis have been studied in diverse species, but the canine pancreatitis model has been used most often due to its similarities to the condition in humans. Although pancreatitis in dogs can be induced readily by numerous methods, managing these dogs can be difficult because they often develop severe abdominal pain, vomiting, inappetance, and lethargy. In an effort to study pancreatitis, we performed a pilot study to determine whether an endoscopic pancreatic procedure would be possible in a dog and whether, through various manipulations, a new method of inducing pancreatitis could be developed. The model uses endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), a common procedure in human gastroenterology that has been associated with postprocedural pancreatitis. Although all 8 dogs used in developing the ERCP model had both biochemical and histologic changes consistent with pancreatitis, 7 of the 8 dogs remained free of classic clinical signs of the disease. This method is presented as a refinement of a canine model and presents an alternative method of inducing pancreatitis, with decreased risk of developing associated clinical signs.

  3. An experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis

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    Saruc M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature indicates that acute pancreatitis is a complication of massive hemolysis with a prevalence of about 20%. We describe an experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis. Hemolytic anemia was induced in rats by a single ip injection of 60 mg/kg of 20 mg/ml acetylphenylhydrazine (APH in 20% (v/v ethanol on the first experimental day (day 0. One hundred and fifty Wistar albino rats weighing 180-200 g were divided into three groups of 50 animals each: groups 1, 2 and 3 were injected ip with APH, 20% ethanol, and physiological saline, respectively. Ten rats from each group were sacrificed on study days 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Serum amylase, lipase levels and pancreatic tissue tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and platelet-activating factor (PAF contents were determined and a histological examination of the pancreas was performed. No hemolysis or pancreatitis was observed in any of the rats in groups 2 and 3. In group 1, massive hemolysis was observed in 35 (70% of 50 rats, moderate hemolysis in seven (14%, and no hemolysis in eight (16%. Thirty-three of 35 (94.2% rats with massive hemolysis had hyperamylasemia, and 29 of these rats (82.8% had histologically proven pancreatitis. The most severe pancreatitis occurred on day 3, as demonstrated by histology. Tissue TNF-alpha and PAF levels were statistically higher in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. Acute massive hemolysis induced acute pancreatitis, as indicated by histology, in almost 80% of cases. Hemolysis may induce acute pancreatitis by triggering the release of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines.

  4. Bonnet monkey model for pancreatic changes in induced malnutrition.

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    Sandhyamani, S; Vijayakumari, A; Balaraman Nair, M

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic degenerative lesions of identical nature could be induced in bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata) fed protein-deficient tapioca or cassava starch-based and corn-starch-based diets for 3 or 5 months. Marked to severe lobular and acinar cell atrophy in animals fed low-protein diets resembled human pancreatic atrophy resulting from protein deficiency. Animals fed low-protein, high-carbohydrate diets showed lesions akin to tropical chronic calculus pancreatopathy with diabetes mellitus. The pancreatic lesions comprised moderate to marked acinar cell atrophy, marked islet hyperplasia or nesidioblastosis with hypertrophy and mucoid metaplasia of the duct epithelium. Mucoid vasculopathy of the pancreatic artery and arterioles was observed in all animals given protein-deficient diets. It was enhanced in those given additional carbohydrate. Identical lesions were observed after using either source of carbohydrate. This excluded the role of toxic factors such as cyanoglycosides or heavy metals from a tapioca source in initiating the lesions. The study establishes monkey models for the spectrum of human pancreatic changes associated with malnutrition owing to protein deficiency and nutritional imbalance with low-protein, high-starch diets. The experiments demonstrate the dual effects of similar diets on the parenchyma and vasculature of the pancreas.

  5. The 5-HT3Receptor Antagonist Ondansetron Attenuates Pancreatic Injury in Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis Model.

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    Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Takuto; Onuki, Yuta; Shinoda, Hajime; Mihara, Taiki; Hori, Masatoshi; Inomata, Tomo

    2017-08-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor (5-HT 3 R) antagonist ondansetron has been clinically approved as an anti-emetic agent. Recent findings indicate that ondansetron has anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to assess the therapeutic action of ondansetron in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis model. Male-BALB/c mice were used in the present study. Acute pancreatitis was induced by an hourly injection of cerulein. Ondansetron was administered subcutaneously at a dose of 3 mg/kg. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of 5-HT 3 R in pancreatic tissue was assessed with RT-PCR. Plasma amylase, lipase, and interleukin (IL)-6 levels were evaluated. Pancreatic injury was histopathologically graded, and myeloperoxidase (MPO)-positive cells were counted. 5-HT 3 R mRNA was expressed in the pancreas. In acute pancreatitis model mice, amylase, lipase, and IL-6 levels were significantly increased in the blood. With ondansetron treatment, these levels were significantly decreased. Histopathological evaluation revealed that ondansetron attenuated the inflammatory damage in acute pancreatitis. The number of infiltrated neutrophils stained by MPO was decreased by ondansetron treatment. In summary, the 5-HT 3 R antagonist ondansetron attenuated pancreatic injury through its anti-inflammatory action. These findings suggest that ondansetron may potentially be of use for therapy of acute pancreatitis.

  6. Pancreatitis Induced by Cocaine

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    Sebastián Pablo Chapela

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is one of the commonest diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, characterized by epigastric pain of moderate to severe intensity, which radiates to the back, elevation of pancreatic lipase and amylase enzymes, and changes in pancreatic parenchyma in imaging methods. The most common etiologies vary, generally the most frequent being biliary lithiasis and alcohol, followed by hypertriglyceridemia. Among the less frequent causes is drug-induced pancreatitis. We report a case of acute pancreatitis caused by cocaine, rarely described in literature.

  7. Role of bone marrow cells in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a rat model of pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akita, Shingo; Kubota, Koji [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Kobayashi, Akira, E-mail: kbys@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Misawa, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Akira; Nakata, Takenari; Yokoyama, Takahide [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Takahashi, Masafumi [Center for Molecular Medicine Division of Bioimaging Sciences, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimono, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Miyagawa, Shinichi [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs play a role in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived activated PSCs can produce PDGF and TGF {beta}1. -- Abstract: Bone marrow cell (BMC)-derived myofibroblast-like cells have been reported in various organs, including the pancreas. However, the contribution of these cells to pancreatic fibrosis has not been fully discussed. The present study examined the possible involvement of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) originating from BMCs in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a clinically relevant rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet. BMCs from female transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were transplanted into lethally irradiated male rats. Once chimerism was established, acute pancreatitis was induced by a CDE diet. Chronological changes in the number of PSCs originating from the donor BMCs were examined using double immunofluorescence for GFP and markers for PSCs, such as desmin and alpha smooth muscle actin ({alpha}SMA), 1, 3 and 8 weeks after the initiation of CDE feeding. We also used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate whether the PSCs from the BMCs produce growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF) {beta}1. The percentage of BMC-derived activated PSCs increased significantly, peaking after 1 week of CDE treatment (accounting for 23.3 {+-} 0.9% of the total population of activated PSCs) and then decreasing. These cells produced both PDGF and TGF{beta}1 during the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Our results suggest that PSCs originating from BMCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic injury, at least in part, by producing growth factors in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model.

  8. Metronidazole-Induced Pancreatitis

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    E. O'Halloran

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. This case provides the eighth report of Metronidazole induced pancreatitis. All of the cases were reported in females and ran a benign course.Early diagnosis, discontinuation of the drug and supportive care will lead to a successful recovery in the majority of cases.

  9. Monitoring changes in plasma levels of pancreatic and intestinal enzymes in a model of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency--induced by pancreatic duct-ligation--in young pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozinska, Liudmyla; Prykhodko, Olena; Sureda, Ester Arévalo; Szwiec, Katarzyna; Podgurniak, Pawel; Pierzynowski, Stefan; Weström, Björn

    2015-03-01

    Plasma levels of pancreatic and intestinal enzymes were measured after pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) to monitor pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) in a model using young pigs. Five, 6 week-old pigs (10.9±0.2kg), underwent PDL while age-matched, un-operated pigs were used as controls. Plasma levels of immunoreactive cationic trypsinogen (IRCT), amylase, lipase, and diamine oxidase (DAO) activities were analyzed for 48 days after PDL, including 1 week of oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation (PES) with Creon(®). PDL resulted in an arrested body growth and a rapid surge of pancreatic enzymes (IRCT, amylase and lipase) into the plasma. Nine days after PDL, the plasma levels of these pancreatic enzymes had decreased. IRCT then remained below the level in un-operated pigs while amylase only fell below control at 25 days. The intestinally derived marker DAO and plasma protein levels were unaffected by PDL but DAO decreased slightly with time in PEI pigs. One-week of oral PES restored body growth, but had little effect on pancreatic enzyme plasma levels, except for a tendency towards increased DAO. The study showed that PEI developed within 1-2 weeks after PDL and that only IRCT is a reliable plasma enzyme marker for this. The reduced plasma DAO indicated that PEI also affected the intestines, while PES therapy restored growth of the PDL pigs and slightly increased plasma DAO, suggesting an improved intestinal function. Copyright © 2015 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  10. Damage to pancreatic acinar cells and preservation of islets of Langerhans in a rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by Karwinskia humboldtiana (buckthorn).

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    Carcano-Diaz, Katya; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Segoviano-Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Loera-Arias, Maria de Jesus; Garcia-Juarez, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    Karwinskia humboldtiana (Kh) is a poisonous plant that grows in some regions of the American continent. Consuming large amounts of Kh fruit results in acute intoxication leading to respiratory failure, culminating in death within days. There is evidence of histological damage to the lungs, liver, and kidneys following accidental and experimental Kh intoxication. To date, the microscopic effect of Kh consumption on the pancreas has not been described. We examined the early effects of Kh fruit on pancreatic tissue at different stages of acute intoxication in the Wistar rat. We found progressive damage confined to the exocrine pancreas, starting with a reduction in the number of zymogen granules, loss of acinar architecture, the presence of autophagy-like vesicles, apoptosis and inflammatory infiltrate. The pancreatic pathology culminated in damaged acini characterized by necrosis and edema, with a complete loss of lobular architecture. Interestingly, the morphology of the islets of Langerhans was conserved throughout our evaluations. Taken together, our results indicate the damage induced by a high dose of Kh fruit in the Wistar rat is consistent with an early acute necrotizing pancreatitis that exclusively affects the exocrine pancreas. Therefore, this system might be useful as an animal model to study the treatment of pancreatic diseases. More importantly, as the islets of Langerhans were preserved, the active compounds of Kh fruit could be utilized for the treatment of acinar pancreatic cancer. Further studies might provide insight into the severity of acute Kh intoxication in humans and influence the design of treatments for pancreatic diseases and acinar pancreatic cancer.

  11. Food-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

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    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok K; Upparahalli Venkateshaiah, Sathisha; Goyal, Hemant; Mishra, Anil

    2017-12-01

    Food allergy, a commonly increasing problem worldwide, defined as an adverse immune response to food. A variety of immune-related effector cells such as mast cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, and T cells are involved in food-related allergic responses categorized as IgE mediated, non-IgE mediated, and mixed (IgE and non-IgE) depending upon underlying immunological mechanisms. The dietary antigens mainly target the gastrointestinal tract including pancreas that gets inflamed due to food allergy and leads acute pancreatitis. Reports indicate several food proteins induce pancreatitis; however, detailed underlying mechanism of food-induced pancreatitis is unexplored. The aim of the review is to understand and update the current scenario of food-induced pancreatitis. A comprehensive literature search of relevant research articles has been performed through PubMed, and articles were chosen based on their relevance to food allergen-mediated pancreatitis. Several cases in the literature indicate that acute pancreatitis has been provoked after the consumption of mustard, milk, egg, banana, fish, and kiwi fruits. Food-induced pancreatitis is an ignored and unexplored area of research. The review highlights the significance of food in the development of pancreatitis and draws the attention of physicians and scientists to consider food allergies as a possible cause for initiation of pancreatitis pathogenesis.

  12. Hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficiency induces pancreatic injury in chronic ethanol feeding model of deer mice.

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    Amer, Samir M; Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Kakumanu, Ramu D; Popov, Vsevolod L; Rampy, Bill A; El-Mehallawi, Inas H; Ashmawy, Magdy M; Shakeel Ansari, G A; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2018-02-01

    The single most common cause of chronic pancreatitis (CP, a serious inflammatory disease) is chronic alcohol abuse, which impairs hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, a major ethanol oxidizing enzyme). Previously, we found ~5 fold greater fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs), and injury in the pancreas of hepatic ADH deficient (ADH - ) vs. hepatic normal ADH (ADH + ) deer mice fed 3.5g% ethanol via liquid diet daily for two months. Therefore, progression of ethanol-induced pancreatic injury was determined in ADH - deer mice fed ethanol for four months to delineate the mechanism and metabolic basis of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP). In addition to a substantially increased blood alcohol concentration and plasma FAEEs, significant degenerative changes, including atrophy and loss of acinar cells in some areas, ultrastructural changes evident by such features as swelling and disintegration of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cisternae and ER stress were observed in the pancreas of ethanol-fed ADH - deer mice vs. ADH + deer mice. These changes are consistent with noted increases in pancreatic injury markers (plasma lipase, pancreatic trypsinogen activation peptide, FAEE synthase and cathepsin B) in ethanol-fed ADH - deer mice. Most importantly, an increased levels of pancreatic glucose regulated protein (GRP) 78 (a prominent ER stress marker) were found to be closely associated with increased phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α signaling molecule in PKR-like ER kinase branch of unfolded protein response (UPR) as compared to X box binding protein 1S and activating transcription factor (ATF)6 - 50kDa protein of inositol requiring enzyme 1α and ATF6 branches of UPR, respectively, in ethanol-fed ADH - vs. ADH + deer mice. These results along with findings on plasma FAEEs, and pancreatic histology and injury markers suggest a metabolic basis of ethanol-induced pancreatic injury, and provide new avenues to understand metabolic basis and molecular mechanism of ACP

  13. Metronidazole-induced pancreatitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, E

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old caucasian lady presented to the Accident & Emergency department complaining of acute onset severe epigastric pain radiating through to the back with associated nausea and vomiting. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made. Symptoms commenced after the third dose of Metronidazole therapy prescribed for a recurrent periodontal abscess. The patient described a similar episode 10 months previously. On neither occasion were any other medications being taken, there was no history of alcohol abuse and no other gastro-intestinal aetiology could be identified on imaging. Symptoms resolved quickly upon discontinuation of the antibiotic agent. We conclude therefore that Metronidazole can reasonably be identified as the only potential causative agent.

  14. Phenethyl isothiocyanate inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in a MIAPaca2 xenograft animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Silvia D; Singh, Shivendra V; Whitcomb, David C; Brand, Randall E

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and it has a poor prognosis that points to an increased need to develop effective chemoprevention strategies for this disease. We examined the ability of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, to inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in a MIAPaca2 xenograft animal model. Exposure to PEITC inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of approximately 7 μmol/L. PEITC treatment induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, downregulated the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, upregulated the proapoptotic protein Bak, and suppressed Notch 1 and 2 levels. In addition, treatment with PEITC induced cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase and led to increased cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation and subdiploid (apoptotic) fraction in pancreatic cancer cells. Oral administration of PEITC suppressed the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in a MIAPaca2 xenograft animal model. Our data show that PEITC exerts its inhibitory effect on pancreatic cancer cells through several mechanisms, including G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis, and supports further investigation of PEITC as a chemopreventive agent for pancreatic cancer.

  15. Experimental pancreatitis in the rat: role of bile reflux in sodium taurocholate-induced acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, J. F.; van Gool, J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1986-01-01

    Mortality of sodium taurocholate-induced acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis in the rat was prevented by biliary diversion. Bile reflux into the pancreas after the induction of pancreatitis is postulated to be a major factor affecting mortality of this popular model of acute pancreatitis. The reduction

  16. Docosahexaenoic Acid Inhibits Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

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    Yoo Kyung Jeong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an important regulator in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP. Reactive oxygen species induce activation of inflammatory cascades, inflammatory cell recruitment, and tissue damage. NF-κB regulates inflammatory cytokine gene expression, which induces an acute, edematous form of pancreatitis. Protein kinase C δ (PKCδ activates NF-κB as shown in a mouse model of cerulein-induced AP. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an ω-3 fatty acid, exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects in various cells and tissues. This study investigated whether DHA inhibits cerulein-induced AP in rats by assessing pancreatic edema, myeloperoxidase activity, levels of lipid peroxide and IL-6, activation of NF-κB and PKCδ, and by histologic observation. AP was induced by intraperitoneal injection (i.p. of cerulein (50 μg/kg every hour for 7 h. DHA (13 mg/kg was administered i.p. for three days before AP induction. Pretreatment with DHA reduced cerulein-induced activation of NF-κB, PKCδ, and IL-6 in pancreatic tissues of rats. DHA suppressed pancreatic edema and decreased the abundance of lipid peroxide, myeloperoxidase activity, and inflammatory cell infiltration into the pancreatic tissues of cerulein-stimulated rats. Therefore, DHA may help prevent the development of pancreatitis by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and PKCδ, expression of IL-6, and oxidative damage to the pancreas.

  17. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are

  18. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?

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    Tenner, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

  19. Changes in gene expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 in a canine model of caerulein-induced pancreatitis.

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    Song, Ruhui; Yu, Dohyeon; Park, Jinho

    2016-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process that frequently involves peripancreatic tissues and remote organ systems. It has high morbidity and mortality rates in both human and veterinary patients. The severity of pancreatitis is generally determined by events that occur after acinar cell injury in the pancreas, resulting in elevated levels of various proinflammatory mediators, such as interleukin (IL) 1β and 6, as well as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). When these mediators are excessively released into the systemic circulation, severe pancreatitis occurs with systemic complications. This pathophysiological process is similar to that of sepsis; thus, there are many striking clinical similarities between patients with septic shock and those with severe acute pancreatitis. We induced acute pancreatitis using caerulein in dogs and measured the change in the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines. The levels of TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA peaked at 3 h, at twice the baseline levels, and the serum concentrations of amylase and lipase also increased. Histopathological examination revealed severe hyperemia of the pancreas and hyperemia in the duodenal villi and the hepatic sinusoid. Thus, pancreatitis can be considered an appropriate model to better understand the development of naturally occurring sepsis and to assist in the effective treatment and management of septic patients.

  20. Severe hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis during pregnancy.

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    Gürsoy, Alptekin; Kulaksizoglu, Mustafa; Sahin, Mustafa; Ertugrul, Derun Taner; Ozer, Feyza; Tutuncu, Neslihan Bascil; Demirag, Nilgun Guvener

    2006-04-01

    Chylomicronemia syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of chylomicrons in the fasting state. An acute and potentially life-threatening complication of chyiomicronemia syndrome is severe acute pancreatitis. We report a case of a 24-year-old primigravida with severe hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis. We reviewed the clinical course and treatment of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis. She was admitted in the 37th week of gestation with severe abdominal pain, which was radiating to the back, and having uterine contractions. Cesarean delivery was performed under spinal anesthesia, and a healthy male infant was born. Intraoperative findings included milky peritoneal fluid collection. Elevated pancreatic enzymes with significant hypertriglyceridemia (10,092 mg/dL) suggesting acute pancreatitis were also found on chemical analysis. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was confirmed by computed tomography scan. Treatment with continuous intravenous insulin--glucose, cessation of oral intake, and nasogastric decompression--dramatically decreased the triglyceride levels to 608 mg/dL within five days. She was discharged as symptom free with strict dietary intervention after 10 days. Intravenous insulin is a low-cost and effective alternative treatment in hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis during pregnancy. To our knowledge, such a high triglyceride level has not previously been reported in pregnancy.

  1. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

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    Serpytis, Mindaugas; Karosas, Vytautas; Tamosauskas, Rokas; Dementaviciene, Jurate; Strupas, Kestutis; Sileikis, Audrius; Sipylaite, Jurate

    2012-11-10

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a well known phenomenon of pregnancy occurring due to physiologic changes in sex hormone levels. Occasionally, it could lead to development of acute pancreatitis. Gestational hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis occurs in pregnant women usually with preexisting abnormalities of the lipid metabolism and is associated with additional diagnostic and therapeutic challenges related to hypertriglyceridemia and pregnancy. We present a case of the hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnant woman with no previous history of lipid abnormality and pregnancy as the only known triggering factor for hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis is a rare complication of pregnancy; however, it should be suspected in all pregnant patients admitted for nonobsteric abdominal pain.

  2. Valsartan-induced acute pancreatitis.

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    Can, Burak; Sali, Mursel; Batman, Adnan; Yilmaz, Hasan; Korkmaz, Ugur; Celebi, Altay; Senturk, Omer; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity is uncommon among patients treated with angiotensin II receptor antagonists. A 58-year-old man presented with nausea, vomiting and constant pain in the epigastrium that radiated to the flanks. He received treatment with valsartan (160 mg daily) for hypertension. The clinical, biochemical and radiological findings were compatible with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. After the patient achieved a clinical and biochemical recovery, the valsartan therapy was started again. Six weeks later, he returned to the hospital with an attack of pancreatitis. Subsequently, he returned with repeated attacks of pancreatitis twice, and the valsartan was discontinued. Ten months after the treatment, the patient had no complaints. When severe abdominal symptoms occur for no apparent reason during treatment with valsartan, a diagnosis of pancreatitis should be considered.

  3. Pancreatic protective and hypoglycemic effects of Vitex agnus-castus L. fruit hydroalcoholic extract in D-galactose-induced aging mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Khorsandi, Layasadat; Najimi, Seyedeh Asma

    2017-01-01

    D-galactose induces pancreatic disorder along with aging mouse model. Vitex agnus-castus (VAC) has potential pancreatic protective effect. Hence, this study was designed to evaluate the hypoglycemic and pancreas protective effects of VAC hydroalcoholic extract in D-galactose-induced aging female mice. In the present experimental study, 72 adult female Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice (weighing 30–35 g) were divided into 6 groups of control, VAC hydroalcoholic extract, D-galactose, D-galactose + VAC hydroalcoholic extract, aged, aged + VAC hydroalcoholic extract. The aged model was prepared by subcutaneous injection of D-galactose for 45 days and, VAC hydroalcoholic extract was gavaged twice a day in the last 7 days. 24 h after the last drug and extract administrations, serum samples and pancreatic tissues were removed to evaluate experimental and histological determinations. Serum glucose level decreased in VAC, D-galactose and, aged-treated groups compared to the control (P < 0.05). Insulin level increased in VAC and decreased in D-galactose and aged VAC-treated mice compared to the control (P < 0.05). Homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) increased in D-galactose, aging, and VAC hydroalcoholic extract groups (P < 0.05) and, administration of VAC hydroalcoholic extract improved HOMA-IR in D-galactose and aging treated animals. Despite the size of pancreatic islets decreased in aged and D-galactose groups, VAC administration recovered it. Present data showed that VAC hydroalcoholic extract has hypoglycemic and pancreatic protective effects in natural aged and aging model mice. PMID:28515766

  4. Pancreatic protective and hypoglycemic effects ofVitex agnus-castusL. fruit hydroalcoholic extract in D-galactose-induced aging mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Khorsandi, Layasadat; Najimi, Seyedeh Asma

    2017-04-01

    D-galactose induces pancreatic disorder along with aging mouse model. Vitex agnus-castus (VAC) has potential pancreatic protective effect. Hence, this study was designed to evaluate the hypoglycemic and pancreas protective effects of VAC hydroalcoholic extract in D-galactose-induced aging female mice. In the present experimental study, 72 adult female Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice (weighing 30-35 g) were divided into 6 groups of control, VAC hydroalcoholic extract, D-galactose, D-galactose + VAC hydroalcoholic extract, aged, aged + VAC hydroalcoholic extract. The aged model was prepared by subcutaneous injection of D-galactose for 45 days and, VAC hydroalcoholic extract was gavaged twice a day in the last 7 days. 24 h after the last drug and extract administrations, serum samples and pancreatic tissues were removed to evaluate experimental and histological determinations. Serum glucose level decreased in VAC, D-galactose and, aged-treated groups compared to the control ( P < 0.05). Insulin level increased in VAC and decreased in D-galactose and aged VAC-treated mice compared to the control ( P < 0.05). Homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) increased in D-galactose, aging, and VAC hydroalcoholic extract groups ( P < 0.05) and, administration of VAC hydroalcoholic extract improved HOMA-IR in D-galactose and aging treated animals. Despite the size of pancreatic islets decreased in aged and D-galactose groups, VAC administration recovered it. Present data showed that VAC hydroalcoholic extract has hypoglycemic and pancreatic protective effects in natural aged and aging model mice.

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing pancreatic cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  6. Targeting Trysin-Inflammation Axis for Pancreatitis Therapy in a Humanized Pancreatitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0258 TITLE: Targeting trypsin-inflammation axis for pancreatitis therapy in a humanized pancreatitis model PRINCIPAL...From - To) 15 Sep 2016 – 14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting trypsin-inflammation axis for pancreatitis therapy in a humanized pancreatitis ... pancreatitis especially due to alcohol and smoking goes onto chronic pancreatitis which, in turn, is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Because only a

  7. Regulation of insulin sensitivity, insulin production, and pancreatic β cell survival by angiotensin-(1-7) in a rat model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junhua; Yang, Zhiming; Yang, Huiyu; Wang, Li; Wu, Huilu; Fan, Yunjuan; Wang, Wei; Fan, Xin; Li, Xing

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the antidiabetic activity of Ang-(1-7), an important component of the renin-angiotensin system, in a rat model of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A total of 36 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: control group fed standard laboratory diet, DM group fed high-fat diet and injected with STZ, and Ang-(1-7) group receiving injection of STZ followed by Ang-(1-7) treatment. Body weight, blood glucose levels, fasting serum Ang II and insulin levels, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured. The pancreas was collected for histological examination and gene expression analysis. Notably, the Ang-(1-7) group showed a significant decrease in fasting blood glucose and serum Ang II levels and HOMA-IR values and increase in fasting serum insulin levels. Pancreatic β cells in the control and Ang-(1-7) groups were normally distributed in the center of pancreatic islets with large clear nuclei. In contrast, pancreatic β cells in the DM group had a marked shrinkage of the cytoplasm and condensation of nuclear chromatin. Ang-(1-7) treatment significantly facilitated insulin production by β cells in diabetic rats. The DM-associated elevation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, and Bax and reduction of Bcl-2 was significantly reversed by Ang-(1-7) treatment. Taken together, Ang-(1-7) protects against STZ-induced DM through improvement of insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and pancreatic β cell survival, which is associated with reduction of iNOS expression and alteration of the Bcl-2 family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Methods Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0–2 h, Fraction II at 8–10 h, and Fraction III at 11–12 h). Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11–12 h (Fraction IV). Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS); and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous) human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more abundant high molecular

  9. Pancreatic-induced Intramural Duodenal Haematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius K. Ma

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intramural duodenal haematoma (IDH is an uncommon pathology and it is usually related to anticoagulant therapy. Other causes include various pancreatic diseases, connective tissue disease, peptic ulcer disease and pancreaticoduodenal aneurysm. IDH of pancreatic origin has been infrequently reported. The disease course can be life-threatening and serious complications may occur, including gastric outlet obstruction, duodenal perforation and septicaemia. A case of pancreatic-induced IDH is presented, for which pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed as definitive treatment. In general, medical treatment with continuous nasogastric aspiration and total parenteral nutrition is recommended as initial management strategy. Surgical interventions (evacuation of blood clot or surgical resection are reserved for patients in whom medical treatment fails or complications occur.

  10. No Effect of Dietary Aspartame or Stevia on Pancreatic Acinar Carcinoma Development, Growth, or Induced Mortality in a Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James; Lagou, Vasiliki; Dresselaers, Tom; van Dongen, Katinka A.; Himmelreich, Uwe; Liston, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has an extremely poor prognosis, largely due to a poor record for early detection. Known risk factors for pancreatic cancer include obesity, diet, and diabetes, implicating glucose consumption and regulation as a key player. The role of artificial sweeteners may therefore be pertinent to disease kinetics. The oncogenic impact of artificial sweeteners is a highly controversial area. Aspartame, one of the most studied food additives, is widely recognized as being generally safe, although there are still specific areas where research is incomplete due to study limitations. Stevia, by contrast, has been the subject of relatively few studies, and the potential health benefits are based on extrapolation rather than direct testing. Here, we used longitudinal tracking of pancreatic acinar carcinoma development, growth, and lethality in a sensitized mouse model. Despite exposure to aspartame and stevia from the in utero stage onward, we found no disease modification activity, in either direction. These results contribute to the data on aspartame and stevia safety, while also reducing confidence in several of the purported health benefits. PMID:28232906

  11. Pancreatic carcinoma cells induce fibrosis by stimulating proliferation and matrix synthesis of stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachem, Max G; Schünemann, Marion; Ramadani, Marco; Siech, Marco; Beger, Hans; Buck, Andreas; Zhou, Shaoxia; Schmid-Kotsas, Alexandra; Adler, Guido

    2005-04-01

    Tumor desmoplasia is one of the representative histopathologic findings in ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The aims of this study were to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis associated with pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Immunostainings were performed with human pancreatic adenocarcinomas (n = 27) and tumors induced in nude mice (n = 36) by subcutaneously injecting MiaPaCa2, Panc1, and SW850 with and without pancreatic stellate cells. Matrix-producing cells were isolated from pancreatic adenocarcinomas and compared with pancreatic stellate cells isolated from tissue of chronic pancreatitis. Paracrine stimulation of pancreatic stellate cells by carcinoma cells was studied regarding matrix synthesis (collagen and c-fibronectin on protein and messenger RNA level) and cell proliferation (bromodeoxyuridine incorporation). High numbers of desmin and alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive cells were detected in 26 of 27 pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Intense fibronectin and collagen stainings were associated with these cells. By using cytofilament stainings, gene expression profiling, and morphological examinations, the matrix-producing cells obtained by the outgrowth method from pancreatic adenocarcinomas were identified as pancreatic stellate cells. Supernatants of MiaPaCa2, Panc1, and SW850 cells stimulated proliferation and collagen type I and c-fibronectin synthesis of cultured pancreatic stellate cells. Preincubation of the carcinoma cell supernatants with neutralizing antibodies against fibroblast growth factor 2, transforming growth factor beta 1, and platelet-derived growth factor significantly reduced the stimulatory effects. Subcutaneous injection of carcinoma cells and pancreatic stellate cells induced fast-growing subcutaneous fibrotic tumors in nude mice. Morphometric analysis of carcinoma cells (cytokeratin stainings) showed a high density of carcinoma cells in these tumors. Pancreatic stellate cells strongly support tumor growth in the

  12. Midkine is overexpressed in acute pancreatitis and promotes the pancreatic recovery in L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Li; Qiao, Zhenguo; Xu, Chunfang; Shen, Jiaqing

    2017-06-01

    Midkine (MK) is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous malignancies, but the expression and effect of MK in acute pancreatitis (AP) have not been well studied and documented. In this study, the expression of MK was assayed in mice with L-arginine-induced AP. A recombinant human MK (rhMK) was introduced in this study to test the effect of MK on the L-arginine-induced AP. Serum amylase and lipase were assayed. Pancreas tissue samples were also collected for the evaluation of histological injury. Western blot and immunochemical staining of α-amylase and proliferating cell nuclear antigen were applied for the study of acinar regeneration in the pancreas. The elevation of MK expression was found in mice with AP induced by L-arginine. After rhMK administration, rhMK did not affect the severity of acute pancreatic injury in acute phase in L-arginine-induced pancreatitis in mice, in accordance with changes of serum amylase and lipase and the histological evaluation. But during the recovery phase, the area of remaining acinar cells was increased and the fibrosis was reduced in rhMK-treated mice. Furthermore, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and α-amylase was also upregulated after rhMK treatment. Midkine is over-expressed during AP in the animal model. Recombinant MK could promote the recovery of L-arginine-induced pancreatitis in mice. Therefore, MK may be involved in the regeneration of acinar cells in AP, and rhMK may be a possible therapeutic intervention for the repairment of AP. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Pancreatic parenchymal injection of ethanol and octreotide to induce focal pancreatic fibrosis in rats: Strategies to eliminate postoperative pancreatic fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Ho; Hong, Tae Ho

    2018-02-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) is more likely to occur in a soft pancreas compared to a hard pancreas in which fibrosis has progressed. There is almost no leakage at the anastomosis site or cut surface of a hard pancreas. The aim of this study was to induce localized fibrosis at the cut surface of the pancreas in a rat model. Thirty-six rats were divided into three groups (group S: normal saline group; group E: ethanol group; and group O: octreotide group). Each rat was directly injected with a particular compound at the duodenal lobe of the pancreatic parenchyma. Each group was divided into three subgroups according to the time of post-injection sacrifice (1, 2, or 4 weeks). The hardness, suture holding capacity (SHC), and histological fibrosis grade of each pancreas were measured. The hardness, SHC, and fibrosis grade of groups E and O were increased at week 1, with greater increases in group E (all P injected site (duodenal lobe) and non-injected site (splenic lobe) of the pancreas revealed increases in the three parameters of group E only in the duodenal lobe, with increases in group O at both the duodenal and splenic lobes. Parenchymal injection of ethanol and octreotide increased pancreatic fibrosis. Unlike octreotide, ethanol provoked localized fibrosis that was maintained over time. It is expected that ethanol injection could eliminate POPF during pancreatic surgery. Copyright © 2018 First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine in China. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Erdosteine on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapolat, Banu; Karapolat, Sami; Gurleyik, Emin; Yasar, Mehmet

    2017-10-01

    To create acute pancreatitis condition experimentally in rats using cerulein, and to reveal histopathological effects in pancreatic tissue with erdosteine. An experimental study. Department of General Surgery, Duzce University, Turkey, from June to October 2014. Thirty male Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. No procedures were applied to Group 1. The rats in Group 2 and Group 3 were injected cerulein, to establish an experimental pancreatitis model and the blood amylase and lipase values were examined. The rats in Group 3 were given 10 mg/kg erdosteine. This treatment was continued for another 2 days and the rats were sacrificed. The pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically for edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis, and vacuolization. The lipase and amylase values and the histopathological examination of pancreatic tissues evidenced that the experimental acute pancreatitis model was established and edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis, and vacuolization were observed in the pancreatic tissues. The statistical results suggest that erdosteine can decrease the edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis and vacuolization scores in the tissues. The severity of acute pancreatitis, induced by cerulein in rats, is reduced with the use of erdosteine.

  15. Reactive oxygen species inactivation improves pancreatic capillary blood flow in caerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirelles Jr. Roberto Ferreira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Reactive oxygen species (ROS inactivation was studied to determine alterations in the pancreatic capillary blood flow (PCBF during caerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats. METHODS: A laser-Doppler flowmeter to measure PCBF and N-t-Butyl-Phenylnitrone (PBN compound to inactivate ROS were used. Forty rats were divided in groups: 1 control; 2 caerulein; 3 PBN; 4 caerulein+PBN. Serum biochemistry and histopathological analyses were performed. RESULTS: PCBF measured a mean of 109.08 ± 14.54%, 68.24 ± 10.47%, 102.18 ± 10.23% and 87.73 ± 18.72% in groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. PCBF in groups 2 and 4 decreased 31.75 ± 16.79% and 12.26 ± 15.24%, respectively. Serum amylase was 1323.70 ± 239.10 U/l, 2184.60 ± 700.46 U/l, 1379.80 ± 265.72 U/l and 1622.10 ± 314.60 U/l in groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. There was a significant difference in the PCBF and serum amylase when compared groups 2 and 4. Cytoplasmatic vacuolation was present in groups 2 and 4. Otherwise, no qualitative changes were seen. CONCLUSION: ROS inactivation improves PCBF and minimizes the serum amylase increase during caerulein-induced pancreatitis. ROS effect may be one of the leading causative events in this model of acute pancreatitis.

  16. Analysis of the noise-induced bursting-spiking transition in a pancreatic beta-cell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguirre, J.; Mosekilde, Erik; Sanjuan, M.A.F.

    2004-01-01

    A stochastic model of the electrophysiological behavior of the pancreatic beta cell is studied, as a paradigmatic example of a bursting biological cell embedded in a noisy environment. The analysis is focused on the distortion that a growing noise causes to the basic properties of the membrane...... potential signals, such as their periodic or chaotic nature, and their bursting or spiking behavior. We present effective computational tools to obtain as much information as possible from these signals, and we suggest that the methods could be applied to real time series. Finally, a universal dependence...

  17. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuepeng; Bai, Yongyu; Li, Qiang; Bhugul, Pravin Avinash; Huang, Xince; Liu, Lewei; Pan, Liangliang; Ni, Haizhen; Chen, Bicheng; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Qiyu; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg) into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF). The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP.

  18. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuepeng Jin

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP. AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF. The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP.

  19. Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis (Chylomicronemia Syndrome Treated with Supportive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Uysal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia is a rare cause of pancreatitis. In treatment pancreatic rest, lifestyle changes, medications (fibrates, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and nicotinic acid are essential. Many experimental treatment modalities have been reported as insulin and heparin infusion and plasmapheresis. In this study we present the hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis treated with supportive care.

  20. Bryostatin 1 induces differentiation and potentiates the antitumor effect of Auristatin PE in a human pancreatic tumor (PANC-1) xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, R M; Adsay, N V; Philip, P A; Pettit, G R; Vaitkevicius, V K; Sarkar, F H

    2001-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis of all cancers with a dismal 5-year survival rate. Hence, there is a tremendous need for development of new and effective therapy for this tumor. In an earlier study we reported a potent antitumor activity of Auristatin PE (AuriPE) against pancreatic tumor. In addition, we have also reported that bryostatin 1 (bryo1) induces differentiation of leukemia cells, but the effect of bryo1 has not been investigated in pancreatic tumors. This is the first report where we demonstrate that bryo1 induces differentiation and potentiates the antitumor effect of AuriPE in a human pancreatic tumor (PANC-1) xenograft model. A xenograft model was established by injecting the PANC-1 cells s.c. in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice. After development of the s.c. tumors, tumors were dissected and small fragments were transplanted in vivo to new SCID mice, with a success rate of 100% and a doubling time of 4.8 days. The SCID mouse xenograft model was used to test the in vivo differentiation effect of bryo1 and its efficacy when given alone or in combination with AuriPE. Sections from paraffin-embedded tumors excised from untreated (control) SCID mice revealed typical poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Interestingly, sections of s.c. tumors taken from bryo1-treated mice revealed carcinomas that were much lower grade and less aggressive, and displayed prominent squamous and glandular differentiation. In this study, the tumor growth inhibition (T/C), activity score and cure rate for bryo1, AuriPE and bryo1+AuriPE were 80%, (+) and 0/4; 0.0%, (++++) and 3/5; and 0.0%, (++++) and 3/4, respectively. Mice treated with either AuriPE or bryo1+AuriPE were free of tumors for more than 150 days and were considered cured. The use of bryo1 as a novel differentiating agent and its combination with AuriPE should be further explored for the treatment of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas.

  1. Gallstone and Severe Hypertriglyceride-Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Mary Ashley; Ellis, Jeremy; Vengrove, Marc A; Wilcox, Benjamin; Yankowitz, Jerome; Smulian, John C

    2015-09-01

    Patients with biliary disease or underlying dyslipidemias are at risk for pancreatitis in pregnancy. Appropriate treatment can decrease the risk of recurrence and perinatal complications. Prevention of severe lipid elevations can prevent the development of pancreatitis in pregnancy. To review the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of gallstone and severe hypertriglyceride-induced pancreatitis in pregnancy. We performed a literature search regarding pancreatitis, gallstones, hyperlipidemia, and the treatment of both severe hypertriglyceride-induced pancreatitis and gallstone pancreatitis in pregnancy. In the setting of acute pancreatitis, removal of the offending agent, either gallstones or serum lipids, can lead to improved status and decrease recurrence risk. Patients with acute pancreatitis should be treated with analgesia and fluid resuscitation and maintain a nothing-per-os status. In cases of gallstone pancreatitis, removal of the offending stone through endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or cholecystectomy can decrease recurrence risk. Severe hypertriglyceride-induced pancreatitis includes similar management. Lipopheresis may be considered in refractory cases. Patients with severe hypercholesterolemia should maintain a low-fat diet and can continue lipid-lowering agents outside the statin class of medications. Preventing severe dyslipidemia in gestation can decrease the risk of pancreatitis and improve maternal and neonatal outcomes.

  2. Ascaris lumbricoides-induced acute pancreatitis: diagnosis during EUS for a suspected small pancreatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Carrara, Silvia; Petrone, Maria Chiara; Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2009-09-04

    Ascaris lumbricoides is the second most common intestinal parasite world-wide and, although the infection can be asymptomatic, in some cases it can present with complications, such as acute pancreatitis. We describe the case of a 37-year-old man, with a history of travelling in Eastern countries who presented with Ascaris lumbricoides-induced acute pancreatitis mimicking a small pancreatic cancer, diagnosed during an upper EUS. The endoscopy revealeda roundworm floating in the duodenum; its endoultrasonographic appearance showed a diffuse inhomogeneous pattern, with hypoechoic echotexture, such as in acute pancreatitis. Microbiological examination of the worm revealed a 20 cm long Ascaris lumbricoides. In non endemic countries, acute pancreatitis induced by Ascaris lumbricoides is an unusual diagnosis, and should be suspected especially in patients with history of traveling in endemic areas.

  3. PAF-mediated MAPK signaling hyperactivation via LAMTOR3 induces pancreatic tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Sohee; Lee, Sunhye; Kim, Han-Cheon; Ng, Christopher; Schneider, Andrea M; Ji, Hong; Ying, Haoqiang; Wang, Huamin; DePinho, Ronald A; Park, Jae-Il

    2013-10-31

    Deregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling leads to development of pancreatic cancer. Although Ras-mutation-driven pancreatic tumorigenesis is well understood, the underlying mechanism of Ras-independent MAPK hyperactivation remains elusive. Here, we have identified a distinct function of PCNA-associated factor (PAF) in modulating MAPK signaling. PAF is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer and required for pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. In mouse models, PAF expression induced pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia with expression of pancreatic cancer stem cell markers. PAF-induced ductal epithelial cell hyperproliferation was accompanied by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation independently of Ras or Raf mutations. Intriguingly, PAF transcriptionally activated the expression of late endosomal/lysosomal adaptor, MAPK and mTOR activator 3 (LAMTOR3), which hyperphosphorylates MEK and ERK and is necessary for pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Our results reveal an unsuspected mechanism of mitogenic signaling activation via LAMTOR3 and suggest that PAF-induced MAPK hyperactivation contributes to pancreatic tumorigenesis.

  4. PAF-Mediated MAPK Signaling Hyperactivation via LAMTOR3 Induces Pancreatic Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohee Jun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Deregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling leads to development of pancreatic cancer. Although Ras-mutation-driven pancreatic tumorigenesis is well understood, the underlying mechanism of Ras-independent MAPK hyperactivation remains elusive. Here, we have identified a distinct function of PCNA-associated factor (PAF in modulating MAPK signaling. PAF is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer and required for pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. In mouse models, PAF expression induced pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia with expression of pancreatic cancer stem cell markers. PAF-induced ductal epithelial cell hyperproliferation was accompanied by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation independently of Ras or Raf mutations. Intriguingly, PAF transcriptionally activated the expression of late endosomal/lysosomal adaptor, MAPK and mTOR activator 3 (LAMTOR3, which hyperphosphorylates MEK and ERK and is necessary for pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Our results reveal an unsuspected mechanism of mitogenic signaling activation via LAMTOR3 and suggest that PAF-induced MAPK hyperactivation contributes to pancreatic tumorigenesis.

  5. Severe Hyperlipidemia Induced Hemorrhagic Pancreatitis during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Koscica, Karen L.; Nwaubani, Uzoma; Nazir, Munir; Gimovsky, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background. We report a case of familial hyperlipidemia in pregnancy that resulted in hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Case. A patient at 27-week gestation was admitted for recurrent pancreatitis secondary to severe hyperlipidemia. With conservative care, the patient improved but on the fourth day of admission she experienced a sudden onset of hypotension and was diagnosed with hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Conclusion. Pancreatitis caused by hyperlipidemia is an uncommon event during pregnancy. A famil...

  6. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-21

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  7. Acute pancreatitis-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Yasuhisa; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Kojika, Masahiro; Sato, Hisaho; Suzuki, Keijiro; Matsumoto, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Recent successive reports on acute pancreatitis-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) have revealed that TTP-related microvascular damage is an aggravating factor of acute pancreatitis. Here, we report the case of a 26-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis due to high alcohol consumption. The patient was unconscious as he had taken an overdose of medication, and presented with fever and renal failure due to acute pancreatitis on admission. Although the pancreatitis subsequently improved, the symptoms were still observed; on the next day, he exhibited hemoglobinuria, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Moreover, general blood examinations indicated the presence of schistocytes and reduced activity of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin-like metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motif 13) to 47 %. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with TTP, and plasma exchange was performed. After the development of TTP, the acute pancreatitis recurred, but a severe pathogenesis was prevented by plasma exchange. Thus, ADAMTS13 activity may be useful for predicting a severe pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. In ADAMTS13-deficient cases, plasma exchange may be an effective technique for preventing aggravation of acute pancreatitis.

  8. Prophylactic use of octreotide for asparaginase-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Sachi; Higa, Takeshi; Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Fujimura, Junya; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, we sought to evaluate the prophylactic use of octreotide for asparaginase-induced acute pancreatitis. We reviewed the medical records of seven patients in two institutions who received prophylactic octreotide for re-administration of asparaginase after asparaginase-induced acute pancreatitis. Three patients completed asparaginase treatment without developing pancreatitis, and four experienced recurrence of pancreatitis. A literature search using PubMed identified four additional patients in whom asparaginase was successfully re-administered with octreotide. Prophylactic use of octreotide may, thus, be warranted for patients who would benefit from re-administration of asparaginase for cancer treatment; however, careful observation is needed to monitor for breakthrough recurrence of pancreatitis.

  9. Tempol, a Membrane-Permeable Radical Scavenger, Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory and Cardioprotective Effects in the Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Andrzej; Walczyna, Beata; Rajtar, Grażyna; Marciniak, Sebastian; Wojtak, Andrzej; Lasiecka, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    To date, it remains unclear whether mild form of acute pancreatitis (AP) may cause myocardial damage which may be asymptomatic for a long time. Pathogenesis of AP-related cardiac injury may be attributed in part to ROS/RNS overproduction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the oxidative stress changes in both the pancreas and the heart and to estimate the protective effects of 1-oxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxypiperidine (tempol) at the early phase of AP. Cerulein-induced AP led to the development of acute edematous pancreatitis with a significant decrease in the level of sulfhydryl (–SH) groups (oxidation marker) both in heart and in pancreatic tissues as well as a substantial increase in plasma creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB) activity (marker of the heart muscle lesion) which confirmed the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of cardiac damage. The tempol treatment significantly reduced the intensity of inflammation and oxidative damage and decreased the morphological evidence of pancreas injury at early AP stages. Moreover, it markedly attenuated AP-induced cardiac damage revealed by normalization of the –SH group levels and CK-MB activity. On the basis of these studies, it is possible to conclude that tempol has a profound protective effect against cardiac and pancreatic damage induced by AP. PMID:26770650

  10. Tempol, a Membrane-Permeable Radical Scavenger, Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory and Cardioprotective Effects in the Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Marciniak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, it remains unclear whether mild form of acute pancreatitis (AP may cause myocardial damage which may be asymptomatic for a long time. Pathogenesis of AP-related cardiac injury may be attributed in part to ROS/RNS overproduction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the oxidative stress changes in both the pancreas and the heart and to estimate the protective effects of 1-oxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxypiperidine (tempol at the early phase of AP. Cerulein-induced AP led to the development of acute edematous pancreatitis with a significant decrease in the level of sulfhydryl (–SH groups (oxidation marker both in heart and in pancreatic tissues as well as a substantial increase in plasma creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB activity (marker of the heart muscle lesion which confirmed the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of cardiac damage. The tempol treatment significantly reduced the intensity of inflammation and oxidative damage and decreased the morphological evidence of pancreas injury at early AP stages. Moreover, it markedly attenuated AP-induced cardiac damage revealed by normalization of the –SH group levels and CK-MB activity. On the basis of these studies, it is possible to conclude that tempol has a profound protective effect against cardiac and pancreatic damage induced by AP.

  11. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2)-Induced Inflammation in Initiation, Progression, and Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kapil, E-mail: kmehta@mdanderson.org; Han, Amy [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is among the deadliest cancers, with a median survival of six months. It is generally believed that infiltrating PC arises through the progression of early grade pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanINs). In one model of the disease, the K-ras mutation is an early molecular event during progression of pancreatic cancer; it is followed by the accumulation of additional genetic abnormalities. This model has been supported by animal studies in which activated K-ras and p53 mutations produced metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice. According to this model, oncogenic K-ras induces PanIN formation but fails to promote the invasive stage. However, when these mice are subjected to caerulein treatment, which induces a chronic pancreatitis-like state and inflammatory response, PanINs rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma. These results are consistent with epidemiologic studies showing that patients with chronic pancreatitis have a much higher risk of developing PC. In line with these observations, recent studies have revealed elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in early PanINs, and its expression increases even more as the disease progresses. In this review we discuss the implications of increased TG2 expression in initiation, progression, and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

  12. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha Gupta; Seema Ahmed; Lemuel Shaffer; Paula Cavens; Josef Blankstein

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term an...

  13. Cell cycle characteristics of the pancreas in an animal model of isolated pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui-Wu, Dai; Guang-Yu, Chen; Fa-Qun, He; Zu, Huang; Hong-Tao, Yan; Hong-Yin, Liang; Tao, Wang; Ning, Lin; Li-Jun, Tang; Li-Ping, Chen

    2014-03-01

    In our previous study, we established a small animal model that mimicked the pathophysiology of isolated pancreatic trauma. To gain further insights into the relationships between tissue damage and the ability of the pancreatic cells to regenerate, we induced pancreatic trauma in rats maintained over 7 days and analyzed both the alteration of the cell death and the cell cycle distribution of the pancreatic cells in this study. The rats were divided into two groups as follows: impact and control. The pancreas in the impact group was injured by a BIM-III biotical impact machine. Pancreatic enzyme activity, the level of Ca in the serum, pancreatic cell death, and cell cycle characteristics were examined after the trauma. In the impact groups, lipase was activated later than amylase and lasted persistently. The levels of serum Ca decreased at 6 hours after injury, sharply declined at 24 hours and 72 hours compared with the control groups, and returned to normal levels at 7 days. The pancreatic trauma also induced the compensatory proliferation of pancreatic cells. The results from a TUNEL stain, flow cytometry, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry indicated that pancreatic trauma induces cell death and the compensatory proliferation of pancreatic cells. Detecting amylase and lipase at the same time can help us determine the exocrine function of pancreas. Serum Ca can be used as an indicator for estimating the severity of pancreatic trauma. The cell cycle characteristics of the pancreas in the animal model of isolated pancreatic trauma indicate that the proper remedial time is in the first 24 hours after the pancreatic trauma.

  14. Severe Hyperlipidemia Induced Hemorrhagic Pancreatitis during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L. Koscica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We report a case of familial hyperlipidemia in pregnancy that resulted in hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Case. A patient at 27-week gestation was admitted for recurrent pancreatitis secondary to severe hyperlipidemia. With conservative care, the patient improved but on the fourth day of admission she experienced a sudden onset of hypotension and was diagnosed with hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Conclusion. Pancreatitis caused by hyperlipidemia is an uncommon event during pregnancy. A familiarity with the severe complications associated with this potentially life-threatening condition is important.

  15. Hipertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañas García, María Dolores; Marchán Carranza, Enrique; Galiana Gómez Del Pulgar, Jesús; Fernández de Bobadilla Pascual, Belén

    Hypertrigliceridemia is the third most common cause of acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is 5% in healthy patients and 4% during pregnancy with triglyceride levels >1,000mg/dl. During pregnancy there are changes in the lipid profile that increase between two and four times triglyceride levels. Its increase in excessive form produces an oxidative environment with injury of the endothelium and appearance of complications such as preeclampsia or pancreatitis. We present the case of a pregnant woman with pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Virtudes Céspedes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We explored whether the combination of lurbinectedin (PM01183 with the antimetabolite gemcitabine could result in a synergistic antitumor effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA mouse models. We also studied the contribution of lurbinectedin to this synergism. This drug presents a dual pharmacological effect that contributes to its in vivo antitumor activity: (i specific binding to DNA minor grooves, inhibiting active transcription and DNA repair; and (ii specific depletion of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs. We evaluated the in vivo antitumor activity of lurbinectedin and gemcitabine as single agents and in combination in SW-1990 and MIA PaCa-2 cell-line xenografts and in patient-derived PDA models (AVATAR. Lurbinectedin-gemcitabine combination induced a synergistic effect on both MIA PaCa-2 [combination index (CI=0.66] and SW-1990 (CI=0.80 tumor xenografts. It also induced complete tumor remissions in four out of six patient-derived PDA xenografts. This synergism was associated with enhanced DNA damage (anti-γ-H2AX, cell cycle blockage, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In addition to the enhanced DNA damage, which is a consequence of the interaction of the two drugs with the DNA, lurbinectedin induced TAM depletion leading to cytidine deaminase (CDA downregulation in PDA tumors. This effect could, in turn, induce an increase of gemcitabine-mediated DNA damage that was especially relevant in high-density TAM tumors. These results show that lurbinectedin can be used to develop ‘molecularly targeted’ combination strategies.

  17. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Guillén, María José; López-Casas, Pedro Pablo; Sarno, Francesca; Gallardo, Alberto; Álamo, Patricia; Cuevas, Carmen; Hidalgo, Manuel; Galmarini, Carlos María; Allavena, Paola; Avilés, Pablo; Mangues, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We explored whether the combination of lurbinectedin (PM01183) with the antimetabolite gemcitabine could result in a synergistic antitumor effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) mouse models. We also studied the contribution of lurbinectedin to this synergism. This drug presents a dual pharmacological effect that contributes to its in vivo antitumor activity: (i) specific binding to DNA minor grooves, inhibiting active transcription and DNA repair; and (ii) specific depletion of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We evaluated the in vivo antitumor activity of lurbinectedin and gemcitabine as single agents and in combination in SW-1990 and MIA PaCa-2 cell-line xenografts and in patient-derived PDA models (AVATAR). Lurbinectedin-gemcitabine combination induced a synergistic effect on both MIA PaCa-2 [combination index (CI)=0.66] and SW-1990 (CI=0.80) tumor xenografts. It also induced complete tumor remissions in four out of six patient-derived PDA xenografts. This synergism was associated with enhanced DNA damage (anti-γ-H2AX), cell cycle blockage, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In addition to the enhanced DNA damage, which is a consequence of the interaction of the two drugs with the DNA, lurbinectedin induced TAM depletion leading to cytidine deaminase (CDA) downregulation in PDA tumors. This effect could, in turn, induce an increase of gemcitabine-mediated DNA damage that was especially relevant in high-density TAM tumors. These results show that lurbinectedin can be used to develop ‘molecularly targeted’ combination strategies. PMID:27780828

  18. Management of hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Tejal; Poon, Leona C Y; Teoh, T G; Moorthy, K; Robinson, Stephen; Neary, Nicola; Valabhji, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a recognised rare complication in pregnancy. The reported incidence varies between 3 and 7 in 10 000 pregnancies and is higher in the third trimester. The commonest causes in pregnancy include gallstones, alcohol and hypertriglyceridaemia. Non-gallstone pancreatitis is associated with more complications and poorer outcome with hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis having mortality rates ranging from 7.5 to 9.0% and 10.0 to 17.5% for mother and foetus, respectively. A 40-year-old para 4 woman, who presented at 15(+4) weeks' gestation, was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. Past medical history included Graves' disease and hypertriglyceridaemia. Fenofibrate was discontinued immediately after discovery of the pregnancy. Initial investigations showed elevated amylase (475.0 µ/L) and triglycerides (46.6 mmol/L). Imaging revealed an inflamed pancreas without evidence of biliary obstruction/gallstones hence confirming the diagnosis of hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis. Laboratory tests gradually improved (triglyceride 5.2 mmol/L on day 17). On day 18, ultrasound confirmed foetal demise (18(+1) weeks) and a hysterotomy was performed as she had had four previous caesarean sections. Management of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy requires a multi-disciplinary approach. Hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis has poor outcomes when diagnosed in early pregnancy. Identifying those at risk pre-pregnancy and antenatally can allow close monitoring through pregnancy to optimise care.

  19. Protective effect of bacillopeptidase CFR5 from Bacillus subtilis CFR5 on cerulein-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmila, G R; Venkateswaran, G

    2017-09-16

    Bacillopeptidase is a serine peptidase, known for its fibrinolytic activity. However, a very little information is known about its in vivo inflammatory and/or anti-inflammatory properties. Thus, to understand whether bacillopeptidase incorporation can regulate pancreatitis or not, the cerulein-induced pancreatitis model was used, and the role of bacillopeptidase on pancreatitis was studied. In this study, 46 kDa protein was purified from Bacillus subtilis and identified as bacillopeptidase CFR5 (BPC) through MS/MS analysis. The nutritional prophylactic group was orally fed with two doses of BPC (100 μg/Kg/BW of rat) 6 h before cerulein administration and analyzed for its effect on intestine and pancreas inflammation, cytokines, and pancreatitis marker gene expression. BPC administration significantly reduced the severity of pancreatitis by decreasing serum amylase, lipase, pancreatic edema and myeloperoxidase activity. The pretreatment with BPC suppressed the pancreatic pro-inflammatory and inflammatory cytokines production including IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13 in both pancreas and serum samples. Moreover, BPC supplementation restored pancreatitis mediated disruption of intestinal barrier integrity by upregulating tight junction proteins (ZO-1, occludin), antimicrobial peptides (DEFB1, CRAMP), MUC-2, TFF3 expression and by enhancing SCFA's production. Pretreatment with BPC suppressed the intestinal inflammation with reduced cytokines production in the colon and ileal region of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Thus, BPC based pretreatment protocol is a novel intervention to prevent acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The second case of a young man with L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binet, Quentin; Dufour, Inès; Agneessens, Emmanuel; Debongnie, Jean-Claude; Aouattah, Tarik; Covas, Angélique; Coche, Jean-Charles; De Koninck, Xavier

    2018-04-21

    Dietary supplementation of arginine has been used by numerous world-class athletes and professional bodybuilders over the past 30 years. L-Arginine indeed enhances muscular power and general performance via maintaining ATP level. However, L-arginine is also known to induce acute pancreatitis in murine models. We report the case of young man presenting with upper abdominal pain and increased serum lipase levels. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography confirms a mild acute pancreatitis. Common etiologies have been ruled out and toxicological anamnestic screening reveals the intake of protein powder. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the second case in human of arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. This case report suggests that every patient presenting with acute pancreatitis without obvious etiology should be evaluated for the intake of toxics other than alcohol, including L-arginine.

  1. Recurrent pancreatitis induced by hyperparathyroidism in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Wilk, Mariusz; Okopien, Bogusław

    2011-09-01

    As primary hyperparathyroidism affects mainly middle-aged and elderly women, it is an infrequent finding during gestation and breastfeeding. To date, less than 200 pregnant patients with primary hyperparathyroidism diagnosed during pregnancy have been described. Like in other disorders of the parathyroid gland, the recognition of primary hyperparathyroidism during pregnancy and lactation may be difficult, as clinical symptoms are not specific, while laboratory findings may be masked by some typical pregnancy-induced changes in calcium and phosphate homeostasis. If remains untreated, the disease may result in serious clinical implications for the mother and fetus. Most authors consider surgery within the second trimester of pregnancy as the treatment of choice in this group of patients. In our paper, we discuss the case of a 35-year-old female with a history of recurrent acute pancreatitis and recurrent abortions. As the patient declined surgery, conservative management with calcitonin was started and continued throughout the rest of pregnancy, and led to giving birth to the infant whose only health problem was transient hypocalcemia. The described case shows that conservative management, if started respectively early and conducted on the basis of a patient's condition, may effectively reduce increased perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality in pregnant women declining surgery.

  2. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term and was successfully treated with postpartum therapeutic plasma exchange. Patient also developed several other complications related to her substantial hypertriglyceridemia including preeclampsia, chylous ascites, retinal detachment, pleural effusion, and chronic pericarditis. This patient had no previous family or personal history of lipid abnormality and had four successful prior pregnancies without developing gestational hypertriglyceridemia. Such a severe hypertriglyceridemia is usually seen in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndromes where hypertriglyceridemia is exacerbated by the pregnancy, leading to fatal complications such as acute pancreatitis.

  3. Obese rats exhibit high levels of fat necrosis and isoprostanes in taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Pereda

    vasoconstriction. Future studies are needed to confirm the translational relevance of the present findings obtained in a rat model of taurocholate-induced pancreatic damage and necrosis.

  4. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy causing maternal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hae Rin; Kim, Suk Young; Cho, Yoon Jin; Chon, Seung Joo

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is rare and occurs in approximately 3 in 10,000 pregnancies. It rarely complicates pregnancy, and can occur during any trimester, however over half (52%) of cases occur during the third trimester and during the post-partum period. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, acute pancreatitis caused by hypertriglyceridemia due to increase of estrogen during the gestational period is very unusual, but complication carries a higher risk of morbidity and mortality for both the mother and the fetus. We experienced a case of pregnant woman who died of acute exacerbation of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis at 23 weeks of gestation. We report on progress and management of this case along with literature reviews.

  5. BITC Sensitizes Pancreatic Adenocarcinomas to TRAIL-induced Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A. Wicker

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer with a greater than 95% mortality rate and short survival after diagnosis. Chemotherapeutic resistance hinders successful treatment. This resistance is often associated with mutations in codon 12 of the K-Ras gene (K-Ras 12, which is present in over 90% of all pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Codon 12 mutations maintain Ras in a constitutively active state leading to continuous cellular proliferation. Our study determined if TRAIL resistance in pancreatic adenocarcinomas with K-Ras 12 mutations could be overcome by first sensitizing the cells with Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC. BITC is a component of cruciferous vegetables and a cell cycle inhibitor. BxPC3, MiaPaCa2 and Panc-1 human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines were examined for TRAIL resistance. Our studies show BITC induced TRAIL sensitization by dual activation of both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways.

  6. Metabolic reprogramming induced by ketone bodies diminishes pancreatic cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Surendra K; Gebregiworgis, Teklab; Purohit, Vinee; Chaika, Nina V; Gunda, Venugopal; Radhakrishnan, Prakash; Mehla, Kamiya; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Powers, Robert; Yu, Fang; Singh, Pankaj K

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. To fulfill the increased energy requirements, tumor cells secrete cytokines/factors inducing muscle and fat degradation in cancer patients, a condition known as cancer cachexia. It accounts for nearly 20% of all cancer-related deaths. However, the mechanistic basis of cancer cachexia and therapies targeting cancer cachexia thus far remain elusive. A ketogenic diet, a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet that elevates circulating levels of ketone bodies (i.e., acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone), serves as an alternative energy source. It has also been proposed that a ketogenic diet leads to systemic metabolic changes. Keeping in view the significant role of metabolic alterations in cancer, we hypothesized that a ketogenic diet may diminish glycolytic flux in tumor cells to alleviate cachexia syndrome and, hence, may provide an efficient therapeutic strategy. We observed reduced glycolytic flux in tumor cells upon treatment with ketone bodies. Ketone bodies also diminished glutamine uptake, overall ATP content, and survival in multiple pancreatic cancer cell lines, while inducing apoptosis. A decrease in levels of c-Myc, a metabolic master regulator, and its recruitment on glycolytic gene promoters, was in part responsible for the metabolic phenotype in tumor cells. Ketone body-induced intracellular metabolomic reprogramming in pancreatic cancer cells also leads to a significantly diminished cachexia in cell line models. Our mouse orthotopic xenograft models further confirmed the effect of a ketogenic diet in diminishing tumor growth and cachexia. Thus, our studies demonstrate that the cachectic phenotype is in part due to metabolic alterations in tumor cells, which can be reverted by a ketogenic diet, causing reduced tumor growth and inhibition of muscle and body weight loss.

  7. Time-course proteomic analysis of taurocholate-induced necrotizing acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fétaud-Lapierre, Vanessa; Pastor, Catherine M; Jorge-Costa, Manuel; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Morel, Denis R; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2013-06-24

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas, which varies greatly in course and severity. Severe forms are associated with serious local and/or systemic complications, and eventually death. The pathobiology of acute pancreatitis is complex. Animal models have been developed to investigate pathobiological processes and identify factors determining disease course. We performed a time-course proteomic analysis using a rat model of severe necrotizing acute pancreatitis induced by taurocholate perfusion in the pancreatic ducts. Results showed that levels of proteins associated to a given biological process changed in a coordinated fashion after disease onset. It was possible to follow the response of a particular pathobiological process to pancreatitis induction and to compare the course of protein pathways. Proteins involved in acinar cell secretion were found to follow a different kinetics than other cellular processes. After an initial decrease, secretory pathway-associated proteins raised again at 18 h post-induction. This phenomenon coincided with a burst in the expression of pancreatitis-associated protein (REG3A), an acute phase protein produced by the exocrine pancreas, and with the decrease of classical markers of pancreatic injury, suggesting that the expression of proteins associated to the secretory pathway may be a modulating factor of pancreas injury. Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a complex inflammatory disease, the pathobiology of which is not yet fully understood. Various animal models, relying on different mechanisms of disease induction, have been developed in order to investigate pathobiological processes of AP. In this study, we performed a time-course proteomic analysis to investigate changes of the pancreas proteome occurring in an experimental model of AP induced by perfusion of taurocholate, a bile acid, into the pancreatic duct. This experimental model is characterized by a severe disease with pancreatic necrosis and systemic

  8. P2X7R Blockade Prevents NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and Pancreatic Fibrosis in a Mouse Model of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gui-Xian; Wang, Man-Xue; Nie, Wei; Liu, Da-Wei; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Hong-Bin

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of P2X7R (purinergic 2X7 receptor) and NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3) inflammasome activation in the process of pancreatic fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Chronic pancreatitis was induced by repeated intraperitoneal injections of 50 μg/kg cerulein for 6 weeks in mice. P2X7R antagonist oxidized ATP (OxATP) or brilliant blue G (BBG) was administered after the last cerulein injection for 2 weeks. Pancreatic chronic inflammation and fibrosis were evaluated by histological score, Sirius red staining, and alpha-smooth muscle actin immunohistochemical staining. We further determined pancreatic P2X7R, NLRP3, and caspase-1 expressions in gene and protein levels and the pancreatic concentrations of caspase-1, interleukin 1β (IL-1β), and IL-18. The pancreatic P2X7R, NLRP3, and caspase-1 expressions in gene and protein levels and the pancreatic concentrations of caspase-1, IL-1β, and IL-18 were all reduced significantly in both the OxATP and BBG groups (P P2X7R antagonist OxATP and BBG significantly decreased pancreatic chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a mouse CP model and suggested that blockade of P2X7R-NLRP3 inflammasome signaling pathway may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for CP and its fibrotic process.

  9. [Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis in pregnancy. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exbrayat, V; Morel, J; De Filippis, J-P; Tourne, G; Jospe, R; Auboyer, C

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of a 31-year-old pregnant patient in the 33rd week of gestation, with no history of dyslipidaemia, admitted for sub-acute epigastric pain. The milky aspect of blood samples was remarkable. Blood analysis showed a moderate increase in pancreatic enzymes but a major hyperlipaemia: triglyceridaemia 113 g/l and total cholesterolaemia 25 g/l. We suspected a hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis in pregnancy. The diagnosis was confirmed by CT-scan. Abdominal echography showed no abnormalities in biliary duct. After few hours, a caesarean was performed for acute fetal distress. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit where a decrease of hypertriglyceridemia was already observed. Only one plasmapheresis was performed. Heparin was introduced. Rapid clinical improvement allowed discharge from intensive care at day 3. This case report illustrates lipid decrease with undertaken treatments. We discuss the management of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis in pregnancy.

  10. Valproic acid-induced pancreatitis in a 15-year-old boy with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veri, Kadi; Uibo, Oivi; Talvik, Inga; Talvik, Tiina

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced acute pancreatitis is a rare condition in childhood, and information about the incidence of valproic acid-induced acute pancreatitis in the pediatric population is scarce. In this clinical case, we report a first documented pediatric case of valproic acid-induced pancreatitis in Estonia. A 15-year-old boy with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy developed acute pancreatitis after 2-month therapy with valproic acid. The symptoms of pancreatitis subsided within 1 week after the discontinuation of treatment with valproic acid. Acute pancreatitis should be suspected in any pediatric patient with gastrointestinal symptoms during valproate treatment.

  11. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  12. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes. Treatment Treatment for pancreatitis may include a hospital stay for intravenous (IV) fluids, pain medicine, and other medicines. Surgery is sometimes needed to treat complications. Eating, Diet, & Nutrition If you have pancreatitis, your health care ...

  13. Hypoxia inducible BHLHB2 is a novel and independent prognostic marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Weibin; Reiser-Erkan, Carolin; Michalski, Christoph W.; Raggi, Matthias C.; Quan, Liao; Yupei, Zhao; Friess, Helmut; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The expression and function of BHLHB2 (DEC1/SHARP2) in pancreatic cancer is unknown. → Hypoxia and serum starvation induces BHLHB2 expression in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. → BHLHB2 inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell line SU86.86 increases ED50 of gemcitabine 2.8-fold. → BHLHB2 is an independent prognostic factor in multivariable cox analysis with a hazard ratio of 2:4. -- Abstract: Aims: The cyclic adenosine monophosphate-inducible basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain containing class-B2 transcriptional factor BHLHB2 is differentially expressed in a number of human malignancies. In the present study, the expression, regulation, functions and prognostic impact of BHLHB2 in pancreatic cancer were investigated. Methods: Expression analyses were carried out in tissues of the normal pancreas (n = 10) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n = 77) as well as in eight pancreatic cancer cell lines using quantitative RT-PCR, semiquantitative immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analyses. In vitro functional experiments were conducted using siRNA transfection, hypoxia, serum starvation, apoptosis induction with gemcitabine and actinomycin-D, and invasion assays. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were determined in a multivariable analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: BHLHB2 mRNA and protein expressions were strongly induced by hypoxia and by serum starvation in pancreatic cancer cell lines. BHLHB2 silencing with RNAi had no significant effects on growth and invasion but increased apoptosis resistance against gemcitabine by reducing caspace-3 cleavage. In BHLHB2 silenced cells the ED50 of gemcitabine increased from 13.95 ± 1.353 to 38.70 ± 5.262 nM (p < 0.05). Ex vivo, the weak/absent nuclear staining in normal pancreatic ducts and acinar cells was replaced by moderate to strong nuclear/cytoplasmic staining in PanIN lesions and pancreatic cancer cells. Patients with

  14. Hypoxia inducible BHLHB2 is a novel and independent prognostic marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Weibin; Reiser-Erkan, Carolin; Michalski, Christoph W.; Raggi, Matthias C. [Department of Surgery, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Quan, Liao; Yupei, Zhao [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Peking (China); Friess, Helmut [Department of Surgery, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Erkan, Mert, E-mail: erkan@chir.med.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Kleeff, Joerg [Department of Surgery, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} The expression and function of BHLHB2 (DEC1/SHARP2) in pancreatic cancer is unknown. {yields} Hypoxia and serum starvation induces BHLHB2 expression in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. {yields} BHLHB2 inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell line SU86.86 increases ED50 of gemcitabine 2.8-fold. {yields} BHLHB2 is an independent prognostic factor in multivariable cox analysis with a hazard ratio of 2:4. -- Abstract: Aims: The cyclic adenosine monophosphate-inducible basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain containing class-B2 transcriptional factor BHLHB2 is differentially expressed in a number of human malignancies. In the present study, the expression, regulation, functions and prognostic impact of BHLHB2 in pancreatic cancer were investigated. Methods: Expression analyses were carried out in tissues of the normal pancreas (n = 10) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n = 77) as well as in eight pancreatic cancer cell lines using quantitative RT-PCR, semiquantitative immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analyses. In vitro functional experiments were conducted using siRNA transfection, hypoxia, serum starvation, apoptosis induction with gemcitabine and actinomycin-D, and invasion assays. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were determined in a multivariable analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: BHLHB2 mRNA and protein expressions were strongly induced by hypoxia and by serum starvation in pancreatic cancer cell lines. BHLHB2 silencing with RNAi had no significant effects on growth and invasion but increased apoptosis resistance against gemcitabine by reducing caspace-3 cleavage. In BHLHB2 silenced cells the ED50 of gemcitabine increased from 13.95 {+-} 1.353 to 38.70 {+-} 5.262 nM (p < 0.05). Ex vivo, the weak/absent nuclear staining in normal pancreatic ducts and acinar cells was replaced by moderate to strong nuclear/cytoplasmic staining in PanIN lesions and pancreatic cancer

  15. Effects of dietary fat on virus-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirev, T.; Woutersen, R.A.; Kril, A.

    2002-01-01

    The present study was performed to assess the effects of diets supplemented with low (5%) and high (20%) corn oil on a Pts 56 retrovirus-induced model of pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl. The early microscopic lesions appear after 3 mo after virus treatment and progress over time. Eight to

  16. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia - Induced Pancreatitis During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Çelik

    2008-08-01

    scan of abdomen was normal, with no evidence of cholelithiasis but there was perisplenic fluid accumulation. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia was made. With early conservative treatment the patient’s condition was effectively improved and she was discharged from the hospital 8 days later. After 12 weeks, cesarean section was performed due to previous cesarean section. She was discharged home three days later with her baby.

  17. Acute alcohol-induced pancreatic injury is similar with intravenous and intragastric routes of alcohol administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lutz; Dieckmann, Ralf; Hackert, Thilo; Gebhard, Martha-Maria; Werner, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Five percent of alcoholics develop an acute pancreatitis (AP). The mechanism leading to pancreatic injury is not yet understood. Microcirculatory disorders seem to play a pivotal role. The objective of this study was to compare alcoholic pancreatic injury in response to intravenous and intragastric routes of alcohol administration. Alcohol was applied in rats intravenously (IV) or gastric via a surgical implanted feeding tube (IG). Serum alcohol concentration was maintained between 1.5‰ and 2.5‰. Four subgroups (n = 6/group) were examined in the IV/IG arm and compared with healthy controls. Pancreatic microcirculation, enzyme levels, and morphological damage were assessed after 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours. Microcirculatory analysis showed significantly disturbed pancreatic perfusion and increased adherent leukocytes in IV and IG animals. In IV and IG groups, serum amylase was increased without morphological signs of AP compared with healthy controls. Alcohol application does not induce AP in rodents, but impairs pancreatic microcirculation irrespectively of the application route. Intravenous application is commonly used and shows no disadvantages compared with the physiological intragastric application form. Therefore, the intravenous route offers a valid model, which mimics the physiological process for further studies of the influence of acute alcohol intoxication on the pancreas.

  18. Differentiated properties of hepatocytes induced from pancreatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, David; Shen, Chia-Ning; Slack, Jonathan M W

    2002-09-01

    Transdifferentiation of pancreas to liver is a well-recognized phenomenon and has been described in animal experiments and human pathology. We recently produced an in vitro model for the transdifferentiation (or conversion) of the pancreatic cell line AR42J-B13 to hepatocytes based on culture with dexamethasone (Dex). To determine whether the hepatocytes express markers of hepatic intermediary metabolism and detoxification, we investigated the patterns of expression of glucokinase, cytochrome P450s CYP3A1 and CYP2B1/2, testosterone/4-nitrophenol uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT), and aryl sulfotransferase. All were expressed. We also determined the expression of 2 enzymes involved in ammonia detoxification: carbamoylphosphate synthetase I (CPS I) and glutamine synthetase (GS). These enzymes are normally strictly compartmentalized in liver in a wide periportal pattern and the last downstream perivenous hepatocytes, respectively. Following culture with Dex, CPS I and GS are expressed in 2 different cell populations, suggesting that both periportal and perivenous hepatocytes are induced. We also produced a reporter assay based on the activation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) by the transthyretin (TTR) promoter or glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) promoter. After culture with Dex, transfected cells begin to express GFP, showing that hepatic promoters are activated in concert with the induction of the hepatocyte phenotype. Lastly, we examined the stability of the hepatic phenotype and found that some cells still express liver markers (transferrin or albumin) up to 14 days after removal of Dex. In conclusion, these results suggest that pancreatic hepatocytes produced by this method may offer an alternative model to primary cultures of hepatocytes for the study of liver function.

  19. The pancreatitis-associated protein VMP1, a key regulator of inducible autophagy, promotes KrasG12D-mediated pancreatic cancer initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncle, C; Molejon, M I; Lac, S; Tellechea, J I; Lomberk, G; Gramatica, L; Fernandez Zapico, M F; Dusetti, N; Urrutia, R; Iovanna, J L

    2016-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental evidence have firmly established that chronic pancreatitis, in particular in the context of Kras oncogenic mutations, predisposes to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the repertoire of molecular mediators of pancreatitis involved in Kras-mediated initiation of pancreatic carcinogenesis remains to be fully defined. In this study we demonstrate a novel role for vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1), a pancreatitis-associated protein critical for inducible autophagy, in the regulation of Kras-induced PDAC initiation. Using a newly developed genetically engineered model, we demonstrate that VMP1 increases the ability of Kras to give rise to preneoplastic lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs). This promoting effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation is due, at least in part, by an increase in cell proliferation combined with a decrease in apoptosis. Using chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy, we show that this drug antagonizes the effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation. Thus, we conclude that VMP1-mediated autophagy cooperate with Kras to promote PDAC initiation. These findings are of significant medical relevance, molecules targeting autophagy are currently being tested along chemotherapeutic agents to treat PDAC and other tumors in human trials. PMID:27415425

  20. In Vivo Imaging Reveals Significant Tumor Vascular Dysfunction and Increased Tumor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Expression Induced by High Single-Dose Irradiation in a Pancreatic Tumor Model

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    Maeda, Azusa [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chen, Yonghong; Bu, Jiachuan; Mujcic, Hilda [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wouters, Bradly G. [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); DaCosta, Ralph S., E-mail: rdacosta@uhnres.utoronto.ca [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of high-dose irradiation on pancreatic tumor vasculature and microenvironment using in vivo imaging techniques. Methods and Materials: A BxPC3 pancreatic tumor xenograft was established in a dorsal skinfold window chamber model and a subcutaneous hind leg model. Tumors were irradiated with a single dose of 4, 12, or 24 Gy. The dorsal skinfold window chamber model was used to assess tumor response, vascular function and permeability, platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium, and tumor hypoxia for up to 14 days after 24-Gy irradiation. The hind leg model was used to monitor tumor size, hypoxia, and vascularity for up to 65 days after 24-Gy irradiation. Tumors were assessed histologically to validate in vivo observations. Results: In vivo fluorescence imaging revealed temporary vascular dysfunction in tumors irradiated with a single dose of 4 to 24 Gy, but most significantly with a single dose of 24 Gy. Vascular functional recovery was observed by 14 days after irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, irradiation with 24 Gy caused platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium within hours to days after irradiation. Vascular permeability was significantly higher in irradiated tumors compared with nonirradiated controls 14 days after irradiation. This observation corresponded with increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in irradiated tumors. In the hind leg model, irradiation with a single dose of 24 Gy led to tumor growth delay, followed by tumor regrowth. Conclusions: Irradiation of the BxPC3 tumors with a single dose of 24 Gy caused transient vascular dysfunction and increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Such biological changes may impact tumor response to high single-dose and hypofractionated irradiation, and further investigations are needed to better understand the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy.

  1. Dimethyl fumarate protects pancreatic islet cells and non-endocrine tissue in L-arginine-induced chronic pancreatitis.

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    Lourdes Robles

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis (CP is a progressive disorder resulting in the destruction and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma which ultimately leads to impairment of the endocrine and exocrine functions. Dimethyl Fumarate (DMF was recently approved by FDA for treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis. DMF's unique anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties make it an interesting drug to test on other inflammatory conditions. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of DMF on islet cells and non-endocrine tissue in a rodent model of L-Arginine-induced CP.Male Wistar rats fed daily DMF (25 mg/kg or vehicle by oral gavage were given 5 IP injections of L-Arginine (250 mg/100 g × 2, 1 hr apart. Rats were assessed with weights and intra-peritoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT, 2 g/kg. Islets were isolated and assessed for islet mass and viability with flow cytometry. Non-endocrine tissue was assessed for histology, myeloperoxidase (MPO, and lipid peroxidation level (MDA. In vitro assessments included determination of heme oxygenase (HO-1 protein expression by Western blot.Weight gain was significantly reduced in untreated CP group at 6 weeks. IPGTT revealed significant impairment in untreated CP group and its restoration with DMF therapy (P <0.05. Untreated CP rats had pancreatic atrophy, severe acinar architectural damage, edema, and fatty infiltration as well as elevated MDA and MPO levels, which were significantly improved by DMF treatment. After islet isolation, the volume of non-endocrine tissue was significantly smaller in untreated CP group. Although islet counts were similar in the two groups, islet viability was significantly reduced in untreated CP group and improved with DMF treatment. In vitro incubation of human pancreatic tissue with DMF significantly increased HO-1 expression.Administration of DMF attenuated L-Arginine-induced CP and islet function in rats. DMF treatment could be a possible strategy to improve clinical

  2. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Mami; Hori, Mika; Mutoh, Michihiro; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5’ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequent...

  3. Lipoic acid suppresses portal endotoxemia-induced steatohepatitis and pancreatic inflammation in rats.

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    Tian, Yu-Feng; He, Chih-Tsueng; Chen, Yu-Ting; Hsieh, Po-Shiuan

    2013-05-14

    To examine the effect of α-lipoic acid (LA) on mild portal endotoxemia-induced steatohepatitis and associated pancreatic abnormalities in fructose-fed rats. Rats were randomly assigned into two groups with a regular or 60% fructose-enriched diet for 8 wk. After fructose feeding for 4 wk, rats were further divided into four subgroups: with intraportal saline (FPV), with intraportal saline plus administration of LA (FPV + LA), with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion (FPLPS), and with LPS infusion plus administration of LA (FPLPS + LA). Rats were treated with LPS using intraportal infusion while LA was administered orally. Metabolite levels, superoxide levels, inflammatory markers, malondialdehyde content, glutathione content and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene expression were all measured using standard biochemical techniques. Pancreatic insulin secretion was evaluated by a hyperglycemic clamp technique. Histology of liver and pancreas tissues were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. Fructose-induced elevation in plasma C-reactive protein, amylase, superoxide, white blood cell count as well as in hepatic and pancreatic contents of malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 were increased in animals treated with LPS and reversed with LA administration. The augmented hepatic gene expression of TLR4 in fructose-fed rats was further increased in those with intraportal LPS infusion, which was partially reversed by LA administration. Pathological examination showed inflammatory changes and leukocyte infiltration in hepatic and pancreatic islets of animals treated with LPS but were rarely observed in those with LA treatment. In addition to affects on the liver, impaired pancreatic insulin secretion seen in fructose-fed rats was deteriorated in with LPS treatment and partially reversed with LA administration. These data suggest LA could significantly suppress mild portal-endotoxemia but not fructose-induced liver and

  4. Experimental model of chronic pancreatitis, a review - Does it really exist?

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Riaz; Ochi, Koji; Harada, Hideo; Tanaka, Juntaro; Mizushima, Takaaki; Matsumoto, Shuji; Seno, Toshinobu; Ichimura, Mitsuko; Akiyama, Tsuneo; Yokota, Satoshi

    1995-01-01

    Experimental model of pancreatitis is mandatory for elucidating the pathobiology of the disease and also to see the response of a novel treatment. In addition, the need for an animal model of chronic pancreatitis is further strengthened by the relative inaccessibility and paucity of the human pancreatitis tissue. Whereas various models of acute pancreatitis and also of exocrine pancreatic tumor have been described, chronic pancr-eatitis has not been consistently reproduced in experimental ani...

  5. Inhibitors of ORAI1 Prevent Cytosolic Calcium-Associated Injury of Human Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Acute Pancreatitis in 3 Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Voronina, Svetlana; Javed, Muhammad A.; Awais, Muhammad; Szatmary, Peter; Latawiec, Diane; Chvanov, Michael; Collier, David; Huang, Wei; Barrett, John; Begg, Malcolm; Stauderman, Ken; Roos, Jack; Grigoryev, Sergey; Ramos, Stephanie; Rogers, Evan; Whitten, Jeff; Velicelebi, Gonul; Dunn, Michael; Tepikin, Alexei V.; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Sustained activation of the cytosolic calcium concentration induces injury to pancreatic acinar cells and necrosis. The calcium release–activated calcium modulator ORAI1 is the most abundant Ca2+ entry channel in pancreatic acinar cells; it sustains calcium overload in mice exposed to toxins that induce pancreatitis. We investigated the roles of ORAI1 in pancreatic acinar cell injury and the development of acute pancreatitis in mice. Methods Mouse and human acinar cells, as well as HEK 293 cells transfected to express human ORAI1 with human stromal interaction molecule 1, were hyperstimulated or incubated with human bile acid, thapsigargin, or cyclopiazonic acid to induce calcium entry. GSK-7975A or CM_128 were added to some cells, which were analyzed by confocal and video microscopy and patch clamp recordings. Acute pancreatitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by ductal injection of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate or intravenous' administration of cerulein or ethanol and palmitoleic acid. Some mice then were given GSK-7975A or CM_128, which inhibit ORAI1, at different time points to assess local and systemic effects. Results GSK-7975A and CM_128 each separately inhibited toxin-induced activation of ORAI1 and/or activation of Ca2+ currents after Ca2+ release, in a concentration-dependent manner, in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells (inhibition >90% of the levels observed in control cells). The ORAI1 inhibitors also prevented activation of the necrotic cell death pathway in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells. GSK-7975A and CM_128 each inhibited all local and systemic features of acute pancreatitis in all 3 models, in dose- and time-dependent manners. The agents were significantly more effective, in a range of parameters, when given at 1 vs 6 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Conclusions Cytosolic calcium overload, mediated via ORAI1, contributes to the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. ORAI1 inhibitors might be developed

  6. Scrotal Swelling as a Complication of Hydrochlorothiazide Induced Acute Pancreatitis

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    Ivan Nikiforov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Scrotal swelling is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis with few reported cases in the literature. In this case report, we present a 59-year-old male with hydrochlorothiazide induced pancreatitis who developed scrotal swelling. Case Presentation. A 59-year-old male presented to the emergency department with sharp epigastric abdominal pain that radiated to the back and chest. On physical examination, he had abdominal tenderness and distention with hypoactive bowel sounds. Computed tomography (CT scan of the abdomen showed acute pancreatitis. The patient’s condition deteriorated and he was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU. After he improved and was transferred out of the ICU, the patient developed swelling of the scrotum and penis. Ultrasound (US of the scrotum showed large hydrocele bilaterally with no varicoceles or testicular masses. Good blood flow was observed for both testicles. The swelling diminished over the next eight days with the addition of Lasix and the patient was discharged home in stable condition. Conclusion. Scrotal swelling is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. It usually resolves spontaneously with conservative medical management such as diuretics and elevation of the legs.

  7. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β ablation limits pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia.

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    Ding, Li; Liou, Geou-Yarh; Schmitt, Daniel M; Storz, Peter; Zhang, Jin-San; Billadeau, Daniel D

    2017-09-01

    Acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a reversible epithelial transdifferentiation process that occurs in the pancreas in response to acute inflammation. ADM can rapidly progress towards pre-malignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions in the presence of mutant KRas and ultimately pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In the present work, we elucidate the role and related mechanism of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3β) in ADM development using in vitro 3D cultures and genetically engineered mouse models. We show that GSK-3β promotes TGF-α-induced ADM in 3D cultured primary acinar cells, whereas deletion of GSK-3β attenuates caerulein-induced ADM formation and PanIN progression in Kras G12D transgenic mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that GSK-3β ablation influences ADM formation and PanIN progression by suppressing oncogenic KRas-driven cell proliferation. Mechanistically, we show that GSK-3β regulates proliferation by increasing the activation of S6 kinase. Taken together, these results indicate that GSK-3β participates in early pancreatitis-induced ADM and thus could be a target for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis and the prevention of PDAC progression. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Obestatin Accelerates the Recovery in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats.

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    Jakub Bukowczan

    Full Text Available Several previous studies have shown that obestatin exhibits protective and regenerative effects in some organs including the stomach, kidney, and the brain. In the pancreas, pretreatment with obestatin inhibits the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, and promotes survival of pancreatic beta cells and human islets. However, no studies investigated the effect of obestatin administration following the onset of experimental acute pancreatitis.The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obestatin therapy in the course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, we tested the influence of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and administration of obestatin on daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion.Acute pancreatitis was induced by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion of the pancreas. Obestatin (8 nmol/kg/dose was administered intraperitoneally twice a day, starting 24 hours after the beginning of reperfusion. The effect of obestatin in the course of necrotizing pancreatitis was assessed between 2 and 14 days, and included histological, functional, and biochemical analyses. Secretory studies were performed on the third day after sham-operation or induction of acute pancreatitis in conscious rats equipped with chronic pancreatic fistula.Treatment with obestatin ameliorated morphological signs of pancreatic damage including edema, vacuolization of acinar cells, hemorrhages, acinar necrosis, and leukocyte infiltration of the gland, and led to earlier pancreatic regeneration. Structural changes were accompanied by biochemical and functional improvements manifested by accelerated normalization of interleukin-1β level and activity of myeloperoxidase and lipase, attenuation of the decrease in pancreatic DNA synthesis, and by an improvement of pancreatic blood flow. Induction of acute pancreatitis by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion significantly decreased daily food intake and

  9. Obestatin Accelerates the Recovery in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

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    Bukowczan, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Tomaszewska, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several previous studies have shown that obestatin exhibits protective and regenerative effects in some organs including the stomach, kidney, and the brain. In the pancreas, pretreatment with obestatin inhibits the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, and promotes survival of pancreatic beta cells and human islets. However, no studies investigated the effect of obestatin administration following the onset of experimental acute pancreatitis. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obestatin therapy in the course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, we tested the influence of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and administration of obestatin on daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion of the pancreas. Obestatin (8nmol/kg/dose) was administered intraperitoneally twice a day, starting 24 hours after the beginning of reperfusion. The effect of obestatin in the course of necrotizing pancreatitis was assessed between 2 and 14 days, and included histological, functional, and biochemical analyses. Secretory studies were performed on the third day after sham-operation or induction of acute pancreatitis in conscious rats equipped with chronic pancreatic fistula. Results Treatment with obestatin ameliorated morphological signs of pancreatic damage including edema, vacuolization of acinar cells, hemorrhages, acinar necrosis, and leukocyte infiltration of the gland, and led to earlier pancreatic regeneration. Structural changes were accompanied by biochemical and functional improvements manifested by accelerated normalization of interleukin-1β level and activity of myeloperoxidase and lipase, attenuation of the decrease in pancreatic DNA synthesis, and by an improvement of pancreatic blood flow. Induction of acute pancreatitis by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion significantly decreased daily food

  10. Neural plasticity in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

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    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic nerves undergo prominent alterations during the evolution and progression of human chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Intrapancreatic nerves increase in size (neural hypertrophy) and number (increased neural density). The proportion of autonomic and sensory fibres (neural remodelling) is switched, and are infiltrated by perineural inflammatory cells (pancreatic neuritis) or invaded by pancreatic cancer cells (neural invasion). These neuropathic alterations also correlate with neuropathic pain. Instead of being mere histopathological manifestations of disease progression, pancreatic neural plasticity synergizes with the enhanced excitability of sensory neurons, with Schwann cell recruitment toward cancer and with central nervous system alterations. These alterations maintain a bidirectional interaction between nerves and non-neural pancreatic cells, as demonstrated by tissue and neural damage inducing neuropathic pain, and activated neurons releasing mediators that modulate inflammation and cancer growth. Owing to the prognostic effects of pain and neural invasion in pancreatic cancer, dissecting the mechanism of pancreatic neuroplasticity holds major translational relevance. However, current in vivo models of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis contain many discrepancies from human disease that overshadow their translational value. The present Review discusses novel possibilities for mechanistically uncovering the role of the nervous system in pancreatic disease progression.

  11. TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway mediates HMGB1-induced pancreatic injury in mice with severe acute pancreatitis.

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    Li, Gang; Wu, Xuejun; Yang, Le; He, Yuxiang; Liu, Yang; Jin, Xing; Yuan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an extremely dangerous acute abdominal disorder which causes multiple complications and has a high mortality rate. Previous research has suggested that high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SAP; however, the mechanisms underlying this strong correlation remain unclear. In this study, to further investigate whether HMGB1 acts as a stimulating factor, and whether Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) acts as its major mediator in the development of pancreatic injury during SAP, recombinant human HMGB1 (rhHMGB1) and TLR4-deficient mice were used. We found that HMGB1 and TLR4 were highly expressed, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was activated in our mouse model of SAP. We noted that the rhHMGB1 pancreas-targeted injection activated the TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway and induced pancreatic injury in wild-type mice. In TLR4-deficient mice, the rhHMGB1-induced activation of NF-κB and pathological changes in the pancreas were less evident than in wild-type mice. Therefore, this study provides evidence that HMGB1 promotes the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, and its downstream TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway is a potential important mediator in the development of this form of pancreatic injury.

  12. Congo red modulates ACh-induced Ca2+ oscillations in single pancreatic acinar cells of mice

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    Huang, Ze-bing; Wang, Hai-yan; Sun, Na-na; Wang, Jing-ke; Zhao, Meng-qin; Shen, Jian-xin; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P; Fan, Xue-gong; Wu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Congo red, a secondary diazo dye, is usually used as an indicator for the presence of amyloid fibrils. Recent studies show that congo red exerts neuroprotective effects in a variety of models of neurodegenerative diseases. However, its pharmacological profile remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of congo red on ACh-induced Ca2+ oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells in vitro. Methods: Acutely dissociated pancreatic acinar cells of mice were prepared. A U-tube drug application system was used to deliver drugs into the bath. Intracellular Ca2+ oscillations were monitored by whole-cell recording of Ca2+-activated Cl− currents and by using confocal Ca2+ imaging. For intracellular drug application, the drug was added in pipette solution and diffused into cell after the whole-cell configuration was established. Results: Bath application of ACh (10 nmol/L) induced typical Ca2+ oscillations in dissociated pancreatic acinar cells. Addition of congo red (1, 10, 100 μmol/L) dose-dependently enhanced Ach-induced Ca2+ oscillations, but congo red alone did not induce any detectable response. Furthermore, this enhancement depended on the concentrations of ACh: congo red markedly enhanced the Ca2+ oscillations induced by ACh (10–30 nmol/L), but did not alter the Ca2+ oscillations induced by ACh (100–10000 nmol/L). Congo red also enhanced the Ca2+ oscillations induced by bath application of IP3 (30 μmol/L). Intracellular application of congo red failed to alter ACh-induced Ca2+ oscillations. Conclusion: Congo red significantly modulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling in pancreatic acinar cells, and this pharmacological effect should be fully considered when developing congo red as a novel therapeutic drug. PMID:25345744

  13. Congo red modulates ACh-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in single pancreatic acinar cells of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ze-bing; Wang, Hai-yan; Sun, Na-na; Wang, Jing-ke; Zhao, Meng-qin; Shen, Jian-xin; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P; Fan, Xue-gong; Wu, Jie

    2014-12-01

    Congo red, a secondary diazo dye, is usually used as an indicator for the presence of amyloid fibrils. Recent studies show that congo red exerts neuroprotective effects in a variety of models of neurodegenerative diseases. However, its pharmacological profile remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of congo red on ACh-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells in vitro. Acutely dissociated pancreatic acinar cells of mice were prepared. A U-tube drug application system was used to deliver drugs into the bath. Intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations were monitored by whole-cell recording of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents and by using confocal Ca(2+) imaging. For intracellular drug application, the drug was added in pipette solution and diffused into cell after the whole-cell configuration was established. Bath application of ACh (10 nmol/L) induced typical Ca(2+) oscillations in dissociated pancreatic acinar cells. Addition of congo red (1, 10, 100 μmol/L) dose-dependently enhanced Ach-induced Ca(2+) oscillations, but congo red alone did not induce any detectable response. Furthermore, this enhancement depended on the concentrations of ACh: congo red markedly enhanced the Ca(2+) oscillations induced by ACh (10-30 nmol/L), but did not alter the Ca(2+) oscillations induced by ACh (100-10000 nmol/L). Congo red also enhanced the Ca(2+) oscillations induced by bath application of IP3 (30 μmol/L). Intracellular application of congo red failed to alter ACh-induced Ca(2+) oscillations. Congo red significantly modulates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in pancreatic acinar cells, and this pharmacological effect should be fully considered when developing congo red as a novel therapeutic drug.

  14. Recruitment and activation of pancreatic stellate cells from the bone marrow in pancreatic cancer: a model of tumor-host interaction.

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    Christopher J Scarlett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer are characterised by extensive stellate cell mediated fibrosis, and current therapeutic development includes targeting pancreatic cancer stroma and tumor-host interactions. Recent evidence has suggested that circulating bone marrow derived stem cells (BMDC contribute to solid organs. We aimed to define the role of circulating haematopoietic cells in the normal and diseased pancreas. METHODS: Whole bone marrow was harvested from male β-actin-EGFP donor mice and transplanted into irradiated female recipient C57/BL6 mice. Chronic pancreatitis was induced with repeat injections of caerulein, while carcinogenesis was induced with an intrapancreatic injection of dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA. Phenotype of engrafted donor-derived cells within the pancreas was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. RESULTS: GFP positive cells were visible in the exocrine pancreatic epithelia from 3 months post transplantation. These exhibited acinar morphology and were positive for amylase and peanut agglutinin. Mice administered caerulein developed chronic pancreatitis while DMBA mice exhibited precursor lesions and pancreatic cancer. No acinar cells were identified to be donor-derived upon cessation of cerulein treatment, however rare occurrences of bone marrow-derived acinar cells were observed during pancreatic regeneration. Increased recruitment of BMDC was observed within the desmoplastic stroma, contributing to the activated pancreatic stellate cell (PaSC population in both diseases. Expression of stellate cell markers CELSR3, PBX1 and GFAP was observed in BMD cancer-associated PaSCs, however cancer-associated, but not pancreatitis-associated BMD PaSCs, expressed the cancer PaSC specific marker CELSR3. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that BMDC can incorporate into the pancreas and adopt the differentiated state of the exocrine compartment. BMDC that

  15. A case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura induced by acute pancreatitis

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    Arimoto M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Miyoko Arimoto1, Yutaka Komiyama2, Fumiko Okamae1, Akemi Ichibe1, Setsuko Teranishi1, Hirohiko Tokunaga1, Keiko Nakaya3, Michie Fujiwara3, Manabu Yamaoka4, Shuji Onishi4, Rie Miyamoto5, Naoto Nakamichi5, Shosaku Nomura51Blood Transfusion Unit, Kansai Medical University Takii Hospital, 2Department of Clinical Sciences and Laboratory Medicine, Kansai Medical University, 3Clinical Medical Technology Unit, Kansai Medical University Takii Hospital, 4Blood Transfusion Unit, Kansai Medical University Hirakata Hospital, 5First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, JapanAbstract: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a multisystemic microvascular disorder that may be caused by an imbalance between unusually large von Willebrand factor multimers and the cleaving protease ADAMTS13. In acquired TTP, especially in secondary TTP with various underlying diseases, the diagnosis is difficult because there are many cases that do not exhibit severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 or raised levels of ADAMST13 inhibitors. It is well known that collagen disease, malignancy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation can be underlying conditions that induce TTP. However, TTP induced by acute pancreatitis, as experienced by our patient, has rarely been reported. Our patient completely recovered with treatments using steroids and plasma exchange (PE only. In cases where patients develop acute pancreatitis with no apparent causes for hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, the possibility of TTP should be considered. Treatments for TTP including PE should be evaluated as soon as a diagnosis is made.Keywords: thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, ADAMTS13, acute pancreatitis, plasma exchange

  16. Extra-pancreatic invasion induces lipolytic and fibrotic changes in the adipose microenvironment, with released fatty acids enhancing the invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells

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    Okumura, Takashi; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Sada, Masafumi; Abe, Toshiya; Endo, Sho; Koikawa, Kazuhiro; Iwamoto, Chika; Miura, Daisuke; Mizuuchi, Yusuke; Moriyama, Taiki; Nakata, Kohei; Miyasaka, Yoshihiro; Manabe, Tatsuya; Ohtsuka, Takao; Nagai, Eishi; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Oda, Yoshinao; Hashizume, Makoto; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer progression involves components of the tumor microenvironment, including stellate cells, immune cells, endothelial cells, and the extracellular matrix. Although peripancreatic fat is the main stromal component involved in extra-pancreatic invasion, its roles in local invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer remain unclear. This study investigated the role of adipose tissue in pancreatic cancer progression using genetically engineered mice (Pdx1-Cre; LSL-KrasG12D; Trp53R172H/+) and an in vitro model of organotypic fat invasion. Mice fed a high fat diet had significantly larger primary pancreatic tumors and a significantly higher rate of distant organ metastasis than mice fed a standard diet. In the organotypic fat invasion model, pancreatic cancer cell clusters were smaller and more elongated in shape and showed increased fibrosis. Adipose tissue-derived conditioned medium enhanced pancreatic cancer cell invasiveness and gemcitabine resistance, as well as inducing morphologic changes in cancer cells and increasing the numbers of lipid droplets in their cytoplasm. The concentrations of oleic, palmitoleic, and linoleic acids were higher in adipose tissue-derived conditioned medium than in normal medium, with these fatty acids significantly enhancing the migration of cancer cells. Mature adipocytes were smaller and the concentration of fatty acids in the medium higher when these cells were co-cultured with cancer cells. These findings indicate that lipolytic and fibrotic changes in peripancreatic adipose tissue enhance local invasiveness and metastasis via adipocyte-released fatty acids. Inhibition of fatty acid uptake by cancer cells may be a novel therapy targeting interactions between cancer and stromal cells. PMID:28407685

  17. Use of laparoscopy for diagnosing experimentally induced acute pancreatitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-wook; Oh, Ye-in; Choi, Ji-hye; Kim, Dae-yong; Youn, Hwa-young

    2014-12-01

    Diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in dogs remains a significant challenge despite the development of advanced diagnostic methodologies. Visual inspection and pancreas biopsy using laparoscopy are generally considered to be procedures free of complications when conducted on healthy animals. However, the usefulness of laparoscopy for diagnosing acute pancreatitis has not been assessed. In the present study, the efficacy of laparoscopy for diagnosing acute pancreatitis in dogs was evaluated in animals with experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. Gross appearance of the pancreatic area was examined by laparoscopy to survey for the presence of edema, adhesions, effusion, pseudocysts, hemorrhage, and fat necrosis. Laparoscopic biopsy was performed and the histopathologic results were compared to those of pancreatic samples obtained during necropsy. The correlation between laparoscopy and histopathologic findings of the pancreas was evaluated. The presence of adhesions, effusion, and hemorrhage in the pancreatic area observed by laparoscopy significantly correlated with the histopathologic results (p pancreatitis in dogs.

  18. Dimethyl Fumarate Protects Pancreatic Islet Cells and Non-Endocrine Tissue in L-Arginine-Induced Chronic Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Lourdes; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Li, Shiri; Masuda, Yuichi; Takasu, Chie; Takasu, Mizuki; Vo, Kelly; Farzaneh, Seyed H.; Stamos, Michael J.; Ichii, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disorder resulting in the destruction and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma which ultimately leads to impairment of the endocrine and exocrine functions. Dimethyl Fumarate (DMF) was recently approved by FDA for treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis. DMF's unique anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties make it an interesting drug to test on other inflammatory conditions. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of DMF on islet cells and non-endocrine tissue in a rodent model of L-Arginine-induced CP. Methods Male Wistar rats fed daily DMF (25 mg/kg) or vehicle by oral gavage were given 5 IP injections of L-Arginine (250 mg/100 g×2, 1 hr apart). Rats were assessed with weights and intra-peritoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT, 2 g/kg). Islets were isolated and assessed for islet mass and viability with flow cytometry. Non-endocrine tissue was assessed for histology, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and lipid peroxidation level (MDA). In vitro assessments included determination of heme oxygenase (HO-1) protein expression by Western blot. Results Weight gain was significantly reduced in untreated CP group at 6 weeks. IPGTT revealed significant impairment in untreated CP group and its restoration with DMF therapy (P L-Arginine-induced CP and islet function in rats. DMF treatment could be a possible strategy to improve clinical outcome in patients with CP. PMID:25198679

  19. Therapeutic Effect of Obestatin in the Course of Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowczan, Jakub; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata; Tomaszewska, Romana; Dembinski, Artur

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of obestatin therapy on the course of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced by cerulein given intraperitoneally 5 times with 1 hour intervals at the dose of 50 μg/kg per dose. Obestatin was administered twice a day at the dose of 8 nmol/kg per dose, starting the first dose 24 hours after the last injection of cerulein. Severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) was examined at 0 hour or 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days after the last injection of cerulein. Administration of cerulein led to development of acute edematous pancreatitis in all rats, and maximal severity of this disease was observed 24 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Treatment with obestatin reduced morphological signs of pancreatic damage (pancreatic edema, leukocyte infiltration, vacuolization of acinar cells) and led to earlier regeneration of the pancreas. Biochemical indexes of severity of pancreatitis such as serum activity of pancreatic digestive enzymes were significantly reduced in animals treated with obestatin. These effects were accompanied by increase in pancreatic DNA synthesis and decrease in serum level of proinflammatory interleukin 1β. In addition, administration of obestatin improved pancreatic blood flow in rats with AP. Treatment with exogenous obestatin reduces severity of AP and accelerates pancreatic recovery.

  20. Effect of percutaneous catheter drainage on pancreatic injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis induced by sodium taurocholate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-yu; Dai, Rui-wu; Luo, Hao; Liu, Wei-hui; Chen, Tao; Lin, Ning; Wang, Tao; Luo, Guo-de; Tang, Li-jun

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) on pancreatic injury in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) rats. Sixty Wistar rats were equally randomized into three groups: a sham operated control group, an SAP control group, and a PCD group. The levels of inflammatory cytokines, the activity of group II phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in blood and ascitic fluid, and the pancreas level of group II PLA2 and trypsin activity were measured 24 h after the operation. The apoptosis of the pancreatic cells, the expression of cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), active caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax in the pancreas was detected. Pancreatic pathological changes were observed. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines, the activity of group II PLA2 and trypsin activity in pancreas in the SAP group were higher than those in the PCD group. The histopathological results revealed that the pancreatic injury was alleviated in the PCD group. The expression of COX-2 and iNOS in the pancreatic tissue in the SAP control rats was higher than that in the PCD rats. The expression of Bcl-2 was decreased and the expression of active caspase-3 and Bax was increased in the pancreas of PCD rats. The apoptosis index of the pancreatic cells in the PCD rats was higher than that in the SAP control rats. PCD can relieve SAP-induced pancreatic injury by inhibiting inflammatory reactions, and promoting apoptosis of pancreatic cells. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Model organoids provide new research opportunities for ductal pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304074799; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A; Engle, Dannielle D; Tuveson, David A; Clevers, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07164282X

    We recently established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and human pancreas tissues. These organoids exhibit ductal- and disease stage-specific characteristics and, after orthotopic transplantation, recapitulate the full spectrum of tumor progression. Pancreatic organoid technology

  2. Ex vivo human pancreatic slice preparations offer a valuable model for studying pancreatic exocrine biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tao; Dolai, Subhankar; Xie, Li; Winter, Erin; Orabi, Abrahim I; Karimian, Negar; Cosen-Binker, Laura I; Huang, Ya-Chi; Thorn, Peter; Cattral, Mark S; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2017-04-07

    A genuine understanding of human exocrine pancreas biology and pathobiology has been hampered by a lack of suitable preparations and reliance on rodent models employing dispersed acini preparations. We have developed an organotypic slice preparation of the normal portions of human pancreas obtained from cancer resections. The preparation was assessed for physiologic and pathologic responses to the cholinergic agonist carbachol (Cch) and cholecystokinin (CCK-8), including 1) amylase secretion, 2) exocytosis, 3) intracellular Ca 2+ responses, 4) cytoplasmic autophagic vacuole formation, and 5) protease activation. Cch and CCK-8 both dose-dependently stimulated secretory responses from human pancreas slices similar to those previously observed in dispersed rodent acini. Confocal microscopy imaging showed that these responses were accounted for by efficient apical exocytosis at physiologic doses of both agonists and by apical blockade and redirection of exocytosis to the basolateral plasma membrane at supramaximal doses. The secretory responses and exocytotic events evoked by CCK-8 were mediated by CCK-A and not CCK-B receptors. Physiologic agonist doses evoked oscillatory Ca 2+ increases across the acini. Supraphysiologic doses induced formation of cytoplasmic autophagic vacuoles and activation of proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin). Maximal atropine pretreatment that completely blocked all the Cch-evoked responses did not affect any of the CCK-8-evoked responses, indicating that rather than acting on the nerves within the pancreas slice, CCK cellular actions directly affected human acinar cells. Human pancreas slices represent excellent preparations to examine pancreatic cell biology and pathobiology and could help screen for potential treatments for human pancreatitis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Evaluation of N-acetylcysteine treatment in acute pancreatitis-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yubero, Sara; Ramudo, Laura; Manso, Manuel A; Collía, Francisco; De Dios, Isabel

    2012-07-01

    Pulmonary complications are frequent during acute pancreatitis (AP). We investigate the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on lung injury in mild and severe AP. ANIMALS AND TREATMENT: Mild and severe AP was induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO) and infusion of 3.5 % sodium taurocholate (NaTc) into the bile-pancreatic duct, respectively. NAC (50 mg/kg) was given 1 h before and 1 h after AP. Amylase activity was measured in plasma. Lungs were harvested for mRNA expression analysis of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC), P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histological examination. Hyperamylasemia was reduced by NAC in both AP models. NAC down-regulated MCP-1, CINC and P-selectin in BPDO- but not in NaTc-induced AP. Pulmonary insults did not vary in mild AP and were exacerbated in severe AP by NAC treatment. NAC reduced lung MPO activity in mild but not in severe AP. Although NAC treatment down-regulated inflammatory mediators in lungs during AP it did not prevent leukocyte infiltration, which could be responsible for maintaining the lung injury. As a result, NAC aggravated the lung damage in severe AP and failed to exert beneficial effects in the mild disease model.

  4. Effect of tiron on remote organ injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis induced by L-arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateyya, Hayam; Wagih, Heba M; El-Sherbeeny, Nagla A

    2016-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory disorder of the pancreas that can be complicated by involvement of other remote organs. Oxidative stress is known to have a crucial role in the development of pancreatic acinar damage and one of the main causes in multisystem organ failure in experimental AP. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of tiron on pancreas and remote organ damage in L-arginine (L-Arg) induced AP rat model. Thirty-two male rats were divided in random into four groups: control, tiron, L-Arg, and tiron with L-Arg. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were withdrawn for biochemical analysis. The pancreas, lung, kidney, and liver were collected for histopathological examination. Estimation of pancreatic water content was done. Analysis of pulmonary, hepatic, renal, and pancreatic lipid peroxide levels (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and reduced glutathione (GSH) were carried out. Finally, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) expression in pancreatic tissue was determined. Results indicated that treatment with tiron significantly decreased lipid peroxide levels and markedly increased both SOD activity and GSH level. Moreover, histopathological analysis further confirmed that administration of tiron relatively ameliorates pancreatic acinar cells and remote organ damage. Increased immunoreactivity of NF-κB and TGF-β1 were reduced also by tiron treatment. These findings pointed out the protective role of the mitochondrial antioxidant, tiron against AP induced by L-Arg.

  5. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Mami; Hori, Mika; Mutoh, Michihiro; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5′ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention

  6. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Mami, E-mail: mtakahas@ncc.go.jp; Hori, Mika; Mutoh, Michihiro [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Keiji [Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Yada 52-1, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Nakagama, Hitoshi [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2011-02-09

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5′ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  7. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Nakagama

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropylamine (BOP into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5’ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  8. Experimental animal models of pancreatic carcinogenesis for prevention studies and their relevance to human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mami; Hori, Mika; Mutoh, Michihiro; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2011-02-09

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5' CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  9. Canagliflozin-induced pancreatitis: a rare side effect of a new drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhary M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mudit Chowdhary,1 Ahmad A Kabbani,1 Akansha Chhabra21Department of Internal Medicine, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, GA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Acute pancreatitis is most commonly attributed to gallstones, alcohol abuse, and metabolic disorders such as hyperlipidemia and hypercalcemia. Medications are an infrequent yet commonly overlooked etiology of pancreatitis. Although several drugs have been implicated, antidiabetic agents are a rare cause for drug-induced pancreatitis. Canagliflozin is a new drug in the class of SGLT-2 inhibitors used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Serious reported side effects include renal impairment, hyperkalemia, and hypotension. Pancreatitis as a result of canagliflozin, however, is exceedingly rare. Here we describe a case of a 33-year old female who presented with severe acute pancreatitis in the setting of recent initiation of canagliflozin. Given the timing of her presentation and after excluding all other possible etiologies, it was determined that canagliflozin was the likely source of her illness. This case highlights the importance of identifying drug-induced pancreatitis, especially in novel drugs, as it is commonly neglected in patients with multiple medical comorbidities and those taking numerous medications. Prompt identification of drug-induced pancreatitis can improve management as well as decrease morbidity and mortality in these individuals.Keywords: canagliflozin, Invokana, pancreatitis, drug-induced pancreatitis, SGLT-2 inhibitor

  10. Sulforaphane targets pancreatic tumour-initiating cells by NF-kappaB-induced antiapoptotic signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallifatidis, G; Rausch, V; Baumann, B; Apel, A; Beckermann, B M; Groth, A; Mattern, J; Li, Z; Kolb, A; Moldenhauer, G; Altevogt, P; Wirth, T; Werner, J; Schemmer, P; Büchler, M W; Salnikov, A V; Herr, I

    2009-07-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that highly treatment-resistant tumour-initiating cells (TICs) play a central role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered to be a novel anticancer agent; however, recent studies have shown that many pancreatic cancer cells are resistant to apoptosis induction by TRAIL due to TRAIL-activated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signalling. Several chemopreventive agents are able to inhibit NF-kappaB, and favourable results have been obtained--for example, for the broccoli compound sulforaphane-in preventing metastasis in clinical studies. The aim of the study was to identify TICs in pancreatic carcinoma for analysis of resistance mechanisms and for definition of sensitising agents. TICs were defined by expression patterns of a CD44(+)/CD24(-), CD44(+)/CD24(+) or CD44(+)/CD133(+) phenotype and correlation to growth in immunodeficient mice, differentiation grade, clonogenic growth, sphere formation, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and therapy resistance. Mechanistically, specific binding of transcriptionally active cRel-containing NF-kappaB complexes in TICs was observed. Sulforaphane prevented NF-kappaB binding, downregulated apoptosis inhibitors and induced apoptosis, together with prevention of clonogenicity. Gemcitabine, the chemopreventive agents resveratrol and wogonin, and the death ligand TRAIL were less effective. In a xenograft model, sulforaphane strongly blocked tumour growth and angiogenesis, while combination with TRAIL had an additive effect without obvious cytotoxicity in normal cells. Freshly isolated patient tumour cells expressing markers for TICs could be sensitised by sulforaphane for TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity. The data provide new insights into resistance mechanisms of TICs and suggest the combination of sulforaphane with TRAIL as a promising strategy for targeting of pancreatic TICs.

  11. Pegaspargase Induced Hypertriglyceridemia Resulting in Severe Fatal Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Vyas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pegaspargase is used to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL. Pegaspargase definitely has its benefits in treating ALL; however we cannot lose sight of one of its very rare but potentially deadly complications, acute pancreatitis. Clinicians should monitor triglycerides while the patient is on treatment with Pegaspargase and suspect acute pancreatitis if the patient develops abdominal pain. If pancreatitis occurs, therapy should be stopped immediately and not reinstituted. For patients with hypertriglyceridemia without pancreatitis, discontinuation of therapy should be considered.

  12. The HaP-T1 Syrian golden hamster pancreatic cancer model: cell implantation is better than tissue implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Ajit T; Shah, Sudeep R; Davidson, Brian R

    2004-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by a poor prognosis and an unsatisfactory response to conventional therapy. Appropriate experimental animal models that mimic the disease are essential to establish new therapies. The aim of this study was to compare homologous orthotopic cell implantation (OCI) and orthotopic tissue implantation (OTI) methods in the nitrosamine-derived HaP-T1 Syrian golden hamster pancreatic cancer model. Pancreatic tumors were induced in 32 Syrian hamsters by the OCI (n = 16) and OTI (n = 16) techniques. OTI and OCI subgroups (n = 4) were killed at 1, 2, 5, and 8 weeks post-implantation. Tumor uptake and growth and the rates of local invasion and metastases were compared at autopsy. Tumor uptake was 100% by OCI and 88% by OTI. Induced pancreatic tumors were significantly larger in the OCI group (mean weight, 1.7 g vs. 0.26 g, P cancer research.

  13. A bioengineered murine model using CD24+CD44+ pancreatic cancer stem cells for chemotherapy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Shengqi; Li, Jianshe; Zhang, Zhongtao; Deng, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    In this work we first developed a murine pancreatic tumor model using CD24 + CD44 + pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSC) supported by an electrospun scaffold. Unlike conventional models, the use of CSC and the scaffold, which were biologically and chemically defined, afforded scientists a reliable platform to evaluate novel chemotherapy regimens. CD24 + CD44 + CSC successfully initiated tumorigenesis in vitro on the scaffold without suffering apoptosis, evidencing the lack of cytotoxicity of scaffolding materials. Also, the scaffold contributed to the acceleration of in vivo tumorigenesis and increased the likelihood of tumor formation. Using this model, we set out to explore the effectiveness of irinotecan/gemcitabine (IRIN-GEM), a chemotherapy regimen, for pancreatic cancer. Our study showed that IRIN-GEM induced a tumor regression whereas gemcitabine alone could only arrest the tumor growth. Further study suggested that the superior performance of IRIN-GEM could be attributed to its capacity to demolish the CD24 + CD44 + CSC sub-population by inducing a large-scale apoptosis. The use of highly proliferative yet homogenous CD24 + CD44 + CSC along with a chemically defined scaffold accelerated the tumor formation and significantly reduced the variability associated with conventional murine models. Armed with this new model, we discovered that IRIN-GEM would be a promising chemotherapy candidate for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. (paper)

  14. Preclinical models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hwang, Chang-Il; Boj, Sylvia F|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304074799; Clevers, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07164282X; Tuveson, David A

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most difficult human malignancies to treat. The 5-year survival rate of PDA patients is 7% and PDA is predicted to become the second leading cancer-related cause of death in the USA. Despite intensive efforts, the translation of findings in

  15. Taraxacum officinale protects against cholecystokinin-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sang-Wan; Koo, Hyun-Na; An, Hyo-Jin; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Lim, Byung-Cheal; Seo, Eun-A; Ryu, Do-Gon; Moon, Goo; Kim, Hong-Yeoul; Kim, Hyung-Min; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2005-01-28

    Taraxacum officinale (TO) has been frequently used as a remedy for inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of TO on cholecystokinin (CCK)-octapeptide-induced acute pancreatitis in rats. TO at 10 mg/kg was orally administered, followed by 75 microg/kg CCK octapeptide injected subcutaneously three times after 1, 3 and 5 h. This whole procedure was repeated for 5 d. We determined the pancreatic weight/body weight ratio, the levels of pancreatic HSP60 and HSP72, and the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Repeated CCK octapeptide treatment resulted in typical laboratory and morphological changes of experimentally-induced pancreatitis. TO significantly decreased the pancreatic weight/body weight ratio in CCK octapeptide-induced acute pancreatitis. TO also increased the pancreatic levels of HSP60 and HSP72. Additionally, the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-alpha decreased in the animals treated with TO. TO may have a protective effect against CCK octapeptide-induced acute pancreatitis.

  16. Are pancreatic autoantibodies associated with azathioprine-induced pancreatitis in Crohn's disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weersma, Rinse K; Batstra, Manou R; Kleibeuker, Jan H; van Dullemen, Hendrik M

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Azathioprine is frequently used in the treatment of Crohn's disease. A severe side effect is acute pancreatitis, which is specific for Crohn's disease. Autoantibodies against exocrine pancreas occur in about 30% of Crohn's disease cases but not in other inflammatory diseases. Pancreatic

  17. Effect of parenteral and early intrajejunal nutrition on pancreatic digestive enzyme synthesis, storage and discharge in dog models of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Huan-Long; Su, Zhen-Dong; Hu, Lei-Guang; Ding, Zai-Xian; Lin, Qing-Tian

    2007-02-21

    To study the effect of early intrajejunal nutrition on enzyme-protein synthesis and secretion during acute pancreatitis. Fifteen dogs were randomly divided into parenteral nutrition (n = 7) and early intrajejunal nutrition groups (n = 8). An acute pancreatitis model was induced by injecting 5% sodium taurocholate and trypsin into the pancreas via the pancreatic duct. Intrajejunal nutrition was delivered with a catheter via a jejunostomy tube after the model was established for 24 h. On d 1 and 7 and at the beginning of nutritional support, radioactive tracing and electron microscopes were used to evaluate the enzyme-protein synthesis in acinar cells, the subcellular fractionation and the change in zymogen granules after 1.85 x 10(6) Bq L-(3)H phenylalanine was infused at 30, 60, 120, and 180 min. The 3H radioactivity in pancreatic acinar cells reached its peak level at 60 min, and the contents in the early intrajejunal nutrition group were higher than those in the parenteral nutrition group, which were then decreased. The mean number and area of zymogen granules did not show any significant statistical difference in both groups on d 1 or on d 7 (P > 0.05). Early intrajejunal nutrition might be effective in dogs with acute pancreatitis.

  18. Oxidative Stress-Responsive Apoptosis Inducing Protein (ORAIP) Plays a Critical Role in High Glucose-Induced Apoptosis in Rat Cardiac Myocytes and Murine Pancreatic β-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Takako; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Murayama, Kimie; Okumura, Ko; Seko, Yoshinori

    2017-10-18

    We previously identified a novel apoptosis-inducing humoral factor in the conditioned medium of hypoxic/reoxygenated-cardiac myocytes. We named this novel post-translationally-modified secreted-form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A Oxidative stress-Responsive Apoptosis-Inducing Protein (ORAIP). We confirmed that myocardial ischemia/reperfusion markedly increased plasma ORAIP levels and rat myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury was clearly suppressed by neutralizing anti-ORAIP monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in vivo. In this study, to investigate the mechanism of cell injury of cardiac myocytes and pancreatic β-cells involved in diabetes mellitus (DM), we analyzed plasma ORAIP levels in DM model rats and the role of ORAIP in high glucose-induced apoptosis of cardiac myocytes in vitro. We also examined whether recombinant-ORAIP induces apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells. Plasma ORAIP levels in DM rats during diabetic phase were about 18 times elevated as compared with non-diabetic phase. High glucose induced massive apoptosis in cardiac myocytes (66.2 ± 2.2%), which was 78% suppressed by neutralizing anti-ORAIP mAb in vitro. Furthermore, recombinant-ORAIP clearly induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells in vitro. These findings strongly suggested that ORAIP plays a pivotal role in hyperglycemia-induced myocardial injury and pancreatic β-cell injury in DM. ORAIP will be a biomarker and a critical therapeutic target for cardiac injury and progression of DM itself.

  19. Animal models of pancreatic cancer for drug research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapischke, Matthias; Pries, Alexandra

    2008-10-01

    The operative and conservative results of therapy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remain appallingly poor. This underlines the demand for further research for effective anticancer drugs. The various animal models remain the essential method for the determination of efficacy of substances during preclinical phase. Unfortunately, most of these tested substances showed a good efficacy in pancreatic carcinoma in the animal model but were not confirmed during the clinical phase. The available literature in PubMed, Medline, Ovid and secondary literature was searched regarding the available animal models for drug testing against pancreatic cancer. The models were analyzed regarding their pros and cons in anticancer drug testing. The different modifications of the orthotopic model (especially in mice) seem at present to be the best model for anticancer testing in pancreatic carcinoma. The value of genetically engineered animal model (GEM) and syngeneic models is on debate. A good selection of the model concerning the questions supposed to be clarified may improve the comparability of the results of animal experiments compared to clinical trials.

  20. Targeting Trypsin-Inflammation Axis for Pancreatitis Therapy in a Humanized Pancreatitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    2015. This task required: (a) Preparation and final approval of an MTA between the two institutions; (b) administrative coordination between the...the funding period, we also initiated studies to measure the effects of alcohol and the smoking compounds NNK (a nicotine derivative) and cigarette...trypsinogen activation) using rodent models, human pancreatic primary acinar cells. Overlap: There are no administrative , financial or scientific overlaps

  1. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    trypsin-dependent pathway in pancreatitis and to begin testing therapeutic and preventive approaches. Mutations in the digestive enzyme trypsinogen...expression of mutant trypsinogens at the protein level, we will perform chromatographic analysis of the total trypsinogen fraction isolated from mouse...pancreata (Subtask 4a). This subtask has been delayed until homozygous animals could be generated. Homozygous animals are now available and chromatographic

  2. N-acetylcysteine amid reduces pancreatic damage in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmaz, Serdar; Usta, Arif; Cekic, Arif Burak; Alhan, Etem; Kural, Birgül Vanizor; Ercin, Cengiz

    2016-06-15

    Inflammatory explosion and oxidative stress are important mechanisms of injury in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). This study investigated the effects of N-acetylcysteine amid (NACA), a novel cell-permeant antioxidant with anti-inflammatory activity, on experimental ANP in rats. Fifty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used, and ANP was induced by cerulein. The animals were divided into four groups which were sham + saline, sham + NACA, ANP + saline, and ANP + NACA. NACA (2.2 mg/kg, i.p) was administered for 6 h, after the induction of ANP. The extent of acinar cell injury, mortality, systemic cardiorespiratory variables, functional capillary density, renal/hepatic functions, and changes in some enzyme markers for pancreas and lung tissues were investigated. Induction of ANP increased mortality from 0% in the sham group to 43.75% in the ANP + saline group (P pancreatic necrosis, serum amylase, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), interleukin-6, LDH in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, serum urea, tissue myeloperoxidase in pancreas and lung tissues and malondialdehyde. There was less pronounced increase in these parameters in NACA treated group. Compared with ANP group, ANP + NACA group had lower levels of pancreatic necrosis (0.5 ± 0.2 versus 1.45 ± 0.2, P pancreatitis indicates its potential usefulness in the management of ANP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel biodegradable pancreatic stent for human pancreatic applications: a preclinical safety study in a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukkarinen, Johanna; Lämsä, Teemu; Nordback, Isto; Mikkonen, Joonas; Sand, Juhani

    2008-06-01

    Endoscopic stenting is one treatment method for pancreatic strictures or pseudocysts in patients with symptomatic chronic pancreatitis. With a biodegradable stent, the later removal of the stent could be avoided. We investigated the degradation, patency, and toxicity of a novel biodegradable, self-expanding radiopaque polylactide-barium sulfate pancreatic stent in a large animal model. Animal study. Five swine had a biodegradable pancreatic stent placed into the pancreatic duct (PD) and were followed-up for 6 months. Repeated blood tests and radiographs were studied during the follow-up. The animals were euthanized at 6 months, at which time, the PD inner diameter was measured, and histology was analyzed and graded. For comparison, histology from 5 nonstented animals was also analyzed. The stent was correctly inserted into the PD in 4 of 5 animals. All the animals remained healthy, gained weight, and showed no signs of pancreatitis. A radiograph showed that the stent was in its original place in all animals at 1 month but had disappeared in all animals by 3 months. At 6 months, the autopsied pancreatic tissue was soft, and the PD was patent in all of the animals. The PD was slightly dilated at the site of the stent in the head of the pancreas compared with the preoperative diameter (5 mm [range 3-6 mm] vs 2 mm [range 1-3 mm], P parts of the biodegradable pancreatic stent compared with the distal nonexposed parts, or to the samples from the nonstented animals. This novel biodegradable pancreatic stent, studied in these swine, appeared to be safe for use in the PD. These encouraging results warrant further clinical trials with this biodegradable pancreatic stent in pancreatic applications in human beings.

  4. The Protective Effects of Shen-Fu Injection on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis in a Rat Model

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    Lei Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of Shen-Fu injection (SFI on a caerulein-induced rat pancreatitis (AP model. Methods. SFI was given to rats in the SFI treated group through intraperitoneal injection. Blood and pancreas samples were collected for serological and histopathological studies. Results. Our results showed that AP caused significant decrease in tissue glutathione (GSH and serum IL-4 and IL-10, while pancreatic malondialdehyde (MDA and myeloperoxidase (MPO were increased. Furthermore, TNF-α, IL-1β, amylase, and lipase levels were also significantly increased. On the other hand, SFI treatment reserved all these biochemical indices as well as histopathologic alterations that were induced by caerulein. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the SFI protects against caerulein-induced AP in rats via modulation of cytokines, oxidative stress, and Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB activity.

  5. Exendin-4 protects mitochondria from reactive oxygen species induced apoptosis in pancreatic Beta cells.

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    Zhen Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Mitochondrial oxidative stress is the basis for pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and a common pathway for numerous types of damage, including glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity. We cultivated mice pancreatic β-cell tumor Min6 cell lines in vitro and observed pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and changes in mitochondrial function before and after the addition of Exendin-4. Based on these observations, we discuss the protective role of Exendin-4 against mitochondrial oxidative damage and its relationship with Ca(2+-independent phospholipase A2. METHODS: We established a pancreatic β-cell oxidative stress damage model using Min6 cell lines cultured in vitro with tert-buty1 hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide. We then added Exendin-4 to observe changes in the rate of cell apoptosis (Annexin-V-FITC-PI staining flow cytometry and DNA ladder. We detected the activity of the caspase 3 and 8 apoptotic factors, measured the mitochondrial membrane potential losses and reactive oxygen species production levels, and detected the expression of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO in the cytosol and mitochondria, mitochondrial Ca2-independent phospholipase A2 and Ca(2+-independent phospholipase A2 mRNA. RESULTS: The time-concentration curve showed that different percentages of apoptosis occurred at different time-concentrations in tert-buty1 hydroperoxide- and hydrogen peroxide-induced Min6 cells. Incubation with 100 µmol/l of Exendin-4 for 48 hours reduced the Min6 cell apoptosis rate (p<0.05. The mitochondrial membrane potential loss and total reactive oxygen species levels decreased (p<0.05, and the release of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO from the mitochondria was reduced. The study also showed that Ca(2+-independent phospholipase A2 activity was positively related to Exendin-4 activity. CONCLUSION: Exendin-4 reduces Min6 cell oxidative damage and the cell apoptosis rate, which may be related to Ca(2-independent phospholipase A2.

  6. Effects of hydrogen sulfide on inflammation in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis

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    Bhatia Madhav

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrogen sulfide (H2S, a gaseous mediator plays an important role in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. H2S has been extensively studied for its various roles in cardiovascular and neurological disorders. However, the role of H2S in inflammation is still controversial. The current study was aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor in in vivo model of acute pancreatitis in mice. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced in mice by hourly caerulein injections (50 μg/kg for 10 hours. Mice were treated with different dosages of NaHS (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg or 15 mg/kg or with vehicle, distilled water (DW. NaHS or DW was administered 1 h before induction of pancreatitis. Mice were sacrificed 1 h after the last caerulein injection. Blood, pancreas and lung tissues were collected and were processed to measure the plasma amylase, myeloperoxidase (MPO activities in pancreas and lung and chemokines and adhesion molecules in pancreas and lung. Results It was revealed that significant reduction of inflammation, both in pancreas and lung was associated with NaHS 10 mg/kg. Further the anti-inflammatory effects of NaHS 10 mg/kg were associated with reduction of pancreatic and pulmonary inflammatory chemokines and adhesion molecules. NaHS 5 mg/kg did not cause significant improvement on inflammation in pancreas and associated lung injury and NaHS 15 mg/kg did not further enhance the beneficial effects seen with NaHS 10 mg/kg. Conclusion In conclusion, these data provide evidence for anti-inflammatory effects of H2S based on its dosage used.

  7. Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) Induced Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Signaling Is Essential for Murine Pancreatitis-Associated Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodziak, Dariusz; Dong, Aiwen; Basin, Michael F.; Lowe, Anson W.

    2016-01-01

    A recently published study identified Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) as a regulator of EGFR signaling by promoting receptor presentation from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. AGR2 also promotes tissue regeneration in amphibians and fish. Whether AGR2-induced EGFR signaling is essential for tissue regeneration in higher vertebrates was evaluated using a well-characterized murine model for pancreatitis. The impact of AGR2 expression and EGFR signaling on tissue regeneration was evaluated using the caerulein-induced pancreatitis mouse model. EGFR signaling and cell proliferation were examined in the context of the AGR2-/- null mouse or with the EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG1478. In addition, the Hippo signaling coactivator YAP1 was evaluated in the context of AGR2 expression during pancreatitis. Pancreatitis-induced AGR2 expression enabled EGFR translocation to the plasma membrane, the initiation of cell signaling, and cell proliferation. EGFR signaling and tissue regeneration were partially inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, but absent in the AGR2-/- null mouse. AG1478-treated and AGR2-/- null mice with pancreatitis died whereas all wild-type controls recovered. YAP1 activation was also dependent on pancreatitis-induced AGR2 expression. AGR2-induced EGFR signaling was essential for tissue regeneration and recovery from pancreatitis. The results establish tissue regeneration as a major function of AGR2-induced EGFR signaling in adult higher vertebrates. Enhanced AGR2 expression and EGFR signaling are also universally present in human pancreatic cancer, which support a linkage between tissue injury, regeneration, and cancer pathogenesis. PMID:27764193

  8. Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) Induced Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Signaling Is Essential for Murine Pancreatitis-Associated Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodziak, Dariusz; Dong, Aiwen; Basin, Michael F; Lowe, Anson W

    2016-01-01

    A recently published study identified Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) as a regulator of EGFR signaling by promoting receptor presentation from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. AGR2 also promotes tissue regeneration in amphibians and fish. Whether AGR2-induced EGFR signaling is essential for tissue regeneration in higher vertebrates was evaluated using a well-characterized murine model for pancreatitis. The impact of AGR2 expression and EGFR signaling on tissue regeneration was evaluated using the caerulein-induced pancreatitis mouse model. EGFR signaling and cell proliferation were examined in the context of the AGR2-/- null mouse or with the EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG1478. In addition, the Hippo signaling coactivator YAP1 was evaluated in the context of AGR2 expression during pancreatitis. Pancreatitis-induced AGR2 expression enabled EGFR translocation to the plasma membrane, the initiation of cell signaling, and cell proliferation. EGFR signaling and tissue regeneration were partially inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, but absent in the AGR2-/- null mouse. AG1478-treated and AGR2-/- null mice with pancreatitis died whereas all wild-type controls recovered. YAP1 activation was also dependent on pancreatitis-induced AGR2 expression. AGR2-induced EGFR signaling was essential for tissue regeneration and recovery from pancreatitis. The results establish tissue regeneration as a major function of AGR2-induced EGFR signaling in adult higher vertebrates. Enhanced AGR2 expression and EGFR signaling are also universally present in human pancreatic cancer, which support a linkage between tissue injury, regeneration, and cancer pathogenesis.

  9. Long-term high-fat diet induces pancreatic injuries via pancreatic microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress in rats with hyperlipidemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Mingxian; Li Yanqing; Meng Min; Ren Hongbo; Kou Yi

    2006-01-01

    Relations between hyperlipidemia and chronic pancreatitis remain unclear. Microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress are involved in pathogeneses of a high numbers of diseases. The objective of this study was to induce hyperlipidemia in rats by long-term high-fat diet intake, then investigate the biochemical, microcirculatory, and histological alterations in blood and pancreatic tissues of these animals, and discuss their potential significances. Pancreatic blood flow was detected by intravital microscope; malondialdehyde (MDA) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured in pancreatic tissues for assessment of oxidative stress and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression was determined by immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. The results showed that the velocity of pancreatic microvascular blood flow of rats with hyperlipidemia decreased significantly as compared to control value (p = 0.008). Pancreatic MDA content increased whereas SOD activity decreased in these rats (p = 0.022; p = 0.039, respectively). Histologically, microvesicles in acinar and islet cells, dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum, swollen mitochondrion and modified vascular endothelial cells were observed under light microscope and transmission electron microscope. In addition, α-SMA expression was up-regulated significantly (p < 0.05). These results suggest that long-term high-fat diet can induce chronic pancreatic injuries which could be considered as 'nonalcoholic fatty pancreatic disease', and pancreatic microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress may play an important part in the underlying pathogenesis

  10. Early Developmental Perturbations in a Human Stem Cell Model of MODY5/HNF1B Pancreatic Hypoplasia

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    Adrian Kee Keong Teo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with an HNF1BS148L/+ mutation (MODY5 typically exhibit pancreatic hypoplasia. However, the molecular mechanisms are unknown due to inaccessibility of patient material and because mouse models do not fully recapitulate MODY5. Here, we differentiated MODY5 human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs into pancreatic progenitors, and show that the HNF1BS148L/+ mutation causes a compensatory increase in several pancreatic transcription factors, and surprisingly, a decrease in PAX6 pancreatic gene expression. The lack of suppression of PDX1, PTF1A, GATA4, and GATA6 indicates that MODY5-mediated pancreatic hypoplasia is mechanistically independent. Overexpression studies demonstrate that a compensatory increase in PDX1 gene expression is due to mutant HNF1BS148L/+ but not wild-type HNF1B or HNF1A. Furthermore, HNF1B does not appear to directly regulate PAX6 gene expression necessary for glucose tolerance. Our results demonstrate compensatory mechanisms in the pancreatic transcription factor network due to mutant HNF1BS148L/+ protein. Thus, patients typically develop MODY5 but not neonatal diabetes despite exhibiting pancreatic hypoplasia.

  11. Oxidative stress plays a role in high glucose-induced activation of pancreatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Gyeong Ryul; Lee, Esder; Chun, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Song, Ki-Ho, E-mail: kihos@catholic.ac.kr

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •High glucose increased production of reactive oxygen species in cultured pancreatic stellate cells. •High glucose facilitated the activation of these cells. •Antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced activation of these cells. -- Abstract: The activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) is thought to be a potential mechanism underlying islet fibrosis, which may contribute to progressive β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Recently, we demonstrated that antioxidants reduced islet fibrosis in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. However, there is no in vitro study demonstrating that high glucose itself can induce oxidative stress in PSCs. Thus, PSCs were isolated and cultured from Sprague Dawley rats, and treated with high glucose for 72 h. High glucose increased the production of reactive oxygen species. When treated with high glucose, freshly isolated PSCs exhibited myofibroblastic transformation. During early culture (passage 1), PSCs treated with high glucose contained an increased number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells. During late culture (passages 2–5), PSCs treated with high glucose exhibited increases in cell proliferation, the expression of fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor, release of interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-β and collagen, and cell migration. Finally, the treatment of PSCs with high glucose and antioxidants attenuated these changes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high glucose increased oxidative stress in primary rat PSCs, thereby facilitating the activation of these cells, while antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced PSC activation.

  12. Oxidative stress plays a role in high glucose-induced activation of pancreatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Gyeong Ryul; Lee, Esder; Chun, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Song, Ki-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •High glucose increased production of reactive oxygen species in cultured pancreatic stellate cells. •High glucose facilitated the activation of these cells. •Antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced activation of these cells. -- Abstract: The activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) is thought to be a potential mechanism underlying islet fibrosis, which may contribute to progressive β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Recently, we demonstrated that antioxidants reduced islet fibrosis in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. However, there is no in vitro study demonstrating that high glucose itself can induce oxidative stress in PSCs. Thus, PSCs were isolated and cultured from Sprague Dawley rats, and treated with high glucose for 72 h. High glucose increased the production of reactive oxygen species. When treated with high glucose, freshly isolated PSCs exhibited myofibroblastic transformation. During early culture (passage 1), PSCs treated with high glucose contained an increased number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells. During late culture (passages 2–5), PSCs treated with high glucose exhibited increases in cell proliferation, the expression of fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor, release of interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-β and collagen, and cell migration. Finally, the treatment of PSCs with high glucose and antioxidants attenuated these changes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high glucose increased oxidative stress in primary rat PSCs, thereby facilitating the activation of these cells, while antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced PSC activation

  13. Role of CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, Jean Louis; Lenglet, Sébastien; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Steffens, Sabine; Galan, Katia; Pelli, Graziano; Spahr, Laurent; Mach, Francois; Hadengue, Antoine

    2011-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of variable severity. Leucocytes are thought to play a key role in the development of pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. The interactions between inflammatory cells and their mediators are crucial for determining tissue damage. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (or CCL-2), CCR-2 and CCR-4 are chemokines and chemokine receptors involved in leucocyte trafficking. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of the CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 chemokine receptors in the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. To address the role of CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 that attracts leucocytes cells in inflamed tissues, pancreatitis was induced by administering supramaximal doses of cerulein in mice that do not express CCL-2, CCR-2 or CCR-4. The severity of pancreatitis was measured by serum amylase, pancreatic oedema and acinar cell necrosis. Lung injury was quantitated by evaluating lung microvascular permeability and lung myeloperoxidase activity. Chemokine and chemokine-receptor expression were quantitated by real-time PCR. The nature of inflammatory cells invading the pancreas and lungs was studied by immunostaining. The authors have found that pancreas CCL-2 and CCR-2 levels rise during pancreatitis. Both pancreatitis and the associated lung injury are blunted, but not completely prevented, in mice deficient in CCL-2, whereas the deficiency in either CCR-2 or CCR-4 does not reduce the severity of both the pancreatitis and the lung injury. The amounts of neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages (MOMA)-2 cells were significantly lower in mice deficient in CCL-2 compared with their sufficient littermates. These results suggest that CCL-2 plays a key role in pancreatitis by modulating the infiltration by neutrophils and MOMA-2 cells, and that its deficiency may improve the outcome of the disease.

  14. Therapeutic Effect of Low Doses of Acenocoumarol in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzecha, Zygmunt; Sendur, Paweł; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Dembiński, Marcin; Sendur, Ryszard; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Olszanecki, Rafał; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Tomasz, Kaczmarzyk; Tomaszewska, Romana; Dembiński, Artur

    2017-04-21

    Intravascular activation of coagulation is observed in acute pancreatitis and is related to the severity of this inflammation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of acenocoumarol therapy on the course of acute pancreatitis induced in male rats by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion. Acenocoumarol at a dose of 50, 100, or 150 µg/kg/dose was administered intragastrically once a day, starting the first dose 24 h after the initiation of pancreatic reperfusion. Histological examination showed that treatment with acenocoumarol reduces pancreatic edema, necrosis, and hemorrhages in rats with pancreatitis. Moreover, the administration of acenocoumarol decreased pancreatic inflammatory infiltration and vacuolization of pancreatic acinar cells. These findings were accompanied with a reduction in the serum activity of lipase and amylase, concentration of interleukin-1β, and plasma d-Dimer concentration. Moreover, the administration of acenocoumarol improved pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic DNA synthesis. Acenocoumarol given at a dose of 150 µg/kg/dose was the most effective in the treatment of early phase acute pancreatitis. However later, acenocoumarol given at the highest dose failed to exhibit any therapeutic effect; whereas lower doses of acenocoumarol were still effective in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. Treatment with acenocoumarol accelerates the recovery of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

  15. Alteration of the renin-angiotensin system in caerulein induced acute pancreatitis in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddam, Ravinder Reddy; Ang, Abel Damien; Badiei, Alireza; Chambers, Stephen T; Bhatia, Madhav

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if RAS bioactive enzymes and peptides are perturbed in acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury. The intervention group of mice were treated with ten hourly intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of caerulein (50 μg/kg) to induce acute pancreatitis. Animals were euthanized, samples of pancreas, lung and blood were collected, and plasma was prepared and stored for subsequent analysis. ACE and ACE2 activities were determined by spectrofluorometric assay. ACE, ACE2, Ang II and Ang-(1-7) levels were quantified by ELISA. There was a significant decrease in ACE2 enzymatic activity in pancreatic and lung tissues of mice with acute pancreatitis. In contrast, there were no significant changes in measured levels of ACE and ACE2 in the pancreas, and lung or activity of ACE in pancreatic and lung tissue following acute pancreatitis. There were no significant differences in the activities and levels of circulating ACE and ACE2 following acute pancreatitis. The ACE to ACE2 activity ratio was markedly increased in pancreatic and lung tissues of mice with acute pancreatitis. No significant changes were observed in the levels of Ang II except for a decrease in lung tissue. No changes were observed in Ang-(1-7) levels in pancreas, lung and plasma between the groups. The Ang II to Ang-(1-7) ratio was increased in the pancreas but was decreased in the lung following caerulein treatment. These data suggest dysregulation of RAS in acute pancreatitis as evidenced by altered Ang II/Ang-(1-7) levels induced by the imbalance of ACE/ACE2 activity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd.

  16. HIF1 Contributes to Hypoxia-Induced Pancreatic Cancer Cells Invasion via Promoting QSOX1 Expression

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    Chen-Ye Shi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 1 (QSOX1, which oxidizes sulfhydryl groups to form disulfide bonds in proteins, is found to be over-expressed in various pancreatic cancer cell lines and patients. QSOX1 promotes invasion of pancreatic cancer cells by activating MMP-2 and MMP-9. However, its regulatory mechanism remains largely undefined. Methods: Real-time PCR and Western blot were employed to detect the expression of QSOX1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines under hypoxic condition. Luciferase reporter and ChIP assays were used to assess the regulation of QSOX1 by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1. Small interfering RNA (siRNA was applied to knock down endogenous expression of QSOX1. Matrigel-coated invasion chamber essays were conducted to detect the invasion capacity of QSOX1-depleted cells. Results: Both hypoxia and hypoxia mimicking reagent up-regulated the expression of QSOX1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Knockdown of HIF-1α eliminated hypoxia induced QSOX1 expression. HIF-1α was found directly bound to two hypoxia-response elements (HRE of QSOX1 gene, both of which were required for HIF-1 induced QSOX1 expression. Moreover, QSOX1 silencing blocked hypoxia-induced pancreatic cancer cells invasion. Conclusion: QSOX1 is a direct target of HIF-1 and may contribute to hypoxia-induced pancreatic cancer cells invasion.

  17. The novel cytokine interleukin-33 activates acinar cell proinflammatory pathways and induces acute pancreatic inflammation in mice.

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    Duraisamy Kempuraj

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is potentially fatal but treatment options are limited as disease pathogenesis is poorly understood. IL-33, a novel IL-1 cytokine family member, plays a role in various inflammatory conditions but its role in acute pancreatitis is not well understood. Specifically, whether pancreatic acinar cells produce IL-33 when stressed or respond to IL-33 stimulation, and whether IL-33 exacerbates acute pancreatic inflammation is unknown.In duct ligation-induced acute pancreatitis in mice and rats, we found that (a IL-33 concentration was increased in the pancreas; (b mast cells, which secrete and also respond to IL-33, showed degranulation in the pancreas and lung; (c plasma histamine and pancreatic substance P concentrations were increased; and (d pancreatic and pulmonary proinflammatory cytokine concentrations were increased. In isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells, TNF-α stimulation increased IL-33 release while IL-33 stimulation increased proinflammatory cytokine release, both involving the ERK MAP kinase pathway; the flavonoid luteolin inhibited IL-33-stimulated IL-6 and CCL2/MCP-1 release. In mice without duct ligation, exogenous IL-33 administration induced pancreatic inflammation without mast cell degranulation or jejunal inflammation; pancreatic changes included multifocal edema and perivascular infiltration by neutrophils and some macrophages. ERK MAP kinase (but not p38 or JNK and NF-kB subunit p65 were activated in the pancreas of mice receiving exogenous IL-33, and acinar cells isolated from the pancreas of these mice showed increased spontaneous cytokine release (IL-6, CXCL2/MIP-2α. Also, IL-33 activated ERK in human pancreatic tissue.As exogenous IL-33 does not induce jejunal inflammation in the same mice in which it induces pancreatic inflammation, we have discovered a potential role for an IL-33/acinar cell axis in the recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages and the exacerbation of acute pancreatic inflammation

  18. The novel cytokine interleukin-33 activates acinar cell proinflammatory pathways and induces acute pancreatic inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Twait, Erik C; Williard, Deborah E; Yuan, Zuobiao; Meyerholz, David K; Samuel, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is potentially fatal but treatment options are limited as disease pathogenesis is poorly understood. IL-33, a novel IL-1 cytokine family member, plays a role in various inflammatory conditions but its role in acute pancreatitis is not well understood. Specifically, whether pancreatic acinar cells produce IL-33 when stressed or respond to IL-33 stimulation, and whether IL-33 exacerbates acute pancreatic inflammation is unknown. In duct ligation-induced acute pancreatitis in mice and rats, we found that (a) IL-33 concentration was increased in the pancreas; (b) mast cells, which secrete and also respond to IL-33, showed degranulation in the pancreas and lung; (c) plasma histamine and pancreatic substance P concentrations were increased; and (d) pancreatic and pulmonary proinflammatory cytokine concentrations were increased. In isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells, TNF-α stimulation increased IL-33 release while IL-33 stimulation increased proinflammatory cytokine release, both involving the ERK MAP kinase pathway; the flavonoid luteolin inhibited IL-33-stimulated IL-6 and CCL2/MCP-1 release. In mice without duct ligation, exogenous IL-33 administration induced pancreatic inflammation without mast cell degranulation or jejunal inflammation; pancreatic changes included multifocal edema and perivascular infiltration by neutrophils and some macrophages. ERK MAP kinase (but not p38 or JNK) and NF-kB subunit p65 were activated in the pancreas of mice receiving exogenous IL-33, and acinar cells isolated from the pancreas of these mice showed increased spontaneous cytokine release (IL-6, CXCL2/MIP-2α). Also, IL-33 activated ERK in human pancreatic tissue. As exogenous IL-33 does not induce jejunal inflammation in the same mice in which it induces pancreatic inflammation, we have discovered a potential role for an IL-33/acinar cell axis in the recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages and the exacerbation of acute pancreatic inflammation. IL-33 is

  19. Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris fruit extract on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borran, Mina; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities of Tribulus terrestris (T. terrestris) could be helpful in the treatment of acute pancreatitis; thus, this study was designed to investigate the effects of T. terrestris on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Materials and Methods: Three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) of T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract were administered both orally (60 minutes before pancreatitis induction, p.o.) and intra-peritoneally (30 minutes before pancreatitis induction, i.p.) to different groups of mice (n=6). Pancreatitis was induced by five injections (i.p.) of cerulein 50μg/kg body weight with 1 hr intervals. Animals were euthanized 5 hr after the last injection of cerulein and tissue injures were assessed biochemically and pathologically. Results: T. terrestris extract 200 and 400mg/kg (p.o.) and T. terrestris extract 400 mg/kg (i.p.) reduced pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and serum amylase and lipase levels and alleviated histological parameters. Conclusion: These data suggest that T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract was effective in protecting against experimental acute pancreatitis and possibly the efficacy depends on dose and route of administration. PMID:28748172

  20. Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris fruit extract on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Borran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities of Tribulus terrestris (T. terrestris could be helpful in the treatment of acute pancreatitis; thus, this study was designed to investigate the effects of T. terrestris on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Materials and Methods: Three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg of T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract were administered both orally (60 minutes before pancreatitis induction, p.o. and intra-peritoneally (30 minutes before pancreatitis induction, i.p. to different groups of mice (n=6. Pancreatitis was induced by five injections (i.p. of cerulein 50μg/kg body weight with 1 hr intervals. Animals were euthanized 5 hr after the last injection of cerulein and tissue injures were assessed biochemically and pathologically. Results: T. terrestris extract 200 and 400mg/kg (p.o. and T. terrestris extract 400 mg/kg (i.p. reduced pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and serum amylase and lipase levels and alleviated histological parameters. Conclusion: These data suggest that T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract was effective in protecting against experimental acute pancreatitis and possibly the efficacy depends on dose and route of administration.

  1. Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris fruit extract on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borran, Mina; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2017-01-01

    Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities of Tribulus terrestris ( T. terrestris ) could be helpful in the treatment of acute pancreatitis; thus, this study was designed to investigate the effects of T. terrestris on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) of T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract were administered both orally (60 minutes before pancreatitis induction, p.o.) and intra-peritoneally (30 minutes before pancreatitis induction, i.p.) to different groups of mice (n=6). Pancreatitis was induced by five injections (i.p.) of cerulein 50μg/kg body weight with 1 hr intervals. Animals were euthanized 5 hr after the last injection of cerulein and tissue injures were assessed biochemically and pathologically. T. terrestris extract 200 and 400mg/kg (p.o.) and T. terrestris extract 400 mg/kg (i.p.) reduced pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and serum amylase and lipase levels and alleviated histological parameters. These data suggest that T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract was effective in protecting against experimental acute pancreatitis and possibly the efficacy depends on dose and route of administration.

  2. Administration of human recombinant activated protein C is not associated with pancreatic parenchymal haemorrhage in L-arginine-induced experimental acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamdar, Saurabh; Babu, Benoy I; Nirmalan, Mahesh; Jeziorska, Maria; McMahon, Raymond F T; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2013-11-10

    Microvascular thrombosis is a critical event in severe acute pancreatitis. Human recombinant activated protein C (Xigris®, Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN, USA) modulates the interplay between pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant pathways and maintains microvascular patency. However, the anticoagulant properties of Xigris® may precipitate bleeding from the inflamed pancreas. This study tests the hypothesis that Xigris® can ameliorate experimental acute pancreatitis without causing pancreatic haemorrhage. Sprague Dawley rats were allocated as follows: Group 1: control (n=7); Group 2: acute pancreatitis (n=6); Group 3: administration of Xigris® 500 µg/kg body weight before induction of acute pancreatitis (n=6); and Group 4: Administration of Xigris® 500 µg/kg body weight 30 minutes after induction of acute pancreatitis (n=6). Acute pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal administration of L-arginine 300 mg/100 g body weight. Animals were sacrificed at 48 hours and biochemical, haematological, and histological markers of pancreatic haemorrhage and inflammation assessed. Median lipase in animals with acute pancreatitis was 10 U/mL (range: 7-16 U/mL) compared to 5.5 (range: 3-8 U/mL) in controls (P=0.028). Lipase was also elevated in animals given Xigris® both before (12 U/mL, range: 8-22 U/mL; P=0.031 vs. control group) and after (46 U/mL, range: 9-71 U/mL; P=0.015 vs. control group) induction of acute pancreatitis). Haemoglobin levels were similar among all groups (P=0.323). There was no histological evidence of pancreatic haemorrhage in animals treated with Xigris®. Pre-treatment with Xigris® was associated with a significant reduction in pancreatic injury. This effect was absent when Xigris® was administered after induction of acute pancreatitis. Xigris® did not lead to pancreatic haemorrhage in experimental acute pancreatitis. Administration of Xigris® prior to induction of acute pancreatitis was associated with amelioration of injury. This effect was

  3. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianbao; Wang, Fan; Bi, Yan; Ji, Baoan

    2016-09-01

    Animal models of pancreatitis are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and developing and testing novel interventions. In this review, we aim to summarize the most commonly used animal models, overview their pathophysiology, and discuss their strengths and limitations. We will also briefly describe common animal study procedures and refer readers to more detailed protocols in the literature. Although animal models include pigs, dogs, opossums, and other animals, we will mainly focus on rodent models because of their popularity. Autoimmune pancreatitis and genetically engineered animal models will be reviewed elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianbao; Wang, Fan; Bi, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of pancreatitis are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and developing and testing novel interventions. In this review, we aim to summarize the most commonly used animal models, overview their pathophysiology, and discuss their strengths and limitations. We will also briefly describe common animal study procedures and refer readers to more detailed protocols in the literature. Although animal models include pigs, dogs, opossums, and other animals, we will mainly focus on rodent models because of their popularity. Autoimmune pancreatitis and genetically engineered animal models will be reviewed elsewhere. PMID:27418683

  5. Roles of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction Induced by Lipotoxicity

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    Julien Véret

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in order to maintain glucose homeostasis. However, various environmental stresses such as obesity have been shown to induce loss of secretory responsiveness in pancreatic β cells and pancreatic β cell apoptosis which can favor the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Indeed, elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs have been shown to induce β cell apoptosis. Importantly, the chronic adverse effects of FFAs on β cell function and viability are potentiated in the presence of hyperglycaemia, a phenomenon that has been termed gluco-lipotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of gluco-lipotoxicity in pancreatic β cells are not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that sphingolipid metabolism plays a key role in gluco-lipotoxicity induced apoptosis and loss of function of pancreatic β cells. The present review focuses on how the two main sphingolipid mediators, ceramides and sphingoid base-1-phosphates, regulate the deleterious effects of gluco-lipotoxicity on pancreatic β cells. The review highlights the role of a sphingolipid biostat on the dysregulation of β cell fate and function induced by gluco-lipotoxicity, offering the possibility of new therapeutic targets to prevent the onset of T2D.

  6. An Exploratory Study on the Development of an Animal Model of Acute Pancreatitis Following Nicotine Exposure

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    Chowdhury P

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is known to be a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis is believed to be a predisposed condition for pancreatic cancer. As of this date, there is no established experimental animal model to conduct detailed studies on these two deadly diseases. Our aim is to establish a rodent model by which we can systematically study the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Methods Adult Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to graded doses of nicotine by various routes for periods of three to 16 weeks. Blood samples were measured for hormonal and metabolic parameters. The pancreas was evaluated for histopathological changes and its function was assessed in isolated pancreatic acini upon stimulation with cholecystokinin (CCK or carbachol (Cch. The pancreatic tissue was evaluated further for oncogene expression. Results Body weight, food and fluid intakes, plasma glucose and insulin levels were significantly reduced in animals with nicotine exposure when compared to control. However, CCK and gastrin levels in the blood were significantly elevated. Pancreatic function was decreased significantly with no alteration in CCK receptor binding. Pancreatic histology revealed vacuolation, swelling, cellular pyknosis and karyorrhexis. Mutant oncogene, H-ras, was overexpressed in nicotine-treated pancreatic tissue. Summary and conclusion The results suggest that alterations in metabolic, hormonal and pathologic parameters following nicotine-treatment appear consistent with diagnostic criteria of human pancreatitis. It is proposed that rats could be considered as a potential animal model to study the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

  7. Acute fulminant drug induced necrotizing pancreatitis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis

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    Pablo Miramontes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis is a rare adverse event, although it has been reported in association with different drugs, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and analgesic agents commonly used in rheumatology. In different reviews of the pancreotoxicity of drugs, infliximab and etanercept are mentioned among all medications implicated in drug-induced pancreatitis, but clinical cases of acute pancreatitis complicating treatment with these anti-TNF-α agents have been exceptionally reported. We describe a patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with etanercept, who developed an acute fulminant necrotizing pancreatitis that resulted in death. Doctors should pay close attention to patients taking biologic drugs in which a complaint of abdominal pain lasting for several days with no apparent cause may require a prompt referral for medical consultation.

  8. Z-360, a novel therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer, prevents up-regulation of ephrin B1 gene expression and phosphorylation of NR2B via suppression of interleukin-1 β production in a cancer-induced pain model in mice

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    Hori Yuko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Z-360 is an orally active cholecystokinin-2 (CCK2/gastrin receptor antagonist currently under development as a therapeutic drug for pancreatic cancer. It was previously reported that Z-360 treatment in combination with gemcitabine prolonged the survival period in a lethal pancreatic cancer xenograft model in mice. In a phase Ib/IIa clinical study, Z-360 treatment displayed a trend of reduced pain in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in combination with gemcitabine including analgesics such as opioids. Here, we investigated the mechanism of analgesic action of Z-360 in a severe cancer-induced pain model in mice, which is considered to be opioid-resistant, by examining ephrin B1 gene expression, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR2B subunit phosphorylation, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β production. Results In a mouse model of cancer-induced pain, ephrin B1 gene expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs and the phosphorylation of NR2B in the spinal cord were induced. Z-360 treatment inhibited both ephrin B1 gene expression and the phosphorylation of NR2B. In addition, IL-1β production increased in the cancer-inoculated hind paw of mice, but could be suppressed by treatment with Z-360. Moreover, we observed that the CCK1 receptor antagonist devazepide similarly suppressed up-regulation of ephrin B1 gene expression and IL-1β production, and that the intraperitoneal injection of sulfated CCK-8 induced the production of IL-1β in the cancer-inoculated region. Conclusions We have identified a novel pain cascade, in which IL-1β production in cancer-inoculated regions induces ephrin B1 gene expression in DRGs and then ephrin B1 enhances the tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B via Eph B receptor in the spinal cord. Notably, Z-360 relieves cancer-induced pain by preventing this pain cascade through the suppression of IL-1β production, likely via the blockade of CCK1 receptor. The pre-clinical results presented here support the analgesic

  9. New Insights into the Methodology of L-Arginine-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kui, Balázs; Balla, Zsolt; Vasas, Béla; Végh, Eszter T.; Pallagi, Petra; Kormányos, Eszter S.; Venglovecz, Viktória; Iványi, Béla; Takács, Tamás; Hegyi, Péter; Rakonczay, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Animal models are ideal to study the pathomechanism and therapy of acute pancreatitis (AP). The use of L-arginine-induced AP model is nowadays becoming increasingly popular in mice. However, carefully looking through the literature, marked differences in disease severity could be observed. In fact, while setting up the L-arginine (2×4 g/kg i.p.)-induced AP model in BALB/c mice, we found a relatively low rate (around 15%) of pancreatic necrosis, whereas others have detected much higher rates (up to 55%). We suspected that this may be due to differences between mouse strains. We administered various concentrations (5–30%, pH = 7.4) and doses (2×4, 3×3, or 4×2.5 g/kg) of L-arginine-HCl in BALB/c, FVB/n and C57BL/6 mice. The potential gender-specific effect of L-arginine was investigated in C57BL/6 mice. The fate of mice in response to the i.p. injections of L arginine followed one of three courses. Some mice (1) developed severe AP or (2) remained AP-free by 72 h, whereas others (3) had to be euthanized (to avoid their death, which was caused by the high dose of L-arginine and not AP) within 12 h., In FVB/n and C57BL/6 mice, the pancreatic necrosis rate (about 50%) was significantly higher than that observed in BALB/c mice using 2×4 g/kg 10% L–arginine, but euthanasia was necessary in a large proportion of animals, The i.p. injection of lower L-arginine concentrations (e.g. 5–8%) in case of the 2×4 g/kg dose, or other L-arginine doses (3×3 or 4×2.5 g/kg, 10%) were better for inducing AP. We could not detect any significant differences between the AP severity of male and female mice. Taken together, when setting up the L-arginine-induced AP model, there are several important factors that are worth consideration such as the dose and concentration of the administered L arginine-HCl solution and also the strain of mice. PMID:25688985

  10. An alternative treatment in hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy: Plasmapheresis

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    Dilek Altun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal influences during pregnancy can compromise otherwise controlled lipid levels in women with familial hypertriglyceridemia and predispose to pancreatitis leading to increased morbidity in both mother and fetus. Both cholesterol and triglyceride levels in serum increase progressively during pregnancy. The mainstay of treatment includes dietary restriction of fatty meal and lipid-lowering medications. Experiences with plasmapheresis are limited. We report two cases of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis during pregnancy, which were successfully treated by plasmapheresis.

  11. Glycogene expression alterations associated with pancreatic cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition in complementary model systems.

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    Kevin A Maupin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability to selectively detect and target cancer cells that have undergone an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT may lead to improved methods to treat cancers such as pancreatic cancer. The remodeling of cellular glycosylation previously has been associated with cell differentiation and may represent a valuable class of molecular targets for EMT.As a first step toward investigating the nature of glycosylation alterations in EMT, we characterized the expression of glycan-related genes in three in-vitro model systems that each represented a complementary aspect of pancreatic cancer EMT. These models included: 1 TGFβ-induced EMT, which provided a look at the active transition between states; 2 a panel of 22 pancreatic cancer cell lines, which represented terminal differentiation states of either epithelial-like or mesenchymal-like; and 3 actively-migrating and stationary cells, which provided a look at the mechanism of migration. We analyzed expression data from a list of 587 genes involved in glycosylation (biosynthesis, sugar transport, glycan-binding, etc. or EMT. Glycogenes were altered at a higher prevalence than all other genes in the first two models (p<0.05 and <0.005, respectively but not in the migration model. Several functional themes were shared between the induced-EMT model and the cell line panel, including alterations to matrix components and proteoglycans, the sulfation of glycosaminoglycans; mannose receptor family members; initiation of O-glycosylation; and certain forms of sialylation. Protein-level changes were confirmed by Western blot for the mannose receptor MRC2 and the O-glycosylation enzyme GALNT3, and cell-surface sulfation changes were confirmed using Alcian Blue staining.Alterations to glycogenes are a major component of cancer EMT and are characterized by changes to matrix components, the sulfation of GAGs, mannose receptors, O-glycosylation, and specific sialylated structures. These results provide leads for

  12. Bifurcation structure of a model of bursting pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Lading, B.; Yanchuk, S.

    2001-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional bifurcation studies of a prototypic model of bursting oscillations in pancreatic P-cells reveal a squid-formed area of chaotic dynamics in the parameter plane, with period-doubling bifurcations on one side of the arms and saddle-node bifurcations on the other. The transit......One- and two-dimensional bifurcation studies of a prototypic model of bursting oscillations in pancreatic P-cells reveal a squid-formed area of chaotic dynamics in the parameter plane, with period-doubling bifurcations on one side of the arms and saddle-node bifurcations on the other....... The transition from this structure to the so-called period-adding structure is found to involve a subcritical period-doubling bifurcation and the emergence of type-III intermittency. The period-adding transition itself is not smooth but consists of a saddle-node bifurcation in which (n + 1)-spike bursting...

  13. A rare case of hypercalcemia-induced pancreatitis in a first trimester pregnant woman

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    Carine Ghassan Richa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to report a case of acute pancreatitis secondary to hypercalcemia induced by primary hyperparathyroidism in a pregnant woman at the end of the first trimester. The case included a 32-year-old woman who was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis and severe hypercalcemia refractory to many regimens of medical therapy in the first trimester of pregnancy. She was successfully treated with parathyroidectomy in the early second trimester with complete resolution of hypercalcemia and pancreatitis. Neonatal course was unremarkable. To our best knowledge, this is a rare case when primary hyperparathyroidism and its complications are diagnosed in the first trimester of pregnancy. In conclusion, primary hyperparathyroidism is a rare life-threatening condition to the fetus and mother especially when associated with complications such as pancreatitis. Early therapeutic intervention is important to reduce the morbidity and mortality. Parathyroidectomy performed in the second trimester can be the only solution.

  14. [Propofol-induced pancreatitis after surgery for thyroid carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Karoline; Rostgaard-Knudsen, Martin; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2014-05-19

    Propofol is a hypnotic agent for induction and maintainance of general anaesthesia and it is used for sedation of critically ill intensive care patients. As a rare adverse effect propofol can cause acute pancreatitis. We report a case of post-operative pancreatitis in an otherwise healthy 62-year-old male who was anaesthezised with propofol during an otherwise uncomplicated surgery for thyroid carcinoma. Other common causes could be excluded. Since this is a possible lethal complication in post-operative patients, medical doctors should be aware of this adverse effect.

  15. A Mini-Review on the Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) on Cerulein-Induced and Hypertriglyceridemic Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yoo Kyung; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2017-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis refers to the sudden inflammation of the pancreas. It is associated with premature activation and release of digestive enzymes into the pancreatic interstitium and systemic circulation, resulting in pancreatic tissue autodigestion and multiple organ dysfunction, as well as with increased cytokine production, ultimately leading to deleterious local and systemic effects. Although mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have not been completely elucidated, oxidative stress is regarded as a major risk factor. In human acute pancreatitis, lipid peroxide levels in pancreatic tissues increase. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (C22:6n-3), exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on various cells. Previous studies have shown that DHA activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and induces catalase, which inhibits oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory signaling required for cytokine expression in experimental acute pancreatitis using cerulein. Cerulein, a cholecystokinin analog, induces intra-acinar activation of trypsinogen in the pancreas, which results in human acute pancreatitis-like symptoms. Therefore, DHA supplementation may be beneficial for preventing or inhibiting acute pancreatitis development. Since DHA reduces serum triglyceride levels, addition of DHA to lipid-lowering drugs like statins has been investigated to reduce hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis. However, high DHA concentrations increase cytosolic Ca2+, which activates protein kinase C and may induce hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis. In this review, effect of DHA on cerulein-induced and hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis has been discussed. The relation of high concentration of DHA to hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis has been included. PMID:29068376

  16. A Mini-Review on the Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA on Cerulein-Induced and Hypertriglyceridemic Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Kyung Jeong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis refers to the sudden inflammation of the pancreas. It is associated with premature activation and release of digestive enzymes into the pancreatic interstitium and systemic circulation, resulting in pancreatic tissue autodigestion and multiple organ dysfunction, as well as with increased cytokine production, ultimately leading to deleterious local and systemic effects. Although mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have not been completely elucidated, oxidative stress is regarded as a major risk factor. In human acute pancreatitis, lipid peroxide levels in pancreatic tissues increase. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (C22:6n-3, exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on various cells. Previous studies have shown that DHA activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and induces catalase, which inhibits oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory signaling required for cytokine expression in experimental acute pancreatitis using cerulein. Cerulein, a cholecystokinin analog, induces intra-acinar activation of trypsinogen in the pancreas, which results in human acute pancreatitis-like symptoms. Therefore, DHA supplementation may be beneficial for preventing or inhibiting acute pancreatitis development. Since DHA reduces serum triglyceride levels, addition of DHA to lipid-lowering drugs like statins has been investigated to reduce hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis. However, high DHA concentrations increase cytosolic Ca2+, which activates protein kinase C and may induce hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis. In this review, effect of DHA on cerulein-induced and hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis has been discussed. The relation of high concentration of DHA to hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis has been included.

  17. Lactose Induces Phenotypic and Functional Changes of Neutrophils and Macrophages to Alleviate Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

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    Li-Long Pan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is one common clinical acute abdominal disease, for which specific pharmacological or nutritional therapies remain elusive. Lactose, a macronutrient and an inducer of host innate immune responses, possesses immune modulatory functions. The current study aimed to investigate potential modulatory effects of lactose and the interplay between the nutrient and pancreatic immunity during experimentally induced AP in mice. We found that either prophylactic or therapeutic treatment of lactose time-dependently reduced the severity of AP, as evidenced by reduced pancreatic edema, serum amylase levels, and pancreatic myeloperoxidase activities, as well as by histological examination of pancreatic damage. Overall, lactose promoted a regulatory cytokine milieu in the pancreas and reduced infiltration of inflammatory neutrophils and macrophages. On acinar cells, lactose was able to suppress caerulein-induced inflammatory signaling pathways and to suppress chemoattractant tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 production. Additionally, lactose acted on pancreas-infiltrated macrophages, increasing interleukin-10 and decreasing tumor necrosis factor alpha production. Notably, lactose treatment reversed AP-associated infiltration of activated neutrophils. Last, the effect of lactose on neutrophil infiltration was mimicked by a galectin-3 antagonist, suggesting a potential endogenous target of lactose. Together, the current study demonstrates an immune regulatory effect of lactose to alleviate AP and suggests its potential as a convenient, value-added therapeutic macronutrient to control AP, and lower the risk of its systemic complications.

  18. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasseur, Sophie, E-mail: sophie.vasseur@inserm.fr; Tomasini, Richard; Tournaire, Roselyne; Iovanna, Juan L. [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, BP 915,13288 Marseille cedex 9 (France)

    2010-12-16

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis.

  19. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan L. Iovanna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis.

  20. Acute pancreatitis induced by mycophenolate mofetil in a kidney transplant patient

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    Einollahi Behzad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a rare life-threatening complication in patients after kidney transplantation. Here we described a 56-year-old man who had received a living related kidney transplant for an end-stage renal disease. In his regular follow-up, his serum creatinine was gradually increased and he underwent an allograft biopsy, which revealed an interstitial nephritis/tubular atrophy grade II. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF was prescribed to control chronic allograft nephropathy. He presented with complaints of severe abdominal pain, vomiting, loss of appetite and fever requiring hospital admission twelve days later. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed on the basis of laboratory data and imaging findings during hospital admission. There was no history of alcohol consumption in our patient. Unfortunately he died one week later and autopsy findings demonstrated acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The bladder drainage of this patients was normal. Laboratory findings in this patient did not endorse infections and other possibilities regarding the etiology of acute pancreatitis in this patient. Therefore, we concluded that acute pancreatitis in near the patient was induced by drugs and basis on our evidence, MMF is the most important suspect. This study suggests that acute pancreatitis can be considered as a side effect of MMF.

  1. Dihydro-Resveratrol Ameliorates Lung Injury in Rats with Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ze-Si; Ku, Chuen Fai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Shi, Xiao-Ke; Wang, Hong-Qi; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Tsang, Siu Wai; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process originated in the pancreas; however, it often leads to systemic complications that affect distant organs. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is indeed the predominant cause of death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. In this study, we aimed to delineate the ameliorative effect of dihydro-resveratrol, a prominent analog of trans-resveratrol, against acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury and the underlying molecular actions. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats with repetitive injections of cerulein (50 µg/kg/h) and a shot of lipopolysaccharide (7.5 mg/kg). By means of histological examination and biochemical assays, the severity of lung injury was assessed in the aspects of tissue damages, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. When treated with dihydro-resveratrol, pulmonary architectural distortion, hemorrhage, interstitial edema, and alveolar thickening were significantly reduced in rats with acute pancreatitis. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the activity of myeloperoxidase in pulmonary tissues were notably repressed. Importantly, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation was attenuated. This study is the first to report the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol ameliorated acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury via an inhibitory modulation of pro-inflammatory response, which was associated with a suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Acute Pancreatitis Induced by Methimazole in a Patient With Subclinical Hyperthyroidism

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    Katrina Agito MD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report here a unique case of methimazole (MMI-induced pancreatitis. To our knowledge, this is the sixth case reported in the literature and the first diagnosed in a patient with toxic multinodular goiter. A 51-year-old Caucasian female with a history of benign multinodular goiter and subclinical hyperthyroidism was started on MMI 10 mg orally daily. Three weeks later, she developed sharp epigastric pain, diarrhea, lack of appetite, and fever. Her lipase was elevated 5 times the upper limit of normal, consistent with acute pancreatitis. There was no history of hypertriglyceridemia, or alcohol abuse. Abdominal computed tomography was consistent with acute uncomplicated pancreatitis, without evidence of gallstones or tumors. MMI was discontinued, and her hyperthyroid symptoms were managed with propranolol. Her acute episode of pancreatitis quickly resolved clinically and biochemically. One year later, she redeveloped mild clinical symptoms of hyperthyroidism with biochemical evidence of subclinical hyperthyroidism. MMI 10 mg orally daily was restarted. Five days later, she experienced progressive abdominal discomfort. Her lipase was elevated 12 times the upper limit of normal, and the abdominal computed tomography was again compatible with acute uncomplicated pancreatitis. MMI was again discontinued, which was followed by rapid resolution of her pancreatitis. The patient is currently considering undergoing definitive therapy with radioactive iodine ablation. Our case as well as previous case reports in the literature should raise awareness about the possibility of pancreatitis in subjects treated with MMI in the presence of suggestive symptoms. If the diagnosis is confirmed by elevated pancreatic enzymes, the drug should be discontinued.

  3. The Herbal Medicine Cordyceps sinensis Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Streptozotocin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Cao, Diyong; Liu, Hua; Liu, Xinghai; Mai, Wenli; Lan, Haitao; Huo, Wen; Zheng, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Our previous work found that Cordyceps sinensis (CS) improves the activity and secretory function of pancreatic islet beta cells. The objective was to observe a further possible role of CS in the protection of insulin-secreting cells. A rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was developed with streptozotocin (STZ) and a high-energy fat diet (HFD). CS was administered in the successful model of rats with type 2 diabetes. After 4 weeks, the biochemistry index of blood samples was measured, and pathologic observation was performed by immunohistochemistry. In the rats with type 2 diabetes induced by a HFD and STZ, the levels of fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin were elevated, and the insulin sensitivity index was decreased. Pathologic examination found an increased number of apoptotic cells, an elevated protein expression of pro-apoptotic C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and an increased c-Jun level by means of JNK phosphorylation, responsive to the endoplasmic reticulum stress of islet beta cells. With treatment by CS for 4 weeks, the elevated levels of both fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin in the rats with type 2 diabetes were significantly lower, and the decreased insulin sensitivity index was reversed. Compared to the control rats with type 2 diabetes, CS application significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells and decreased protein expression of both CHOP and c-Jun. The herbal compound CS could protect pancreatic beta cells from the pro-apoptotic endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by HFD-STZ. This suggests an alternative approach to treating type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of urtica dioica extract on experimental acute pancreatitis model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Baris; Basar, Omer; Aktas, Bora; Altinbas, Akif; Ekiz, Fuat; Büyükcam, Fatih; Albayrak, Aynur; Ginis, Zeynep; Oztürk, Gülfer; Coban, Sahin; Ucar, Engin; Kaya, Oskay; Yüksel, Osman; Caner, Sedat; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the acute inflammation of pancreas and peripancreatic tissues, and distant organs are also affected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Urtica dioica extract (UDE) treatment on cerulein induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Twenty-one Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups: Control, Pancreatitis, and UDE treatment group. In the control group no procedures were performed. In the pancreatitis and treatment groups, pancreatitis was induced with intraperitoneal injection of cerulein, followed by intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml saline (pancreatitis group) and 1 ml 5.2% UDE (treatment group). Pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α), amylase and markers of apoptosis (M30, M65) were also measured in blood samples. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with Caspase-3 antibody. Histopathological findings in the UDE treatment group were less severe than in the pancreatitis group (5.7 vs 11.7, p = 0.010). TNF-α levels were not statistically different between treated and control groups (63.3 vs. 57.2, p = 0.141). UDE treatment was associated with less apoptosis [determined by M30, caspase-3 index (%)], (1.769 vs. 0.288, p = 0.056; 3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.224; respectively). UDE treatment of pancreatitis merits further study.

  5. [Acute pancreatitis induced by major hypertriglyceridemia during pregnancy. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, L; Seconda, S; Lassel, L; Le Bouar, G; Poulain, P

    2009-09-01

    A parturient in the 37th week of gestation is referred to the obstetrical emergency ward for an acute abdominal pain with vomiting and fever. Few hours after her admission, a caesarean section is performed for acute fetal distress. It gave birth to a 3940 g healthy newborn. An abundant and milky peritoneal fluid is noted during the C-section related to a major hypertriglyceridemia (84,47 g/L) which induced an acute pancreatitis explaining the early symptoms. The patient is then hospitalized in surgical reanimation: heparin and a low fat diet led to a quick decrease of triglyceridemia and the healing of the acute pancreatitis. We review the most recent literature about acute pancreatitis during pregnancy, especially induced by hypertriglyceridemia, and the different management option: heparin, parenteral nutrition or plasmapheresis.

  6. Fatal hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Roerbaek

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old man treated with quetiapine for anxiety disorder developed hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was otherwise physically healthy with no family history of hyperlipidaemia. Despite aggressive intensive therapy he died of multiorgan failure...... within 36 h from initial presentation. While second-generation antipsychotics are well known to be causally linked to diabetes and hyperlipidaemia, this is to my knowledge the first-described case of a fatal triad of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly...... induced by quetiapine. Clinicians should be aware of this rare clinical presentation since rapid progression to multiorgan failure can occur. Early supportive therapy should be initiated. Lactescent serum and ketoacidosis in severe acute pancreatitis should not be overlooked-initiate insulin therapy...

  7. Proinflammatory cytokines in alcohol or gallstone induced acute pancreatitis. A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novovic, Srdan; Andersen, Anders Møller; Ersbøll, Annette Kjaer

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: If differences of inflammatory pathways in acute pancreatitis exist for various etiologies, selective and specific antiinflammatory and other modulatory treatment regimens might be indicated. Circulating levels of prominent proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, 8, 18, and TNF-alpha were...... measured in patients having their first attack of either alcohol- or gallstone-induced acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Seventy-five consecutive patients were prospectively included over a 15-month period, sixty of them being either alcohol- or gallstone-induced. All patients were treated according...... and clinical outcome is independent of the underlying etiology. Revealing the complex spatial and temporal profile of proinflammatory cytokine expression in acute pancreatitis is necessary and important for the development of a more targeted rational therapy....

  8. Epigenetic reprogramming in Mist1(-/- mice predicts the molecular response to cerulein-induced pancreatitis.

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    Rashid Mehmood

    Full Text Available Gene expression is affected by modifications to histone core proteins within chromatin. Changes in these modifications, or epigenetic reprogramming, can dictate cell fate and promote susceptibility to disease. The goal of this study was to determine the extent of epigenetic reprogramming in response to chronic stress that occurs following ablation of MIST1 (Mist1(-/- , which is repressed in pancreatic disease. Chromatin immunoprecipitation for trimethylation of lysine residue 4 on histone 3 (H3K4Me3 in purified acinar cells from wild type and Mist1(-/- mice was followed by Next Generation sequencing (ChIP-seq or ChIP-qPCR. H3K4Me3-enriched genes were assessed for expression by qRT-PCR in pancreatic tissue before and after induction of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. While most of H3K4Me3-enrichment is restricted to transcriptional start sites, >25% of enrichment sites are found within, downstream or between annotated genes. Less than 10% of these sites were altered in Mist1(-/- acini, with most changes in H3K4Me3 enrichment not reflecting altered gene expression. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of genes differentially-enriched for H3K4Me3 revealed an association with pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in Mist1(-/- tissue. Most of these genes were not differentially expressed but several were readily induced by acute experimental pancreatitis, with significantly increased expression in Mist1(-/- tissue relative to wild type mice. We suggest that the chronic cell stress observed in the absence of MIST1 results in epigenetic reprogramming of genes involved in promoting pancreatitis to a poised state, thereby increasing the sensitivity to events that promote disease.

  9. Role of the Use of Omental Flap in Prognosis of Cases with Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Experimental Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Hassan; Nader Shaaban; Ashraf M Abu-Seida; Mostafa Khodeir; Reem Jan; Hisham Elsharkawy; Engie Hefnawy

    2016-01-01

    Aim Acute pancreatitis frequently involves peripancreatic tissues and remote organ systems resulting in severe complications and high risk of mortality. Therefore, the present study was carried out to assess the effect of omental flap as a new treatment of acute pancreatitis. Methods Ten mongrel dogs with experimentally induced acute pancreatitis were randomly divided into two equal groups; treated and control groups. The pancreas was wrapped with omental flap in the treated group and the pan...

  10. Signal transduction of MCP-1 expression induced by pancreatitis-associated ascitic fluid in pancreatic acinar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramudo, Laura; Yubero, Sara; Manso, Manuel A; Vicente, Secundino; De Dios, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatitis-associated ascitic fluid (PAAF) is known to contribute to the progression of acute pancreatitis (AP). We have investigated the capability of PAAF to activate the expression of MCP-1 in pancreatic acinar cells and the involvement of MAPK, NF-κB and STAT3 as downstream signalling transduction pathways. The actions of dexamethasone (Dx) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on the PAAF’s acinar effects have also been evaluated. Acinar cells were incubated for 1 hr with PAAF collected from rats with severe AP induced by sodium taurocholate in the absence or presence of Dx (10−7 M) or NAC (30 mM). MCP-1 mRNA expression, phospho-p38-MAPK, IκBα, nuclear p65 levels and nuclear translocation of STAT3 were analysed. In response to PAAF, overexpression of MCP-1, phosphorylation of p38-MAPK, degradation of IκBα and increases in p65 nuclear levels and STAT3 activity were found in acinar cells. PAAF-mediated MCP-1 up-regulation was completely suppressed by Dx and NAC. MAPK activation was only inhibited by NAC, NF-κB activation was repressed by Dx and NAC, and STAT3 pathway was strongly blocked by Dx and significantly reduced by NAC. In conclusion, acinar cells were activated by PAAF to produce MCP-1, mainly via NF-κB and STAT3 pathways. Both downstream pathways were targeted by Dx and NAC to repress the PAAF-mediated acinar MCP-1 up-regulation. PMID:19604316

  11. Cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212 in vitro inhibits interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) release by rat pancreatic acini and in vivo induces dual effects on the course of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, C; Agostini, S; Alema', G S; Casolini, P; Carpino, F; Giuli, C; Improta, G; Linari, G; Petrozza, V; Broccardo, M

    2010-11-01

    Cannabinoids (CBs) evoke their effects by activating the cannabinoid receptor subtypes CB1-r and CB2-r and exert anti-inflammatory effects altering chemokine and cytokine expression. Various cytokines and chemokines are produced and released by rodent pancreatic acini in acute pancreatitis. Although CB1-r and CB2-r expressed in rat exocrine pancreatic acinar cells do not modulate digestive enzyme release, whether they modulate inflammatory mediators remains unclear. We investigated the CB-r system role on exocrine pancreas in unstimulated conditions and during acute pancreatitis. We evaluated in vitro and in vivo changes induced by WIN55,212 on the inflammatory variables amylasemia, pancreatic edema and morphology, and on acinar release and content of the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and chemokine monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in untreated rats and rats with caerulein (CK)-induced pancreatitis. In the in vitro experiments, WIN55,212 (10(-6) mol L(-1)) inhibited IL-6 and MCP-1 release from acinar cells of unstimulated rats and after CK-induced pancreatitis. In vivo, when rats were pretreated with WIN55,212 (2 mg kg(-1), intraperitoneally) before experimentally-induced pancreatitis, serum amylase, pancreatic edema and IL-6 and MCP-1 acinar content diminished and pancreatic morphology improved. Conversely, when rats with experimentally-induced pancreatitis were post-treated with WIN55,212, pancreatitis worsened. These findings provide new evidence showing that the pancreatic CB1-r/CB2-r system modulates pro-inflammatory factor levels in rat exocrine pancreatic acinar cells. The dual, time-dependent WIN55,212-induced changes in the development and course of acute pancreatitis support the idea that the role of the endogenous CB receptor system differs according to the local inflammatory status. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Tamoxifen-induced acute pancreatitis – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Czyżykowski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor modulator used for the treatment of oestrogen/progesterone receptor positive breast cancer. It has antagonistic or agonistic activity depending on the tissue location. Generally it causes mild and reversible side effects, however more serious ones including cardiovascular and thromboembolic adverse events, uterine cancer or acute pancreatitis can also occur. Tamoxifen, like oestrogens, increases the plasma level of TG and liver secretion of VLDL. Moreover, it inhibits the key enzymes of triglyceride metabolism. In this report we present a case of a 55-year-old woman with a history of a poorly controlled hypertriglyceridaemia diagnosed with breast cancer. She was treated with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonotherapy with tamoxifen. About three months after hormonal treatment, her triglyceride level increased. Five months later she developed an acute necrotic pancreatitis that required hospitalization. Her serum samples on admission were highly lipemic. An abdominal ultrasound showed no evidence of gallstones or dilation of the bile ducts. There was no history of alcohol abuse or abdominal trauma. Tamoxifen was suspected as a trigger factor for pancreatitis. After the drug withdrawal and administration of the conservative management the patient’s medical condition improved. Due to a postmenopausal status of the patient and no harmful effect on serum lipids, an adjuvant hormonotherapy with aromatase inhibitor was started.

  13. Novel Transgenic Mice for Inducible Gene Overexpression in Pancreatic Cells Define Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Regulations of Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massouridès, Emmanuelle; Singh-Estivalet, Amrit; Valtat, Bérengère; Dorchene, Delphine; Jaisser, Frédéric; Bréant, Bernadette; Tronche, Francois

    2012-01-01

    Conditional gene deletion in specific cell populations has helped the understanding of pancreas development. Using this approach, we have shown that deleting the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene in pancreatic precursor cells leads to a doubled beta-cell mass. Here, we provide genetic tools that permit a temporally and spatially controlled expression of target genes in pancreatic cells using the Tetracycline inducible system. To efficiently target the Tetracycline transactivator (tTA) in specific cell populations, we generated Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BAC) transgenic mice expressing the improved Tetracycline transactivator (itTA) either in pancreatic progenitor cells expressing the transcription factor Pdx1 (BAC-Pdx1-itTA), or in beta cells expressing the insulin1 gene (BAC-Ins1-itTA). In the two transgenic models, itTA-mediated activation of reporter genes was efficient and subject to regulation by Doxycycline (Dox). The analysis of a tetracycline-regulated LacZ reporter gene shows that in BAC-Pdx1-itTA mice, itTA is expressed from embryonic (E) day 11.5 in all pancreatic precursor cells. In the adult pancreas, itTA is active in mature beta, delta cells and in few acinar cells. In BAC-Ins1-itTA mice tTA is active from E13.5 and is restricted to beta cells in fetal and adult pancreas. In both lines, tTA activity was suppressed by Dox treatment and re-induced after Dox removal. Using these transgenic lines, we overexpressed the GR in selective pancreatic cell populations and found that overexpression in precursor cells altered adult beta-cell fraction but not glucose tolerance. In contrast, GR overexpression in mature beta cells did not alter beta-cell fraction but impaired glucose tolerance with insufficient insulin secretion. In conclusion, these new itTA mouse models will allow fine-tuning of gene expression to investigate gene function in pancreatic biology and help us understand how glucocorticoid signaling affects on the long-term distinct aspects of

  14. Effects of Tempol on Experimental Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Model in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbıs, Halil; Aykota, Muhammed Rasid; Ozturk, Bunyamin; Kabay, Burhan; Sungurtekin, Ugur; Ozden, Akın; Yenisey, Cigdem; Turk, Nilay Sen; Erdem, Ergun

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of Tempol on local organ damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model. This experimental study was conducted on 40 male Wistar- albino rats. The animals were randomly allocated into four groups: (i) Sham-operated group, laparotomies and cannulations of the pancreatic duct without acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) (n=10); (ii) Sham + Tempol group, identical to group 1 except for intravenous tempol treatment for 4 hours (n = 10); (iii) ANP group, glycodeoxycholic acid was infused into the pancreatic duct and cerulein was infused intravenously for 6 hours for development of ANP (n=10); and (iv) ANP + Tempol treated group, in addition to the procedure in group 3, rats were administered tempol intravenously for 4 hours (n = 10). Injury of the pancreas was evaluated histopathologically. Malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase levels of the pancreatic tissue, blood gas analysis, leukocyte and hematocrit levels were measured. Wet/dry weight of pancreatic tissue was also measured. Serum amylase levels, pancreatic tissue malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase levels, wet/dry weight ratio, pancreatic edema, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis and hemorrhage, inflammation and perivascular infiltration were significantly lower in the ANP + Tempol group compared with the ANP group. Tempol infusion reduced local organ damage due to acute necrotizing pancreatitis in this experimental study. These findings demonstrate that tempol has protective effects on local organ damage due to acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats.

  15. Innate Immune Molecule Surfactant Protein D Attenuates Sepsis-induced Acute Pancreatic Injury through Modulating Apoptosis and NF-κB-mediated Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyong; Shi, Qiao; Liu, Jiao; Abdel-Razek, Osama; Xu, Yongan; Cooney, Robert N; Wang, Guirong

    2015-12-04

    Sepsis causes multiple-organ dysfunction including pancreatic injury, thus resulting in high mortality. Innate immune molecule surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays a critical role in host defense and regulating inflammation of infectious diseases. In this study we investigated SP-D functions in the acute pancreatic injury (API) with C57BL/6 Wild-type (WT) and SP-D knockout (KO) mice in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model. Our results confirm SP-D expression in pancreatic islets and intercalated ducts and are the first to explore the role of pancreatic SP-D in sepsis. CLP decreased pancreatic SP-D levels and caused severe pancreatic injury with higher serum amylase 24 h after CLP. Apoptosis and neutrophil infiltration were increased in the pancreas of septic KO mice (p < 0.05, vs septic WT mice), with lower Bcl-2 and higher caspase-3 levels in septic KO mice (p < 0.05). Molecular analysis revealed increased NF-κB-p65 and phosphorylated IκB-α levels along with higher serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in septic KO mice compared to septic WT mice (p < 0.01). Furthermore, in vitro islet cultures stimulated with LPS produced higher TNF-α and IL-6 (p < 0.05) from KO mice compared to WT mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate SP-D plays protective roles by inhibiting apoptosis and modulating NF-κB-mediated inflammation in CLP-induced API.

  16. Proinflammatory Cytokines Induce Endocrine Differentiation in Pancreatic Ductal Cells via STAT3-Dependent NGN3 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Achel Valdez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A major goal of diabetes research is to develop strategies that replenish pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. One emerging strategy is to harness pancreatic plasticity—the ability of pancreatic cells to undergo cellular interconversions—a phenomenon implicated in physiological stress and pancreatic injury. Here, we investigate the effects of inflammatory cytokine stress on the differentiation potential of ductal cells in a human cell line, in mouse ductal cells by pancreatic intraductal injection, and during the progression of autoimmune diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD mouse model. We find that inflammatory cytokine insults stimulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT as well as the endocrine program in human pancreatic ductal cells via STAT3-dependent NGN3 activation. Furthermore, we show that inflammatory cytokines activate ductal-to-endocrine cell reprogramming in vivo independent of hyperglycemic stress. Together, our findings provide evidence that inflammatory cytokines direct ductal-to-endocrine cell differentiation, with implications for beta cell regeneration.

  17. Ginkgo Biloba Extract Kaempferol Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Chen, Aaron Y.; Li, Min; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2010-01-01

    Background Kaempferol is one of the most important constituents in ginkgo flavonoids. Recent studies indicate kaempferol may have anti-tumor activities. The objective in this study was to determine the effect and mechanisms of kaempferol on pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. Materials and Methods Pancreatic cancer cell lines MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1 were treated with Kampferol, and the inhibitory effects of kaempferol on pancreatic cancer cell proliferation were examined by direct cell counting, 3H-thymidine incorporation and MTS assay. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from cells was determined as an index of cytotoxicity. Apoptosis was analyzed by TUNEL assay. Results Upon the treatment with 70 μM kaempferol for 4 days, MIA PaCa-2 cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by 79% and 45.7% as determined by direct cell counting and MTS assay, respectively, compared with control cells (Pkaempferol significantly inhibited Panc-1 cell proliferation. Kaempferol treatment also significantly reduced 3H-thymidine incorporation in both MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells. Combination treatment of low concentrations of kaempferol and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) showed an additive effect on the inhibition of MIA PaCa-2 cell proliferation. Furthermore, kaempferol had a significantly less cytotoxicity than 5-FU in normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (P=0.029). In both MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells, apoptotic cell population was increased when treated with kaempferol in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions Ginkgo biloba extract kaempferol effectively inhibits pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and induces cancer cell apoptosis, which may sensitize pancreatic tumor cells to chemotherapy. Kaempferol may have clinical applications as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:18570926

  18. First report of small cell lung cancer with PTHrP-induced hypercalcemic pancreatitis causing disconnected duct syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montminy, Eric M; Landreneau, Stephen W; Karlitz, Jordan J

    2017-10-10

    Here we report a patient diagnosed with small cell lung cancer after first presenting with parathyroid hormone-related peptide-induced hypercalcemic pancreatitis and developed walled-off necrosis that resulted in disruption of the main pancreatic duct. Disconnected duct syndrome (DDS) is a rare syndrome that occurs when the main pancreatic duct exocrine flow is disrupted resulting in leakage of pancreatic enzymes and further inflammatory sequela. To date, no prior reports have described DDS occurring with paraneoplastic reactions. Diagnostic imaging techniques and therapeutic interventions are reviewed to provide insight into current approaches to DDS.

  19. Effect of L-cysteine on remote organ injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis induced by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Juan; Wan, Rong; Shen, Jia-Qing; Shen, Jie; Wang, Xing-Peng

    2013-08-01

    Remote organ failure occurs in cases of acute pancreatitis (AP); however, the reports on AP induced by pancreatic duct obstruction are rare. In this study we determined the effect of L-cysteine on pancreaticobiliary inflammation and remote organ damage in rats after pancreaticobiliary duct ligation (PBDL). AP was induced by PBDL in rats with 5/0 silk. Sixty rats were randomly divided into 4 groups. Groups A and B were sham-operated groups that received injections of saline or L-cysteine (10 mg/kg) intraperitoneally (15 rats in each group). Groups C and D were PBDL groups that received injections of saline or L-cysteine (10 mg/kg) intraperitoneally (15 rats in each group). The tissue samples of the pancreas and remote organs such as the lung, liver, intestine and kidney were subsequently examined for pathological changes under a light microscope. The samples were also stored for the determination of malondialdehyde and glutathione levels. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), plasma amylase, ALT and AST levels were determined spectrophotometrically using an automated analyzer. Also, we evaluated the effect of L-cysteine on remote organ injury in rats with AP induced by retrograde infusion of 3.5% sodium taurocholate (NaTc) into the bile-pancreatic duct. Varying degrees of injury in the pancreas, lung, liver, intestine and kidney were observed in the rats 24 hours after PBDL. The severity of injury to the lung, liver and intestine was attenuated, while injury status was not changed significantly in the pancreas and kidney after L-cysteine treatment. Oxidative stress was also affected by L-cysteine in PBDL-treated rats. The concentration of tissue malondialdehyde decreased in the pancreas and remote organs of PBDL and L-cysteine administrated rats, and the concentration of glutathione increased more significantly than that of the model control group. However, L-cysteine administration reduced the severity of injury in remote organs but not in the pancreas in rats with NaTc-induced

  20. Severity of post-ERCP pancreatitis directly proportional to the invasiveness of endoscopic intervention: a pilot study in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscaglia, J M; Simons, B W; Prosser, B J; Ruben, D S; Giday, S A; Magno, P; Clarke, J O; Shin, E J; Kalloo, A N; Kantsevoy, S V; Gabrielson, K L; Jagannath, S B

    2008-06-01

    Pancreatitis complicates 1% - 22% of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures. The study aims were to develop a reproducible animal model of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP), and investigate the impact of endoscopic technique on severity of PEP. ERCP was carried out in six male hound dogs. Pancreatitis was induced by one of three escalating methods: 1) pancreatic acinarization with 20 - 30 mL of contrast; 2) acinarization + ductal balloon occlusion + sphincterotomy; 3) acinarization + intraductal synthetic bile injection + ductal balloon occlusion + sphincterotomy. Dogs 5 and 6 received a pancreatic stent. Necropsy was performed on postoperative day 5. All pancreatic specimens were graded by two blinded pathologists according to a validated scoring system. All dogs were compared with three control dogs. Dogs 1 - 4 developed clinical pancreatitis and hyperamylasemia (11 736 vs. 722 U/L, P = 0.02). Total injury scores were significantly elevated compared with controls (6.85 vs. 1.06, P = 0.004). There was significant increase in acinar cell necrosis (0.86 vs. 0.06, P = Dogs 5 and 6 developed clinical pancreatitis without significant hyperamylasemia; total injury scores were elevated compared with controls (4.83 vs. 1.06, P = 0.01), but lower than in Dogs 1 - 4 (4.83 vs. 6.85, P = 0.25). There was escalating severity of pancreatic injury from Dogs 1 to 4 correlating with the method of endoscopic injury used. Severity of PEP is directly proportional to invasiveness of endoscopic intervention. Pancreatic acinarization, even without balloon occlusion and sphincterotomy, can be used as a reliable animal model for future studies investigating therapy and prevention of disease.

  1. Phenolic compounds isolated from Dioscorea zingiberensis protect against pancreatic acinar cells necrosis induced by sodium taurocholate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Rui; Hu, Liqiang; Xing, Zhihua; Shi, Na; Shen, Yan; Gong, Meng

    2017-03-15

    One new bibenzyl (1) and one new phenanthrene (2), together with two known bibenzyls (3-4) and four known diarylheptanoids (5-8) were isolated from the rhizomes of Dioscorea zingiberensis. The structures of 1-2 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR. Phenols 1-8 were evaluated for their anti-pancreatitic activities on sodium taurocholate (NaT)-induced pancreatic acinars necrosis. Notably, 0.5mM of compound 6 exhibited comparable inhibitory effect with 5mM of caffeine. Furthermore, compound 6 prevented the ATP depletion and excessive ROS production which could be also involved in mitochondria-mediated injuries in acute pancreatitis. As a result, compound 6 has been demonstrated to be a potential candidate for mediating mitochondrial dysfunction to prevent pancreatic necrosis. This study is also the first report on the isolation of bibenzyls and diarylheptanoids from this plant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Protective Effect of Tetrandrine on Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-lin Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tet is a type of alkaloid extracted from Stephania tetrandra, and it has recently been demonstrated that Tet can protect against inflammation and free radical injury and inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators. The present study was designed to observe the protective effect of Tet on sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. The rat model of SAP was induced by retrograde bile duct injection of sodium taurocholate and then treated with Verapamil and Tet. The results showed that Tet can reduce NF-κB activation in pancreas issue, inhibit the SAP cascade, and improve SAP through inducing pancreas acinar cell apoptosis and stabilizing intracellular calcium in the pancreas, thus mitigating the damage to the pancreas. Our study revealed that Tet may reduce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS to protect against damage, and these roles may be mediated through the NF-κB pathway to improve the proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory imbalance.

  3. Clinical features and treatment of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis during pregnancy: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunlan; Liu, Jie; Lu, Yingying; Fan, Junjie; Wang, Xingpeng; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Yue

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the features and treatment of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis (HTGP) during pregnancy. A retrospective study of 21 pregnant women diagnosed with acute pancreatitis (AP) was performed. Patients were divided into acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP), HTGP, and idiopathic groups according to etiology. 95% of the patients were in the third trimester of gestation. The percentage of patients with HTGP was higher than that of ABP (48% vs.14%). The percentage of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in the HTGP group was higher than that in the ABP group (40.0% vs.0%). The Ranson scores for moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP) and SAP in the HTGP group were significantly different (2.50 ± 0.58 vs.3.60 ± 0.89, P  0.05, respectively). In the HTGP group, there were five patients given plasma exchange therapy and five not. Plasmapheresis decreased the incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) from 100% to 28.6% and the TG level from 20.36 ± 7.41 mmol/L to 5.23 ± 3.62 mmol/L (P pregnancy with SIRS or multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). J. Clin. Apheresis 31:571-578, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Treating Diet-Induced Diabetes and Obesity with Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells and Antidiabetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Bruin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived pancreatic progenitor cells effectively reverse hyperglycemia in rodent models of type 1 diabetes, but their capacity to treat type 2 diabetes has not been reported. An immunodeficient model of type 2 diabetes was generated by high-fat diet (HFD feeding in SCID-beige mice. Exposure to HFDs did not impact the maturation of macroencapsulated pancreatic progenitor cells into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells following transplantation, and the cell therapy improved glucose tolerance in HFD-fed transplant recipients after 24 weeks. However, since diet-induced hyperglycemia and obesity were not fully ameliorated by transplantation alone, a second cohort of HFD-fed mice was treated with pancreatic progenitor cells combined with one of three antidiabetic drugs. All combination therapies rapidly improved body weight and co-treatment with either sitagliptin or metformin improved hyperglycemia after only 12 weeks. Therefore, a stem cell-based therapy may be effective for treating type 2 diabetes, particularly in combination with antidiabetic drugs.

  5. Esculetin induces antiproliferative and apoptotic response in pancreatic cancer cells by directly binding to KEAP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Rashi; Sawney, Sharad; Saini, Vikas; Steffi, Chris; Tiwari, Manisha; Saluja, Daman

    2016-10-18

    A handful of studies have exploited antitumor potential of esculetin, a dihydroxy coumarine derivative; the targets to which it binds and the possible downstream mechanism for its cytotoxicity in cancer cells remain to be elucidated. Using pancreatic cancer cell lines as a model system, herein the study was initiated to check the efficacy of esculetin in inhibiting growth of these cancer cells, to decipher mechanism of its action and to predict its direct binding target protein. The cytotoxicity of esculetin was determined in PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2 and AsPC-1 cell lines; followed by an inspection of intracellular levels of ROS and its associated transcription factor, p65-NF-κB. The interaction between transcription factor, Nrf2 and its regulator KEAP1 was studied in the presence and absence of esculetin. The effect of Nrf2 on gene expression of antioxidant response element pathway was monitored by real time PCR. Thereafter, potential binding target of esculetin was predicted through molecular docking and then confirmed in vitro. Esculetin treatment in all three pancreatic cancer cell lines resulted in significant growth inhibition with G1-phase cell cycle arrest and induction of mitochondrial dependent apoptosis through activation of caspases 3, 8 and 9. A notable decrease was observed in intracellular ROS and protein levels of p65-NF-κB in PANC-1 cells on esculetin treatment. Antioxidant response regulator Nrf2 has been reportedly involved in crosstalk with NF-κB. Interaction between Nrf2 and KEAP1 was found to be lost upon esculetin treatment in PANC-1 and MIA Paca-2 cells. Nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and an upregulation of expression of Nrf2 regulated gene NQO1, observed on esculetin treatment in PANC-1 further supported the activation of Nrf2. To account for the loss of Nrf2-KEAP1 interaction on esculetin treatment, direct binding potential between esculetin and KEAP1 was depicted in silico using molecular docking studies. Pull down assay using esculetin

  6. High fat diet and GLP-1 drugs induce pancreatic injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, Rodney; Xu, Lin; Stewart, Sharron; Zhang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) drugs are currently used to treat type-2 diabetes. Safety concerns for increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal metaplasia have accompanied these drugs. High fat diet (HFD) is a type-2 diabetes risk factor that may affect the response to GLP-1 drug treatment. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of diet and GLP-1 based drugs on the exocrine pancreas in mice. Experiments were designed in a mouse model of insulin resistance created by feeding a HFD or standard diet (STD) for 6 weeks. The GLP-1 drugs, sitagliptin (SIT) and exenatide (EXE) were administered once daily for additional 6 weeks in both mice fed HFD or STD. The results showed that body weight, blood glucose levels, and serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β, and KC) were significantly greater in HFD mice than in STD mice regardless of GLP-1 drug treatment. The semi-quantitative grading showed that pancreatic changes were significantly greater in EXE and SIT-treated mice compared to control and that HFD exacerbated spontaneous exocrine pancreatic changes seen in saline-treated mice on a standard diet. Exocrine pancreatic changes identified in this study included acinar cell injury (hypertrophy, autophagy, apoptosis, necrosis, and atrophy), vascular injury, interstitial edema and inflammation, fat necrosis, and duct changes. These findings support HFD as a risk factor to increased susceptibility/severity for acute pancreatitis and indicate that GLP-1 drugs cause pancreatic injury that can be exacerbated in a HFD environment

  7. No evidence of drug-induced pancreatitis in rats treated with exenatide for 13 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarkiewicz, K; Belanger, P; Gu, G; Parkes, D; Roy, D

    2013-05-01

    The potential association of glucagon-like peptide receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) with the development of pancreatitis or pancreatic malignancies in patients with diabetes has been suggested. This study evaluated the long-term effects of the GLP-1RA exenatide on pancreatic exocrine structure and function in the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat model of type 2 diabetes. Rats received subcutaneous twice-daily injections of 0 (control), 6, 40 and 250 µg/kg/day exenatide for 3 months. Clinical signs, body and pancreas weight, food consumption, HbA1c, fasting serum amylase, lipase, glucose and insulin concentrations were evaluated during treatment and after a 28-day off-drug period to assess the reversibility of any observed effects. Morphometric analysis of pancreatic ductal cell proliferation and apoptosis were performed. Plasma exenatide concentrations were several-fold higher than therapeutic levels observed in humans. No exenatide-related effects were observed on clinical signs, lipase concentration, pancreatic weight, pancreatic histology, ductal cell proliferation or apoptosis. Exenatide improved animal survival, physical condition, glucose concentrations and HbA1c, decreased food intake, and increased serum insulin concentration. Total amylase concentrations, although within normal ranges, were slightly higher in exenatide-treated rats; following the off-drug period, total amylase concentrations were comparable in treated and untreated rats. Exenatide-related minimal-to-moderate islet hypertrophy was observed at doses ≥6 µg/kg/day, with dose-related increases in incidence and degree. These changes were still present after the off-drug period. Chronic administration of exenatide in ZDF rats resulted in the expected metabolic benefits and improved animal survival, with no adverse effects noted on pancreatic exocrine structure and function. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. High fat diet and GLP-1 drugs induce pancreatic injury in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouse, Rodney, E-mail: rodney.rouse@fda.hhs.gov; Xu, Lin; Stewart, Sharron; Zhang, Jun

    2014-04-15

    Glucagon Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) drugs are currently used to treat type-2 diabetes. Safety concerns for increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal metaplasia have accompanied these drugs. High fat diet (HFD) is a type-2 diabetes risk factor that may affect the response to GLP-1 drug treatment. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of diet and GLP-1 based drugs on the exocrine pancreas in mice. Experiments were designed in a mouse model of insulin resistance created by feeding a HFD or standard diet (STD) for 6 weeks. The GLP-1 drugs, sitagliptin (SIT) and exenatide (EXE) were administered once daily for additional 6 weeks in both mice fed HFD or STD. The results showed that body weight, blood glucose levels, and serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β, and KC) were significantly greater in HFD mice than in STD mice regardless of GLP-1 drug treatment. The semi-quantitative grading showed that pancreatic changes were significantly greater in EXE and SIT-treated mice compared to control and that HFD exacerbated spontaneous exocrine pancreatic changes seen in saline-treated mice on a standard diet. Exocrine pancreatic changes identified in this study included acinar cell injury (hypertrophy, autophagy, apoptosis, necrosis, and atrophy), vascular injury, interstitial edema and inflammation, fat necrosis, and duct changes. These findings support HFD as a risk factor to increased susceptibility/severity for acute pancreatitis and indicate that GLP-1 drugs cause pancreatic injury that can be exacerbated in a HFD environment.

  9. Cholinergic intrapancreatic neurons induce Ca²+ signaling and early-response gene expression in pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D J; cowles, R A; Segura, B J; Romanchuk, G; Barnhart, D C; Mulholland, M W

    2000-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine function has been demonstrated to be under neuronal regulation. The pathways responsible for this effect, and the long-term consequences of such interactions, are incompletely described. The effects of neuronal depolarization on pancreatic acinar cells were studied to determine whether calcium signaling and c-fos expression were activated. In pancreatic lobules, which contain both neurons and acinar cells, agonists that selectively stimulated neurons increased intracellular calcium in acinar cells. Depolarization also led to the expression of c-fos protein in 24% +/- 4% of the acinar cells. In AR42J pancreatic acinar cells, cholinergic stimulation demonstrated an average increase of 398 +/- 19 nmol/L in intracellular calcium levels, and induced c-fos expression that was time and dose dependent. The data indicate that intrapancreatic neurons induce Ca²+ signaling and early-response gene expression in pancreatic acinar cells.

  10. Met receptor tyrosine kinase signaling induces secretion of the angiogenic chemokine interleukin-8/CXCL8 in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen S Hill

    Full Text Available At diagnosis, the majority of pancreatic cancer patients present with advanced disease when curative resection is no longer feasible and current therapeutic treatments are largely ineffective. An improved understanding of molecular targets for effective intervention of pancreatic cancer is thus urgent. The Met receptor tyrosine kinase is one candidate implicated in pancreatic cancer. Notably, Met is over expressed in up to 80% of invasive pancreatic cancers but not in normal ductal cells correlating with poor overall patient survival and increased recurrence rates following surgical resection. However the functional role of Met signaling in pancreatic cancer remains poorly understood. Here we used RNA interference to directly examine the pathobiological importance of increased Met signaling for pancreatic cancer. We show that Met knockdown in pancreatic tumor cells results in decreased cell survival, cell invasion, and migration on collagen I in vitro. Using an orthotopic model for pancreatic cancer, we provide in vivo evidence that Met knockdown reduced tumor burden correlating with decreased cell survival and tumor angiogenesis, with minimal effect on cell growth. Notably, we report that Met signaling regulates the secretion of the pro-angiogenic chemokine interleukin-8/CXCL8. Our data showing that the interleukin-8 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 are not expressed on pancreatic tumor cells, suggests a paracrine mechanism by which Met signaling regulates interleukin-8 secretion to remodel the tumor microenvironment, a novel finding that could have important clinical implications for improving the effectiveness of treatments for pancreatic cancer.

  11. Vagotomy plus Bilroth II gastrectomy for the prevention of recurrent alcohol-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, H H; Mullins, R J; Scovill, W A

    1985-06-01

    Three retrospective reviews documenting a lessened frequency of acute recurrent alcohol-induced pancreatitis following vagotomy, with or without gastrectomy or gastroenterostomy, prompted a prospective evaluation of truncal vagotomy with Bilroth II gastrectomy as a means of preventing such exacerbations. Randomization between operation and encouragement to abstain from alcohol in patients with a history of more than one, but less than ten, acute bouts of alcohol-induced pancreatitis was set by odd-even digits in the hospital number. Of 176 patients admitted with acute alcoholic pancreatitis during 23 months of study, 49 were excluded because of too few or too many prior attacks. Another 61 refused to enter the study. At least one (average 1.9) recurrence requiring hospitalization was noted in 49, or 80%, of these patients on follow-up for 2 to 26 months (average 14 months). Of the 66 who consented to participate, 33 were randomized not to undergo operation and had almost identical recurrence statistics (i.e., an average of 1.7 recurrences in 24, or 73%). By contrast, only two of 31, or six per cent, allocated to operation have experienced a recurrence (p less than 0.001). Two who had been randomized were excluded because of persisting active pancreatitis.

  12. Carbon monoxide-bound hemoglobin vesicles ameliorate multiorgan injuries induced by severe acute pancreatitis in mice by their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Saori; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Sakai, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Keishi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has attracted attention as a possible therapeutic agent for affecting anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Previously, CO-bound hemoglobin vesicle (CO-HbV) was developed as a nanotechnology-based CO donor, and its safety profile and therapeutic potential as a clinically applicable carrier of CO were examined in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the therapeutic efficacy of CO-HbV against severe acute pancreatitis was examined with secondary distal organ-injured model mice that were fed with a choline-deficient ethionine-supplemented diet. A CO-HbV treatment significantly reduced the mortality of the acute pancreatitis model mice compared to saline and HbV. Biochemical and histological evaluations clearly showed that CO-HbV suppressed acute pancreatitis by inhibiting the production of systemic proinflammatory cytokines, neutrophil infiltration, and oxidative injuries in pancreatic tissue. Interestingly, CO-HbV also diminished the subsequent damage to distal organs including liver, kidneys, and lungs. This could be due to the suppression of neutrophil infiltration into tissues and the subsequently enhanced oxidative injuries. In contrast, O 2 -bound HbV, the inactive form of CO-HbV, was ineffective against both pancreatitis and distal organ injuries, confirming that CO was directly responsible for the protective effects of CO-HbV in acute pancreatitis. These findings suggest that CO-HbV has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant characteristics of CO and consequently exerts a superior protective effect against acute pancreatitis-induced multiorgan damage.

  13. Requirement of Nuclear Factor κB for Smac Mimetic–Mediated Sensitization of Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells for Gemcitabine-Induced Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Stadel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Defects in apoptosis contribute to treatment resistance and poor outcome of pancreatic cancer, calling for novel therapeutic strategies. Here, we provide the first evidence that nuclear factor (NF κB is required for Smac mimetic– mediated sensitization of pancreatic carcinoma cells for gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. The Smac mimetic BV6 cooperates with gemcitabine to reduce cell viability and to induce apoptosis. In addition, BV6 significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of several anticancer drugs against pancreatic carcinoma cells, including doxorubicin, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil. Molecular studies reveal that BV6 stimulates NF-κB activation, which is further increased in the presence of gemcitabine. Importantly, inhibition of NF-κB by overexpression of the dominant-negative IκBα superrepressor significantly decreases BV6- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis, demonstrating that NF-κB exerts a proapoptotic function in this model of apoptosis. In support of this notion, inhibition of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα by the TNFα blocking antibody Enbrel reduces BV6- and gemcitabine-induced activation of caspase 8 and 3, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptosis. By demonstrating that BV6 and gemcitabine trigger a NF-κB–dependent, TNFα-mediated loop to activate apoptosis signaling pathways and caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death, our findings have important implications for the development of Smac mimetic–based combination protocols in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  14. The Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer Atlas (MMPCA for classification of pancreatic cancer lesions: A large histological investigation of the Ptf1aCre/+;LSL-KrasG12D/+ transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle J Veite-Schmahl

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is one of the leading forms of cancer related deaths in the United States. With limited treatment options and unreliable diagnostic methods, long-term survival rates following a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer remain poor. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN are precancerous lesions that precede progression towards PDAC. PanIN occur in increasing complexity as the disease progresses and the description of PanIN plays a critical role in describing, staging and diagnosing PDAC. Inconsistencies in PanIN classifications exist even amongst leading pathologists. This has led to debate and confusion among researchers and pathologists involved in pancreatic cancer research, diagnosis and treatment. We have sought to initiate a discussion with leading pathologists with a goal of increasing consensus in the interpretation of PanIN and associated structures within the precancerous pancreas. Toward achieving this goal, we are in the process of conducting an extensive study of over 1000 male and female pancreata in varying stages of PanIN progression isolated from the Ptf1aCre/+;LSL-KrasG12D/+ transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Using this extensive database, we have established the Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer Atlas (MMPCA to serve as a platform for meaningful and interactive discussion among researchers and pathologists who study pancreatic disease. We hope that the MMPCA will be an effective tool for promoting a more consistent and accurate consensus of PanIN classifications in the future.

  15. Solanine Induces Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. Mechanically, solanine promotes the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (MPTP by downregulating the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; thereafter, Cytochrome c and Smac are released from mitochondria into cytosol to process the caspase-3 zymogen into an activated form. Moreover, we found that the expression of tumor metastasis related proteins, MMP-2 and MMP-9, was also decreased in the cells treated with solanine. Therefore, our results suggested that solanine was an effective compound for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Linc-ROR confers gemcitabine resistance to pancreatic cancer cells via inducing autophagy and modulating the miR-124/PTBP1/PKM2 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenggang; Zhao, Zhiming; Zhou, Zhipeng; Liu, Rong

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the regulation of linc-ROR on autophagy and gemcitabine resistance of pancreatic cancer cells and further studied the underlying involvement of the miR-124/PTBP1/PKM2 axis in this regulation. Pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1 and MIAPaCa-2 cells were used as in vitro model. Autophagy was assessed by western blot of LC3 I/II and observation GFP-LC3 puncta. Cell viability was examined using CCK-8 assay. Cell apoptosis was examined by flow cytometric analysis of Annexin V/PI staining. QRT-PCR, RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization and dual luciferase assay were used to study the expression and the binding between linc-ROR and miR-124. Linc-ROR siRNA significantly sensitized PANC-1 and MIAPaCa-2 cells to gemcitabine, while linc-ROR overexpression significantly reduced the sensitivity. Linc-ROR knockdown reduced basal autophagy, while linc-ROR overexpression markedly increased basal autophagy in the cells. Linc-ROR siRNA showed similar effect as 3-MA on enhancing gemcitabine-induced cell apoptosis and also reduced PKM2 expression. MiR-124 overexpression restored PKM1 and reduced PKM2 levels in the cells. In addition, miR-124 mimics also alleviated autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells. Both miR-124 mimics and PKM2 siRNA enhanced gemcitabine-induced cell apoptosis. In both pancreatic cell lines and PADC tissues, linc-ROR is negatively correlated with miR-124 expression. In addition, dual luciferase assay verified two 8mer binding sites between miR-124 and linc-ROR. Linc-ROR confers gemcitabine resistance to pancreatic cancer cells at least partly via inducing autophagy. There is a linc-ROR/miR-124/PTBP1/PKM2 axis involved in regulation of gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells.

  17. Bifurcation structure of a model of bursting pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Lading, B.; Yanchuk, S.

    2001-01-01

    . The transition from this structure to the so-called period-adding structure is found to involve a subcritical period-doubling bifurcation and the emergence of type-III intermittency. The period-adding transition itself is not smooth but consists of a saddle-node bifurcation in which (n + 1)-spike bursting...... behavior is born, slightly overlapping with a subcritical period-doubling bifurcation in which n-spike bursting behavior loses its stability.......One- and two-dimensional bifurcation studies of a prototypic model of bursting oscillations in pancreatic P-cells reveal a squid-formed area of chaotic dynamics in the parameter plane, with period-doubling bifurcations on one side of the arms and saddle-node bifurcations on the other...

  18. Novel pancreatic cancer cell lines derived from genetically engineered mouse models of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma: applications in diagnosis and therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María P Torres

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC remains one of the most lethal human malignancies with poor prognosis. Despite all advances in preclinical research, there have not been significant translation of novel therapies into the clinics. The development of genetically engineered mouse (GEM models that produce spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC have increased our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. Although these PDAC mouse models are ideal for studying potential therapies and specific genetic mutations, there is a need for developing syngeneic cell lines from these models. In this study, we describe the successful establishment and characterization of three cell lines derived from two (PDAC mouse models. The cell line UN-KC-6141 was derived from a pancreatic tumor of a Kras(G12D;Pdx1-Cre (KC mouse at 50 weeks of age, whereas UN-KPC-960 and UN-KPC-961 cell lines were derived from pancreatic tumors of Kras(G12D;Trp53(R172H;Pdx1-Cre (KPC mice at 17 weeks of age. The cancer mutations of these parent mice carried over to the daughter cell lines (i.e. Kras(G12D mutation was observed in all three cell lines while Trp53 mutation was observed only in KPC cell lines. The cell lines showed typical cobblestone epithelial morphology in culture, and unlike the previously established mouse PDAC cell line Panc02, expressed the ductal marker CK19. Furthermore, these cell lines expressed the epithelial-mesenchymal markers E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and also, Muc1 and Muc4 mucins. In addition, these cell lines were resistant to the chemotherapeutic drug Gemcitabine. Their implantation in vivo produced subcutaneous as well as tumors in the pancreas (orthotopic. The genetic mutations in these cell lines mimic the genetic compendium of human PDAC, which make them valuable models with a high potential of translational relevance for examining diagnostic markers and therapeutic drugs.

  19. The novel hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-2098 has antitumor effect in pancreatic cancer; possible mechanism through inhibiting VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1α targeted gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Kotaro; Nishioka, Masanori; Imura, Satoru; Batmunkh, Erdenebulgan; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hori, Hitoshi; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2012-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been considered to be a potential therapeutic target, because hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a novel hypoxic cytotoxin, 3-[2-hydroxyethyl(methyl)amino]-2-quinoxalinecarbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (TX-2098) in inhibiting the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), and consequently vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic cancer. The antitumor effects of TX-2098 under hypoxia were tested against various human pancreatic cancer cell lines using WST-8 assay. VEGF protein induced pancreatic cancer was determined on cell-free supernatant by ELISA. Moreover, nude mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically implanted human SUIT-2 were treated with TX-2098. Tumor volume, survival and expression of HIF-1 and associated molecules were evaluated in treatment versus control groups. In vitro, TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of various pancreatic cancer cell lines. In s.c model, tumors from nude mice injected with pancreatic cancer cells and treated with TX-2098 showed significant reductions in volume (P<0.01 versus control). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TX-2098 significantly inhibited mRNA expression of the HIF-1 associated molecules, VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and Aldolase A (P<0.01 versus control). These treatments also prolong the survival in orthotopic models. These results suggest that the effect of TX-2098 in pancreatic cancer might be correlated with the expression of VEGF and HIF-1 targeted molecules. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ischemia-reperfusion rat model of acute pancreatitis: protein carbonyl as a putative early biomarker of pancreatic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanaider, Alberto; de Carvalho, Thales Penna; de Oliveira Coelho, Simone; Renteria, Juan Miguel; Eleuthério, Elis Cristina Araújo; Castelo-Branco, Morgana Teixeira Lima; Madi, Kalil; Baetas-da-Cruz, Wagner; de Souza, Heitor Siffert Pereira

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disorder that can affect adjacent and/or remote organs. Some evidence indicates that the production of reactive oxygen species is able to induce AP. Protein carbonyl (PC) derivatives, which can also be generated through oxidative cleavage mechanisms, have been implicated in several diseases, but there is little or no information on this biomarker in AP. We investigated the association between some inflammatory mediators and PC, with the severity of ischemia-reperfusion AP. Wistar rats (n = 56) were randomly assigned in the following groups : control; sham, 15- or 180-min clamping of splenic artery, with 24 or 72 h of follow-up. The relationships between serum level of PC and thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) to myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in tissue homogenates and to cytokines in culture supernatants of pancreatic samples were analyzed. MPO activity was related to the histology scores and increased in all clamping groups. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 were higher in the 180-min groups. Significant correlations were found between MPO activity and the concentrations of TNF-α and IL-1β. PC levels increased in the 15-min to 24-h group. TBARS levels were not altered substantially. MPO activity and TNF-α and IL-1β concentrations in pancreatic tissue are correlated with AP severity. Serum levels of PC appear to begin to rise early in the course of the ischemia-reperfusion AP and are no longer detected at later stages in the absence of severe pancreatitis. These data suggest that PC can be an efficient tool for the diagnosis of early stages of AP.

  1. MUC1 enhances invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, L D; Sahraei, M; Subramani, D B; Besmer, D; Nath, S; Tinder, T L; Bajaj, E; Shanmugam, K; Lee, Y Y; Hwang, S I L; Gendler, S J; Mukherjee, P

    2011-03-24

    Increased motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells are associated with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Snai1 and Slug are zinc-finger transcription factors that trigger this process by repressing E-cadherin and enhancing vimentin and N-cadherin protein expression. However, the mechanisms that regulate this activation in pancreatic tumors remain elusive. MUC1, a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein, is associated with the most invasive forms of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDA). In this study, we show that over expression of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer cells triggers the molecular process of EMT, which translates to increased invasiveness and metastasis. EMT was significantly reduced when MUC1 was genetically deleted in a mouse model of PDA or when all seven tyrosines in the cytoplasmic tail of MUC1 were mutated to phenylalanine (mutated MUC1 CT). Using proteomics, RT-PCR and western blotting, we revealed a significant increase in vimentin, Slug and Snail expression with repression of E-Cadherin in MUC1-expressing cells compared with cells expressing the mutated MUC1 CT. In the cells that carried the mutated MUC1 CT, MUC1 failed to co-immunoprecipitate with β-catenin and translocate to the nucleus, thereby blocking transcription of the genes associated with EMT and metastasis. Thus, functional tyrosines are critical in stimulating the interactions between MUC1 and β-catenin and their nuclear translocation to initiate the process of EMT. This study signifies the oncogenic role of MUC1 CT and is the first to identify a direct role of the MUC1 in initiating EMT during pancreatic cancer. The data may have implications in future design of MUC1-targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer.

  2. Insulin downregulates the expression of the Ca2+-activated nonselective cation channel TRPM5 in pancreatic islets from leptin-deficient mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Colsoul, Barbara; Jacobs, Griet; Philippaert, Koenraad; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Segal, Andrei; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas; Schuit, Frans; Vennekens, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    We recently proposed that the transient receptor potential melastatin 5 (TRPM5) cation channel contributes to glucose-induced electrical activity of the β cell and positively influences glucose-induced insulin release and glucose homeostasis. In this study, we investigated Trpm5 expression and function in pancreatic islets from mouse models of type II diabetes. Gene expression analysis revealed a strong reduction of Trpm5 mRNA levels in pancreatic islets of db/db and ob/ob mice. The glucose-i...

  3. Inhibition of Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer Models by Interference With CD44v6 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke-Ogi, Alexandra; Jannasch, Katharina; Shatirishvili, Marine; Fuchs, Beatrix; Chiblak, Sara; Morton, Jennifer; Tawk, Bouchra; Lindner, Thomas; Sansom, Owen; Alves, Frauke; Warth, Arne; Schwager, Christian; Mier, Walter; Kleeff, Jörg; Ponta, Helmut; Abdollahi, Amir; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique

    2016-02-01

    Cancer cells with high metastatic potential and stem cell-like characteristics express the cell surface marker CD44. CD44 isoforms that include the v6 exon are co-receptors for the receptor tyrosine kinases MET and Vascular Endothelial Growth factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). We studied CD44v6 signaling in several pancreatic cancer cell lines, and its role in tumor growth and metastasis in several models of pancreatic cancer. We analyzed the effects of v6 peptides that interfere with the co-receptor functions of CD44v6 for MET and VEGFR-2 in tumors and metastases grown from cells that express different CD44 isoforms, including CD44v6. The peptides were injected into rats with syngeneic tumors and mice with orthotopic or xenograft tumors. We also tested the effects of the peptides in mice with xenograft tumors grown from patient tumor samples and mice that express an oncogenic form of RAS and develop spontaneous pancreatic cancer (KPC mice). We measured levels of CD44v6 messenger RNA (mRNA) in pancreatic cancer tissues from 136 patients. Xenograft tumors grown from human cancer cells injected with v6 peptides were smaller and formed fewer metastases in mice. The v6 peptide was more efficient than the MET inhibitor crizotinib and/or the VEGFR-2 inhibitor pazopanib in reducing xenograft tumor growth and metastasis. Injection of KPC mice with the v6 peptide increased their survival time. Injection of mice and rats bearing metastases with the v6 peptide induced regression of metastases. Higher levels of CD44v6 mRNA in human pancreatic tumor tissues were associated with increased expression of MET, tumor metastasis, and shorter patient survival times. Peptide inhibitors of CD44v6 isoforms block tumor growth and metastasis in several independent models of pancreatic cancer. The v6 peptides induced regression of metastases. Levels of CD44v6 mRNA are increased, along with those of MET mRNA, in patients with metastatic pancreatic tumors, compared with nonmetastatic tumors

  4. Protective effect of chlorogenic acid on the inflammatory damage of pancreas and lung in mice with l-arginine-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawara, Tatsuya; Takeda, Hiroshi; Nishihira, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Pancreatitis is characterized by inflammatory disease with severe tissue injury in pancreas, and the incidence of pancreatitis has been recently increasing. Although several treatments of acute pancreatitis have been developed, some patients have been resistant to current therapy. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is one of the polyphenols, and is known to have an anti-inflammatory effect. In this study, we investigated the effects of CGA on experimental pancreatitis in mice. Pancreatitis was induced by twice injection of l-arginine (5g/kg body weight). Mice were intraperitoneally injected with CGA (20mg/kg or 40mg/kg) 1h before administration of l-arginine. Administration of 40mg/kg of CGA decreased the histological severity of pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Moreover, administration of CGA inhibited the levels of pancreatic enzyme activity. Interestingly, CGA reduced the serum and pancreatic levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in mice with l-arginine-induced pancreatitis. Our results suggest that CGA has an anti-inflammatory effect on l-arginine-induced pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Calendula officinalis ameliorates l-arginine-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Sidhu, Shabir; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Khan, M U

    2016-12-01

    Calendula officinalis L. (Asteraceae) has been traditionally used in treating inflammation of internal organs, gastrointestinal tract ulcers and wound healing. The present study investigates the effect of ethanol extract (95%) of Calendula officinalis flowers in l-arginine induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. Rats were divided into four groups: normal control, l-arginine control, Calendula officinalis extract (COE) treated and melatonin treated (positive control), which were further divided into subgroups (24 h, day 3 and 14) according to time points. Two injections of l-arginine 2 g/kg i.p. at 1 h intervals were administered in l-arginine control, COE and melatonin-treated groups to produce acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Biochemical parameters [serum amylase, lipase, pancreatic amylase, nucleic acid content, total proteins, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), collagen content, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and nitrite/nitrate] and histopathological studies were carried out. COE treatment (400 mg/kg p.o.) was found to be beneficial. This was evidenced by significantly lowered histopathological scores (2 at day 14). Nucleic acid content (DNA 21.1 and RNA 5.44 mg/g pancreas), total proteins (0.66 mg/mL pancreas) and pancreatic amylase (1031.3 100 SU/g pancreas) were significantly improved. Marked reduction in pancreatic oxidative and nitrosative stress; collagen (122 μmoles/100 mg pancreas) and TGF-β1 (118.56 pg/mL) levels were noted. Results obtained were comparable to those of positive control. The beneficial effect of COE may be attributed to its antioxidant, antinitrosative and antifibrotic actions. Hence, the study concludes that COE promotes spontaneous repair and regeneration of the pancreas.

  6. Qualitative and quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic assessment of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S Y; Nakamura, K; Morishita, K; Sasaki, N; Murakami, M; Osuga, T; Ohta, H; Yamasaki, M; Takiguchi, M

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is the most common disease of the canine exocrine pancreas, and accurate noninvasive diagnosis is challenging. To determine the feasibility of using quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) to detect pancreatic perfusional changes in cerulein-induced AP in dogs. Six adult female Beagles. Each dog received 2 hours of IV infusion with 7.5 μg/kg/h of cerulein diluted in saline. As control, all dogs received 2 hours of IV infusion of saline 2 weeks before cerulein infusion. CEUS of the pancreas and duodenum were performed before (0 hour), and at 2, 4, 6, and 12 hours after saline and cerulein infusion. Time-intensity curves were created from regions of interest in the pancreas and duodenum. Five perfusional parameters were measured for statistical analysis: time to initial up-slope, peak time, time to wash-out, peak intensity (PI), and area under the curve (AUC). In cerulein-induced AP, pancreatic PI increased at 2 and 4 hours when compared to 0 hour, and at 2, 4, and 6 hours when compared to control. AUC increased at 4 hours when compared to 0 hour, and at 2 and 4 hours when compared to control. Time to wash-out was prolonged at 4 hours when compared to control. For saline control, peak time was faster at 2 hours when compared to 0 hour. CEUS parameters PI and AUC can provide useful information in differentiating acute pancreatitis from normal pancreas. Cerulein-induced AP was characterized by prolonged hyperechoic enhancement on CEUS. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  7. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Liu, Wen Wu [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Xiang, Hong Gang [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Fan, Lie Ying [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Shanghai East Hospital, Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200120 (China); Sun, Qiang [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Xu, Xin Yun [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Cai, Jian Mei [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ruan, Can Ping; Su, Ning; Yan, Rong Lin [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Sun, Xue Jun, E-mail: sunxjk@hotmail.com [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wang2929@hotmail.com [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China)

    2010-03-05

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreas were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-{kappa}B activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-{kappa}B activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.

  8. Targeted radiotherapy with 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez C, J.; Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M.; Ferro F, G.; Murphy S, E.

    2006-01-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for peptide receptor targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses after administration of 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE in mice as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells expressing somatostatin receptors, were implanted in athymic mice (n=18) to obtain the 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE biokinetics and dosimetry. To estimate its therapeutic efficacy 87 MBq were injected in a tail vein of 3 mice and 19 days p.i. there were a partial relapse. There was an epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidneys of mouse III. The absorbed dose to tumour, kidney and pancreas was 50.5 ± 7.2 Gy, 17.5 ± 2.5 Gy and 12.6 ± 2.3 Gy respectively. These studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man considering its kidney radiotoxicity. (Author)

  9. Development and Validation of a Prediction Model to Estimate Individual Risk of Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ami; Woo, Sang Myung; Joo, Jungnam; Yang, Hye-Ryung; Lee, Woo Jin; Park, Sang-Jae; Nam, Byung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    There is no reliable screening tool to identify people with high risk of developing pancreatic cancer even though pancreatic cancer represents the fifth-leading cause of cancer-related death in Korea. The goal of this study was to develop an individualized risk prediction model that can be used to screen for asymptomatic pancreatic cancer in Korean men and women. Gender-specific risk prediction models for pancreatic cancer were developed using the Cox proportional hazards model based on an 8-year follow-up of a cohort study of 1,289,933 men and 557,701 women in Korea who had biennial examinations in 1996-1997. The performance of the models was evaluated with respect to their discrimination and calibration ability based on the C-statistic and Hosmer-Lemeshow type χ2 statistic. A total of 1,634 (0.13%) men and 561 (0.10%) women were newly diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Age, height, BMI, fasting glucose, urine glucose, smoking, and age at smoking initiation were included in the risk prediction model for men. Height, BMI, fasting glucose, urine glucose, smoking, and drinking habit were included in the risk prediction model for women. Smoking was the most significant risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer in both men and women. The risk prediction model exhibited good discrimination and calibration ability, and in external validation it had excellent prediction ability. Gender-specific risk prediction models for pancreatic cancer were developed and validated for the first time. The prediction models will be a useful tool for detecting high-risk individuals who may benefit from increased surveillance for pancreatic cancer.

  10. Protective efficacy of folic acid and vitamin B12 against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharjee Ankita

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although cigarette smoking is associated with insulin resistance and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, few studies have examined the effect of nicotine on the adult endocrine pancreas. In this study, male Wister rats were treated with nicotine (3 mg/kg body weight/day with or without supplementation of folic acid (36 μg/kg body weight/day or vitamin B12 (0.63 μg/kg body weight/day alone or in combination. Fasting blood glucose, insulin and HBA1C level and different oxidative and anti-oxidative stress parameters were measured and pancreatic tissue sections were stained with eosin-haematoxylene. Data were analysed by nonparametric statistics. The results revealed that nicotine induced prediabetes condition with subsequent damage to pancreatic islets in rats. Nicotine also caused oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue as evidenced by increased nitric oxide and malondialdehyde level and decreased superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione level. Compared to vitamin B12 supplementation, folic acid blunted the nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets with higher efficacy. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination were able to confer significant protection on pancreatic islets against nicotine induced toxicity. These results suggest that supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination may be a possible strategy of detoxification against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat.

  11. Tenascin-C induces resistance to apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cell through activation of ERK/NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Meiyan; He, Xiaodan; Wei, Wei; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Ti; Shen, Xiaohong

    2015-06-01

    As a glycol-protein located in extracellular matrix (ECM), tenascin-C (TNC) is absent in most normal adult tissues but is highly expressed in the majority of malignant solid tumors. Pancreatic cancer is characterized by an abundant fibrous tissue rich in TNC. Although it was reported that TNC's expression increased in the progression from low-grade precursor lesions to invasive cancer and was associated with tumor differentiation in human pancreatic cancer, studies on the relations between TNC and tumor progression in pancreatic cancer were rare. In this study, we performed an analysis to determine the effects of TNC on modulating cell apoptosis and chemo-resistance and explored its mechanisms involving activation in pancreatic cancer cell. The expressions of TNC, ERK1/2/p-ERK1/2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 were detected by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Then the effects of exogenous and endogenous TNC on the regulation of tumor proliferation, apoptosis and gemcitabine cytotoxicity were investigated. The associations among the TNC knockdown, TNC stimulation and expressions of ERK1/2/NF-κB/p65 and apoptotic regulatory proteins were also analyzed in cell lines. The mechanism of TNC on modulating cancer cell apoptosis and drug resistant through activation of ERK1/2/NF-κB/p65 signals was evaluated. The effect of TNC on regulating cell cycle distribution was also tested. TNC, ERK1/2/p-ERK1/2, and apoptotic regulatory proteins Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 were highly expressed in human pancreatic cancer tissues. In vitro, exogenous TNC promoted pancreatic cancer cell growth also mediates basal as well as starved and drug-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. The effects of TNC on anti-apoptosis were induced by the activation state of ERK1/2/NF-κB/p65 signals in pancreatic cell. TNC phosphorylate ERK1/2 to induce NF-κB/p65 nucleus translocation. The latter contributes to promote Bcl-xL, Bcl-2 protein expressions and reduce caspase activity, which inhibit cell apoptotic

  12. Expression and clinical significance of rhubarb on serum amylase and TNF-alpha of rat model of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W F; Li, Z T; Fang, J J; Wang, G B; Yu, Y; Liu, Z Q; Wu, Y N; Zheng, S S; Cai, L

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of rhubarb extract on acute pancreatitis. Ninety-six healthy Sprague Dawley rats, weighing 301±5.12 g were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham surgery (group A), acute pancreatitis model (group B), acute pancreatitis with normal saline (group C), and acute pancreatitis model with rhubarb (group D). The levels of serum amylase (AMY) and TNF-α were measured at 1st, 6th, 12th and 24th hour after modeling, and the pancreatic tissue were used to observe the pathologic changes. Compared to the sham group, the serum AMY and serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) levels were significantly increased in the other groups (p acute pancreatitis. The rhubarb reduced the serum AMY and TNF-α level in rats with acute pancreatitis and reduced the pathological changes of pancreas and other tissues.

  13. Management of familial hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis during pregnancy with therapeutic plasma exchange: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Fadi; Toumeh, Anis; Abuissa Qadan, Mahmoud A; Karaz, Rana; AlAkdar, Bassam; Assaly, Ragheb

    2014-01-01

    Familial severe hypertriglyceridemia (levels greater than 1000 mg/dL) is a known cause of acute pancreatitis. Pregnancy can dysregulate controlled lipid levels in women with familial hypertriglyceridemia and lead to acute pancreatitis and significant morbidity in both mother and fetus. We report a case of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis during pregnancy that was successfully treated using therapeutic plasma exchange, resulting in delivery of a healthy preterm infant. Therapeutic plasma exchange is an effective approach to treat gestational hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis. Other treatment options include combined heparin and insulin infusion. Moreover, particular caution should be applied when interpreting the results of prothrombin time in the setting of severe hypertriglyceridemia as false elevation with testing methods could happen.

  14. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis: A rare manifestation of an incomplete “dapsone syndrome”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anup K.; Jawed, Qaiser

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) is under-reported, and a large number of drugs are listed as offenders, but are often overlooked. Knowledge about the possible association of medications in causing AP is important, and needs a high index of suspicion, especially with drugs that have been reported to be the etiology only rarely. Dapsone, a commonly used drug, can cause various hypersensitivity reactions including AP collectively called “dapsone syndrome.” Here, we report dapsone-induced AP in a young man. Our case shows certain dissimilarities like associated acute renal failure and acute hemolysis not previously described. PMID:25097293

  15. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis: a rare manifestation of an incomplete "dapsone syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anup K; Jawed, Qaiser

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) is under-reported, and a large number of drugs are listed as offenders, but are often overlooked. Knowledge about the possible association of medications in causing AP is important, and needs a high index of suspicion, especially with drugs that have been reported to be the etiology only rarely. Dapsone, a commonly used drug, can cause various hypersensitivity reactions including AP collectively called "dapsone syndrome." Here, we report dapsone-induced AP in a young man. Our case shows certain dissimilarities like associated acute renal failure and acute hemolysis not previously described.

  16. Eff ects of hemin, a heme oxygenase-1 inducer in L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury in adult male albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz N. M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the current study was to assess the protective outcome of hemin, a heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 inducer on L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Acute pancreatitis (AP is considered to be a critical inflammatory disorder with a major impact on the patient health. Various theories have been recommended regarding the pathophysiology of AP and associated pulmonary complications.

  17. Nilotinib-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vihang Patel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nilotinib, a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is used for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML; it has been widely used especially for imatinib-resistant CML. Despite being a novel drug in this therapeutic class, it has the potential to be harmful. We present the case of an elderly woman who developed life-threatening acute pancreatitis as an adverse event after having started the drug. There is only one reported case in the literature of nilotinib-induced acute pancreatitis. The purpose of this case report is to educate physicians who prescribe this medication to be aware of potential life-threatening adverse events. As more and more therapies are available, physicians should be aware of potential effects of cancer treatment that could be life-threatening to patients.

  18. Exercise-Induced Secretion of FGF21 and Follistatin Are Blocked by Pancreatic Clamp and Impaired in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Schiøler; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Xu, Guowang

    2016-01-01

    of the study was to investigate the regulatory roles of glucagon to insulin ratio and T2D on exercise-induced FGF21 and follistatin secretion. Design /Interventions: Young healthy males performed a 2-hour bicycle exercise bout followed by 5 hours of rest in supine position with and without a pancreatic clamp...... a 10-fold (P clamp. Exercise with the pancreatic clamp completely blunted the exercise-induced increase in FGF21 (P = .007), whereas the induction of follistatin was approximately 50% reduced (P...... = .04). Exercise-induced FGF21 secretion was completely absent in patients with T2D, whereas the exercise-induced follistatin increase was impaired. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Exercise-induced increases in plasma FGF21 and follistatin are attenuated by the pancreatic clamp, indicating important roles...

  19. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Attenuates Acute Renal Injury in Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis by Inhibiting ROS and NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen (H2, a new antioxidant, was reported to reduce •OH and ONOO− selectively and inhibit certain proinflammatory mediators to product, without disturbing metabolic redox reactions or ROS involved in cell signaling. We herein aim to explore its protective effects on acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanisms. Rats were injected with hydrogen-rich saline (HRS group or normal saline (SO and SAP group through tail intravenously (6 mL/kg and compensated subcutaneously (20 mL/kg after successful modeling. Results showed that hydrogen-rich saline attenuated the following: (1 serum Cr and BUN, (2 pancreatic and renal pathological injuries, (3 renal MDA, (4 renal MPO, (5 serum IL-1β, IL-6, and renal TNF-α, HMGB1, and (6 tyrosine nitration, IκB degradation, and NF-κB activation in renal tissues. In addition, it increased the level of IL-10 and SOD activity in renal tissues. These results proved that hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, presumably because of its detoxification activity against excessive ROS, and inhibits the activation of NF-κB by affecting IκB nitration and degradation. Our findings highlight the potential value of hydrogen-rich saline as a new therapeutic method on acute renal injury in severe acute pancreatitis clinically.

  20. Hypomethylating therapy in an aggressive stroma-rich model of pancreatic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Reena; Gonda, Tamas; Quante, Michael; Salas, Martha; Kim, Samuel; Brooks, Jenna; Hirsch, Steffen; Davies, Justine; Cullo, Angelica; Olive, Kenneth; Wang, Timothy C; Szabolcs, Matthias; Tycko, Benjamin; Ludwig, Thomas

    2013-01-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal malignancy that resists current treatments. To test epigenetic therapy against this cancer, we used the DNA demethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) in an aggressive mouse model of stromal rich PDAC (KPC-Brca1 mice). In untreated tumors, we found globally decreased 5-methyl-cytosine (5-mC) in malignant epithelial cells and in cancer-associated myofibroblasts (CAF), along with increased amounts of 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine (5-HmC) in CAFs, in progression from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to PDAC. DAC further reduced DNA methylation and slowed PDAC progression, markedly extending survival in an early-treatment protocol and significantly though transiently inhibiting tumor growth when initiated later, without adverse side effects. Escaping tumors contained areas of sarcomatoid transformation with disappearance of CAFs. Mixing-allografting experiments and proliferation indices showed that DAC efficacy was due to inhibition of both the malignant epithelial cells and the CAFs. Expression profiling and immunohistochemistry highlighted DAC induction of STAT1 in the tumors, and DAC plus IFN-γ produced an additive antiproliferative effect on PDAC cells. DAC induced strong expression of the testis antigen deleted in azoospermia-like (DAZL) in CAFs. These data show that DAC is effective against PDAC in vivo and provide a rationale for future studies combining hypomethylating agents with cytokines and immunotherapy.

  1. Inhibition of carbachol-induced formation of inositolphosphates in isolated pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kardasz, A.M.J.; Capito, Kirsten; Hansen, Svend Erik

    1991-01-01

    Medicinsk biokemi, feed-back inhibition, phospholipase C, pancreatic islets, Calcium, proteinkinase C......Medicinsk biokemi, feed-back inhibition, phospholipase C, pancreatic islets, Calcium, proteinkinase C...

  2. Elucidation of Molecular Mechanisms of Streptozotocin-Induced Oxidative Stress, Apoptosis, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Rin-5F Pancreatic β-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa M. T. Al Nahdi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptozotocin is a pancreatic beta-cell-specific cytotoxin and is widely used to induce experimental type 1 diabetes in rodent models. The precise molecular mechanism of STZ cytotoxicity is however not clear. Studies have suggested that STZ is preferably absorbed by insulin-secreting β-cells and induces cytotoxicity by producing reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS. In the present study, we have investigated the mechanism of cytotoxicity of STZ in insulin-secreting pancreatic cancer cells (Rin-5F at different doses and time intervals. Cell viability, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial bioenergetics were studied. Our results showed that STZ induces alterations in glutathione homeostasis and inhibited the activities of the respiratory enzymes, resulting in inhibition of ATP synthesis. Apoptosis was observed in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Western blot analysis has also confirmed altered expression of oxidative stress markers (e.g., NOS and Nrf2, cell signaling kinases, apoptotic protein-like caspase-3, PARP, and mitochondrial specific proteins. These results suggest that STZ-induced cytotoxicity in pancreatic cells is mediated by an increase in oxidative stress, alterations in cellular metabolism, and mitochondrial dysfunction. This study may be significant in better understanding the mechanism of STZ-induced β-cell toxicity/resistance and the etiology of type 1 diabetes induction.

  3. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  4. Curcumin enhances recovery of pancreatic islets from cellular stress induced inflammation and apoptosis in diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C.

    2015-01-01

    The phytochemical, curcumin, has been reported to play many beneficial roles. However, under diabetic conditions, the detail mechanism of its beneficial action in the glucose homeostasis regulatory organ, pancreas, is poorly understood. The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of curcumin in the pancreatic tissue of STZ induced and cellular stress mediated diabetes in eight weeks old male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Post to diabetes induction, animals were treated with curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanism was determined using various biochemical assays, DNA fragmentation, FACS, histology, immunoblotting and ELISA. Treatment with curcumin reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress related markers. In vivo and in vitro experimental results revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ), reduced level of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) along with enhanced levels of signaling molecules of ER stress dependent and independent apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in STZ administered group. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated all the adverse changes and helps the organ back to its normal physiology. Results suggest that curcumin protects pancreatic beta-cells by attenuating inflammatory responses, and inhibiting ER/mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways of apoptosis and crosstalk between them. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect proposes the possibility of using this molecule as an effective protector in the cellular stress mediated diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • STZ induced cellular stress plays a vital role in pancreatic dysfunction. • Cellular stress causes inflammation, pancreatic islet cell death and diabetes. • Deregulation of Nrf-2

  5. Curcumin enhances recovery of pancreatic islets from cellular stress induced inflammation and apoptosis in diabetic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C., E-mail: parames@jcbose.ac.in

    2015-02-01

    The phytochemical, curcumin, has been reported to play many beneficial roles. However, under diabetic conditions, the detail mechanism of its beneficial action in the glucose homeostasis regulatory organ, pancreas, is poorly understood. The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of curcumin in the pancreatic tissue of STZ induced and cellular stress mediated diabetes in eight weeks old male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Post to diabetes induction, animals were treated with curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanism was determined using various biochemical assays, DNA fragmentation, FACS, histology, immunoblotting and ELISA. Treatment with curcumin reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress related markers. In vivo and in vitro experimental results revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ), reduced level of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) along with enhanced levels of signaling molecules of ER stress dependent and independent apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in STZ administered group. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated all the adverse changes and helps the organ back to its normal physiology. Results suggest that curcumin protects pancreatic beta-cells by attenuating inflammatory responses, and inhibiting ER/mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways of apoptosis and crosstalk between them. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect proposes the possibility of using this molecule as an effective protector in the cellular stress mediated diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • STZ induced cellular stress plays a vital role in pancreatic dysfunction. • Cellular stress causes inflammation, pancreatic islet cell death and diabetes. • Deregulation of Nrf-2

  6. Global gene expression profiling of pancreatic islets in mice during streptozotocin-induced β-cell damage and pancreatic Glp-1 gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Tonne

    2013-09-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ, a glucosamine-nitrosourea compound, has potent genotoxic effects on pancreatic β-cells and is frequently used to induce diabetes in experimental animals. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 has β-cell protective effects and is known to preserve β-cells from STZ treatment. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms of STZ-induced diabetes and GLP-1-mediated β-cell protection in STZ-treated mice. At 1 week after multiple low-dose STZ administrations, pancreatic β-cells showed impaired insulin expression, while maintaining expression of nuclear Nkx6.1. This was accompanied by significant upregulation of p53-responsive genes in islets, including a mediator of cell cycle arrest, p21 (also known as Waf1 and Cip1. STZ treatment also suppressed expression of a wide range of genes linked with key β-cell functions or diabetes development, such as G6pc2, Slc2a2 (Glut2, Slc30a8, Neurod1, Ucn3, Gad1, Isl1, Foxa2, Vdr, Pdx1, Fkbp1b and Abcc8, suggesting global β-cell defects in STZ-treated islets. The Tmem229B, Prss53 and Ttc28 genes were highly expressed in untreated islets and strongly suppressed by STZ, suggesting their potential roles in β-cell function. When a pancreas-targeted adeno-associated virus (AAV vector was employed for long-term Glp-1 gene delivery, pancreatic GLP-1 expression protected mice from STZ-induced diabetes through preservation of the β-cell mass. Despite its potent β-cell protective effects, however, pancreatic GLP-1 overexpression showed limited effects on the global gene expression profiles in the islets. Network analysis identified the programmed-cell-death-associated pathways as the most relevant network in Glp-1 gene therapy. Upon pancreatic GLP-1 expression, upregulation of Cxcl13 and Nptx2 was observed in STZ-damaged islets, but not in untreated normal islets. Given the pro-β-cell-survival effects of Cxcl12 (Sdf-1 in inducing GLP-1 production in α-cells, pancreatic GLP-1-mediated Cxcl13 induction might also play a

  7. The novel hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-2098 has antitumor effect in pancreatic cancer; possible mechanism through inhibiting VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} targeted gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Kotaro, E-mail: hif.panc@gmail.com [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Nishioka, Masanori; Imura, Satoru; Batmunkh, Erdenebulgan [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Uto, Yoshihiro [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Institute of Socio Technosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Nagasawa, Hideko [Laboratory of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan); Hori, Hitoshi [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Institute of Socio Technosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Shimada, Mitsuo [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan)

    2012-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been considered to be a potential therapeutic target, because hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a novel hypoxic cytotoxin, 3-[2-hydroxyethyl(methyl)amino]-2-quinoxalinecarbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (TX-2098) in inhibiting the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), and consequently vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic cancer. The antitumor effects of TX-2098 under hypoxia were tested against various human pancreatic cancer cell lines using WST-8 assay. VEGF protein induced pancreatic cancer was determined on cell-free supernatant by ELISA. Moreover, nude mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically implanted human SUIT-2 were treated with TX-2098. Tumor volume, survival and expression of HIF-1 and associated molecules were evaluated in treatment versus control groups. In vitro, TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of various pancreatic cancer cell lines. In s.c model, tumors from nude mice injected with pancreatic cancer cells and treated with TX-2098 showed significant reductions in volume (P < 0.01 versus control). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TX-2098 significantly inhibited mRNA expression of the HIF-1 associated molecules, VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and Aldolase A (P < 0.01 versus control). These treatments also prolong the survival in orthotopic models. These results suggest that the effect of TX-2098 in pancreatic cancer might be correlated with the expression of VEGF and HIF-1 targeted molecules. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed and synthesized novel hypoxic cytoxin, TX-2098. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 reduced VEGF protein level than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098

  8. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andoh Y

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Andoh,1,2 Naohiko Makino,2 Mitsunori Yamakawa11Department of Pathological Diagnostics, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanBackground: It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs among dendritic cells (DCs fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines.Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated.Results: The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1 was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs

  9. Antioxidative phytoceuticals to ameliorate pancreatitis in animal models: An answer from nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Min; Lee, Sooyeon; Chung, Mi Kyung; Kwon, Sung-Hun; Kim, Eun-Hee; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Kwon, Chang Il; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2014-01-01

    Despite enthusiastic efforts directed at elucidating critical underlying mechanisms towards the identification of novel therapeutic targets for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), the disease remains without a specific therapy to be executed within the first hours to days after onset of symptoms. Although earlier management for SAP should aim to either treat organ failure or reduce infectious complications, the current standard of care for the general management of AP in the first hours to days after onset of symptoms include intravenous fluid replacement, nutritional changes, and the use of analgesics with a close monitoring of vital signs. Furthermore, repeated evaluation of severity is very important, as the condition is particularly unstable in the early stages. In cases where biliary pancreatitis is accompanied by acute cholangitis or in cases where biliary stasis is suspected, an early endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is recommended. However, practice guidelines regarding the treatment of pancreatitis are suboptimal. In chronic pancreatitis, conservative management strategies include lifestyle modifications and dietary changes followed by analgesics and pancreatic enzyme supplementation. Recently, attention has been focused on phytoceuticals or antioxidants as agents that could surpass the limitations associated with currently available therapies. Because oxidative stress has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, antioxidants alone or combined with conventional therapy may improve oxidative-stress-induced organ damage. Interest in phytoceuticals stems from their potential use as simple, accurate tools for pancreatitis prognostication that could replace older and more tedious methods. Therefore, the use of antioxidative nutrition or phytoceuticals may represent a new direction for clinical research in pancreatitis. In this review article, recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis are

  10. Effects of long term feeding of raw soya bean flour on virus- induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirev, T.; Woutersen, R.A.; Kiril, A.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of a diet enriched with 25% raw soya bean flour (RSF) on the pancreas and on the avian retrovirus Pts 56-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl were studied. It has been shown that prolonged RSF feeding of new-hatched virus-infected and uninfected guinea fowl-poults induced

  11. Protective and curative effects of Cocos nucifera inflorescence on alloxan-induced pancreatic cytotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renjith, Raveendran S; Rajamohan, Thankappan

    2012-01-01

    This study was planned to investigate the effects of pre and post-treatment of young inflorescence of Cocos nucifera (CnI) on alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Male albino Sprague Dawely rats were divided into five groups of six animals each. Group I was normal control, Group II was diabetic control, Cocos nucifera Inflorescence (CnI) was fed along with diet [20% (w/w)] orally (Group III) for a period of 11 days prior to alloxan injection (150 mg/kg i.p.). The curative effect of CnI was evaluated at the same feeding levels in alloxan-induced diabetic rats (Group IV) for a period of 30 days. The effects of both pretreatment and post-treatment (Group V) were also evaluated. Biochemical parameters such serum glucose, hepatic glycogen, and enzymes involving carbohydrate metabolism (hexokinase, phosphoglucomutase, pyruvate kinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose 1, 6-diphosphatase, glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase, and glycogen phosphorylase) were assayed along with pancreatic histopathology. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance followed by Duncan's post hoc multiple variance test. P < 0.05 was considered statistical significant. Diabetic control rats showed significant increase in serum glucose (P < 0.05) and decrease in hepatic glycogen levels (P < 0.05) compared to normal rats, which was reversed to near normal in both CnI pretreated and post-treated rats. Treatment with CnI resulted in significant decrease (P < 0.05) in activities of gluconeogenic enzymes in Group III and IV on compared to the diabetic control group, while glycolytic enzyme activities were improved in these groups. The cytotoxicity of pancreatic islets also ameliorated by treatment with CnI on histopathological examination. The results obtained in the study indicate the protective and curative effects of CnI on alloxan-induced pancreatic cytotoxicity, which is mediated through the regulation of carbohydrate metabolic enzyme activities and islets cell repair.

  12. L-carnitine protects against cyclosporine-induced pancreatic and renal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Y; Piao, S G; Zou, H B; Jin, J; Fang, M R; Lei, D M; Gao, B H; Yang, C W; Li, C

    2013-10-01

    L-carnitine has protective effects against various types of injury. This study was designed to evaluate the beneficial effects of L-carnitine on pancreatic and renal injuries caused by cyclosporine (CsA). Rats maintained on a low sodium diet were given vehicle (olive oil, 1 mL/kg/d), CsA (15 mg/kg/d), L-carnitine (50 or 200 mg/kg/d), or a combination of CsA and L-carnitine for 4 weeks. The impact of L-carnitine on pancreatic injury was assessed by blood glucose levels, plasma insulin concentrations, and hemoglobulin A1c (HbA1c). In addition, the protective effects of L-carnitine against CsA-induced kidney injury were evaluated in terms of renal function, histopathology (inflammatory cell influx and tubulointerstitial fibrosis), oxidative stress (8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-OHdG), transforming growth factor-betal (TGF-β1), apoptosis (caspase-3), and autophagy (LC3-II). CsA treatment caused diabetes, renal dysfunction, tubulointerstitial inflammation (ED-1-positive cells), and fibrosis, which were accompanied by an increase in 8-OHdG production and upregulation of TGF-β1, caspase-3, and LC3-II. Concomitant administration of L-carnitine increased plasma insulin concentrations, decreasing plasma glucose and HbA1c levels. In the kidney, L-carnitine induced dose-dependent improvement of renal function, inflammation, and fibrosis in parallel with suppression of the expression of TGF-β1 and 8-OHdG. Furthermore, the administration of L-carnitine at a high dose inhibited the expression of caspase-3 and LC3-II. These findings suggest that L-carnitine has a protective effect against CsA-induced pancreatic and renal injuries. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Morphometric Measurements to Quantify the Cerulein Induced Hyperstimulatory Pancreatitis of Rats under the Protective Effect of Lectins

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    Ludwig Jonas

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In preceding papers we demonstrated an inhibitory effect of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA and Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA on the cholecystokinin (CCK binding to the CCK receptor of rat pancreatic cells and also on the CCK induced Ca2+ release and α-amylase secretion in vitro as well as on pancreatic secretion of intact rats in vivo. In the present study we show the same inhibitory effect of both lectins on the cerulein pancreatitis of rats. This acute pancreatitis was induced by supramaximal injections (5 µg/kg/h iv or 10 µg/kg/h ip of the CCK analogue cerulein in rats every hour. To monitor the degree of pancreatitis, we measured the number and diameter of injury vacuoles in the pancreatic acinar cells as one of the most important signs of this type of pancreatitis by light microscopic morphometry with two different systems on paraffin sections. Furthermore, the serum α-amylase activity was measured biochemically. We found a correlation between the diameter of vacuoles inside the acinar cells and the serum enzyme activity up to 24 h. The simultaneous ip administration of cerulein and WGA or UEA in a dosage of 125 µg/kg/h for 8 h led to a reduction of vacuolar diameter from 13.1 ± 2.0 µm (cerulein to 7.5 ± 1.1 µm (cerulein + WGA or 7.2 ± 1.3 µm (cerulein + UEA. The serum amylase activity was reduced from 63.7 ± 15.8 mmol/l \\times min (cerulein to 37.7 ± 11.8 (cerulein + WGA or 39.4; +52.9; -31.1 (cerulein + UEA-I. Both parameters allow the grading this special type of pancreatitis to demonstrate the protective effect of the lectins.

  14. Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic Inflammation to Organ Failure in Trauma and Critical Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0376 TITLE: Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic Inflammation to Organ Failgure in Trauma...COVERED 22 Sep 2016 - 21 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Trauma, extensive burns, bacterial infections, and acute pancreatitis (AP) are common

  15. HIV-Antiretroviral Therapy Induced Liver, Gastrointestinal, and Pancreatic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela G. Neuman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes possible connections between antiretroviral therapies (ARTs used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and adverse drug reactions (ADRs encountered predominantly in the liver, including hypersensitivity syndrome reactions, as well as throughout the gastrointestinal system, including the pancreas. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has a positive influence on the quality of life and longevity in HIV patients, substantially reducing morbidity and mortality in this population. However, HAART produces a spectrum of ADRs. Alcohol consumption can interact with HAART as well as other pharmaceutical agents used for the prevention of opportunistic infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. Other coinfections that occur in HIV, such as hepatitis viruses B or C, cytomegalovirus, or herpes simplex virus, further complicate the etiology of HAART-induced ADRs. The aspect of liver pathology including liver structure and function has received little attention and deserves further evaluation. The materials used provide a data-supported approach. They are based on systematic review and analysis of recently published world literature (MedLine search and the experience of the authors in the specified topic. We conclude that therapeutic and drug monitoring of ART, using laboratory identification of phenotypic susceptibilities, drug interactions with other medications, drug interactions with herbal medicines, and alcohol intake might enable a safer use of this medication.

  16. Knockdown of GRP78 promotes apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells and attenuates the severity of cerulein and LPS induced pancreatic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a potentially lethal disease characterized by inflammation and parenchymal cell death; also, the severity of AP correlates directly with necrosis and inversely with apoptosis. However, mechanisms of regulating cell death in AP remain unclear. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperone protein GRP78 has anti-apoptotic properties, in addition to modulating ER stress responses. This study used RNA interference (RNAi approach to investigate the potential role of GRP78 in regulating apoptosis during AP. In vitro models of AP were successfully developed by treating AR42J cells with cerulein or cerulein plus lipoplysaccharide (LPS. There was more pancreatic inflammation and less apoptosis with the cerulein plus LPS treatment. Furthermore, knockdown of GRP78 expression markedly promoted apoptosis and reduced necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells. This was accomplished by enhancing the activation of caspases and inhibiting the activity of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP, as well as a receptor interacting protein kinase-1(RIPK1, which is a key mediator of necrosis. This attenuated the severity of pancreatic inflammation, especially after cerulein plus LPS treatment. In conclusion, these findings indicate that GRP78 plays an anti-apoptotic role in regulating the cell death response during AP. Therefore, GRP78 is a potential therapeutic target for AP.

  17. Attenuation of pancreatitis-induced pulmonary injury by aerosolized hypertonic saline.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, C J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The immunomodulatory effects of hypertonic saline (HTS) provide potential strategies to attenuate inappropriate inflammatory reactions. This study tested the hypothesis that administration of intratracheal aerosolized HTS modulates the development of lung injury in pancreatitis. METHODS: Pancreatitis was induced in 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection of 20% L-arginine (500 mg\\/100 g body weight). At 24 and 48 h, intratracheal aerosolized HTS (7.5% NaCl, 0.5 mL) was administered to 8 rats, while a further 8 received 0.5 mL of aerosolized normal saline (NS). At 72 hours, pulmonary neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity) and endothelial permeability (bronchoalveolar lavage and wet:dry weight ratios) were assessed. In addition, histological assessment of representative lung tissue was performed by a blinded assessor. In a separate experiment, polymorphonucleocytes (PMN) were isolated from human donors, and exposed to increments of HTS. Neutrophil transmigration across an endothelial cell layer, VEGF release, and apoptosis at 1, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h were assessed. RESULTS: Histopathological lung injury scores were significantly reduced in the HTS group (4.78 +\\/- 1.43 vs. 8.64 +\\/- 0.86); p < 0.001). Pulmonary neutrophil sequestration (1.40 +\\/- 0.2) and increased endothelial permeability (6.77 +\\/- 1.14) were evident in the animals resuscitated with normal saline when compared with HTS (0.70 +\\/- 0.1 and 3.57 +\\/- 1.32), respectively; p < 0.04). HTS significantly reduced PMN transmigration (by 97.1, p = 0.002, and induced PMN apoptosis (p < 0.03). HTS did not impact significantly upon neutrophil VEGF release (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Intratracheal aerosolized HTS attenuates the neutrophil-mediated pulmonary insult subsequent to pancreatitis. This may represent a novel therapeutic strategy.

  18. Effects of calcium buffering on glucose-induced insulin release in mouse pancreatic islets: an approximation to the calcium sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertusa, J A; Sanchez-Andres, J V; Martín, F; Soria, B

    1999-10-15

    1. The properties of the calcium sensor for glucose-induced insulin secretion have been studied using cell-permeant Ca2+ buffers with distinct kinetics and affinities. In addition, submembrane cytosolic Ca2+ distribution has been modelled after trains of glucose-induced action potential-like depolarizations. 2. Slow Ca2+ buffers (around 1 mmol l-1 intracellular concentration) with different affinities (EGTA and Calcium Orange-5N) did not significantly affect glucose-induced insulin release. Modelling showed no effect on cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations at the outermost shell (0.05 microm), their effects being observed in the innermost shells dependent on Ca2+ affinity. 3. In contrast, fast Ca2+ buffers (around 1 mmol l-1 intracellular concentration) with different affinities (BAPTA and Calcium Green-5N) caused a 50 % inhibition of early insulin response and completely blocked the late phase of glucose-induced insulin response, their simulations showing a decrease of [Ca2+]i at both the inner and outermost shells. 4. These data are consistent with the existence in pancreatic beta-cells of a higher affinity Ca2+ sensor than that proposed for neurons. Moreover, these data are consistent with the proposed existence of two distinct pools of granules: (i) 'primed' vesicles, colocalized with Ca2+ channels and responsible of the first phase of insulin release; and (ii) 'reserved pool' vesicles, not colocalized and responsible for the second phase.

  19. Pre-clinical Models of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hwang, Chang-Il; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most difficult human malignancies to treat. Five-year survival rate of PDA patients is 7%, and PDA is predicted to become the second leading cancer-related cause of death in the United States of America. Despite intensive efforts, the translation

  20. Azathioprine-induced Acute Pancreatitis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases—A Prospective Study on Incidence and Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, Wolfgang; Bokemeyer, Bernd; Bündgens, Burkhard; Büning, Jürgen; Miehlke, Stephan; Hüppe, Dietrich; Maaser, Christian; Klugmann, Tobias; Kruis, Wolfgang; Siegmund, Britta; Helwig, Ulf; Weismüller, Joseph; Drabik, Attyla; Stallmach, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Azathioprine [AZA] is recommended for maintenance of steroid-free remission in inflammatory bowel disease IBD. The aim of this study has been to establish the incidence and severity of AZA-induced pancreatitis, an idiosyncratic and major side effect, and to identify specific risk factors. Methods: We studied 510 IBD patients [338 Crohn’s disease, 157 ulcerative colitis, 15 indeterminate colitis] with initiation of AZA treatment in a prospective multicentre registry study. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in accordance with international guidelines. Results: AZA was continued by 324 [63.5%] and stopped by 186 [36.5%] patients. The most common cause of discontinuation was nausea [12.2%]. AZA-induced pancreatitis occurred in 37 patients [7.3%]. Of these: 43% were hospitalised with a median inpatient time period of 5 days; 10% had peripancreatic fluid collections; 24% had vomiting; and 14% had fever. No patient had to undergo nonsurgical or surgical interventions. Smoking was the strongest risk factor for AZA-induced acute pancreatitis [p pancreatitis is a common adverse event in IBD patients, but in this study had a mild course in all patients. Smoking is the most important risk factor. PMID:26468141

  1. Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol induces p27(Kip1)-dependent cell-cycle arrest in pancreatic cancer cells via an E2F-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodul, Pamela J; Dong, Yanbin; Husain, Kazim; Pimiento, Jose M; Chen, Jiandong; Zhang, Anying; Francois, Rony; Pledger, Warren J; Coppola, Domenico; Sebti, Said M; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Malafa, Mokenge P

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol has been shown to have antitumor activity, but the precise molecular mechanism by which it inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that δ-tocotrienol exerted significant cell growth inhibition pancreatic ductal cancer (PDCA) cells without affecting normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial cell growth. We also showed that δ-tocotrienol-induced growth inhibition occurred concomitantly with G(1) cell-cycle arrest and increased p27(Kip1) nuclear accumulation. This finding is significant considering that loss of nuclear p27(Kip1) expression is a well-established adverse prognostic factor in PDCA. Furthermore, δ-tocotrienol inactivated RAF-MEK-ERK signaling, a pathway known to suppress p27(Kip1) expression. To determine whether p27(Kip1) induction is required for δ-tocotrienol inhibition of PDCA cell proliferation, we stably silenced the CDKN1B gene, encoding p27(Kip1), in MIAPaCa-2 PDCA cells and demonstrated that p27(Kip1) silencing suppressed cell-cycle arrest induced by δ-tocotrienol. Furthermore, δ-tocotrienol induced p27(Kip1) mRNA expression but not its protein degradation. p27(Kip1) gene promoter activity was induced by δ-tocotrienol through the promoter's E2F-1 binding site, and this activity was attenuated by E2F-1 depletion using E2F-1 small interfering RNA. Finally, decreased proliferation, mediated by Ki67 and p27(Kip1) expression by δ-tocotrienol, was confirmed in vivo in a nude mouse xenograft pancreatic cancer model. Our findings reveal a new mechanism, dependent on p27(Kip1) induction, by which δ-tocotrienol can inhibit proliferation in PDCA cells, providing a new rationale for p27(Kip1) as a biomarker for δ-tocotrienol efficacy in pancreatic cancer prevention and therapy.

  2. Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol induces p27(Kip1-dependent cell-cycle arrest in pancreatic cancer cells via an E2F-1-dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela J Hodul

    Full Text Available Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol has been shown to have antitumor activity, but the precise molecular mechanism by which it inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that δ-tocotrienol exerted significant cell growth inhibition pancreatic ductal cancer (PDCA cells without affecting normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial cell growth. We also showed that δ-tocotrienol-induced growth inhibition occurred concomitantly with G(1 cell-cycle arrest and increased p27(Kip1 nuclear accumulation. This finding is significant considering that loss of nuclear p27(Kip1 expression is a well-established adverse prognostic factor in PDCA. Furthermore, δ-tocotrienol inactivated RAF-MEK-ERK signaling, a pathway known to suppress p27(Kip1 expression. To determine whether p27(Kip1 induction is required for δ-tocotrienol inhibition of PDCA cell proliferation, we stably silenced the CDKN1B gene, encoding p27(Kip1, in MIAPaCa-2 PDCA cells and demonstrated that p27(Kip1 silencing suppressed cell-cycle arrest induced by δ-tocotrienol. Furthermore, δ-tocotrienol induced p27(Kip1 mRNA expression but not its protein degradation. p27(Kip1 gene promoter activity was induced by δ-tocotrienol through the promoter's E2F-1 binding site, and this activity was attenuated by E2F-1 depletion using E2F-1 small interfering RNA. Finally, decreased proliferation, mediated by Ki67 and p27(Kip1 expression by δ-tocotrienol, was confirmed in vivo in a nude mouse xenograft pancreatic cancer model. Our findings reveal a new mechanism, dependent on p27(Kip1 induction, by which δ-tocotrienol can inhibit proliferation in PDCA cells, providing a new rationale for p27(Kip1 as a biomarker for δ-tocotrienol efficacy in pancreatic cancer prevention and therapy.

  3. Belinostat-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cells involve activation of TAK1-AMPK signaling axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bing, E-mail: wangbin69@yahoo.com; Wang, Xin-bao; Chen, Li-yu; Huang, Ling; Dong, Rui-zen

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Belinostat activates AMPK in cultured pancreatic cancer cells. •Activation of AMPK is important for belinostat-induced cytotoxic effects. •ROS and TAK1 are involved in belinostat-induced AMPK activation. •AMPK activation mediates mTOR inhibition by belinostat. -- Abstract: Pancreatic cancer accounts for more than 250,000 deaths worldwide each year. Recent studies have shown that belinostat, a novel pan histone deacetylases inhibitor (HDACi) induces apoptosis and growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In the current study, we found that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation was required for belinostat-induced apoptosis and anti-proliferation in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells. A significant AMPK activation was induced by belinostat in PANC-1 cells. Inhibition of AMPK by RNAi knockdown or dominant negative (DN) mutation significantly inhibited belinostat-induced apoptosis in PANC-1 cells. Reversely, AMPK activator AICAR and A-769662 exerted strong cytotoxicity in PANC-1 cells. Belinostat promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in PANC-1 cells, increased ROS induced transforming growth factor-β-activating kinase 1 (TAK1)/AMPK association to activate AMPK. Meanwhile, anti-oxidants N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC) and MnTBAP as well as TAK1 shRNA knockdown suppressed belinostat-induced AMPK activation and PANC-1 cell apoptosis. In conclusion, we propose that belinostat-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition require the activation of ROS-TAK1-AMPK signaling axis in cultured pancreatic cancer cells.

  4. Chlorella protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced pancreatic β-cell damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Yu; Huang, Pei-Jane; Chao, Che-Yi

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the etiology of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and diabetes. Studies have shown that chlorella could be important in health promotion or disease prevention through its antioxidant capacity. However, whether chlorella has a cytoprotective effect in pancreatic β-cells remains to be elucidated. We investigated the protective effects of chlorella on H2O2-induced oxidative damage in INS-1 (832/13) cells. Chlorella partially restored cell viability after H2O2 toxicity. To further investigate the effects of chlorella on mitochondria function and cellular oxidative stress, we analyzed mitochondria membrane potential, ATP concentrations, and cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Chlorella prevented mitochondria disruption and maintained cellular ATP levels after H2O2 toxicity. It also normalized intracellular levels of ROS to that of control in the presence of H2O2. Chlorella protected cells from apoptosis as indicated by less p-Histone and caspase 3 activation. In addition, chlorella not only enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), but also partially restored the reduced GSIS after H2O2 toxicity. Our results suggest that chlorella is effective in amelioration of cellular oxidative stress and destruction, and therefore protects INS-1 (832/13) cells from H2O2-induced apoptosis and increases insulin secretion. Chlorella should be studied for use in the prevention or treatment of diabetes.

  5. HDAC2 attenuates TRAIL-induced apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saur Dieter

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is one of the most malignant tumors with a dismal prognosis and no effective conservative therapeutic strategies. Although it is demonstrated that histone deacetylases (HDACs, especially the class I HDACs HDAC1, 2 and 3 are highly expressed in this disease, little is known about HDAC isoenzyme specific functions. Results Depletion of HDAC2, but not HDAC1, in the pancreatic cancer cell lines MiaPaCa2 and Panc1 resulted in a marked sensitization towards the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. Correspondingly, the more class I selective HDAC inhibitor (HDACI valproic acid (VPA synergized with TRAIL to induce apoptosis of MiaPaCa2 and Panc1 cells. At the molecular level, an increased expression of the TRAIL receptor 1 (DR5, accelerated processing of caspase 8, pronounced cleavage of the BH3-only protein Bid, and increased effector caspase activation was observed in HDAC2-depleted and TRAIL-treated MiaPaCa2 cells. Conclusions Our data characterize a novel HDAC2 function in PDAC cells and point to a strategy to overcome TRAIL resistance of PDAC cells, a prerequisite to succeed with a TRAIL targeted therapy in clinical settings.

  6. Assessment of benzene induced oxidative impairment in rat isolated pancreatic islets and effect on insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Baeeri, Maryam; Rahimifard, Mahban; Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Benzene (C6H6) is an organic compound used in petrochemicals and numerous other industries. It is abundantly released to our environment as a chemical pollutant causing widespread human exposure. This study mainly focused on benzene induced toxicity on rat pancreatic islets with respect to oxidative damage, insulin secretion and glucokinase (GK) activity. Benzene was dissolved in corn oil and administered orally at doses 200, 400 and 800mg/kg/day, for 4 weeks. In rats, benzene significantly raised the concentration of plasma insulin. Also the effect of benzene on the release of glucose-induced insulin was pronounced in isolated islets. Benzene caused oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, and also reduced the cell viability and total thiols groups, in the islets of exposed rats. In conclusion, the current study revealed that pancreatic glucose metabolism is susceptible to benzene toxicity and the resultant oxidative stress could lead to functional abnormalities in the pancreas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition characterized by ... of pancreatic attacks, which can progress to chronic pancreatitis . Symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Onset ...

  8. Spongiatriol Inhibits Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation and Induces Apoptosis in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Esther; Maher, Michael; Temkin, Alexis; Pitts, Tara; Wright, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the US, is highly resistant to all current chemotherapies, and its growth is facilitated by chronic inflammation. The majority of pro-inflammatory cytokines initiate signaling cascades that converge at the activation of the Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NFκB), a signal transduction molecule that promotes cell survival, proliferation and angiogenesis. In an effort to identify novel inhibitors of NFκB, the HBOI library of pure compounds was screened using a reporter cell line that produces luciferin under the transcriptional control of NFκB. Seven compounds were identified through this screen, but in the case of five of them, their reported mechanism of action made them unlikely to be specific NFκB inhibitors. Spongiatriol, a marine furanoditerpenoid that was first isolated in the 1970s, is shown here to inhibit NFκB transcriptional activity in a reporter cell line, to reduce levels of phosphorylated (active) NFκB in the AsPC-1 cell line, to have an IC50 for cytotoxicity in the low micromolar range against the AsPC-1, BxPC-3, MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cell lines, and to induce moderate but significant apoptosis in both the AsPC-1 and the Panc-1 cell lines. PMID:23549285

  9. Downregulation of TRAF2 mediates NIK-induced pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenicity.

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    Heike Döppler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increased levels of NF-κB are hallmarks of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC and both classical and alternative NF-κB activation pathways have been implicated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that activation of the alternative pathway is a source for the high basal NF-κB activity in PDAC cell lines. Increased activity of the p52/RelB NF-κB complex is mediated through stabilization and activation of NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK. We identify proteasomal downregulation of TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2 as a mechanism by which levels of active NIK are increased in PDAC cell lines. Such upregulation of NIK expression and activity levels relays to increased proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, but not migration or survival of PDAC cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Rapid growth is one characteristic of pancreatic cancer. Our data indicates that the TRAF2/NIK/NF-κB2 pathway regulates PDAC cell tumorigenicity and could be a valuable target for therapy of this cancer.

  10. Curcumin Inhibits Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Pancreatic Cancer

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    Sabrina Bimonte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. The best chemotherapeutic agent used to treat pancreatic cancer is the gemcitabine. However, gemcitabine treatment is associated with many side effects. Thus novel strategies involving less toxic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer are necessary. Curcumin is one such agent that inhibits the proliferation and angiogenesis of a wide variety of tumor cells, through the modulation of many cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated whether curcumin plays antitumor effects in MIA PaCa-2 cells. In vitro studies showed that curcumin inhibits the proliferation and enhances apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 cells. To test whether the antitumor activity of curcumin is also observed in vivo, we generated an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer by injection of MIA PaCa-2 cells in nude mice. We placed mice on diet containing curcumin at 0.6% for 6 weeks. In these treated mice tumors were smaller with respect to controls and showed a downregulation of the transcription nuclear factor NF-κB and NF-κB-regulated gene products. Overall, our data indicate that curcumin has a great potential in treatment of human pancreatic cancer through the modulation of NF-κB pathway.

  11. Antroquinonol, a natural ubiquinone derivative, induces a cross talk between apoptosis, autophagy and senescence in human pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chia-Chun; Chiang, Po-Cheng; Lu, Pin-Hsuan; Kuo, Mao-Tien; Wen, Wu-Che; Chen, Peini; Guh, Jih-Hwa

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm of the pancreas. A mutation and constitutive activation of K-ras occurs in more than 90% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. A successful approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancers is urgent. Antroquinonol, a ubiquinone derivative isolated from a camphor tree mushroom, Antrodia camphorata, induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation in pancreatic cancer PANC-1 and AsPC-1 cells. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content by propidium iodide staining showed that antroquinonol induced G1 arrest of the cell cycle and a subsequent apoptosis. Antroquinonol inhibited Akt phosphorylation at Ser(473), the phosphorylation site critical for Akt kinase activity, and blocked the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) phosphorylation at Ser(2448), a site dependent on mTOR activity. Several signals responsible for mTOR/p70S6K/4E-BP1 signaling cascades have also been examined to validate the pathway. Moreover, antroquinonol induced the down-regulation of several cell cycle regulators and mitochondrial antiapoptotic proteins. In contrast, the expressions of K-ras and its phosphorylation were significantly increased. The coimmunoprecipitation assay showed that the association of K-ras and Bcl-xL was dramatically augmented, which was indicative of apoptotic cell death. Antroquinonol also induced the cross talk between apoptosis, autophagic cell death and accelerated senescence, which was, at least partly, explained by the up-regulation of p21(Waf1/Cip1) and K-ras. In summary, the data suggest that antroquinonol induces anticancer activity in human pancreatic cancers through an inhibitory effect on PI3-kinase/Akt/mTOR pathways that in turn down-regulates cell cycle regulators. The translational inhibition causes G1 arrest of the cell cycle and an ultimate mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, autophagic cell death and accelerated senescence also explain antroquinonol-mediated anticancer effect. Copyright © 2012

  12. Pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis: potential application from experimental models and human medicine to dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The cellular events leading to pancreatitis have been studied extensively in experimental models. Understanding the cellular events and inciting causes of the multisystem inflammatory cascades that are activated with this disease is of vital importance to advance diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Unfortunately, the pathophysiology of pancreatitis in dogs is not well understood, and extrapolation from experimental and human medicine is necessary. The interplay of the inflammatory cascades (kinin, complement, cytokine) is extremely complex in both initiating leukocyte migration and perpetuating disease. Recently, nitric oxide (NO) and altered microcirculation of the pancreas have been proposed as major initiators of inflammation. In addition, the role of the gut is becoming increasingly explored as a cause of oxidative stress and potentiation of systemic inflammation in pancreatitis. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  13. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Are Activated in Placental Injury in Rat Model of Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Teng; Yu, Jia; Wang, Wei-Xing; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Chen, Chen; Deng, Wen-Hong; He, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Peng; Shi, Qiao; Guo, Wen-Yi

    2016-07-01

    To establish a rat model of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy (APIP) and evaluate its general presentations, assess placental injury, and discuss possible mechanisms. The APIP rat model was induced by sodium taurocholate in Sprague-Dawley rats of later gestation. Normal and sham-operated (SO) rats in later gestation were set as controls, 3 time points were set in SO and APIP groups to determine optimal modeling time. Histological changes of pancreas and placenta were assessed. Placental injury was determined by immunohistochemistry stain of caspase-3. Serum levels of amylase, lipase, and Ca; proinflammatory cytokines as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; mitogen-activated protein kinases and their phosphorylated forms by Western blotting. Pancreatic necrotizing and placental injury occurred in time-dependent patterns. Serum levels of amylase and lipase significantly increased but Ca decreased; tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 were all increased in the APIP group; c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38, and ERK1/2 were activated but with different distributing patterns in the placenta. Placental injury is involved in the rat model of APIP, and a modeling time of 6 hours is optimal and conducive to further studies; c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 may play important roles in placental injury during APIP.

  14. Decoy receptor 3 suppresses FasL-induced apoptosis via ERK1/2 activation in pancreatic cancer cells

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    Zhang, Yi; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Xin; Song, Shiduo; Zhang, Lifeng; Zhu, Dongming [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Wang, Zhenxin [Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Chen, Xiaochen [Department of Pathology, The Obstetrics & Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200090 (China); Zhou, Jian, E-mail: zhoujian20150602@126.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2015-08-07

    Resistance to Fas Ligand (FasL) mediated apoptosis plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is reported to interact with FasL and is overexpressed in some malignant tumors. We sought to investigate the role of DcR3 in resistance to FasL in pancreatic cancer. We compared expression of apoptosis related genes between FasL-resistant SW1990 and FasL-sensitive Patu8988 pancreatic cell lines by microarray analysis. We explored the impact of siRNA knockdown of, or exogenous supplementation with, DcR3 on FasL-induced cell growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines and expression of proteins involved in apoptotic signaling. We assessed the level of DcR3 protein and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in tumor and non-tumor tissue samples of 66 patients with pancreatic carcinoma. RNAi knockdown of DcR3 expression in SW1990 cells reduced resistance to FasL-induced apoptosis, and supplementation of Patu8988 with rDcR3 had the opposite effect. RNAi knockdown of DcR3 in SW1990 cells elevated expression of caspase 3, 8 and 9, and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation (P < 0.05), but did not alter phosphorylated-Akt expression. 47 tumor tissue specimens, but only 15 matched non-tumor specimens stained for DcR3 (χ{sup 2} = 31.1447, P < 0.001). The proliferation index of DcR3 positive specimens (14.26  ±  2.67%) was significantly higher than that of DcR3 negative specimens (43.58  ±  7.88%, P < 0.01). DcR3 expression positively correlated with p-ERK1/2 expression in pancreatic cancer tissues (r = 0.607, P < 0.001). DcR3 enhances ERK1/2 phosphorylation and opposes FasL signaling in pancreatic cancer cells. - Highlights: • We investigated the role of DcR3 in FasL resistance in pancreatic cancer. • Knockdown of DcR3 in SW1990 cells reduced resistance to FasL-induced apoptosis. • DcR3 knockdown also elevated caspase expression, and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. • Tumor and non-tumor tissues were collected from 66 pancreatic carcinoma patients

  15. Development and histopathological characterization of tumorgraft models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

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    Patrick L Garcia

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the one of the deadliest of all malignancies. The five year survival rate for patients with this disease is 3-5%. Thus, there is a compelling need for novel therapeutic strategies to improve the clinical outcome for patients with pancreatic cancer.  Several groups have demonstrated for other types of solid tumors that early passage human tumor xenograft models can be used to define some genetic and molecular characteristics of specific human tumors. Published studies also suggest that murine tumorgraft models (early passage xenografts derived from direct implantation of primary tumor specimens may be useful in identifying compounds with efficacy against specific tumor types.  Because pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease and few well-characterized model systems are available for translational research, we developed and characterized a panel of pancreatic tumorgraft models for biological evaluation and therapeutic drug testing.  Of the 41 primary tumor specimens implanted subcutaneously into mice, 35 produced viable tumorgraft models.  We document the fidelity of histological and morphological characteristics and of KRAS mutation status among primary (F0, F1, and F2 tumors for the twenty models that have progressed to the F3 generation.  Importantly, our procedures produced a take rate of 85%, higher than any reported in the literature. Primary tumor specimens that failed to produce tumorgrafts were those that either contained <10% tumor cells or that were obtained from significantly smaller primary tumors. In view of the fidelity of characteristics of primary tumor specimens through at least the F2 generation in mice, we propose that these tumorgraft models represent a useful tool for identifying critical characteristics of pancreatic tumors and for evaluating potential therapies. 

  16. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricci, C.; Mota, C.M.; Moscato, S.; D' Alessandro, D.; Ugel, S.; Sartoris, S.; Bronte, V.; Boggi, U.; Campani, D.; Funel, N.; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, S.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl

  17. Analysis of Kras gene from induced pancreatic cancer rats administered with Momordicacharantia and Ocimumbasilicum leaf extracts

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    J.B. Minari

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze K-ras gene from induced pancreatic cancer rats administered with Momordicacharantia and Ocimumbasilicum leaf extracts. Methods: Twenty-five (25 adult rats weighing between 90–120 g were divided into 5 groups namely RA, RB, RC, NC and PC, each group had 5 rats. The PC which served as the control was fed with normal fish meal and water ad libitum; the NC which is the negative control received 20 mg/ml/week of Nitrosamines only while other groups received different concentrations of aqueous extract of both M. charantia and O. basilicum (200 mg, 100 mg, 50 mg and Nitrosamine. Qualitative phytochemical screening of the aqueous extract of both M. charantia and O. basilicum was carried out. The extraction of DNA was done using Jena Bioscience DNA preparation kit and the protocol was based on the spin column based genomic DNA purification from blood, animal and plant cells. Agarose gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the K-ras gene extracted from the pancreas tissues of experimental rats while hematoxylinand eosin staining was used for histological assay. Results: Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, flavonoids, saponins and glycosides in M. charantia while saponins, tannins and glycosides were discovered in O. basilicum. Significant reduction in the weight of rats treated with 200 mg of aqueous extracts of M. charantia and O. basilicum while rats that were dosed with nitrosamines only showed a slight increase in weight in the first three weeks when compared to the positive control. Histological studies revealed that there is both enlargement and reduction in the islet cell size, with one of the sections showing a normal islet cell size. While the agarose gel electrophoresis revealed that there may be possibility of prevention of damage to k-ras gene as a result of the effect of plants extract. Conclusion: This work has shown that the leaf extracts of both M. charantia and O. basilicum

  18. Effect of Chaiqinchengqi decoction on inositol requiring enzyme 1α in alveolar macrophages of dogs with acute necrotising pancreatitis induced by sodium taurocholate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Guo; Xiaoxiang, Wang; Ruijie, Luo; Xiaoxin, Zhang; Xiaonan, Yang; Qing, Xia; Ping, Xue

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effect of Chaiqinchengqi decoction (CQCQD) on inositol requiring enzyme lα (IRElα) in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of the dog model of acute necrotising pancreatitis (ANP) induced by sodium taurocholate. Fifteen beagle dogs were randomised into a control group, ANP group and CQCQD group (n = 5 per group). ANP was induced by a retrograde duct injection of 50 mg/kg of 5% sodium taurocholate. The dogs in the control group received injections of the same volume of saline as the sodium taurocholate. After the models were induced, the dogs in the CQCQD group were administered 10 mL/kg CQCQD every 2 h for 6 h. Two hours after the last administration of either CQCQD or saline, they were sacrificed by anaesthesia. AMs were collected to determine the IRElα and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA and protein expression, and pancreatic tissues were collected for histopathology analysis. Compared with the ANP group, the mRNA and protein expression of IREl a and the protein expression of IL-1β of AMs in the CQCQD group were significantly down-regulated, and the pancreatic histopathology score of the CQCQD group also was lower. There was no significant difference in the mRNA expression of IL-1β of AMs between the two groups. The CQCQD-induced down-regulation of the IL-1β protein expression may involve the down-regulation of the mRNA and protein expression of IRElα in AMs.

  19. EGFR-targeted gelatin nanoparticles for systemic administration of gemcitabine in an orthotopic pancreatic cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit; Xu, Jing; Mattheolabakis, George; Amiji, Mansoor

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we have formulated redox-responsive epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted type B gelatin nanoparticles as a targeted vector for systemic delivery of gemcitabine therapy in pancreatic cancer. The gelatin nanoparticles were formed by ethanol-induced desolvation process to encapsulate the bound drug. The surface of the nanoparticles was decorated either with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains to impart enhanced circulation time or with EGFR targeting peptide to confer target specificity. Our in vitro studies in Panc-1 human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells confirm that gemcitabine encapsulated in EGFR-targeted gelatin nanoparticles, released through disulfide bond cleavage, had a significantly improved cytotoxic profile. Further, the in vivo anticancer activity was evaluated in an orthotopic pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor bearing SCID beige mice, which confirmed that EGFR-targeted gelatin nanoparticles could efficiently deliver gemcitabine to the tumor leading to higher therapeutic benefit as compared to the drug in solution. The treatment of pancreatic cancer remains unsatisfactory, with an average 5-year survival of less than 5%. New treatment modalities are thus urgently needed. In this study, the authors presented their formulation of redox-responsive epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted type B gelatin nanoparticles as a carrier for gemcitabine. In-vitro and in-vivo experiments showed encouraging results. It is hoped that the findings would provide a novel and alternative drug delivery platform for the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Microencapsulated tumor assay: Evaluation of the nude mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming-Zhe; Cheng, Dong-Feng; Ye, Jin-Hua; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Jia-Xiang; Shi, Min-Min; Han, Bao-San; Peng, Cheng-Hong

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish a more stable and accurate nude mouse model of pancreatic cancer using cancer cell microencapsulation. METHODS: The assay is based on microencapsulation technology, wherein human tumor cells are encapsulated in small microcapsules (approximately 420 μm in diameter) constructed of semipermeable membranes. We implemented two kinds of subcutaneous implantation models in nude mice using the injection of single tumor cells and encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells. The size of subcutaneously implanted tumors was observed on a weekly basis using two methods, and growth curves were generated from these data. The growth and metastasis of orthotopically injected single tumor cells and encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells were evaluated at four and eight weeks postimplantation by positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan and necropsy. The pancreatic tumor samples obtained from each method were then sent for pathological examination. We evaluated differences in the rates of tumor incidence and the presence of metastasis and variations in tumor volume and tumor weight in the cancer microcapsules vs single-cell suspensions. RESULTS: Sequential in vitro observations of the microcapsules showed that the cancer cells in microcapsules proliferated well and formed spheroids at days 4 to 6. Further in vitro culture resulted in bursting of the membrane of the microcapsules and cells deviated outward and continued to grow in flasks. The optimum injection time was found to be 5 d after tumor encapsulation. In the subcutaneous implantation model, there were no significant differences in terms of tumor volume between the encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells and cells alone and rate of tumor incidence. There was a significant difference in the rate of successful implantation between the cancer cell microencapsulation group and the single tumor-cell suspension group (100% vs 71.43%, respectively, P = 0.0489) in the orthotropic implantation model. The former method

  1. Hepatic perfusion changes in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis: Evaluation by perfusion CT

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    Tutcu, Semra [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Serter, Selim, E-mail: serterselim@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Kaya, Yavuz; Kara, Eray [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Nese, Nalan [Department of Pathology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Pekindil, Goekhan [Department of Radiology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Coskun, Teoman [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: It is known that acute pancreatitis may cause secondary changes in several organs. Liver is one of these involved organs. In different experimental studies hepatic damages were shown histopathologically in acute pancreatitis but there are a few studies about perfusion disorders that accompany these histopathologic changes. Perfusion CT (pCT) provides the ability to detect regional and global alterations in organ blood flow. The purpose of the study was to describe hepatic perfusion changes in experimental acute pancreatitis model with pCT. Materials and methods: Forty Sprague-Dawley rats of both genders with average weights of 250 g were used. Rats were randomized into two groups. Twenty rats were in control group and 20 in acute pancreatitis group. pCT was performed. Perfusion maps were formed by processing the obtained images with perfusion CT software. Blood flow (BF) and blood volume (BV) values were obtained from these maps. All pancreatic and liver tissues were taken off with laparotomy and histopathologic investigation was performed. Student's t test was used for statistical analyses. Results: In pCT we found statistically significant increase in blood volume in both lobes of liver and in blood flow in right lobe of the liver (p < 0.01). Although blood flow in left lobe of the liver increased, it did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The quantitative analysis of liver parenchyma with pCT showed that acute pancreatitis causes a significant perfusion changes in the hepatic tissue. Systemic mediators seem to be effective as well as local inflammatory changes in perfusion changes.

  2. Activator protein 1 promotes gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer by upregulating its downstream target Bim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Wenjing; Du, Yongxing; Zhang, Taiping; You, Lei; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-12-01

    Gemcitabine is a commonly used chemotherapy drug in pancreatic cancer. The function of activator protein 1 (AP-1) is cell-specific, and its function depends on the expression of other complex members. In the present study, we added gemcitabine to the media of Panc-1 and SW1990 cells at clinically achieved concentrations (10 µM). Compared with constitutive c-Fos expression, c-Jun expression increased in a dose-dependent manner upon gemcitabine treatment. c-Jun overexpression increased gemcitabine-induced apoptosis through Bim activation, while cell apoptosis and Bim expression decreased following c-Jun knockdown. Furthermore, gemcitabine-induced apoptosis and Bim levels decreased when c-Jun phosphorylation was blocked by SP600125. Our findings suggest that c-Jun, which is a member of the AP-1 complex, functions in gemcitabine-induced apoptosis by regulating its downstream target Bim in pancreatic cancer cells.

  3. Inorganic mercury causes pancreatic β-cell death via the oxidative stress-induced apoptotic and necrotic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yawen; Huang Chunfa; Yang Chingyao; Yen Chengchieh; Tsai Kehsung; Liu Shinghwa

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is a well-known highly toxic metal. In this study, we characterize and investigate the cytotoxicity and its possible mechanisms of inorganic mercury in pancreatic β-cells. Mercury chloride (HgCl 2 ) dose-dependently decreased the function of insulin secretion and cell viability in pancreatic β-cell-derived HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. HgCl 2 significantly increased ROS formation in HIT-T15 cells. Antioxidant N-acetylcysteine effectively reversed HgCl 2 -induced insulin secretion dysfunction in HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. Moreover, HgCl 2 increased sub-G1 hypodiploids and annexin-V binding in HIT-T15 cells, indicating that HgCl 2 possessed ability in apoptosis induction. HgCl 2 also displayed several features of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals including disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, increase of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and activations of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase 3. Exposure of HIT-T15 cells to HgCl 2 could significantly increase both apoptotic and necrotic cell populations by acridine orange/ethidium bromide dual staining. Meanwhile, HgCl 2 could also trigger the depletion of intracellular ATP levels and increase the LDH release from HIT-T15 cells. These HgCl 2 -induced cell death-related signals could be significantly reversed by N-acetylcysteine. The intracellular mercury levels were markedly elevated in HgCl 2 -treated HIT-T15 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that HgCl 2 -induced oxidative stress causes pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and cytotoxicity involved the co-existence of apoptotic and necrotic cell death.

  4. Dendritic cells loaded with pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs lysates induce antitumor immune killing effect in vitro.

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    Tao Yin

    Full Text Available According to the cancer stem cells (CSCs theory, malignant tumors may be heterogeneous in which a small population of CSCs drive the progression of cancer. Because of their intrinsic abilities, CSCs may survive a variety of treatments and then lead to therapeutic resistance and cancer recurrence. Pancreatic CSCs have been reported to be responsible for the malignant behaviors of pancreatic cancer, including suppression of immune protection. Thus, development of immune strategies to eradicate pancreatic CSCs may be of great value for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we enriched pancreatic CSCs by culturing Panc-1 cells under sphere-forming conditions. Panc-1 CSCs expressed low levels of HLA-ABC and CD86, as measured by flow cytometry analysis. We further found that the Panc-1 CSCs modulate immunity by inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation which is promoted by phytohemagglutinin (PHA and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies. The monocyte derived dendritic cells (DCs were charged with total lysates generated from Panc-1 CSCs obtained from tumor sphere culturing. After co-culturing with lymphocytes at different ratios, the Panc-1 CSCs lysates modified DC effectively promoted lymphocyte proliferation. The activating efficiency reached 72.4% and 74.7% at the ratios of 1∶10 and 1∶20 with lymphocytes. The activated lymphocytes secreted high levels of INF-γ and IL-2, which are strong antitumor cytokines. Moreover, Panc-1 CSCs lysates modified DC induced significant cytotoxic effects of lymphocytes on Panc-1 CSCs and parental Panc-1 cells, respectively, as shown by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay. Our study demonstrates that the development of CSCs-based vaccine is a promising strategy for treating pancreatic cancer.

  5. Honokiol arrests cell cycle, induces apoptosis, and potentiates the cytotoxic effect of gemcitabine in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Arora

    Full Text Available Survival rates for patients with pancreatic cancer are extremely poor due to its asymptomatic progression to advanced and metastatic stage for which current therapies remain largely ineffective. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents and treatment approaches are desired to improve the clinical outcome. In this study, we determined the effects of honokiol, a biologically active constituent of oriental medicinal herb Magnolia officinalis/grandiflora, on two pancreatic cancer cell lines, MiaPaCa and Panc1, alone and in combination with the standard chemotherapeutic drug, gemcitabine. Honokiol exerted growth inhibitory effects on both the pancreatic cancer cell lines by causing cell cycle arrest at G₁ phase and induction of apoptosis. At the molecular level, honokiol markedly decreased the expression of cyclins (D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk2 and Cdk4, and caused an increase in Cdk inhibitors, p21 and p27. Furthermore, honokiol treatment led to augmentation of Bax/Bcl-2 and Bax/Bcl-xL ratios to favor apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. These changes were accompanied by enhanced cytoplasmic accumulation of NF-κB with a concomitant decrease in nuclear fraction and reduced transcriptional activity of NF-κB responsive promoter. This was associated with decreased phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B alpha (IκB-α causing its stabilization and thus increased cellular levels. Importantly, honokiol also potentiated the cytotoxic effects of gemcitabine, in part, by restricting the gemcitabine-induced nuclear accumulation of NF-κB in the treated pancreatic cancer cell lines. Altogether, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, the growth inhibitory effects of honokiol in pancreatic cancer and indicate its potential usefulness as a novel natural agent in prevention and therapy.

  6. Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Transcriptionally Controlled Adenoviruses Eradicate Pancreatic Tumors and Liver Metastasis in Mouse Models12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huch, Meritxell; Gros, Alena; José, Anabel; González, Juan Ramon; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Treatment options for pancreatic cancer have shown limited success mainly owing to poor selectivity for pancreatic tumor tissue and to a lack of activity in the tumor. In this study, we describe the ability of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) promoter to efficiently and selectively target pancreatic tumors and metastases, which enables the successful management of pancreatic cancer. We have generated a replication-defective reporter adenovirus, AduPARLuc, and a conditionally replicating adenovirus, AduPARE1A, and we have studied the selectivity and antitumoral efficacy in pancreatic tumors and metastases. Toxicity was studied on intravascular delivery. We demonstrate that the uPAR promoter is highly active in pancreatic tumors but very weak in normal tissues. Tumor specificity is evidenced by a 100-fold increase in the tumor-to-liver ratio and by selective targeting of liver metastases (P < .001). Importantly, the AduPARE1A maintains the oncolytic activity of the wild-type virus, with reduced toxicity, and exhibits significant antitumoral activity (25% tumor eradication) and prolonged survival in pancreatic xenograft models (P < .0001). Furthermore, upon intravascular delivery, we demonstrate complete eradication of liver metastasis in 33% of mice, improving median survival (P = 5.43 x 10-5). The antitumoral selective activity of AduPARE1A shows the potential of uPAR promoter-based therapies in pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:19484141

  7. CXCR2 inhibition suppresses acute and chronic pancreatic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Colin W; Karim, Saadia A; Foth, Mona; Rishi, Loveena; Leach, Joshua D G; Porter, Ross J; Nixon, Colin; Jeffry Evans, T R; Carter, C Ross; Nibbs, Robert J B; Sansom, Owen J; Morton, Jennifer P

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatitis is a significant clinical problem and the lack of effective therapeutic options means that treatment is often palliative rather than curative. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of both acute and chronic pancreatitis is necessary to develop new therapies. Pathological changes in pancreatitis are dependent on innate immune cell recruitment to the site of initial tissue damage, and on the coordination of downstream inflammatory pathways. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 drives neutrophil recruitment during inflammation, and to investigate its role in pancreatic inflammation, we induced acute and chronic pancreatitis in wild-type and Cxcr2(-/-) mice. Strikingly, Cxcr2(-/-) mice were strongly protected from tissue damage in models of acute pancreatitis, and this could be recapitulated by neutrophil depletion or by the specific deletion of Cxcr2 from myeloid cells. The pancreata of Cxcr2(-/-) mice were also substantially protected from damage during chronic pancreatitis. Neutrophil depletion was less effective in this model, suggesting that CXCR2 on non-neutrophils contributes to the development of chronic pancreatitis. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 in wild-type mice replicated the protection seen in Cxcr2(-/-) mice in acute and chronic models of pancreatitis. Moreover, acute pancreatic inflammation was reversible by inhibition of CXCR2. Thus, CXCR2 is critically involved in the development of acute and chronic pancreatitis in mice, and its inhibition or loss protects against pancreatic damage. CXCR2 may therefore be a viable therapeutic target in the treatment of pancreatitis. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. Loss of high-frequency glucose-induced Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic islets correlates with impaired glucose tolerance in Trpm5−/− mice

    OpenAIRE

    Colsoul, Barbara; Schraenen, Anica; Lemaire, Katleen; Quintens, Roel; Van Lommel, Leentje; Segal, Andrei; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Talavera, Karel; Voets, Thomas; Margolskee, Robert F.; Kokrashvili, Zaza; Gilon, Patrick; Nilius, Bernd; Schuit, Frans C.; Vennekens, Rudi

    2010-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is critically dependent on insulin release from pancreatic beta-cells, which is strictly regulated by glucose-induced oscillations in membrane potential (V(m)) and the cytosolic calcium level ([Ca(2+)](cyt)). We propose that TRPM5, a Ca(2+)-activated monovalent cation channel, is a positive regulator of glucose-induced insulin release. Immunofluorescence revealed expression of TRPM5 in pancreatic islets. A Ca(2+)-activated nonselective cation current with TRPM5-like proper...

  9. Insulin downregulates the expression of the Ca2+-activated nonselective cation channel TRPM5 in pancreatic islets from leptin-deficient mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colsoul, Barbara; Jacobs, Griet; Philippaert, Koenraad; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Segal, Andrei; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas; Schuit, Frans; Vennekens, Rudi

    2014-03-01

    We recently proposed that the transient receptor potential melastatin 5 (TRPM5) cation channel contributes to glucose-induced electrical activity of the β cell and positively influences glucose-induced insulin release and glucose homeostasis. In this study, we investigated Trpm5 expression and function in pancreatic islets from mouse models of type II diabetes. Gene expression analysis revealed a strong reduction of Trpm5 mRNA levels in pancreatic islets of db/db and ob/ob mice. The glucose-induced Ca(2+) oscillation pattern in db/db and ob/ob islets mimicked those of Trpm5 (-/-) islets. Leptin treatment of ob/ob mice not only reversed the diabetic phenotype seen in these mice but also upregulated Trpm5 expression. Leptin treatment had no additional effect on Trpm5 expression levels when plasma insulin levels were comparable to those of the vehicle-injected control group. In murine β cell line, MIN6, insulin downregulated TRPM5 expression in a dose-dependent manner, unlike glucose or leptin. In conclusion, our data show that increased plasma insulin levels downregulate TRPM5 expression in pancreatic islets from leptin-deficient mouse models of type 2 diabetes.

  10. Preventive Effect of Three Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Seeds Fractions on Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Behzd; Taheri, Diana; Gomarian, Mahdi

    2014-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) refers to afflicted inflammation of pancreas with unfavorable adverse effects and developed multiple organ failures. Unfortunately, there is not a certain therapeutic method for this disease. Oxidative stress has a serious role in the pathogenesis of AP. Thus, decreasing of oxidative stress may prevent induction and progression of AP. Punica granatum L. has been extensively used in traditional medicine and possesses various active biological elements. Due to antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of pomegranate, it could be considered as a good candidate alternative medicine with beneficial effects on AP. In this study, we decided to study the protective effect of three fractions of pomegranate seeds on cerulein-induced AP. AP was induced in male Syrian mice by five intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cerulein (50 μg/kg) with 1 h intervals. Treatments with pomegranate freeze-dried powder (PFDP) and hydroalcoholic pomegranate seeds extract (PSE) at doses of 125, 250, 500 mg/kg (i.p.) were started 30 min before pancreatitis induction. Pomegranate seed oil fraction (PSOF) was orally administered (50, 100, 200 μL/kg) and continued for 10 days. Pancreatic tissue was evaluated for histopathological parameters and pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity as well as lipase and amylase levels were measured in plasma. The higher doses of three fractions (250 and 500 mg/kg for PFDP and PSE and doses of 100, 200 μL/kg for PSOF) significantly reduced amylase and lipase activity in serum (at least P < 0.01), pancreatic MPO activity (P < 0.001), edema, leukocyte infiltration and vacuolization in comparison to the control group (P < 0.05). These results propose that pomegranate seeds fractions can prevent and/or treat the AP.

  11. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  12. Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Models: Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Fetal Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Damasceno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose homeostasis is controlled by endocrine pancreatic cells, and any pancreatic disturbance can result in diabetes. Because 8% to 12% of diabetic pregnant women present with malformed fetuses, there is great interest in understanding the etiology, pathophysiological mechanisms, and treatment of gestational diabetes. Hyperglycemia enhances the production of reactive oxygen species, leading to oxidative stress, which is involved in diabetic teratogenesis. It has also been suggested that maternal diabetes alters embryonic gene expression, which might cause malformations. Due to ethical issues involving human studies that sometimes have invasive aspects and the multiplicity of uncontrolled variables that can alter the uterine environment during clinical studies, it is necessary to use animal models to better understand diabetic pathophysiology. This review aimed to gather information about pathophysiological mechanisms and fetal outcomes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms and factors involved in diabetes, the use of pancreatic regeneration studies is increasing in an attempt to understand the behavior of pancreatic beta cells. In addition, these studies suggest a new preventive concept as a treatment basis for diabetes, introducing therapeutic efforts to minimize or prevent diabetes-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage, and teratogenesis.

  13. Unraveling Pancreatic Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Yohann; de Mestier, Louis; Perez, Manuela; Avisse, Claude; Lévy, Philippe; Kianmanesh, Reza

    2018-04-01

    Limited pancreatic resections are increasingly performed, but the rate of postoperative fistula is higher than after classical resections. Pancreatic segmentation, anatomically and radiologically identifiable, may theoretically help the surgeon removing selected anatomical portions with their own segmental pancreatic duct and thus might decrease the postoperative fistula rate. We aimed at systematically and comprehensively reviewing the previously proposed pancreatic segmentations and discuss their relevance and limitations. PubMed database was searched for articles investigating pancreatic segmentation, including human or animal anatomy, and cadaveric or surgical studies. Overall, 47/99 articles were selected and grouped into 4 main hypotheses of pancreatic segmentation methodology: anatomic, vascular, embryologic and lymphatic. The head, body and tail segments are gross description without distinct borders. The arterial territories defined vascular segments and isolate an isthmic paucivascular area. The embryological theory relied on the fusion plans of the embryological buds. The lymphatic drainage pathways defined the lymphatic segmentation. These theories had differences, but converged toward separating the head and body/tail parts, and the anterior from posterior and inferior parts of the pancreatic head. The rate of postoperative fistula was not decreased when surgical resection was performed following any of these segmentation theories; hence, none of them appeared relevant enough to guide pancreatic transections. Current pancreatic segmentation theories do not enable defining anatomical-surgical pancreatic segments. Other approaches should be explored, in particular focusing on pancreatic ducts, through pancreatic ducts reconstructions and embryologic 3D modelization.

  14. MUC1 enhances tumor progression and contributes towards immunosuppression in a mouse model of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinder, Teresa L.; Subramani, Durai B.; Basu, Gargi D.; Bradley, Judy M.; Schettini, Jorge; Million, Arefayene; Skaar, Todd

    2008-01-01

    MUC1, a membrane tethered mucin glycoprotein, is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in >80% of human ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, the role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has been elusive, partly due to the lack of an appropriate model. We report the characterization of a novel mouse model that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule (PDA.MUC1 mice). Pancreatic tumors arise in an appropriate MUC1-tolerant background within an immune competent host. Significant enhancement in the development of pancreatic intraepithelial pre-neoplastic lesions (PanINs) and progression to adenocarcinoma is observed in PDA.MUC1 mice, possibly due to increased proliferation. Tumors from PDA.MUC1 mice express higher levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and indoleamine 2,3, dioxygenase compared to PDA mice lacking MUC1, especially during early stages of tumor development. The increased pro-inflammatory milieu correlates with an increased percentage of regulatory T cells and myeloid suppressor cells in the pancreatic tumor and tumor draining lymph nodes. Data shows that during pancreatic cancer progression, MUC1-mediated mechanisms enhance the onset and progression of the disease which in turn regulate the immune responses. Thus, the mouse model is ideally-suited for testing novel chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies against pancreatic cancer. PMID:18713982

  15. MUC1 enhances tumor progression and contributes toward immunosuppression in a mouse model of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinder, Teresa L; Subramani, Durai B; Basu, Gargi D; Bradley, Judy M; Schettini, Jorge; Million, Arefayene; Skaar, Todd; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2008-09-01

    MUC1, a membrane tethered mucin glycoprotein, is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in >80% of human ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, the role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has been elusive, partly due to the lack of an appropriate model. We report the characterization of a novel mouse model that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule (PDA.MUC1 mice). Pancreatic tumors arise in an appropriate MUC1-tolerant background within an immune-competent host. Significant enhancement in the development of pancreatic intraepithelial preneoplastic lesions and progression to adenocarcinoma is observed in PDA.MUC1 mice, possibly due to increased proliferation. Tumors from PDA.MUC1 mice express higher levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and IDO compared with PDA mice lacking MUC1, especially during early stages of tumor development. The increased proinflammatory milieu correlates with an increased percentage of regulatory T cells and myeloid suppressor cells in the pancreatic tumor and tumor draining lymph nodes. Data shows that during pancreatic cancer progression, MUC1-mediated mechanisms enhance the onset and progression of the disease, which in turn regulate the immune responses. Thus, the mouse model is ideally suited for testing novel chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies against pancreatic cancer.

  16. Syndecan-2 promotes perineural invasion and cooperates with K-ras to induce an invasive pancreatic cancer cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Tiago; Abiatari, Ivane; Raulefs, Susanne; Sauliunaite, Danguole; Erkan, Mert; Kong, Bo; Friess, Helmut; Michalski, Christoph W; Kleeff, Jörg

    2012-04-03

    We have identified syndecan-2 as a protein potentially involved in perineural invasion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Syndecan-2 (SDC-2) expression was analyzed in human normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC tissues. Functional in vitro assays were carried out to determine its role in invasion, migration and signaling. SDC-2 was expressed in the majority of the tested pancreatic cancer cell lines while it was upregulated in nerve-invasive PDAC cell clones. There were 2 distinct expression patterns of SDC-2 in PDAC tissue samples: SDC-2 positivity in the cancer cell cytoplasm and a peritumoral expression. Though SDC-2 silencing (using specific siRNA oligonucleotides) did not affect anchorage-dependent growth, it significantly reduced cell motility and invasiveness in the pancreatic cancer cell lines T3M4 and Su8686. On the transcriptional level, migration-and invasion-associated genes were down-regulated following SDC-2 RNAi. Furthermore, SDC-2 silencing reduced K-ras activity, phosphorylation of Src and--further downstream--phosphorylation of ERK2 while levels of the putative SDC-2 signal transducer p120GAP remained unaltered. SDC-2 is a novel (perineural) invasion-associated gene in PDAC which cooperates with K-ras to induce a more invasive phenotype.

  17. Syndecan-2 promotes perineural invasion and cooperates with K-ras to induce an invasive pancreatic cancer cell phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Oliveira Tiago

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have identified syndecan-2 as a protein potentially involved in perineural invasion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells. Methods Syndecan-2 (SDC-2 expression was analyzed in human normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC tissues. Functional in vitro assays were carried out to determine its role in invasion, migration and signaling. Results SDC-2 was expressed in the majority of the tested pancreatic cancer cell lines while it was upregulated in nerve-invasive PDAC cell clones. There were 2 distinct expression patterns of SDC-2 in PDAC tissue samples: SDC-2 positivity in the cancer cell cytoplasm and a peritumoral expression. Though SDC-2 silencing (using specific siRNA oligonucleotides did not affect anchorage-dependent growth, it significantly reduced cell motility and invasiveness in the pancreatic cancer cell lines T3M4 and Su8686. On the transcriptional level, migration-and invasion-associated genes were down-regulated following SDC-2 RNAi. Furthermore, SDC-2 silencing reduced K-ras activity, phosphorylation of Src and - further downstream - phosphorylation of ERK2 while levels of the putative SDC-2 signal transducer p120GAP remained unaltered. Conclusion SDC-2 is a novel (perineural invasion-associated gene in PDAC which cooperates with K-ras to induce a more invasive phenotype.

  18. Spiclomazine induces apoptosis associated with the suppression of cell viability, migration and invasion in pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Zhao

    Full Text Available The effective treatment for pancreatic carcinoma remains critically needed. Herein, this current study showed that spiclomazine treatment caused a reduction in viability in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines CFPAC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 in vitro. It was notable in this regard that, compared with pancreatic carcinoma cells, normal human embryonic kidney (HEK-293 and liver (HL-7702 cells were more resistant to the antigrowth effect of spiclomazine. Biochemically, spiclomazine treatment regulated the expression of protein levels in the apoptosis related pathways. Consistent with this effect, spiclomazine reduced the mitochondria membrane potential, elevated reactive oxygen species, and activated caspase-3/9. In addition, a key finding from this study was that spiclomazine suppressed migration and invasion of cancer cells through down-regulation of MMP-2/9. Collectively, the proposed studies did shed light on the antiproliferation effect of spiclomazine on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, and further clarified the mechanisms that spiclomazine induced apoptosis associated with the suppression of migration and invasion.

  19. Alcohol-induced severe acute pancreatitis followed by hemolytic uremic syndrome managed with continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peng; Yuan, Ai-hong; Wang, Chun-hua; Li, Xin; Wu, Hai-yang

    2014-01-06

    Acute kidney injury in patients with acute pancreatitis carries a poor prognosis. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by non-immune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney, and though rare in adults it is associated with high mortality and a high rate of chronic renal failure. Herein, we report a case of alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis in a 38-year-old Chinese female complicated by HUS. Her renal function progressively deteriorated in 2 days, and daily continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) was thus performed for a total of 13 treatments. She also received intermittent transfusions of fresh frozen plasma. Her renal failure was successfully managed, with subsequent return of normal renal function. She was discharged 1 month after admission and follow-up at 3 months revealed normal urea and creatinine. CRRT was shown to be useful for the treatment of HUS following acute pancreatitis. Prior case reports and our case should remind clinicians that HUS is a possible complication of acute pancreatitis. This study highlights the importance of early diagnosis and prompt initiation of CRRT to prevent mortality and improve outcomes.

  20. Suppression of Tumor Growth and Muscle Wasting in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer by the Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor AR-42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sally E; Ding, Li-Yun; Mo, Xiaokui; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; Huang, Po-Hsien

    2016-12-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the third leading cause of cancer death in the United States. This study was aimed at evaluating the efficacy of AR-42 (formerly OSU-HDAC42), a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor currently in clinical trials, in suppressing tumor growth and/or cancer-induced muscle wasting in murine models of PDAC. The in vitro antiproliferative activity of AR-42 was evaluated in six human pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, COLO-357, PANC-1, MiaPaCa-2, BxPC-3, SW1990). AsPC-1 subcutaneous xenograft and transgenic KP fl/fl C (LSL-Kras G12D ;Trp53 flox/flox ;Pdx-1-Cre) mouse models of pancreatic cancer were used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of AR-42 in suppressing tumor growth and/or muscle wasting. Growth suppression in AR-42-treated cells was observed in all six human pancreatic cancer cell lines with dose-dependent modulation of proliferation and apoptotic markers, which was associated with the hallmark features of HDAC inhibition, including p21 upregulation and histone H3 hyperacetylation. Oral administration of AR-42 at 50 mg/kg every other day resulted in suppression of tumor burden in the AsPC-1 xenograft and KP fl/fl C models by 78% and 55%, respectively, at the end of treatment. Tumor suppression was associated with HDAC inhibition, increased apoptosis, and inhibition of proliferation. Additionally, AR-42 as a single agent preserved muscle size and increased grip strength in KP fl/fl C mice. Finally, the combination of AR-42 and gemcitabine in transgenic mice demonstrated a significant increase in survival than either agent alone. These results suggest that AR-42 represents a therapeutically promising strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Association between pancreatitis and fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is a common digestive disease with a high mortality rate. Clinical physicians often encounter patients with pancreatitis and fatty liver disease. This article investigates the association between pancreatitis and fatty liver disease from the aspects of the prevalence of fatty liver disease in patients with pancreatitis, the influence of fatty liver disease on the prognosis of pancreatitis, and pancreatitis induced by acute fatty liver disease during pregnancy.

  2. The fusion of autophagosome with lysosome is impaired in L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongwei; Yu, Xiao; Zhu, Shaihong; Li, Xia; Lu, Ben; Li, Zhiqiang; Yu, Can

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory pancreatic disease that carries considerable morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of this disease remains poorly understood. We investigated the incidence of autophagy in mice following induction of acute pancreatitis. Mice were received intraperitoneal injections of L-arginine (200 mg × 2/100 g BW), while controls were administered with saline. Pancreatic tissues were assessed by histology, electron microscopy and western blotting. Injection of L-arginine resulted in the accumulation of autophagosomes and a relative paucity of autolysosomes. Moreover, the autophagy marker p62 is significantly increased. However, the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 (Lamp-2), a protein that is required for the proper fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes, is decreased in acute pancreatitis. These results suggest that a crucial role for autophagy and Lamp-2 in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Our data suggest that the autophagic flux is impaired in acute pancreatitis. The depletion of Lamp-2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

  3. Berberine induces apoptosis via ROS generation in PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2 pancreatic cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.H. [Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, J.H. [Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, E.J. [Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Ansan University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, N. [Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-12

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death. Gemcitabine is widely used as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, but the prognosis is still poor. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from a variety of natural herbs, possesses a variety of pharmacological properties including anticancer effects. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of berberine and compared its use with that of gemcitabine in the pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2. Berberine inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. After berberine treatment, the G1 phase of PANC-1 cells increased by 10% compared to control cells, and the G1 phase of MIA-PaCa2 cells was increased by 2%. Whereas gemcitabine exerts antiproliferation effects through S-phase arrest, our results showed that berberine inhibited proliferation by inducing G1-phase arrest. Berberine-induced apoptosis of PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2 cells increased by 7 and 2% compared to control cells, respectively. Notably, berberine had a greater apoptotic effect in PANC-1 cells than gemcitabine. Upon treatment of PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2 with berberine at a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}), apoptosis was induced by a mechanism that involved the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) rather than caspase 3/7 activation. Our findings showed that berberine had anti-cancer effects and may be an effective drug for pancreatic cancer chemotherapy.

  4. p-[123I]iodo-l-phenylalanine for detection of pancreatic cancer: basic investigations of the uptake characteristics in primary human pancreatic tumour cells and evaluation in in vivo models of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samnick, Samuel; Hellwig, Dirk; Kirsch, Carl-Martin; Romeike, Bernd F.M.; Feiden, Wolfgang; Kubuschok, Boris; Amon, Michaela; Menger, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is associated with the worst 5-year survival rate of any human cancer. This high mortality is due, in part, to difficulties in establishing early and accurate diagnosis. Because most tumours share the ability to accumulate amino acids more effectively than normal tissues and any other pathology, assessment of amino acid transport in tumour cells using radiolabelled amino acids has become one of the most promising tools for tumour imaging. This study investigated the potential of p-[ 123 I]iodo-l-phenylalanine (IPA) for detection of pancreatic cancer by single-photon emission tomography. IPA affinity for pancreatic tumour was investigated in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma PaCa44 and PanC1 cells, followed by analysis of the underlying mechanisms of tracer accumulation in neoplastic cells. Thereafter, IPA was evaluated for targeting of pancreatic tumours using SCID mice engrafted with primary human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells, as well as in acute inflammation models in immunocompetent mice and rats. IPA accumulated intensively in human pancreatic tumour cells. Radioactivity accumulation in tumour cells following a 30-min incubation at 37 C/pH 7.4 varied from 41% to 58% of the total loaded activity per 10 6 cells. The cellular uptake was temperature and pH dependent and predominantly mediated by specific carriers for neutral amino acids, namely the sodium-independent and l-leucine-preferring (L-system) transporter and the alanine-, serine- and cysteine-preferring (ASC-system) transporter. Protein incorporation was less than 8%. Biodistribution studies showed rapid localization of the tracer to tumours, reaching 10%±2.5% to 15%±3% of the injected dose per gram (I.D./g) in heterotopic tumours compared with 17%±3.5% to 22%±4.3% I.D./g in the orthotopic tumours, at 60 and 240 min post injection of IPA, respectively. In contrast, IPA uptake in the gastrointestinal tract and areas of inflammation remained moderate and decreased with time. Excellent

  5. The Use of Bovine Pericardial Buttress on Linear Stapler Fails to Reduce Pancreatic Fistula Incidence in a Porcine Pancreatic Transection Model

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    A. Maciver

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effectiveness of buttressing the surgical stapler to reduce postoperative pancreatic fistulae in a porcine model. As a pilot study, pigs (n=6 underwent laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy using a standard stapler. Daily drain output and lipase were measured postoperative day 5 and 14. In a second study, pancreatic transection was performed to occlude the proximal and distal duct at the pancreatic neck using a standard stapler (n=6, or stapler with bovine pericardial strip buttress (n=6. Results. In pilot study, 3/6 animals had drain lipase greater than 3x serum on day 14. In the second series, drain volumes were not significantly different between buttressed and control groups on day 5 (55.3 ± 31.6 and 29.3 ± 14.2 cc, resp., nor on day 14 (9.5 ± 4.2 cc and 2.5 ± 0.8 cc, resp., P=0.13. Drain lipase was not statistically significant on day 5 (3,166 ± 1,433 and 6,063 ± 1,872 U/L, resp., P=0.25 or day 14 (924 ± 541 and 360 ± 250 U/L. By definition, 3/6 developed pancreatic fistula; only one (control demonstrating a contained collection arising from the staple line. Conclusion. Buttressed stapler failed to protect against pancreatic fistula in this rigorous surgical model.

  6. The effect of intra-abdominal hypertension incorporating severe acute pancreatitis in a porcine model.

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    Lu Ke

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS and intra abdominal hypertension(IAH are common clinical findings in patients with severe acute pancreatitis(SAP. It is thought that an increased intra abdominal pressure(IAP is associated with poor prognosis in SAP patients. But the detailed effect of IAH/ACS on different organ system is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of SAP combined with IAH on hemodynamics, systemic oxygenation, and organ damage in a 12 h lasting porcine model. MEASUREMENTS AND METHODS: Following baseline registrations, a total of 30 animals were divided into 5 groups (6 animals in each group: SAP+IAP30 group, SAP+IAP20 group, SAP group, IAP30 group(sham-operated but without SAP and sham-operated group. We used a N(2 pneumoperitoneum to induce different levels of IAH and retrograde intra-ductal infusion of sodium taurocholate to induce SAP. The investigation period was 12 h. Hemodynamic parameters (CO, HR, MAP, CVP, urine output, oxygenation parameters(e.g., S(vO(2, PO(2, PaCO(2, peak inspiratory pressure, as well as serum parameters (e.g., ALT, amylase, lactate, creatinine were recorded. Histological examination of liver, intestine, pancreas, and lung was performed. MAIN RESULTS: Cardiac output significantly decreased in the SAP+IAH animals compared with other groups. Furthermore, AST, creatinine, SUN and lactate showed similar increasing tendency paralleled with profoundly decrease in S(vO(2. The histopathological analyses also revealed higher grade injury of liver, intestine, pancreas and lung in the SAP+IAH groups. However, few differences were found between the two SAP+IAH groups with different levels of IAP. CONCLUSIONS: Our newly developed porcine SAP+IAH model demonstrated that there were remarkable effects on global hemodynamics, oxygenation and organ function in response to sustained IAH of 12 h combined with SAP. Moreover, our model should be helpful to study the mechanisms of IAH/ACS-induced

  7. Targeted radiotherapy with {sup 177} Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez C, J.; Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ferro F, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Murphy S, E. [Hospital Santelena, 06000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for peptide receptor targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses after administration of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE in mice as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells expressing somatostatin receptors, were implanted in athymic mice (n=18) to obtain the {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE biokinetics and dosimetry. To estimate its therapeutic efficacy 87 MBq were injected in a tail vein of 3 mice and 19 days p.i. there were a partial relapse. There was an epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidneys of mouse III. The absorbed dose to tumour, kidney and pancreas was 50.5 {+-} 7.2 Gy, 17.5 {+-} 2.5 Gy and 12.6 {+-} 2.3 Gy respectively. These studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man considering its kidney radiotoxicity. (Author)

  8. Targeted radiotherapy with {sup 177} Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M. A de; Pedraza L, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rodriguez C, J. [Faculty of Medicine, UAEM, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ferro F, G. [ININ, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Murphy S, E. [Hospital Santelena, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses and to evaluate {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells, which over-express somatostatin receptors, were injected in athymic mice and 20 days later the mean tumour size was 3.08 square cm (n=3). A mean of 86.3 MBq {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE, was injected in a tail vein and 19 days after therapy the size of the tumours was 0.81 square cm. There was a partial relapse and after 16 days, when sacrificed, the mean tumour size was 8.28 cubic cm. An epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidney of one treated mouse was found. The tumour of the control mouse was 8.61 cubic cm when sacrificed 14 days after tumour induction. Radiotherapy estimates to the tumours was 35.9-39.7 Gy and the tumours might have been completely reduced with a second therapy dose. These preliminary studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that Lu-{sup 177}-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man, considering kidney radiation. (Author)

  9. Effects of methimazole-induced hypothyroidism on immunohistochemical, stereomorphometric and some ultrastructural characteristics of pancreatic β-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ukropina Mirela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The function of pancreatic β-cells is to produce and secrete insulin, a crucial hormone in carbohydrate metabolism. The transcription factor PDX1 is required for insulin gene transcription and mature β-cell function. Since this factor is regulated by triiodothyronine, a disturbance in insulin biosynthesis and/or secretion is usually related to a deficiency of this hormone. In the present study, we used methods of immunohistochemistry, stereology and electron microscopy to explore the correlation between altered thyroid status and insulin synthesis/secretion in a model of methimazole-induced hypothyroidism in rats. In hypothyroid animals fewer functional PDX1-positive β-cells were detected in the islets of Langerhans, while insulin immunostaining was stronger. Stereological analysis of β-cell granules revealed more numerous immature insulin granules in hypothyroid rats. Taken together, these data suggest that the applied treatment caused impaired insulin synthesis and secretion. Rare cells with granules characteristic for both α- and β-cells observed in hypothyroid animals could provide functional compensation for diminished insulin synthesis.

  10. Polypharmacy and risk of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Dan; Lindblad, Mats; Bexelius, Tomas; Oskarsson, Viktor; Sadr-Azodi, Omid; Ljung, Rickard

    2016-11-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis is receiving increased medical and epidemiological attention. However, as no study has examined the role of polypharmacy per se in the development of acute pancreatitis, we examined the association between polypharmacy and risk of acute pancreatitis. A nationwide case-control study was conducted between 2006 and 2008 of Swedish people aged 40-84 years. The Swedish Patient Register was used to identify 6161 cases of first-episode acute pancreatitis. The Swedish Register of the Total Population was used to randomly select 61 637 controls from the general population using frequency-based density sampling, matched for age, sex, and calendar year. The Swedish Prescribed Drug Register was used to assess polypharmacy, defined as the number of unique drugs prescribed during the last 6 months before the index date (i.e. the date of acute pancreatitis for cases and a random date for controls). Odds ratios (ORs), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), of acute pancreatitis were estimated by unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for matching variables and potential confounding factors. The number of prescribed drugs was associated with a dose-dependent increase in the risk of acute pancreatitis. In the multivariable-adjusted model, compared to those without any prescriptions, the OR was 1.69 (95%CI: 1.55-1.86) for persons with 1-2 drugs, 2.40 (2.20-2.62) for 3-5 drugs, 3.17 (2.88-3.48) for 6-9 drugs, and 4.57 (4.12-5.06) for 10 or more drugs. This population-based case-control study shows a dose-dependent association between increasing polypharmacy and risk of acute pancreatitis. These findings provide further insights into drug-induced pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Protein phosphorylation in pancreatic islets induced by 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pek, S.B.; Usami, Masaru; Bilir, N.; Fischer-Bovenkerk, C.; Ueda, Tetsufumi

    1990-01-01

    The authors have shown previously that 3-phosphoglycerate, which is a glycolytic metabolite of glucose, induces protein phosphorylation in bovine and rat brain and in rat heart, kidney, liver, lung, and whole pancreas. Since glycolytic metabolism of glucose is of paramount importance in insulin release, they considered the possibility that 3-phosphoglycerate may act as a coupling factor, and they searched for evidence for the existence of 3-phosphoglycerate-dependent protein phosphorylation systems in freshly isolated normal rat pancreatic islets. Membrane and cytosol fractions were incubated with [γ- 32 P]ATP and appropriate test substances and were subjected to NaDodSO 4 /PAGE and autoradiography. As little as 0.005 mM 3-phosphoglycerate or 2-phosphoglycerate stimulated the phosphorylation of 65-kDa cytosol protein by as early as 0.25 min. The phosphate bond of the 65-kDa phosphoprotein was sufficiently stable to withstand dialysis; the radioactivity could not be chased out by subsequent exposure to ATP, ADP, 3-phosphoglycerate, or 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate. Moreover, cAMP, cGMP, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, or calcium failed to stimulate the phosphorylation of the 65-kDa protein. Phosphoglycerate-dependent protein phosphorylation in islets may have relevance to stimulation of insulin secretion

  12. Sesamin Ameliorates Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction and Apoptosis

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    Xiang Kong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs, the direct modulators of β-cells, have been shown to cause insulin-producing β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis through increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Sesamin has been demonstrated to possess antioxidative activity. This study was designed to investigate whether sesamin protects against AGEs-evoked β-cell damage via its antioxidant property. The effects of sesamin were examined in C57BL/6J mice and MIN6 cell line. In in vivo studies, mice were intraperitoneally injected with AGEs (120 mg/kg and orally treated with sesamin (160 mg/kg for four weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin releasing tests were performed. Insulin content, ROS generation and β-cell apoptosis in pancreatic islets were also measured. In in vitro studies, MIN6 cells were pretreated with sesamin (50 or 100 μM and then exposed to AGEs (200 mg/L for 24 h. Insulin secretion, β-cell death, ROS production as well as expression and activity of NADPH oxidase were determined. Sesamin treatment obviously ameliorated AGE-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro. These effects were associated with decreased ROS production, down-regulated expression of p67phox and p22phox, and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. These results suggest that sesamin protects β-cells from damage caused by AGEs through suppressing NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress.

  13. PPARδ Activation Rescues Pancreatic β-Cell Line INS-1E from Palmitate-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress through Enhanced Fatty Acid Oxidation

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    Mingming Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key factors responsible for the development of type 2 diabetes is the loss of functional pancreatic β cells. This occurs due to a chronic exposure to a high fatty acid environment. ER stress is caused by an accumulation of irreversible misfold or unfold protein: these trigger the death of functional pancreatic β cells. PPARδ is an orphan nuclear receptor. It plays a pivotal role in regulating the metabolism of dietary lipids and fats. However, the correlation between PPARδ of fatty acids and ER stress of pancreatic β cells is not quite clear till date. Here, we show that PPARδ attenuates palmitate-induced ER stress of pancreatic β cells. On the other hand, PPARδ agonist inhibits both abnormal changes in ER structure and activation of signaling cascade, which is downstream ER stress. Further, we illustrate that PPARδ attenuates palmitate-induced ER stress by promoting fatty acid oxidation through treatment with etomoxir, an inhibitor of fatty acid oxidation. It dramatically abolishes PPARδ-mediated inhibition of ER stress. Finally, we show that PPARδ could protect pancreatic β cells from palmitate-induced cell death and dysfunction of insulin secretion. Our work elucidates the protective effect of PPARδ on the fatty-acid-induced toxicity of pancreatic β cells.

  14. Demethylation of induced pluripotent stem cells from type 1 diabetic patients enhances differentiation into functional pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, Gohar S; Kim, Eun-Mi; Zavazava, Nicholas

    2017-08-25

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) can be managed by transplanting either the whole pancreas or isolated pancreatic islets. However, cadaveric pancreas is scarcely available for clinical use, limiting this approach. As such, there is a great need to identify alternative sources of clinically usable pancreatic tissues. Here, we used induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from patients with T1D to generate glucose-responsive, insulin-producing cells (IPCs) via 3D culture. Initially, T1D iPS cells were resistant to differentiation, but transient demethylation treatment significantly enhanced IPC yield. The cells responded to high-glucose stimulation by secreting insulin in vitro The shape, size, and number of their granules, as observed by transmission electron microscopy, were identical to those found in cadaveric β cells. When the IPCs were transplanted into immunodeficient mice that had developed streptozotocin-induced diabetes, they promoted a dramatic decrease in hyperglycemia, causing the mice to become normoglycemic within 28 days. None of the mice died or developed teratomas. Because the cells are derived from "self," immunosuppression is not required, providing a much safer and reliable treatment option for T1D patients. Moreover, these cells can be used for drug screening, thereby accelerating drug discovery. In conclusion, our approach eliminates the need for cadaveric pancreatic tissue.

  15. MicroRNA-21 induces 5-fluorouracil resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells by regulating PTEN and PDCD4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xueju; Wang, Weibin; Wang, Lanlan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xian; Chen, Mingtai; Wang, Fang; Yu, Jia; Ma, Yanni; Sun, Guotao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients are often resistant to chemotherapy treatment, which results in poor prognosis. The objective of this study was to delineate the mechanism by which miR-21 induces drug resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human pancreatic cancer cells (PATU8988 and PANC-1). We report that PATU8988 cells resistant to 5-FU express high levels of miR-21 in comparison to sensitive primary PATU8988 cells. Suppression of miR-21 expression in 5-Fu-resistant PATU8988 cells can alleviate its 5-FU resistance. Meanwhile, lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of miR-21 not only conferred resistance to 5-FU but also promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion of PATU8988 and PANC-1 cells. The proresistance effects of miR-21 were attributed to the attenuated expression of tumor suppressor genes, including PTEN and PDCD4. Overexpression of PTEN and PDCD4 antagonized miR-21-induced resistance to 5-FU and migration activity. Our work demonstrates that miR-21 can confer drug resistance to 5-FU in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating the expression of tumor suppressor genes, as the target genes of miR-21, PTEN and PDCD4 can rescue 5-FU sensitivity and the phenotypic characteristics disrupted by miR-21

  16. Mesenchymal-epithelial transition of pancreatic cancer cells at perineural invasion sites is induced by Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii-Nishimura, Yoko; Yamazaki, Ken; Masugi, Yohei; Douguchi, Junya; Kurebayashi, Yutaka; Kubota, Naoto; Ojima, Hidenori; Kitago, Minoru; Shinoda, Masahiro; Hashiguchi, Akinori; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2018-02-19

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) promotes invasion and metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the importance of its reverse process, mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET), for PDAC remains unclear. We aimed to characterize the histological finding "focal differentiation" in PDAC at perineural invasion sites in the context of MET and to investigate the role of Schwann cells in inducing tumor MET. Tumor differentiation and immunohistochemical expressions of E-cadherin, SMAD3, and vimentin at perineural invasion sites were examined in 168 PDAC tissues. Four PDAC cell lines were co-cultured with Schwann cells to investigate cell morphology, motility, or EMT-related markers using immunocytochemistry and quantitative PCR. Of 168 tumors, 124 (74%) showed focal differentiation with enhanced E-cadherin membrane expression (P grade 1/2 tumor, tumors with focal differentiation showed worse survival compared to those without focal differentiation (P = 0.019). PDAC cells co-cultured with Schwann cells demonstrated a sheet-like appearance, increased E-cadherin expression, decreased expressions of SMAD3 and vimentin, and reduced cell motility. In conclusion, MET-like change is induced by Schwann cells, suggesting that Schwann cells contribute to PDAC colonization in pancreatic nerves through activating the MET machinery inside tumor cells in the pancreatic tumor microenvironment. © 2018 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Synergistic combination of gemcitabine and dietary molecule induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells and down regulates PKM2 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Pandita

    Full Text Available Gemcitabine, an effective agent in treatment of cancer of pancreas, has undergone failures in many instances after multiple cycles of therapy due to emergence of drug resistance. Combination of dietary compounds with clinically validated drugs has emerged as an effective therapeutic approach to treat pancreatic tumors, refractory to gemcitabine therapy. In order to optimize a possible synergistic combination of Gemcitabine (GCB with dietary molecules, Betuilnic acid (BA and Thymoquinone (TQ, stand-alone IC50 dose of GCB, BA and TQ was calculated for pancreatic cancer cell lines. Fixed IC50 dose ratio of the dietary molecules in combination with reduced IC50 dose of GCB was tested on GCB resistant PANC-1 and sensitive MIA PaCa-2 cells for synergism, additive response and antagonism, using calcusyn. Combination index (CI revealed that pre-treatment of BA and TQ along with GCB synergistically inhibited the cancer cell proliferation in in-vitro experiments. Pyruvate kinase (PK M2 isoform, a promising target involved in cancer cell metabolism, showed down-regulation in presence of TQ or BA in combination with GCB. GCB with BA acted preferentially on tumor mitochondria and triggered mitochondrial permeability transition. Pre-exposure of the cell lines, MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1, to TQ in combination with GCB induced apoptosis. Thus, the effectiveness of BA or TQ in combination with GCB to inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and down-regulate the expression of PKM2, reflects promise in pancreatic cancer treatment.

  18. Effects of Momordica charantia on pancreatic histopathological changes associated with streptozotocin-induced diabetes in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, M; Zuki, A B Z; Goh, Y M; Rezaeizadeh, A; Noordin, M M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the effects of Momordica charantia (MC) fruit aqueous extract on pancreatic histopathological changes in neonatal STZ-induced type-II diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced in one day Sprague-Dawley neonatal rats using a single intrapretoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (85 mg/kg body weight) and monitored for 12 weeks thereafter. The diabetic rats were separated into three groups, as follows: the diabetic control group (i.e. nSTZ), the diabetic group (i.e. nSTZ/M) - which was orally given 20 mg/kg of MC fruit extract, and the diabetic group (i.e. nSTZ/G) - that was treated with glibenclamide, 0.1 mg/kg for a period of four weeks. At the end of treatment, the animals were sacrificed and blood samples were collected from the saphenous vein to measure the blood glucose and serum insulin level. The pancreatic specimens were removed and processed for light microscopy, electron microscopy examination and immunohistochemical study. The results of this study showed that MC fruit aqueous extract reduced the blood glucose level as well as glibenclamide and increased the serum insulin level in the treated diabetic rats (Pdiabetic treated rats (P<0.05). Our results suggest that oral feeding of MC fruit extract may have a significant role in the renewal of pancreatic β-cells in the nSTZ rats.

  19. Fisetin attenuates cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis through down regulation of JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Il-Joo; Bae, Gi-Sang; Choi, Sun Bok; Kim, Dong-Goo; Shin, Joon-Yeon; Seo, Seung-Hee; Choi, Mee-Ok; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2014-08-15

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a complicated disease which is largely undiscovered. Fisetin, a natural flavonoid from fruits and vegetables, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-cancer activities in various disease models. However, the effects of fisetin on AP have not been determined. Pre- and post- treatment of mice with fisetin reduced the severity of AP and pancreatitis-associated lung injury and inhibited several biochemical parameters (pancreatic weight to body weight ratio, amylase, lipase, and myeloperoxidase activity) and production of inflammatory cytokines. In pancreatic acinar cells, fisetin also inhibited cell death and production of inflammatory cytokines. In addition, fisetin inhibited activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, these results suggest that fisetin exhibits anti-inflammatory effect on AP and could be a beneficial agent in the treatment of AP and its pulmonary complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nutrient and hormone-neurotransmitter stimuli induce hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides in rat pancreatic islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Best, L.; Malaisse, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Preincubation of rat pancreatic islets with 3 H-inositol, and subsequent exposure, in the presence of LiCl, to either glucose or carbamylcholine resulted in a rapid stimulation of 3 H-inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and 3 H-myo-inositol 1,4-bisphosphate formation, the level of which reached a plateau after about 5 min of stimulation. Both stimuli also caused an approximately linear accumulation of 3 H-myo-inositol 1-phosphate. The amounts of 3 H-inositol phosphates formed were dependent on the concentration of LiCl. Studies of 32 P-labeling of islet ATP, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2), and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate revealed that these approached isotopic equilibrium after about 240-min incubation, whereas 32 P-labeling of phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylethanolamine proceeded at a lower rate. Carbamylcholine provoked an immediate fall in 32 P-PtdIns(4,5)P2 and, to a lesser extent, 32 P-phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. Glucose caused a similar response although, in this case, the most marked decline was in a more polar 32 P-labeled lipid. Cholecystokinin-pancreozymin was also found to induce 32 P-PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis, although the ionophore A23187 was without effect. Both carbamylcholine and glucose induced an increase in 32 P-phosphatidic acid. The results provide two independent pieces of evidence suggesting that phospholipase C-mediated hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides occurs as an early response in rat islets to either nutrient or neurotransmitter secretagogues

  1. Acinar cell apoptosis in Serpini2-deficient mice models pancreatic insufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacie K Loftus

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic insufficiency (PI when left untreated results in a state of malnutrition due to an inability to absorb nutrients. Frequently, PI is diagnosed as part of a larger clinical presentation in cystic fibrosis or Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. In this study, a mouse model for isolated exocrine PI was identified in a mouse line generated by a transgene insertion. The trait is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, and homozygous animals are growth retarded, have abnormal immunity, and have reduced life span. Mice with the disease locus, named pequeño (pq, exhibit progressive apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells with severe exocrine acinar cell loss by 8 wk of age, while the islets and ductal tissue persist. The mutation in pq/pq mice results from a random transgene insertion. Molecular characterization of the transgene insertion site by fluorescent in situ hybridization and genomic deletion mapping identified an approximately 210-kb deletion on Chromosome 3, deleting two genes. One of these genes, Serpini2, encodes a protein that is a member of the serpin family of protease inhibitors. Reintroduction of only the Serpini2 gene by bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic complementation corrected the acinar cell defect as well as body weight and immune phenotypes, showing that deletion of Serpini2 causes the pequeño phenotype. Dietary supplementation of pancreatic enzymes also corrected body size, body weight, and immunodeficiency, and increased the life span of Serpini2-deficient mice, despite continued acinar cell loss. To our knowledge, this study describes the first characterized genetic animal model for isolated PI. Genetic complementation of the transgene insertion mutant demonstrates that Serpini2 deficiency directly results in the acinar cell apoptosis, malabsorption, and malnutrition observed in pq/pq mice. The rescue of growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and mortality by either Serpini2 bacterial artificial chromosome

  2. Fluorescence laparoscopy imaging of pancreatic tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Cao, Hop S.; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Lee, Claudia; Snyder, Cynthia S.; Thompson, Kari J.; Horgan, Santiago; Talamini, Mark A.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of fluorescent proteins to label tumors is revolutionizing cancer research, enabling imaging of both primary and metastatic lesions, which is important for diagnosis, staging, and therapy. This report describes the use of fluorescence laparoscopy to image green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing tumors in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. Methods The orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer was established by injecting GFP-expressing MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells into the pancreas of 6-week-old female athymic mice. On postoperative day 14, diagnostic laparoscopy using both white and fluorescent light was performed. A standard laparoscopic system was modified by placing a 480-nm short-pass excitation filter between the light cable and the laparoscope in addition to using a 2-mm-thick emission filter. A camera was used that allowed variable exposure time and gain setting. For mouse laparoscopy, a 3-mm 0° laparoscope was used. The mouse’s abdomen was gently insufflated to 2 mm Hg via a 22-gauge angiocatheter. After laparoscopy, the animals were sacrificed, and the tumors were collected and processed for histologic review. The experiments were performed in triplicate. Results Fluorescence laparoscopy enabled rapid imaging of the brightly fluorescent tumor in the pancreatic body. Use of the proper filters enabled simultaneous visualization of the tumor and the surrounding structures with minimal autofluorescence. Fluorescence laparoscopy thus allowed exact localization of the tumor, eliminating the need to switch back and forth between white and fluorescence lighting, under which the background usually is so darkened that it is difficult to maintain spatial orientation. Conclusion The use of fluorescence laparoscopy permits the facile, real-time imaging and localization of tumors labeled with fluorescent proteins. The results described in this report should have important clinical potential. PMID:20533064

  3. Fatal Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Due to Severe Triglyceride-Induced Pancreatitis in Early Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibber, Tamanna; Gibson, Paul S

    2017-10-03

    Serum levels of maternal lipids rise physiologically in normal pregnancy, and women with underlying hypertriglyceridemia may experience dramatic elevations which place them at risk for pancreatitis. We describe the case of a woman with severe familial hypertriglyceridemia and prior pancreatitis who discontinued her lipid-lowering therapy early in pregnancy. She promptly developed severe abdominal pain and was hospitalized with acute pancreatitis during the late first trimester. Despite aggressive medical treatment and critical care monitoring, she developed abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) with associated acute renal failure, which progressed to cardiorespiratory failure and was ultimately fatal. ACS is an alarming complication of acute pancreatitis that has been poorly studied in pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Unusual fatal multiple-organ dysfunction and pancreatitis induced by a single wasp sting

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    C Azad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute onset of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS is a well-known complication following multiple wasp stings. However, MODS after a single wasp sting has been rarely reported in children and acute pancreatitis have probably never been observed before. Herein we describe the case of a 12-year-old boy who had urticaria and abdominal pain after a single wasp sting. The child gradually developed MODS while his abdominal complaints were worsening. Despite aggressive supportive management, the child did not survive. Afterward, the cause of the acute abdomen was finally diagnosed as acute pancreatitis. Both MODS and pancreatitis following a single wasp sting are very unusual. Thus, although pancreatitis is rarely manifested, it should be suspected after a wasp sting if there are predominant abdominal symptoms.

  5. Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes complicated by an episode of severe hypertriglyceridaemia-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecker, Nathalie; Decochez, Katelijn

    2013-04-29

    A 23-year-old woman with a history of type 2 diabetes and non-compliance presented to the emergency department with abdominal epigastric pain and nausea. Laboratory examination revealed a mild ketoacidosis while an abdominal CT scan performed the following day demonstrated a severe acute pancreatitis of the body and tail (Balthazar grade E) despite normal amylase serum levels on admission. The presence of a lactescent serum was the clue to an extremely high triglyceride level (>10 000 mg/dl) causing the pancreatitis. The hypertriglyceridaemia itself was attributed mainly to the diabetic ketoacidosis. There was no family history of hypertriglyceridaemia. The triad consisting of diabetic ketoacidosis, hypertriglyceridaemia and acute pancreatitis is an unusual presentation of poorly controlled diabetes which can occur in type 1 as well as type 2 diabetic adults and children. Treatment with intravenous insulin and hydration successfully resolved the ketoacidosis and hypertriglyceridaemia and reversed the episode of acute pancreatitis.

  6. Enterovirus strain and type-specific differences in growth kinetics and virus-induced cell destruction in human pancreatic duct epithelial HPDE cells

    OpenAIRE

    Smura, Teemu; Natri, Olli; Ylipaasto, Petri; Hellman, Marika; Al-Hello, Haider; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Roivainen, Merja

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus infections have been suspected to be involved in the development of type 1 diabetes. However, the pathogenetic mechanism of enterovirus-induced type 1 diabetes is not known. Pancreatic ductal cells are closely associated with pancreatic islets. Therefore, enterovirus infections in ductal cells may also affect beta-cells and be involved in the induction of type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of different enterovirus strains to infect, replicate and prod...

  7. Acute Pancreatitis Associated with Ifosfamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao-Chiu Hung

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication during chemotherapy for pediatric patients with solid tumors. We report a 9-year-old boy with osteosarcoma who experienced 2 episodes of pancreatitis 1 day and 48 days after infusion of ifosfamide (IFOS, respectively. From a MEDLINE search, this is the 3rd reported case and 2nd reported pediatric case of IFOS-induced pancreatitis, and only this case experienced late-onset pancreatitis.

  8. Utilizing past and present mouse systems to engineer more relevant pancreatic cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCant, Brian T; Principe, Daniel R; Guerra, Carmen; Pasca di Magliano, Marina; Grippo, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    The study of pancreatic cancer has prompted the development of numerous mouse models that aim to recapitulate the phenotypic and mechanistic features of this deadly malignancy. This review accomplishes two tasks. First, it provides an overview of the models that have been used as representations of both the neoplastic and carcinoma phenotypes. Second, it presents new modeling schemes that ultimately will serve to more faithfully capture the temporal and spatial progression of the human disease, providing platforms for improved understanding of the role of non-epithelial compartments in disease etiology as well as evaluating therapeutic approaches.

  9. Utilizing Past and Present Mouse Systems to Engineer More Relevant Pancreatic Cancer Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T DeCant

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of pancreatic cancer has prompted the development of numerous mouse models that aim to recapitulate the phenotypic and mechanistic features of this deadly malignancy. This review accomplishes two tasks. First, it provides an overview of the models that have been used as representations of both the neoplastic and carcinoma phenotypes. Second, it presents new modeling schemes that ultimately will serve to more faithfully capture the temporal and spatial progression of the human disease, providing platforms for improved understanding of the role of non-epithelial compartments in disease etiology as well as evaluating therapeutic approaches.

  10. Altered synthesis of some secretory proteins in pancreatic lobules isolated from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, R.D.; Erlanson-Albertsson, C.

    1990-01-01

    The in vitro incorporation of [35S]cysteine into lipase, colipase, amylase, procarboxypeptidase A and B, and the serine proteases and total proteins was studied in pancreatic lobules isolated from normal and diabetic rats with or without insulin treatment. The incorporation of [35S]cysteine into total proteins was 65% greater in pancreatic lobules from diabetic animals than from normal rats. The increased incorporation was partly reversed by insulin treatment (2 U/100 g/day for 5 days) of diabetic rats. The relative rates of biosynthesis for amylase and the procarboxypeptidases in diabetic pancreatic lobules were decreased by 75 and 25%, respectively, after 1 h of incubation, while those for lipase, colipase, and the serine proteases were increased by 90, 85, and 35%, respectively. The absolute rates of synthesis for these enzymes changed in the same direction as the relative rates in diabetic lobules, except that for the procarboxypeptidases, which did not change. The changed rates of biosynthesis for the pancreatic enzymes were reversed by insulin treatment of the diabetic rats. Kinetic studies showed that the incorporation of [35S]cysteine into amylase, lipase, and colipase was linear until up to 2 h of incubation in normal pancreatic lobules, while in the diabetic lobules the incorporation into lipase and colipase was accelerated, reaching a plateau level already after 1 h of incubation. It is concluded that the biosynthesis of pancreatic secretory proteins in diabetic rats is greatly changed both in terms of quantity and kinetics

  11. Predicting risk for portal vein thrombosis in acute pancreatitis patients: A comparison of radical basis function artificial neural network and logistic regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Yang; Hu, Jian; Gao, Kun; Tu, Jianfeng; Li, Wei-Qin; Wang, Wei

    2017-06-01

    To construct a radical basis function (RBF) artificial neural networks (ANNs) model to predict the incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP)-induced portal vein thrombosis. The analysis included 353 patients with AP who had admitted between January 2011 and December 2015. RBF ANNs model and logistic regression model were constructed based on eleven factors relevant to AP respectively. Statistical indexes were used to evaluate the value of the prediction in two models. The predict sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy by RBF ANNs model for PVT were 73.3%, 91.4%, 68.8%, 93.0% and 87.7%, respectively. There were significant differences between the RBF ANNs and logistic regression models in these parameters (Plogistic regression model. D-dimer, AMY, Hct and PT were important prediction factors of approval for AP-induced PVT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Protective effect of Mimosa pudica L. in an L-arginine model of acute necrotising pancreatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Sidhu, Shabir; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Khan, M U

    2016-07-01

    Mimosa pudica is used in traditional medicine for treating various disorders such as inflammatory conditions, diarrhoea, insomnia, alopecia, urogenital infections and wounds. The present study investigated the effect of M. pudica extract (MPE) on L-arginine-induced acute necrotising pancreatitis in rats. The ethanolic extract of M. pudica leaves was studied for the presence of quercetin and gallic acid using high-performance liquid chromatography. Four groups were employed-normal control rats, L-arginine control rats (two intraperitoneal [i.p.] injections of 2 g/kg at an interval of 1 h), MPE-treated rats (400 mg/kg orally) and melatonin-treated rats (positive control 10 mg/kg i.p.), which were further divided into subgroups according to time points (24 h, 3 days and 14 days). Serum amylase, lipase, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), pancreatic amylase, nucleic acid content, protein, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), thiobarbituric reactive substances, glutathione, nitrite/nitrate, collagen content and histopathological examination were carried out. MPE significantly improved acute necrotising pancreatitis by modulating diagnostic markers of pancreatitis such as serum lipase and pancreatic amylase, inflammation (TNF-α), and oxidative and nitrosative stress. Moreover, MPE administration induced regenerative changes in the pancreas evidenced by increased levels of pancreatic proteins, nucleic acid content and histopathology report. In addition, MPE improved TGF-β1 and collagen levels thereby preventing fibrosis. The current investigation indicates the novel role of MPE in reducing the severity of acute necrotising pancreatitis by plausible mechanisms such as anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic activity and by promoting repair and regeneration of the pancreas.

  13. Pancreatic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enzymes become prematurely active and irritate the pancreas (pancreatitis). Pseudocysts can also result from injury to the ... alcohol use and gallstones are risk factors for pancreatitis, and pancreatitis is a risk factor for pseudocysts. ...

  14. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  15. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its blood vessels. This problem is called acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis affects men more often than women. Certain ... well it can be treated. Complications of acute pancreatitis may include: Acute kidney failure Long-term lung damage (ARDS) Buildup ...

  16. Tumor manipulation during pancreatic resection for pancreatic cancer induces dissemination of tumor cells into the peritoneal cavity: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M. Willemijn; van Duijvenbode, Dennis C.; Dijk, Frederike; Busch, Oliver R.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gerhards, Michael F.; Festen, Sebastiaan

    2018-01-01

    Intraoperative tumor manipulation may induce the dissemination of occult peritoneal tumor cells (OPTC) into the peritoneal cavity. A systematic review was performed in the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases from inception to March 15, 2017. Eligible were studies that analyzed the presence of OPTC

  17. Allantoin ameliorates chemically-induced pancreatic β-cell damage through activation of the imidazoline I3 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Amitani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Allantoin is the primary active compound in yams (Dioscorea spp.. Recently, allantoin has been demonstrated to activate imidazoline 3 (I3 receptors located in pancreatic tissues. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the role of allantoin in the effect to improve damage induced in pancreatic β-cells by streptozotocin (STZ via the I3 receptors.Research Design and Methods. The effect of allantoin on STZ-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells was examined using the ApoTox-Glo triplex assay, live/dead cell double staining assay, flow cytometric analysis, and Western blottings. The potential mechanism was investigated using KU14R: an I3 receptor antagonist, and U73122: a phospholipase C (PLC inhibitor. The effects of allantoin on serum glucose and insulin secretion were measured in STZ-treated rats.Results. Allantoin attenuated apoptosis and cytotoxicity and increased the viability of STZ-induced β-cells in a dose-dependent manner; this effect was suppressed by KU14R and U73112. Allantoin decreased the level of caspase-3 and increased the level of phosphorylated B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 expression detected by Western blotting. The improvement in β-cells viability was confirmed using flow cytometry analysis. Daily injection of allantoin for 8 days in STZ-treated rats significantly lowered plasma glucose and increased plasma insulin levels. This action was inhibited by treatment with KU14R.Conclusion. Allantoin ameliorates the damage of β-cells induced by STZ. The blockade by pharmacological inhibitors indicated that allantoin can activate the I3 receptors through a PLC-related pathway to decrease this damage. Therefore, allantoin and related analogs may be effective in the therapy for β-cell damage.

  18. Loss of high-frequency glucose-induced Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic islets correlates with impaired glucose tolerance in Trpm5-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colsoul, Barbara; Schraenen, Anica; Lemaire, Katleen; Quintens, Roel; Van Lommel, Leentje; Segal, Andrei; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Talavera, Karel; Voets, Thomas; Margolskee, Robert F; Kokrashvili, Zaza; Gilon, Patrick; Nilius, Bernd; Schuit, Frans C; Vennekens, Rudi

    2010-03-16

    Glucose homeostasis is critically dependent on insulin release from pancreatic beta-cells, which is strictly regulated by glucose-induced oscillations in membrane potential (V(m)) and the cytosolic calcium level ([Ca(2+)](cyt)). We propose that TRPM5, a Ca(2+)-activated monovalent cation channel, is a positive regulator of glucose-induced insulin release. Immunofluorescence revealed expression of TRPM5 in pancreatic islets. A Ca(2+)-activated nonselective cation current with TRPM5-like properties is significantly reduced in Trpm5(-/-) cells. Ca(2+)-imaging and electrophysiological analysis show that glucose-induced oscillations of V(m) and [Ca(2+)](cyt) have on average a reduced frequency in Trpm5(-/-) islets, specifically due to a lack of fast oscillations. As a consequence, glucose-induced insulin release from Trpm5(-/-) pancreatic islets is significantly reduced, resulting in an impaired glucose tolerance in Trpm5(-/-) mice.

  19. Loss of high-frequency glucose-induced Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic islets correlates with impaired glucose tolerance in Trpm5−/− mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colsoul, Barbara; Schraenen, Anica; Lemaire, Katleen; Quintens, Roel; Van Lommel, Leentje; Segal, Andrei; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Talavera, Karel; Voets, Thomas; Margolskee, Robert F.; Kokrashvili, Zaza; Gilon, Patrick; Nilius, Bernd; Schuit, Frans C.; Vennekens, Rudi

    2010-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is critically dependent on insulin release from pancreatic β-cells, which is strictly regulated by glucose-induced oscillations in membrane potential (Vm) and the cytosolic calcium level ([Ca2+]cyt). We propose that TRPM5, a Ca2+-activated monovalent cation channel, is a positive regulator of glucose-induced insulin release. Immunofluorescence revealed expression of TRPM5 in pancreatic islets. A Ca2+-activated nonselective cation current with TRPM5-like properties is significantly reduced in Trpm5−/− cells. Ca2+-imaging and electrophysiological analysis show that glucose-induced oscillations of Vm and [Ca2+]cyt have on average a reduced frequency in Trpm5−/− islets, specifically due to a lack of fast oscillations. As a consequence, glucose-induced insulin release from Trpm5−/− pancreatic islets is significantly reduced, resulting in an impaired glucose tolerance in Trpm5−/− mice. PMID:20194741

  20. Modulation of pancreatic β-cells in neonatally streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetic rats by the ethanolic extract of Momordica charantia fruit pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafizur, Rahman Md; Kabir, Nurul; Chishti, Sidra

    2011-02-01

    Effective doses of the Momordica charantia fruit pulp (MCF) ethanolic extract on pancreatic β-cells modulation in neonatally streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetic rats were studied. Diabetic rats (n=8) were treated with MCF extract (400 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) or glibenclamide (5 mg kg(-1)) for 28 days. Control rats (n=11) and untreated diabetic rats (n=8) received only water. Fasting glucose, serum insulin (by ELISA) and β-cell function (HOMA %B by homeostasis model assessment) were measured. β- and α-cells were identified by immunostaining, nuclei by DAPI, and β-cell size and number by morphometry. Significant improvement of fasting blood glucose, serum insulin and β-cell function was observed with the MCF extract for the diabetic rat model. The islet size, total β-cell area and number of β-cells were increased to almost double in the diabetic rats treated with MCF extract as compared to the untreated diabetic rats. The number of α-cells did not change significantly. Insulin granules in β-cells were notably reduced in diabetic islets as compared to control islets. However, extract-treated diabetic rat β-cells were abundant with insulin granules, which was comparable to non-diabetic control islets. The modulation of pancreatic β-cells may be involved in the experimental observation of anti-diabetic effects of M. charantia extract.

  1. The Roles of ROS and Caspases in TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis and Necroptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhang

    Full Text Available Death signaling provided by tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL can induce death in cancer cells with little cytotoxicity to normal cells; this cell death has been thought to involve caspase-dependent apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are also mediators that induce cell death, but their roles in TRAIL-induced apoptosis have not been elucidated fully. In the current study, we investigated ROS and caspases in human pancreatic cancer cells undergoing two different types of TRAIL-induced cell death, apoptosis and necroptosis. TRAIL treatment increased ROS in two TRAIL-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines, MiaPaCa-2 and BxPC-3, but ROS were involved in TRAIL-induced apoptosis only in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Unexpectedly, inhibition of ROS by either N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a peroxide inhibitor, or Tempol, a superoxide inhibitor, increased the annexin V-/propidium iodide (PI+ early necrotic population in TRAIL-treated cells. Additionally, both necrostatin-1, an inhibitor of receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of RIP3 decreased the annexin V-/PI+ early necrotic population after TRAIL treatment. Furthermore, an increase in early apoptosis was induced in TRAIL-treated cancer cells under inhibition of either caspase-2 or -9. Caspase-2 worked upstream of caspase-9, and no crosstalk was observed between ROS and caspase-2/-9 in TRAIL-treated cells. Together, these results indicate that ROS contribute to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in MiaPaCa-2 cells, and that ROS play an inhibitory role in TRAIL-induced necroptosis of MiaPaCa-2 and BxPC-3 cells, with caspase-2 and -9 playing regulatory roles in this process.

  2. Prececal digestibility of various sources of starch in minipigs with or without experimentally induced exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mösseler, A; Kramer, N; Becker, C; Gregory, P C; Kamphues, J

    2012-12-01

    Low prececal digestibility of starch leads to a higher starch flux into the hindgut, causing a forced microbial fermentation, energy losses, and meteorism. For exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), lack of pancreatic amylase can be compensated mostly by hindgut fermentation of starch. Even in pigs with complete loss of pancreatic secretion, starch digestibility over the entire tract is reaching levels of controls. To optimize diets for human patients with EPI, the proportion of starch that is digested by the ileum is important. Minipigs were fitted with an ileocecal reentrant fistula (n = 8) to determine prececal digestibility of starch. In 5 minipigs the pancreatic duct was ligated (PL) to induce EPI; 3 minipigs served as controls (Con). Various starch sources were tested in a 1-d screening test; therefore, disappearance rate (DR) instead of digestibility was used. Test meals consisted of 169 g DM of a basal diet plus 67.5 g DM of the starch (without thermal treatment; purified; starch content of 89 to 94.5%) and Cr(2)O(3). The test meal contained (% of DM) starch, 67; crude fat, 1.69; CP, 15; crude fiber, 2.0; and Cr(2)O(3), 0.25. In PL, prececal DR of starch was lower than in Con (P 90%) but was lower (P < 0.05) for potato (Solanum tuberosum) starch (75.4%). In PL, prececal DR of starch was higher (P < 0.05) for wheat (Triticum aestivum) starch (61.2%) than corn (Zea mays) starch (43.0%) and rice (Oryza sativa) starch (29.2%) and intermediate for potato and field pea (Pisum sativum) starch. For patients with EPI, wheat starch seems favorable due to the higher prececal digestibility whereas raw corn and rice starch should be avoided.

  3. Dexmedetomidine attenuates pancreatic injury and inflammatory response in mice with pancreatitis by possible reduction of NLRP3 activation and up-regulation of NET expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Pan, Yiyuan; Gao, Lin; Lu, Guotao; Zhang, Jingzhu; Xie, Xiaochun; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Baiqiang; Li, Gang; Li, Weiqin

    2018-01-22

    Previous studies have shown that acute inflammation is associated with increased sympathetic activity, which in turn increases the inflammatory response and leads to organ damage. The present study aimed to investigate whether dexmedetomidine administration during acute pancreatitis (AP) lessens pancreatic pathological and functional injury and the inflammatory response, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Mild pancreatitis was induced in mice with caerulein, and severe pancreatitis was induced with caerulein plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). After pancreatitis induction, dexmedetomidine at 10 or 20 μg/kg was injected via the tail vein. Pancreatic pathological and functional injury was assessed by histology and serum levels of amylase and lipase, respectively. The inflammatory response was evaluated by determining serum levels of inflammatory factors. The expression of myeloperoxidase (MPO) was examined by immunohistochemistry. The expression of norepinephrine transporter (NET), NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and interleukin (IL)-1β in pancreatic tissue was detected by Western blot and real-time PCR. Dexmedetomidine at 20 μg/kg significantly attenuated pancreatic pathological injury, reduced serum levels of amylase, lipase, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and decreased the expression of MPO in pancreatic tissue in both mouse models of pancreatitis. In addition, dexmedetomidine at 20 μg/kg significantly down-regulated the expression of NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and IL-1β in pancreatic tissue, but up-regulated the expression of NET in both mouse models. Dexmedetomidine attenuates pancreatic injury and inflammatory response in mice with pancreatitis possibly by reducing NLRP3 activation and up-regulating NET expression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Feick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available : In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated.

  5. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated. PMID:20617020

  6. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Acute Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  7. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Z.; Liao, Q.; Hu, Y.; You, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhao, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D) models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer

  8. Oral Supplementation with a Special Additive of Retinyl Palmitate and Alpha Tocopherol Reduces Growth Retardation in Young Pancreatic Duct Ligated Pigs Used as a Model for Children Suffering from Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mößeler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI is a disease of diverse aetiology—e.g., majority of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF show PEI congenitally. Malnutrition and malabsorption of nutrients impair growth and nutritional status. As reduced fat digestion leads to a deficiency of fat-soluble vitamins the supplementation is standard, but absorption is a critical point in PEI-patients. The pancreatic duct ligated (PL pig is an established model for PEI in humans and has been proven to be a suitable model to compare different vitamin additives for supplementation. In a former study, PEI caused distinct growth retardation in young piglets, but did not affect growth in older ones. Our study hypothesised that this age-dependent effect is caused by exhausted body reserves of fat-soluble vitamins and, therefore, extra supply reduces growth retardation. PEI was induced by PL at the age of seven (PL-7 or 16 weeks (PL-16. Controls (C underwent a sham surgery. Some PL-7 pigs (PL-7 + Vit were fed a special vitamin additive. PEI reduced the mean final body weight (kg at 26 weeks of age significantly with lower effect in PL-16-pigs (C:117; PL-7:49.5; PL-7 + Vit:77.1; PL-16:96.4. Extra vitamin supply resulted in an increased growth and normalised serum concentration of alpha-tocopherol, underlining the importance of special supplementation in PEI-patients.

  9. Hypoglycemic and pancreatic protective effects of Portulaca oleracea extract in alloxan induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Basma K; Schaalan, Mona F; Tolba, Amina M

    2017-01-11

    Diabetes is a major public health concern. In spite of continuous new drug development to treat diabetes, herbal remedies remain a potential adjunct therapy to maintain better glycemic control while also imparting few side-effects. Portulaca oleracea has been traditionally used to manage several diseases due to the anti-oxidant and anti-atherogenic effects it imparts. To better understand the mechanisms associated with potential protective effect of P. oleracea extract against diabetes, alloxan-induced diabetic rats were used in this study. Forty Wistar rats (male, 7-8-wk-old, 140-160 g) were divided into four groups (n = 10/group): Group I (control), Group II (P. oleracea-treated; gavaged with P. oleracea extract daily [at 250 mg/kg] for 4 weeks), Group III (diabetic control; daily IP injection of alloxan [at 75 mg/kg] for 5 days) and Group IV (P. oleracea-pre-treated diabetic; gavaged with P. oleracea extract daily [at 250 mg/kg] for 4 weeks and then daily IP injection of alloxan [at 75 mg/kg] for 5 days). Body weight, food consumption, blood (serum) levels of glucose, C peptide, Hb A1C, insulin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 were determined for all groups. The results indicated that while Hb A1C, serum levels of glucose, TNF-α and IL-6 were all significantly decreased in the P. oleracea-pre-treated diabetic rats, these hosts also had significant increases in C peptide and insulin compared to levels in the counterpart diabetic rats. These results were confirmed by the histopathological assessments which showed marked improvement of the destructive effect on pancreatic islet cells induced by alloxan. P. oleracea extract is a general tissue protective and regeneartive agent, as evidenced by increasing β-cell mass and therefore improved the glucose metabolism. Thus, stimulation of Portulaca oleracea signaling in β- cells may be a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetes prevention.

  10. Soluble factors from stellate cells induce pancreatic cancer cell proliferation via Nrf2-activated metabolic reprogramming and ROS detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuan Seng; Looi, Chung Yeng; Subramaniam, Kavita S; Masamune, Atsushi; Chung, Ivy

    2016-06-14

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSC), a prominent stromal cell, contribute to the progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We aim to investigate the mechanisms by which PSC promote cell proliferation in PDAC cell lines, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1. PSC-conditioned media (PSC-CM) induced proliferation of these cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Nrf2 protein was upregulated and subsequently, its transcriptional activity was increased with greater DNA binding activity and transcription of target genes. Downregulation of Nrf2 led to suppression of PSC-CM activity in BxPC-3, but not in AsPC-1 cells. However, overexpression of Nrf2 alone resulted in increased cell proliferation in both cell lines, and treatment with PSC-CM further enhanced this effect. Activation of Nrf2 pathway resulted in upregulation of metabolic genes involved in pentose phosphate pathway, glutaminolysis and glutathione biosynthesis. Downregulation and inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase with siRNA and chemical approaches reduced PSC-mediated cell proliferation. Among the cytokines present in PSC-CM, stromal-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) activated Nrf2 pathway to induce cell proliferation in both cells, as shown with neutralization antibodies, recombinant proteins and signaling inhibitors. Taken together, SDF-1α and IL-6 secreted from PSC induced PDAC cell proliferation via Nrf2-activated metabolic reprogramming and ROS detoxification.

  11. Pancreatic effect of andrographolide isolated from Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.) Nees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, Agung Endro; Rais, Ichwan Ridwan; Setiawan, Iwan; Pratiwi, Pramita Yuli; Hadibarata, Tony; Tegar, Maulana; Pramono, Suwidjiyo

    2014-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.) Nees is a plant that originates from India and grows widely to Southeast which used for several purposes mainly as treatment of diabetes mellitus so the aim of this study was evaluate andrographolide for its pancreatic effect in neonatal streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, a model of type 2 diabetic rats. Diabetic condition was induced with an intraperitoneal injection of 90 mg kg(-1) streptozotocin in two-day-old rats. After three months, the neonatal STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated with andrographolide or andrographolide-enriched extract of A. paniculata (AEEAP) for 8 consecutive days. Pancreatic effect was evaluated by estimating mainly the preprandial and postprandial blood glucose levels and other parameters such as morphology of pancreatic islet, beta cells density and morphology and immunohistochemically pancreatic insulin. Andrographolide significantly (p andrographolide and AEEAP exhibited pancreatic actions in neonatal STZ-induced diabetic rats. The activity of andrographolide was more effective than this of AEEAP.

  12. The role of pancreatic ductal secretion in protection against acute pancreatitis in mice*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallagi, Petra; Balla, Zsolt; Singh, Anurag K; Dósa, Sándor; Iványi, Béla; Kukor, Zoltán; Tóth, Adél; Riederer, Brigitte; Liu, Yongjian; Engelhardt, Regina; Jármay, Katalin; Szabó, Andrea; Janovszky, Agnes; Perides, George; Venglovecz, Viktória; Maléth, József; Wittmann, Tibor; Takács, Tamás; Gray, Mike A; Gácser, Attila; Hegyi, Péter; Seidler, Ursula; Rakonczay, Zoltán

    2014-03-01

    A common potentially fatal disease of the pancreas is acute pancreatitis, for which there is no treatment. Most studies of this disorder focus on the damage to acinar cells since they are assumed to be the primary target of multiple stressors affecting the pancreas. However, increasing evidence suggests that the ducts may also have a crucial role in induction of the disease. To test this hypothesis, we sought to determine the specific role of the duct in the induction of acute pancreatitis using well-established disease models and mice with deletion of the Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 that have selectively impaired ductal function. Randomized animal study. Animal research laboratory. Wild-type and Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 knockout mice. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis was induced by i.p. administration of cerulein or by intraductal administration of sodium taurocholate. The pancreatic expression of Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (a key player in the control of ductal secretion) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. In vivo pancreatic ductal secretion was studied in anesthetized mice. Functions of pancreatic acinar and ductal cells as well as inflammatory cells were analyzed in vitro. Deletion of Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 resulted in gross mislocalization of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, causing marked reduction in pancreatic ductal fluid and bicarbonate secretion. Importantly, deletion of Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 had no deleterious effect on functions of acinar and inflammatory cells. Deletion of Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1, which specifically impaired ductal function, increased the severity of acute pancreatitis in the two mouse models tested. Our findings provide the first direct evidence for the crucial role of ductal secretion in protecting the pancreas from acute pancreatitis and strongly suggest that improved ductal function should be an

  13. Targeted screening of individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer: results of a simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandharipande, Pari V; Heberle, Curtis; Dowling, Emily C; Kong, Chung Yin; Tramontano, Angela; Perzan, Katherine E; Brugge, William; Hur, Chin

    2015-04-01

    To identify when, from the standpoint of relative risk, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-based screening may be effective in patients with a known or suspected genetic predisposition to pancreatic cancer. The authors developed a Markov model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The model was calibrated to National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry data and informed by the literature. A hypothetical screening strategy was evaluated in which all population individuals underwent one-time MR imaging screening at age 50 years. Screening outcomes for individuals with an average risk for PDAC ("base case") were compared with those for individuals at an increased risk to assess for differential benefits in populations with a known or suspected genetic predisposition. Effects of varying key inputs, including MR imaging performance, surgical mortality, and screening age, were evaluated with a sensitivity analysis. RESULTS In the base case, screening resulted in a small number of cancer deaths averted (39 of 100 000 men, 38 of 100 000 women) and a net decrease in life expectancy (-3 days for men, -4 days for women), which was driven by unnecessary pancreatic surgeries associated with false-positive results. Life expectancy gains were achieved if an individual's risk for PDAC exceeded 2.4 (men) or 2.7 (women) times that of the general population. When relative risk increased further, for example to 30 times that of the general population, averted cancer deaths and life expectancy gains increased substantially (1219 of 100 000 men, life expectancy gain: 65 days; 1204 of 100 000 women, life expectancy gain: 71 days). In addition, results were sensitive to MR imaging specificity and the surgical mortality rate. Although PDAC screening with MR imaging for the entire population is not effective, individuals with even modestly increased risk may benefit. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  14. Treatment of nitrosamine-induced pancreatic tumors in hamsters with analogs of somatostatin and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V.

    1987-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was induced in female Syrian golden hamsters by injecting N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) once a week at a dose of 10 mg per kg of body weight for 18 weeks. Hamsters were then treated with somatostatin analog (RC-160) or with (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) delayed delivery systems. After 18 weeks of BOP administration, the hamsters were divided into three groups of 10-20 animals each. Group I consisted of untreated controls, group II was injected with RC-160, and group III was injected with (D-Trp/sub 2/)LH-RH. A striking decrease in tumor weight and volume was obtained in animals treated with (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH or with the somatostatin analog RC-160. After 45 days of treatment with either analog, the survival rate was significantly higher in groups II and III (70%), as compared with the control group (35%). The studies, done by light microscopy, high-resolution microscopy, and electron microscopy, showed a decrease in the total number of cancer cells and changes in the epithelium, connective tissue, and cellular organelles in groups II and III treated with the hypothalamic analogs as compared to controls. These results in female hamsters with induced ductal pancreatic tumors confirm and extend the authors findings, obtained in male animals with transplanted tumors, that (D-Trp/sub 6/)LH-RH and somatostatin analogs inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancers.

  15. Protective effects of coenzyme Q10 and L-carnitine against statin-induced pancreatic mitochondrial toxicity in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadighara, Melina; Joktaji, Jalal Pourahamad; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Statins are widely used in patients with hyperlipidemia and whom with high risk of cardiovascular diseases. Unfortunately, statins also exert some adverse effects on the liver and pancreas and enhance the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The objective of the present research was to investigate the protective effects of coenzyme Q10 (Co-Q10) and L-carnitine (LC) on statins induced toxicity on pancreatic mitochondria in vivo. Seven groups of male Wistar rats received atorvastatin (20 mg/kg, p.o.), atorvastatin + Co-Q10 (10 mg/kg, i.p.), atorvastatin + LC (500 mg/kg, i.p.), lovastatin (80 mg/kg, p.o), lovastatin + Co-Q10 (10 mg/kg, i.p.), and lovastatin + LC (500 mg/kg, i.p.). Serum glucose and insulin levels were measured before and after two weeks of treatment, while the pancreas was removed and toxic effects of statins, as well as the protective effects of Co-Q10 and LC were assessed. The results showed that atorvastatin and lovastatin significantly increased glucose level and decreased insulin secretion. The glucose level in Co-Q10 and LC groups was significantly lower than statins alone groups. The findings also showed that statin groups had higher rate of pancreatic toxicity including higher level of reactive oxygen species production, decreased cytochrome c oxidase activity, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and swelling in comparison to controls. These factors were significantly diminished by co-administration of Co-Q10 or LC compared to statin groups alone. Additionally, supplements caused a significant increase in serum insulin and succinate dehydrogenase activity. Our study provided new evidence supporting beneficial effects of Co-Q10 and LC on statin-induced pancreatic toxicity. PMID:29204172

  16. Protective effects of coenzyme Q10and L-carnitine against statin-induced pancreatic mitochondrial toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadighara, Melina; Joktaji, Jalal Pourahamad; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2017-12-01

    Statins are widely used in patients with hyperlipidemia and whom with high risk of cardiovascular diseases. Unfortunately, statins also exert some adverse effects on the liver and pancreas and enhance the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The objective of the present research was to investigate the protective effects of coenzyme Q 10 (Co-Q 10 ) and L-carnitine (LC) on statins induced toxicity on pancreatic mitochondria in vivo . Seven groups of male Wistar rats received atorvastatin (20 mg/kg, p.o.), atorvastatin + Co-Q 10 (10 mg/kg, i.p.), atorvastatin + LC (500 mg/kg, i.p.), lovastatin (80 mg/kg, p.o), lovastatin + Co-Q 10 (10 mg/kg, i.p.), and lovastatin + LC (500 mg/kg, i.p.). Serum glucose and insulin levels were measured before and after two weeks of treatment, while the pancreas was removed and toxic effects of statins, as well as the protective effects of Co-Q 10 and LC were assessed. The results showed that atorvastatin and lovastatin significantly increased glucose level and decreased insulin secretion. The glucose level in Co-Q 10 and LC groups was significantly lower than statins alone groups. The findings also showed that statin groups had higher rate of pancreatic toxicity including higher level of reactive oxygen species production, decreased cytochrome c oxidase activity, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and swelling in comparison to controls. These factors were significantly diminished by co-administration of Co-Q 10 or LC compared to statin groups alone. Additionally, supplements caused a significant increase in serum insulin and succinate dehydrogenase activity. Our study provided new evidence supporting beneficial effects of Co-Q 10 and LC on statin-induced pancreatic toxicity.

  17. Regeneration of pancreatic non-β endocrine cells in adult mice following a single diabetes-inducing dose of streptozotocin.

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    Yanqing Zhang

    Full Text Available The non-β endocrine cells in pancreatic islets play an essential counterpart and regulatory role to the insulin-producing β-cells in the regulation of blood-glucose homeostasis. While significant progress has been made towards the understanding of β-cell regeneration in adults, very little is known about the regeneration of the non-β endocrine cells such as glucagon-producing α-cells and somatostatin producing δ-cells. Previous studies have noted the increase of α-cell composition in diabetes patients and in animal models. It is thus our hypothesis that non-β-cells such as α-cells and δ-cells in adults can regenerate, and that the regeneration accelerates in diabetic conditions. To test this hypothesis, we examined islet cell composition in a streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes mouse model in detail. Our data showed the number of α-cells in each islet increased following STZ-mediated β-cell destruction, peaked at Day 6, which was about 3 times that of normal islets. In addition, we found δ-cell numbers doubled by Day 6 following STZ treatment. These data suggest α- and δ-cell regeneration occurred rapidly following a single diabetes-inducing dose of STZ in mice. Using in vivo BrdU labeling techniques, we demonstrated α- and δ-cell regeneration involved cell proliferation. Co-staining of the islets with the proliferating cell marker Ki67 showed α- and δ-cells could replicate, suggesting self-duplication played a role in their regeneration. Furthermore, Pdx1(+/Insulin(- cells were detected following STZ treatment, indicating the involvement of endocrine progenitor cells in the regeneration of these non-β cells. This is further confirmed by the detection of Pdx1(+/glucagon(+ cells and Pdx1(+/somatostatin(+ cells following STZ treatment. Taken together, our study demonstrated adult α- and δ-cells could regenerate, and both self-duplication and regeneration from endocrine precursor cells were involved in their regeneration.

  18. Diclofenac inhibits tumor growth in a murine model of pancreatic cancer by modulation of VEGF levels and arginase activity.

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    Nina Mayorek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX, diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A(2 (PLA(2, thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that diclofenac treatment (30 mg/kg/bw for 11 days of mice inoculated with PANC02 cells, reduced the tumor weight by 60%, correlating with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Since this effect was not observed in vitro on cultured PANCO2 cells, we theorized that diclofenac beneficial treatment involved other mediators present in vivo. Indeed, diclofenac drastically decreased tumor vascularization by downregulating VEGF in the tumor and in abdominal cavity fluid. Furthermore, diclofenac directly inhibited vascular sprouting ex vivo. Surprisingly, in contrast to other COX-2 inhibitors, diclofenac increased arginase activity/arginase 1 protein content in tumor stroma cells, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells by 2.4, 4.8 and 2 fold, respectively. We propose that the subsequent arginine depletion and decrease in NO levels, both in serum and peritoneal cavity, adds to tumor growth inhibition by malnourishment and poor vasculature development. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, diclofenac shows pronounced antitumoral properties in pancreatic cancer model that can contribute to further treatment development. The ability of diclofenac to induce arginase activity in tumor stroma, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells provides a tool to study a controversial issue of pro-and antitumoral effects of arginine depletion.

  19. Diclofenac inhibits tumor growth in a murine model of pancreatic cancer by modulation of VEGF levels and arginase activity.

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    Mayorek, Nina; Naftali-Shani, Nili; Grunewald, Myriam

    2010-09-15

    Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX), diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. We found that diclofenac treatment (30 mg/kg/bw for 11 days) of mice inoculated with PANC02 cells, reduced the tumor weight by 60%, correlating with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Since this effect was not observed in vitro on cultured PANCO2 cells, we theorized that diclofenac beneficial treatment involved other mediators present in vivo. Indeed, diclofenac drastically decreased tumor vascularization by downregulating VEGF in the tumor and in abdominal cavity fluid. Furthermore, diclofenac directly inhibited vascular sprouting ex vivo. Surprisingly, in contrast to other COX-2 inhibitors, diclofenac increased arginase activity/arginase 1 protein content in tumor stroma cells, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells by 2.4, 4.8 and 2 fold, respectively. We propose that the subsequent arginine depletion and decrease in NO levels, both in serum and peritoneal cavity, adds to tumor growth inhibition by malnourishment and poor vasculature development. In conclusion, diclofenac shows pronounced antitumoral properties in pancreatic cancer model that can contribute to further treatment development. The ability of diclofenac to induce arginase activity in tumor stroma, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells provides a tool to study a controversial issue of pro-and antitumoral effects of arginine depletion.

  20. TRO40303 Ameliorates Alcohol-Induced Pancreatitis Through Reduction of Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester–Induced Mitochondrial Injury and Necrotic Cell Death

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    Javed, Muhammad Ahsan; Wen, Li; Awais, Muhammad; Latawiec, Diane; Huang, Wei; Chvanov, Michael; Schaller, Sophie; Bordet, Thierry; Michaud, Magali; Pruss, Rebecca; Tepikin, Alexei; Criddle, David; Sutton, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibition is a promising approach to treat acute pancreatitis (AP). We sought to determine (i) the effects of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor 3,5-seco-4-nor-cholestan-5-one oxime-3-ol (TRO40303) on murine and human pancreatic acinar cell (PAC) injury induced by fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) or taurolithocholic acid-3-sulfate and (ii) TRO40303 pharmacokinetics and efficacy in experimental alcoholic AP (FAEE-AP). Methods Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c), and cell fate were examined in freshly isolated murine or human PACs by confocal microscopy. TRO40303 pharmacokinetics were assessed in cerulein-induced AP and therapeutic efficacy in FAEE-AP induced with palmitoleic acid and ethanol. Severity of AP was assessed by standard biomarkers and blinded histopathology. Results TRO40303 prevented loss of Δψm and necrosis induced by 100 μM palmitoleic acid ethyl ester or 500 μM taurolithocholic acid-3-sulfate in murine and human PACs. Pharmacokinetic analysis found TRO40303 accumulated in the pancreas. A single dose of 3 mg/kg TRO40303 significantly reduced serum amylase (P = 0.043), pancreatic trypsin (P = 0.018), and histopathology scores (P = 0.0058) in FAEE-AP. Conclusions TRO40303 protects mitochondria and prevents necrotic cell death pathway activation in murine and human PACs, ameliorates the severity of FAEE-AP, and is a candidate drug for human AP. PMID:29200128

  1. Hypoglycemic effects of Zanthoxylum alkylamides by enhancing glucose metabolism and ameliorating pancreatic dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

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    You, Yuming; Ren, Ting; Zhang, Shiqi; Shirima, Gerald Gasper; Cheng, YaJiao; Liu, Xiong

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the hypoglycemic effect of Zanthoxylum alkylamides and explore the potential mechanism in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetic rats were orally treated with 3, 6, and 9 mg per kg bw alkylamides daily for 28 days. As the alkylamide dose increased, the relative weights of the liver and kidney, fasting blood glucose, and fructosamine levels were significantly decreased. The alkylamides also significantly increased the body weight and improved the oral glucose tolerance of the rats. Likewise, the alkylamides significantly increased the levels of liver and muscle glycogen and plasma insulin. These substances further alleviated the histopathological changes in the pancreas of the diabetic rats. The beneficial effects of high-dose alkylamides showed a comparable activity to the anti-diabetic drug glibenclamide. Western blot and real-time PCR results revealed that the alkylamide treatment significantly decreased the expression levels of the key enzymes (phosphoenolpyruvate caboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase) involved in gluconeogenesis and increased the glycolysis enzyme (glucokinase) in the liver, and enhanced the expression levels of pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1, glucokinase, and glucose transporter 2 in the pancreas. In addition, it was also observed that the alkylamides, unlike glibenclamide, increased the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 and decreased cannabinoid receptor 1 expressions in the liver and pancreas. Therefore, alkylamides can prevent STZ-induced hyperglycemia by altering the expression levels of the genes related to glucose metabolism and by ameliorating pancreatic dysfunction.

  2. HMGB1 and Histones Play a Significant Role in Inducing Systemic Inflammation and Multiple Organ Dysfunctions in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

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    Runkuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP starts as a local inflammation of pancreatic tissue that induces the development of multiple extrapancreatic organs dysfunction; however, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Ischemia-reperfusion, circulating inflammatory cytokines, and possible bile cytokines significantly contribute to gut mucosal injury and intestinal bacterial translocation (BT during SAP. Circulating HMGB1 level is significantly increased in SAP patients and HMGB1 is an important factor that mediates (at least partly gut BT during SAP. Gut BT plays a critical role in triggering/inducing systemic inflammation/sepsis in critical illness, and profound systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS can lead to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS during SAP, and systemic inflammation with multiorgan dysfunction is the cause of death in experimental SAP. Therefore, HMGB1 is an important factor that links gut BT and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, HMGB1 significantly contributes to multiple organ injuries. The SAP patients also have significantly increased circulating histones and cell-free DNAs levels, which can reflect the disease severity and contribute to multiple organ injuries in SAP. Hepatic Kupffer cells (KCs are the predominant source of circulating inflammatory cytokines in SAP, and new evidence indicates that hepatocyte is another important source of circulating HMGB1 in SAP; therefore, treating the liver injury is important in SAP.

  3. Protective effects of polyenoylphosphatidylcholine in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.

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    Li, Xiangyi; Wu, Zheng; Sha, Huanchen; Wang, Zheng; Ma, Zhenhua; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of polyenoylphosphatidylcholine (PPC) in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and its mechanism. Seventy-two clean, conventional Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (SAP; sham operation [SO], SAP + PPC, and SO + PPC; n = 18 per group). The SAP model was induced by injecting 4% sodium taurocholate (1 mL/kg) into the biliopancreatic duct. Animals in the SO groups underwent laparotomy and biliopancreatic duct puncture without fluid injection. Polyenoylphosphatidylcholine (50 mg/kg) was injected through the penis dorsal vein. Pancreatic acinar cell membrane fluidity and pancreatic tissue calcium pump activity were measured through fluorescence polarization and quantization of phosphonium ions, whereas pancreatic tissue superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde were detected through xanthine oxidase method and thiobarbituric acid colorimetric analysis method, respectively. The SAP + PPC group had significantly improved pathologic pancreas; increased in pancreatic acinar cell membrane fluidity, pancreatic tissue Ca-Mg-ATPase activity, and superoxide dismutase; as well as decreased in malondialdehyde, ascites volume, and serum amylase compared with the SAP group. Polyenoylphosphatidylcholine could reduce the damage to the pancreas through increasing pancreatic acinar cell membrane fluidity and pancreatic tissue calcium pump activity. Polyenoylphosphatidylcholine also scavenges oxygen free radicals and reduces lipid peroxide levels.

  4. Dynamic regulation of PDX-1 and FoxO1 expression by FoxA2 in dexamethasone-induced pancreatic β-cells dysfunction.

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    Chen, Fang; Zhu, Yunxia; Tang, Xinyi; Sun, Yidan; Jia, Weiping; Sun, Yujie; Han, Xiao

    2011-05-01

    Transcription factors forkhead box (Fox)O1 and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) are involved in dexamethasone (DEX)-induced dysfunction in pancreatic β-cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of FoxO1 and PDX-1 expression in β-cells treated with DEX is not fully understood. In this study, we found that DEX markedly increased FoxO1 mRNA and protein expression, whereas it decreased PDX-1 mRNA and protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further study showed that FoxA2 was involved in regulation of FoxO1 and PDX-1 expression in DEX-induced pancreatic β-cells dysfunction. Interestingly, we demonstrated for the first time that FoxA2 could bind to the FoxO1 gene promoter and positively regulate FoxO1 expression. Moreover, we found that DEX increased the activity of FoxA2 binding to the FoxO1 promoter but decreased the activity of FoxA2 binding to the PDX-1 promoter of RINm5F cells. Knockdown of FoxA2 by RNA interference inhibited FoxO1 expression and restored PDX-1 expression in pancreatic β-cells treated with DEX. However, DEX had no effect on the expression of FoxA2. Together, the results of the present study demonstrated that FoxA2 could dynamically regulate FoxO1 and PDX-1 expression in pancreatic β-cells treated with DEX, which provides new important information on the transcriptional regulation of FoxO1 and PDX-1 in DEX-induced pancreatic β-cells. Inhibition of FoxA2 can effectively protect β-cells against DEX-induced dysfunction.

  5. Combination of siRNA-directed Kras oncogene silencing and arsenic-induced apoptosis using a nanomedicine strategy for the effective treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Linjuan; Li, Jingguo; Wang, Yong; Qian, Chenchen; Chen, Yinting; Zhang, Qiubo; Wu, Wei; Lin, Zhong; Liang, Jianzhong; Shuai, Xintao; Huang, Kaihong

    2014-02-01

    The synergetic inhibitory effects on human pancreatic cancer by nanoparticle-mediated siRNA and arsenic therapy were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lysine) were prepared to form siRNA-complexed polyplex and poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(DL-lactide) were prepared to form arsenic-encapsulated vesicle, respectively. Down-regulation of the mutant Kras gene by siRNA caused defective abilities of proliferation, clonal formation, migration, and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, as well as cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, which substantially enhanced the apoptosis-inducing effect of arsenic administration. Consequently, co-administration of the two nanomedicines encapsulating siRNA or arsenic showed ideal tumor growth inhibition both in vitro and in vivo as a result of synergistic effect of the siRNA-directed Kras oncogene silencing and arsenic-induced cell apoptosis. These results suggest that the combination of mutant Kras gene silencing and arsenic therapy using nanoparticle-mediated delivery strategy is promising for pancreatic cancer treatment. Treatment of pancreatic cancer remains a major challenge. These authors demonstrate a method that combines a siRNA-based Kras silencing with arsenic delivery to pancreatic cancer cells using nanoparticles, resulting in enhanced apoptosis induction in the treated cells. © 2013.

  6. ERK2-regulated TIMP1 Induces Hyperproliferation of K-RasG12D-Transformed Pancreatic Ductal Cells

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    Gregory P. Botta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC commonly contains a mutation in K-RasG12D and is characterized by a desmoplastic reaction composed of deregulated, proliferating cells embedded in an abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM. Our previous observations imply that inhibiting the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK2 kinase signal pathway reverses a matrix metalloproteinase 1-specific invasive phenotype. Here, we investigated the specific genes downstream of MAPK-ERK2 responsible for the hyperproliferative abilities of human and murine primary ductal epithelial cells (PDCs within an ECM. Compared with control, DNA synthesis and total cell proliferation was significantly increased in human PDCs harboring the PDAC common p53, Rb/p16INK4a, and K-RasG12D mutations. Both of these effects were readily reversed following small-molecule inhibition or lentiviral silencing of ERK2. Microarray analysis of PDCs in three-dimensional (3D culture revealed a unique, MAPK-influenced gene signature downstream of K-RasG12D. Unbiased hierarchical analysis permitted filtration of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1. Pancreatic cells isolated from Pdx1-Cre; LSL-K-rasG12D/+-mutated mice exhibit increased TIMP1 RNA transcription compared to wild-type littermate controls. Analyses of both 3D, in vitro human K-RasG12D PDCs and data mining of publicly annotated human pancreatic data sets correlatively indicate increased levels of TIMP1 RNA. While silencing TIMP1 did not significantly effect PDC proliferation, exogenous addition of human recombinant TIMP1 significantly increased proliferation but only in transformed K-RasG12D PDCs in 3D. Overall, TIMP1 is an upregulated gene product and a proliferative inducer of K-RasG12D-mutated PDCs through the ERK2 signaling pathway.

  7. Yarrowia lipolytica Lipase 2 Is Stable and Highly Active in Test Meals and Increases Fat Absorption in an Animal Model of Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency.

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    Aloulou, Ahmed; Schué, Mathieu; Puccinelli, Delphine; Milano, Stéphane; Delchambre, Chantal; Leblond, Yves; Laugier, René; Carrière, Frédéric

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) reduces pancreatic secretion of digestive enzymes, including lipases. Oral pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) with pancreatin produces unsatisfactory results. The lipase 2 produced by the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLIP2; GenBank: AJ012632) might be used in PERT. We investigated its ability to digest triglycerides in a test meal and its efficacy in reducing fecal fat in an animal model of PEI. YLLIP2 was produced by genetically engineered Y lipolytica and purified from culture media. YLLIP2 or other gastric (LIPF) and pancreatic (PNLIPD) lipases were added to a meal paste containing dietary triglycerides, at a range of pH values (pH 2-7), with and without pepsin or human bile and incubated at 37°C. We collected samples at various time points and measured lipase activities and stabilities. To create an animal model of PEI, steatorrhea was induced by embolization of the exocrine pancreas gland and pancreatic duct ligation in minipigs. The animals were given YLLIP2 (1, 4, 8, 40, or 80 mg/d) or pancreatin (100,000 US Pharmacopeia lipase units/d, controls) for 9 days. We then collected stool samples, measured fat levels, and calculated coefficient of fat absorption (CFA) values. YLLIP2 was highly stable and poorly degraded by pepsin, and had the highest activity of all lipases tested on meal triglyceride at pH 4-7 (pH 6 with bile: 94 ± 34 U/mg; pH 4 without bile: 43 ± 13 U/mg). Only gastric lipase was active and stable at pH 3, whereas YLLIP2 was sensitive to pepsin hydrolysis after pH inactivation. From in vitro test meal experiments, the lipase activity of YLLIP2 (10 mg) was estimated to be equivalent to that of pancreatin (1200 mg; 100,000 US Pharmacopeia units) at pH 6. In PEI minipigs, CFA values increased from 60.1% ± 9.3% before surgery to 90.5% ± 3.2% after administration of 1200 mg pancreatin (P meal triglycerides in a large pH range, with and without bile. Oral administration of milligram amounts of

  8. The fractal spatial distribution of pancreatic islets in three dimensions: a self-avoiding growth model

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    Jo, Junghyo; Periwal, Vipul; Hörnblad, Andreas; Ahlgren, Ulf; Kilimnik, German; Hara, Manami

    2013-01-01

    The islets of Langerhans, responsible for controlling blood glucose levels, are dispersed within the pancreas. A universal power law governing the fractal spatial distribution of islets in two-dimensional pancreatic sections has been reported. However, the fractal geometry in the actual three-dimensional pancreas volume, and the developmental process that gives rise to such a self-similar structure, has not been investigated. Here, we examined the three-dimensional spatial distribution of islets in intact mouse pancreata using optical projection tomography and found a power law with a fractal dimension of 2.1. Furthermore, based on two-dimensional pancreatic sections of human autopsies, we found that the distribution of human islets also follows a universal power law with a fractal dimension of 1.5 in adult pancreata, which agrees with the value previously reported in smaller mammalian pancreas sections. Finally, we developed a self-avoiding growth model for the development of the islet distribution and found that the fractal nature of the spatial islet distribution may be associated with the self-avoidance in the branching process of vascularization in the pancreas. (paper)

  9. Assessment of Toxicological Perturbations and Variants of Pancreatic Islet Development in the Zebrafish Model

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    Karilyn E. Sant

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic islets, largely comprised of insulin-producing beta cells, play a critical role in endocrine signaling and glucose homeostasis. Because they have low levels of antioxidant defenses and a high perfusion rate, the endocrine islets may be a highly susceptible target tissue of chemical exposures. However, this endpoint, as well as the integrity of the surrounding exocrine pancreas, is often overlooked in studies of developmental toxicology. Disruption of development by toxicants can alter cell fate and migration, resulting in structural alterations that are difficult to detect in mammalian embryo systems, but that are easily observed in the zebrafish embryo model (Danio rerio. Using endogenously expressed fluorescent protein markers for developing zebrafish beta cells and exocrine pancreas tissue, we documented differences in islet area and incidence rates of islet morphological variants in zebrafish embryos between 48 and 96 h post fertilization (hpf, raised under control conditions commonly used in embryotoxicity assays. We identified critical windows for chemical exposures during which increased incidences of endocrine pancreas abnormalities were observed following exposure to cyclopamine (2–12 hpf, Mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP (3–48 hpf, and Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS (3–48 hpf. Both islet area and length of the exocrine pancreas were sensitive to oxidative stress from exposure to the oxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide during a highly proliferative critical window (72 hpf. Finally, pancreatic dysmorphogenesis following developmental exposures is discussed with respect to human disease.

  10. Starch Origin and Thermal Processing Affect Starch Digestion in a Minipig Model of Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency.

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    Mößeler, Anne; Vagt, Sandra; Beyerbach, Martin; Kamphues, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Although steatorrhea is the most obvious symptom of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), enzymatic digestion of protein and starch is also impaired. Low praecaecal digestibility of starch causes a forced microbial fermentation accounting for energy losses and meteorism. To optimise dietetic measures, knowledge of praecaecal digestibility of starch is needed but such information from PEI patients is rare. Minipigs fitted with an ileocaecal fistula with (n = 3) or without (n = 3) pancreatic duct ligation (PL) were used to estimate the rate of praecaecal disappearance (pcD) of starch. Different botanical sources of starch (rice, amaranth, potato, and pea) were fed either raw or cooked. In the controls (C), there was an almost complete pcD (>92%) except for potato starch (61.5%) which was significantly lower. In PL pcD of raw starch was significantly lower for all sources of starch except for amaranth (87.9%). Thermal processing increased pcD in PL, reaching values of C for starch from rice, potato, and pea. This study clearly underlines the need for precise specification of starch used for patients with specific dietetic needs like PEI. Data should be generated in suitable animal models or patients as tests in healthy individuals would not have given similar conclusions.

  11. Starch Origin and Thermal Processing Affect Starch Digestion in a Minipig Model of Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency

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    Anne Mößeler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although steatorrhea is the most obvious symptom of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI, enzymatic digestion of protein and starch is also impaired. Low praecaecal digestibility of starch causes a forced microbial fermentation accounting for energy losses and meteorism. To optimise dietetic measures, knowledge of praecaecal digestibility of starch is needed but such information from PEI patients is rare. Minipigs fitted with an ileocaecal fistula with (n=3 or without (n=3 pancreatic duct ligation (PL were used to estimate the rate of praecaecal disappearance (pcD of starch. Different botanical sources of starch (rice, amaranth, potato, and pea were fed either raw or cooked. In the controls (C, there was an almost complete pcD (>92% except for potato starch (61.5% which was significantly lower. In PL pcD of raw starch was significantly lower for all sources of starch except for amaranth (87.9%. Thermal processing increased pcD in PL, reaching values of C for starch from rice, potato, and pea. This study clearly underlines the need for precise specification of starch used for patients with specific dietetic needs like PEI. Data should be generated in suitable animal models or patients as tests in healthy individuals would not have given similar conclusions.

  12. Fractal spatial distribution of pancreatic islets in three dimensions: a self-avoiding growth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Junghyo; Hörnblad, Andreas; Kilimnik, German; Hara, Manami; Ahlgren, Ulf; Periwal, Vipul

    2013-01-01

    The islets of Langerhans, responsible for controlling blood glucose levels, are dispersed within the pancreas. A universal power law governing the fractal spatial distribution of islets in two-dimensional pancreatic sections has been reported. However, the fractal geometry in the actual three-dimensional pancreas volume, and the developmental process that gives rise to such a self-similar structure, have not been investigated. Here, we examined the three-dimensional spatial distribution of islets in intact mouse pancreata using optical projection tomography and found a power law with a fractal dimension, 2.1. Furthermore, based on two-dimensional pancreatic sections of human autopsies, we found that the distribution of human islets also follows a universal power law with fractal dimension 1.5 in adult pancreata, which agrees with the value previously reported in smaller mammalian pancreas sections. Finally, we developed a self-avoiding growth model for the development of the islet distribution and found that the fractal nature of the spatial islet distribution may be associated with the self-avoidance in the branching process of vascularization in the pancreas. PMID:23629025

  13. Gastric Varices with Remarkable Collateral Veins in Valpronic Acid-Induced Chronic Pancreatitis

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    Y. Hattori

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid (VPA is a commonly prescribed and approved treatment for epilepsy, including Angelman syndrome, throughout the world. However, the long-term administration of drugs like VPA is associated with the possible development of gastric varices and splenic obstruction as a result of chronic pancreatitis. Such cases can be difficult to treat using endoscopy or interventional radiology because of hemodynamic abnormalities; therefore, surgical treatment is often necessary.

  14. Acute Exposure to a Precursor of Advanced Glycation End Products Induces a Dual Effect on the Rat Pancreatic Islet Function

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    Ghada Elmhiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Advanced glycation end products, known as AGEs, are a major risk factor for diabetes onset and maintenance. Methylglyoxal (MG, a highly reactive metabolite of glucose, is a precursor for the generation of endogenous AGEs. Methods. In this current study we incubated in vitro pancreatic islets from adult rats in absence or presence of MG (10 μmol/l with different concentrations of glucose and different metabolic components (acetylcholine, epinephrine, potassium, forskolin, and leucine. Results. Different effects of MG on insulin secretion were evidenced. In basal glucose stimulation (5.6 mM, MG induced a significant (P<0.05 increase of insulin secretion. By contrast, in higher glucose concentrations (8.3 mM and 16.7 mM, MG significantly inhibited insulin secretion (P<0.05. In the presence of potassium, forskolin, and epinephrine, MG enhanced insulin secretion (P<0.05, while when it was incubated with acetylcholine and leucine, MG resulted in a decrease of insulin secretion (P<0.05. Conclusion. We suggest that MG modulates the secretion activity of beta-cell depending on its level of stimulation by other metabolic factors. These results provide insights on a dual acute effect of MG on the pancreatic cells.

  15. Evaluation of the prognostic value of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in patients with hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuchen; Fuentes, Harry E; Attar, Bashar M; Jaiswal, Palash; Demetria, Melchor

    Recent studies attribute promising prognostic values to various inflammatory biomarkers in acute pancreatitis, including the following: the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and red cell distribution width (RDW). We aimed to determine the performance of these biomarkers for detecting disease severity in patients with hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis (HTG-AP). We retrospectively reviewed 110 patients with HTG-AP and compared the NLR, PLR, and RDW in different severity groups. We performed receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to identify the optimal cut-off value for NLR to predict severe AP. NLR was significantly higher in patients with severe AP than mild and moderately severe AP (14.6 vs. 6.9, p response syndrome (81.5% vs. 44.6%, p = 0.001) and persistent acute kidney injury (25.9% vs. 3.6%, p ratio 6.71, p = 0.019). NLR represents an inexpensive, readily available test with a promising value to predict disease severity in HTG-AP. Among the three inflammatory biomarkers, NLR has the highest discriminatory capacity for severe HTG-AP, with an optimal cut-off value of 10. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor induces tumor promoting and anti-tumoral effects on pancreatic cancer via TNFR1.

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    Martin Chopra

    Full Text Available Multiple activities are ascribed to the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF in health and disease. In particular, TNF was shown to affect carcinogenesis in multiple ways. This cytokine acts via the activation of two cell surface receptors, TNFR1, which is associated with inflammation, and TNFR2, which was shown to cause anti-inflammatory signaling. We assessed the effects of TNF and its two receptors on the progression of pancreatic cancer by in vivo bioluminescence imaging in a syngeneic orthotopic tumor mouse model with Panc02 cells. Mice deficient for TNFR1 were unable to spontaneously reject Panc02 tumors and furthermore displayed enhanced tumor progression. In contrast, a fraction of wild type (37.5%, TNF deficient (12.5%, and TNFR2 deficient mice (22.2% were able to fully reject the tumor within two weeks. Pancreatic tumors in TNFR1 deficient mice displayed increased vascular density, enhanced infiltration of CD4(+ T cells and CD4(+ forkhead box P3 (FoxP3(+ regulatory T cells (Treg but reduced numbers of CD8(+ T cells. These alterations were further accompanied by transcriptional upregulation of IL4. Thus, TNF and TNFR1 are required in pancreatic ductal carcinoma to ensure optimal CD8(+ T cell-mediated immunosurveillance and tumor rejection. Exogenous systemic administration of human TNF, however, which only interacts with murine TNFR1, accelerated tumor progression. This suggests that TNFR1 has basically the capability in the Panc02 model to trigger pro-and anti-tumoral effects but the spatiotemporal availability of TNF seems to determine finally the overall outcome.

  17. Tumor-Specific Fluorescent Antibody Imaging Enables Accurate Staging Laparoscopy in an Orthotopic Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hop S Tran; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Metildi, Cristina A; Menen, Rhiana S; Lee, Claudia; Snyder, Cynthia S; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Luiken, George A; Talamini, Mark A; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Laparoscopy is important in staging pancreatic cancer, but false negatives remain problematic. Making tumors fluorescent has the potential to improve the accuracy of staging laparoscopy. Methodology Orthotopic and carcinomatosis models of pancreatic cancer were established with BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer cells in nude mice. Alexa488-anti-CEA conjugates were injected via tail vein 24 hours prior to laparoscopy. Mice were examined under bright field laparoscopic (BL) and fluorescence laparoscopic (FL) modes. Outcomes measured included time to identification of primary tumor for the orthotopic model and number of metastases identified within 2 minutes for the carcinomatosis model. Results FL enabled more rapid and accurate identification and localization of primary tumors and metastases than BL. Using BL took statistically significantly longer time than FL. More metastatic lesions were detected and localized under FL compared to BL and with greater accuracy, with sensitivities of 96% vs. 40%, respectively, when compared to control. FL was sensitive enough to detect metastatic lesions laparoscopy with tumors labeled with fluorophore-conjugated anti-CEA antibody permits rapid detection and accurate localization of primary and metastatic pancreatic cancer in an orthotopic model. The results of the present report demonstrate the future clinical potential of fluorescence laparoscopy. PMID:22369743

  18. Experimental model of severe acute pancreatitis in rabbits Modelo experimental de pancreatite aguda grave em coelhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Goldenberg

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop an experimental model of severe acute pancreatitis in rabbits through a pancreatic ductal injection of sodium taurocholate. METHODS: Twenty-four albino rabbits of the New Zealand lineage were distributed into four groups of six animals (A, B, C and S. The rabbits of three experimental groups (A, B and C were submitted to a laparatomy and received a pancreatic ductal injection of 1ml/kg sodium taurocholate 5%. Also, they were submitted to further laparatomies after 4h, 8h and 12h, respectively. The control group (S was subdivided into two groups of three animals: in subgroup S1 only the pancreatic duct catheterization was performed whereas in subgroup S2 the pancreatic duct catheterization as well as an injection of 1ml/kg physiologic solution 0.9% were carried out. After 12 hours, the rabbits were evaluated. In the re-intervention, blood was collected to determine the amylasemia and a pancreatectomy was carried out to investigate interstitial infiltration, steatonecrosis and necrosis of the organ, using an optical microscope. RESULTS: There was an elevation of amylase in all groups thus proving the existence of acute pancreatitis. The size of the interlobular septum increased progressively with a greater variation between group S1 (0.13 and group C (0. 53 (p=0.035. While all the animals in group A exhibited focal cellular necrosis, it was more intense in the rabbits of group B and culminated with a high proportion of severe pancreatic necrosis in group C animals. The difference in the intensity of cellular necrosis showed statistic significance (p=0.001. CONCLUSION: The proposed experimental model demonstrated its reproducibility and effectiveness in producing severe acute pancreatitis in rabbits.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver modelo experimental de pancreatite aguda grave em coelhos por meio da injeção de taurocolato de sódio no ducto pancreático. MÉTODOS: Vinte e quatro coelhos albinos da linhagem Nova Zelândia foram distribu

  19. Modeling Explosion Induced Aftershocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, K.; Ford, S. R.; Pitarka, A.; Walter, W. R.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.

    2017-12-01

    Many traditional earthquake-explosion discrimination tools are based on properties of the seismic waveform or their spectral components. Common discrimination methods include estimates of body wave amplitude ratios, surface wave magnitude scaling, moment tensor characteristics, and depth. Such methods are limited by station coverage and noise. Ford and Walter (2010) proposed an alternate discrimination method based on using properties of aftershock sequences as a means of earthquakeexplosion differentiation. Previous studies have shown that explosion sources produce fewer aftershocks that are generally smaller in magnitude compared to aftershocks of similarly sized earthquake sources (Jarpe et al., 1994, Ford and Walter, 2010). It has also been suggested that the explosion-induced aftershocks have smaller Gutenberg- Richter b-values (Ryall and Savage, 1969) and that their rates decay faster than a typical Omori-like sequence (Gross, 1996). To discern whether these observations are generally true of explosions or are related to specific site conditions (e.g. explosion proximity to active faults, tectonic setting, crustal stress magnitudes) would require a thorough global analysis. Such a study, however, is hindered both by lack of evenly distributed explosion-sources and the availability of global seismicity data. Here, we employ two methods to test the efficacy of explosions at triggering aftershocks under a variety of physical conditions. First, we use the earthquake rate equations from Dieterich (1994) to compute the rate of aftershocks related to an explosion source assuming a simple spring-slider model. We compare seismicity rates computed with these analytical solutions to those produced by the 3D, multi-cycle earthquake simulator, RSQSim. We explore the relationship between geological conditions and the characteristics of the resulting explosion-induced aftershock sequence. We also test hypothesis that aftershock generation is dependent upon the frequency

  20. Fentanyl Ameliorates Severe Acute Pancreatitis-Induced Myocardial Injury in Rats by Regulating NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yayun; Chen, Manhua

    2017-07-06

    BACKGROUND Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a sudden inflammation of the pancreas. It results in multiple, severe complications, and 15-20% of patients develop severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) with mortality as high as 30%. Consequently, it is imperative to develop an effective therapy for SAP. MATERIAL AND METHODS We used 30 adult male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Rats were randomly divided into 3 groups - sham, SAP, and fentanyl+SAP - with 10 rats in each group. An automatic biochemical analyzer was used to analyze the concentration of creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay was applied to assess the cell apoptosis rate. Pathological changes in pancreas/heart were detected with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. Western immunoblot assay was used to analyze protein levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IκB. RESULTS Fentanyl pre-treatment inhibits SAP-induced elevation of CK-MB/LDH concentrations in serum. Compared with the sham group, SAP generates a higher brown/yellow staining rate, which is abated by fentanyl. In the pancreas, SAP generated more serious interstitial edema/hemorrhage and fat necrosis than in the sham group, which are attenuated by fentanyl. Likewise, compared to the sham group, SAP generates swelled/disordered myocardial fibers and congested blood vessels in myocardium, which are ameliorated by fentanyl. In the sham group, there was little IL-1β/IL-6, and fentanyl significantly inhibited SAP-induced up-regulation of IL-1β/IL-6 levels. Compared with the sham group, SAP significantly reduced IκB level, which was rescued by fentanyl. CONCLUSIONS Fentanyl effectively alleviates SAP-induced pancreas and heart injuries through regulating the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway.

  1. Effects of KCNQ1 channel blocker, 293B, on the acetylcholine-induced Cl- secretion of rat pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Hyung Seo; Uhm, Dae-Yong; Kim, Sung Joon

    2004-05-01

    In rat pancreatic acini (RPAs), acetylcholine (ACh) typically induces a tonic depolarization of membrane potential (Vm) via increasing cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration and subsequent activation of Cl- channels. In this study, to investigate the role of K+ channels during the ACh-induced Cl- secretion, the intracellular Cl- concentration ([Cl-]i) of RPAs was monitored using SPQ, a fluorescent dye quenchable by Cl-, and the effects of K+ channel blockers were examined. Also, the secretion of fluid and enzyme from the whole pancreas of rat was measured. The fluorescence of RPAs loaded with SPQ (FSPQ) was slightly increased by the application of ACh (ACh-Delta FSPQ), indicating net secretion of Cl-. However, the relative change of FSPQ normalized to the control fluorescence (F/F0) of RPAs was only about 20% of the effect observed in rat submandibular gland acinus. The ACh-Delta FSPQ of RPAs was not influenced by the pretreatment with 293B (20 micromol/L), a blocker of KCNQ-type K+ channels. Even the cocktail of K+ channel blockers (10 mmol/L TEA, 3 mmol/L Ba2+, 20 micromol/L 293B) exerted only minute inhibitory effects on ACh-Delta FSPQ in RPAs. In the vascularly perfused rat pancreas, the fluid and enzyme secretion induced by ACh was directly measured. 293B and HMR-1556, both specific blockers of KCNQ1 channel, did not block but even enhanced the secretion of fluid and amylase. These results suggest that the role of KCNQ1 channels may not be essential in the Ca2+-mediated Cl- secretion in rat pancreatic acini.

  2. Glycated albumin suppresses glucose-induced insulin secretion by impairing glucose metabolism in rat pancreatic β-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muto Takashi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycated albumin (GA is an Amadori product used as a marker of hyperglycemia. In this study, we investigated the effect of GA on insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells. Methods Islets were collected from male Wistar rats by collagenase digestion. Insulin secretion in the presence of non-glycated human albumin (HA and GA was measured under three different glucose concentrations, 3 mM (G3, 7 mM (G7, and 15 mM (G15, with various stimulators. Insulin secretion was measured with antagonists of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS, and the expression of iNOS-mRNA was investigated by real-time PCR. Results Insulin secretion in the presence of HA and GA was 20.9 ± 3.9 and 21.6 ± 5.5 μU/3 islets/h for G3 (P = 0.920, and 154 ± 9.3 and 126.1 ± 7.3 μU/3 islets/h (P = 0.046, for G15, respectively. High extracellular potassium and 10 mM tolbutamide abrogated the inhibition of insulin secretion by GA. Glyceraldehyde, dihydroxyacetone, methylpyruvate, GLP-1, and forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, did not abrogate the inhibition. Real-time PCR showed that GA did not induce iNOS-mRNA expression. Furthermore, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase, aminoguanidine, and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester did not abrogate the inhibition of insulin secretion. Conclusion GA suppresses glucose-induced insulin secretion from rat pancreatic β-cells through impairment of intracellular glucose metabolism.

  3. Low-dose gemcitabine induces major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A/B expression and enhances an antitumor innate immune response in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Tomoharu; Miki, Kenji; Kamigaki, Takashi; Makino, Isamu; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Ahmed, Ali K; Duncan, Mark D; Harmon, John W; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the effect of gemcitabine (GEM), a key drug for pancreatic cancer treatment, on the expression of cell surface MICA/B in pancreatic cancer cells and resulting cytotoxicity of γδ T cells. We assessed the effect of GEM on the upregulation of cell surface MICA/B expression by flow cytometry, utilizing six pancreatic cancer cell lines. MICA and CD16 expressions from resected pancreatic cancer patient specimens, which received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) with GEM, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. GEM could increase MICA/B expression on cell surface in pancreatic cancer cell lines (in 2 of 6 cell lines). This effect was most effectively at concentration not affecting cell growth of GEM (0.001 μM), because MICA/B negative population was appeared at concentration at cytostatic and cytotoxic effect to cell growth (0.1 and 10 μM). The cytotoxic activity of γδ T cells against PANC-1 was detected and functions through interactions between NKG2D and MICA/B. However, the enhancement of NKG2D-dependent cytotoxicity with increased MICA/B expression, by GEM treatment, was not observed. In addition, soluble MIC molecules were released from pancreatic cancer cell lines in culture supernatant with GEM treatment. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that MICA expression in tumor cells and CD16 positive cells surrounding tumors were significantly higher in the NAC group compared to that of the control group. There was a significant correlation between NAC and MICA expression, as well as NAC and CD16 positive cell expression. The present results indicate that low-dose GEM-induced MICA/B expression enhances innate immune function rather than cytotoxicity in pancreatic cancer. In addition, our result suggests that the inhibition of cleavage and release of MIC molecules from the tumor surface could potentially improve NKG2D-dependent cytotoxicity.

  4. Pancreatitis - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007679.htm Pancreatitis - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pancreatitis in children occurs when the pancreas becomes swollen ...

  5. Pancreatitis - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100149.htm Pancreatitis - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pancreatitis A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  6. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  7. Sulforaphane Protects against High Cholesterol-Induced Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Impairments, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress and Preserves Pancreaticβ-Cells Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Tan, Kah Ni; Gotteland, Martin; Borges, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in inducing pancreatic β -cell dysfunction, leading to an impaired insulin secretory response to glucose. This study aimed to determine the protective effects of sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate Nrf2-inducer, against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β -cells dysfunction, through molecular and cellular mechanisms involving mitochondrial bioenergetics. Sulforaphane prevented cholesterol-induced alterations in the coupling efficiency of mitochondrial respiration, improving ATP turnover and spare capacity, and averted the impairment of the electron flow at complexes I, II, and IV. Sulforaphane also attenuated the cholesterol-induced activation of the NF κ B pathway, normalizing the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, it also inhibited the decrease in sirtuin 1 expression and greatly increased Pgc-1α expression in Min6 cells. Sulforaphane increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes downstream of the Nrf2 pathway and prevented lipid peroxidation induced by cholesterol. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of sulforaphane and its ability to protect and improve mitochondrial bioenergetic function contribute to its protective action against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β -cell dysfunction. Our data provide a scientifically tested foundation upon which sulforaphane can be developed as nutraceutical to preserve β -cell function and eventually control hyperglycemia.

  8. Sulforaphane Protects against High Cholesterol-Induced Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Impairments, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress and Preserves Pancreatic β-Cells Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Carrasco-Pozo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol plays an important role in inducing pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, leading to an impaired insulin secretory response to glucose. This study aimed to determine the protective effects of sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate Nrf2-inducer, against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β-cells dysfunction, through molecular and cellular mechanisms involving mitochondrial bioenergetics. Sulforaphane prevented cholesterol-induced alterations in the coupling efficiency of mitochondrial respiration, improving ATP turnover and spare capacity, and averted the impairment of the electron flow at complexes I, II, and IV. Sulforaphane also attenuated the cholesterol-induced activation of the NFκB pathway, normalizing the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, it also inhibited the decrease in sirtuin 1 expression and greatly increased Pgc-1α expression in Min6 cells. Sulforaphane increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes downstream of the Nrf2 pathway and prevented lipid peroxidation induced by cholesterol. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of sulforaphane and its ability to protect and improve mitochondrial bioenergetic function contribute to its protective action against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Our data provide a scientifically tested foundation upon which sulforaphane can be developed as nutraceutical to preserve β-cell function and eventually control hyperglycemia.

  9. p8 inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells and its expression is induced through pathways involved in growth inhibition and repressed by factors promoting cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasseur Sophie

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p8 is a stress-induced protein with multiple functions and biochemically related to the architectural factor HMG-I/Y. We analyzed the expression and function of p8 in pancreatic cancer-derived cells. Methods Expression of p8 was silenced in the human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1 and BxPc-3 by infection with a retrovirus expressing p8 RNA in the antisense orientation. Cell growth was measured in control and p8-silenced cells. Influence on p8 expression of the induction of intracellular pathways promoting cellular growth or growth arrest was monitored. Results p8-silenced cells grew more rapidly than control cells transfected with the empty retrovirus. Activation of the Ras→Raf→MEK→ERK and JNK intracellular pathways down-regulated p8 expression. In addition, the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 up-regulates expression of p8. Conversely, p38 or TGFβ-1 induced p8 expression whereas the specific p38 inhibitor SB203580 down-regulated p8 expression. Finally, TGFβ-1 induction was in part mediated through p38. Conclusions p8 inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. p8 expression is induced through pathways involved in growth inhibition and repressed by factors that promote cell growth. These results suggest that p8 belongs to a pathway regulating the growth of pancreatic cancer cells.

  10. Rotavirus infection induces transient pancreatic involution and hyperglycemia in weanling mice.

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    Margo C Honeyman

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is a ubiquitous double-stranded RNA virus responsible for most cases of infantile gastroenteritis. It infects pancreatic islets in vitro and is implicated as a trigger of autoimmune destruction of islet beta cells leading to type 1 diabetes, but pancreatic pathology secondary to rotavirus infection in vivo has not been documented. To address this issue, we inoculated 3 week-old C57Bl/6 mice at weaning with rhesus rotavirus, which is closely related to human rotaviruses and known to infect mouse islets in vitro. Virus was quantified in tissues by culture-isolation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A requirement for viral double stranded RNA was investigated in toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3-deficient mice. Cell proliferation and apoptosis, and insulin expression, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Following rotavirus inoculation by gavage, two phases of mild, transient hyperglycemia were observed beginning after 2 and 8 days. In the first phase, widespread apoptosis of pancreatic cells was associated with a decrease in pancreas mass and insulin production, without detectable virus in the pancreas. These effects were mimicked by injection of the double-stranded RNA mimic, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, and were TLR3-dependent. By the second phase, the pancreas had regenerated but islets were smaller than normal and viral antigen was then detected in the pancreas for several days. These findings directly demonstrate pathogenic effects of rotavirus infection on the pancreas in vivo, mediated initially by the interaction of rotavirus double-stranded RNA with TLR3.

  11. The protective effects and genetic pathways of thorn grape seeds oil against high glucose-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xihu; Kang, Xincong; Zeng, Luman; Li, Jian; Yang, Yan; Liu, Dongbo

    2014-01-09

    Excessive apoptosis of β-cell is closely related to diabetes mellitus. Chronic exposure to high glucose causes β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis in diabetes. Thorn grape (Vitis davidii Foex.) has been used to treat diabetes in Traditional Chinese medicine for many years. In our previous research, thorn grape seeds oil (TGSO) showed promising anti-diabetic effects in animal models. However, it is unknown whether TGSO played an anti-apoptotic role in the anti-diabetic effects and the mechanism regarding signal transduction pathway is unclear either. The rattus pancreatic β-cell line RIN-m5F was treated with/without TGSO which was extracted by supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) fluid extraction and analyzed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). Cell apoptosis was detected by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), insulin secretion was assayed by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), and the apoptosis-related genes expressions were evaluated by quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). TGSO, containing 87.02% unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), significantly reduced pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and protected the insulin secretion impaired by high glucose. The expressions of pro-apoptotic genes such as iNOS, Caspase-3, ATF-3, JNK, p38 and Fas were down-regulated while the anti-apoptotic genes Akt and Bcl-2/Bax were up-regulated. The results indicated that TGSO protected β-cells from high glucose-induced apoptosis and its protective activity may be linked to mitochondrial pathway, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway and Fas signal pathway, which implied that TGSO might be an effective complementary or alternative medicine to reduce β-cell apoptosis and dysfunction.

  12. Genotype tunes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissue tension to induce matricellular fibrosis and tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laklai, Hanane; Miroshnikova, Yekaterina A.; Pickup, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    stiff, matricellular-enriched fibrosis associated with high epithelial tension and shorter patient survival. In several KRAS-driven mouse models, both the loss of TGF-β signaling and elevated β1-integrin mechanosignaling engaged a positive feedback loop whereby STAT3 signaling promotes tumor progression...... by increasing matricellular fibrosis and tissue tension. In contrast, epithelial STAT3 ablation attenuated tumor progression by reducing the stromal stiffening and epithelial contractility induced by loss of TGF-β signaling. In PDAC patient biopsies, higher matricellular protein and activated STAT3 were...

  13. P2X7 Receptor Mediates Spinal Microglia Activation of Visceral Hyperalgesia in a Rat Model of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Yi; Lee, I-Hui; Tan, Ping-Heng; Wang, Yen-Po; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Lu, Ching-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the activated spinal microglia in association with the pain in chronic pancreatitis (CP) remain unknown. We tested whether P2X7R on spinal microglia mediates the pathogenesis of visceral pain using a CP rat model. The CP model was induced via intraductal injection of 2% trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid into male Sprague-Dawley rats. Hyperalgesia was assessed based on the mechanical sensitivity to Von-Frey filaments (VFFs), and nocifensive behaviors were measured in response to electrical stimulation of the pancreas. Three weeks after CP induction, spinal cord samples were harvested for immunostaining, immunoblot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses of the P2X7R. Changes in nocifensive behaviors and associated molecular effectors were assessed by blocking spinal cord P2X7R pharmacologically using the selective P2X7R antagonist brilliant blue G (BBG) or genetically using short interfering RNA (siRNA). CP induced a significant up-regulation of spinal P2X7R expression, which colocalized with a microglial marker (OX-42). Intrathecal administration of BBG significantly attenuated CP-related visceral hyperalgesia in response to VFF-mediated or electrical stimulation of the pancreas, which was associated with suppressed spinal expression of P2X7R and inhibited activation of spinal microglia. Intrathecal injection of siRNA to knock down P2X7R expression in the spinal cord would suppress the nociceptive behaviors in CP rats. Spinal microglia P2X7R mediates central sensitization of chronic visceral pain in CP. BBG may represent an effective drug for the treatment of chronic pain in CP patients.

  14. Modeling data for pancreatitis in presence of a duodenal diverticula using logistic regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineva, S.; Prodanova, K.; Mlachkova, D.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of a periampullary duodenal diverticulum (PDD) is often observed during upper digestive tract barium meal studies and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). A few papers reported that the diverticulum had something to do with the incidence of pancreatitis. The aim of this study is to investigate if the presence of duodenal diverticula predisposes to the development of a pancreatic disease. A total 3966 patients who had undergone ERCP were studied retrospectively. They were divided into 2 groups-with and without PDD. Patients with a duodenal diverticula had a higher rate of acute pancreatitis. The duodenal diverticula is a risk factor for acute idiopathic pancreatitis. A multiple logistic regression to obtain adjusted estimate of odds and to identify if a PDD is a predictor of acute or chronic pancreatitis was performed. The software package STATISTICA 10.0 was used for analyzing the real data.

  15. Submillimeter-Resolution Fluorescence Laparoscopy of Pancreatic Cancer in a Carcinomatosis Mouse Model Visualizes Metastases Not Seen with Standard Laparoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hop S. Tran; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Menen, Rhiana S.; Metildi, Cristina A.; Lee, Claudia; Snyder, Cynthia S.; Talamini, Mark A.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Staging laparoscopy can visualize peritoneal and liver metastases in pancreatic cancer otherwise undetectable by preoperative imaging. However, false-negative rates may be as high as 18%–26%. The aim of the present study was to improve detection of metastatic pancreatic cancer with the use of fluorescence laparoscopy (FL) in a nude-mouse model with the tumors expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). Methods The carcinomatosis mouse model of human pancreatic cancer was established by intraperitoneal injections of green fluorescent protein-expressing MiaPaca-2 human pancreatic cancer cells into 6-week-old female athymic mice. Two weeks later, mice underwent diagnostic laparoscopy. Laparoscopy was performed first under standard brightfield lighting, followed by fluorescent lighting. The number of metastatic foci identified within the four quadrants of the peritoneal cavity was recorded. After laparoscopy, the animals were sacrificed, opened, and imaged with the OV-100 Small Animal Imaging system as a positive control to identify metastasis. Tumors were collected and processed for histologic review. Results FL enabled visualization of pancreatic cancer metastatic foci not visualized with standard brightfield laparoscopy (BL). Under FL, in 1 representative mouse, 26 separate micrometastatic lesions were identified. In contrast, only very large tumors were seen using BL. Use of the OV-100 images, as positive controls, confirmed the presence of tumor foci. FL thus allowed identification and exact localization of submillimeter tumor foci. Such small-sized tumor foci were not distinguished from surrounding tissue under BL. All malignant lesions were histologically confirmed. Conclusions The use of FL enables the identification of tumor foci that cannot be seen with standard laparoscopy. The technology described in this report has important potential for the clinical development of FL. PMID:21699431

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  17. FEM-based oxygen consumption and cell viability models for avascular pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Peter

    2009-04-16

    The function and viability of cultured, transplanted, or encapsulated pancreatic islets is often limited by hypoxia because these islets have lost their vasculature during the isolation process and have to rely on gradient-driven passive diffusion, which cannot provide adequate oxygen transport. Pancreatic islets (islets of Langerhans) are particularly susceptible due to their relatively large size, large metabolic demand, and increased sensitivity to hypoxia. Here, finite element method (FEM) based multiphysics models are explored to describe oxygen transport and cell viability in avascular islets both in static and in moving culture media. Two- and three-dimensional models were built in COMSOL Multiphysics using the convection and diffusion as well as the incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics application modes. Oxygen consumption was assumed to follow Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics and to cease when local concentrations fell below a critical threshold; in a dynamic model, it was also allowed to increase with increasing glucose concentration. Partial differential equation (PDE) based exploratory cellular-level oxygen consumption and cell viability models incorporating physiologically realistic assumptions have been implemented for fully scaled cell culture geometries with 100, 150, and 200 microm diameter islets as representative. Calculated oxygen concentrations and intra-islet regions likely to suffer from hypoxia-related necrosis obtained for traditional flask-type cultures, oxygen-permeable silicone-rubber membrane bottom cultures, and perifusion chambers with flowing media and varying incoming glucose levels are presented in detail illustrated with corresponding colour-coded figures and animations. Results of the computational models are, as a first estimate, in good quantitative agreement with existing experimental evidence, and they confirm that during culture, hypoxia is often a problem for non-vascularised islet and can lead to considerable cell

  18. FEM-based oxygen consumption and cell viability models for avascular pancreatic islets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchwald Peter

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The function and viability of cultured, transplanted, or encapsulated pancreatic islets is often limited by hypoxia because these islets have lost their vasculature during the isolation process and have to rely on gradient-driven passive diffusion, which cannot provide adequate oxygen transport. Pancreatic islets (islets of Langerhans are particularly susceptible due to their relatively large size, large metabolic demand, and increased sensitivity to hypoxia. Here, finite element method (FEM based multiphysics models are explored to describe oxygen transport and cell viability in avascular islets both in static and in moving culture media. Methods Two- and three-dimensional models were built in COMSOL Multiphysics using the convection and diffusion as well as the incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics application modes. Oxygen consumption was assumed to follow Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics and to cease when local concentrations fell below a critical threshold; in a dynamic model, it was also allowed to increase with increasing glucose concentration. Results Partial differential equation (PDE based exploratory cellular-level oxygen consumption and cell viability models incorporating physiologically realistic assumptions have been implemented for fully scaled cell culture geometries with 100, 150, and 200 μm diameter islets as representative. Calculated oxygen concentrations and intra-islet regions likely to suffer from hypoxia-related necrosis obtained for traditional flask-type cultures, oxygen-permeable silicone-rubber membrane bottom cultures, and perifusion chambers with flowing media and varying incoming glucose levels are presented in detail illustrated with corresponding colour-coded figures and animations. Conclusion Results of the computational models are, as a first estimate, in good quantitative agreement with existing experimental evidence, and they confirm that during culture, hypoxia is often a problem for

  19. AICA-riboside induces apoptosis of pancreatic beta cells through stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefas, B A; Heimberg, H; Vaulont, S; Meisse, D; Hue, L; Pipeleers, D; Van de Casteele, M

    2003-02-01

    Prolonged exposure of beta cells to low glucose concentrations triggers their apoptosis and is known to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in beta cell lines. We examined whether prolonged activation of AMPK can trigger apoptosis in rodent beta cells. Primary beta cells were FACS-purified from rats, and from wild-type and AMPK(alpha2)-deficient mice. AMPK activation in beta cells was induced by the adenosine analog AICA-riboside and detected by immunoblotting using a phosphospecific antibody. Apoptosis of rodent beta cells was monitored by FACS analysis of beta cell DNA content, by direct counting of apoptotic cells using fluorescence microscopy, or by measurement of their caspase-3 activity. Dose-dependent and time-dependent apoptosis of the cells, concommittant with an activation of caspase-3, were suppressed by the caspase inhibitors zVAD-fmk and zDEVD-fmk. Apoptosis induction by AICA-riboside was also prevented by adding the MAPK-inhibitor SB203580 which blocked the AICA-riboside-induced phosphorylation of AMPK. Beta cells isolated from AMPK-(alpha2)-deficient mice were resistant against AICA-riboside induced apoptosis. Sustained activation of AMPK by AICA-riboside can trigger a caspase-dependent apoptosis of pancreatic beta cells.

  20. Induction of endoplasmic reticulum-induced stress genes in Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells is dependent on Sp proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahim, Maen; Liu, Shengxi; Safe, Stephen

    2005-04-22

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a critical role in multiple diseases, and pharmacologically active drugs can induce cell death through ER stress pathways. Stress-induced genes are activated through assembly of transcription factors on ER stress response elements (ERSEs) in target gene promoters. Gel mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays have confirmed interactions of NF-Y and YY1 with the distal motifs of the tripartite ERSE from the glucose-related protein 78 (GRP78) gene promoter. The GC-rich nonanucleotide (N(9)) sequence, which forms the ER stress response binding factor (ERSF) complex binds TFII-I and ATF6; however, we have now shown that in Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells, this complex also binds Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 proteins. Sp proteins are constitutively bound to the ERSE; however, activation of GRP78 protein (or reporter gene) by thapsigargin or tunicamycin is inhibited after cotransfection with small inhibitory RNAs for Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4. This study demonstrates that Sp transcription factors are important for stress-induced responses through their binding to ERSEs.

  1. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  2. Acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia and treatment with plasmapheresis: case report = Pancreatitis aguda inducida por hipertrigliceridemia y tratamiento con plasmaféresis: reporte de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz Ortiz, Édison

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG is a potential cause of acute pancreatitis (AP, especially when its values are greater than 1.000 mg/dL. Different therapeutic measures have been proposed for patients with AP secondary to HTG, including the one that seems to be more effective: plasmapheresis. We report the case of a patient with severe HTG (triglycerides 6.480 mg/dL that suffered from AP, and had favorable evolution with plasmapheresis.

  3. Dclk1 Defines Quiescent Pancreatic Progenitors that Promote Injury-Induced Regeneration and Tumorigenesis | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The existence of adult pancreatic progenitor cells has been debated. While some favor the concept of facultative progenitors involved in homeostasis and repair, neither a location nor markers for such cells have been defined. Using genetic lineage tracing, we show that Doublecortin-like kinase-1 (Dclk1) labels a rare population of long-lived, quiescent pancreatic cells. In vitro, Dclk1+ cells proliferate readily and sustain pancreatic organoid growth. In vivo, Dclk1+ cells are necessary for pancreatic regeneration following injury and chronic inflammation.

  4. Diminished agonist-stimulated inositol trisphosphate generation blocks stimulus-secretion coupling in mouse pancreatic acini during diet-induced experimental pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, R.E.; Saluja, A.K.; Houlihan, M.J.; Steer, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Young female mice fed a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet rapidly develop acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis. We have observed that pancreatic acini prepared from these mice are unable to secrete amylase in response to addition of the cholinergic agonist carbachol, although they retain the ability to secrete amylase in response to the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. The CDE diet does not alter the binding characteristics (Kd or the maximal number of binding sites) for muscarinic cholinergic receptors as tested using the antagonist [ 3 H]N-methylscopolamine nor the competition for this binding by carbachol. Addition of carbachol to acini prepared from mice fed the CDE diet does not result in as marked an increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ levels as that noted in control samples (evaluated using quin2 fluorescence). These observations indicate that the CDE diet interferes with stimulus-secretion coupling in mouse pancreatic acini at a step subsequent to hormone-receptor binding and prior to Ca2+ release. This conclusion is confirmed by our finding that the hormone-stimulated generation of [ 3 H]inositol phosphates (inositol trisphosphate, inositol bisphosphate, and inositol monophosphate) from acini labeled with [ 3 H]myoinositol is markedly reduced in acini prepared from mice fed the CDE diet. This reduction is not due to a decrease in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate. This communication represents the first report of a system in which a blockade of inositol phosphate generation can be related to a physiologic defect and pathologic lesion

  5. A novel colchicine-based microtubule inhibitor exhibits potent antitumor activity by inducing mitochondrial mediated apoptosis in MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok; Singh, Baljinder; Mahajan, Girish; Sharma, Parduman R; Bharate, Sandip B; Mintoo, Mubashir J; Mondhe, Dilip M

    2016-10-01

    Colchicine, an antimitotic alkaloid isolated from Colchicum autumnale, is a classical drug for treatment of gout and familial Mediterranean fever. It causes antiproliferative effects through the inhibition of microtubule formation, which leads to mitotic arrest and cell death by apoptosis. Here, we report that a novel colchicine analog, 4o (N-[(7S)-1,2,3-trimethoxy-9-oxo-10-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-4-chlorophenylamino]-5,6,7,9-tetrahydrobenzo[a]heptalen-7-yl]acetamide), which exhibited potent anticancer activities both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, 4o with excellent pharmacokinetic profile and no P-gp induction liability displayed strong inhibition of proliferation against various human cancer cell lines. However, pancreatic cancer cell line MIA PaCa-2 was found to be more sensitive towards 4o and showed strong inhibition in concentration and time-dependent manner. By increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, 4o induced endoplasmic reticular stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in MIA PaCa-2 cells. Blockage of ROS production reversed 4o-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium release, and cell death. More importantly, it revealed that increased ROS generation might be an effective strategy in treating human pancreatic cancer. Further 4o treatment induced mitotic arrest, altered the expression of cell cycle-associated proteins, and disrupted the microtubules in MIA PaCa-2 cells. 4o treatment caused loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, upregulation of Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2, and cleavage of caspase-3, thereby showing activation of mitochondrial mediated apoptosis. The in vivo anticancer activity of the compound was studied using sarcoma-180 (ascitic) and leukemia (P388 lymphocytic and L1210 lymphoid) models in mice and showed promising antitumor activity with the least toxicity unlike colchicine. Such studies have hitherto not been reported. Taken together, these findings highlighted that 4o, a

  6. Sonic hedgehog signaling inhibition provides opportunities for targeted therapy by sulforaphane in regulating pancreatic cancer stem cell self-renewal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rodova

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway has been associated with cancer stem cells (CSC and implicated in the initiation of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic CSCs are rare tumor cells characterized by their ability to self-renew, and are responsible for tumor recurrence accompanied by resistance to current therapies. The lethality of these incurable, aggressive and invasive pancreatic tumors remains a daunting clinical challenge. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the role of Shh pathway in pancreatic cancer and to examine the molecular mechanisms by which sulforaphane (SFN, an active compound in cruciferous vegetables, inhibits self-renewal capacity of human pancreatic CSCs. Interestingly, we demonstrate here that Shh pathway is highly activated in pancreatic CSCs and plays important role in maintaining stemness by regulating the expression of stemness genes. Given the requirement for Hedgehog in pancreatic cancer, we investigated whether hedgehog blockade by SFN could target the stem cell population in pancreatic cancer. In an in vitro model, human pancreatic CSCs derived spheres were significantly inhibited on treatment with SFN, suggesting the clonogenic depletion of the CSCs. Interestingly, SFN inhibited the components of Shh pathway and Gli transcriptional activity. Interference of Shh-Gli signaling significantly blocked SFN-induced inhibitory effects demonstrating the requirement of an active pathway for the growth of pancreatic CSCs. SFN also inhibited downstream targets of Gli transcription by suppressing the expression of pluripotency maintaining factors (Nanog and Oct-4 as well as PDGFRα and Cyclin D1. Furthermore, SFN induced apoptosis by inhibition of BCL-2 and activation of caspases. Our data reveal the essential role of Shh-Gli signaling in controlling the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs. We propose that pancreatic cancer preventative effects of SFN may result from inhibition of the Shh pathway

  7. HLA-DQA1-HLA-DRB1 polymorphism is a major predictor of azathioprine-induced pancreatitis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A; Jansen, L E; Rose, R V; Gregor, J C; Ponich, T; Chande, N; Khanna, R; Yan, B; Jairath, V; Khanna, N; Sey, M; Beaton, M; McIntosh, K; Teft, W A; Kim, R B

    2018-03-01

    Azathioprine (AZA)-induced pancreatitis is an unpredictable and dose-independent adverse event affecting 2%-7% of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients treated with AZA. There are no tools in clinical practice to identify at-risk individuals; however, a genome wide association study (GWAS) identified a strong association between the Class II HLA gene region polymorphism (rs2647087) and thiopurine-induced pancreatitis. To independently confirm the findings of the GWAS in an IBD cohort, to evaluate its utility in clinical practice and to offer a novel AZA treatment algorithm for IBD based on pharmacogenomic principles. A retrospective cohort study evaluated 373 AZA-exposed IBD patients from a tertiary care academic centre in London, Canada. Due to the limited number of patients taking mercaptopurine (MP), such patients were not included this cohort. All subjects underwent screening for the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2647087 mapped to the HLA-DQA1*02:01-HLA-DRB1*07:01 haplotype and were sub-divided based on the presence (n = 13) or absence (n = 360) of an AZA-induced pancreatitis diagnosis. The risk of AZA-induced pancreatitis was assessed based on rs2647087 genotype. The risk of pancreatitis during AZA-therapy was highly predictable and genotype dependent: 0.53% for wild type (A/A), 4.25% (OR = 4.19, 95% CI 1.02-36.45, P = 0.044) for heterozygous (A/C), and 14.63% (OR = 15.83, 95% CI 3.80-145.26, P = 0.0001) for homozygous variant (C/C) patients. The class II HLA region (at rs2647087) is an important marker of AZA-induced pancreatitis risk. We propose a simple and clinically implementable algorithm based on rs2647087 and TPMT genotypes for AZA selection and dosing for patients with IBD. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Extracellular ATP-induced nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transient is mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zheng; Li, Zhengzheng; Peng, Gong; Chen, Xiaoli; Yin, Wenxuan [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China); Kotlikoff, Michael I. [Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Yuan, Zeng-qiang, E-mail: zqyuan@sun5.ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China); Ji, Guangju, E-mail: gj28@ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China)

    2009-05-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) induces an intracellular Ca{sup 2+} transient by activating phospholipase C (PLC)-associated P2X4 purinergic receptors, leading to production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and subsequent Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores in mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells. Using laser scanning confocal microscopy, Ca{sup 2+} indicator fluo-4 AM, and the cell permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342, we examined the properties of eATP-induced Ca{sup 2+} release in pancreatic {beta}-cell nuclei. eATP induced a higher nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transient in pancreatic {beta}-cell nuclei than in the cytosol. After pretreatment with thapsigargin (TG), an inhibitor of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (SERCA) pumps, the amplitude of eATP-induced Ca{sup 2+} transients in the nucleus was still much higher than those in the cytosol. This effect of eATP was not altered by inhibition of either the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (PMCA) or the plasma membrane Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger (NCX) by LaCl{sub 3} or by replacement of Na{sup +} with N-Methyl-Glucosamine. eATP-induced nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transients were abolished by a cell-permeable IP3R inhibitor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), but were not blocked by the ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist ryanodine. Immunofluorescence studies showed that IP3Rs are expressed on the nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells. These results indicate that eATP triggers nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transients by mobilizing a nuclear Ca{sup 2+} store via nuclear IP3Rs.

  9. Curcumin attenuates palmitate-induced apoptosis in MIN6 pancreatic β-cells through PI3K/Akt/FoxO1 and mitochondrial survival pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Feng; Kang, Jinsen; Cao, Yajun; Fan, Shengjun; Yang, Haopeng; An, Yu; Pan, Yan; Tie, Lu; Li, Xuejun

    2015-11-01

    Lipotoxicity plays a vital role in development and progression of type 2 diabetes. Prolonged elevation of free fatty acids especially the palmitate leads to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a polyphenol from the curry spice turmeric, is considered to be a broadly cytoprotective agent. The present study was designed to determine the protective effect of curcumin on palmitate-induced apoptosis in β-cells and investigate underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that curcumin improved cell viability and enhanced glucose-induced insulin secretory function in MIN6 pancreatic β-cells. Palmitate incubation evoked chromatin condensation, DNA nick end labeling and activation of caspase-3 and -9. Curcumin treatment inhibited palmitate-induced apoptosis, relieved mitochondrial depolarization and up-regulated Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Palmitate induced the generation of reactive oxygen species and inhibited activities of antioxidant enzymes, which could be neutralized by curcumin treatment. Moreover, curcumin could promote rapid phosphorylation of Akt and nuclear exclusion of FoxO1 in MIN6 cells under lipotoxic condition. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Akt specific inhibitors abolished the anti-lipotoxic effect of curcumin and stimulated FoxO1 nuclear translocation. These findings suggested that curcumin protected MIN6 pancreatic β-Cells against apoptosis through activation of Akt, inhibition of nuclear translocation of FoxO1 and mitochondrial survival pathway.

  10. A model for cell migration in non-isotropic fibrin networks with an application to pancreatic tumor islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiao; Weihs, Daphne; Vermolen, Fred J

    2018-04-01

    Cell migration, known as an orchestrated movement of cells, is crucially important for wound healing, tumor growth, immune response as well as other biomedical processes. This paper presents a cell-based model to describe cell migration in non-isotropic fibrin networks around pancreatic tumor islets. This migration is determined by the mechanical strain energy density as well as cytokines-driven chemotaxis. Cell displacement is modeled by solving a large system of ordinary stochastic differential equations where the stochastic parts result from random walk. The stochastic differential equations are solved by the use of the classical Euler-Maruyama method. In this paper, the influence of anisotropic stromal extracellular matrix in pancreatic tumor islets on T-lymphocytes migration in different immune systems is investigated. As a result, tumor peripheral stromal extracellular matrix impedes the immune response of T-lymphocytes through changing direction of their migration.

  11. Delayed radiation-induced inflammation accompanying a marked carbohydrate antigen 19-9 elevation in a patient with resected pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Cardinal, Jon S.; Jacobson, Geraldine M. [West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Although carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 is a useful tumor marker for pancreatic cancer, it can also become elevated from a variety of benign and malignant conditions. Herein we describe an unusual presentation of elevated CA 19-9 in an asymptomatic patient who had previously undergone adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy for resected early stage pancreatic cancer. The rise in CA 19-9 might be due to delayed radiation-induced inflammation related to previous intra-abdominal radiation therapy with or without radiation recall induced by gemcitabine. After treatment with corticosteroids the CA 19-9 level decreased to normal, and the patient has not developed any evidence of recurrent cancer to date.

  12. The potential role of SOCS-3 in the interleukin-1beta-induced desensitization of insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Glondu, Murielle; Filloux, Chantal

    2004-01-01

    insulin-dependent IR autophosphorylation and IRS/PI3K pathway in a way comparable to IL-1beta treatment in RINm5F cells. We propose that IL-1beta decreases insulin action in beta-cells through the induction of SOCS-3 expression, and that this effect potentially alters insulin-induced beta-cell survival.......Defects in insulin secretion, resulting from loss of function or destruction of pancreatic beta-cells, trigger diabetes. Interleukin (IL)-1beta is a proinflammatory cytokine that is involved in type 1 and type 2 diabetes development and impairs beta-cell survival and function. Because effective...... insulin signaling is required for the optimal beta-cell function, we assessed the effect of IL-1beta on the insulin pathway in a rat pancreatic beta-cell line. We show that IL-1beta decreases insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) and insulin receptor substrate (IRS...

  13. Pancreatic injury in hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice after subchronic exposure to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaphalia, Bhupendra S; Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Kondraganti, Shakuntala; Wu, Hai; Boor, Paul J; Ansari, G A Shakeel

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatitis caused by activation of digestive zymogens in the exocrine pancreas is a serious chronic health problem in alcoholic patients. However, mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis remains obscure due to lack of a suitable animal model. Earlier, we reported pancreatic injury and substantial increases in endogenous formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH(-)) deer mice fed 4% ethanol. To understand the mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis, we evaluated dose-dependent metabolism of ethanol and related pancreatic injury in ADH(-) and hepatic ADH-normal (ADH(+)) deer mice fed 1%, 2% or 3.5% ethanol via Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet daily for 2months. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was remarkably increased and the concentration was ∼1.5-fold greater in ADH(-) vs. ADH(+) deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. At the end of the experiment, remarkable increases in pancreatic FAEEs and significant pancreatic injury indicated by the presence of prominent perinuclear space, pyknotic nuclei, apoptotic bodies and dilation of glandular ER were found only in ADH(-) deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. This pancreatic injury was further supported by increased plasma lipase and pancreatic cathepsin B (a lysosomal hydrolase capable of activating trypsinogen), trypsinogen activation peptide (by-product of trypsinogen activation process) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (endoplasmic reticulum stress marker). These findings suggest that ADH-deficiency and high alcohol levels in the body are the key factors in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Therefore, determining how this early stage of pancreatic injury advances to inflammation stage could be important for understanding the mechanism(s) of alcoholic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pancreatic injury in hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice after subchronic exposure to ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Kondraganti, Shakuntala; Wu Hai; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatitis caused by activation of digestive zymogens in the exocrine pancreas is a serious chronic health problem in alcoholic patients. However, mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis remains obscure due to lack of a suitable animal model. Earlier, we reported pancreatic injury and substantial increases in endogenous formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH - ) deer mice fed 4% ethanol. To understand the mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis, we evaluated dose-dependent metabolism of ethanol and related pancreatic injury in ADH - and hepatic ADH-normal (ADH + ) deer mice fed 1%, 2% or 3.5% ethanol via Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet daily for 2 months. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was remarkably increased and the concentration was ∼ 1.5-fold greater in ADH - vs. ADH + deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. At the end of the experiment, remarkable increases in pancreatic FAEEs and significant pancreatic injury indicated by the presence of prominent perinuclear space, pyknotic nuclei, apoptotic bodies and dilation of glandular ER were found only in ADH - deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. This pancreatic injury was further supported by increased plasma lipase and pancreatic cathepsin B (a lysosomal hydrolase capable of activating trypsinogen), trypsinogen activation peptide (by-product of trypsinogen activation process) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (endoplasmic reticulum stress marker). These findings suggest that ADH-deficiency and high alcohol levels in the body are the key factors in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Therefore, determining how this early stage of pancreatic injury advances to inflammation stage could be important for understanding the mechanism(s) of alcoholic pancreatitis.

  15. HLA-DQA1-HLA-DRB1 variants confer susceptibility to pancreatitis induced by thiopurine immunosuppressants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heap, Graham A.; Weedon, Michael N.; Bewshea, Claire M.; Singh, Abhey; Chen, Mian; Satchwel, Jack B.; Vivian, Julian P.; So, Kenji; Dubois, Patrick C.; Andrews, Jane M.; Annese, Vito; Bampton, Peter; Barnardo, Martin; Bell, Sally; Cole, Andy; Connor, Susan J.; Creed, Tom; Cummings, Fraser R.; D'Amato, Mauro; Daneshmend, Tawfique K.; Fedorak, Richard N.; Florin, Timothy H.; Gaya, Daniel R.; Greig, Emma; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hart, Alisa; Irving, Peter M.; Jones, Gareth; Karban, Amir; Lawrance, Ian C.; Lee, James C.; Lees, Charlie; Lev-Tzion, Raffi; Lindsay, James; Mansfield, John; Mawdsley, Joel; Mazhar, Zia; Parkes, Miles; Parnell, Kirstie; Orchard, Timothy R.; Radford-Smith, Graham; Russell, Richard K.; Reffitt, David; Satsangi, Jack; Silverberg, Mark S.; Sturniolo, Giacomo C.; Tremelling, Mark; Tsianos, Epameinondas V.; van Heel, David A.; Walsh, Alissa; Watermeyer, Gill; Weersma, Rinse K.; Zeissig, Sebastian; Rossjohn, Jamie; Holden, Arthur L.; Ahmad, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis occurs in approximately 4% of patients treated with the thiopurines azathioprine or mercaptopurine. Its development is unpredictable and almost always leads to drug withdrawal. We identified patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who had developed pancreatitis within 3 months of

  16. Matrix models of induced QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makeenko, Yu.

    1994-01-01

    I review recent works on the problem of inducing large-N QCD by matrix fields. In the first part of the talk I describe the matrix models which induce large-N QCD and present the results of studies of their phase structure by the standard lattice technology (in particular, by the mean field method). The second part is devoted to the exact solution of these models in the strong coupling region by means of the loop equations. I describe the solution of the Kazakov-Migdal model with the quadratic and logarithmic potentials as well as that of analogous fermionic models with the quadratic potential. (orig.)

  17. Pancreatic Juice Culture in Acute Pancreatitis and Other Pancreatic Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Masataka Kikuyama; Tatsunori Sato; Takafumi Kurokami; Yuji Ota; Yoshihiro Yokoi

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the results of pancreatic juice cultures of patients with acute pancreatitis and other pancreatic disorders. Methods Twenty patients who underwent pancreatic juice culture were studied. Nine had acute pancreatitis due to alcohol (n=5), idiopathic causes (n=2), drugs (n=1), or gallstones (n=1), and remaining 11 had other pancreatic disorders such as an intraductal papillary mucin-producing neoplasm (n=3) and main pancreatic duct dilatation with a stricture due to a...

  18. Nuclear factor-κB-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition induced by HIF-1α activation in pancreatic cancer cells under hypoxic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo-Xin Cheng

    Full Text Available Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT induced by hypoxia is one of the critical causes of treatment failure in different types of human cancers. NF-κB is closely involved in the progression of EMT. Compared with HIF-1α, the correlation between NF-κB and EMT during hypoxia has been less studied, and although the phenomenon was observed in the past, the molecular mechanisms involved remained unclear.Here, we report that hypoxia or overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α promotes EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. On molecular or pharmacologic inhibition of NF-κB, hypoxic cells regained expression of E-cadherin, lost expression of N-cadherin, and attenuated their highly invasive and drug-resistant phenotype. Introducing a pcDNA3.0/HIF-1α into pancreatic cancer cells under normoxic conditions heightened NF-κB activity, phenocopying EMT effects produced by hypoxia. Conversely, inhibiting the heightened NF-κB activity in this setting attenuated the EMT phenotype.These results suggest that hypoxia or overexpression of HIF-1α induces the EMT that is largely dependent on NF-κB in pancreatic cancer cells.

  19. Adenoviruses Expressing PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD and MafA Induces the Transdifferentiation of Porcine Neonatal Pancreas Cell Clusters and Adult Pig Pancreatic Cells into Beta-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Hye You

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA limitation in the number of insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells is a special feature of diabetes. The identification of alternative sources for the induction of insulin-producing surrogate beta-cells is a matter of profound importance. PDX-1/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA overexpression have been shown to influence the differentiation and proliferation of pancreatic stem cells. However, few studies have been conducted using adult animal pancreatic stem cells.MethodsAdult pig pancreatic cells were prepared from the non-endocrine fraction of adult pig pancreata. Porcine neonatal pancreas cell clusters (NPCCs were prepared from neonatal pigs aged 1-2 days. The dispersed pancreatic cells were infected with PDX-1/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA adenoviruses. After infection, these cells were transplanted under the kidney capsules of normoglycemic nude mice.ResultsThe adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD and MafA induced insulin gene expression in NPCCs, but not in adult pig pancreatic cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed that the number of insulin-positive cells in NPCCs and adult pig pancreatic cells was approximately 2.6- and 1.1-fold greater than those in the green fluorescent protein control group, respectively. At four weeks after transplantation, the relative volume of insulin-positive cells in the grafts increased in the NPCCs, but not in the adult porcine pancreatic cells.ConclusionThese data indicate that PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA facilitate the beta-cell differentiation of NPCCs, but not adult pig pancreatic cells. Therefore PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA-induced NPCCs can be considered good sources for the induction of pancreatic beta-cells, and may also have some utility in the treatment of diabetes.

  20. Calcium signaling induced by angiotensin II in the pancreatic acinar cell line AR42J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, D C; Sarosi, G A; Romanchuk, G; Mulholland, M W

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the nature and mechanisms of angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling in AR42J cells. Cytosolic calcium concentrations were determined using fura-2-based microfluorimetry. Angiotensin II causes elevations in free cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in the rat pancreatic acinar cell line AR42J. The mechanisms of angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling were examined using fura-2-based fluorescent digital microscopy. Angiotensin II caused dose-dependent increments in [Ca2+]i over a concentration range of 0.1-1,000 nM, with an average increment of 243 +/- 16 nM at an angiotensin II concentration of 1,000 nM. Dup753, an AT1-specific antagonist, inhibited angiotensin II-evoked signaling, whereas the AT2 antagonist PD123,319 had no effect. Preincubation with the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 reduced the response in [Ca2+]i to 25% of that of the control. Thapsigargin abolished angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling. The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonist heparin introduced by radiofrequency electroporation inhibited responses to 46 +/- 6% of controls. Angiotensin II-evoked signals were reduced in magnitude and duration by elimination of Ca2+ from the extracellular buffer. Preincubation with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml) had no effect. Angiotensin II did not stimulate cyclic AMP or suppress vasoactive intestinal peptide stimulated cyclic AMP production over the concentration range that caused Ca2+ signaling.

  1. Kill two birds with one stone: making multi-transgenic pre-diabetes mouse models through insulin resistance and pancreatic apoptosis pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyuan Kong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance accompanied by defective insulin secretion. Transgenic mouse models play an important role in medical research. However, single transgenic mouse models may not mimic the complex phenotypes of most cases of type 2 diabetes. Methods Focusing on genes related to pancreatic islet damage, peripheral insulin resistance and related environmental inducing factors, we generated single-transgenic (C/EBP homology protein, CHOP mice (CHOP mice, dual-transgenic (human islet amyloid polypeptide, hIAPP; CHOP mice (hIAPP-CHOP mice and triple-transgenic (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, 11β-HSD1; hIAPP; CHOP mice (11β-HSD1-hIAPP- CHOP mice. The latter two types of transgenic (Tg animals were induced with high-fat high-sucrose diets (HFHSD. We analyzed the diabetes-related symptoms and histology features of the transgenic animals. Results Comparing symptoms on the spot-checked points, we determined that the triple-transgene mice were more suitable for systematic study. The results of intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT of triple-transgene animals began to change 60 days after induction (p < 0.001. After 190 days of induction, the body weights (p < 0.01 and plasma glucose of the animals in Tg were higher than those of the animals in Negative Control (Nc. After sacrificed, large amounts of lipid were found deposited in adipose (p < 0.01 and ectopically deposited in the non-adipose tissues (p < 0.05 or 0.01 of the animals in the Tg HFHSD group. The weights of kidneys and hearts of Tg animals were significantly increased (p < 0.01. Serum C peptide (C-P was decreased due to Tg effects, and insulin levels were increased due to the effects of the HFHSD in the Tg HFHSD group, indicating that damaged insulin secretion and insulin resistance hyperinsulinemia existed simultaneously in these animals. The serum corticosterone of Tg was slightly higher than those of Nc due to the

  2. Development of a Novel Preclinical Pancreatic Cancer Research Model: Bioluminescence Image-Guided Focal Irradiation and Tumor Monitoring of Orthotopic Xenografts1

    OpenAIRE

    Tuli, Richard; Surmak, Andrew; Reyes, Juvenal; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Armour, Michael; Leubner, Ashley; Blackford, Amanda; Tryggestad, Erik; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Wong, John; DeWeese, Theodore L; Herman, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: We report on a novel preclinical pancreatic cancer research model that uses bioluminescence imaging (BLI)-guided irradiation of orthotopic xenograft tumors, sparing of surrounding normal tissues, and quantitative, noninvasive longitudinal assessment of treatment response. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Luciferase-expressing MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic carcinoma cells were orthotopically injected in nude mice. BLI was compared to pathologic tumor volume, and photon emission was assessed over time. B...

  3. Enterovirus strain and type-specific differences in growth kinetics and virus-induced cell destruction in human pancreatic duct epithelial HPDE cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smura, Teemu; Natri, Olli; Ylipaasto, Petri; Hellman, Marika; Al-Hello, Haider; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Roivainen, Merja

    2015-12-02

    Enterovirus infections have been suspected to be involved in the development of type 1 diabetes. However, the pathogenetic mechanism of enterovirus-induced type 1 diabetes is not known. Pancreatic ductal cells are closely associated with pancreatic islets. Therefore, enterovirus infections in ductal cells may also affect beta-cells and be involved in the induction of type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of different enterovirus strains to infect, replicate and produce cytopathic effect in human pancreatic ductal cells. Furthermore, the viral factors that affect these capabilities were studied. The pancreatic ductal cells were highly susceptible to enterovirus infections. Both viral growth and cytolysis were detected for several enterovirus serotypes. However, the viral growth and capability to induce cytopathic effect (cpe) did not correlate completely. Some of the virus strains replicated in ductal cells without apparent cpe. Furthermore, there were strain-specific differences in the growth kinetics and the ability to cause cpe within some serotypes. Viral adaptation experiments were carried out to study the potential genetic determinants behind these phenotypic differences. The blind-passage of non-lytic CV-B6-Schmitt strain in HPDE-cells resulted in lytic phenotype and increased progeny production. This was associated with the substitution of a single amino acid (K257E) in the virus capsid protein VP1 and the viral ability to use decay accelerating factor (DAF) as a receptor. This study demonstrates considerable plasticity in the cell tropism, receptor usage and cytolytic properties of enteroviruses and underlines the strong effect of single or few amino acid substitutions in cell tropism and lytic capabilities of a given enterovirus. Since ductal cells are anatomically close to pancreatic islets, the capability of enteroviruses to infect and destroy pancreatic ductal cells may also implicate in respect to enterovirus induced type 1

  4. Therapeutic effects of microbubble added to combined high-intensity focused ultrasound and chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Mi Hye; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Hae Ri; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model

  5. Therapeutic Effects of Microbubbles Added to Combined High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Chemotherapy in a Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Mi Hye; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Hae Ri; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model

  6. Therapeutic effects of microbubble added to combined high-intensity focused ultrasound and chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Ri [Dept. of Pre-Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University College of Dentistry, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model.

  7. Therapeutic Effects of Microbubbles Added to Combined High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Chemotherapy in a Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Ri [Department of Pre-Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University College of Dentistry, Gangneung 25457 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul 06973 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model.

  8. Mucin (Muc expression during pancreatic cancer progression in spontaneous mouse model: potential implications for diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachagani Satyanarayana

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer (PC is a lethal malignancy primarily driven by activated Kras mutations and characterized by the deregulation of several genes including mucins. Previous studies on mucins have identified their significant role in both benign and malignant human diseases including PC progression and metastasis. However, the initiation of MUC expression during PC remains unknown because of lack of early stage tumor tissues from PC patients. Methods In the present study, we have evaluated stage specific expression patterns of mucins during mouse PC progression in (KrasG12D;Pdx1-Cre (KC murine PC model from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR. Results In agreement with previous studies on human PC, we observed a progressive increase in the expression of mucins particularly Muc1, Muc4 and Muc5AC in the pancreas of KC (as early as PanIN I mice with advancement of PanIN lesions and PDAC both at mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, mucin expression correlated with the increased expression of inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ (p CXCL1 (p CXCL2 (p  Conclusions Our study reinforces the potential utility of the KC murine model for determining the functional role of mucins in PC pathogenesis by crossing KC mice with corresponding mucin knockout mice and evaluating mucin based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for lethal PC.

  9. Kynurenine-3-monooxygenase inhibition prevents multiple organ failure in rodent models of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Damian J; Webster, Scott P; Uings, Iain; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Wilson, Kris; Hutchinson, Jonathan P; Mirguet, Olivier; Walker, Ann; Beaufils, Benjamin; Ancellin, Nicolas; Trottet, Lionel; Bénéton, Véronique; Mowat, Christopher G; Wilkinson, Martin; Rowland, Paul; Haslam, Carl; McBride, Andrew; Homer, Natalie Z M; Baily, James E; Sharp, Matthew G F; Garden, O James; Hughes, Jeremy; Howie, Sarah E M; Holmes, Duncan S; Liddle, John; Iredale, John P

    2016-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating inflammatory condition of the pancreas that is considered to be a paradigm of sterile inflammation leading to systemic multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death. Acute mortality from AP-MODS exceeds 20% (ref. 3), and the lifespans of those who survive the initial episode are typically shorter than those of the general population. There are no specific therapies available to protect individuals from AP-MODS. Here we show that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO), a key enzyme of tryptophan metabolism, is central to the pathogenesis of AP-MODS. We created a mouse strain that is deficient for Kmo (encoding KMO) and that has a robust biochemical phenotype that protects against extrapancreatic tissue injury to the lung, kidney and liver in experimental AP-MODS. A medicinal chemistry strategy based on modifications of the kynurenine substrate led to the discovery of the oxazolidinone GSK180 as a potent and specific inhibitor of KMO. The binding mode of the inhibitor in the active site was confirmed by X-ray co-crystallography at 3.2 Å resolution. Treatment with GSK180 resulted in rapid changes in the levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites in vivo, and it afforded therapeutic protection against MODS in a rat model of AP. Our findings establish KMO inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of AP-MODS, and they open up a new area for drug discovery in critical illness.

  10. Pancreatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyasekaran, Malathi; Biradar, Vishnu; Ramaswamy, Ganesh; Srinivas, S; Ashish, B; Sumathi, B; Nirmala, D; Geetha, M

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic disease in children has a wide clinical spectrum and may present as Acute pancreatitis (AP), Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP), Chronic pancreatitis (CP) and Pancreatic disease without pancreatitis. This article highlights the etiopathogenesis and management of pancreatitis in children along with clinical data from five tertiary care hospitals in south India [Chennai (3), Cochin and Pune].

  11. A natural product toosendanin inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumor growth in pancreatic cancer via deactivating Akt/mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhe; Fu, Wei; Wang, Gongping

    2017-11-04

    The pancreatic cancer is among the most aggressive malignancies with strong proclivity to metastasis. The malignancy during pancreatic cancer progression is largely ascribed to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we showed that toosendanin (TSN), which is an active component in traditional Chinese medicine, can strongly attenuate pancreatic cancer progression. TSN suppressed the viability and grow of pancreatic cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. The migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells were also consistently inhibited dose-dependently. TSN can reverse the TGF-β induced EMT and morphological change in pancreatic cancer cells by increasing Ecadherin expression while reducing Vimentin, ZEB1 and SNAIL levels. Furthermore, TSN evidently repressed xenograft tumor growth in mouse pancreatic cancer models without significantly toxic side effects. Mechanistic studies suggested that TSN mediated pancreatic cancer inhibition by blocking Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Our results showed that TSN inhibits pancreatic cancer progression via downregulating Akt/mTOR signaling. Since the concentrations of TSN used in current study is very low, our results demonstrated that TSN can inhibit pancreatic cancer progression thereby implying that TSN can be used as a potential pharmacological agent especially in treatment of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The gamma secretase inhibitor MRK-003 attenuates pancreatic cancer growth in preclinical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuma, Masamichi; Rasheed, Zeshaan A.; Yabuuchi, Shinichi; Omura, Noriyuki; Campbell, Nathaniel R.; de Wilde, Roeland F.; De Oliveira, Elizabeth; Zhang, Qing; Puig, Oscar; Matsui, William; Hidalgo, Manuel; Maitra, Anirban; Rajeshkumar, NV

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal malignancy, with most patients facing an adverse clinical outcome. Aberrant Notch pathway activation has been implicated in the initiation and progression of PDAC, specifically the aggressive phenotype of the disease. We used a panel of human PDAC cell lines, as well as patient-derived PDAC xenografts to determine whether pharmacological targeting of Notch pathway could inhibit PDAC growth and potentiate gemcitabine sensitivity. MRK-003, a potent and selective γ-secretase inhibitor, treatment is effective against PDAC as evidenced by the down-regulation of nuclear Notch1 intracellular domain (N1ICD), inhibition of anchorage independent growth, and reduction of tumor-initiating cells capable of extensive self-renewal. Pre-treatment of PDAC cells with MRK-003 in cell culture significantly inhibited the subsequent engraftment in immunocompromised mice. MRK-003 monotherapy significantly blocked tumor growth in 5 of 9 (56%) PDAC xenografts. A combination of MRK-003 and gemcitabine showed enhanced antitumor effects compared to gemcitabine in 4 of 9 (44%) PDAC xenografts, reduced tumor cell proliferation and induced both apoptosis and intra-tumoral necrosis. Gene expression analysis of untreated tumors indicated that up-regulation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) pathway components were predictive of sensitivity to MRK-003, while up-regulation in B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling and nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NRF2) pathway correlated with response to the combination of MRK-003 with gemcitabine. Our findings strengthen the rationale for small molecule inhibition of Notch signaling as a therapeutic strategy in PDAC. PMID:22752426

  13. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2009-01-01

    bile duct. Obstructive jaundice is a common symptom at presentation, and pancreatic cancer represents an important clinical differential diagnosis. In late stages of the disease, the normal pancreatic parenchyma is often replaced by large amounts of fibrosis. Histologically, there seem to be two...

  14. NUPR1 works against the metabolic stress-induced autophagy-associated cell death in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Tewfik; Cano, Carla E; Grasso, Daniel; Garcia, Maria Noé; Sandi, Maria José; Calvo, Ezequiel L; Dagorn, Jean-Charles; Lomberk, Gwen; Goruppi, Sandro; Urrutia, Raul; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Velasco, Guillermo; Iovanna, Juan L

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is increasing with more than 43,000 predicted new cases in the US and 65,000 in Europe this year. Pancreatic cancer patients have a short life expectancy with less than 3-4% 5-y survival, which results in an equivalent incidence and mortality rate. One of the major challenges in pancreatic cancer is the identification of pharmacological approaches that overcome the resistance of this cancer to therapy. Intensive research in the past decades has led to the classification of pancreatic cancers and the identification of the driver key genetic events. Despite the advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for pancreatic cancer pathogenesis, this knowledge had little impact on significantly improving the treatment for this dismal disease. In particular, we know today that the lack of therapeutic response in pancreatic cancer is due to the intrinsic high resistance of these tumors to chemotherapy and radiation, rather than to the inappropriate design of these therapeutic approaches. Thus, in order to ensure a better outcome for pancreatic cancer patients, there is a strong need for research focused on the mechanism that determines this resistant phenotype and the means that might drive enhanced response to therapy.

  15. Activating transcription factor 3 promotes loss of the acinar cell phenotype in response to cerulein-induced pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Elena N; Young, Claire C; Toma, Jelena; Levy, Michael; Berger, Kurt R; Johnson, Charis L; Mehmood, Rashid; Swan, Patrick; Chu, Alphonse; Cregan, Sean P; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Howlett, Christopher J; Pin, Christopher L

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatitis is a debilitating disease of the exocrine pancreas that, under chronic conditions, is a major susceptibility factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Although down-regulation of genes that promote the mature acinar cell fate is required to reduce injury associated with pancreatitis, the factors that promote this repression are unknown. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a key mediator of the unfolded protein response, a pathway rapidly activated during pancreatic insult. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing, we show that ATF3 is bound to the transcriptional regulatory regions of >30% of differentially expressed genes during the initiation of pancreatitis. Of importance, ATF3-dependent regulation of these genes was observed only upon induction of pancreatitis, with pathways involved in inflammation, acinar cell differentiation, and cell junctions being specifically targeted. Characterizing expression of transcription factors that affect acinar cell differentiation suggested that acinar cells lacking ATF3 maintain a mature cell phenotype during pancreatitis, a finding supported by maintenance of junctional proteins and polarity markers. As a result, Atf3 -/- pancreatic tissue displayed increased tissue damage and inflammatory cell infiltration at early time points during injury but, at later time points, showed reduced acinar-to-duct cell metaplasia. Thus our results reveal a critical role for ATF3 as a key regulator of the acinar cell transcriptional response during injury and may provide a link between chronic pancreatitis and PDAC. © 2017 Fazio et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  16. Deficiency in the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 renders pancreatic β-cells vulnerable to arsenic-induced cell damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bei [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Fu, Jingqi; Zheng, Hongzhi; Xue, Peng; Yarborough, Kathy; Woods, Courtney G.; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E. [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jpi@thehamner.org [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Chronic human exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs), a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes, where impairment of pancreatic β-cell function is a key pathogenic factor. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. However, persistent activation of Nrf2 in response to chronic oxidative stress, including inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup 3+}) exposure, blunts glucose-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling and impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). In the current study, we found that MIN6 pancreatic β-cells with stable knockdown of Nrf2 (Nrf2-KD) by lentiviral shRNA and pancreatic islets isolated from Nrf2-knockout (Nrf2−/−) mice exhibited reduced expression of several antioxidant and detoxification enzymes in response to acute iAs{sup 3+} exposure. As a result, Nrf2-KD MIN6 cells and Nrf2−/− islets were more susceptible to iAs{sup 3+} and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup 3+})-induced cell damage, as measured by decreased cell viability, augmented apoptosis and morphological change. Pretreatment of MIN6 cells with Nrf2 activator tert-butylhydroquinone protected the cells from iAs{sup 3+}-induced cell damage in an Nrf2-dependent fashion. In contrast, antioxidant N‐acetyl cysteine protected Nrf2-KD MIN6 cells against acute cytotoxicity of iAs{sup 3+}. The present study demonstrates that Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response is critical in the pancreatic β-cell defense mechanism against acute cytotoxicity by arsenic. The findings here, combined with our previous results on the inhibitory effect of antioxidants on ROS signaling and GSIS, suggest that Nrf2 plays paradoxical roles in pancreatic β-cell dysfunction induced by environmental arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ► Lack of Nrf2 reduced expression of antioxidant genes induced by iAs{sup 3+} in β-cells. ► Deficiency of Nrf2 in

  17. Acute Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Nationwide Matched-cohort Study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegård, Jakob; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe

    2018-01-01

    . Pancreatic cancer risk was expressed as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs, calculated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Cox models were stratified by age, sex, and year of pancreatitis diagnosis and adjusted for alcohol- and smoking-related conditions, and Charlson Comorbidity Index score. Results We...... included 41,669 patients diagnosed with incident acute pancreatitis and 208,340 comparison individuals. Patients with acute pancreatitis had an increased risk of pancreatic cancer compared with the age- and sex-matched general population throughout the follow-up period. The risk decreased over time......Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. However, findings from studies on this association are conflicting. We investigated the association between acute pancreatitis and increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Methods We conducted a nationwide, population...

  18. Characterization of Momordica charantia L. polysaccharide and its protective effect on pancreatic cells injury in STZ-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cong; Chen, Hongman; Bai, Weiqi

    2018-04-09

    A polysaccharide with a molecular weight of 13,029 Da was isolated from Momordica charantia (MCP) fruit and purified by ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The isolated polysaccharide MCPIIa contained L-Rha, D-GalA, D-Gal, D-Xyl, L-Ara in a molar ratio of 12:3.05:19.89:5.95:56. IR spectrum and NMR studies indicated that the MCPIIa sugar units were linked, via β-glycosidic bonds, to a large number of arabinofuranose, glucuronic acid, and xylopyranosyl residues. In addition, the hypoglycemic effect of MCPIIa was investigated in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. After STZ-induction, MCPIIa (100, 200, or 300 mg/kg body weight) was administered orally, once daily, for 28 days. Glycemia in STZ-diabetogenic mice was significantly reduced, and compared with diabetes mellitus (DM) mice, serum insulin concentration increased significantly, following MCPIIa administration. Transmission electron microscopy showed an alleviation of STZ-lesions in pancreatic tissue from mice treated with MCPIIa. These results indicate that MCPIIa may be useful as an anti-diabetic agent. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion in low-protein-fed rats is associated with altered pancreatic islets redox status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Ana Paula G; Zoppi, Claudio C; Silveira, Leonardo R; Batista, Thiago M; Paula, Flávia M; da Silva, Priscilla M R; Rafacho, Alex; Barbosa-Sampaio, Helena C; Boschero, Antonio C; Carneiro, Everardo M

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relationship between early life protein malnutrition-induced redox imbalance, and reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. After weaning, male Wistar rats were submitted to a normal-protein-diet (17%-protein, NP) or to a low-protein-diet (6%-protein, LP) for 60 days. Pancreatic islets were isolated and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), oxidized (GSSG) and reduced (GSH) glutathione content, CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) and catalase (CAT) gene expression, as well as enzymatic antioxidant activities were quantified. Islets that were pre-incubated with H 2 O 2 and/or N-acetylcysteine, were subsequently incubated with glucose for insulin secretion measurement. Protein malnutrition increased CAT mRNA content by 100%. LP group SOD1 and CAT activities were 50% increased and reduced, respectively. H 2 O 2 production was more than 50% increased whereas GSH/GSSG ratio was near 60% lower in LP group. Insulin secretion was, in most conditions, approximately 50% lower in LP rat islets. When islets were pre-incubated with H 2 O 2 (100 μM), and incubated with glucose (33 mM), LP rats showed significant decrease of insulin secretion. This effect was attenuated when LP islets were exposed to N-acetylcysteine. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Apolipoprotein CIII Reduces Proinflammatory Cytokine-Induced Apoptosis in Rat Pancreatic Islets via the Akt Prosurvival Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Juntti-Berggren, Lisa; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein CIII (ApoCIII) is mainly synthesized in the liver and is important for triglyceride metabolism. The plasma concentration of ApoCIII is elevated in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), and in vitro ApoCIII causes apoptosis in pancreatic ß-cells in the absence of inflammatory stress...... µg/ml) did not cause apoptosis. In the presence of the islet-cytotoxic cytokines IL-1ß + interferon-¿, ApoCIII reduced cytokine-mediated islet cell death and impairment of ß-cell function. ApoCIII had no effects on mitogen-activated protein kinases (c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38, and ERK) and had...... of the survival serine-threonine kinase Akt. Inhibition of the Akt signaling pathway by the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 counteracted the antiapoptotic effect of ApoCIII on cytokine-induced apoptosis. We conclude that ApoCIII in the presence of T1D-relevant proinflammatory cytokines reduces...

  1. Exendin-4, a new peptide from Heloderma suspectum venom, potentiates cholecystokinin-induced amylase release from rat pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, R; Singh, L; Eng, J; Raufman, J P

    1992-09-22

    We examined the actions of exendin-4, a new peptide isolated from Heloderma suspectum venom, on dispersed acini from rat pancreas. Exendin-4 caused a 3-fold increase in cAMP but did not alter cellular calcium concentration. Exendin-4-induced increases in cAMP were inhibited by an exendin-receptor antagonist, exendin (9-39)NH2, but not by VIP-receptor antagonists. Whereas up to 1 microM exendin-4 alone did not alter amylase release, potentiation of enzyme release was observed when the peptide (greater than 30 pM) was combined with cholecystokinin. Potentiation of amylase release was also observed when exendin-4 was combined with carbamylcholine, bombesin or a calcium ionophore, A23187. These results indicate that stimulation of exendin receptors on rat pancreatic acini causes an increase in cellular cAMP. Although this increase in cAMP alone does not result in amylase release, combination of exendin-4 with agents that increase cell calcium results in potentiation of amylase release.

  2. A Polyprotein-Expressing Salmonid Alphavirus Replicon Induces Modest Protection in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo Salar Against Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azila Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is an important strategy for the control and prevention of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar in the post-smolt stage in sea-water. In this study, a heterologous gene expression system, based on a replicon construct of salmonid alphavirus (SAV, was used for in vitro and in vivo expression of IPN virus proteins. The large open reading frame of segment A, encoding the polyprotein NH2-pVP2-VP4-VP3-COOH, as well as pVP2, were cloned and expressed by the SAV replicon in Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214 and epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC cells. The replicon constructs pSAV/polyprotein (pSAV/PP and pSAV/pVP2 were used to immunize Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar by a single intramuscular injection and tested in a subsequent IPN virus (IPNV challenge trial. A low to moderate protection against IPN was observed in fish immunized with the replicon vaccine that encoded the pSAV/PP, while the pSAV/pVP2 construct was not found to induce protection.

  3. Lipolysis of visceral adipocyte triglyceride by pancreatic lipases converts mild acute pancreatitis to severe pancreatitis independent of necrosis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram N; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Cline, Rachel A; DeLany, James P; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2015-03-01

    Visceral fat necrosis has been associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for over 100 years; however, its pathogenesis and role in SAP outcomes are poorly understood. Based on recent work suggesting that pancreatic fat lipolysis plays an important role in SAP, we evaluated the role of pancreatic lipases in SAP-associated visceral fat necrosis, the inflammatory response, local injury, and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP). For this, cerulein pancreatitis was induced in lean and obese mice, alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat and parameters of AP induction (serum amylase and lipase), fat necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure, and inflammatory response were assessed. Pancreatic lipases were measured in fat necrosis and were overexpressed in 3T3-L1 cells. We noted obesity to convert mild cerulein AP to SAP with greater cytokines, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and multisystem organ failure, and 100% mortality without affecting AP induction or pancreatic necrosis. Increased pancreatic lipase amounts and activity were noted in the extensive visceral fat necrosis of dying obese mice. Lipase inhibition reduced fat necrosis, UFAs, organ failure, and mortality but not the parameters of AP induction. Pancreatic lipase expression increased lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. We conclude that UFAs generated via lipolysis of visceral fat by pancreatic lipases convert mild AP to SAP independent of pancreatic necrosis and the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative dual-tracer studies of carbon-14 tryptophan and iodine-131 HIPDM in animal models of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, K.; Som, P.; Brill, A.B.; Sacker, D.F.; Meinken, G.E.; Srivastava, S.C.; Atkins, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that a significant amount of the diamine derivative 131 I-N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3- propanediamine (HIPDM) is taken up and retained by the normal pancreas. Therefore, we studied the uptake of [ 13 1I]HIPDM in various pathophysiological models in mice (chronic alcoholism, diabetes with beta-cell atrophy and obesity with beta-cell hypertrophy) and compared to 14 C-L-Tryptophan (TRY) distribution in order to determine the factors influencing their pancreatic uptake. In normal animals, the pancreas uptake of TRY was generally higher than HIPDM. In diabetes, the relative concentration of both compounds was higher over the controls; however, in obesity, TRY showed lower accumulation than in controls while HIPDM showed no significant difference. Chronic ethanol (20%) ingestion increased TRY uptake in the pancreas compared to controls (36.88 ± 3.21 vs. 30.03 ± 4.17% ID/g; p less than 0.01) after 5 wk study period, but it decreased by 10 wk (22.36 ± 0.95% ID/g; p less than 0.005). There were no significant changes in [ 131 I]HIPDM distribution in alcoholics as compared to the controls. Radioiodinated HIPDM has potential advantages over [ 11 C]TRY for pancreatic imaging since conventional imaging techniques can be employed. Our data, however, suggest that 11 C-L-TRY is a more sensitive indicator of various pancreatic disorders

  5. Multi‑transgenic minipig models exhibiting potential for hepatic insulin resistance and pancreatic apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Siyuan; Ruan, Jinxue; Xin, Leilei; Fan, Junhua; Xia, Jihan; Liu, Zhiguo; Mu, Yulian; Yang, Shulin; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    There are currently no multi‑transgenic minipig models of diabetes for the regulation of multiple genes involved in its pathogenesis. The foot and mouth disease virus 2A (F2A)‑mediated polycistronic system possesses several advantages, and the present study developed a novel multi‑transgenic minipig model associated with diabetes using this system. The tissue‑specific polycistronic system used in the present study consisted of two expression cassettes, separated by an insulator: (i) 11‑β‑hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β‑HSD1), driven by the porcine liver‑specific apolipoprotein E promoter; (ii) human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), linked to the furin digested site and F‑2A, driven by the porcine pancreas‑specific insulin promoter. In the present study, porcine fetal fibroblasts were transfected with this vector. Following somatic cell nuclear transfer using 10 cell clones and the transplantation of 1,459 embryos in total, three Landrace x Yorkshire surrogates became pregnant and delivered three Wuzhishan piglets. Genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) demonstrated that the piglets were multi‑transgenic. Reverse transcription‑quantitative PCR confirmed that 11β‑HSD1 transcription was upregulated in the targeted liver. Similarly, hIAPP and CHOP were expressed at high levels, compared with the control (P<0.05 and P<0.01) in the pancreas, consistent with the western blotting and immunohistochemistry results. The primary results also showed that overexpression of 11β‑HSD1 in the liver increased the liver fat lipid parameters; and the levels of hIAPP and CHOP in the pancreatic islet cells, leading to delayed β‑cell development and apoptosis. This novel tissue‑specific polycistronic system offers a promising starting point for efficiently mimicking multigenic metabolic disease.

  6. X-ray phase-contrast CT of a pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Tapfer

    Full Text Available To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (CT for preclinical research, a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC was investigated. One ex-vivo mouse specimen was scanned with different grating-based phase-contrast CT imaging setups covering two different settings: i high-resolution synchrotron radiation (SR imaging and ii dose-reduced imaging using either synchrotron radiation or a conventional x-ray tube source. These experimental settings were chosen to assess the potential of phase-contrast imaging for two different types of application: i high-performance imaging for virtual microscopy applications and ii biomedical imaging with increased soft-tissue contrast for in-vivo applications. For validation and as a reference, histological slicing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were performed on the same mouse specimen. For each x-ray imaging setup, attenuation and phase-contrast images were compared visually with regard to contrast in general, and specifically concerning the recognizability of lesions and cancerous tissue. To quantitatively assess contrast, the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR of selected regions of interest (ROI in the attenuation images and the phase images were analyzed and compared. It was found that both for virtual microscopy and for in-vivo applications, there is great potential for phase-contrast imaging: in the SR-based benchmarking data, fine details about tissue composition are accessible in the phase images and the visibility of solid tumor tissue under dose-reduced conditions is markedly superior in the phase images. The present study hence demonstrates improved diagnostic value with phase-contrast CT in a mouse model of a complex endogenous cancer, promoting the use and further development of grating-based phase-contrast CT for biomedical imaging applications.

  7. Recapitulating the clinical scenario of BRCA-associated pancreatic cancer in pre-clinical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Talia; Stossel, Chani; Atias, Dikla; Buzhor, Ella; Halperin, Sharon; Cohen, Keren; Raitses-Gurevich, Maria; Glick, Yulia; Raskin, Stephen; Yehuda, Daniel; Feldman, Anna; Schvimer, Michael; Friedman, Eitan; Karni, Rotem; Wilson, Julie M; Denroche, Robert E; Lungu, Ilinca; Bartlett, John M S; Mbabaali, Faridah; Gallinger, Steven; Berger, Raanan

    2018-02-03

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal malignancies. BRCA-associated PDAC comprises a clinically relevant subtype. A portion of these patients are highly susceptible to DNA damaging therapeutics, however, responses are heterogeneous and clinical resistance evolves. We have developed unique patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from metastatic lesions of germline BRCA-mutated patients obtained at distinct time points; before treatment and at progression. Thus, closely mimicking clinical scenarios, to further investigate treatment naïve and resistant patients. DNA was isolated from six BRCA-mutated PDXs and classified by whole-genome sequencing to stable-genome or homologous recombination deficient (HRD)-genome. The sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents was evaluated in vivo in three BRCA-associated PDAC PDXs models: (1) HRD-genome naïve to treatments; (2) stable-genome naïve to treatment; (3) HRD-genome resistant to treatment. Correlation between disease course at tissue acquisition and response to PARP inhibitor (PARPi)/platinum was demonstrated in PDXs in vivo. Only the HRD-genome PDX, naïve to treatment, was sensitive to PARP inhibitor/cisplatin treatments. Our results demonstrate heterogeneous responses to DNA damaging agents/PARPi in BRCA-associated PDX thus reflecting the wide clinical spectrum. An HRD-genome PDX generated from a naïve to treatment biopsy was sensitive to platinum/PARPi whereas no benefit was observed in treating a HRD-genome PDXs generated from a patient that had acquired resistance nor stable-genome PDXs. © 2018 UICC.

  8. Building and verifying a severity prediction model of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on BISAP, MEWS and routine test indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jiang-Feng; Zhao, Yu-Xin; Ju, Jian; Wang, Wei

    2017-10-01

    To discuss the value of the Bedside Index for Severity in Acute Pancreatitis (BISAP), Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS), serum Ca2+, similarly hereinafter, and red cell distribution width (RDW) for predicting the severity grade of acute pancreatitis and to develop and verify a more accurate scoring system to predict the severity of AP. In 302 patients with AP, we calculated BISAP and MEWS scores and conducted regression analyses on the relationships of BISAP scoring, RDW, MEWS, and serum Ca2+ with the severity of AP using single-factor logistics. The variables with statistical significance in the single-factor logistic regression were used in a multi-factor logistic regression model; forward stepwise regression was used to screen variables and build a multi-factor prediction model. A receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC curve) was constructed, and the significance of multi- and single-factor prediction models in predicting the severity of AP using the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was evaluated. The internal validity of the model was verified through bootstrapping. Among 302 patients with AP, 209 had mild acute pancreatitis (MAP) and 93 had severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). According to single-factor logistic regression analysis, we found that BISAP, MEWS and serum Ca2+ are prediction indexes of the severity of AP (P-valueprediction index of AP severity (P-value>0.05). The multi-factor logistic regression analysis showed that BISAP and serum Ca2+ are independent prediction indexes of AP severity (P-valueprediction index of AP severity (P-value>0.05); BISAP is negatively related to serum Ca2+ (r=-0.330, P-valuemodel is as follows: ln()=7.306+1.151*BISAP-4.516*serum Ca2+. The predictive ability of each model for SAP follows the order of the combined BISAP and serum Ca2+ prediction model>Ca2+>BISAP. There is no statistical significance for the predictive ability of BISAP and serum Ca2+ (P-value>0.05); however, there is remarkable statistical significance for

  9. Secreted factors from dental pulp stem cells improve glucose intolerance in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice by increasing pancreatic β-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumoto-Akita, Takako; Tsunekawa, Shin; Yamamoto, Akihito; Uenishi, Eita; Ishikawa, Kota; Ogata, Hidetada; Iida, Atsushi; Ikeniwa, Makoto; Hosokawa, Kaori; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Maekawa, Ryuya; Yamauchi, Yuichiro; Seino, Yusuke; Hamada, Yoji; Hibi, Hideharu; Arima, Hiroshi; Ueda, Minoru; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have reported that stem cell transplantation promotes propagation and protection of pancreatic β-cells in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice without the differentiation of transplanted cells into pancreatic β-cells, suggesting that the improvement is due to a paracrine effect of the transplanted cells. We investigated the effects of factors secreted by dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) on β-cell function and survival. Conditioned medium from SHED (SHED-CM) was collected 48 h after culturing in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). The insulin levels in SHED-CM and serum-free conditioned media from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-CM) were undetectable. STZ-induced diabetic male C57B/6J mice were injected with DMEM as a control, SHED-CM, exendin-4 (Ex-4), or BM-CM for 14 days. Mouse pancreatic β-cell line MIN6 cells were incubated with different concentrations of STZ with SHED-CM, DMEM, Ex-4, or BM-CM for 6 h. Administration of 1 mL of SHED-CM twice a day improved glucose intolerance in STZ-induced diabetic mice and the effect continued for 20 days after the end of treatment. SHED-CM treatment increased pancreatic insulin content and β-cell mass through proliferation and an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test revealed enhanced insulin secretion. Incubation of MIN6 cells (a mouse pancreatic β-cell line) with SHED-CM enhanced insulin secretion in a glucose concentration-dependent manner and reduced STZ-induced cell death, indicating that the amelioration of hyperglycemia was caused by the direct effects of SHED-CM on β-cell function and survival. These effects were more pronounced than with the use of Ex-4, a conventional incretin-based drug, and BM-CM, which is a medium derived from other stem cells. These findings suggest that SHED-CM provides direct protection and encourages the propagation of β-cells, and has potential as a novel strategy for treatment

  10. Prognosis of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis after corticosteroid therapy-induced remission in terms of relapse and diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Miyazawa

    Full Text Available Relapse and diabetes mellitus (DM are major problems for the prognosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP. We examined the prognosis of type 1 AIP after corticosteroid therapy (CST-induced remission in terms of relapse and DM.The study enrolled 82 patients diagnosed with type 1 AIP who achieved remission with CST. We retrospectively evaluated the relapse rate in terms of the administration period of CST, clinical factors associated with relapse, and the temporal change in glucose tolerance.During follow-up, 32 patients (39.0% experienced relapse. There was no significant clinical factor that could predict relapse before beginning CST. AIP patients who ceased CST within 2 or 3 years experienced significantly earlier relapse than those who had the continuance of CST (p = 0.050 or p = 0.020. Of the 37 DM patients, 15 patients (40.5% had pre-existing DM, 17 (45.9% showed new-onset DM, and 5 (13.5% developed CST-induced DM. Patients with new-onset DM were significantly more likely to show improvement (p = 0.008 than those with pre-existing DM.It was difficult to predict relapse of AIP based on clinical parameters before beginning CST. Relapse was likely to occur within 3 years after the beginning of CST and maintenance of CST for at least 3 years reduced the risk of relapse. The early initiation of CST for AIP with impaired glucose tolerance is desirable because pre-existing DM is refractory to CST.

  11. MiR-142 modulates human pancreatic cancer proliferation and invasion by targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α in the tumor microenvironments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yebin Lu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs regulate most protein-coding genes, including genes important in cancer and other diseases. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of miR-142 could be significantly suppressed in pancreatic cancer specimens and cell lines compared to their adjacent tissues and normal pancreatic cells. Growth and invasion of PANC-1 and SW1990 cells were attenuated by overexpression of miR-142 in vitro. With the help of bioinformatics analysis, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α was identified to be a direct target of miR-142, and a luciferase reporter experiment confirmed this discovery. Overexpression of miR-142 decreases protein expression of HIF-1α. In the hypoxic microenvironment, HIF-1α was up-regulated while miR-142 was down-regulated. The invaded cells significantly increased in the hypoxic microenvironment compared to the normoxic microenvironment. The hypoxia treatment induced cells’ proliferation, and invasion could be inhibited by miR-142 overexpression or HIF-1α inhibition. Moreover, expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT markers, Vimentin, VEGF-C and E-cad, was altered under hypoxia conditions and regulated by miR-142/HIF-1α. Above all, these findings provided insights on the functional mechanism of miR-142, suggesting that the miR-142/HIF-1α axis may interfere with the proliferative and invasive properties of pancreatic cancer cells, and indicated that miR-142 could be a potential therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer.

  12. Clostridium butyricum CGMCC0313.1 Protects against Autoimmune Diabetes by Modulating Intestinal Immune Homeostasis and Inducing Pancreatic Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Jia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence indicates that indigenous Clostridium species induce colonic regulatory T cells (Tregs, and gut lymphocytes are able to migrate to pancreatic islets in an inflammatory environment. Thus, we speculate that supplementation with the well-characterized probiotics Clostridium butyricum CGMCC0313.1 (CB0313.1 may induce pancreatic Tregs and consequently inhibit the diabetes incidence in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice. CB0313.1 was administered daily to female NOD mice from 3 to 45 weeks of age. The control group received an equal volume of sterile water. Fasting glucose was measured twice a week. Pyrosequencing of the gut microbiota and flow cytometry of mesenteric lymph node (MLN, pancreatic lymph node (PLN, pancreatic and splenic immune cells were performed to investigate the effect of CB0313.1 treatment. Early oral administration of CB0313.1 mitigated insulitis, delayed the onset of diabetes, and improved energy metabolic dysfunction. Protection may involve increased Tregs, rebalanced Th1/Th2/Th17 cells and changes to a less proinflammatory immunological milieu in the gut, PLN, and pancreas. An increase of α4β7+ (the gut homing receptor Tregs in the PLN suggests that the mechanism may involve increased migration of gut-primed Tregs to the pancreas. Furthermore, 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that CB0313.1 enhanced the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, enriched Clostridium-subgroups and butyrate-producing bacteria subgroups. Our results provide the basis for future clinical investigations in preventing type 1 diabetes by oral CB0313.1 administration.

  13. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...

  14. Development of biomarker specific of pancreatic beta cells (incretin radiolabelled) for image of beta functional mass in diabetic and obese: study in animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Increased prevalence of obesity worldwide, has become a vast concern, stimulating investigations focusing prevention and therapy of this condition. The association of type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance aggravates the prognosis of obesity. Even patients successfully submitted to bariatric or metabolic surgery, may not be cured of diabetes, as improvement of circulating values of glucose and insulin not necessarily reflects recovery of pancreatic beta cell mass. There is no consensus about how to estimate beta cell mass in vivo. Available tools suffer from low sensitivity and specificity, often being as well cumbersome and expensive. Radiolabeled incretins, such as glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogs, seem to be promising options for the measurement of beta cell mass in diabetes and insulinoma. The objective of this study was the development of two conjugates of GLP-1 analog, radiolabeled with 99m Technetium, as a noninvasive imaging method for the estimation of pancreatic beta cell mass, in the presence of obesity. Animal models were selected, including hyperlipidic diet-induced obesity, diet restricted obesity, and as controls, alloxan diabetes. Results indicated that both radiotracers achieved over 97% radiochemical yield. The most successful product was 99m Tc-HYNIC-βAla-Exendin-4. Low beta cell mass uptake occurred in diet-induced obesity. Diet-restricted obesity, with substantial shedding of excess body weight, was followed by remarkable decrease of fasting blood glucose, however beta cell mass uptake was only mildly improved. Future studies are recommended in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dieting, including bariatric and metabolic operations. (author)

  15. Dicumarol inhibition of NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase induces growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer via a superoxide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Joseph J; Hinkhouse, Marilyn M; Grady, Matthew; Gaut, Andrew W; Liu, Jingru; Zhang, Yu Ping; Weydert, Christine J Darby; Domann, Frederick E; Oberley, Larry W

    2003-09-01

    NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO(1)), a homodimeric, ubiquitous, flavoprotein, catalyzes the two-electron reduction of quinones to hydroquinones. This reaction prevents the one-electron reduction of quinones by cytochrome P450 reductase and other flavoproteins that would result in oxidative cycling with generation of superoxide (O(2)(.-)). NQO(1) gene regulation may be up-regulated in some tumors to accommodate the needs of rapidly metabolizing cells to regenerate NAD(+). We hypothesized that pancreatic cancer cells would exhibit high levels of this enzyme, and inhibiting it would suppress the malignant phenotype. Reverse transcription-PCR, Western blots, and activity assays demonstrated that NQO(1) was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer cell lines tested but present in very low amounts in the normal human pancreas. To determine whether inhibition of NQO(1) would alter the malignant phenotype, MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells were treated with a selective inhibitor of NQO(1), dicumarol. Dicumarol increased intracellular production of O(2)(.-), as measured by hydroethidine staining, and inhibited cell growth. Both of these effects were blunted with infection of an adenoviral vector containing the cDNA for manganese superoxide dismutase. Dicumarol also inhibited cell growth, plating efficiency, and growth in soft agar. We conclude that inhibition of NQO(1) increases intracellular O(2)(.-) production and inhibits the in vitro malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer. These mechanisms suggest that altering the intracellular redox environment of pancreatic cancer cells may inhibit growth and delineate a potential strategy directed against pancreatic cancer.

  16. Evaluation of miR-216a and miR-217 as potential biomarkers of acute pancreatic injury in rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, David; Rosenzweig, Barry; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Lin; Stewart, Sharron; Thompson, Karol; Rouse, Rodney

    2014-09-01

    Mild injury of the exocrine pancreas is often asymptomatic and can be under- or mis-diagnosed. The pancreas-enriched microRNAs miR-216a and miR-217 were evaluated as potential serum biomarkers of exocrine pancreas injury in rodent models of acute pancreatitis induced by caerulein, l-arginine, and pancreatic duct ligation. Both microRNAs showed time- and dose- relevant responses to pancreatic injury and wider dynamic ranges of response than serum amylase or lipase. Pancreas-selective microRNAs were found to be relatively sensitive serum biomarkers of pancreatic injury in rodents with potentially greater specificity than the current standard assays.

  17. Pancreas-specific deletion of mouse Gata4 and Gata6 causes pancreatic agenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Shouhong; Borok, Matthew J.; Decker, Kimberly J.; Battle, Michele A.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Hale, Michael A.; Macdonald, Raymond J.; Sussel, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic agenesis is a human disorder caused by defects in pancreas development. To date, only a few genes have been linked to pancreatic agenesis in humans, with mutations in pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) and pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a (PTF1A) reported in only 5 families with described cases. Recently, mutations in GATA6 have been identified in a large percentage of human cases, and a GATA4 mutant allele has been implicated in a single case. In the mouse, Gata4 and Gata6 are expressed in several endoderm-derived tissues, including the pancreas. To analyze the functions of GATA4 and/or GATA6 during mouse pancreatic development, we generated pancreas-specific deletions of Gata4 and Gata6. Surprisingly, loss of either Gata4 or Gata6 in the pancreas resulted in only mild pancreatic defects, which resolved postnatally. However, simultaneous deletion of both Gata4 and Gata6 in the pancreas caused severe pancreatic agenesis due to disruption of pancreatic progenitor cell proliferation, defects in branching morphogenesis, and a subsequent failure to induce the differentiation of progenitor cells expressing carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1) and neurogenin 3 (NEUROG3). These studies address the conserved and nonconserved mechanisms underlying GATA4 and GATA6 function during pancreas development and provide a new mouse model to characterize the underlying developmental defects associated with pancreatic agenesis. PMID:23006325

  18. Studies on mechanisms of interferon-gamma action in pancreatic cancer using a data-driven and model-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pöhland Ralf

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon-gamma (IFNγ is a multifunctional cytokine with antifibrotic and antiproliferative efficiency. We previously found that pancreatic stellate cells (PSC, the main effector cells in cancer-associated fibrosis, are targets of IFNγ action in the pancreas. Applying a combined experimental and computational approach, we have demonstrated a pivotal role of STAT1 in IFNγ signaling in PSC. Using in vivo and in vitro models of pancreatic cancer, we have now studied IFNγ effects on the tumor cells themselves. We hypothesize that IFNγ inhibits tumor progression through two mechanisms, reduction of fibrogenesis and antiproliferative effects on the tumor cells. To elucidate the molecular action of IFNγ, we have established a mathematical model of STAT1 activation and combined experimental studies with computer simulations. Results In BALB/c-nu/nu mice, flank tumors composed of DSL-6A/C1 pancreatic cancer cells and PSC grew faster than pure DSL-6A/C1 cell tumors. IFNγ inhibited the growth of both types of tumors to a similar degree. Since the stroma reaction typically reduces the efficiency of therapeutic agents, these data suggested that IFNγ may retain its antitumor efficiency in PSC-containing tumors by targeting the stellate cells. Studies with cocultures of DSL-6A/C1 cells and PSC revealed a modest antiproliferative effect of IFNγ under serum-free conditions. Immunoblot analysis of STAT1 phosphorylation and confocal microscopy studies on the nuclear translocation of STAT1 in DSL-6A/C1 cells suggested that IFNγ-induced activation of the transcription factor was weaker than in PSC. The mathematical model not only reproduced the experimental data, but also underscored the conclusions drawn from the experiments by indicating that a maximum of 1/500 of total STAT1 is located as phosphorylated STAT1 in the nucleus upon IFNγ treatment of the tumor cells. Conclusions IFNγ is equally effective in DSL-6A/C1 tumors with and

  19. STAT5 activity in pancreatic beta-cells influences the severity of diabetes in animal models of type 1 and 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackerott, Malene; Møldrup, Annette; Thams, Peter

    2006-01-01

    glucose levels, lower plasma insulin levels, and lower pancreatic insulin content than wild-type mice, whereas RIP-CASTAT5 mice maintained higher levels of plasma insulin. In conclusion, our results indicate that STAT5 activity in beta-cells influences the susceptibility to experimentally induced type 1...

  20. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorek, Daniel L.J., E-mail: dthorek1@jhmi.edu [Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kramer, Robin M. [Tri-Institutional Training Program in Laboratory Animal Medicine and Science, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), Weill Cornell Medical College, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY (United States); Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve [Department of Medicine, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Ulmert, David [Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Skåne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Russell, James, E-mail: russellj@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (