WorldWideScience

Sample records for model independent measurement

  1. Cosmic homogeneity: a spectroscopic and model-independent measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, R. S.; Carvalho, G. C.; Bengaly, C. A. P., Jr.; Carvalho, J. C.; Bernui, A.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Maartens, R.

    2018-03-01

    Cosmology relies on the Cosmological Principle, i.e. the hypothesis that the Universe is homogeneous and isotropic on large scales. This implies in particular that the counts of galaxies should approach a homogeneous scaling with volume at sufficiently large scales. Testing homogeneity is crucial to obtain a correct interpretation of the physical assumptions underlying the current cosmic acceleration and structure formation of the Universe. In this letter, we use the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey to make the first spectroscopic and model-independent measurements of the angular homogeneity scale θh. Applying four statistical estimators, we show that the angular distribution of galaxies in the range 0.46 Universe in the past. These results are in agreement with the foundations of the standard cosmological paradigm.

  2. Expanding Model Independent Approaches for Measuring the CKM angle $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Prouve, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Model independent approaches to measuring the CKM angle $\\gamma$ in $B\\rightarrow DK$ decays at LHCb are explored. In particular, we consider the case where the $D$ meson decays into a final state with four hadrons. Using four-body final states such as $\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, $K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ and $K^+ K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ in addition to traditional 2 and 3 body states and has the potential to significantly improve to the overall constraint on $\\gamma$. There is a significant systematic uncertainty associated with modelling the complex phase of the $D$ decay amplitude across the five-dimensional phase space of the four body decay. It is therefore important to replace these model-dependent quantities with model-independent parameters as input for the $\\gamma$ measurement. These model independent parameters have been measured using quantum-correlated $\\psi(3770) \\rightarrow D^0 \\overline{D^0}$ decays collected by the CLEO-c experiment, and, for $D\\rightarrow K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, with $D^0-\\overline{D^0...

  3. Model-independent analysis of the Fermilab Tevatron turn-by-turn beam position monitor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrenko, A.V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Valishev, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Coherent transverse beam oscillations in the Tevatron were analyzed with the model-independent analysis (MIA) technique. This allowed one to obtain the model-independent values of coupled betatron amplitudes, phase advances, and dispersion function around the ring from a single dipole kick measurement. In order to solve the MIA mode mixing problem which limits the accuracy of determination of the optical functions, we have developed a new technique of rotational MIA mode untangling. The basic idea is to treat each beam position monitor (BPM) as two BPMs separated in a ring by exactly one turn. This leads to a simple criterion of MIA mode separation: the betatron phase advance between any BPM and its counterpart shifted by one turn should be equal to the betatron tune and therefore should not depend on the BPM position in the ring. Furthermore, we describe a MIA-based technique to locate vibrating magnets in a storage ring.

  4. A model-independent treatment of FSR in low energy σhad measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefer, A.; Jadach, S.; Gluza, J.; Jegerlehner, F.

    2003-03-01

    A new strategy for extracting the total cross section σ(e + e - → h + h - ) for the production of a charged scalar meson pair h + h - from experimental e + e - collision data is proposed. It is shown that by exploiting basic symmetries, like gauge invariance and parity conservation, it is possible to circumvent the need of ad hoc modeling to disentangle photonic radiation by the final state hadrons from photons radiated off the initial e + e - pair. The presented essentially model-independent approach is expected to be particularly interesting for the π + π - production channel since it provides a possibility to significantly reduce the model uncertainty of the extraction of the electromagnetic pion form factor vertical stroke F π vertical stroke 2 which is mainly related to our deficient knowledge of the hard photon radiation mechanism from the hadronic final state. Especially, for π + π - cross-section measurements via radiative return experiments, like the ones performed currently at the Φ-factory DAΦNE, an appreciable reduction of the model error could be achieved since here one is facing the problem of a leading order final state radiation (FSR) background. Applying the proposed method could be one step into the direction of a more accurate theoretical prediction of the muon anomalous magnetic moment a μ for which the precise knowledge of vertical stroke F π vertical stroke 2 is crucial. Furthermore, the validity and limitations of FSR models including scalar QED can hereby be tested. (orig.)

  5. Model-independent differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Könemann, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Computing differences (diffs) and merging different versions is well-known for text files, but for models it is a very young field - especially patches for models are still matter of research. Text-based and model-based diffs have different starting points because the semantics of their structure...... is fundamentally different. This paper reports on our ongoing work on model-independent diffs, i.e. a diff that does not directly refer to the models it was created from. Based on that, we present an idea of how the diff could be generalized, e.g. many atomic diffs are merged to a new, generalized diff. One use...

  6. Model-Independent Diffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Könemann, Patrick

    Computing differences (diffs) and merging different versions is wellknown for text files, but for models it is a very young field. Text-based and model-based diffs have different goals and different starting points, because the semantics of their structure is fundamentally different. Text files...... it was created from. We present concepts for model-independent diffs, how it can be created and used. In the end, we present an idea of how the diff could be generalized, e.g. many atomic differences are merged to a new, generalized diff – similar to a patch for text files. The advantage of such a generalized...

  7. Model independent measurement of the leptonic kaon decay $K^{\\pm}\\to \\mu^{\\pm}\

    CERN Document Server

    Marchevski, Radoslav; Baldini, W; Balev, S; Batley, J R; Behler, M; Bifani, S; Biino, C; Bizzeti, A; Bloch-Devaux, B; Bocquet, G; Cabibbo, N; Calvetti, M; Cartiglia, N; Ceccucci, A; Cenci, P; Cerri, C; Cheshkov, C; ChèZe, J B; Clemencic, M; Collazuol, G; Costantini, F; Cotta Ramusino, A; Coward, D; Cundy, D; Dabrowski, A; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; De Beer, M; Derré, J; Dibon, H; Dilella, L; Doble, N; Eppard, K; Falaleev, V; Fantechi, R; Fidecaro, M; Fiorini, L; Fiorini, M; Fonseca Martin, T; Frabetti, P L; Gatignon, L; Gersabeck, E; Gianoli, A; Giudici, S; Gonidec, A; Goudzovski, E; Goy Lopez, S; Holder, M; Hristov, P; Iacopini, E; Imbergamo, E; Jeitler, M; Kalmus, G; Kekelidze, V; Kleinknecht, K; Kozhuharov, V; Kubischta, W; Lamanna, G; Lazzeroni, C; Lenti, M; Litov, L; Madigozhin, D; Maier, A; Mannelli, I; Marchetto, F; Marel, G; Markytan, M; Marouelli, P; Martini, M; Masetti, L; Mazzucato, E; Michetti, A; Mikulec, I; Molokanova, N; Monnier, E; Moosbrugger, U; Morales Morales, C; Munday, D J; Nappi, A; Neuhofer, G; Norton, A; Patel, M; Pepe, M; Peters, A; Petrucci, F; Petrucci, M C; Peyaud, B; Piccini, M; Pierazzini, G; Polenkevich, I; Potrebenikov, Yu; Raggi, M; Renk, B; Rubin, P; Ruggiero, G; Savrié, M; Scarpa, M; Shieh, M; Slater, M W; Sozzi, M; Stoynev, S; Swallow, E; Szleper, M; Valdata-Nappi, M; Vallage, B; Velasco, M; Veltri, M; Venditti, S; Wache, M; Wahl, H; Walker, A; Wanke, R; Widhalm, L; Winhart, A; Winston, R; Wood, M D; Wotton, S A; Zinchenko, A; Ziolkowski , M

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of the branching ratio of the rare leptonic kaon decay K ± → μ ± ν μ e + e − is pre- sented using data collected by the NA48/2 experiment in 2003 and 2004. The measurement is performed in the region M ee > 140 MeV/c 2 . In this particular region low energy QCD contri- butions become important and can be calculated in the framework of Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT). From a total number of 1 . 56 × 10 11 recorded kaon decays, the branching ratio is mea- sured to be B ( K ± → μ ± ν μ e + e − | M ee > 140 MeV / c 2 ) = ( 7 . 8 ± 0 . 2 ) × 10 − 8

  8. Model-independent measurement of mixing parameters in $D^0 \\to K_S^0 \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-04-06

    The first model-independent measurement of the charm mixing parameters in the decay $D^0 \\to K_S \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ is reported, using a sample of $pp$ collision data recorded by the LHCb experiment, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The measured values are \\begin{eqnarray*} x &=& ( -0.86 \\pm 0.53 \\pm 0.17 ) \\times 10^{-2}, \\\\ y &=& ( +0.03 \\pm 0.46 \\pm 0.13 ) \\times 10^{-2}, \\end{eqnarray*} where the first uncertainties are statistical and include small contributions due to the external input for the strong phase measured by the CLEO collaboration, and the second uncertainties are systematic.

  9. Model-Independent Measurement of the W-Boson Helicity in Top-Quark Decays at D0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Ancu, L. S.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Anzelc, M. S.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Arthaud, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Assis Jesus, A. C. S.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Ay, C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, P.; Barberis, E.; Barfuss, A.-F.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Benitez, J. A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Biscarat, C.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Calfayan, P.; Calvet, S.; Cammin, J.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chan, K.; Chandra, A.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevallier, F.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christofek, L.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Coadou, Y.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cutts, D.; Ćwiok, M.; da Motta, H.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dong, H.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Ford, M.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Gelé, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Ginther, G.; Gollub, N.; Gómez, B.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guo, J.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez, G.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haefner, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, L.; Hansson, P.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegeman, J. G.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoeth, H.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hossain, S.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jakobs, K.; Jarvis, C.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J. R.; Kalk, J. M.; Kappler, S.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kau, D.; Kaur, R.; Kaushik, V.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Khatidze, D.; Kim, T. J.; Kirby, M. H.; Kirsch, M.; Klima, B.; Kohli, J. M.; Konrath, J.-P.; Korablev, V. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Krop, D.; Kuhl, T.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kvita, J.; Lacroix, F.; Lam, D.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Lellouch, J.; Leveque, J.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Li, L.; Lietti, S. M.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magass, C.; Magerkurth, A.; Mal, P. K.; Malbouisson, H. B.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Martin, B.; McCarthy, R.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendoza, L.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, A.; Millet, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Molina, J.; Mommsen, R. K.; Mondal, N. K.; Moore, R. W.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulders, M.; Mulhearn, M.; Mundal, O.; Mundim, L.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nilsen, H.; Nogima, H.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Obrant, G.; Ochando, C.; Onoprienko, D.; Oshima, N.; Osta, J.; Otec, R.

    2008-02-01

    We present the first model-independent measurement of the helicity of W bosons produced in top quark decays, based on a 1fb-1 sample of candidate tt¯ events in the dilepton and lepton plus jets channels collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp¯ Collider. We reconstruct the angle θ* between the momenta of the down-type fermion and the top quark in the W boson rest frame for each top quark decay. A fit of the resulting cos⁡θ* distribution finds that the fraction of longitudinal W bosons f0=0.425±0.166(stat)±0.102(syst) and the fraction of right-handed W bosons f+=0.119±0.090(stat)±0.053(syst), which is consistent at the 30% C.L. with the standard model.

  10. Error analysis of tumor blood flow measurement using dynamic contrast-enhanced data and model-independent deconvolution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Kenya; Miyazaki, Shohei

    2007-01-01

    We performed error analysis of tumor blood flow (TBF) measurement using dynamic contrast-enhanced data and model-independent deconvolution analysis, based on computer simulations. For analysis, we generated a time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent in the volume of interest (VOI) from the arterial input function (AIF) consisting of gamma-variate functions using an adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model under various plasma flow (F p ), mean capillary transit time (T c ), permeability-surface area product (PS) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values. Deconvolution analyses based on truncated singular value decomposition with a fixed threshold value (TSVD-F), with an adaptive threshold value (TSVD-A) and with the threshold value determined by generalized cross validation (TSVD-G) were used to estimate F p values from the simulated concentration-time curves in the VOI and AIF. First, we investigated the relationship between the optimal threshold value and SNR in TSVD-F, and then derived the equation describing the relationship between the threshold value and SNR for TSVD-A. Second, we investigated the dependences of the estimated F p values on T c , PS, the total duration for data acquisition and the shape of AIF. Although TSVD-F with a threshold value of 0.025, TSVD-A with the threshold value determined by the equation derived in this study and TSVD-G could estimate the F p values in a similar manner, the standard deviation of the estimates was the smallest and largest for TSVD-A and TSVD-G, respectively. PS did not largely affect the estimates, while T c did in all methods. Increasing the total duration significantly improved the variations in the estimates in all methods. TSVD-G was most sensitive to the shape of AIF, especially when the total duration was short. In conclusion, this study will be useful for understanding the reliability and limitation of model-independent deconvolution analysis when applied to TBF measurement using an

  11. Comparison of co-located independent ground-based middle atmospheric wind and temperature measurements with numerical weather prediction models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Pichon, A.; Assink, J.D.; Heinrich, P.; Blanc, E.; Charlton-Perez, A.; Lee, C.F.; Keckhut, P.; Hauchecorne, A.; Rufenacht, R.; Kampfer, N.; Drob, D.P.; Smets, P.S.M.; Evers, L.G.; Ceranna, L.; Pilger, C.; Ross, O.; Claud, C.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution, ground-based and independent observations including co-located wind radiometer, lidar stations, and infrasound instruments are used to evaluate the accuracy of general circulation models and data-constrained assimilation systems in the middle atmosphere at northern hemisphere

  12. PROBING THE EXPANSION HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSE BY MODEL-INDEPENDENT RECONSTRUCTION FROM SUPERNOVAE AND GAMMA-RAY BURST MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou, E-mail: fengcj@shnu.edu.cn, E-mail: kychz@shnu.edu.cn [Shanghai United Center for Astrophysics (SUCA), Shanghai Normal University, 100 Guilin Road, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2016-04-10

    To probe the late evolution history of the universe, we adopt two kinds of optimal basis systems. One of them is constructed by performing the principle component analysis, and the other is built by taking the multidimensional scaling approach. Cosmological observables such as the luminosity distance can be decomposed into these basis systems. These basis systems are optimized for different kinds of cosmological models that are based on different physical assumptions, even for a mixture model of them. Therefore, the so-called feature space that is projected from the basis systems is cosmological model independent, and it provides a parameterization for studying and reconstructing the Hubble expansion rate from the supernova luminosity distance and even gamma-ray burst (GRB) data with self-calibration. The circular problem when using GRBs as cosmological candles is naturally eliminated in this procedure. By using the Levenberg–Marquardt technique and the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we perform an observational constraint on this kind of parameterization. The data we used include the “joint light-curve analysis” data set that consists of 740 Type Ia supernovae and 109 long GRBs with the well-known Amati relation.

  13. Measurement device-independent quantum dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Arpita

    2017-12-01

    Very recently, the experimental demonstration of quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) with state-of-the-art atomic quantum memory has been reported (Zhang et al. in Phys Rev Lett 118:220501, 2017). Quantum dialogue (QD) falls under QSDC where the secrete messages are communicated simultaneously between two legitimate parties. The successful experimental demonstration of QSDC opens up the possibilities for practical implementation of QD protocols. Thus, it is necessary to analyze the practical security issues of QD protocols for future implementation. Since the very first proposal for QD by Nguyen (Phys Lett A 328:6-10, 2004), a large number of variants and extensions have been presented till date. However, all of those leak half of the secret bits to the adversary through classical communications of the measurement results. In this direction, motivated by the idea of Lo et al. (Phys Rev Lett 108:130503, 2012), we propose a measurement device-independent quantum dialogue scheme which is resistant to such information leakage as well as side-channel attacks. In the proposed protocol, Alice and Bob, two legitimate parties, are allowed to prepare the states only. The states are measured by an untrusted third party who may himself behave as an adversary. We show that our protocol is secure under this adversarial model. The current protocol does not require any quantum memory, and thus, it is inherently robust against memory attacks. Such robustness might not be guaranteed in the QSDC protocol with quantum memory (Zhang et al. 2017).

  14. Functional Independence Measure Penderita Cedera Servikal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zafrullah Arifin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spine injury is one of the most common spinal cord injuries in trauma patients. From 100,000 spinal cord injury cases reported in the United States of America (2008, 2/3 involved cervical spine injury. American Spinal Cord Injury Association (ASIA Impairment Score is used as an initial assessment but further prognostic outcome of these patients is often not paid enough attention. The objective of this study was to find the value of functional independence measure (FIM cervical spine injury patients with conservative management and correlation with age, sex, type of trauma, onset of trauma, cervical bone abnormalities, type of spinal lesion and ASIA Impairment Score. A prospective cohort study was performed to all patients with cervical spine injury which fullfil the inclusion criteria treated in Neurosurgery Department of Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung. The subjects were classified based on age, sex, single/multiple trauma, acute/chronic, cervical bone abnormalities, complete/incomplete lesion, ASIA impairment score and initial complication. The patients were performed to FIM examination in Outpatient clinic of Neurosurgery. T-test and chi-square test with p<0.05 were done to analyze the data. There were 17 cervical spine injury patients treated in Neurosurgery Department of Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung during April 2009–April 2010. The average FIM value of cervical spine injury in those patients was 4+1.63 by cohort prospective study. There were no correlation between FIM value with age (p=0.064, sex (p=0.144, type of trauma (p=0.959, onset of trauma (p=0.220 and cervical bone abnormalities (p=0.869. We found a significant correlation between FIM value with type of cervical spine lesion (p=0.037 and ASIA Impairment Score (p<0.001 in cervical spine patients. In conclusion, type of cervical spine lesion and ASIA impairment score have significant correlation with FIM value of patients in 3 months after cervical injury.

  15. Independent Component Analysis in Multimedia Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Modeling of multimedia and multimodal data becomes increasingly important with the digitalization of the world. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the potential of independent component analysis and blind sources separation methods for modeling and understanding of multimedia data, which...

  16. Radiometric measurement independent of profile. Belt weighers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, J.

    1986-01-01

    Radiometric measuring techniques allow contactless determination of the material carried by belt conveyors. Data defining the material is obtained via attenuation of gamma rays passing through the material on the belt. The method applies the absorption law according to Lambert-Beer, which has to be corrected by a build-up factor because of the stray radiation induced by the Compton effect. The profile-dependent error observed with conventional radiometric belt weighers is caused by the non-linearity of the absorption law in connection with the simultaneous summation of the various partial rays in a detector. The scanning method allows separate evaluation of the partial rays' attenuation and thus yields the correct data of the material carried, regardless of the profile. The scanning method is applied on a finite number of scanning sections, and a residual error has to be taken into account. The stochastics of quantum emission and absorption leads to an error whose expectation value is to be taken into account in the scanning algorithm. As the conveyor belt is in motion during the process of measurements, only part of the material conveyed is irradiated. The resulting assessment error is investigated as a function of the autocorrelation function of the material on the belt. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Model-independent cosmological constraints from growth and expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Huillier, Benjamin; Shafieloo, Arman; Kim, Hyungjin

    2018-02-01

    Reconstructing the expansion history of the Universe from type Ia supernovae data, we fit the growth rate measurements and put model-independent constraints on some key cosmological parameters, namely, Ωm, γ, and σ8. The constraints are consistent with those from the concordance model within the framework of general relativity, but the current quality of the data is not sufficient to rule out modified gravity models. Adding the condition that dark energy density should be positive at all redshifts, independently of its equation of state, further constrains the parameters and interestingly supports the concordance model.

  18. Measuring the Statutory Independence of Sub-Saharan Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measuring the Statutory Independence of Sub-Saharan Africa Central Banks. ... Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review ... Central bank independence, i.e. freedom from political pressure in the conduct of monetary policy, is an attempt to overcome the inflationary bias inherent in the trade-off between inflation and ...

  19. Model-independent tests of cosmic gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Eric V

    2011-12-28

    Gravitation governs the expansion and fate of the universe, and the growth of large-scale structure within it, but has not been tested in detail on these cosmic scales. The observed acceleration of the expansion may provide signs of gravitational laws beyond general relativity (GR). Since the form of any such extension is not clear, from either theory or data, we adopt a model-independent approach to parametrizing deviations to the Einstein framework. We explore the phase space dynamics of two key post-GR functions and derive a classification scheme, and an absolute criterion on accuracy necessary for distinguishing classes of gravity models. Future surveys will be able to constrain the post-GR functions' amplitudes and forms to the required precision, and hence reveal new aspects of gravitation.

  20. Model-independent Exoplanet Transit Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Erik; Piskunov, Nikolai

    2018-05-01

    We propose a new data analysis method for obtaining transmission spectra of exoplanet atmospheres and brightness variation across the stellar disk from transit observations. The new method is capable of recovering exoplanet atmosphere absorption spectra and stellar specific intensities without relying on theoretical models of stars and planets. We simultaneously fit both stellar specific intensity and planetary radius directly to transit light curves. This allows stellar models to be removed from the data analysis. Furthermore, we use a data quality weighted filtering technique to achieve an optimal trade-off between spectral resolution and reconstruction fidelity homogenizing the signal-to-noise ratio across the wavelength range. Such an approach is more efficient than conventional data binning onto a low-resolution wavelength grid. We demonstrate that our analysis is capable of reproducing results achieved by using an explicit quadratic limb-darkening equation and that the filtering technique helps eliminate spurious spectral features in regions with strong telluric absorption. The method is applied to the VLT FORS2 observations of the exoplanets GJ 1214 b and WASP-49 b, and our results are in agreement with previous studies. Comparisons between obtained stellar specific intensity and numerical models indicates that the method is capable of accurately reconstructing the specific intensity. The proposed method enables more robust characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres by separating derivation of planetary transmission and stellar specific intensity spectra (that is model-independent) from chemical and physical interpretation.

  1. Reference-Frame-Independent and Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution Using One Single Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Zhu, Changhua; Ma, Shuquan; Wei, Kejin; Pei, Changxing

    2018-04-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) is immune to all detector side-channel attacks. However, practical implementations of MDI-QKD, which require two-photon interferences from separated independent single-photon sources and a nontrivial reference alignment procedure, are still challenging with current technologies. Here, we propose a scheme that significantly reduces the experimental complexity of two-photon interferences and eliminates reference frame alignment by the combination of plug-and-play and reference frame independent MDI-QKD. Simulation results show that the secure communication distance can be up to 219 km in the finite-data case and the scheme has good potential for practical MDI-QKD systems.

  2. Constrained independent component analysis approach to nonobtrusive pulse rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouri, Gill R.; Kyal, Survi; Dianat, Sohail; Mestha, Lalit K.

    2012-07-01

    Nonobtrusive pulse rate measurement using a webcam is considered. We demonstrate how state-of-the-art algorithms based on independent component analysis suffer from a sorting problem which hinders their performance, and propose a novel algorithm based on constrained independent component analysis to improve performance. We present how the proposed algorithm extracts a photoplethysmography signal and resolves the sorting problem. In addition, we perform a comparative study between the proposed algorithm and state-of-the-art algorithms over 45 video streams using a finger probe oxymeter for reference measurements. The proposed algorithm provides improved accuracy: the root mean square error is decreased from 20.6 and 9.5 beats per minute (bpm) for existing algorithms to 3.5 bpm for the proposed algorithm. An error of 3.5 bpm is within the inaccuracy expected from the reference measurements. This implies that the proposed algorithm provided performance of equal accuracy to the finger probe oximeter.

  3. Development Parenting Model to Increase the Independence of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunarty, Kustiah; Dirawan, Gufran Darma

    2015-01-01

    This study examines parenting and the child's independence model. The research problem is whether there is a relationship between parenting and the child's independence. The purpose of research is to determine: firstly, the type of parenting in an effort to increase the independence of the child; and the relationship between parenting models and…

  4. Spinal Cord Independence Measure, version III: applicability to the UK spinal cord injured population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Clive A; Tesio, Luigi; Itzkovich, Malka; Soni, Bakul M; Silva, Pedro; Mecci, Munawar; Chadwick, Raymond; el Masry, Waghi; Osman, Aheed; Savic, Gordana; Gardner, Brian; Bergström, Ebba; Catz, Amiram

    2009-09-01

    To examine the validity, reliability and usefulness of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure for the UK spinal cord injury population. Multi-centre cohort study. Four UK regional spinal cord injury centres. Eighty-six people with spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord Independence Measure and Functional Independence Measure on admission analysed using inferential statistics, and Rasch analysis of Spinal Cord Independence Measure. Internal consistency, inter-rater reliability, discriminant validity; Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscale match between distribution of item difficulty and patient ability measurements; reliability of patient ability measures; fit of data to Rasch model; unidimensionality of subscales; hierarchical ordering of categories within items; differential item functioning across patient groups. Scale reliability (kappa coefficients range 0.491-0.835; (p Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscales compatible with stringent Rasch requirements; mean infit indices high; distinct strata of abilities identified; most thresholds ordered; item hierarchy stable across clinical groups and centres. Misfit and differences in item hierarchy identified. Difficulties assessing central cord injuries highlighted. Conventional statistical and Rasch analyses justify the use of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure in clinical practice and research in the UK. Cross-cultural validity may be further improved.

  5. A diagrammatic construction of formal E-independent model hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvasnicka, V.

    1977-01-01

    A diagrammatic construction of formal E-independent model interaction (i.e., without second-quantization formalism) is suggested. The construction starts from the quasi-degenerate Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory, in the framework of which an E-dependent model Hamiltonian is simply constructed. Applying the ''E-removing'' procedure to this E-dependent model Hamiltonian, the E-independent formal model Hamiltonian either Hermitian or non-Hermitian can diagrammatically be easily derived. For the formal E-independent model Hamiltonian the separability theorem is proved, which can be profitably used for a rather ''formalistic ''construction of a many-body E-independent model Hamiltonian

  6. Turkish adaptation of Spinal Cord Independence Measure--version III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesiktas, Nur; Paker, Nurdan; Bugdayci, Derya; Sencan, Sureyya; Karan, Ayse; Muslumanoglu, Lutfiye

    2012-03-01

    Various rating scales have been used to assess ability in individuals with spinal cord injury. There is no specific functional assessment scale for Turkish patients with spinal cord injury. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) is a specific test, which has become popular in the last decade. A study was conducted to validate and evaluate the Turkish adaptation of the SCIM III (T-SCIM III). The SCIM III was translated into Turkish. Reliability, (internal consistency, interrater reliability, and test-retest reliability), validity (with Functional Independence Measurement), and sensitivity (changes in 8-week exercise program) were studied. Internal consistency for total score was sufficient (Cronbach α=0.79). The interrater reliability was moderate to high (Cohen κ between 0.72 and 1). Convergent validity was high (r=0.89, PSCIM III was found to be more sensitive than the Functional Independence Measurement to changes in function. Hence, we recommend the use of T-SCIM III in clinical practice as a reliable, valid, and easy-to-use tool.

  7. Functional independence measure in patients with intermittent claudication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Shihara de Assis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVEOf this study were to evaluate the functional independence of patients with intermittent claudication and to verify its association with sociodemographic and clinical variables, walking ability and physical activity level.METHODThis was a descriptive, exploratory, cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. Fifty participants (66.4 years; 68% male were recruited from Claudication Unit of a tertiary hospital. Functional Independence Measure were used to evaluate functional incapacity; the Baltimore Activity Scale, to estimate the physical activity level and the Walking Impairement Questionnaire, the walking ability.RESULTSParticipants had complete functional independence (124.8 + 2.0, low levels of physical activity (4.2 + 2.0, and impairment of walking ability; the worst performance was found in walking velocity domain (21.2 + 16.4. The functional independence score was associated with physical activity (r=0,402 and walking ability scores (distance, r=0,485; speed, r=0,463; stairs, r=0,337.CONCLUSIONIn conclusion, the level of functionality is associated with functional capacity in these patients.

  8. Model-independent measurement of $\\boldsymbol{t}$-channel single top quark production in $\\boldsymbol{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at $\\boldsymbol{\\sqrt{s}=1.96}$ TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    We present a model-independent measurement of t-channel electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and selecting events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy and one or two jets originating from the fragmentation of b quarks, we measure a cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tqb + X) = 2.90 {+-} 0.59 (stat + syst) pb for a top quark mass of 172.5 GeV. The probability of the background to fluctuate and produce a signal as large as the one observed is 1.6 x 10{sup -8}, corresponding to a significance of 5.5 standard deviations.

  9. Model-independent measurement of the e{sup +}e{sup -} → HZ cross section at a future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider using hadronic Z decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, M.A. [University of Cambridge, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    A future e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, such as the ILC or CLIC, would allow the Higgs sector to be probed with a precision significantly beyond that achievable at the High-Luminosity LHC. A central part of the Higgs programme at an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is the model-independent determination of the absolute Higgs couplings to fermions and to gauge bosons. Here the measurement of the e{sup +}e{sup -} → HZ Higgsstrahlung cross section, using the recoil mass technique, sets the absolute scale for all Higgs coupling measurements. Previous studies have considered σ(e{sup +}e{sup -} → HZ) with Z → l{sup +}l{sup -}, where l = e, μ. In this paper it is shown for the first time that a near model-independent recoil mass technique can be extended to the hadronic decays of the Z boson. Because the branching ratio for Z → q anti q is approximately ten times greater than for Z → l{sup +}l{sup -}, this method is statistically more powerful than using the leptonic decays. For an integrated luminosity of 500 fb{sup -1} at a centre-of-mass energy of √(s) = 350 GeV at CLIC, σ(e{sup +}e{sup -} → HZ) can be measured to ±1.8 % using the hadronic recoil mass technique. A similar precision is found for the ILC operating at √(s) = 350 GeV. The centre-of-mass dependence of this measurement technique is discussed, arguing for the initial operation of a future linear collider at just above the top-pair production threshold. (orig.)

  10. Measuring energy security. Can the United States achieve oil independence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Stochastic simulation of the direct economic costs of oil dependence in an uncertain future is proposed as a useful metric of oil dependence. The market failure from which these costs arise is imperfect competition in the world oil market, chiefly as a consequence of the use of market power by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) cartel. Oil dependence costs can be substantial. It is estimated that oil dependence costs to the US economy in 2008 will exceed $500 billion. Other costs, such as military expenditures or foreign policy constraints are deemed to be largely derivative of the actual or potential economic costs of oil dependence. The use of quantifiable economic costs as a security metric leads to a measurable definition of oil independence, or oil security, which can be used to test the ability of specific policies to achieve oil independence in an uncertain future. (author)

  11. Model-Independent Beam Dynamics Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.; Wang, C.X.; Yan, Y.T.; Bane, K.L.; Cai, Y.; Decker, F.; Minty, M.G.; Stupakov, G.V.; Zimmermann, F.

    1999-01-01

    Using a singular value decomposition of a beam line matrix, composed of many beam position measurements for a large number of pulses, together with the measurement of pulse-by-pulse beam properties or machine attributes, the contributions of each variable to the beam centroid motion can be identified with a greatly improved resolution. The eigenvalues above the noise floor determine the number of significant physical variables. This method is applicable to storage rings, linear accelerators, and any system involving a number of sources and a larger number of sensors with unknown correlations. Applications are presented from the Stanford Linear Collider. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  12. Development of independent generalized probabilistic models for regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gashev, M.Kh.; Zinchenko, Yu.A.; Stefanishin, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses the development of probabilistic models to be used in regulatory activities. Results from the development of independent generalized PSA-1 models for purposes of SNRIU risk-informed regulation are presented

  13. Model independent spin determination at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelhaeuser, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    By the end of the year 2011, both the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider have recorded around 5 inverse femtobarns of data at an energy of 7 TeV. There are only vague hints from the already analysed data towards new physics at the TeV scale. However, one knows that around this scale, new physics should show up so that theoretical issues of the standard model of particle physics can be cured. During the last decades, extensions to the standard model that are supposed to solve its problems have been constructed, and the corresponding phenomenology has been worked out. As soon as new physics is discovered, one has to deal with the problem of determining the nature of the underlying model. A first hint is of course given by the mass spectrum and quantum numbers such as electric and colour charges of the new particles. However, there are two popular model classes, supersymmetric models and extradimensional models, which can exhibit almost equal properties at the accessible energy range. Both introduce partners to the standard model particles with the same charges and thus one needs an extended discrimination method. From the origin of these partners arises a relevant difference: The partners constructed in extradimensional models have the same spin as their standard model partners while in Supersymmetry they differ by spin 1/2. These different spins have an impact on the phenomenology of the two models. For example, one can exploit the fact that the total cross sections are affected, but this requires a very good knowledge of the couplings and masses involved. Another approach uses angular distributions depending on the particle spins. A prevailing method based on this idea uses the invariant mass distribution of the visible particles in decay chains. One can relate these distributions to the spin of the particle mediating the decay since it reflects itself in the highest power of the invariant mass s ff of the adjacent particles. In this thesis we

  14. Model independent spin determination at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelhaeuser, Lisa

    2012-04-25

    By the end of the year 2011, both the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider have recorded around 5 inverse femtobarns of data at an energy of 7 TeV. There are only vague hints from the already analysed data towards new physics at the TeV scale. However, one knows that around this scale, new physics should show up so that theoretical issues of the standard model of particle physics can be cured. During the last decades, extensions to the standard model that are supposed to solve its problems have been constructed, and the corresponding phenomenology has been worked out. As soon as new physics is discovered, one has to deal with the problem of determining the nature of the underlying model. A first hint is of course given by the mass spectrum and quantum numbers such as electric and colour charges of the new particles. However, there are two popular model classes, supersymmetric models and extradimensional models, which can exhibit almost equal properties at the accessible energy range. Both introduce partners to the standard model particles with the same charges and thus one needs an extended discrimination method. From the origin of these partners arises a relevant difference: The partners constructed in extradimensional models have the same spin as their standard model partners while in Supersymmetry they differ by spin 1/2. These different spins have an impact on the phenomenology of the two models. For example, one can exploit the fact that the total cross sections are affected, but this requires a very good knowledge of the couplings and masses involved. Another approach uses angular distributions depending on the particle spins. A prevailing method based on this idea uses the invariant mass distribution of the visible particles in decay chains. One can relate these distributions to the spin of the particle mediating the decay since it reflects itself in the highest power of the invariant mass s{sub ff} of the adjacent particles. In this thesis

  15. Choice of Measurement Locations of Nonlinear Structures Using Proper Orthogonal Modes and Effective Independence Distribution Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Ritto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a methodology to automatically choose the measurement locations of a nonlinear structure/equipment that needs to be monitored while operating. The response of the computational model (or experimental data is used to construct the proper orthogonal modes applying the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD, and the effective independence distribution vector (EIDV procedure is employed to eliminate, iteratively, locations that contribute less for the independence of the target proper orthogonal modes.

  16. Model selection and comparison for independents sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Kjær; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2014-01-01

    In the signal processing literature, many methods have been proposed for estimating the number of sinusoidal basis functions from a noisy data set. The most popular method is the asymptotic MAP criterion, which is sometimes also referred to as the BIC. In this paper, we extend and improve this me....... Through simulations, we demonstrate that the lp-BIC outperforms the asymptotic MAP criterion and other state of the art methods in terms of model selection, de-noising and prediction performance. The simulation code is available online.......In the signal processing literature, many methods have been proposed for estimating the number of sinusoidal basis functions from a noisy data set. The most popular method is the asymptotic MAP criterion, which is sometimes also referred to as the BIC. In this paper, we extend and improve...... this method by considering the problem in a full Bayesian framework instead of the approximate formulation, on which the asymptotic MAP criterion is based. This leads to a new model selection and comparison method, the lp-BIC, whose computational complexity is of the same order as the asymptotic MAP criterion...

  17. Bayesian Test of Significance for Conditional Independence: The Multinomial Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo de Morais Andrade

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Conditional independence tests have received special attention lately in machine learning and computational intelligence related literature as an important indicator of the relationship among the variables used by their models. In the field of probabilistic graphical models, which includes Bayesian network models, conditional independence tests are especially important for the task of learning the probabilistic graphical model structure from data. In this paper, we propose the full Bayesian significance test for tests of conditional independence for discrete datasets. The full Bayesian significance test is a powerful Bayesian test for precise hypothesis, as an alternative to the frequentist’s significance tests (characterized by the calculation of the p-value.

  18. Techniques for studies of unbinned model independent CP violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedford, Nicholas; Weisser, Constantin; Parkes, Chris; Gersabeck, Marco; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Chen, Shanzhen [University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    Charge-Parity (CP) violation is a known part of the Standard Model and has been observed and measured in both the B and K meson systems. The observed levels, however, are insufficient to explain the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe, and so other sources need to be found. One area of current investigation is the D meson system, where predicted levels of CP violation are much lower than in the B and K meson systems. This means that more sensitive methods are required when searching for CP violation in this system. Several unbinned model independent methods have been proposed for this purpose, all of which need to be optimised and their sensitivities compared.

  19. One-sided measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wen-Fei; Zhen, Yi-Zheng; Zheng, Yu-Lin; Li, Li; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Liu, Nai-Le; Chen, Kai

    2018-01-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol was proposed to remove all the detector side channel attacks, while its security relies on the trusted encoding systems. Here we propose a one-sided MDI-QKD (1SMDI-QKD) protocol, which enjoys detection loophole-free advantage, and at the same time weakens the state preparation assumption in MDI-QKD. The 1SMDI-QKD can be regarded as a modified MDI-QKD, in which Bob's encoding system is trusted, while Alice's is uncharacterized. For the practical implementation, we also provide a scheme by utilizing coherent light source with an analytical two decoy state estimation method. Simulation with realistic experimental parameters shows that the protocol has a promising performance, and thus can be applied to practical QKD applications.

  20. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum digital signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, G L; Lucamarini, M; Yuan, Z L; Dynes, J F; Comandar, L C; Sharpe, A W; Shields, A J; Curty, M; Puthoor, I V; Andersson, E

    2017-10-23

    The development of quantum networks will be paramount towards practical and secure telecommunications. These networks will need to sign and distribute information between many parties with information-theoretic security, requiring both quantum digital signatures (QDS) and quantum key distribution (QKD). Here, we introduce and experimentally realise a quantum network architecture, where the nodes are fully connected using a minimum amount of physical links. The central node of the network can act either as a totally untrusted relay, connecting the end users via the recently introduced measurement-device-independent (MDI)-QKD, or as a trusted recipient directly communicating with the end users via QKD. Using this network, we perform a proof-of-principle demonstration of QDS mediated by MDI-QKD. For that, we devised an efficient protocol to distil multiple signatures from the same block of data, thus reducing the statistical fluctuations in the sample and greatly enhancing the final QDS rate in the finite-size scenario.

  1. Memory-assisted measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayi, Christiana; Razavi, Mohsen; Ma, Xiongfeng; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    A protocol with the potential of beating the existing distance records for conventional quantum key distribution (QKD) systems is proposed. It borrows ideas from quantum repeaters by using memories in the middle of the link, and that of measurement-device-independent QKD, which only requires optical source equipment at the user's end. For certain memories with short access times, our scheme allows a higher repetition rate than that of quantum repeaters with single-mode memories, thereby requiring lower coherence times. By accounting for various sources of nonideality, such as memory decoherence, dark counts, misalignment errors, and background noise, as well as timing issues with memories, we develop a mathematical framework within which we can compare QKD systems with and without memories. In particular, we show that with the state-of-the-art technology for quantum memories, it is potentially possible to devise memory-assisted QKD systems that, at certain distances of practical interest, outperform current QKD implementations.

  2. Measure of functional independence dominates discharge outcome prediction after inpatient rehabilitation for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Allen W; Therneau, Terry M; Schultz, Billie A; Niewczyk, Paulette M; Granger, Carl V

    2015-04-01

    Identifying clinical data acquired at inpatient rehabilitation admission for stroke that accurately predict key outcomes at discharge could inform the development of customized plans of care to achieve favorable outcomes. The purpose of this analysis was to use a large comprehensive national data set to consider a wide range of clinical elements known at admission to identify those that predict key outcomes at rehabilitation discharge. Sample data were obtained from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation data set with the diagnosis of stroke for the years 2005 through 2007. This data set includes demographic, administrative, and medical variables collected at admission and discharge and uses the FIM (functional independence measure) instrument to assess functional independence. Primary outcomes of interest were functional independence measure gain, length of stay, and discharge to home. The sample included 148,367 people (75% white; mean age, 70.6±13.1 years; 97% with ischemic stroke) admitted to inpatient rehabilitation a mean of 8.2±12 days after symptom onset. The total functional independence measure score, the functional independence measure motor subscore, and the case-mix group were equally the strongest predictors for any of the primary outcomes. The most clinically relevant 3-variable model used the functional independence measure motor subscore, age, and walking distance at admission (r(2)=0.107). No important additional effect for any other variable was detected when added to this model. This analysis shows that a measure of functional independence in motor performance and age at rehabilitation hospital admission for stroke are predominant predictors of outcome at discharge in a uniquely large US national data set. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Observational attachment theory-based parenting measures predict children's attachment narratives independently from social learning theory-based measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Carla; O'Connor, Thomas G; Futh, Annabel; Scott, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Conceptually and methodologically distinct models exist for assessing quality of parent-child relationships, but few studies contrast competing models or assess their overlap in predicting developmental outcomes. Using observational methodology, the current study examined the distinctiveness of attachment theory-based and social learning theory-based measures of parenting in predicting two key measures of child adjustment: security of attachment narratives and social acceptance in peer nominations. A total of 113 5-6-year-old children from ethnically diverse families participated. Parent-child relationships were rated using standard paradigms. Measures derived from attachment theory included sensitive responding and mutuality; measures derived from social learning theory included positive attending, directives, and criticism. Child outcomes were independently-rated attachment narrative representations and peer nominations. Results indicated that Attachment theory-based and Social Learning theory-based measures were modestly correlated; nonetheless, parent-child mutuality predicted secure child attachment narratives independently of social learning theory-based measures; in contrast, criticism predicted peer-nominated fighting independently of attachment theory-based measures. In young children, there is some evidence that attachment theory-based measures may be particularly predictive of attachment narratives; however, no single model of measuring parent-child relationships is likely to best predict multiple developmental outcomes. Assessment in research and applied settings may benefit from integration of different theoretical and methodological paradigms.

  4. Model-independent measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ using $B^0 \\to D K^{\\ast 0}$ decays with $D \\to K_{S}^{0} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $K_{S}^{0} K^{+} K^{-}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hongming, Li; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusardi, Nicola; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-06-21

    A binned Dalitz plot analysis of the decays $B^0 \\to D K^{\\ast 0}$, with $D \\to K_{S}^{0} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $D \\to K_{S}^{0} K^{+} K^{-}$, is performed to measure the observables $x_\\pm$ and $y_\\pm$, which are related to the CKM angle $\\gamma$ and the hadronic parameters of the decays. The $D$ decay strong phase variation over the Dalitz plot is taken from measurements performed at the CLEO-c experiment, making the analysis independent of the $D$ decay model. With a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0\\,\\rm{fb}^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment, the values of the $CP$ violation parameters are found to be $x_+ = 0.05 \\pm 0.35 \\pm 0.02$, $x_-=-0.31\\pm 0.20 \\pm 0.04$, $y_+=-0.81\\pm 0.28\\pm 0.06$ and $y_-=0.31\\pm 0.21 \\pm 0.05$, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. These observables correspond to values $\\gamma$ = $(71 \\pm 20)^\\circ$, $r_{B^0} = 0.56\\pm 0.17$ and $\\delta_{B^0} = (204\\,^{+21}_{-20})^\\circ$. The parame...

  5. Independent measuring station for the GNEJS neutron spectrometer information and measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorokhov, I.S.; Laptev, A.B.; Marchenkov, V.V.; Tubol'tsev, Yu.V.; Fokin, E.Yu.; Shcherbakov, O.A.

    1984-01-01

    An independent measuring station (IMS) being a part of the information and measuring system of the neutron time-of-flight spectrometer is described. IMS represents the time (time-to-amplitude or time-to-angular) module analyzer assembled on the base of one or several CAMAC crates. The station permits to perform time measurements as well as the time measurements with amplitude weighing in an independent mode with subseqUent data transmission the central PDP-11/05 computer. The station processor unit is an independent controller. The software consists of the programming langUage of the controller from local terminal and programs ensuring measuring and shaping the spectra with their output on TV display devic. communication with the computer and dialogue with the operator

  6. Noninvasive Model Independent Noise Control with Adaptive Feedback Cancellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An active noise control (ANC system is model dependent/independent if its controller transfer function is dependent/independent on initial estimates of path models in a sound field. Since parameters of path models in a sound field will change when boundary conditions of the sound field change, model-independent ANC systems (MIANC are able to tolerate variations of boundary conditions in sound fields and more reliable than model-dependent counterparts. A possible way to implement MIANC systems is online path modeling. Many such systems require invasive probing signals (persistent excitations to obtain accurate estimates of path models. In this study, a noninvasive MIANC system is proposed. It uses online path estimates to cancel feedback, recover reference signal, and optimize a stable controller in the minimum H2 norm sense, without any forms of persistent excitations. Theoretical analysis and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the stable control performance of the proposed system.

  7. The model-independent analysis for Higgs boson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-23

    independent search for the Higgs boson and also check if the 125 GeV particle is indeed the Standard .... est ai can be evaluated, having the other unconstrained model parameters treated as the nuisance parameters. The signal ...

  8. Memory-assisted measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayi, Christiana; Razavi, Mohsen; Ma, Xiongfeng; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    A protocol with the potential of beating the existing distance records for conventional quantum key distribution (QKD) systems is proposed. It borrows ideas from quantum repeaters by using memories in the middle of the link, and that of measurement-device-independent QKD, which only requires optical source equipment at the user's end. For certain memories with short access times, our scheme allows a higher repetition rate than that of quantum repeaters with single-mode memories, thereby requiring lower coherence times. By accounting for various sources of nonideality, such as memory decoherence, dark counts, misalignment errors, and background noise, as well as timing issues with memories, we develop a mathematical framework within which we can compare QKD systems with and without memories. In particular, we show that with the state-of-the-art technology for quantum memories, it is potentially possible to devise memory-assisted QKD systems that, at certain distances of practical interest, outperform current QKD implementations. (paper)

  9. How Many Separable Sources? Model Selection In Independent Components Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Roger P.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Strother, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Unlike mixtures consisting solely of non-Gaussian sources, mixtures including two or more Gaussian components cannot be separated using standard independent components analysis methods that are based on higher order statistics and independent observations. The mixed Independent Components Analysis....../Principal Components Analysis (mixed ICA/PCA) model described here accommodates one or more Gaussian components in the independent components analysis model and uses principal components analysis to characterize contributions from this inseparable Gaussian subspace. Information theory can then be used to select from...... among potential model categories with differing numbers of Gaussian components. Based on simulation studies, the assumptions and approximations underlying the Akaike Information Criterion do not hold in this setting, even with a very large number of observations. Cross-validation is a suitable, though...

  10. Model Independent Analysis of Beam Centroid Dynamics in Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chun-xi

    2003-04-21

    Fundamental issues in Beam-Position-Monitor (BPM)-based beam dynamics observations are studied in this dissertation. The major topic is the Model-Independent Analysis (MIA) of beam centroid dynamics. Conventional beam dynamics analysis requires a certain machine model, which itself of ten needs to be refined by beam measurements. Instead of using any particular machine model, MIA relies on a statistical analysis of the vast amount of BPM data that often can be collected non-invasively during normal machine operation. There are two major parts in MIA. One is noise reduction and degrees-of-freedom analysis using a singular value decomposition of a BPM-data matrix, which constitutes a principal component analysis of BPM data. The other is a physical base decomposition of the BPM-data matrix based on the time structure of pulse-by-pulse beam and/or machine parameters. The combination of these two methods allows one to break the resolution limit set by individual BPMs and observe beam dynamics at more accurate levels. A physical base decomposition is particularly useful for understanding various beam dynamics issues. MIA improves observation and analysis of beam dynamics and thus leads to better understanding and control of beams in both linacs and rings. The statistical nature of MIA makes it potentially useful in other fields. Another important topic discussed in this dissertation is the measurement of a nonlinear Poincare section (one-turn) map in circular accelerators. The beam dynamics in a ring is intrinsically nonlinear. In fact, nonlinearities are a major factor that limits stability and influences the dynamics of halos. The Poincare section map plays a basic role in characterizing and analyzing such a periodic nonlinear system. Although many kinds of nonlinear beam dynamics experiments have been conducted, no direct measurement of a nonlinear map has been reported for a ring in normal operation mode. This dissertation analyzes various issues concerning map

  11. Model Independent Analysis of Beam Centroid Dynamics in Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chun-xi

    2003-01-01

    Fundamental issues in Beam-Position-Monitor (BPM)-based beam dynamics observations are studied in this dissertation. The major topic is the Model-Independent Analysis (MIA) of beam centroid dynamics. Conventional beam dynamics analysis requires a certain machine model, which itself of ten needs to be refined by beam measurements. Instead of using any particular machine model, MIA relies on a statistical analysis of the vast amount of BPM data that often can be collected non-invasively during normal machine operation. There are two major parts in MIA. One is noise reduction and degrees-of-freedom analysis using a singular value decomposition of a BPM-data matrix, which constitutes a principal component analysis of BPM data. The other is a physical base decomposition of the BPM-data matrix based on the time structure of pulse-by-pulse beam and/or machine parameters. The combination of these two methods allows one to break the resolution limit set by individual BPMs and observe beam dynamics at more accurate levels. A physical base decomposition is particularly useful for understanding various beam dynamics issues. MIA improves observation and analysis of beam dynamics and thus leads to better understanding and control of beams in both linacs and rings. The statistical nature of MIA makes it potentially useful in other fields. Another important topic discussed in this dissertation is the measurement of a nonlinear Poincare section (one-turn) map in circular accelerators. The beam dynamics in a ring is intrinsically nonlinear. In fact, nonlinearities are a major factor that limits stability and influences the dynamics of halos. The Poincare section map plays a basic role in characterizing and analyzing such a periodic nonlinear system. Although many kinds of nonlinear beam dynamics experiments have been conducted, no direct measurement of a nonlinear map has been reported for a ring in normal operation mode. This dissertation analyzes various issues concerning map

  12. Model-independent Constraints on Cosmic Curvature and Opacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Jian; Wei, Jun-Jie; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Xia, Jun-Qing; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we propose to estimate the spatial curvature of the universe and the cosmic opacity in a model-independent way with expansion rate measurements, H(z), and type Ia supernova (SNe Ia). On the one hand, using a nonparametric smoothing method Gaussian process, we reconstruct a function H(z) from opacity-free expansion rate measurements. Then, we integrate the H(z) to obtain distance modulus μ H, which is dependent on the cosmic curvature. On the other hand, distances of SNe Ia can be determined by their photometric observations and thus are opacity-dependent. In our analysis, by confronting distance moduli μ H with those obtained from SNe Ia, we achieve estimations for both the spatial curvature and the cosmic opacity without any assumptions for the cosmological model. Here, it should be noted that light curve fitting parameters, accounting for the distance estimation of SNe Ia, are determined in a global fit together with the cosmic opacity and spatial curvature to get rid of the dependence of these parameters on cosmology. In addition, we also investigate whether the inclusion of different priors for the present expansion rate (H 0: global estimation, 67.74 ± 0.46 km s-1 Mpc-1, and local measurement, 73.24 ± 1.74 km s-1 Mpc-1) exert influence on the reconstructed H(z) and the following estimations of the spatial curvature and cosmic opacity. Results show that, in general, a spatially flat and transparent universe is preferred by the observations. Moreover, it is suggested that priors for H 0 matter a lot. Finally, we find that there is a strong degeneracy between the curvature and the opacity.

  13. Final model independent result of DAMA/LIBRA-phase1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R.; D' Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Belli, P. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Cappella, F.; D' Angelo, A.; Prosperi, D. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Caracciolo, V.; Castellano, S.; Cerulli, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Dai, C.J.; He, H.L.; Kuang, H.H.; Ma, X.H.; Sheng, X.D.; Wang, R.G. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); Incicchitti, A. [INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Montecchia, F. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Ingegneria Informatica, Rome (Italy); Ye, Z.P. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); University of Jing Gangshan, Jiangxi (China)

    2013-12-15

    The results obtained with the total exposure of 1.04 ton x yr collected by DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the I.N.F.N. during 7 annual cycles (i.e. adding a further 0.17 ton x yr exposure) are presented. The DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 data give evidence for the presence of Dark Matter (DM) particles in the galactic halo, on the basis of the exploited model independent DM annual modulation signature by using highly radio-pure NaI(Tl) target, at 7.5{sigma} C.L. Including also the first generation DAMA/NaI experiment (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton x yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles), the C.L. is 9.3{sigma} and the modulation amplitude of the single-hit events in the (2-6) keV energy interval is: (0.0112{+-}0.0012) cpd/kg/keV; the measured phase is (144{+-}7) days and the measured period is (0.998{+-}0.002) yr, values well in agreement with those expected for DM particles. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade. (orig.)

  14. Model-independent effects of Δ excitation in nucleon polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascalutsa, Vladimir; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2003-01-01

    Model-independent effects of Δ(1232) excitation on nucleon polarizabilities are computed in a Lorentz-invariant fashion. We find a large effect of relative order (M Δ -M)/M in some of the spin polarizabilities, with the backward spin polarizability receiving the largest contribution. Similar subleading effects are found to be important in the fourth-order spin-independent polarizabilities α Eν , α E2 , β Mν , and β M2 . Combining our results with those for the model-independent effects of pion loops we obtain predictions for spin and fourth-order polarizabilities which compare favorably with the results of a recent dispersion-relation analysis of data

  15. Measurement of platelet aggregation, independently of patient platelet count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, P J; Frederiksen, H; Hvas, A-M

    2017-01-01

    –IIIa, P-selectin and CD63 after addition of agonists: collagen-related peptide, thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP), and ADP. Results The platelet aggregation assay showed a low intraserial coefficient of variation of ≤ 3%. Similar results were obtained for platelet-rich plasma and isolated......Essentials •Platelet function may influence bleeding risk in thrombocytopenia, but useful tests are needed. •A flow cytometric platelet aggregation test independent of the patient platelet count was made. •Platelet aggregation was reduced in thrombocytopenic patients with hematological cancer....... •High platelet aggregation ruled out bleeding tendency in thrombocytopenic patients. Summary Background Methods for testing platelet aggregation in thrombocytopenia are lacking. Objective To establish a flow-cytometric test of in vitro platelet aggregation independently of the patient's platelet count...

  16. Model-independent approach for dark matter phenomenology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have studied the phenomenology of dark matter at the ILC and cosmic positron experiments based on model-independent approach. We have found a strong correlation between dark matter signatures at the ILC and those in the indirect detection experiments of dark matter. Once the dark matter is discovered in the ...

  17. Validation of elk resource selection models with spatially independent data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priscilla K. Coe; Bruce K. Johnson; Michael J. Wisdom; John G. Cook; Marty Vavra; Ryan M. Nielson

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of how landscape features affect wildlife resource use is essential for informed management. Resource selection functions often are used to make and validate predictions about landscape use; however, resource selection functions are rarely validated with data from landscapes independent of those from which the models were built. This problem has severely...

  18. Model-independent approach for dark matter phenomenology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have studied the phenomenology of dark matter at the ILC and cosmic positron experiments based on model-independent approach. We have found a strong correlation between dark matter signatures at the ILC and those in the indirect detection experiments of dark matter. Once the dark matter is discovered in the ...

  19. Model-independent approach for dark matter phenomenology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have studied the phenomenology of dark matter at the ILC and cosmic positron experiments based on model-independent approach. We have found a strong correlation between dark matter signatures at the ILC and those in the indirect detec- tion experiments of dark matter. Once the dark matter is discovered ...

  20. Compositional models and conditional independence in evidence theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiroušek, Radim; Vejnarová, Jiřina

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2011), s. 316-334 ISSN 0888-613X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Evidence theory * Conditional independence * multidimensional models Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.948, year: 2011 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/MTR/jirousek-0370515.pdf

  1. A comparative study of independent particle model based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We find that among these three independent particle model based methods, the ss-VSCF method provides most accurate results in the thermal averages followed by t-SCF and the v-VSCF is the least accurate. However, the ss-VSCF is found to be computationally very expensive for the large molecules. The t-SCF gives ...

  2. Independence-Based Optimization of Epistemic Model Checking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    imperfect information of their environment. It has been applied to settings that include diagnosis [8], and reasoning in game - like settings [15, 16, 32...represents the model as a concurrent pro- gram, in which each of the agents executes a protocol in the context of an environment. We provide a symbolic ...handled by the symbolic model checking algorithms. The paper presents experimental results that demonstrate that the condi- tional independence

  3. Model independent control of lightly damped noise/vibration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing

    2008-07-01

    Feedforward control is a popular strategy of active noise/vibration control. In well-damped noise/vibration systems, path transfer functions from actuators to sensors can be modeled by finite impulse response (FIR) filters with negligible errors. It is possible to implement noninvasive model independent feedforward control by a recently proposed method called orthogonal adaptation. In lightly damped noise/vibration systems, however, path transfer functions have infinite impulse responses (IIRs) that cause difficulties in design and implementation of broadband feedforward controllers. A major source of difficulties is model error if IIR path transfer functions are approximated by FIR filters. In general, active control performance deteriorates as model error increases. In this study, a new method is proposed to design and implement model independent feedforward controllers for broadband in lightly damped noise/vibration systems. It is shown analytically that the proposed method is able to drive the convergence of a noninvasive model independent feedforward controller to improve broadband control in lightly damped noise/vibration systems. The controller is optimized in the minimum H2 norm sense. Experiment results are presented to verify the analytical results.

  4. Measuring self-care independence in children with cystic fibrosis: the Self-Care Independence Scale (SCIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Susana R; Graham, Julie L; Varlotta, Laurie; Holsclaw, Douglas

    2003-08-01

    We describe the development and psychometric properties of a survey tool designed to evaluate children's level of independence in their cystic fibrosis (CF) treatment. Children's self-care autonomy is important to measure and may have a direct effect on children's active involvement in their treatment and their adherence. Existing instruments that evaluate children's independence in their CF treatment fail to yield practical information that can help research and patient management. The Self-Care Independence Scale (SCIS) is a 44-item questionnaire that is completed by parents. The SCIS was completed by the parents of 76 patients with CF (ages 4-17 years). Youths completed two structured interviews, which screened patients for average or higher cognitive functioning (an inclusion criterion) and measured their CF treatment knowledge. Parents completed two other self-report questionnaires. Results indicated that the SCIS has acceptable internal consistency and good test-retest reliability. The construct validity of the SCIS was supported by positive correlations between patient age, number of years since diagnosis, and SCIS total scores. The concurrent validity of the SCIS was supported by correlations between a measure of nonillness-specific dependence and a measure of patient self-care knowledge. Children's SCIS total scores per age group are presented. This study supports the SCIS as a psychometrically sound measure of self-care independence in CF. This measure has several uses. For example, the SCIS may be a screening tool for adolescents who are preparing to transition to adult CF centers and who will need to assume more independence in their self-care. The SCIS may also be used to evaluate educational programs that promote self-care knowledge and skill in children with CF. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Hadron properties within the model of quasi-independent quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorokhov, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    The spectrum of families of rho, PSI and Y mesons and electromagnetic characteristics of baryons are calculated, based on the model of quasi-independent quarks and assuming the independence of the scalar interaction potential of quark quantum numbers (including ''flavour''). Mesons that are bounded states of the different mass quarks are treated by introducing the concept of ''averaged quarks''. The case is also considered when the interaction potential behaves, with respect to the Lorentz group, as the fourth vector component. Good agreement of the calculation with the experimental data is observed

  6. Lightweight Graphical Models for Selectivity Estimation Without Independence Assumptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzoumas, Kostas; Deshpande, Amol; Jensen, Christian S.

    2011-01-01

    , propagated exponentially, can lead to severely sub-optimal plans. Modern optimizers typically maintain one-dimensional statistical summaries and make the attribute value independence and join uniformity assumptions for efficiently estimating selectivities. Therefore, selectivity estimation errors in today......’s optimizers are frequently caused by missed correlations between attributes. We present a selectivity estimation approach that does not make the independence assumptions. By carefully using concepts from the field of graphical models, we are able to factor the joint probability distribution of all...

  7. Data-Model Relationship in Text-Independent Speaker Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stapert Robert

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Text-independent speaker recognition systems such as those based on Gaussian mixture models (GMMs do not include time sequence information (TSI within the model itself. The level of importance of TSI in speaker recognition is an interesting question and one addressed in this paper. Recent works has shown that the utilisation of higher-level information such as idiolect, pronunciation, and prosodics can be useful in reducing speaker recognition error rates. In accordance with these developments, the aim of this paper is to show that as more data becomes available, the basic GMM can be enhanced by utilising TSI, even in a text-independent mode. This paper presents experimental work incorporating TSI into the conventional GMM. The resulting system, known as the segmental mixture model (SMM, embeds dynamic time warping (DTW into a GMM framework. Results are presented on the 2000-speaker SpeechDat Welsh database which show improved speaker recognition performance with the SMM.

  8. Occam factors and model independent Bayesian learning of continuous distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemenman, Ilya; Bialek, William

    2002-01-01

    Learning of a smooth but nonparametric probability density can be regularized using methods of quantum field theory. We implement a field theoretic prior numerically, test its efficacy, and show that the data and the phase space factors arising from the integration over the model space determine the free parameter of the theory ('smoothness scale') self-consistently. This persists even for distributions that are atypical in the prior and is a step towards a model independent theory for learning continuous distributions. Finally, we point out that a wrong parametrization of a model family may sometimes be advantageous for small data sets

  9. Online Statistical Modeling (Regression Analysis) for Independent Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Made Tirta, I.; Anggraeni, Dian; Pandutama, Martinus

    2017-06-01

    Regression analysis (statistical analmodelling) are among statistical methods which are frequently needed in analyzing quantitative data, especially to model relationship between response and explanatory variables. Nowadays, statistical models have been developed into various directions to model various type and complex relationship of data. Rich varieties of advanced and recent statistical modelling are mostly available on open source software (one of them is R). However, these advanced statistical modelling, are not very friendly to novice R users, since they are based on programming script or command line interface. Our research aims to developed web interface (based on R and shiny), so that most recent and advanced statistical modelling are readily available, accessible and applicable on web. We have previously made interface in the form of e-tutorial for several modern and advanced statistical modelling on R especially for independent responses (including linear models/LM, generalized linier models/GLM, generalized additive model/GAM and generalized additive model for location scale and shape/GAMLSS). In this research we unified them in the form of data analysis, including model using Computer Intensive Statistics (Bootstrap and Markov Chain Monte Carlo/ MCMC). All are readily accessible on our online Virtual Statistics Laboratory. The web (interface) make the statistical modeling becomes easier to apply and easier to compare them in order to find the most appropriate model for the data.

  10. Model-independent confirmation of the $Z(4430)^-$ state

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jezabek, Marek; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spinella, Franco; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The decay $B^0\\to \\psi(2S) K^+\\pi^-$ is analyzed using $\\rm 3~fb^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data collected with the LHCb detector. A model-independent description of the $\\psi(2S) \\pi$ mass spectrum is obtained, using as input the $K\\pi$ mass spectrum and angular distribution derived directly from data, without requiring a theoretical description of resonance shapes or their interference. The hypothesis that the $\\psi(2S)\\pi$ mass spectrum can be described in terms of $K\\pi$ reflections alone is rejected with more than 8$\\sigma$ significance. This provides confirmation, in a model-independent way, of the need for an additional resonant component in the mass region of the $Z(4430)^-$ exotic state.

  11. A model technology transfer program for independent operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1996-08-01

    In August 1992, the Energy Research Center (ERC) at the University of Kansas was awarded a contract by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a technology transfer regional model. This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program.

  12. Modelling Central Bank Independence and Inflation: Deus Ex Machina?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumiter Florin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Central bank independence represents the core element of assessing the complex relationship between government and central bank, having at background the fundamental issue of a free monetary policy decision-making process from the hands of the political circle. However, central bank independence is a multilevel concept within some social, economic and behavioral implications both for the central banks and for the society at whole. Central bank independence is needed in order to establish an autonomous central bank with a high degree of freedom in choosing its’ instruments, objectives, techniques and tactics. Moreover, a high degree of transparency for the public disclosure and monitoring of central bank operation and transaction is needed for the social barometer of the central bank. Consequently the central bank must have a high degree of accountability and responsibility vis - á - vis of the most democratic institution, i.e. Parliament. In this article it is presented a comprehensive study regarding the complex relationship between central bank independence and inflation by modeling these two monetary policy panacea, in order to make a fine tuning regarding the causal relationship established in a heterodox manner.

  13. The independent spreaders involved SIR Rumor model in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhen; Tang, Shaoting; Zhang, Xiao; Zheng, Zhiming

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies of rumor or information diffusion process in complex networks show that in contrast to traditional comprehension, individuals who participate in rumor spreading within one network do not always get the rumor from their neighbors. They can obtain the rumor from different sources like online social networks and then publish it on their personal sites. In our paper, we discuss this phenomenon in complex networks by adopting the concept of independent spreaders. Rather than getting the rumor from neighbors, independent spreaders learn it from other channels. We further develop the classic "ignorant-spreaders-stiflers" or SIR model of rumor diffusion process in complex networks. A steady-state analysis is conducted to investigate the final spectrum of the rumor spreading under various spreading rate, stifling rate, density of independent spreaders and average degree of the network. Results show that independent spreaders effectively enhance the rumor diffusion process, by delivering the rumor to regions far away from the current rumor infected regions. And though the rumor spreading process in SF networks is faster than that in ER networks, the final size of rumor spreading in ER networks is larger than that in SF networks.

  14. Colour-independent partition functions in coloured vertex models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O., E-mail: omar.foda@unimelb.edu.au [Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Wheeler, M., E-mail: mwheeler@lpthe.jussieu.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Hautes Energies, CNRS UMR 7589 (France); Université Pierre et Marie Curie – Paris 6, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France)

    2013-06-11

    We study lattice configurations related to S{sub n}, the scalar product of an off-shell state and an on-shell state in rational A{sub n} integrable vertex models, n∈{1,2}. The lattice lines are colourless and oriented. The state variables are n conserved colours that flow along the line orientations, but do not necessarily cover every bond in the lattice. Choosing boundary conditions such that the positions where the colours flow into the lattice are fixed, and where they flow out are summed over, we show that the partition functions of these configurations, with these boundary conditions, are n-independent. Our results extend to trigonometric A{sub n} models, and to all n. This n-independence explains, in vertex-model terms, results from recent studies of S{sub 2} (Caetano and Vieira, 2012, [1], Wheeler, (arXiv:1204.2089), [2]). Namely, 1.S{sub 2}, which depends on two sets of Bethe roots, {b_1} and {b_2}, and cannot (as far as we know) be expressed in single determinant form, degenerates in the limit {b_1}→∞, and/or {b_2}→∞, into a product of determinants, 2. Each of the latter determinants is an A{sub 1} vertex-model partition function.

  15. Colour-independent partition functions in coloured vertex models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O.; Wheeler, M.

    2013-01-01

    We study lattice configurations related to S n , the scalar product of an off-shell state and an on-shell state in rational A n integrable vertex models, n∈{1,2}. The lattice lines are colourless and oriented. The state variables are n conserved colours that flow along the line orientations, but do not necessarily cover every bond in the lattice. Choosing boundary conditions such that the positions where the colours flow into the lattice are fixed, and where they flow out are summed over, we show that the partition functions of these configurations, with these boundary conditions, are n-independent. Our results extend to trigonometric A n models, and to all n. This n-independence explains, in vertex-model terms, results from recent studies of S 2 (Caetano and Vieira, 2012, [1], Wheeler, (arXiv:1204.2089), [2]). Namely, 1.S 2 , which depends on two sets of Bethe roots, {b 1 } and {b 2 }, and cannot (as far as we know) be expressed in single determinant form, degenerates in the limit {b 1 }→∞, and/or {b 2 }→∞, into a product of determinants, 2. Each of the latter determinants is an A 1 vertex-model partition function

  16. Cell-associated HIV DNA measured early during infection has prognostic value independent of serum HIV RNA measured concomitantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzenstein, Terese L; Oliveri, Roberto S; Benfield, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Using data from the Danish AIDS Cohort of HIV-infected homosexual men established in the 1980s, the prognostic value of early HIV DNA loads was evaluated. In addition to DNA measurements, concomitant serum HIV RNA levels, CD4 cell counts and CCR5 genotypes were determined. The patients were divided...... into 3 groups, according to whether their cell-associated HIV DNA load was or = 2,500 DNA copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Clinical progression rates differed significantly between the groups (p HIV DNA load had prognostic value independent...... of serum HIV RNA (p HIV DNA, HIV RNA and CD4 cell counts were all included in a Cox model, only serum HIV RNA had independent prognostic value. Patients heterozygous for the CCR5 delta 32 allele had significantly lower HIV DNA loads than those homozygous for the normal allele (p

  17. Cell-associated HIV DNA measured early during infection has prognostic value independent of serum HIV RNA measured concomitantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzenstein, Terese L; Oliveri, Roberto S; Benfield, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Using data from the Danish AIDS Cohort of HIV-infected homosexual men established in the 1980s, the prognostic value of early HIV DNA loads was evaluated. In addition to DNA measurements, concomitant serum HIV RNA levels, CD4 cell counts and CCR5 genotypes were determined. The patients were divided...... of serum HIV RNA (p HIV DNA, HIV RNA and CD4 cell counts were all included in a Cox model, only serum HIV RNA had independent prognostic value. Patients heterozygous for the CCR5 delta 32 allele had significantly lower HIV DNA loads than those homozygous for the normal allele (p ... into 3 groups, according to whether their cell-associated HIV DNA load was or = 2,500 DNA copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Clinical progression rates differed significantly between the groups (p HIV DNA load had prognostic value independent...

  18. Empowerment of Mustaḥiq Zakat Model Towards Business Independency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzah Hamzah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zakat has not been utilized intensively for the empowerment of mustaḥiq (zakat beneficiaries in the form of productive economic business. The objective of the research was to analyze the level of mustaḥiqs’ business independency; to analyze dominant factors that influenced mustaḥiqs’ business independency, and to formulate an appropriate strategy to develop the mustaḥiqs’ business independency. The research has been carried out on 254 mustaḥiqs in Bogor Regency (66 mustaḥiqs engaged in vegetable production at Cibungbulang District, 85 mustaḥiqs in skewer business at Tenjolaya District, and 103 mustaḥiqs in shoe business at Taman Sari District. A census sampling, data collection through a questionnaire, an in-depth interview and observation were carried out in 2013. Data were analyzed descriptively and statistically, using structural equation model (SEM. The results of the research showed that: (1 the strategy of mustaḥiq empowerment could be carried out through strengthening the intrinsic motivation, training technical aspects, assisting business capital and assistance. Empowerment can be conducted synergically by the government (arrangement, service, and counseling, private sectors/State Owned Business (BUMN, higher education and community.

  19. Text-Independent Speaker Identification Using the Histogram Transform Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Zhanyu; Yu, Hong; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel probabilistic method for the task of text-independent speaker identification (SI). In order to capture the dynamic information during SI, we design a super-MFCCs features by cascading three neighboring Mel-frequency Cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) frames together....... These super-MFCC vectors are utilized for probabilistic model training such that the speaker’s characteristics can be sufficiently captured. The probability density function (PDF) of the aforementioned super-MFCCs features is estimated by the recently proposed histogram transform (HT) method. To recedes...

  20. Model independent explorations of Majorana neutrino mass origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, James Phearl, Jr.

    The recent observation of nonzero neutrino mass is the first concrete indication of physics beyond the Standard Model. Their properties, unique among the other fermions, leads naturally to the idea of a Majorana neutrino mass term. Despite the strong theoretical prejudice toward this concept, it must be tested experimentally. This is indeed possible in the context of next generation experiments. Unfortunately, the scale of neutrino mass generation may be too large to explore directly, but useful information may still be extracted from independent experimental channels. Here I survey various model independent probes of Majorana neutrino mass origins. A brief introduction to the concepts relevant to the analysis is followed by a discussion of the physical ranges of neutrino mass and mixing parameters within the context of standard and non-standard interactions. Armed with this, I move on to systematically analyze the properties of radiatively generated neutrino masses induced by nonrenormalizable lepton number violating effective operators of mass dimensions five through eleven. By fitting these to the observed light mass scale, I extract predictions for neutrino mixing as well as neutrinoless double beta decay, rare meson/tau decays and collider phenomenology. I find that many such models are already constrained by current data and many more will be probed in the near future. I then move on demonstrate the utility of a low scale see saw mechanism via a viable 3+2+1 sterile neutrino model that satisfies all oscillation data as well as solves problems associated with supernova kicks and heavy element nucleosynthesis. From this I extract predictions for tritium and neutrinoless double beta decay searches. This is supplemented throughout by descriptions of practical limitations in addition to suggestions for future work.

  1. Model-independent curvature determination with 21cm intensity mapping experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzemann, Amadeus; Bull, Philip; Clarkson, Chris; Santos, Mario G.; Spinelli, Marta; Weltman, Amanda

    2018-04-01

    Measurements of the spatial curvature of the Universe have improved significantly in recent years, but still tend to require strong assumptions to be made about the equation of state of dark energy (DE) in order to reach sub-percent precision. When these assumptions are relaxed, strong degeneracies arise that make it hard to disentangle DE and curvature, degrading the constraints. We show that forthcoming 21cm intensity mapping experiments such as HIRAX are ideally designed to carry out model-independent curvature measurements, as they can measure the clustering signal at high redshift with sufficient precision to break many of the degeneracies. We consider two different model-independent methods, based on `avoiding' the DE-dominated regime and non-parametric modelling of the DE equation of state respectively. Our forecasts show that HIRAX will be able to improve upon current model-independent constraints by around an order of magnitude, reaching percent-level accuracy even when an arbitrary DE equation of state is assumed. In the same model-independent analysis, the sample variance limit for a similar survey is another order of magnitude better.

  2. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  3. An interactive algorithm for identifying multiattribute measurable value functions based on finite-order independence of structural difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Hiroyuki; Hikita, Shiro

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, we develop an interactive algorithm for identifying multiattribute measurable value functions based on the concept of finite-order independence of structural difference. This concept includes Dyer and Sarin's weak difference independence as special cases. The algorithm developed is composed of four major parts: 1) formulation of the problem 2) assessment of normalized conditional value functions and structural difference functions 3) assessment of corner values 4) assessment of the order of independence of structural difference and selection of the model. A hypothetical numerical example of a trade-off analysis for siting a nuclear power plant is included. (author)

  4. Model independent bounds on magnetic moments of Majorana neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Nicole F.; Gorchtein, Mikhail; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Vogel, Petr; Wang, Peng

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the implications of neutrino masses for the magnitude of neutrino magnetic moments. By considering electroweak radiative corrections to the neutrino mass, we derive model-independent naturalness upper bounds on neutrino magnetic moments, μ ν , generated by physics above the electroweak scale. For Dirac neutrinos, the bound is several orders of magnitude more stringent than present experimental limits. However, for Majorana neutrinos the magnetic moment contribution to the mass is Yukawa suppressed. The bounds we derive for magnetic moments of Majorana neutrinos are weaker than present experimental limits if μ ν is generated by new physics at ∼1 TeV, and surpass current experimental sensitivity only for new physics scales >10-100 TeV. The discovery of a neutrino magnetic moment near present limits would thus signify that neutrinos are Majorana particles

  5. Estimating myocardial perfusion from dynamic contrast-enhanced CMR with a model-independent deconvolution method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadrmas Dan J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Model-independent analysis with B-spline regularization has been used to quantify myocardial blood flow (perfusion in dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR studies. However, the model-independent approach has not been extensively evaluated to determine how the contrast-to-noise ratio between blood and tissue enhancement affects estimates of myocardial perfusion and the degree to which the regularization is dependent on the noise in the measured enhancement data. We investigated these questions with a model-independent analysis method that uses iterative minimization and a temporal smoothness regularizer. Perfusion estimates using this method were compared to results from dynamic 13N-ammonia PET. Results An iterative model-independent analysis method was developed and tested to estimate regional and pixelwise myocardial perfusion in five normal subjects imaged with a saturation recovery turboFLASH sequence at 3 T CMR. Estimates of myocardial perfusion using model-independent analysis are dependent on the choice of the regularization weight parameter, which increases nonlinearly to handle large decreases in the contrast-to-noise ratio of the measured tissue enhancement data. Quantitative perfusion estimates in five subjects imaged with 3 T CMR were 1.1 ± 0.8 ml/min/g at rest and 3.1 ± 1.7 ml/min/g at adenosine stress. The perfusion estimates correlated with dynamic 13N-ammonia PET (y = 0.90x + 0.24, r = 0.85 and were similar to results from other validated CMR studies. Conclusion This work shows that a model-independent analysis method that uses iterative minimization and temporal regularization can be used to quantify myocardial perfusion with dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion CMR. Results from this method are robust to choices in the regularization weight parameter over relatively large ranges in the contrast-to-noise ratio of the tissue enhancement data.

  6. Model Independent Search For New Physics At The Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudalakis, Georgios [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2008-04-01

    The Standard Model of elementary particles can not be the final theory. There are theoretical reasons to expect the appearance of new physics, possibly at the energy scale of few TeV. Several possible theories of new physics have been proposed, each with unknown probability to be confirmed. Instead of arbitrarily choosing to examine one of those theories, this thesis is about searching for any sign of new physics in a model-independent way. This search is performed at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The Standard Model prediction is implemented in all final states simultaneously, and an array of statistical probes is employed to search for significant discrepancies between data and prediction. The probes are sensitive to overall population discrepancies, shape disagreements in distributions of kinematic quantities of final particles, excesses of events of large total transverse momentum, and local excesses of data expected from resonances due to new massive particles. The result of this search, first in 1 fb-1 and then in 2 fb-1, is null, namely no considerable evidence of new physics was found.

  7. Measuring and modelling concurrency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, Larry

    2013-01-01

    This article explores three critical topics discussed in the recent debate over concurrency (overlapping sexual partnerships): measurement of the prevalence of concurrency, mathematical modelling of concurrency and HIV epidemic dynamics, and measuring the correlation between HIV and concurrency. The focus of the article is the concurrency hypothesis – the proposition that presumed high prevalence of concurrency explains sub-Saharan Africa's exceptionally high HIV prevalence. Recent surveys using improved questionnaire design show reported concurrency ranging from 0.8% to 7.6% in the region. Even after adjusting for plausible levels of reporting errors, appropriately parameterized sexual network models of HIV epidemics do not generate sustainable epidemic trajectories (avoid epidemic extinction) at levels of concurrency found in recent surveys in sub-Saharan Africa. Efforts to support the concurrency hypothesis with a statistical correlation between HIV incidence and concurrency prevalence are not yet successful. Two decades of efforts to find evidence in support of the concurrency hypothesis have failed to build a convincing case. PMID:23406964

  8. Disability measures in stroke: relationship among the Barthel Index, the Functional Independence Measure, and the Modified Rankin Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sooyeon; Hartzema, Abraham G; Duncan, Pamela W; Min-Lai, Sue

    2004-04-01

    Residual disability after stroke presents a major economic and humanistic burden. To quantify disability in patients, activities of daily living (ADL; Barthel Index [BI], and motor component of Functional Independence Measure [M-FIM]) and categorical disability measures (Modified Rankin Scale [MRS]) are used. The purpose of this study is to examine the predicting ability of ADL measures to global disability scale. Kansas City Stroke Study data were used for the present study. Correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis test, and polytomous logistic regression analysis were applied to examine the relationship between the ADL measure and global disability scale. Model fit statistics were examined to verify logistic regression appropriateness. A categorization scheme, which minimized the false-positive response rate, was selected as the optimal categorizing system. The 3 measures were highly correlated. Both BI and M-FIM differentiated disability better in lower than higher disability. In logistic regression, BI differentiated 4 disability levels; M-FIM differentiated 3 levels in MRS. However, on the basis of results of the Kruskal-Wallis and multiple comparison tests, we suspect that M-FIM may have the potential to predict MRS categories better with a different model. The proposed categorization scheme can serve as a translation between measures. However, because of the ceiling effect of BI and M-FIM, the translation could not be completed for all 6 levels of MRS. No apparent variation over time in the categorization scheme was observed. Further research needs to be conducted to develop better prediction models explaining the relationship between M-FIM and MRS.

  9. A model technology transfer program for independent operators: Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program. The original Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) activities, upon which the KTTM is based, were developed and tested for Kansas and have proved to be effective in assisting independent operators in utilizing technology. Through joint activities of TORP and the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), the KTTM was developed and documented for application in other oil-producing regions. During the course of developing this model, twelve documents describing the implementation of the KTTM were developed as deliverables to DOE. These include: (1) a problem identification (PI) manual describing the format and results of six PI workshops conducted in different areas of Kansas, (2) three technology workshop participant manuals on advanced waterflooding, reservoir description, and personal computer applications, (3) three technology workshop instructor manuals which provides instructor material for all three workshops, (4) three technologies were documented as demonstration projects which included reservoir management, permeability modification, and utilization of a liquid-level acoustic measuring device, (5) a bibliography of all literature utilized in the documents, and (6) a document which describes the KTTM.

  10. Revisiting a model-independent dark energy reconstruction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazkoz, Ruth; Salzano, Vincenzo; Sendra, Irene [Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Fisika Teorikoaren eta Zientziaren Historia Saila, Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Bilbao (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    In this work we offer new insights into the model-independent dark energy reconstruction method developed by Daly and Djorgovski (Astrophys. J. 597:9, 2003; Astrophys. J. 612:652, 2004; Astrophys. J. 677:1, 2008). Our results, using updated SNeIa and GRBs, allow to highlight some of the intrinsic weaknesses of the method. Conclusions on the main dark energy features as drawn from this method are intimately related to the features of the samples themselves, particularly for GRBs, which are poor performers in this context and cannot be used for cosmological purposes, that is, the state of the art does not allow to regard them on the same quality basis as SNeIa. We find there is a considerable sensitivity to some parameters (window width, overlap, selection criteria) affecting the results. Then, we try to establish what the current redshift range is for which one can make solid predictions on dark energy evolution. Finally, we strengthen the former view that this model is modest in the sense it provides only a picture of the global trend and has to be managed very carefully. But, on the other hand, we believe it offers an interesting complement to other approaches, given that it works on minimal assumptions. (orig.)

  11. Moving from IMRT QA measurements toward independent computer calculations using control charts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In this study, we investigated IMRT QA using Statistical Process Control for the purpose of comparing the processes of patient-specific measurements and the corresponding independent computer calculations. Materials and methods: Point dose data from the treatment planning system (TPS), independent computer calculations, and physical measurements for prostate and head and neck cases were studied. Control charts were used to analyze the IMRT QA processes from several institutions in the academic and community setting. Control charts are a method to describe the performance of a process. The width of the control chart limits (or action limits) describes the process' ability to meet clinical specifications of ±5%. In all, 24 process comparisons were made (12 measurement QA and 12 independent computer calculation QA). Results: For head and neck IMRT QA, the average process ability for the measurement QA was ±6.9% compared to ±7.2% for the independent computer calculation QA. For prostate IMRT QA, the average process ability was 4.4% for both measurement QA and independent computer calculation QA. It was found that 11 of the 24 processes were in control. At none of the institutions were the processes of measurements and independent computer calculations both in control and performing within clinical specifications. Conclusion: There is room to improve the processes of IMRT QA measurements and independent computer calculations. In situations where the improvement of the processes is such that each is in control and well within clinical specifications, it may be appropriate to suspend patient-specific IMRT QA measurements for every patient in the place of independent computer calculations

  12. Aggressiveness as a latent personality trait of domestic dogs: Testing local independence and measurement invariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Conor; Newberry, Ruth C

    2017-01-01

    Studies of animal personality attempt to uncover underlying or "latent" personality traits that explain broad patterns of behaviour, often by applying latent variable statistical models (e.g., factor analysis) to multivariate data sets. Two integral, but infrequently confirmed, assumptions of latent variable models in animal personality are: i) behavioural variables are independent (i.e., uncorrelated) conditional on the latent personality traits they reflect (local independence), and ii) personality traits are associated with behavioural variables in the same way across individuals or groups of individuals (measurement invariance). We tested these assumptions using observations of aggression in four age classes (4-10 months, 10 months-3 years, 3-6 years, over 6 years) of male and female shelter dogs (N = 4,743) in 11 different contexts. A structural equation model supported the hypothesis of two positively correlated personality traits underlying aggression across contexts: aggressiveness towards people and aggressiveness towards dogs (comparative fit index: 0.96; Tucker-Lewis index: 0.95; root mean square error of approximation: 0.03). Aggression across contexts was moderately repeatable (towards people: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.479; towards dogs: ICC = 0.303). However, certain contexts related to aggressiveness towards people (but not dogs) shared significant residual relationships unaccounted for by latent levels of aggressiveness. Furthermore, aggressiveness towards people and dogs in different contexts interacted with sex and age. Thus, sex and age differences in displays of aggression were not simple functions of underlying aggressiveness. Our results illustrate that the robustness of traits in latent variable models must be critically assessed before making conclusions about the effects of, or factors influencing, animal personality. Our findings are of concern because inaccurate "aggressive personality" trait attributions can be costly

  13. Aggressiveness as a latent personality trait of domestic dogs: Testing local independence and measurement invariance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor Goold

    Full Text Available Studies of animal personality attempt to uncover underlying or "latent" personality traits that explain broad patterns of behaviour, often by applying latent variable statistical models (e.g., factor analysis to multivariate data sets. Two integral, but infrequently confirmed, assumptions of latent variable models in animal personality are: i behavioural variables are independent (i.e., uncorrelated conditional on the latent personality traits they reflect (local independence, and ii personality traits are associated with behavioural variables in the same way across individuals or groups of individuals (measurement invariance. We tested these assumptions using observations of aggression in four age classes (4-10 months, 10 months-3 years, 3-6 years, over 6 years of male and female shelter dogs (N = 4,743 in 11 different contexts. A structural equation model supported the hypothesis of two positively correlated personality traits underlying aggression across contexts: aggressiveness towards people and aggressiveness towards dogs (comparative fit index: 0.96; Tucker-Lewis index: 0.95; root mean square error of approximation: 0.03. Aggression across contexts was moderately repeatable (towards people: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC = 0.479; towards dogs: ICC = 0.303. However, certain contexts related to aggressiveness towards people (but not dogs shared significant residual relationships unaccounted for by latent levels of aggressiveness. Furthermore, aggressiveness towards people and dogs in different contexts interacted with sex and age. Thus, sex and age differences in displays of aggression were not simple functions of underlying aggressiveness. Our results illustrate that the robustness of traits in latent variable models must be critically assessed before making conclusions about the effects of, or factors influencing, animal personality. Our findings are of concern because inaccurate "aggressive personality" trait attributions can be

  14. A domain-independent descriptive design model and its application to structured reflection on design processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reymen, Isabelle; Hammer, D.K.; Kroes, P.A.; van Aken, Joan Ernst; van Aken, J.E.; Dorst, C.H.; Bax, M.F.T.; Basten, T

    2006-01-01

    Domain-independent models of the design process are an important means for facilitating interdisciplinary communication and for supporting multidisciplinary design. Many so-called domain-independent models are, however, not really domain independent. We state that to be domain independent, the

  15. Modelling the role of the design context in the design process: a domain-independent approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reymen, Isabelle; Kroes, P.; Basten, T; Durling, D.; Shackleton, J.

    2002-01-01

    Domain-independent models of the design process are an important means for facilitating interdisciplinary communication and for supporting multidisciplinary design. Many so-called domain-independent models are, however, not really domain independent. We state that, to be domain independent, the

  16. Changes in activity after a complete spinal cord injury as measured by the Spinal Cord Independence Measure II (SCIM II)

    OpenAIRE

    Wirth, B; van Hedel, H J A; Kometer, B; Dietz, V; Curt, A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The assessment of rehabilitation efficacy in spinal cord injury (SCI) should be based on a combination of neurological and functional outcome measures. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure II (SCIM II) is an independence scale that was specifically developed for subjects with SCI. However, little is known about the changes in SCIM II scores during and after rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate changes in functional recovery during the first year after...

  17. A Model of Trusted Measurement Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ma Zhili; Wang Zhihao; Dai Liang; Zhu Xiaoqin

    2017-01-01

    A model of Trusted Measurement supporting behavior measurement based on trusted connection architecture (TCA) with three entities and three levels is proposed, and a frame to illustrate the model is given. The model synthesizes three trusted measurement dimensions including trusted identity, trusted status and trusted behavior, satisfies the essential requirements of trusted measurement, and unified the TCA with three entities and three levels.

  18. Modeling Alzheimer Disease Through Functional Independence and Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchella, Chiara; Bartolo, Michelangelo; Bernini, Sara; Picascia, Marta; Malinverni, Paola; Sinforiani, Elena

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between cognitive and functional impairment in Alzheimer Disease (AD) at the earliest stages of the disease is not well characterized. This study aimed at investigating such relationships along AD evolution by means of the Disability Assessment for Dementia (DAD). Consecutive pairs of AD outpatients and their primary informal caregivers were enrolled. Patients were evaluated by means of the Mini Mental State Examination and neuropsychological tests. A clinician completed the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale to stage dementia severity and interviewed the caregivers to complete the Neuropsychiatric Inventory to assess behavioral disturbances and the DAD to evaluate patients' functional competence. A total of 158 dyads were enrolled; the Mini Mental State Examination score was used to stratify patients into 4 groups (>24; 20 to 23.9; 10 to 19.9; <10) that were compared. The statistical analysis revealed that all the cognitive domains were positively related to functional independence, but only logical and executive functions seemed to predict autonomy. An intergroup comparison did not show significant differences in the DAD subscales measuring initiation, planning and organization, and performance. The role of education emerged, confirming the relevance of cognitive reserve. As the field moves toward earlier intervention in preclinical AD, the detection of early functional changes may drive the definition of trials on prevention or intervention for dementia.

  19. Zeroing In on Mindfulness Facets: Similarities, Validity, and Dimensionality across Three Independent Measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex B Siegling

    Full Text Available The field of mindfulness has seen a proliferation of psychometric measures, characterised by differences in operationalisation and conceptualisation. To illuminate the scope of, and offer insights into, the diversity apparent in the burgeoning literature, two distinct samples were used to examine the similarities, validity, and dimensionality of mindfulness facets and subscales across three independent measures: the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ, Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale (PHLMS, and Toronto Mindfulness Scale (TMS. Results revealed problematic associations of FFMQ Observe with the other FFMQ facets and supported a four-factor structure (omitting this facet, while disputing the originally envisaged five-factor model; thus, solidifying a pattern in the literature. Results also confirmed the bidimensional nature of the PHLMS and TMS subscales, respectively. A joint Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed that PHLMS Acceptance could be assimilated within the FFMQ's four-factor model (as a distinct factor. The study offers a way of understanding interrelationships between the available mindfulness scales, so as to help practitioners and researchers make a more informed choice when conceptualising and operationalising mindfulness.

  20. Zeroing In on Mindfulness Facets: Similarities, Validity, and Dimensionality across Three Independent Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegling, Alex B.; Petrides, K. V.

    2016-01-01

    The field of mindfulness has seen a proliferation of psychometric measures, characterised by differences in operationalisation and conceptualisation. To illuminate the scope of, and offer insights into, the diversity apparent in the burgeoning literature, two distinct samples were used to examine the similarities, validity, and dimensionality of mindfulness facets and subscales across three independent measures: the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale (PHLMS), and Toronto Mindfulness Scale (TMS). Results revealed problematic associations of FFMQ Observe with the other FFMQ facets and supported a four-factor structure (omitting this facet), while disputing the originally envisaged five-factor model; thus, solidifying a pattern in the literature. Results also confirmed the bidimensional nature of the PHLMS and TMS subscales, respectively. A joint Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed that PHLMS Acceptance could be assimilated within the FFMQ’s four-factor model (as a distinct factor). The study offers a way of understanding interrelationships between the available mindfulness scales, so as to help practitioners and researchers make a more informed choice when conceptualising and operationalising mindfulness. PMID:27055017

  1. Development, validity and reliability of the food allergy independent measure (FAIM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, J. L.; Flokstra-de Blok, B. M. J.; Vlieg-Boerstra, B. J.; Oude Elberink, J. N. G.; DunnGalvin, A.; Hourihane, J. O.'B.; Duiverman, E. J.; Dubois, A. E. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire-Child Form, -Teenager Form and -Adult Form (FAQLQ-CF, -TF and -AF) have recently been developed. To measure construct validity in the FAQLQs, a suitable independent measure was needed with which FAQLQ scores could be correlated. However, in food

  2. Development, validity and reliability of the food allergy independent measure (FAIM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, J. L.; Flokstra-de Blok, B. M. J.; Vlieg - Boerstra, B. J.; Oude Elberink, J. N. G.; DunnGalvin, A.; Hourihane, J. O'B.; Duiverman, E. J.; Dubois, A. E. J.

    Background: The Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire-Child Form, -Teenager Form and -Adult Form (FAQLQ-CF, -TF and -AF) have recently been developed. To measure construct validity in the FAQLQs, a suitable independent measure was needed with which FAQLQ scores could be correlated. However, in

  3. Economic trends of tokamak power plants independent of physics scaling models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Steiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    This study examines the effects of plasma radius, field on axis, plasma impurity level, and aspect ratio on power level and unit capital cost, $/kW/sub e/, of tokamak power plants sized independent of plasma physics scaling models. It is noted that tokamaks sized in this manner are thermally unstable based on trapped particle scaling relationships. It is observed that there is an economic advantage for larger power level tokamaks achieved by physics independent sizing; however, the incentive for increased power levels is less than that for fission reactors. It is further observed that the economic advantage of these larger power level tokamaks is decreased when plasma thermal stability measures are incorporated, such as by increasing the plasma impurity concentration. This trend of economy with size obtained by physics independent sizing is opposite to that observed when the tokamak designs are constrained to obey the trapped particle and empirical scaling relationships

  4. Measures of outdoor play and independent mobility in children and youth: A methodological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Bree; Stone, Michelle R

    2015-09-01

    Declines in children's outdoor play have been documented globally, which are partly due to heightened restrictions around children's independent mobility. Literature on outdoor play and children's independent mobility is increasing, yet no paper has summarized the various methodological approaches used. A methodological review could highlight most commonly used measures and comprehensive research designs that could result in more standardized methodological approaches. Methodological review. A standardized protocol guided a methodological review of published research on measures of outdoor play and children's independent mobility in children and youth (0-18 years). Online searches of 8 electronic databases were conducted and studies included if they contained a subjective/objective measure of outdoor play or children's independent mobility. References of included articles were scanned to identify additional articles. Twenty-four studies were included on outdoor play, and twenty-three on children's independent mobility. Study designs were diverse. Common objective measures included accelerometry, global positioning systems and direct observation; questionnaires, surveys and interviews were common subjective measures. Focus groups, activity logs, monitoring sheets, travel/activity diaries, behavioral maps and guided tours were also utilized. Questionnaires were used most frequently, yet few studies used the same questionnaire. Five studies employed comprehensive, mixed-methods designs. Outdoor play and children's independent mobility have been measured using a wide variety of techniques, with only a few studies using similar methodologies. A standardized methodological approach does not exist. Future researchers should consider including both objective measures (accelerometry and global positioning systems) and subjective measures (questionnaires, activity logs, interviews), as more comprehensive designs will enhance understanding of each multidimensional construct

  5. Regression mixture models : Does modeling the covariance between independent variables and latent classes improve the results?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamont, A.E.; Vermunt, J.K.; Van Horn, M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Regression mixture models are increasingly used as an exploratory approach to identify heterogeneity in the effects of a predictor on an outcome. In this simulation study, we tested the effects of violating an implicit assumption often made in these models; that is, independent variables in the

  6. Variance gradients and uncertainty budgets for nonlinear measurement functions with independent inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanelli, Mark; Kacker, Raghu; Kessel, Rüdiger

    2013-01-01

    A novel variance-based measure for global sensitivity analysis, termed a variance gradient (VG), is presented for constructing uncertainty budgets under the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) framework for nonlinear measurement functions with independent inputs. The motivation behind VGs is the desire of metrologists to understand which inputs' variance reductions would most effectively reduce the variance of the measurand. VGs are particularly useful when the application of the first supplement to the GUM is indicated because of the inadequacy of measurement function linearization. However, VGs reduce to a commonly understood variance decomposition in the case of a linear(ized) measurement function with independent inputs for which the original GUM readily applies. The usefulness of VGs is illustrated by application to an example from the first supplement to the GUM, as well as to the benchmark Ishigami function. A comparison of VGs to other available sensitivity measures is made. (paper)

  7. Measurement of form-factor-independent observables in the decay B0→K(*0)μ(+)μ(-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-11-08

    We present a measurement of form-factor-independent angular observables in the decay B(0)→K*(892)(0)μ(+)μ(-). The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Four observables are measured in six bins of the dimuon invariant mass squared q² in the range 0.1model is found for 23 of the 24 measurements. A local discrepancy, corresponding to 3.7 Gaussian standard deviations is observed in one q² bin for one of the observables. Considering the 24 measurements as independent, the probability to observe such a discrepancy, or larger, in one is 0.5%.

  8. Measurement of form-factor independent observables in the decay $B^{0} \\to K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of form-factor independent angular observables in the decay $B^0\\to K^{*}(892)^{0}\\mu^+ \\mu^-$. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7TeV. Four observables are measured in six bins of the dimuon invariant mass squared, $q^2$, in the range 0.1 < $q^2$ < 19.0 GeV$^{2}/c^{4}$. Agreement with Standard Model predictions is found for 23 of the 24 measurements. A local discrepancy, corresponding to 3.7 Gaussian standard deviations, is observed in one $q^2$ bin for one of the observables. Considering the 24 measurements as independent, the probability to observe such a discrepancy, or larger, in one is 0.5%.

  9. Measurement-Device Independency Analysis of Continuous-Variable Quantum Digital Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Shang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available With the practical implementation of continuous-variable quantum cryptographic protocols, security problems resulting from measurement-device loopholes are being given increasing attention. At present, research on measurement-device independency analysis is limited in quantum key distribution protocols, while there exist different security problems for different protocols. Considering the importance of quantum digital signature in quantum cryptography, in this paper, we attempt to analyze the measurement-device independency of continuous-variable quantum digital signature, especially continuous-variable quantum homomorphic signature. Firstly, we calculate the upper bound of the error rate of a protocol. If it is negligible on condition that all measurement devices are untrusted, the protocol is deemed to be measurement-device-independent. Then, we simplify the calculation by using the characteristics of continuous variables and prove the measurement-device independency of the protocol according to the calculation result. In addition, the proposed analysis method can be extended to other quantum cryptographic protocols besides continuous-variable quantum homomorphic signature.

  10. A Comparison of Mangrove Canopy Height Using Multiple Independent Measurements from Land, Air, and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomasino, David; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Lee, SeungKuk; Feliciano, Emanuelle; Trettin, Carl; Simard, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Canopy height is one of the strongest predictors of biomass and carbon in forested ecosystems. Additionally, mangrove ecosystems represent one of the most concentrated carbon reservoirs that are rapidly degrading as a result of deforestation, development, and hydrologic manipulation. Therefore, the accuracy of Canopy Height Models (CHM) over mangrove forest can provide crucial information for monitoring and verification protocols. We compared four CHMs derived from independent remotely sensed imagery and identified potential errors and bias between measurement types. CHMs were derived from three spaceborne datasets; Very-High Resolution (VHR) stereophotogrammetry, TerraSAR-X add-on for Digital Elevation Measurement (DEM), and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (TanDEM-X), and lidar data which was acquired from an airborne platform. Each dataset exhibited different error characteristics that were related to spatial resolution, sensitivities of the sensors, and reference frames. Canopies over 10 meters were accurately predicted by all CHMs while the distributions of canopy height were best predicted by the VHR CHM. Depending on the guidelines and strategies needed for monitoring and verification activities, coarse resolution CHMs could be used to track canopy height at regional and global scales with finer resolution imagery used to validate and monitor critical areas undergoing rapid changes.

  11. A Comparison of Mangrove Canopy Height Using Multiple Independent Measurements from Land, Air, and Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lagomasino

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Canopy height is one of the strongest predictors of biomass and carbon in forested ecosystems. Additionally, mangrove ecosystems represent one of the most concentrated carbon reservoirs that are rapidly degrading as a result of deforestation, development, and hydrologic manipulation. Therefore, the accuracy of Canopy Height Models (CHM over mangrove forest can provide crucial information for monitoring and verification protocols. We compared four CHMs derived from independent remotely sensed imagery and identified potential errors and bias between measurement types. CHMs were derived from three spaceborne datasets; Very-High Resolution (VHR stereophotogrammetry, TerraSAR-X add-on for Digital Elevation Measurement, and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (TanDEM-X, and lidar data which was acquired from an airborne platform. Each dataset exhibited different error characteristics that were related to spatial resolution, sensitivities of the sensors, and reference frames. Canopies over 10 m were accurately predicted by all CHMs while the distributions of canopy height were best predicted by the VHR CHM. Depending on the guidelines and strategies needed for monitoring and verification activities, coarse resolution CHMs could be used to track canopy height at regional and global scales with finer resolution imagery used to validate and monitor critical areas undergoing rapid changes.

  12. Invariant Set Theory: Violating Measurement Independence without Fine Tuning, Conspiracy, Constraints on Free Will or Retrocausality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Palmer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Invariant Set (IS theory is a locally causal ontic theory of physics based on the Cosmological Invariant Set postulate that the universe U can be considered a deterministic dynamical system evolving precisely on a (suitably constructed fractal dynamically invariant set in U's state space. IS theory violates the Bell inequalities by violating Measurement Independence. Despite this, IS theory is not fine tuned, is not conspiratorial, does not constrain experimenter free will and does not invoke retrocausality. The reasons behind these claims are discussed in this paper. These arise from properties not found in conventional ontic models: the invariant set has zero measure in its Euclidean embedding space, has Cantor Set structure homeomorphic to the p-adic integers (p>>0 and is non-computable. In particular, it is shown that the p-adic metric encapulates the physics of the Cosmological Invariant Set postulate, and provides the technical means to demonstrate no fine tuning or conspiracy. Quantum theory can be viewed as the singular limit of IS theory when when p is set equal to infinity. Since it is based around a top-down constraint from cosmology, IS theory suggests that gravitational and quantum physics will be unified by a gravitational theory of the quantum, rather than a quantum theory of gravity. Some implications arising from such a perspective are discussed.

  13. Model-independent measurement of the CKM angle gamma using B-0 -> DK*0 decays with D -> K (S) (0) pi (+)pi (-) and K (S) (0) K+K-

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Cheung, S-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gandara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hongming, L.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J-P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Cid, E. Lemos; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Pernas, M. Ramos; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, I. T.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Azquez Sierra, C. V.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-01-01

    A binned Dalitz plot analysis of the decays B (0) -> DK*(0), with D -> K (S) (0) pi(+)pi(-) and D -> K (S) (0) K+K-, is performed to measure the observables x(+/-) and y(+/-), which are related to the CKM angle gamma and the hadronic parameters of the decays. The D decay strong phase variation over

  14. Techniques to extract physical modes in model-independent analysis of rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.-X.

    2004-01-01

    A basic goal of Model-Independent Analysis is to extract the physical modes underlying the beam histories collected at a large number of beam position monitors so that beam dynamics and machine properties can be deduced independent of specific machine models. Here we discuss techniques to achieve this goal, especially the Principal Component Analysis and the Independent Component Analysis.

  15. Environmental Measurements and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental measurement is any data collection activity involving the assessment of chemical, physical, or biological factors in the environment which affect human health. Learn more about these programs and tools that aid in environmental decisions

  16. A Model of Independent Learning Applied to the Online Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warring, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This case study forms a foundation for understanding the drivers for successful online learning within a constructivist paradigm. It investigates whether Chinese international students completing a degree had achieved a level of independence necessary to succeed in this context. It found that these students had not achieved the independence…

  17. Bayesian conditional-independence modeling of the AIDS epidemic in England and Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilks, Walter R.; De Angelis, Daniela; Day, Nicholas E.

    We describe the use of conditional-independence modeling, Bayesian inference and Markov chain Monte Carlo, to model and project the HIV-AIDS epidemic in homosexual/bisexual males in England and Wales. Complexity in this analysis arises through selectively missing data, indirectly observed underlying processes, and measurement error. Our emphasis is on presentation and discussion of the concepts, not on the technicalities of this analysis, which can be found elsewhere [D. De Angelis, W.R. Gilks, N.E. Day, Bayesian projection of the the acquired immune deficiency syndrome epidemic (with discussion), Applied Statistics, in press].

  18. A measurement of D-mixing in wrong sign $D^{0}\\to K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ decays to provide input to a model-independent determination of the CKM phase $\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080464; Rademacker, Jonas

    A measurement of the time dependent ratio of $D^{0}\\to K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ to $D^{0}\\to K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+$ decays is sensitive to both D-mixing and the interference between doubly Cabibbo suppressed (DCS) and Cabibbo favoured (CF) $D^{0}\\to K \\pi \\pi \\pi$ amplitudes. Such a measurement is made using 1.0 $\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of data collected by the LHCb experiment at a proton-proton centre of mass collision energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV. The ratio of DCS to CF amplitudes is measured to be, $r_D^{K3\\pi} = 0.0548 \\pm 0.0012$. The interference between DCS and CF amplitudes is described by the complex interference parameter $\\mathcal{Z}^{K3\\pi}$. A combination of results from LHCb and CLEO-c gives the following constraints: $\\mathcal{Re}\\mathcal{Z}^{K3\\pi}= -0.135^{+0.095}_{-0.105}$, $\\mathcal{Im}\\mathcal{Z}^{K3\\pi} = -0.26^{+0.19}_{-0.16}$. The probability of the data being a statistical fluctuation of the no-mixing hypothesis is $2.5\\times10^{-6}$, corresponding to a significance of $4.7\\sigma$ - this is...

  19. Asymptomatic Independence and Separability in Convariance Structure Models: Implications for Specification Error, Power, and Model Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D; Wenger, R N

    1993-10-01

    This article presents a didactic discussion on the role of asymptotically independent test statistics and separable hypotheses as they pertain to issues of specification error, power, and model modification in the covariance structure modeling framework. Specifically, it is shown that when restricting two parameter estimates on the basis of the multivariate Wald test, the condition of asymptotic independence is necessary but not sufficient for the univariate Wald test statistics to sum to the multivariate Wald test. Instead, what is required is mutual asymptotic independence (MAI) among the univariate tests. This result generalizes to sets of multivariate tests as well. When MA1 is lacking, hypotheses can exhibit transitive relationships. It is also shown that the pattern of zero and non-zero elements of the covariance matrix of the estimates are indicative of mutually asymptotically independent test statistics, separable and transitive hypotheses. The concepts of MAI, separability, and transitivity serve as an explanatory framework for how specification errors are propagated through systems of equations and how power analyses are differentially affected by specification errors of the same magnitude. A small population study supports the major findings of this article. The question of univariate versus multivariate sequential model modification is also addressed. We argue that multivariate sequential model modification strategies do not take into account the typical lack of MA1 thus inadvertently misleading substantive investigators. Instead, a prudent approach favors univariate sequential model modification.

  20. Differential item functioning of the functional independence measure in higher performing neurological patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallmeijer, AJ; Dekker, J; Roorda, LD; Knol, DL; van Baalen, B; de Groot, [No Value; Schepers, VPM; Lankhorst, GJ

    2005-01-01

    Objective: When comparing outcomes of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM(TM)) between patient groups, item characteristics of the FIM(TM) should be consistent across groups. The purpose of this study was to compare item difficulty of the FIM(TM) in 3 patient groups with neurological disorders.

  1. Slifers revisited: a method for determining yields independent of radiochemical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambo, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    It would be very desirable if an independent method other than radiochemical measurement were available to determine the yields of low-yield events in the alluviums and tuffs of areas 2, 9, and 10 at the Nevada Test Site. The successful application of slifers to the measurement of yields from high-yield events suggests that under some conditions they may also be usable with low-yield events. This view is supported by the evidence discussed here, which is based on direct experience with slifer yield measurements for low-yield events in porous media. Suggested methods for improving slifer yield determinations and a method for determining yields independent of radiochemical measurements are offered

  2. Method for independent strain and temperature measurement in polymeric tensile test specimen using embedded FBG sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; McGugan, Malcolm; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2016-01-01

    to calculate independently the strain and temperature are presented in the article, together with a measurement resolution study. This multi-parameter measurement method was applied to an epoxy tensile specimen, tested in a unidirectional tensile test machine with a temperature controlled cabinet. A full......A novel method to obtain independent strain and temperature measurements using embedded Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) in polymeric tensile test specimens is presented in this paper. The FBG strain and temperature cross-sensitivity was decoupled using two single mode FBG sensors, which were embedded...... of temperature, from 40 C to -10 C. The consistency of the expected theoretical results with the calibration procedure and the experimental validation shows that this proposed method is applicable to measure accurate strain and temperature in polymers during static or fatigue tensile testing. Two different...

  3. Model-independent determination of the triple Higgs coupling at e+e- colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barklow, Tim; Fujii, Keisuke; Jung, Sunghoon; Peskin, Michael E.; Tian, Junping

    2018-03-01

    The observation of Higgs pair production at high-energy colliders can give evidence for the presence of a triple Higgs coupling. However, the actual determination of the value of this coupling is more difficult. In the context of general models for new physics, double Higgs production processes can receive contributions from many possible beyond-Standard-Model effects. This dependence must be understood if one is to make a definite statement about the deviation of the Higgs field potential from the Standard Model. In this paper, we study the extraction of the triple Higgs coupling from the process e+e-→Z h h . We show that, by combining the measurement of this process with other measurements available at a 500 GeV e+e- collider, it is possible to quote model-independent limits on the effective field theory parameter c6 that parametrizes modifications of the Higgs potential. We present precise error estimates based on the anticipated International Linear Collider physics program, studied with full simulation. Our analysis also gives new insight into the model-independent extraction of the Higgs boson coupling constants and total width from e+e- data.

  4. A highly granular semi-digital hadron calorimeter for a future linear e + e − collider and a model independent Higgs boson measurement in the ZH→qq+X channel

    CERN Document Server

    Haddad, Yacine

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a concept for a linear electron-positron accelerator with a centre-of-mass energy of up to 1 TeV. Its main purpose is the precise measurement of particles discovered by the LHC such as the Higgs boson particle. The International Large Detector (ILD) is one of its detector concepts, specifically designed for the usage of Particle Flow Algorithms requiring highly granular calorimeters. Within the CALICE collaboration, several prototypes of such calorimeters, exploring different technologies, have been developed and tested. This thesis focuses on one of them: a semi-digital hadron calorimeter (SDHCAL) equipped with Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) sensors. It is a sampling calorimeter composed of 48 layers segmented in cells of one square centimetre for a total of half a millions channels. The first part of the present thesis describes the analysis of the data taken during beam tests at CERN, in which the detector was operated in a trigger less mode; saving of all ...

  5. Model plant Key Measurement Points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    For IAEA safeguards a Key Measurement Point is defined as the location where nuclear material appears in such a form that it may be measured to determine material flow or inventory. This presentation describes in an introductory manner the key measurement points and associated measurements for the model plant used in this training course

  6. Pure study and experimental application of laser measurement for students in independent colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanyi; Liu, Zhe

    2017-08-01

    The cultivation of independent college students is the development of applied talents and the strength of students' innovative ability. This requires teachers to make better use of the resources of the school, to develop students' ability with greatest possible and to encourage students to learn independently and personality development. We can carry out multi-discipline curriculum design practice after the study of related disciplines in order to make students have a more in-depth understanding and learning of the professional courses. In this paper, we will research on curriculum design based on the combination of Laser Measurement Technology and Digital Image Processing.

  7. Validation of a Grid Independent Spray Model and Fuel Chemistry Mechanism for Low Temperature Diesel Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Yoshikawa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Spray and combustion submodels used in a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code, KIVACHEMKIN, were validated for Low Temperature Combustion (LTC in a diesel engine by comparing measured and model predicted fuel spray penetrations, and in-cylinder distributions of OH and soot. The conditions considered were long ignition delay, early and late fuel injection cases. It was found that use of a grid independent spray model, called the GASJET model, with an improved n-heptane chemistry mechanism can well predict the heat release rate, not only of the main combustion stage, but also of the cool flame stage. Additionally, the GASJET model appropriately predicts the distributions of OH and soot in the cylinder even when the resolution of the computational mesh is decreased by half, which significantly reduces the required computational time.

  8. Assessment of Response Surface Models using Independent Confirmation Point Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoach, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights various advantages that confirmation-point residuals have over conventional model design-point residuals in assessing the adequacy of a response surface model fitted by regression techniques to a sample of experimental data. Particular advantages are highlighted for the case of design matrices that may be ill-conditioned for a given sample of data. The impact of both aleatory and epistemological uncertainty in response model adequacy assessments is considered.

  9. Skill and independence weighting for multi-model assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, Benjamin M.; Wehner, Michael; Knutti, Reto

    2017-01-01

    We present a weighting strategy for use with the CMIP5 multi-model archive in the fourth National Climate Assessment, which considers both skill in the climatological performance of models over North America as well as the inter-dependency of models arising from common parameterizations or tuning practices. The method exploits information relating to the climatological mean state of a number of projection-relevant variables as well as metrics representing long-term statistics of weather extremes. The weights, once computed can be used to simply compute weighted means and significance information from an ensemble containing multiple initial condition members from potentially co-dependent models of varying skill. Two parameters in the algorithm determine the degree to which model climatological skill and model uniqueness are rewarded; these parameters are explored and final values are defended for the assessment. The influence of model weighting on projected temperature and precipitation changes is found to be moderate, partly due to a compensating effect between model skill and uniqueness. However, more aggressive skill weighting and weighting by targeted metrics is found to have a more significant effect on inferred ensemble confidence in future patterns of change for a given projection.

  10. A Method of Calculating Functional Independence Measure at Discharge from Functional Independence Measure Effectiveness Predicted by Multiple Regression Analysis Has a High Degree of Predictive Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Makoto; Watanabe, Susumu; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2017-09-01

    Multiple linear regression analysis is often used to predict the outcome of stroke rehabilitation. However, the predictive accuracy may not be satisfactory. The objective of this study was to elucidate the predictive accuracy of a method of calculating motor Functional Independence Measure (mFIM) at discharge from mFIM effectiveness predicted by multiple regression analysis. The subjects were 505 patients with stroke who were hospitalized in a convalescent rehabilitation hospital. The formula "mFIM at discharge = mFIM effectiveness × (91 points - mFIM at admission) + mFIM at admission" was used. By including the predicted mFIM effectiveness obtained through multiple regression analysis in this formula, we obtained the predicted mFIM at discharge (A). We also used multiple regression analysis to directly predict mFIM at discharge (B). The correlation between the predicted and the measured values of mFIM at discharge was compared between A and B. The correlation coefficients were .916 for A and .878 for B. Calculating mFIM at discharge from mFIM effectiveness predicted by multiple regression analysis had a higher degree of predictive accuracy of mFIM at discharge than that directly predicted. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Model-Independent Constraints on New Physics in $b \\to s$ Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Straub, David M.

    2012-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive model-independent analysis of rare decays involving the b --> s transition to put constraints on dimension-six Delta(F)=1 effective operators. The constraints are derived from all the available up-to-date experimental data from the B-factories, CDF and LHCb. The implications and future prospects for observables in b --> s l+l- and b --> s nu nu transitions in view of improved measurements are also investigated. The present work updates and generalises previous studies providing, at the same time, a useful tool to test the flavour structure of any theory beyond the SM.

  12. An independent verification and validation of the Future Theater Level Model conceptual model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, D.S. III; Kruse, K.L.; Martellaro, A.J.; Packard, S.L.; Thomas, B. Jr.; Turley, V.K.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of independent verification and validation performed on a combat model in its design stage. The combat model is the Future Theater Level Model (FTLM), under development by The Joint Staff/J-8. J-8 has undertaken its development to provide an analysis tool that addresses the uncertainties of combat more directly than previous models and yields more rapid study results. The methodology adopted for this verification and validation consisted of document analyses. Included were detailed examination of the FTLM design documents (at all stages of development), the FTLM Mission Needs Statement, and selected documentation for other theater level combat models. These documents were compared to assess the FTLM as to its design stage, its purpose as an analytical combat model, and its capabilities as specified in the Mission Needs Statement. The conceptual design passed those tests. The recommendations included specific modifications as well as a recommendation for continued development. The methodology is significant because independent verification and validation have not been previously reported as being performed on a combat model in its design stage. The results are significant because The Joint Staff/J-8 will be using the recommendations from this study in determining whether to proceed with develop of the model.

  13. Device independent quantum key distribution secure against coherent attacks with memoryless measurement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKague, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Device independent quantum key distribution (QKD) aims to provide a higher degree of security than traditional QKD schemes by reducing the number of assumptions that need to be made about the physical devices used. The previous proof of security by Pironio et al (2009 New J. Phys. 11 045021) applies only to collective attacks where the state is identical and independent and the measurement devices operate identically for each trial in the protocol. We extend this result to a more general class of attacks where the state is arbitrary and the measurement devices have no memory. We accomplish this by a reduction of arbitrary adversary strategies to qubit strategies and a proof of security for qubit strategies based on the previous proof by Pironio et al and techniques adapted from Renner.

  14. Validation of the Brazilian version of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Riberto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : The Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM III specifically assesses individuals with spinal cord injuries. Objective : To translate and validate the Brazilian version of SCIM III. Method : SCIM III was translated, back-translated and adapted to the Portuguese language. Two interviewers assessed 83 subjects with spinal cord injuries in each one of seven collaborating rehabilitation centers. Functional Independence Measure (FIM™ and ASIA motor and sensory indices were also used. After six months, subjects were re-evaluated with the same instruments. Results : Examiners clearly understood the Brazilian version of SCIM III. Inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was 0.918, and test-retest ICC was 0.991. After six months, the variation of gains in the FIM™ positively correlated with gains in SCIM III. Conclusion : The Brazilian version of the SCIM III is easy to understand, has good psychometric properties, and is valid.

  15. Model independence of constraints on particle dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, K.; Sadoulet, B.

    1989-03-01

    The connection between the annihilation, elastic, and production cross sections is reviewed, showing how a general lower limit on the interaction rate in a detector is obtained from the requirement that a particle be the dark matter. High energy production experiments further constrain models, making very light dark matter particles unlikely. Special attention is paid to the uncertainties, loopholes and model dependencies that go into the arguments and several examples are given. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Automated statistical modeling of analytical measurement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The statistical modeling of analytical measurement systems at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) has been completely automated through computer software. The statistical modeling of analytical measurement systems is one part of a complete quality control program used by the Remote Analytical Laboratory (RAL) at the ICPP. The quality control program is an integration of automated data input, measurement system calibration, database management, and statistical process control. The quality control program and statistical modeling program meet the guidelines set forth by the American Society for Testing Materials and American National Standards Institute. A statistical model is a set of mathematical equations describing any systematic bias inherent in a measurement system and the precision of a measurement system. A statistical model is developed from data generated from the analysis of control standards. Control standards are samples which are made up at precise known levels by an independent laboratory and submitted to the RAL. The RAL analysts who process control standards do not know the values of those control standards. The object behind statistical modeling is to describe real process samples in terms of their bias and precision and, to verify that a measurement system is operating satisfactorily. The processing of control standards gives us this ability

  17. Macro Scale Independently Homogenized Subcells for Modeling Braided Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinzler, Brina J.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed to analyze the impact response of triaxially braided carbon fiber composites, including the penetration velocity and impact damage patterns. In the analytical model, the triaxial braid architecture is simulated by using four parallel shell elements, each of which is modeled as a laminated composite. Currently, each shell element is considered to be a smeared homogeneous material. The commercial transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA is used to conduct the simulations, and a continuum damage mechanics model internal to LS-DYNA is used as the material constitutive model. To determine the stiffness and strength properties required for the constitutive model, a top-down approach for determining the strength properties is merged with a bottom-up approach for determining the stiffness properties. The top-down portion uses global strengths obtained from macro-scale coupon level testing to characterize the material strengths for each subcell. The bottom-up portion uses micro-scale fiber and matrix stiffness properties to characterize the material stiffness for each subcell. Simulations of quasi-static coupon level tests for several representative composites are conducted along with impact simulations.

  18. Impact imaging of aircraft composite structure based on a model-independent spatial-wavenumber filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Liu, Bin; Yuan, Shenfang; Su, Zhongqing

    2016-01-01

    The spatial-wavenumber filtering technique is an effective approach to distinguish the propagating direction and wave mode of Lamb wave in spatial-wavenumber domain. Therefore, it has been gradually studied for damage evaluation in recent years. But for on-line impact monitoring in practical application, the main problem is how to realize the spatial-wavenumber filtering of impact signal when the wavenumber of high spatial resolution cannot be measured or the accurate wavenumber curve cannot be modeled. In this paper, a new model-independent spatial-wavenumber filter based impact imaging method is proposed. In this method, a 2D cross-shaped array constructed by two linear piezoelectric (PZT) sensor arrays is used to acquire impact signal on-line. The continuous complex Shannon wavelet transform is adopted to extract the frequency narrowband signals from the frequency wideband impact response signals of the PZT sensors. A model-independent spatial-wavenumber filter is designed based on the spatial-wavenumber filtering technique. Based on the designed filter, a wavenumber searching and best match mechanism is proposed to implement the spatial-wavenumber filtering of the frequency narrowband signals without modeling, which can be used to obtain a wavenumber-time image of the impact relative to a linear PZT sensor array. By using the two wavenumber-time images of the 2D cross-shaped array, the impact direction can be estimated without blind angle. The impact distance relative to the 2D cross-shaped array can be calculated by using the difference of time-of-flight between the frequency narrowband signals of two different central frequencies and the corresponding group velocities. The validations performed on a carbon fiber composite laminate plate and an aircraft composite oil tank show a good impact localization accuracy of the model-independent spatial-wavenumber filter based impact imaging method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The finite and large-N behaviors of independent-value matrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Geloun, Joseph, E-mail: jbengeloun@perimeterinstitute.ca [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St N, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); International Chair in Mathematical Physics and Applications, ICMPA–UNESCO Chair, 072 B.P. 50 Cotonou, Republic of Benin (Benin); Klauder, John R., E-mail: klauder@phys.ufl.edu [Department of Physics and Department of Mathematics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8440 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We investigate the finite and large N behaviors of independent-value O(N)-invariant matrix models. These are models defined with matrix-type fields and with no gradient term in their action. They are generically nonrenormalizable but can be handled by nonperturbative techniques. We find that the functional integral of any O(N) matrix trace invariant may be expressed in terms of an O(N)-invariant measure. Based on this result, we prove that, in the limit that all interaction coupling constants go to zero, any interacting theory is continuously connected to a pseudo-free theory. This theory differs radically from the familiar free theory consisting in putting the coupling constants to zero in the initial action. The proof is given for generic, finite-size matrix models, whereas, in the limiting case N → ∞, we succeed in showing this behavior for restricted types of actions using a particular scaling of the parameters.

  20. Model plant key measurement points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The key measurement points for the model low enriched fuel fabrication plant are described as well as the measurement methods. These are the measurement points and methods that are used to complete the plant's formal material balance. The purpose of the session is to enable participants to: (1) understand the basis for each key measurement; and (2) understand the importance of each measurement to the overall plant material balance. The feed to the model low enriched uranium fuel fabrication plant is UF 6 and the product is finished light water reactor fuel assemblies. The waste discards are solid and liquid wastes. The plant inventory consists of unopened UF 6 cylinders, UF 6 heels, fuel assemblies, fuel rods, fuel pellets, UO 2 powder, U 3 O 8 powder, and various scrap materials. At the key measurement points the total plant material balance (flow and inventory) is measured. The two types of key measurement points-flow and inventory are described

  1. Changes in activity after a complete spinal cord injury as measured by the Spinal Cord Independence Measure II (SCIM II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Brigitte; van Hedel, Hubertus J A; Kometer, Barbara; Dietz, Volker; Curt, Armin

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of rehabilitation efficacy in spinal cord injury (SCI) should be based on a combination of neurological and functional outcome measures. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure II (SCIM II) is an independence scale that was specifically developed for subjects with SCI. However, little is know about the changes in SCIM II scores during and after rehabilitation. The aims of this study were to evaluate changes in functional recovery during the first year after a complete SCI as measured by the SCIM II compared with neurological recovery (motor scores according to the American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA]). SCIM II data and ASIA motor scores 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after injury (derived from the database of the European Multicenter Study of Human Spinal Cord Injury) of 64 patients with complete paraplegia and 36 patients with complete quadriplegia were analyzed. In patients with complete paraplegia, the SCIM II total score improved significantly during the 1-year follow-up, even after discharge from rehabilitation. In contrast, the ASIA motor scores showed little recovery. In patients with quadriplegia, functional and motor recovery developed in parallel during rehabilitation and after discharge. The SCIM II is responsive to functional changes in patients with a persistent motor complete SCI. It is clinically useful for monitoring functional improvement during rehabilitation and after discharge. The SCIM II and the clinical examination based on the ASIA protocol are of complementary value and separately describe changes in independence and sensorimotor deficits in SCI patients.

  2. Transition Models with Measurement Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Magnac, Thierry; Visser, Michael

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate a transition model that allows for measurement errors in the data. The measurement errors arise because the survey design is partly retrospective, so that individuals sometimes forget or misclassify their past labor market transitions. The observed data are adjusted for errors via a measurement-error mechanism. The parameters of the distribution of the true data, and those of the measurement-error mechanism are estimated by a two-stage method. The results, based on ...

  3. The model-independent analysis for Higgs boson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-07-04

    The discovery of a 125 GeV particle, announced by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations on July 04, 2012, is one of the most important events in the recent history of particle physics. This particle could be the last missing particle of the Standard Model of particle physics or it could be the beginning of the long list of particles ...

  4. Electrode size and boundary condition independent measurement of the effective piezoelectric coefficient of thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stewart

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the piezoelectric coefficient of thin films using interferometry is hindered by bending contributions. Using finite element analysis (FEA simulations, we show that the Lefki and Dormans approximations using either single or double-beam measurements cannot be used with finite top electrode sizes. We introduce a novel method for characterising piezoelectric thin films which uses a differential measurement over the discontinuity at the electrode edge as an internal reference, thereby eliminating bending contributions. This step height is shown to be electrode size and boundary condition independent. An analytical expression is derived which gives good agreement with FEA predictions of the step height.

  5. Model-independent determination of dissociation energies: method and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Manuel; Hansen, Klavs; Herlert, Alexander; Schweikhard, Lutz

    2003-01-01

    A number of methods are available for the purpose of extracting dissociation energies of polyatomic particles. Many of these techniques relate the rate of disintegration at a known excitation energy to the value of the dissociation energy. However, such a determination is susceptible to systematic uncertainties, mainly due to the unknown thermal properties of the particles and the potential existence of 'dark' channels, such as radiative cooling. These problems can be avoided with a recently developed procedure, which applies energy-dependent reactions of the decay products as an uncalibrated thermometer. Thus, it allows a direct measurement of dissociation energies, without any assumption on properties of the system or on details of the disintegration process. The experiments have been performed in a Penning trap, where both rate constants and branching ratios have been measured. The dissociation energies determined with different versions of the method yield identical values, within a small uncertainty

  6. The model-independent analysis for Higgs boson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-23

    Aug 23, 2016 ... VBF, WH and ZH and t¯tH and ff include WW, ZZ, bb, ττ, γγ, and Zγ final states. To accommodate the possibility of Higgs boson decaying into beyond the. Standard Model (BSM) particles with a partial width. BSM, the total width is considered as a dependent parameter such that tot = ∑ ii + BSM, where ii.

  7. A model for rate-dependent but time-independent material behavior in cyclic plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dafalias, Y.F.; Ramey, M.R.; Sheikh, I.

    1977-01-01

    It is the purpose of this paper to present a model for rate-dependent but time independent material behavior under cyclic loading in the plastic range. What is referred to as time independent behavior here, is the absence of creep and relaxation phenomena from the behavior of the model. The notion of plastic internal variables (piv) is introduced, as properly invariant scalars or second order tensors, whose constitutive relations are rate-type equations not necessarily homogeneous of oder one in the rates, as it would be required for independent plasticity. The concept of a yield surface in the strain space and a loading function in terms of the total strain rate is introduced, where the sign of the loading function defines zero or non-zero value of the rate of piv. Thus rate dependence is achieved without time dependent behavior (no creep or relaxation). In addition, discrete memory parameters associated with the most recent event of unloading-reloading in different directions enter the constitutive relations for the piv. A particular form of the constitutive relations is assumed, where the rate of piv is a linear combination of the strain rate components, with coefficients depending on the second invariant of the strain rate tensor, which can be viewed as a scalar measure of the rate of deformation in the multiaxial case and a direct generalization of the uniaxial strain rate. This leads to a particularly simple form of the constitutive relations resembling the ones for rate independent plasticity. The uniaxial counterpart would be a relation between the plastic strain rate (as one of the piv) and the total strain rate through a plastic modulus which depends on the strain rate, the piv, and the discrete memory parameters

  8. Revealing strong bias in common measures of galaxy properties using new inclination-independent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devour, Brian M.; Bell, Eric F.

    2017-06-01

    Accurate measurement of galaxy structures is a prerequisite for quantitative investigation of galaxy properties or evolution. Yet, the impact of galaxy inclination and dust on commonly used metrics of galaxy structure is poorly quantified. We use infrared data sets to select inclination-independent samples of disc and flattened elliptical galaxies. These samples show strong variation in Sérsic index, concentration and half-light radii with inclination. We develop novel inclination-independent galaxy structures by collapsing the light distribution in the near-infrared on to the major axis, yielding inclination-independent 'linear' measures of size and concentration. With these new metrics we select a sample of Milky Way analogue galaxies with similar stellar masses, star formation rates, sizes and concentrations. Optical luminosities, light distributions and spectral properties are all found to vary strongly with inclination: When inclining to edge-on, r-band luminosities dim by >1 magnitude, sizes decrease by a factor of 2, 'dust-corrected' estimates of star formation rate drop threefold, metallicities decrease by 0.1 dex and edge-on galaxies are half as likely to be classified as star forming. These systematic effects should be accounted for in analyses of galaxy properties.

  9. The Integrated Medical Model: Outcomes from Independent Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J.; Garcia, Y.; Griffin, D.; Arellano, J.; Boley, L.; Goodenow, D. A.; Kerstman, E.; Reyes, D.; Saile, L.; Walton, M.; hide

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) v4.0 underwent an extensive external review in preparation for transition to an operational status. In order to insure impartiality of the review process, the Exploration Medical Capabilities Element of NASA's Human Research Program convened the review through the Systems Review Office at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The review board convened by GSFC consisted of persons from both NASA and academia with expertise in the fields of statistics, epidemiology, modeling, software development, aerospace medicine, and project management (see Figure 1). The board reviewed software and code standards, as well as evidence pedigree associated with both the input and outcomes information. The board also assesses the models verification, validation, sensitivity to parameters and ability to answer operational questions. This talk will discuss the processes for designing the review, how the review progressed and the findings from the board, as well as summarize the IMM project responses to those findings. Overall, the board found that the IMM is scientifically sound, represents a necessary, comprehensive approach to identifying medical and environmental risks facing astronauts in long duration missions and is an excellent tool for communication between engineers and physicians. The board also found IMM and its customer(s) should convene an additional review of the IMM data sources and to develop a sustainable approach to augment, peer review, and maintain the information utilized in the IMM. The board found this is critically important because medical knowledge continues to evolve. Delivery of IMM v4.0 to the Crew Health and Safety (CHS) Program will occur in the 2017. Once delivered for operational decision support, IMM v4.0 will provide CHS with additional quantitative capability in to assess astronaut medical risks and required medical capabilities to help drive down overall mission risks.

  10. MeV dark matter: model independent bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzo, Enrico; Caniu Barros, Cristian J.; Grilli di Cortona, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    We use the framework of dark matter effective field theories to study the complementarity of bounds for a dark matter particle with mass in the MeV range. Taking properly into account the mixing between operators induced by the renormalization group running, we impose experimental constraints coming from the CMB, BBN, LHC, LEP, direct detection experiments and meson decays. In particular, we focus on the case of a vector coupling between the dark matter and the standard model fermions, and study to which extent future experiments can hope to probe regions of parameters space which are not already ruled out by current data.

  11. Voxel-level reproducibility assessment of modality independent elastography in a pre-clinical murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Katelyn M.; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2015-03-01

    Changes in tissue mechanical properties, measured non-invasively by elastography methods, have been shown to be an important diagnostic tool, particularly for cancer. Tissue elasticity information, tracked over the course of therapy, may be an important prognostic indicator of tumor response to treatment. While many elastography techniques exist, this work reports on the use of a novel form of elastography that uses image texture to reconstruct elastic property distributions in tissue (i.e., a modality independent elastography (MIE) method) within the context of a pre-clinical breast cancer system.1,2 The elasticity results have previously shown good correlation with independent mechanical testing.1 Furthermore, MIE has been successfully utilized to localize and characterize lesions in both phantom experiments and simulation experiments with clinical data.2,3 However, the reproducibility of this method has not been characterized in previous work. The goal of this study is to evaluate voxel-level reproducibility of MIE in a pre-clinical model of breast cancer. Bland-Altman analysis of co-registered repeat MIE scans in this preliminary study showed a reproducibility index of 24.7% (scaled to a percent of maximum stiffness) at the voxel level. As opposed to many reports in the magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) literature that speak to reproducibility measures of the bulk organ, these results establish MIE reproducibility at the voxel level; i.e., the reproducibility of locally-defined mechanical property measurements throughout the tumor volume.

  12. Model-independent indirect detection constraints on hidden sector dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elor, Gilly; Rodd, Nicholas L.; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Xue, Wei

    2016-06-01

    If dark matter inhabits an expanded ``hidden sector'', annihilations may proceed through sequential decays or multi-body final states. We map out the potential signals and current constraints on such a framework in indirect searches, using a model-independent setup based on multi-step hierarchical cascade decays. While remaining agnostic to the details of the hidden sector model, our framework captures the generic broadening of the spectrum of secondary particles (photons, neutrinos, e+e- and bar p p) relative to the case of direct annihilation to Standard Model particles. We explore how indirect constraints on dark matter annihilation limit the parameter space for such cascade/multi-particle decays. We investigate limits from the cosmic microwave background by Planck, the Fermi measurement of photons from the dwarf galaxies, and positron data from AMS-02. The presence of a hidden sector can change the constraints on the dark matter by up to an order of magnitude in either direction (although the effect can be much smaller). We find that generally the bound from the Fermi dwarfs is most constraining for annihilations to photon-rich final states, while AMS-02 is most constraining for electron and muon final states; however in certain instances the CMB bounds overtake both, due to their approximate independence on the details of the hidden sector cascade. We provide the full set of cascade spectra considered here as publicly available code with examples at http://web.mit.edu/lns/research/CascadeSpectra.html.

  13. Development of nonintrusive, scatter-independent techniques for measurement of liquid density inside dense sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartfield, Roy

    1994-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique for measuring the liquid density in sprays used to simulate LOX injector flows is under development. This manuscript is a report on work toward that development which is currently in progress. The technique is a scatter-independent, absorption-based approach which depends on the numerical inversion of a collection of absorption profiles. For the case in which visible radiation passes through liquid-gas interfaces so numerous in sprays, substantial reductions and alterations in the signal result from scattering even in the absence of absorption. To avoid these problems, X-Rays will be used as the absorbed radiation. The experimental process is simulated by integrating the absorption spectrum for a known distribution, adding instrument noise to this 'measurement', creating a projection from the 'measurement', filtering the projection, inverting the projection, and comparing the results with the original prescribed distribution.

  14. A measure of total research impact independent of time and discipline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Pepe

    Full Text Available Authorship and citation practices evolve with time and differ by academic discipline. As such, indicators of research productivity based on citation records are naturally subject to historical and disciplinary effects. We observe these effects on a corpus of astronomer career data constructed from a database of refereed publications. We employ a simple mechanism to measure research output using author and reference counts available in bibliographic databases to develop a citation-based indicator of research productivity. The total research impact (tori quantifies, for an individual, the total amount of scholarly work that others have devoted to his/her work, measured in the volume of research papers. A derived measure, the research impact quotient (riq, is an age-independent measure of an individual's research ability. We demonstrate that these measures are substantially less vulnerable to temporal debasement and cross-disciplinary bias than the most popular current measures. The proposed measures of research impact, tori and riq, have been implemented in the Smithsonian/NASA Astrophysics Data System.

  15. A measure of total research impact independent of time and discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Alberto; Kurtz, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Authorship and citation practices evolve with time and differ by academic discipline. As such, indicators of research productivity based on citation records are naturally subject to historical and disciplinary effects. We observe these effects on a corpus of astronomer career data constructed from a database of refereed publications. We employ a simple mechanism to measure research output using author and reference counts available in bibliographic databases to develop a citation-based indicator of research productivity. The total research impact (tori) quantifies, for an individual, the total amount of scholarly work that others have devoted to his/her work, measured in the volume of research papers. A derived measure, the research impact quotient (riq), is an age-independent measure of an individual's research ability. We demonstrate that these measures are substantially less vulnerable to temporal debasement and cross-disciplinary bias than the most popular current measures. The proposed measures of research impact, tori and riq, have been implemented in the Smithsonian/NASA Astrophysics Data System.

  16. Study of nuclear bremsstrahlung in the model independent approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.K.

    1980-01-01

    The bremsstrahlung cross section for the scattering of protons by 12 C near the 1.7-MeV resonance has been measured by the Bologna group and the Brooklyn group. In this study, we have included in our calculations the correction terms in the Feshbach-Yennie approximation and have extracted the time delay in the P- 12 C reaction from the data of the Brooklyn group. The + p process near the (1236) has been systematically studied by an experimental group at UCLA. Recently, Liou and Nutt reported a calculation using the soft-photon approximation and their results agree very well with experiment for coplanar events. We have extended their calculation to noncoplanar cases and have found that the soft-photon approximation of Liou and Nutt can describe the experimental data very well not only for coplanar cases but also for noncoplanar cases for most photon angles. In addition, we have also used the Feshbach-Yennie approximation to calculate the + p cross sections. This approximation always predicts a bump in the bremsstrahlung spectrum, although the bump may be small for some photon angles. In most cases, the predicted cross sections are in good agreement with the UCLA data. However, the data for some angles can only be described by the Feshbach-Yennie approximation, and the peak cross section is too large at some angles. We have applied the soft-photon approximation of Liou and Nutt to calculate the proton-proton bremsstrahlung (pp) cross section and have compared our results with the experimental data at 730, 157, 48 and 42 MeV. We have found that we can use the soft-photon approximation to calculate the R-type cross section without any difficulty, but we cannot use the same approximation to predict the H-type cross section without some ambiguity. We have also applied the Feshbach-Yennie approximation to the pp process at 730-MeV taking into account the principal and correction terms

  17. A cost-effective measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution system for quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valivarthi, Raju; Zhou, Qiang; John, Caleb; Marsili, Francesco; Verma, Varun B.; Shaw, Matthew D.; Nam, Sae Woo; Oblak, Daniel; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2017-12-01

    We experimentally realize a measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) system. It is based on cost-effective and commercially available hardware such as distributed feedback lasers and field-programmable gate arrays that enable time-bin qubit preparation and time-tagging, and active feedback systems that allow for compensation of time-varying properties of photons after transmission through deployed fiber. We examine the performance of our system, and conclude that its design does not compromise performance. Our demonstration paves the way for MDI-QKD-based quantum networks in star-type topology that extend over more than 100 km distance.

  18. Multi-party Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution Based on Cluster States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanqi; Zhu, Changhua; Ma, Shuquan; Pei, Changxing

    2018-03-01

    We propose a novel multi-party measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol based on cluster states. A four-photon analyzer which can distinguish all the 16 cluster states serves as the measurement device for four-party MDI-QKD. Any two out of four participants can build secure keys after the analyzers obtains successful outputs and the two participants perform post-processing. We derive a security analysis for the protocol, and analyze the key rates under different values of polarization misalignment. The results show that four-party MDI-QKD is feasible over 280 km in the optical fiber channel when the key rate is about 10- 6 with the polarization misalignment parameter 0.015. Moreover, our work takes an important step toward a quantum communication network.

  19. Multi-party Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution Based on Cluster States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanqi; Zhu, Changhua; Ma, Shuquan; Pei, Changxing

    2017-12-01

    We propose a novel multi-party measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol based on cluster states. A four-photon analyzer which can distinguish all the 16 cluster states serves as the measurement device for four-party MDI-QKD. Any two out of four participants can build secure keys after the analyzers obtains successful outputs and the two participants perform post-processing. We derive a security analysis for the protocol, and analyze the key rates under different values of polarization misalignment. The results show that four-party MDI-QKD is feasible over 280 km in the optical fiber channel when the key rate is about 10- 6 with the polarization misalignment parameter 0.015. Moreover, our work takes an important step toward a quantum communication network.

  20. Models of Credit Risk Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Hagiu Alina

    2011-01-01

    Credit risk is defined as that risk of financial loss caused by failure by the counterparty. According to statistics, for financial institutions, credit risk is much important than market risk, reduced diversification of the credit risk is the main cause of bank failures. Just recently, the banking industry began to measure credit risk in the context of a portfolio along with the development of risk management started with models value at risk (VAR). Once measured, credit risk can be diversif...

  1. Teamwork skills, shared mental models, and performance in simulated trauma teams: an independent group design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westli, Heidi Kristina; Johnsen, Bjørn Helge; Eid, Jarle; Rasten, Ingvil; Brattebø, Guttorm

    2010-08-31

    Non-technical skills are seen as an important contributor to reducing adverse events and improving medical management in healthcare teams. Previous research on the effectiveness of teams has suggested that shared mental models facilitate coordination and team performance. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether demonstrated teamwork skills and behaviour indicating shared mental models would be associated with observed improved medical management in trauma team simulations. Revised versions of the 'Anesthetists' Non-Technical Skills Behavioural marker system' and 'Anti-Air Teamwork Observation Measure' were field tested in moment-to-moment observation of 27 trauma team simulations in Norwegian hospitals. Independent subject matter experts rated medical management in the teams. An independent group design was used to explore differences in teamwork skills between higher-performing and lower-performing teams. Specific teamwork skills and behavioural markers were associated with indicators of good team performance. Higher and lower-performing teams differed in information exchange, supporting behaviour and communication, with higher performing teams showing more effective information exchange and communication, and less supporting behaviours. Behavioural markers of shared mental models predicted effective medical management better than teamwork skills. The present study replicates and extends previous research by providing new empirical evidence of the significance of specific teamwork skills and a shared mental model for the effective medical management of trauma teams. In addition, the study underlines the generic nature of teamwork skills by demonstrating their transferability from different clinical simulations like the anaesthesia environment to trauma care, as well as the potential usefulness of behavioural frequency analysis in future research on non-technical skills.

  2. Teamwork skills, shared mental models, and performance in simulated trauma teams: an independent group design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westli Heidi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-technical skills are seen as an important contributor to reducing adverse events and improving medical management in healthcare teams. Previous research on the effectiveness of teams has suggested that shared mental models facilitate coordination and team performance. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether demonstrated teamwork skills and behaviour indicating shared mental models would be associated with observed improved medical management in trauma team simulations. Methods Revised versions of the 'Anesthetists' Non-Technical Skills Behavioural marker system' and 'Anti-Air Teamwork Observation Measure' were field tested in moment-to-moment observation of 27 trauma team simulations in Norwegian hospitals. Independent subject matter experts rated medical management in the teams. An independent group design was used to explore differences in teamwork skills between higher-performing and lower-performing teams. Results Specific teamwork skills and behavioural markers were associated with indicators of good team performance. Higher and lower-performing teams differed in information exchange, supporting behaviour and communication, with higher performing teams showing more effective information exchange and communication, and less supporting behaviours. Behavioural markers of shared mental models predicted effective medical management better than teamwork skills. Conclusions The present study replicates and extends previous research by providing new empirical evidence of the significance of specific teamwork skills and a shared mental model for the effective medical management of trauma teams. In addition, the study underlines the generic nature of teamwork skills by demonstrating their transferability from different clinical simulations like the anaesthesia environment to trauma care, as well as the potential usefulness of behavioural frequency analysis in future research on non-technical skills.

  3. Published diagnostic models safely excluded colorectal cancer in an independent primary care validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elias, Sjoerd G; Kok, Liselotte; Witteman, Ben J M; Goedhard, Jelle G; Romberg-Camps, Mariëlle J L; Muris, Jean W M; de Wit, Niek J; Moons, Karel G M

    OBJECTIVE: To validate published diagnostic models for their ability to safely reduce unnecessary endoscopy referrals in primary care patients suspected of significant colorectal disease. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Following a systematic literature search, we independently validated the identified

  4. Results of the Independent Verification and Validation Study for the D2-Puff Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bowers, J

    1999-01-01

    .... The independent verification and validation (IV&V) study of D2-Puff Version 2.0.6 focused on these accreditation requirements and the implicit requirement that the model provide safe-sided hazard estimates...

  5. A model-independent description of few-body system with strong interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simenog, I.V.

    1985-01-01

    In this contribution, the authors discuss the formulation of equations that provide model-independent description of systems of three and more nucleons irrespective of the details of the interaction, substantiate the approach, estimate the correction terms with respect to the force range, and give basic qualitative results obtained by means of the model-independent procedure. They consider three nucleons in the doublet state (spin S=I/2) taking into account only S-interaction. The elastic nd-scattering amplitude may be found from the model-independent equations that follow from the Faddeev equations in the short-range-force limit. They note that the solutions of several model-independent equations and basic results obtained with the use of this approach may serve both as a standard solution and starting point in the discussion of various conceptions concerning the details of nuclear interactions

  6. Validation of the Italian version of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM III) Self-Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavita, J; Torre, M; China, S; Bressi, F; Bonatti, E; Capirossi, R; Tiberti, S; Olivi, S; Musumeci, G; Maietti, E; Fekete, C; Baroncini, I; Brinkhof, M W G; Molinari, M; Scivoletto, G

    2016-07-01

    Cross-sectional validation study. To validate the Italian version of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure Self-Report (SCIM SR). Two spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation facilities in Italy. The SCIM III comprises items on 19 daily tasks, grouped into three subscales: 'Self-care,' 'Respiration and sphincter management' and 'Mobility'. The total SCIM score ranges between 0 and 100. The Italian self-reported version (SCIM SR) was translated from the German tool. We studied 116 patients on their first hospitalization for rehabilitation after an SCI. At the time of discharge, patients were evaluated by the rehabilitation team using the SCIM III and self-assessed their independence with regard to activities of daily living using the SCIM SR. Pearson's correlation, Bland-Altman method, and stratified and regression analyses were used to examine the differences between evaluations. On the basis of Pearson's correlation, there was good agreement between the data from the SCIM III and SCIM SR (r=0.918 for 'Self-care,' 0.806 for 'Respiration and sphincter management,' 0.906 for 'Mobility' and 0.934 for total scores). By Bland-Altman analysis, patients rated their functioning nearly the same as professionals-the mean difference between SCIM III and SCIM SR scores was approximately 0 for all subscales and total scores. The stratified and regression analyses failed to identify any specific factor that was associated with differences between SCIM III and SCIM SR scores. These results support the validity of the Italian version of the SCIM SR, which can facilitate longer-term evaluations of the independence of individuals with SCIs.

  7. Some Convex Functions Based Measures of Independence and Their Application to Strange Attractor Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyuki Aihara

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The classical information-theoretic measures such as the entropy and the mutual information (MI are widely applicable to many areas in science and engineering. Csiszar generalized the entropy and the MI by using the convex functions. Recently, we proposed the grid occupancy (GO and the quasientropy (QE as measures of independence. The QE explicitly includes a convex function in its definition, while the expectation of GO is a subclass of QE. In this paper, we study the effect of different convex functions on GO, QE, and Csiszar’s generalized mutual information (GMI. A quality factor (QF is proposed to quantify the sharpness of their minima. Using the QF, it is shown that these measures can have sharper minima than the classical MI. Besides, a recursive algorithm for computing GMI, which is a generalization of Fraser and Swinney’s algorithm for computing MI, is proposed. Moreover, we apply GO, QE, and GMI to chaotic time series analysis. It is shown that these measures are good criteria for determining the optimum delay in strange attractor reconstruction.

  8. Division Quilts: A Measurement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Sarah S.; Lupton, Tina M.; Richardson, Kerri

    2015-01-01

    As teachers seek activities to assist students in understanding division as more than just the algorithm, they find many examples of division as fair sharing. However, teachers have few activities to engage students in a quotative (measurement) model of division. Efraim Fischbein and his colleagues (1985) defined two types of whole-number…

  9. Use of the Functional Independence Measure in people for whom weaning from mechanical ventilation is difficult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnani, Giulia; Vagheggini, Guido; Panait Vlad, Eugenia; Berrighi, Daniele; Pantani, Luca; Ambrosino, Nicolino

    2011-07-01

    The Functional Independence Measure (FIM) has been proposed as an outcome measure for people receiving pulmonary rehabilitation after an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical utility of the FIM after a weaning program in people for whom weaning from mechanical ventilation is difficult. Design This was a retrospective observational study. People who had had a tracheostomy, for whom weaning from mechanical ventilation was difficult, and who were participating in a weaning program (WP group) were retrospectively evaluated. People receiving pulmonary rehabilitation after an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (PR group) were included as a validated control group. The scores on the FIM questionnaire and the Medical Research Council dyspnea scores were assessed at admission to and at discharge from the programs. Admission and discharge data from 56 participants in the WP group and 63 participants in the PR group were compared. At admission, according to the FIM, 5 participants in the WP group (7.7%) were defined as functionally independent, 34 (52.3%) were defined as partially dependent, and 26 (40.0%) were defined as completely dependent. At discharge, the mean FIM global score was significantly improved, from 47.9 (SD=22.8) to 62.6 (SD=30.0). For participants in the WP group, changes in the FIM score were significantly inversely related to the admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (R=-.286) and Simplified Acute Physiology (R=-.293) scores and directly related to the admission FIM score (R=.355). At admission, 46 participants in the PR group (67.7%) were defined as functionally independent, 19 (27.9%) were defined as partially dependent, and 3 (4.4%) were defined as completely dependent. After pulmonary rehabilitation, the mean FIM global score was significantly improved, from 97.4 (SD=27.5) to 102.5 (SD=25.7). Limitations The study was not

  10. Precise Void Fraction Measurement in Two-phase Flows Independent of the Flow Regime Using Gamma-ray Attenuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nazemi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Void fraction is an important parameter in the oil industry. This quantity is necessary for volume rate measurement in multiphase flows. In this study, the void fraction percentage was estimated precisely, independent of the flow regime in gas–liquid two-phase flows by using γ-ray attenuation and a multilayer perceptron neural network. In all previous studies that implemented a multibeam γ-ray attenuation technique to determine void fraction independent of the flow regime in two-phase flows, three or more detectors were used while in this study just two NaI detectors were used. Using fewer detectors is of advantage in industrial nuclear gauges because of reduced expense and improved simplicity. In this work, an artificial neural network is also implemented to predict the void fraction percentage independent of the flow regime. To do this, a multilayer perceptron neural network is used for developing the artificial neural network model in MATLAB. The required data for training and testing the network in three different regimes (annular, stratified, and bubbly were obtained using an experimental setup. Using the technique developed in this work, void fraction percentages were predicted with mean relative error of <1.4%.

  11. Measurement of functional independence level and falls-risk in individuals with undiagnosed phenylketonuria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mazur, Artur

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the level of functional independence in adult patients with previously undiagnosed or untreated phenylketonuria (PKU). The study was conducted among 400 intellectually impaired adult residents of Social Welfare Homes in South-Eastern Poland born prior to the introduction of neonatal PKU screening programs. PKU was screened by filter paper test using tandem mass spectrometry methods, and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of PKU organic acids in urine. Degree of functional independence included the assessment of activities of daily living (Barthel Index) and measures of balance and gait (Tinetti scale). Eleven individuals with previously untreated PKU were identified whereby eight presented with moderate disability and three with mild disability. Six had a high risk of falls and five had a moderate risk of falls. This study indicates that there is considerable number of undiagnosed PKU patients within the Polish population who require assessment and management in order to reduce the impact of the neurological and neuropsychiatric problems associated with the condition. Appropriate therapy for those with undiagnosed PKU should, in particular, address the risk of falls.

  12. Precise models deserve precise measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin E. Hilbig

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The recognition heuristic (RH --- which predicts non-compensatory reliance on recognition in comparative judgments --- has attracted much research and some disagreement, at times. Most studies have dealt with whether or under which conditions the RH is truly used in paired-comparisons. However, even though the RH is a precise descriptive model, there has been less attention concerning the precision of the methods applied to measure RH-use. In the current work, I provide an overview of different measures of RH-use tailored to the paradigm of natural recognition which has emerged as a preferred way of studying the RH. The measures are compared with respect to different criteria --- with particular emphasis on how well they uncover true use of the RH. To this end, both simulations and a re-analysis of empirical data are presented. The results indicate that the adherence rate --- which has been pervasively applied to measure RH-use --- is a severely biased measure. As an alternative, a recently developed formal measurement model emerges as the recommended candidate for assessment of RH-use.

  13. Passive measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lian; Zhou, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Xue-jun; Chen, Xiao

    2018-03-01

    Based on the orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation, we present a novel passive measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) scheme with the two-mode source. Combining with the tight bounds of the yield and error rate of single-photon pairs given in our paper, we conduct performance analysis on the scheme with heralded single-photon source. The numerical simulations show that the performance of our scheme is significantly superior to the traditional MDI-QKD in the error rate, key generation rate and secure transmission distance, since the application of orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation can exclude the basis-dependent flaw and increase the information content for each single photon. Moreover, the performance is improved with the rise of the frame length. Therefore, our scheme, without intensity modulation, avoids the source side channels and enhances the key generation rate. It has greatly utility value in the MDI-QKD setups.

  14. Self-referenced continuous-variable measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijun; Wang, Xudong; Li, Jiawei; Huang, Duan; Zhang, Ling; Guo, Ying

    2018-05-01

    We propose a scheme to remove the demand of transmitting a high-brightness local oscillator (LO) in continuous-variable measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (CV-MDI QKD) protocol, which we call as the self-referenced (SR) CV-MDI QKD. We show that our scheme is immune to the side-channel attacks, such as the calibration attacks, the wavelength attacks and the LO fluctuation attacks, which are all exploiting the security loopholes introduced by transmitting the LO. Besides, the proposed scheme waives the necessity of complex multiplexer and demultiplexer, which can greatly simplify the QKD processes and improve the transmission efficiency. The numerical simulations under collective attacks show that all the improvements brought about by our scheme are only at the expense of slight transmission distance shortening. This scheme shows an available method to mend the security loopholes incurred by transmitting LO in CV-MDI QKD.

  15. Continuous-variable measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with photon subtraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong-Xin; Huang, Peng; Bai, Dong-Yun; Wang, Shi-Yu; Bao, Wan-Su; Zeng, Gui-Hua

    2018-04-01

    It has been found that non-Gaussian operations can be applied to increase and distill entanglement between Gaussian entangled states. We show the successful use of the non-Gaussian operation, in particular, photon subtraction operation, on the continuous-variable measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (CV-MDI-QKD) protocol. The proposed method can be implemented based on existing technologies. Security analysis shows that the photon subtraction operation can remarkably increase the maximal transmission distance of the CV-MDI-QKD protocol, which precisely make up for the shortcoming of the original CV-MDI-QKD protocol, and one-photon subtraction operation has the best performance. Moreover, the proposed protocol provides a feasible method for the experimental implementation of the CV-MDI-QKD protocol.

  16. Finite-size analysis of measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography with continuous variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Panagiotis; Ottaviani, Carlo; Pirandola, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    We study the impact of finite-size effects on the key rate of continuous-variable (CV) measurement-device-independent (MDI) quantum key distribution (QKD), considering two-mode Gaussian attacks. Inspired by the parameter estimation technique developed in by Ruppert et al. [Phys. Rev. A 90, 062310 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.062310], we adapt it to study CV-MDI-QKD and, assuming realistic experimental conditions, we analyze the impact of finite-size effects on the key rate. We find that the performance of the protocol approaches the ideal one, increasing the block size, and, most importantly, that blocks between 106 and 109 data points may provide key rates ˜10-2 bit/use over metropolitan distances.

  17. Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution over Untrustful Metropolitan Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Lin Tang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantum cryptography holds the promise to establish an information-theoretically secure global network. All field tests of metropolitan-scale quantum networks to date are based on trusted relays. The security critically relies on the accountability of the trusted relays, which will break down if the relay is dishonest or compromised. Here, we construct a measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDIQKD network in a star topology over a 200-square-kilometer metropolitan area, which is secure against untrustful relays and against all detection attacks. In the field test, our system continuously runs through one week with a secure key rate 10 times larger than previous results. Our results demonstrate that the MDIQKD network, combining the best of both worlds—security and practicality, constitutes an appealing solution to secure metropolitan communications.

  18. Model-independent indirect detection constraints on hidden sector dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elor, Gilly; Rodd, Nicholas L.; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Xue, Wei [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    If dark matter inhabits an expanded “hidden sector”, annihilations may proceed through sequential decays or multi-body final states. We map out the potential signals and current constraints on such a framework in indirect searches, using a model-independent setup based on multi-step hierarchical cascade decays. While remaining agnostic to the details of the hidden sector model, our framework captures the generic broadening of the spectrum of secondary particles (photons, neutrinos, e{sup +}e{sup −} and p-barp) relative to the case of direct annihilation to Standard Model particles. We explore how indirect constraints on dark matter annihilation limit the parameter space for such cascade/multi-particle decays. We investigate limits from the cosmic microwave background by Planck, the Fermi measurement of photons from the dwarf galaxies, and positron data from AMS-02. The presence of a hidden sector can change the constraints on the dark matter by up to an order of magnitude in either direction (although the effect can be much smaller). We find that generally the bound from the Fermi dwarfs is most constraining for annihilations to photon-rich final states, while AMS-02 is most constraining for electron and muon final states; however in certain instances the CMB bounds overtake both, due to their approximate independence on the details of the hidden sector cascade. We provide the full set of cascade spectra considered here as publicly available code with examples at http://web.mit.edu/lns/research/CascadeSpectra.html.

  19. SCIM--spinal cord independence measure: a new disability scale for patients with spinal cord lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catz, A; Itzkovich, M; Agranov, E; Ring, H; Tamir, A

    1997-12-01

    The Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) is a new disability scale developed specifically for patients with spinal cord lesions in order to make the functional assessments of patients with paraplegia or tetraplegia more sensitive to changes. The SCIM includes the following areas of function: self-care (subscore (0-20), respiration and sphincter management (0-40) and mobility (0-40). Each area is scored according to its proportional weight in these patients' general activity. The final score ranges from 0 to 100. This study was performed to evaluate the reliability of the SCIM and its sensitivity to functional changes in spinal cord lesion patients compared with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Thirty patients were included. Scores were recorded one week after admission and thereafter every month during hospitalization. Each area of function was assessed by a pair of staff members from the relevant discipline. The comparison of scores between each pair of rates revealed a remarkable consistency (r = 0.91-0.99; P SCIM score (mean = 51, SD = 21) was lower than the total FIM score (mean = 87, SD = 23) owing to the difference in scale range structure and the relatively high cognitive scores of our patients; however, a relationship was noted between the scores of both scales (r = 0.85, P SCIM was more sensitive than the FIM to changes in function of spinal cord lesion patients: the SCIM detected all the functional changes detected by the FIM total scoring, but the FIM missed 26% of the changes detected by the SCIM total scoring. The mean difference between consecutive scores was higher for the SCIM (P SCIM is a reliable disability scale and is more sensitive to changes in function in spinal cord lesion patients than the FIM. The SCIM when administered by a multidisciplinary team, may be a useful instrument for assessing changes in everyday performance in patients with spinal cord lesion.

  20. [SCIM--spinal cord independence measure (version II): sensitivity to functional changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catz, Amiram; Itzkovich, Malka; Tamir, Ada; Philo, Ora; Steinberg, Flavia; Ring, Haim; Ronen, Jacob; Spasser, Raluca; Gepstein, Reuven

    2002-12-01

    Until recently, the functional ability of patients with spinal cord lesions (SCL) was assessed by standardized scales designed for various disabilities. However, these scales have either a relatively low sensitivity to changes in the functions that are most important for SCL patients or a limited suitability for a specific SCL subgroup. To counter this problem the team of the Spinal Department of Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital developed the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM), which is specific for SCL patients, adjusts for disadvantages of earlier scales, and is user-friendly. It was found to be reliable and more sensitive to functional changes in SCL patients than the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the most often used disability scale today. A second version (SCIM II) was constructed with improved phrasing of some of the components. It too, was found reliable, even more than the original version for certain functions. The present study examined the sensitivity of the SCIM II to changes in function in SCL patients compared to the FIM. Twenty-six patients with SCL underwent sequential SCIM II and FIM examinations during hospitalization for rehabilitation. A high correlation was found between the total scores of the two scales (r = 0.915; p score from the first to the last examination was significantly larger with the SCIM II than with the FIM (p SCIM II. The advantage of the SCIM II over the FIM in detecting functional changes was evident in areas in which the two scales differ substantially. These results support the validity of the SCIM II. Studies with larger groups in different countries and cultures are still needed before the scale can be applied on an international basis.

  1. Analysis of the Functional Independence Measure Value of Cervical Spine Injury Patients with Conservative Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zafrullah Arifin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the Functional Independence Measure Value of Cervical Spine Injury Patients with Conservative Management. Cervical spine injury is one of the most common spinal cord injuries in trauma patients. From 100,000 spinal cord injury cases reported in the United States of America (2008, sixty seven percent involve cervical spine injury. American Spinal Cord Injury Association (ASIA impairment score is used as an initial assessment but not enough attention prognostic outcome of these patients was paid to. The objective of this study is to analyze the value of functional independence measure (FIM cervical spine injury patients with conservative management and its correlation with age, sex, type of trauma, onset of trauma, cervical abnormalities, type of cervical spine lesion and ASIA impairment score. A prospective cohort study was performed to all patients with cervical spine injury treated inNeurosurgery Department of Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung that fullfiled the inclusion criteria. The subjects were classified based on age, sex, single/multiple trauma, acute /chronic, cervical abnormalities, complete/incomplete lesion and ASIA impairment score. The FIM examination was performed in Outpatient clinic of Neurosurgery. T-test and chi-square test was done to analyze the data. There were 17 cervical spine injury patients treated in Neurosurgery Department of Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital during April 2009–April 2010. The average FIM value of cervical spine injury in those patients is 4+ 1.63 by cohort prospective study. There were no correlation between FIM value with age, sex, type of trauma, onset of trauma and cervical abnormalities. Significant correlations were found between FIM value with type of cervical spine lesion and ASIA impairment score in cervical spine patients. Type of cervical spine lesion and ASIA impairment score have significant correlation with FIM value of patients in 6 months after cervical injury.

  2. Reporting and measurement of mass-dependent and mass-independent fractionation of mercury isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, B. A.; Blum, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Hg isotope analysis by MC-ICP-MS is an important new approach for fingerprinting Hg sources and monitoring Hg redox reactions and bioaccumulation, especially with the recent discovery of mass independent Hg isotope fractionation. Unfortunately research groups have adopted different standards, definitions of delta values, and methods of isotopic measurement. We suggest that a single standard, NIST SRM 3133, be adopted for reporting the isotopic variability of Hg isotopes. Isotope ratios should be determined by sample-standard bracketing (SSB) during analysis and reported as permil (‰) deviation from SRM 3133. For the highest precision and accuracy, a Tl internal standard along with SSB should be used to correct instrumental mass bias. Measurement routines should also include on-peak zero corrections and matching of concentration and matrix between the samples and bracketing standard. For samples that display mass-dependent fractionation (MDF), only one delta value needs to be reported (δ202/198Hg). Mass-independent fractionation (MIF) (Jackson et al., 2006; Bergquist et al., 2006; Bergquist and Blum, submitted) requires additional nomenclature, and we suggest reporting MIF as the deviation in isotope ratios from the theoretical mass dependent kinetic isotope fractionation (Δxxx/198Hg)¬. External reproducibility should be monitored by analysis of secondary standards. For studies of MDF, we use an in-house secondary standard solution made from metallic Hg mined from Almaden Spain and obtain a δ202Hg of -0.55 ±0.06‰ (2SD). For studies of MIF, we use NRCC CRM DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) and obtain a mean value of δ202Hg of +0.19 ±0.13‰ (2SD), Δ201Hg of +0.89 ±0.07‰ (2SD) , and Δ199Hg of +1.07 ±0.08‰ (2SD).

  3. Pre- and Postintervention Factor Structure of Functional Independence Measure in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Saltychev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the factor structure of Functional Independence Measure (FIM® scale amongst people with spinal cord injury (SCI. Methods. This was a retrospective, register-based cohort study on 155 rehabilitants with SCI. FIM was assessed at the beginning and at the end of multidisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation. The internal consistency of the FIM was assessed with Cronbach’s alpha and exploratory factor analysis was employed to approximate the construct structure of FIM. Results. The internal consistency demonstrated high Cronbach’s alpha of 0.95 to 0.96. For both pre- and postintervention assessments, the exploratory factor analysis resulted in 3-factor structures. Except for two items (“walking or using a wheelchair” and “expression”, the structures of the identified three factors remained the same from the beginning to the end of rehabilitation. The loadings of all items were sufficient, exceeding 0.3. Both pre- and postintervention chi-square tests showed significant p values < 0.0001. The “motor” domain was divided into two factors with this 2-factor structure enduring through the intervention period. Conclusions. Amongst rehabilitants with SCI, FIM failed to demonstrate unidimensionality. Instead, it showed a 3-factor structure that fluctuated only little depending on the timing of measurement. Additionally, when measured separately, also motor score was 2-dimensional, not 1-dimensional. Using a total or subscale FIM, scores seem to be unjustified in the studied population.

  4. K→πν anti ν: a model-independent analysis and supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buras, A.J.; Silvestrini, L.

    1998-01-01

    We present a model-independent analysis of new-physics contributions to the rare decays K + →π + ν anti ν and K L →π 0 ν anti ν. We parameterize the effects of new physics in these decays by two parameters: r K and the phase θ K , with r K =1 and θ K =0 in the standard model. We show how these parameters can be extracted from future data together with the relevant CKM parameters, in particular the angle β of the unitarity triangle. To this end CP asymmetries in B →ψK S and B →π + π - as well as the ratio vertical stroke V ub /V cb vertical stroke have to be also considered. This analysis offers simultaneously some insight in a possible violation of a ''golden relation'' between K →πν anti ν decays and the CP asymmetry in B →ψK S in the standard model pointed out some time ago. We illustrate these ideas by considering a general class of supersymmetric models. We find that in the ''constrained'' MSSM, in which θ K =0, the measurements of Br(K + →π + ν anti ν) and Br(K L →π 0 ν anti ν) directly determine the angle β. Moreover, the ''golden relation'' remains unaffected. On the other hand, in general SUSY models with unbroken R parity the present experimental constraints still allow for substantial deviations from r K =1 and θ K =0. Typically 0.5 K circle K circle . Consequently, in these models the violation of the ''golden relation'' is possible and values for Br(K + →π + ν anti ν) and Br(K L →π 0 ν anti ν) departing from the standard model expectations by factors 2-3 cannot be excluded. (orig.)

  5. In Vitro Intrinsic Permeability: A Transporter-Independent Measure of Caco-2 Cell Permeability in Drug Design and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredlund, Linda; Winiwarter, Susanne; Hilgendorf, Constanze

    2017-05-01

    In vitro permeability data have a central place in absorption risk assessments in drug discovery and development. For compounds where active efflux impacts permeability in vitro, the inherent passive membrane permeability ("intrinsic permeability") gives a concentration-independent measure of the compound's permeability. This work describes the validation of an in vitro intrinsic permeability assay and application of the data in a predictive in silico model. Apparent intrinsic permeability (P app ) across Caco-2 cell monolayers is determined in the presence of an optimized cocktail of chemical inhibitors toward the three major efflux transporters ABCB1, ABCC2, and ABCG2. The intrinsic P app value gives an estimate of passive permeability, which is independent of transporter expression levels and not limited by solubility or cell toxicity. An in silico model has been established to predict the Caco-2 intrinsic permeability and shown to consistently identify highly permeable compounds. The new intrinsic permeability assay is useful for early absorption estimates and suitable for absorption risk assessment in DMPK and pharmaceutical development.

  6. Linear least squares compartmental-model-independent parameter identification in PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thie, J.A.; Smith, G.T.; Hubner, K.F.

    1997-01-01

    A simplified approach involving linear-regression straight-line parameter fitting of dynamic scan data is developed for both specific and nonspecific models. Where compartmental-model topologies apply, the measured activity may be expressed in terms of: its integrals, plasma activity and plasma integrals -- all in a linear expression with macroparameters as coefficients. Multiple linear regression, as in spreadsheet software, determines parameters for best data fits. Positron emission tomography (PET)-acquired gray-matter images in a dynamic scan are analyzed: both by this method and by traditional iterative nonlinear least squares. Both patient and simulated data were used. Regression and traditional methods are in expected agreement. Monte-Carlo simulations evaluate parameter standard deviations, due to data noise, and much smaller noise-induced biases. Unique straight-line graphical displays permit visualizing data influences on various macroparameters as changes in slopes. Advantages of regression fitting are: simplicity, speed, ease of implementation in spreadsheet software, avoiding risks of convergence failures or false solutions in iterative least squares, and providing various visualizations of the uptake process by straight line graphical displays. Multiparameter model-independent analyses on lesser understood systems is also made possible

  7. Model-independent X-ray Mass Determinations for Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nulsen, Paul

    2005-09-01

    We propose to use high quality X-ray data from the Chandra archive to determine the mass distributions of about 60 clusters of galaxies over the largest possible range of radii. By avoiding unwarranted assumptions, model-independent methods make best use of high quality data. We will employ two model-independent methods. That used by Nulsen & Boehringer (1995) to determine the mass of the Virgo Cluster and a new method, that will be developed as part of the project. The new method will fit a general mass model directly to the X-ray spectra, making best possible use of the fitting errors to constrain mass profiles.

  8. Model-independent search for new physics at D0 experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Finding the evidence of new physics beyond the Standard Model is one of the primary goals of RunII of the Tevatron. Many dedicated searches for new physics are ongoing at the Tevatron but in order to broaden the scope and maximize the chances of finding the new physics, we also search in a model-independent way.

  9. QUANTIFYING THE CONTRIBUTION OF LANGUAGE MODELING TO WRITER­INDEPENDENT ON­LINE HANDWRITING RECOGNITION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitrelli, J.F.; Ratzlaf, E.H.

    2004-01-01

    We describe experiments varying the degree of language­model constraint applied to writer­independent on­line handwriting recognition. Six types of models are used, varying statistical components and hard constraints which govern recognition search during the sequencing of characters to form valid

  10. Kernel Density Independence Sampling based Monte Carlo Scheme (KISMCS) for inverse hydrological modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shafiei, M.; Gharari, S.; Pande, S.; Bhulai, S.

    2014-01-01

    Posterior sampling methods are increasingly being used to describe parameter and model predictive uncertainty in hydrologic modelling. This paper proposes an alternative to random walk chains (such as DREAM-zs). We propose a sampler based on independence chains with an embedded feature of

  11. A finite element model for independent wire rope core with double ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to model and analyse independent wire rope core accurately (IWRC). In this paper, ... Although considerable research studies have been carried out about the analytical solutions of IWRCs by Costello & Sinha ... straight strand as being the main component for modelling IWRC and more complex wire ropes by using IWRC.

  12. Estimators for longitudinal latent exposure models: examining measurement model assumptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Brisa N; Kim, Sehee; Sammel, Mary D

    2017-06-15

    Latent variable (LV) models are increasingly being used in environmental epidemiology as a way to summarize multiple environmental exposures and thus minimize statistical concerns that arise in multiple regression. LV models may be especially useful when multivariate exposures are collected repeatedly over time. LV models can accommodate a variety of assumptions but, at the same time, present the user with many choices for model specification particularly in the case of exposure data collected repeatedly over time. For instance, the user could assume conditional independence of observed exposure biomarkers given the latent exposure and, in the case of longitudinal latent exposure variables, time invariance of the measurement model. Choosing which assumptions to relax is not always straightforward. We were motivated by a study of prenatal lead exposure and mental development, where assumptions of the measurement model for the time-changing longitudinal exposure have appreciable impact on (maximum-likelihood) inferences about the health effects of lead exposure. Although we were not particularly interested in characterizing the change of the LV itself, imposing a longitudinal LV structure on the repeated multivariate exposure measures could result in high efficiency gains for the exposure-disease association. We examine the biases of maximum likelihood estimators when assumptions about the measurement model for the longitudinal latent exposure variable are violated. We adapt existing instrumental variable estimators to the case of longitudinal exposures and propose them as an alternative to estimate the health effects of a time-changing latent predictor. We show that instrumental variable estimators remain unbiased for a wide range of data generating models and have advantages in terms of mean squared error. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Metric-independent measures for supersymmetric extended object theories on curved backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Hitoshi; Rajpoot, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    For Green–Schwarz superstring σ-model on curved backgrounds, we introduce a non-metric measure Φ≡ϵ ij ϵ IJ (∂ i φ I )(∂ j φ J ) with two scalars φ I (I=1,2) used in ‘Two-Measure Theory’ (TMT). As in the flat-background case, the string tension T=(2πα ′ ) −1 emerges as an integration constant for the A i -field equation. This mechanism is further generalized to supermembrane theory, and to super-p-brane theory, both on general curved backgrounds. This shows the universal applications of dynamical measure of TMT to general supersymmetric extended objects on general curved backgrounds

  14. Using the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III to measure functional recovery in a post-acute spinal cord injury program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, P; Morrison, S A; McDowell, S; Vazquez, L

    2010-05-01

    A prospective design was conducted using admission and discharge Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM-III) data for persons discharged from a post-acute rehabilitation program. The purpose of this study is to analyze the functional gains as measured by the SCIM-III that occur during a post-acute rehabilitation program. Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA, USA. Participants were included if they had a motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI), were within 12 months from the date of injury and completed the recommended length of stay. Median SCIM-III changes between admission and discharge were calculated by subgroups (C1-4, C5, C6, C7-8, T1-6 and T7-12) based on the American Spinal Injury Association motor injury levels. Ceiling and floor effects were examined by item and the percentage of participants showing change between admission and discharge were calculated. In all, 114 participants were included in the analysis. The median total SCIM-III score at admission was 42 (range 13-68), whereas the median total SCIM-III score at discharge was 50 (range 16-72). The median improvement of 5 points in total SCIM-III score between admission and discharge was statistically significant. Significant improvements were also observed between admission and discharge across all subgroups except C1-4. Ceiling and floor effects were noted in some subgroups. The SCIM-III seems to be an effective measure for functional assessment of persons with SCI in a post-acute rehabilitation program. There are some ceiling and floor effects noted; however, the SCIM-III seems to be sensitive enough to capture functional changes during a post-acute rehabilitation program.

  15. Measurement error models with interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midthune, Douglas; Carroll, Raymond J.; Freedman, Laurence S.; Kipnis, Victor

    2016-01-01

    An important use of measurement error models is to correct regression models for bias due to covariate measurement error. Most measurement error models assume that the observed error-prone covariate (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$W$\\end{document}) is a linear function of the unobserved true covariate (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$X$\\end{document}) plus other covariates (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$Z$\\end{document}) in the regression model. In this paper, we consider models for \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$W$\\end{document} that include interactions between \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$X$\\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$Z$\\end{document}. We derive the conditional distribution of

  16. A model independent determination of the B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} decay rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernlochner, Florian U. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Lacker, Heiko [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Ligeti, Zoltan [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Stewart, Iain W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics; Tackmann, Frank J.; Tackmann, Kerstin [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    The goal of the SIMBA collaboration is to provide a global fit to the available measurements of inclusive B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} and B{yields}X{sub u}l{nu} decays. By performing a global fit one is able to simultaneously determine the relevant normalizations, i.e. the total B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} rate and the CKM-matrix element vertical stroke Vub vertical stroke, together with the required hadronic parameters, most importantly the b-quark mass and the b-quark distribution function in the B-meson, called the shape function. In this talk, the current status on the model-independent determination of the shape function and vertical stroke C{sub 7}{sup incl}V{sub tb}V{sub ts}{sup *} vertical stroke, which parametrizes the total B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} rate, from a global fit to the available B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} measurements from Babar and Belle is presented. In particular, the theoretical uncertainties originating from variations of the different factorization scales are evaluated.

  17. A model independent determination of the B→Xsγ decay rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernlochner, Florian U.; Lacker, Heiko; Ligeti, Zoltan

    2013-03-01

    The goal of the SIMBA collaboration is to provide a global fit to the available measurements of inclusive B→X s γ and B→X u lν decays. By performing a global fit one is able to simultaneously determine the relevant normalizations, i.e. the total B→X s γ rate and the CKM-matrix element vertical stroke Vub vertical stroke, together with the required hadronic parameters, most importantly the b-quark mass and the b-quark distribution function in the B-meson, called the shape function. In this talk, the current status on the model-independent determination of the shape function and vertical stroke C 7 incl V tb V ts * vertical stroke, which parametrizes the total B→X s γ rate, from a global fit to the available B→X s γ measurements from Babar and Belle is presented. In particular, the theoretical uncertainties originating from variations of the different factorization scales are evaluated.

  18. SMATASY. A Program for the model independent description of the Z resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, S.; Riemann, T.

    1994-07-01

    SMATASY is an interface for the ZF I T T ER package and may be used for the model independent description of the Z resonance at LEP 1 and SLC. It allows the determination of the Z mass and width and its resonance shape parameters r and j for cross-sections and their asymmetries. The r describes the peak height and j the interference of the Z resonance with photon exchange in each scattering channel and for σ T , σ FB , σ lr , σ pol etc. separately. Alternatively, the helicity amplitudes for a given scattering channel may be determined. We compare our formalism with other model independent approaches. The model independent treatment of QED corrections in SMATASY is applicable also far away from the Z peak. (orig.)

  19. Association between body mass index and functional independence measure in patients with deconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitin B; Al-Adawi, Samir; Dorvlo, Atsu S S; Burke, David T

    2008-01-01

    To assess the association of body mass index (BMI) with functional independence measure (FIM) score in patients with deconditioning. We also examined whether the association was different for motor and cognitive subscales of the FIM instrument. A retrospective study of 1077 inpatients admitted to the general medicine service for deconditioning at an acute rehabilitation hospital. Patients were classified into underweight (BMI or = 40). Median gain in FIM scores from admission to discharge was highest in obese class I patients (27 points), followed by obese class II patients (26 points). The most gain in FIM scores was accounted for by the motor subscale. Adjusting for age, gender, and length of in-hospital stay, obese class I patients had a 5.8-point (95% confidence limits = 1.2, 7.0) higher gain in FIM score compared with patients with BMI in the normal range. In an acute rehabilitation setting, obese patients had higher gains in FIM scores as compared with normal-range-BMI patients. Most of the improvements in FIM scores were accounted for by the motor subscale, with little or no improvement on the cognitive scale.

  20. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with multiple crystal heralded source with post-selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Shang-Hong, Zhao; MengYi, Deng

    2018-03-01

    The multiple crystal heralded source with post-selection (MHPS), originally introduced to improve the single-photon character of the heralded source, has specific applications for quantum information protocols. In this paper, by combining decoy-state measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) with spontaneous parametric downconversion process, we present a modified MDI-QKD scheme with MHPS where two architectures are proposed corresponding to symmetric scheme and asymmetric scheme. The symmetric scheme, which linked by photon switches in a log-tree structure, is adopted to overcome the limitation of the current low efficiency of m-to-1 optical switches. The asymmetric scheme, which shows a chained structure, is used to cope with the scalability issue with increase in the number of crystals suffered in symmetric scheme. The numerical simulations show that our modified scheme has apparent advances both in transmission distance and key generation rate compared to the original MDI-QKD with weak coherent source and traditional heralded source with post-selection. Furthermore, the recent advances in integrated photonics suggest that if built into a single chip, the MHPS might be a practical alternative source in quantum key distribution tasks requiring single photons to work.

  1. Incipient cytotoxicity: A time-independent measure of cytotoxic potency in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülden, Michael; Kähler, Daria; Seibert, Hasso

    2015-09-01

    Time is an important determinant of toxicity but largely ignored in in vitro toxicity assays where exposure times chosen are rather arbitrary. To investigate the impact of time on the cytotoxic potency of chemicals in vitro, the concentration dependent cytotoxic action of selected chemicals (surfactants, metals, oxidative stressors, a mitochondrial poison) was determined after various exposure times (1-72 h) in cultures of Balb/c 3T3 cells. Time affected the cytotoxic potency as well as the cytotoxic efficacy. The median cytotoxic concentrations, EC50, decreased and in most cases approached an "incipient" value, EC50,∞, within 72 h. Cytotoxicity due to mitochondrial insult occurred after a threshold time which was dependent on the medium glucose concentration. Within the chemicals studied the extent of potency change with time ranged from 3- to >1000-fold and the "time to incipient cytotoxicity", tic, from 4 to >72 h. Hence, also the relative cytotoxic potencies depend on exposure time. Ignoring this may lead to severe bias in toxicological hazard and risk assessment. Therefore it is recommended to determine the incipient cytotoxic potency of chemical compounds, represented by, e.g., the incipient median effect (EC50,∞), no effect (NEC∞) or lowest effect concentrations (LEC∞) instead of measures obtained after arbitrary exposure times. If this is not possible, the 72 h-potency measurements appear to be useful surrogates. These time-independent incipient potency values can be reasonably compared between substances, endpoints, cells and biological test systems and may serve to define points of departure for quantitative in vitro-in vivo extrapolations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Model independent analysis of Λ baryon polarizations in Λb→Λl+l- decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, T.M.; Oezpineci, A.; Savci, M.

    2003-01-01

    We present a model independent analysis of Λ baryon polarizations in the Λ b →Λl + l - decay. The sensitivity of the averaged Λ polarizations to the new Wilson coefficients is studied. It is observed that there exist certain regions of the new Wilson coefficients where the branching ratio coincides with the standard model prediction, while the Λ baryon polarizations deviate from the standard model results remarkably

  3. Establishing score equivalence of the Functional Independence Measure motor scale and the Barthel Index, utilising the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and Rasch measurement theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodinger, Birgit; O'Connor, Rory J; Stucki, Gerold; Tennant, Alan

    2017-05-16

    Two widely used outcome measures to assess functioning in neurological rehabilitation are the Functional Independence Measure (FIM™) and the Barthel Index. The current study aims to establish the equivalence of the total score of the FIM™ motor scale and the Barthel Index through the application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and Rasch measurement theory. Secondary analysis of a large sample of patients with stroke, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis, undergoing rehabilitation was conducted. All patients were assessed at the same time on both the FIM™ and the Barthel Index. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Linking Rules were used to establish conceptual coherency between the 2 scales, and the Rasch measurement model to establish an exchange of the total scores. Using the FIM™ motor scale, items from both scales linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health d4 Mobility or d5 Self-care chapters. Their co-calibration satisfied the assumptions of the Rasch model for each of 3 diagnostic groups. A ceiling effect was observed for the Barthel Index when contrasted against the FIM™ motor scale. Having a Rasch interval metric to transform scores between the FIM™ motor scale and Barthel Index is valuable for monitoring functioning, meta-analysis, quality audits and hospital benchmarking.

  4. Measuring the Contribution of Independent Christian Secondary Schools to Students' Religious, Personal, and Social Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Leslie J.; ap Siôn, Tania; Village, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    From the late 1960s independent Christian schools have emerged in England and Wales, initiated either by churches or by parents. Many of these new independent schools are linked through the Christian Schools Trust. The impact that these schools are exerting on their students may be of interest for the churches with which they are associated and of…

  5. Distance-independent individual tree diameter-increment model for Thuya [Tetraclinis articulata (VAHL. MAST.] stands in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sghaier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The aim of the work was to develop an individual tree diameter-increment model for Thuya (Tetraclinis articulata in Tunisia.Area of study: The natural Tetraclinis articulata stands at Jbel Lattrech in north-eastern of Tunisia.Material and methods:  Data came from 200 trees located in 50 sample plots. The diameter at age t and the diameter increment for the last five years obtained from cores taken at breast height were measured for each tree. Four difference equations derived from the base functions of Richards, Lundqvist, Hossfeld IV and Weibull were tested using the age-independent formulations of the growth functions. Both numerical and graphical analyses were used to evaluate the performance of the candidate models.Main results: Based on the analysis, the age-independent difference equation derived from the base function Richards model was selected. Two of the three parameters (growth rate and shape parameter of the retained model were related to site quality, represented by a Growth Index, stand density and the basal area in larger trees divided by diameter of the subject tree expressing the inter-tree competition.Research highlights: The proposed model can be useful for predicting the diameter growth of Tetraclinis articulata in Tunisia when age is not available or for trees growing in uneven-aged stands.Keywords: Age-independent growth model; difference equations; Tetraclinis articulata; Tunisia.

  6. Response errors explain the failure of independent-channels models of perception of temporal order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A García-Pérez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Independent-channels models of perception of temporal order (also referred to as threshold models or perceptual latency models have been ruled out because two formal properties of these models (monotonicity and parallelism are not borne out by data from ternary tasks in which observers must judge whether stimulus A was presented before, after, or simultaneously with stimulus B. These models generally assume that observed responses are authentic indicators of unobservable judgments, but blinks, lapses of attention, or errors in pressing the response keys (maybe, but not only, motivated by time pressure when reaction times are being recorded may make observers misreport their judgments or simply guess a response. We present an extension of independent-channels models that considers response errors and we show that the model produces psychometric functions that do not satisfy monotonicity and parallelism. The model is illustrated by fitting it to data from a published study in which the ternary task was used. The fitted functions describe very accurately the absence of monotonicity and parallelism shown by the data. These characteristics of empirical data are thus consistent with independent-channels models when response errors are taken into consideration. The implications of these results for the analysis and interpretation of temporal-order judgment data are discussed.

  7. Response errors explain the failure of independent-channels models of perception of temporal order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Miguel A; Alcalá-Quintana, Rocío

    2012-01-01

    Independent-channels models of perception of temporal order (also referred to as threshold models or perceptual latency models) have been ruled out because two formal properties of these models (monotonicity and parallelism) are not borne out by data from ternary tasks in which observers must judge whether stimulus A was presented before, after, or simultaneously with stimulus B. These models generally assume that observed responses are authentic indicators of unobservable judgments, but blinks, lapses of attention, or errors in pressing the response keys (maybe, but not only, motivated by time pressure when reaction times are being recorded) may make observers misreport their judgments or simply guess a response. We present an extension of independent-channels models that considers response errors and we show that the model produces psychometric functions that do not satisfy monotonicity and parallelism. The model is illustrated by fitting it to data from a published study in which the ternary task was used. The fitted functions describe very accurately the absence of monotonicity and parallelism shown by the data. These characteristics of empirical data are thus consistent with independent-channels models when response errors are taken into consideration. The implications of these results for the analysis and interpretation of temporal order judgment data are discussed.

  8. Approaches in highly parameterized inversion - GENIE, a general model-independent TCP/IP run manager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffels, Christopher T.; Schreuder, Willem A.; Doherty, John E.; Karanovic, Marinko; Tonkin, Matthew J.; Hunt, Randall J.; Welter, David E.

    2012-01-01

    GENIE is a model-independent suite of programs that can be used to generally distribute, manage, and execute multiple model runs via the TCP/IP infrastructure. The suite consists of a file distribution interface, a run manage, a run executer, and a routine that can be compiled as part of a program and used to exchange model runs with the run manager. Because communication is via a standard protocol (TCP/IP), any computer connected to the Internet can serve in any of the capacities offered by this suite. Model independence is consistent with the existing template and instruction file protocols of the widely used PEST parameter estimation program. This report describes (1) the problem addressed; (2) the approach used by GENIE to queue, distribute, and retrieve model runs; and (3) user instructions, classes, and functions developed. It also includes (4) an example to illustrate the linking of GENIE with Parallel PEST using the interface routine.

  9. Towards a framework for deriving platform-independent model-driven software product lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Paz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Model-driven software product lines (MD-SPLs are created from domain models which are transformed, merged and composed with reusable core assets, until software products are produced. Model transformation chains (MTCs must be specified to generate such MD-SPLs. This paper presents a framework for creating platform-independent MD-SPLs; such framework includes a domain specific language (DSL for platform-independent MTC specification and facilities platform-specific MTC generation of several of the most used model transformation frameworks. The DSL also allows product line architects to compose generation taking the need for model transformation strategy and technology interoperability into account and specifying several types of variability involved in such generation.

  10. Independent screening for single-index hazard rate models with ultrahigh dimensional features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders; Scheike, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    on performance. An iterative variant of the method is also described which combines screening with penalized regression to handle more complex feature covariance structures. The methodology is evaluated through simulation studies and through application to a real gene expression data set.......In data sets with many more features than observations, independent screening based on all univariate regression models leads to a computationally convenient variable selection method. Recent efforts have shown that, in the case of generalized linear models, independent screening may suffice...... to capture all relevant features with high probability, even in ultrahigh dimension. It is unclear whether this formal sure screening property is attainable when the response is a right-censored survival time. We propose a computationally very efficient independent screening method for survival data which...

  11. Content Validity and Inter-Rater Reliability of the Halliwick-Concept-Based Instrument "Swimming with Independent Measure"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srsen, Katja Groleger; Vidmar, Gaj; Pikl, Masa; Vrecar, Irena; Burja, Cirila; Krusec, Klavdija

    2012-01-01

    The Halliwick concept is widely used in different settings to promote joyful movement in water and swimming. To assess the swimming skills and progression of an individual swimmer, a valid and reliable measure should be used. The Halliwick-concept-based Swimming with Independent Measure (SWIM) was introduced for this purpose. We aimed to determine…

  12. Model-Independent Calculation of Radiative Neutron Capture on Lithium-7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rupak, Gautam; Higa, Renato

    2011-01-01

    The radiative neutron capture on lithium-7 is calculated model independently using a low-energy halo effective field theory. The cross section is expressed in terms of scattering parameters directly related to the S-matrix elements. It depends on the poorly known p-wave effective range parameter

  13. Radiative corrections for semileptonic decays of hyperons: the 'model independent' part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, K.; Szegoe, K.; Margaritis, T.

    1984-04-01

    The 'model independent' part of the order α radiative correction due to virtual photon exchanges and inner bremsstrahlung is studied for semileptonic decays of hyperons. Numerical results of high accuracy are given for the relative correction to the branching ratio, the electron energy spectrum and the (Esub(e),Esub(f)) Dalitz distribution in the case of four different decays. (author)

  14. Model-independent constraints on dark matter annihilation in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Boddy, Kimberly; Kumar, Jason; Marfatia, Danny; Sandick, Pearl

    2018-01-01

    We present a general, model-independent formalism for determining bounds on the production of photons in dwarf spheroidal galaxies via dark matter annihilation, applicable to any set of assumptions about dark matter particle physics or astrophysics. As an illustration, we analyze gamma-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to constrain a variety of nonstandard dark matter models, several of which have not previously been studied in the context of dwarf galaxy searches.

  15. Measuring Collective Efficacy: A Multilevel Measurement Model for Nested Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsueda, Ross L.; Drakulich, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    This article specifies a multilevel measurement model for survey response when data are nested. The model includes a test-retest model of reliability, a confirmatory factor model of inter-item reliability with item-specific bias effects, an individual-level model of the biasing effects due to respondent characteristics, and a neighborhood-level…

  16. How Consistent are Publicly Reported Cytotoxicity Data? Large-Scale Statistical Analysis of the Concordance of Public Independent Cytotoxicity Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Ciriano, Isidro; Bender, Andreas

    2016-01-05

    While increased attention is being paid to the impact of data quality in cell-line sensitivity and toxicology modeling, to date, no systematic study has evaluated the comparability of independent cytotoxicity measurements on a large-scale. Here, we estimate the experimental uncertainty of public cytotoxicity data from ChEMBL version 19. We applied stringent filtering criteria to assemble a curated data set comprised of pIC50 data for compound-cell line systems measured in independent laboratories. The estimated experimental uncertainty calculated was a mean unsigned error (MUE) value of 0.61-0.76, a median unsigned error (MedUE) value of 0.51-0.58, and a standard deviation of 0.76-1.00 pIC50 units. The experimental uncertainty (σE) estimated from all pairs of cytotoxicity measurements with a ΔpIC50 value lower than 2.5 was found to be 0.59-0.77 pIC50 units, and thus 21-60% and 21-26% higher than that of pKi and pIC50 data for ligand-protein data (σE =0.47-0.48 pKi units and σE =0.57-0.61 pIC50 units, respectively). The estimated σE value from the pairs of pIC50 values measured with metabolic assays was 0.98, whereas the σE value was found to be 0.69 when using the 1388 pIC50 pairs measured using exactly the same experimental setup. The maximum achievable Pearson correlation coefficient (RPearsonmax.2) of in silico models trained on cytotoxicity data from different laboratories was estimated to be 0.51-0.85, which is considerably different from the value of 1 corresponding to perfect predictions, hinting at the maximum performance one can expect also from computational cytotoxicity predictions. The lowest concordance between pairs of measurements was found for the drugs paclitaxel, methotrexate, zidovudine, and docetaxel, and for the cell lines HepG2, NCI-H460, L1210, and CCRF-CEM, hinting at particular sensitivity of those systems to experimental setups. The highest concordance was estimated for the compound-cell line system HL-60-etoposide (σE =0

  17. Development of an Upper Extremity Function Measurement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ickpyo; Simpson, Annie N; Li, Chih-Ying; Velozo, Craig A

    This study demonstrated the development of a measurement model for gross upper-extremity function (GUE). The dependent variable was the Rasch calibration of the 27 ICF-GUE test items. The predictors were object weight, lifting distance from floor, carrying, and lifting. Multiple regression was used to investigate the contribution that each independent variable makes to the model with 203 outpatients. Object weight and lifting distance were the only statistically and clinically significant independent variables in the model, accounting for 83% of the variance (p model indicates that, with each one pound increase in object weight, item challenge increases by 0.16 (p measurement model for the ICF-GUE can be explained by object weight and distance lifted from the floor.

  18. Measuring Performance for Accountability of a Small Social Economy Organization: The Case of an Independent School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a result of a joint project in social economy research between a community partner-an independent school-and academic partners. The school is a democratic organization, run by teachers and parents. The goal of the project was to find ways to improve communication and reporting about general performance of the school as part of the school's accountability to its members. Starting from lessons of the balanced scorecard approach for non-profits, we describe the process of development of survey-based measures for the particular organization. The direction of the tool development and subsequent organizational changes were carried out in a participatory process between the school's staff, the parents, and the board. We identify the limitations and challenges of this process, and outline its successes to draw lessons for other similar democratic organizations. / Cet article est le produit d'un projet conjoint de recherche sur l'économie sociale entre un partenaire communautaire-une école privée-et des partenaires académiques. L'école est une organisation démocratique dirigée par des enseignants et des parents. Le but de ce projet était de trouver des façons d'améliorer la communication et la reddition de compte en ce qui a trait au rendement général de l'école comme faisant partie de la responsabilité de l'école envers ses membres. En commençant par des leçons sur l'approche de tableau de bord équilibré pour les organismes sans but lucratif, nous abordons le processus de l'élaboration de mesures fondées sur des enquêtes pour l'organisation particulière. L'orientation du développement d'outils et des changements organisationnels subséquents ont été déterminés lors d'un processus participatif entre le personnel de l'école, les parents et la direction. Nous établissons les limites et les défis de cette façon de procéder et en soulignons les réussites pour tirer des leçons qui serviront à d

  19. Iron deposition is independent of cellular inflammation in a cerebral model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rachel; Rohr, Aaron M; Wang, Wen-Tung; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Berman, Nancy E J; Lynch, Sharon G; LeVine, Steven M

    2011-06-23

    Perivenular inflammation is a common early pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). A recent hypothesis stated that CNS inflammation is induced by perivenular iron deposits that occur in response to altered blood flow in MS subjects. In order to evaluate this hypothesis, an animal model was developed, called cerebral experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (cEAE), which presents with CNS perivascular iron deposits. This model was used to investigate the relationship of iron deposition to inflammation. In order to generate cEAE, mice were given an encephalitogen injection followed by a stereotactic intracerebral injection of TNF-α and IFN-γ. Control animals received encephalitogen followed by an intracerebral injection of saline, or no encephalitogen plus an intracerebral injection of saline or cytokines. Laser Doppler was used to measure cerebral blood flow. MRI and iron histochemistry were used to localize iron deposits. Additional histological procedures were used to localize inflammatory cell infiltrates, microgliosis and astrogliosis. Doppler analysis revealed that cEAE mice had a reduction in cerebral blood flow compared to controls. MRI revealed T2 hypointense areas in cEAE animals that spatially correlated with iron deposition around vessels and at some sites of inflammation as detected by iron histochemistry. Vessels with associated iron deposits were distributed across both hemispheres. Mice with cEAE had more iron-labeled vessels compared to controls, but these vessels were not commonly associated with inflammatory cell infiltrates. Some iron-laden vessels had associated microgliosis that was above the background microglial response, and iron deposits were observed within reactive microglia. Vessels with associated astrogliosis were more commonly observed without colocalization of iron deposits. The findings indicate that iron deposition around vessels can occur independently of inflammation providing evidence against the hypothesis that iron

  20. Iron deposition is independent of cellular inflammation in a cerebral model of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Phil

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perivenular inflammation is a common early pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS. A recent hypothesis stated that CNS inflammation is induced by perivenular iron deposits that occur in response to altered blood flow in MS subjects. In order to evaluate this hypothesis, an animal model was developed, called cerebral experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (cEAE, which presents with CNS perivascular iron deposits. This model was used to investigate the relationship of iron deposition to inflammation. Methods In order to generate cEAE, mice were given an encephalitogen injection followed by a stereotactic intracerebral injection of TNF-α and IFN-γ. Control animals received encephalitogen followed by an intracerebral injection of saline, or no encephalitogen plus an intracerebral injection of saline or cytokines. Laser Doppler was used to measure cerebral blood flow. MRI and iron histochemistry were used to localize iron deposits. Additional histological procedures were used to localize inflammatory cell infiltrates, microgliosis and astrogliosis. Results Doppler analysis revealed that cEAE mice had a reduction in cerebral blood flow compared to controls. MRI revealed T2 hypointense areas in cEAE animals that spatially correlated with iron deposition around vessels and at some sites of inflammation as detected by iron histochemistry. Vessels with associated iron deposits were distributed across both hemispheres. Mice with cEAE had more iron-labeled vessels compared to controls, but these vessels were not commonly associated with inflammatory cell infiltrates. Some iron-laden vessels had associated microgliosis that was above the background microglial response, and iron deposits were observed within reactive microglia. Vessels with associated astrogliosis were more commonly observed without colocalization of iron deposits. Conclusion The findings indicate that iron deposition around vessels can occur independently of

  1. Comparison of model independent control and tracking with standard control techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ira B.; Triandaf, Ioana A.

    1993-12-01

    This paper highlights some of the new contributions nonlinear dynamics has made in the areas of control and tracking. In particular, emphasis is placed on the model independent approach to control and tracking: The connections between the classical control and the control based on time series embedding methods are made. In experiments of control, our approach does not necessarily imply new equipment is needed in the loop. Rather, it is the control settings which are constructed off-line so that location of the control point and gain are determined without trial and error. Using the model independent approach also allows one to locate and control many other accessible unstable phenomena without having to construct a global nonlinear model. Tracking gives a constructive approach to control inaccessible states, as well as maps out the global regions of phase space.

  2. A model-independent "General Search" for new physics with the ATLAS detector at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Riccardo Maria

    2014-06-02

    The LHC particle collider accelerates bunches of colliding protons at an energy never reached before, and a completely new landscape of new physics has been opened. In this scenario the number of possible physics processes and signatures becomes virtually infinite, making the setup of dedicated analyses impossible. Moreover it is important being able to reveal new physics signals even in regions of the phase-space where it is less lucky to be found, or where suitable theoretical models are missing. In this Thesis a new model-independent “General Search” for the ATLAS experiment has been conceived. In fact, at the time this project started, no model-independent search was set for ATLAS. In the end the new analysis has been run over the first data at 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment, and the results presented. The data have shown a very good agreement with the Standard Model expectation, and no evidence of new physics has been observed. But the strategy and methodology of the new model-independent Ge...

  3. Designing and measuring the impact of using digital learning materials for scaffolding students’ independent decoding and comprehension of unfamiliar texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissel, Stig Toke

    In a design-based research project the aim was to design and measure the impact of using digital learning materials that scaffold Danish second graders’ independent reading of unfamiliar text without controlled vocabulary. In the design process a prototype was evaluated and refined iteratively...... students in identifying the most relevant spelling patterns in words they cannot decode independently or effortlessly. In the formative evaluations, students’ interaction with the learning material was recorded using screen recording software. The effect of students using the learning material was measured...

  4. Constraining new physics with collider measurements of Standard Model signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, Jonathan M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,Gower St., London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Grellscheid, David [IPPP, Department of Physics, Durham University,Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Krämer, Michael; Sarrazin, Björn [Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, RWTH Aachen University,Sommerfeldstr. 16, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Yallup, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,Gower St., London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-14

    A new method providing general consistency constraints for Beyond-the-Standard-Model (BSM) theories, using measurements at particle colliders, is presented. The method, ‘Constraints On New Theories Using Rivet’, CONTUR, exploits the fact that particle-level differential measurements made in fiducial regions of phase-space have a high degree of model-independence. These measurements can therefore be compared to BSM physics implemented in Monte Carlo generators in a very generic way, allowing a wider array of final states to be considered than is typically the case. The CONTUR approach should be seen as complementary to the discovery potential of direct searches, being designed to eliminate inconsistent BSM proposals in a context where many (but perhaps not all) measurements are consistent with the Standard Model. We demonstrate, using a competitive simplified dark matter model, the power of this approach. The CONTUR method is highly scaleable to other models and future measurements.

  5. Complete Evaluation of Available Laboratory-scale Data for the Independence Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Troy Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kress, Joel David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bhat, Kabekode Ghanasham [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-30

    Year 1 Objectives (August 2016 – December 2016) – The original Independence model is a sequentially regressed set of parameters from numerous data sets in the Aspen Plus modeling framework. The immediate goal with the basic data model is to collect and evaluate those data sets relevant to the thermodynamic submodels (pure substance heat capacity, solvent mixture heat capacity, loaded solvent heat capacities, and volatility data). These data are informative for the thermodynamic parameters involved in both vapor-liquid equilibrium, and in the chemical equilibrium of the liquid phase.

  6. Blind Separation of Acoustic Signals Combining SIMO-Model-Based Independent Component Analysis and Binary Masking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiekata Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A new two-stage blind source separation (BSS method for convolutive mixtures of speech is proposed, in which a single-input multiple-output (SIMO-model-based independent component analysis (ICA and a new SIMO-model-based binary masking are combined. SIMO-model-based ICA enables us to separate the mixed signals, not into monaural source signals but into SIMO-model-based signals from independent sources in their original form at the microphones. Thus, the separated signals of SIMO-model-based ICA can maintain the spatial qualities of each sound source. Owing to this attractive property, our novel SIMO-model-based binary masking can be applied to efficiently remove the residual interference components after SIMO-model-based ICA. The experimental results reveal that the separation performance can be considerably improved by the proposed method compared with that achieved by conventional BSS methods. In addition, the real-time implementation of the proposed BSS is illustrated.

  7. Markov Decision Process Measurement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMar, Michelle M

    2018-03-01

    Within-task actions can provide additional information on student competencies but are challenging to model. This paper explores the potential of using a cognitive model for decision making, the Markov decision process, to provide a mapping between within-task actions and latent traits of interest. Psychometric properties of the model are explored, and simulation studies report on parameter recovery within the context of a simple strategy game. The model is then applied to empirical data from an educational game. Estimates from the model are found to correlate more strongly with posttest results than a partial-credit IRT model based on outcome data alone.

  8. Objectively measured sedentary time may predict insulin resistance independent of moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmerhorst, Hendrik J. F.; Wijndaele, Katrien; Brage, Søren; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Ekelund, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    To examine the prospective association between objectively measured time spent sedentary and insulin resistance and whether this association is independent of moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and other relevant confounders. This was a population-based study (Medical Research

  9. Analysis of two standard reference materials using the Shape Independent Model for k0 based INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brushwood, J.; Beeley, P.A.; Neilsen, K.; Bennett, L.G.I.

    2000-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the Shape Independent Model for k 0 based INAA can be applied in the Slowpoke-2 beryllium moderated reactor. The elemental concentration determined using this methodology agreed well with both certified values and those determined by the more conventional 'B'-value method. However, the facility characterising parameter B(x, 46 Sc, 124 Sb) differed significantly from that determined in other reactor types. (author)

  10. Origins and consequences of technology acquirement by independent-living seniors: towards an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, S T M; Luijkx, K G; Vrijhoef, H J M; Nieboer, M E; Aarts, S; van der Voort, C S; Rijnaard, M D; Wouters, E J M

    2017-08-22

    Living independently can be challenging for seniors. Technologies are expected to help older adults age in place, yet little empirical research is available on how seniors develop a need for technologies, how they acquire these technologies, and how these subsequently affect their lives. Aging is complex, dynamic and personal. But how does this translate to seniors' adoption and acceptance of technology? To better understand origins and consequences of technology acquirement by independent-living seniors, an explorative longitudinal qualitative field study was set up. Home visits were made to 33 community-dwelling seniors living in the Netherlands, on three occasions (2012-2014). Semi-structured interviews were conducted on the timeline of acquirements, and people and factors involved in acquirements. Additionally, participants were interviewed on experiences in using technologies since acquirement. Thematic analysis was employed to analyze interview transcripts, using a realist approach to better understand the contexts, mechanisms and outcomes of technology acquirements. Findings were accumulated in a new conceptual model: The Cycle of Technology Acquirement by Independent-Living Seniors (C-TAILS), which provides an integrative perspective on why and how technologies are acquired, and why these may or may not prove to be appropriate and effective, considering an independent-living senior's needs and circumstances at a given point in time. We found that externally driven and purely desire-driven acquirements led to a higher risk of suboptimal use and low levels of need satisfaction. Technology acquirement by independent-living seniors may be best characterized as a heterogeneous process with many different origins, pathways and consequences. Furthermore, technologies that are acquired in ways that are not congruent with seniors' personal needs and circumstances run a higher risk of proving to be ineffective or inappropriate. Yet, these needs and circumstances are

  11. A grid-independent EMMS/bubbling drag model for bubbling and turbulent fluidization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Hao; Lu, Bona; Zhang, Jingyuan

    2017-01-01

    The EMMS/bubbling drag model takes the effects of meso-scale structures (i.e. bubbles) into modeling of drag coefficient and thus improves coarse-grid simulation of bubbling and turbulent fluidized beds. However, its dependence on grid size has not been fully investigated. In this article, we adopt...... a periodic domain show the new drag model is less sensitive to grid size because of the additional dependence on local slip velocity. When applying the new drag model to simulations of realistic bubbling and turbulent fluidized beds, we find grid-independent results are easier to obtain for high......-velocity turbulent fluidized bed cases. The simulation results indicate that the extended EMMS/bubbling drag model is a potential method for coarse-grid simulations of large-scale fluidized beds....

  12. Model-independent search for new physics at D0 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naimuddin, Md.

    2012-01-01

    Finding the evidence of new physics beyond the Standard Model is one of the primary goals of RunII of the Tevatron. Many dedicated searches for new physics are ongoing at the Tevatron but in order to broaden the scope and maximize the chances of finding the new physics, we also search in a model-independent way. The results of such searches for indications of new physics at the electroweak scale are presented using data collected using the D0 detector from pp-bar-interactions at √s = 1.96 TeV. (author)

  13. Constitutive equations for the Doi-Edwards model without independent alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Hansen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    We present two representations of the Doi-Edwards model without Independent Alignment explicitly expressed in terms of the Finger strain tensor, its inverse and its invariants. The two representations provide explicit expressions for the stress prior to and after Rouse relaxation of chain stretch......, respectively. The maximum deviations from the exact representations in simple shear, biaxial extension and uniaxial extension are of order 2%. Based on these two representations, we propose a framework for Doi-Edwards models including chain stretch in the memory integral form....

  14. The independent quark-gluon string model for heavy-ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toneev, V.D.; Amelin, N.S.; Gudima, K.K.

    1989-06-01

    A dynamical model of independent quark-gluon strings is formulated for ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions. The formation and fragmentation of the strings are described in terms of the dual parton model. The consideration of the nuclear interaction is based on a coupled system of relativistic Boltzmann-like kinetic equations including the concept of the hadron formation time. The evolution of energy and baryonic densities is discussed for central O+Au collisions. The calculated characteristics for both the central and fragmentation rapidity region are compared with the recent CERN experimental data to disentangle the contributions of different nuclear effects. (orig.)

  15. Establishing score equivalence of the Functional Independence Measure motor scale and the Barthel Index, utilising the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and Rasch measurement theory

    OpenAIRE

    Prodinger, B; O'Connor, RJ; Stucki, G; Tennant, A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Two widely used outcome measures to assess functioning in neurological rehabilitation are the Functional Independence Measure (FIM™) and the Barthel Index. The current study aims to establish the equivalence of the total score of the FIM™ motor scale and the Barthel Index through the application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and Rasch measurement theory. Methods: Secondary analysis of a large sample of patients with stroke, spinal cor...

  16. Independent spinal cord atrophy measures correlate to motor and sensory deficits in individuals with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Hans Magnus Henrik; Barthelemy, Dorothy; Skimminge, A.

    2011-01-01

    Study design:Cross-sectional descriptive analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical outcome.Objectives:The aim of this study was to present anatomically consistent and independent spinal cord atrophy measures based on standard MRI material and analyze their specific relations to se...... can be used to assess sensory and motor function independently. The finding is corresponding well with the respective locations of the main sensory and motor pathways.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 10 August 2010; doi:10.1038/sc.2010.87....

  17. Evaluation of soft segment modeling on a context independent phoneme classification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razzazi, F.; Sayadiyan, A.

    2007-01-01

    The geometric distribution of states duration is one of the main performance limiting assumptions of hidden Markov modeling of speech signals. Stochastic segment models, generally, and segmental HMM, specifically overcome this deficiency partly at the cost of more complexity in both training and recognition phases. In addition to this assumption, the gradual temporal changes of speech statistics has not been modeled in HMM. In this paper, a new duration modeling approach is presented. The main idea of the model is to consider the effect of adjacent segments on the probability density function estimation and evaluation of each acoustic segment. This idea not only makes the model robust against segmentation errors, but also it models gradual change from one segment to the next one with a minimum set of parameters. The proposed idea is analytically formulated and tested on a TIMIT based context independent phenomena classification system. During the test procedure, the phoneme classification of different phoneme classes was performed by applying various proposed recognition algorithms. The system was optimized and the results have been compared with a continuous density hidden Markov model (CDHMM) with similar computational complexity. The results show 8-10% improvement in phoneme recognition rate in comparison with standard continuous density hidden Markov model. This indicates improved compatibility of the proposed model with the speech nature. (author)

  18. Beyond buckling: humidity-independent measurement of the mechanical properties of green nanobiocomposite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Urooj; Sutherland, Travis; Himbert, Sebastian; Zhu, Yujie; Rheinstädter, Maikel C; Cranston, Emily D; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M

    2017-06-14

    Precise knowledge of the mechanical properties of emerging nanomaterials and nanocomposites is crucial to match their performance with suitable applications. While methods to characterize mechanical properties exist, they are limited by instrument sensitivity and sample requirements. For bio-based nanomaterials this challenge is exacerbated by the extreme dependence of mechanical properties on humidity. This work presents an alternative approach, based on polymer shrinking-induced wrinkling mechanics, to determine the elastic modulus of nanobiocomposite films in a humidity-independent manner. Layer-by-layer (LbL) films containing cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and water-soluble polymers were deposited onto pre-stressed polystyrene substrates followed by thermal shrinking, which wrinkled the films to give them characteristic topographies. Three deposition parameters were varied during LbL assembly: (1) polymer type (xyloglucan - XG, or polyethyleneimine - PEI); (2) polymer concentration (0.1 or 1 wt%); and (3) number of deposition cycles, resulting in 10-600 nm thick nanobiocomposite films with tuneable compositions. Fast Fourier transform analysis on electron microscopy images of the wrinkled films was used to calculate humidity-independent moduli of 70 ± 2 GPa for CNC-XG 0.1 , 72 ± 2 GPa for CNC-PEI 0.1 , and 32.2 ± 0.8 GPa for CNC-PEI 1.0 films. This structuring method is straightforward and amenable to a wide range of supported thin films.

  19. Model-independent constraints on Lorentz invariance violation via the cosmographic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bo Zou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since Lorentz invariance plays an important role in modern physics, it is of interest to test the possible Lorentz invariance violation (LIV. The time-lag (the arrival time delay between light curves in different energy bands of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs has been extensively used to this end. However, to our best knowledge, one or more particular cosmological models were assumed a priori in (almost all of the relevant works in the literature. So, this makes the results on LIV in those works model-dependent and hence not so robust in fact. In the present work, we try to avoid this problem by using a model-independent approach. We calculate the time delay induced by LIV with the cosmic expansion history given in terms of cosmography, without assuming any particular cosmological model. Then, we constrain the possible LIV with the observational data, and find weak hints for LIV.

  20. Model-independent constraints on Lorentz invariance violation via the cosmographic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiao-Bo; Deng, Hua-Kai; Yin, Zhao-Yu; Wei, Hao

    2018-01-01

    Since Lorentz invariance plays an important role in modern physics, it is of interest to test the possible Lorentz invariance violation (LIV). The time-lag (the arrival time delay between light curves in different energy bands) of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has been extensively used to this end. However, to our best knowledge, one or more particular cosmological models were assumed a priori in (almost) all of the relevant works in the literature. So, this makes the results on LIV in those works model-dependent and hence not so robust in fact. In the present work, we try to avoid this problem by using a model-independent approach. We calculate the time delay induced by LIV with the cosmic expansion history given in terms of cosmography, without assuming any particular cosmological model. Then, we constrain the possible LIV with the observational data, and find weak hints for LIV.

  1. Testing the isotropy of the Universe with Type Ia supernovae in a model-independent way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Yang; Wang, F. Y.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we study an anisotropic universe model with Bianchi-I metric using Joint light-curve analysis (JLA) sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Because light-curve parameters of SNe Ia vary with different cosmological models and SNe Ia samples, we fit the SNe Ia light-curve parameters and cosmological parameters simultaneously employing Markov chain Monte Carlo method. Therefore, the results on the amount of deviation from isotropy of the dark energy equation of state (δ), and the level of anisotropy of the large-scale geometry (Σ0) at present, are totally model-independent. The constraints on the skewness and cosmic shear are -0.101 universe (δ = Σ0 = 0). However, a moderate level of anisotropy in the geometry of the Universe and the equation of state of dark energy, is allowed. Besides, there is no obvious evidence for a preferred direction of anisotropic axis in this model.

  2. Impact of AMS-02 Measurements on Reducing GCR Model Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, T. C.; O'Neill, P. M.; Golge, S.; Norbury, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    For vehicle design, shield optimization, mission planning, and astronaut risk assessment, the exposure from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) poses a significant and complex problem both in low Earth orbit and in deep space. To address this problem, various computational tools have been developed to quantify the exposure and risk in a wide range of scenarios. Generally, the tool used to describe the ambient GCR environment provides the input into subsequent computational tools and is therefore a critical component of end-to-end procedures. Over the past few years, several researchers have independently and very carefully compared some of the widely used GCR models to more rigorously characterize model differences and quantify uncertainties. All of the GCR models studied rely heavily on calibrating to available near-Earth measurements of GCR particle energy spectra, typically over restricted energy regions and short time periods. In this work, we first review recent sensitivity studies quantifying the ions and energies in the ambient GCR environment of greatest importance to exposure quantities behind shielding. Currently available measurements used to calibrate and validate GCR models are also summarized within this context. It is shown that the AMS-II measurements will fill a critically important gap in the measurement database. The emergence of AMS-II measurements also provides a unique opportunity to validate existing models against measurements that were not used to calibrate free parameters in the empirical descriptions. Discussion is given regarding rigorous approaches to implement the independent validation efforts, followed by recalibration of empirical parameters.

  3. Dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines in a novel acute mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain dopamine is critically involved in movement control, and its deficiency is the primary cause of motor symptoms in Parkinson disease. Here we report development of an animal model of acute severe dopamine deficiency by using mice lacking the dopamine transporter. In the absence of transporter-mediated recycling mechanisms, dopamine levels become entirely dependent on de novo synthesis. Acute pharmacological inhibition of dopamine synthesis in these mice induces transient elimination of striatal dopamine accompanied by the development of a striking behavioral phenotype manifested as severe akinesia, rigidity, tremor, and ptosis. This phenotype can be reversed by administration of the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA, or by nonselective dopamine agonists. Surprisingly, several amphetamine derivatives were also effective in reversing these behavioral abnormalities in a dopamine-independent manner. Identification of dopamine transporter- and dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines suggests a novel paradigm in the search for prospective anti-Parkinsonian drugs.

  4. Localized hippocampus measures are associated with Alzheimer pathology and cognition independent of total hippocampal volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmichael, Owen; Xie, Jing; Fletcher, Evan; Singh, Baljeet; Decarli, Charles; A, Saradha; Abdi, Hervé; Abdul Hadi, Normi; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Abdullah, Afnizanfaizal; Achuthan, Anusha; Adluru, Nagesh; Aggarwal, Namita; Aghajanian, Jania; Agyemang, Alex; Ahdidan, Jamila; Ahmad, Duaa; Ahmed, Shiek; Ahmed, Fareed; Ahmed, Fayeza; Akbarifar, Roshanak; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Aksu, Yaman; Alcauter, Sarael; Daniel, Alexander; Alin, Aylin; Alshuft, Hamza; Alvarez-Linera, Juan; Amin-Mansour, Ali; Anderson, Dallas; Anderson, Jeff; Andorn, Anne; Ang, Amma; Angersbach, Steve; Ansarian, Reza; Appaji, Abhishek; Appannah, Arti; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Armentrout, Steven; Arrighi, Michael; Arumughababu, S. Vethanayaki; Arunagiri, Vidhya; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Ashford, Wes; Aurelie, Le Page; Avants, Brian; Aviv, Richard; Avula, Ramesh; Ayache, Nicholas; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun; Ayhan, Murat; B V, Sumana; Babic, Tomislav; Bach Cuadra, Meritxell; Bagepally, Bhavani; Baird, Geoffrey; Baker, John; Baker, Suzanne; Bakker, Arnold; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Barbash, Shahar; Barker, Warren; Bartlett, Jonathan; Bartley, Mairead; Baruchin, Andrea; Battaglini, Iacopo; Bauer, Corinna; Bayley, Peter; Beck, Irene; Becker, James; Beckett, Laurel; Bednar, Martin; Bedner, Arkadiusz; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Bekris, Lynn; Belaroussi, Boubakeur; Belloch, Vicente; Ben Ahmed, Olfa; Bender, J. Dennis; Bendib, Mohamed Mokhtar; Benois-Pineau, Jenny; Bhagchandani, Sameer; Bienkowska, Katarzyna; Biffi, Alessandro; Bilgic, Basar; Bilgin, Gokhan; Billing, Bill; Bishop, Courtney; Bittner, Daniel; Björnsdotter, Malin; Black, Sandra; Bloss, Cinnamon; Blunck, Yasmin; Bocti, Christian; Bohorquez, Adriana; Bokde, Arun; Boone, John; Borrie, Michael; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Bouttout, Haroune; Bowman, DuBois; Gene, Gene; Boxer, Adam; Bozoki, Andrea; Bracard, Serge; Braskie, Meredith; Braunewell, Karl; Breitner, Joihn; Bresell, Anders; Brewer, James; Brickhouse, Michael; Brickman, Adam; Britschgi, Markus; Broadbent, Steve; Brock, Birgitte; Buchsbaum, Monte; Buerger, Katharina; Bunce, David; Burnham, Samantha; Burns, Jeffrey; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Butler, Tracy; Cabeza, Rafael; Cabral, George; Caffery, Terrell; Cai, Zhengchen; Callhoff, Johanna; Calvini, Piero; Campbell, Noll; Carbotti, Angela; Carle, Adam; Carmasin, Carle; Carpenter, Carmichael; Carvalho, Janessa; Casanova, Casanova Ramon; Casey, Anne; David, David; Cash, David; Cataldo, Rosella; Cella, Massimo; Chakravarty, Mallar; Chang, Ih; Chao, Linda; Charil, Arnaud; Che-Wei, Chang; Chen, Kewei; Chen, Shuzhong; Chen, Ing-jou; Chen, Jung-Tai; Chen, Rong; Chen, Chuangquan; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Heng; Chen, Jake; Chen, Gang; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Cheng, Xi; Cheng, Bo; Cherkas, Yauheniya; Chertkow, Howard; Cheung, Vinci; Chiang, Gloria; Chiao, Ping; chibane, Mouatez Billah; Chida, Noriko; Chin, Simon; Ching, Christopher; Chisholm, Jane; Cho, Claire; Cho, Sung-Sik; Choe, John; Choubey, Suresh; Chowbina, Sudhir; Ciocia, Gianluigi; Clark, David; Clarkson, Matt; Clerc, Stephanie; Climer, Sharlee; Clunie, David; Coen, Michael; Coimbra, Alexandre; Compton, David; Coubard, Olivier; Coulin, Samuel; Coulson, Elizabeth; Cover, Keith S.; Crans, Gerald; Crawford, Karen; Croop, Robert; Crum, William; Cui, Yue; Da, Long; Daiello, Lori; Darby, Eveleen; Darkner, Sune; Darnell, Robert; Davatzikos, Christos; DavidPrakash, Bhaskaran; Davidson, Christopher; Davis, Melissa; de Bruijne, Marleen; Decker, Summer; DeDuck, Kristina; Dehghan, Hossein; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; DeOrchis, Vincent; Dépy Carron, Delphine; Desjardins, Benoit; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Devanand, Davangere; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Devier, Deidre; DeVous, Michael; Di, Xin; Di, Jianing; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Diciotti, Stefano; Dickerson, Bradford; Dickie, David Alexander; Dickinson, Philip; Dill, Vanderson; Ding, Xiaobo; Dinov, Ivo; Dobosh, Brian; Dobson, Howard; Dodge, Hiroko; Dolman, Andrew; Dolmo, Bess-Carolina; Dong, Wen; Donohue, Michael; Dore, Vincent; Dorflinger, Ernest; Dowling, Maritza; Dragicevic, Natasa; Dubal, Dena; Duchesne, Simon; Duff, Kevin; Dukart, Jürgen; Durazzo, Timothy; Dutta, Joyita; DWors, Robert; Egefjord, Lærke; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Emahazion, Tesfai; Endres, Christopher; Epstein, Noam; Ereshefsky, Larry; Eskildsen, Simon; Espinosa, Eskildsen; Esposito, Mario; Ewers, Michael; Falcone, Guido; Fan, Zhen; Fan, Yong; Fan, Jing; Fang, Zheng; Farahibozorg, Seyedehrezvan; Farahmandpoor, Zeinab; Farb, Norman; Fardo, David; Farias, Sarah; Farnum, Michael; Farrer, Lindsay; Fatke, Bastian; Faux, Noel; Favilla, Stefania; Fazlollahi, Amir; Feldman, Betsy; Félix, Zandra; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Fernandes, Michel; Fernandez, Santos; Fernandez, Elsa; Ferrer, Eugene; Fetterman, Bob; Figurski, Michal; Fillit, Howard; Finch, Stephen; Fiot, Jean-Baptiste; Flenniken, Derek; Flores, Christopher; Flynn Longmire, Crystal; Focke, Niels; Forsythe, Alan; Foxhall, Suzanne; Franko, Edit; Freeman, Roderick; Freire, Rodolpho; Friedrich, Christoph M.; Friesenhahn, Michel; Giovanni, Giovanni; Fritzsche, Klaus; Fujiwara, Ken; Fullerton, Terence; Gaffour, Yacine; Galvin, Ben; Gamst, Anthony; Gan, Ke; Gao, Sujuan; Garg, Gaurav; Gaser, Christian; Gastineau, Edward; Gattaz, Wagner; Gaubert, Malo; Gaudreau, Amanda; Gauthier, Serge; Ge, Tian; Gemme, Gianluca; Geraci, Joseph; Gholipour, Farhad; Ghosh, Debashis; Ghosh, Satrajit; Gieschke, Ronald; Gill, Ryan; Gillespie, William; Gitelman, Darren; Gkontra, Xenia; Gleason, Carey; Glymour, M. Maria; Godbey, Michael; Gold, Brian; Goldberg, Terry; Goldman, Jennifer; Gomar, Jesus; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Gore, Chris; Gorriz, Juan Manuel; Goto, Masami; Gradkowski, Wojciech; Grasela, Thaddeus; Gray, Katherine; Gregory, Erik; Greicius, Michael; Grill, Joshua; Grolmusz, Vince; Gross, Alden; Gross, Alan; Grydeland, Håkon; Guignot, Isabelle; Guo, Hongbin; Guo, Gimiao; Guo, Liang-Hao; Gupta, Vinay; Guyot, Jennifer; Haas, Magali; Habeck, Christian; Habte, Frezghi; Haight, Thaddeus; Hajaj, Chen; Hajiesmaeili, Maryam; Hajjar, Ihab; Hammarstrom, Per; Hampel, Harald; Han, Zhaoying; Han, Duke; Hanna, Yousef; Hanna-Pladdy, Brenda; Hao, Yongfu; Hardy, Peter; Harrison, John; Harvey, Danielle; Hayashi, Toshihiro; Haynes, John-Dylan; He, Yong; He, Huiguang; Head, Denise; Heckemann, Rolf; Heegaard, Niels; Heidebrink, Judith; Hellyer, Peter; Helwig, Michael; Henderson, David; Herholz, Karl; Hess, Christopher; Hill, Sophie; Hisaka, Akihiro; Ho Ming, Au Yeung; Hobart, Jeremy; Hochstetler, Helen; Hofer, Scott; Hoffman, John; Holder, Daniel; Hollingworth, Paul; Holmes, Robin; Hong, Hyunseok; Hong, Hong; Honigberg, Lee; Hoogenraad, Frank; Hope, Thomas; Hot, Pascal; Hsieh, Helen; Hsu, Ailing; Hu, William; Hu, Xiaochen; Hu, Chenhui; Hu, Mingxing; Hua, Wen-Yu; Huang, Chien-Chih; Huang, Xudong; Huang, Juebin; Huang, Yifan; Huang, Chun-Jung; Huang, Zihan; Huentelman, Matthew; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Hurt, Stephen; Hussain, Maqbool; Hutchins, Jim; Hwang, Scott; Hyun, JungMoon; Ifeachor, Emmanuel; Iglesias, Martina; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki; Iman, Adjoudj; Imani, Farzin; Immermann, Fred; Inlow, Mark; Inoue, Lurdes; Insel, Philip; Irizarry, Michael; Ishibashi, Taro; Ishii, Kenji; Ito, Kaori; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Jacks, Adam; Jacobson, Mark; Jacqmin, Philippe; Jaeger, Markus; Jagger, Richard; Jagust, William; Janousova, Eva; Jara, Hernan; Jedynak, Bruno; Jefferson, Angela; Jenq, John; Jiang, Tianzi; Jiang, Chunxiang; Jiao, Yun; Jiaolong, Qin; Jin, Kun; Johnson, Sterling; Johnson, Julene; Johnson, Kent; Gareth, Gareth; Jones, Mark; Jones, Richard; Joshi, Rohit; Joshi, Shantanu; Jouvent, Eric; Juengling, Freimut; Jung, Wonbeom; Junjie, Zhuo; K G, Muthamma; Kabilan, Meena; Kairui, Zhang; Kam, Hye Jin; Kamer, Angela; Kanakaraj, Sithara; Kanchev, Vladimir; Kaneko, Tomoki; Kaneta, Tomohiro; Kang, Hyunseok; Kang, Ju Hee; Kang, Jian; Karantzoulis, Stella; Kaushik, Sandeep S.; Kauwe, John; Kawashima, Shoji; Kaye, Edward; Kazemi, Samaneh; Ke, Han; Kelleher, Thomas; Kennedy, Richard; Keogh, Bart; Kerchner, Geoffrey; Kerr, Daniel; Keshava, Nirmal; Khalil, Andre; Khondker, Zakaria; Kiddle, Steven; Kihara, Takeshi; Killeen, Neil; Killiany, Ron; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Seongkyun; Kim, Dajung; Kim, Ana; Kim, Jong Hun; Kimberg, Daniel; King, Richard; Kirby, Justin; Kirsch, Wolff; Klein, Gregory; Klimas, Michael; Kline, Richard; Klopfenstein, Erin; Koen, Joshua; Koenig, Loren; Koikkalainen, Juha; Kokomoor, Anders; Kong, Xiangnan; Koppel, Jeremy; Korolev, Igor; Krahnke, Tillmann; Krams, Michael; Kuceyeski, Amy; Kuhl, Donald; Kumar, Vinod; Roy, P. Kumar; Kuo, Julie; Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Labib, Victor; Labrish, Catherine; Lai, Song; Lakatos, Anita; Lalonde, François; Lam, Shing Chun Benny; Lam, On Ki; Lampron, Antoine; Landau, Susan; Lane, Barton; Langbaum, Jessica; Langford, Dianne; Lanius, Vivian; Lasch, Shirley; Latella, Marco; Hiuyan, Hiuyan; Leatherday, Christopher; Lee, Doheon; Lee, Grace; Lee, Sei; Lee, Jong an; Lemaitre, Herve; Lenfant, Pierre; Leonards, Ute; Leong, Leonards; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie; Leung, Kelvin; Leung, Yuk Yee; Levey, Allan; Li, Ming; Li, Jie; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Lexin; Li, Yanming; Li, Quanzheng; Li, Rui; Li, Yi; Li, Junning; Li, Yue; Li, Jun; Li, Weidong; Li, Xiaobo; Liang, Peipeng; Liang, Kuchang; Liang, Kelvin; Liao, Weiqi; Liao, Shu; Liaquat, Saad; Liaw, Chyn; Liberman, Gilad; Lilley, Patrick; Lin, Frank; Lin, Xiaoman; Lin, Ai-Ling; Liu, Tianming; Liu, Yawu; Liu, Yanping; Liu, Linda; Liu, Wei; Liu, Collins; Liu, Manhua; Liu, Xiuwen; Liu, Tao; Liu, Ye; Liu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Yin; Liu, Dazhong; Liu, Sidong; Liu, Guodong; Llido, Jerome; Lo, Raymond; Lobach, Iryna; Lobanov, Victor; Lockhart, Andrew; Long, Ziyi; Long, Xiaojing; Long, Miaomiao; Looi, Jeffrey; Lu, Huanxiang; Lu, Yuefeng; Lu, Po-Haong; Lucena, Nathaniel; Luis, Jorge; Lukas, Carsten; Lukic, Ana; Luo, Xi; Luo, Xiongjian; Luo, Lei; Luo, Wanchun; Ma, Suk Ling; Ma, Shen-Ming; Mackin, Scott; Mada, Marius; Madabhushi, Anant; Madeira, Sara; Magland, Jeremy; Mahanta, Mohammad Shahin; Maikusa, Norihide; Maldjian, Joseph; Mandal, Indrajit; Mang, Mandal; Manjon, Jose; Mantri, Ninad; Manzour, Amir; Marcus, Daniel; Margolin, Richard; Marrett, Sean; Marshall, Gad; Martinez Gonzalez, Alberto; Martinez Torteya, Antonio; Martins, Renato; Mather, Mara; Mathis, Chester; Matoug, Sofia; Mattei, Peter; Matthews, Dawn; Mattis, Paul; McCarroll, Steven; McEvoy, Linda; McGeown, William; McGinnis, Scott; McGonigle, John; McIntosh, Anthony Randal; McIntyre, John; McLaren, McIntyre; McMillan, Corey; McQuail, Joseph; Meadowcroft, Mark; Meda, Shashwath; Melie-Garcia, Lester; Melrose, Rebecca; Mendelson, Alexander; Mendez, Mendelson; Menendez, Mendez; Meng, Meng; Meredith, Jere; Meyer, Carsten; Mez, Jesse; Mickael, Guedj; Mikula, Margit; Miller, Michael; Colleen, Colleen; Mintun, Mark; Mistridis, Panagiota; Mitchell, Mistridis; Mitsis, Effie; Mon, Mitsis; Moore, Dana; Morabito, Moore C.; Moradi Birgani, Parmida; Moratal, David; Morimoto, Bruce; Mormino, Elizabeth; Morris, Jill; Morris, Jeffrey; Mortamet, Bénédicte; Moscato, Pablo; Mourao-Miranda, Janaina; Mueller, Susanne; Mueller, Kathyrne; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Mukund, Nandita; Mulder, Emma; Mungas, Dan; Munir, Kamran; Murayama, Shigeo; N, Sairam; Nagata, Ken; Nair, Anil; Nasrabadi, Samira; Nativio, Raffaella; Nazeri, Arash; Nejad, Leila; Nekooei, Sirous; Nemeth, Imola; Nencka, Andrew; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Neu, Scott; Ng, Yen-Bee; Nguyen, Nghi; Nguyen, Hien; Nichols, Thomas; Nicodemus, Kristin; Niecko, Timothy; Nielsen, Casper; Niethammer, Marc; Nishio, Tomoyuki; Nordstrom, Matthew; Noshad, Sina; Notomi, Keiji; Novak, Nic; Nutakki, Gopi Chand; O'Charoen, Sirimon; Obisesan, Thomas; Oh, Joonmi; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Oliveira, João; Oliveira, Ailton; Oliver, Ruth; Olmos, Salvador; Oltra, Javier; Ong, Rowena; Ortner, Marion; Osadebey, Michael; Ostrowitzki, Susanne; Ovando Vazquez, Cesare Moises; Overholser, Rosanna; P, Anishiya; P K A, Chitra; Pa, Judy; Palanisamy, Preethi; Pan, Guodong; Pan, Zhifang; Pan, Sarah; Pande, Yogesh; Pardo, Jose; Pardoe, Heath; Park, Sujin; Park, Lovingly; Park, Moon Ho; Park, Hyunjin; Parker, Christopher; Patel, Yogen; Patil, Amol; Patil, Manasi; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Pierre, Pierre; Pell, Gaby; Pennec, Xavier; Pereira, Francisco; Perlbarg, Vincent; Perneczky, Robert; Peters, Frederic; Petitti, Diana; Petrella, Jeffrey; Petrou, Myria; Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Ngoc, Phuong Trinh Pham; Phillips, Justin; Phillips, Nicole; Pian, Wen-ting; Pierson, Ronald; Piovezan, Mauro; Pipitone, Jon; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Planes, Xavi; Podhorski, Adam; Poirier, Judes; Pomara, Nunzio; Popov, Veljko; Poppenk, Jordan; Potkin, Steven; Potter, Guy; Poulin, Stephane; Prastawa, Marcel; Prince, Jerry; Pruessner, Jens; Qiu, Wendy; Qu, Annie; Qualls, Constance Dean; Quarg, Peter; Quinlan, Judith; Rabbia, Michael; Rajagovindan, Rajasimhan; Rajeesh, Rajeesh; Ramadubramani, Vanamamalai; Ramage, Amy; Ramirez, Alfredo; Randolph, Christopher; Rao, Hengyi; Rao, Anil; Reed, Bruce; Reid, Andrew; Reilhac, Anthonin; Reiner, Peggy; Reinsberger, Claus; Retico, Alessandra; Rhatigan, Lewis; Rhinn, Herve; Rhoades, Earl; Ribbens, Annemie; Richard, Edo; Richards, John; Richter, Mirco; Riddle, William; Ridgway, Gerard; Ringman, John; Rizk-Jackson, Angela; Rizzi, Massimo; Rodriguez, Laura; Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Rogalski, Emily; Rojas Balderrama, Javier; Rokicki, Jaroslav; Romero, Klaus; Rorden, Chris; Jonathan, Jonathan; Rosen, Ori; Rostant, Ola; Rousseau, François; Rubright, Jonathan; Rucinski, Marek; Ruiz, Agustin; Rulseh, Aaron; Rusinek, Henry; Ryan, Laurie; Sabuncu, Mert; Saculva, Marie; Sahuquillo, Juan; Said, Yasmine; Saito, Naomi; Sakata, Muneyuki; Salama, Mahetab; Salazar, Diego; Saman, Sudad; Sanchez, Luciano; Sanders, Elizabeth; Sankar, Tejas; Santhamma, Sindhumol; Sarnel, Haldun; Sarwinda, Devvi; Sasaki, Toshiaki; Sasaya, Tenta; Sato, Hajime; Sattlecker, Martina; Savio, Alexandre; Saykin, Andrew; Scanlon, Blake; Scharre, Douglas; Schegerin, Marc; Schmand, Ben; Schmansky, Nick; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Schramm, Hauke; Schuerch, Markus; Schwartz, Pamela; Schwartz, Eben; Adam, Adam; Schwarz, John; Schweizer, Tom; Selnes, Per; Sembritzki, Klaus; Senjem, Matthew; Sfikas, Giorgos; Sghedoni, Roberto; Shah, Jamal Hussain; Shahbaba, Babak; Shams, Soheil; Shankle, William; Shattuck, David; Shaw, Leslie; Shen, Qi; Shen, Jie; Shen, Qian; Shera, David; Sherva, Richard; Shi, Yonghong; Shi, Feng; Shi, Yonggang; Shi, Jie; Shilaskar, Swati; Shinohara, Russell; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Shulman, Joshua; Sideris, Konstantinos; Siegel, Rene; Silveira, Margarida; Silverman, Daniel; Simak, Alex; Simmons, Andy; Simoes, Rita; Simon, Howard; Simon, Adam; Simpson, Ivor; Singh, Nikhil; Sinha, Neelam; Siuciak, Judy; Sjögren, Niclas; Skinner, Jeannine; Skudlarski, Skinner; Smith, Michael; Smith, Charles; Peter, Peter; Soares, Holly; Soldan, Anja; Soldea, Octavian; Solomon, Paul; Solomon, Alan; Som, Subhojit; Song, Zhuang; Song, Shide; Sosova, Iveta; Soydemir, Melih; Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Speier, William; Sperling, Reisa; Spiegel, R.; Spies, Lothar; Springate, Beth; Spychalla, Anthony; Staff, Roger; Steenland, Nelson; Steffener, Jason; Stern, Yaakov; Stokman, Harro; Stolzenberg, Ethan; Stricker, Nikki; Stühler, Elisabeth; Su, Saisai; Suen, Summit; Sugishita, Morihiro; Suk, Heung-Il; Sukkar, Rafid; Sullivan, Sukkar; Sun, Mingzhu; Sun, Jia; Sun, Yu; Sun, Ying; Sundell, Karen; Sutphen, Courtney; Svetnik, Vladimir; Swan, Melanie; Symons, Sean; Szafranska, Katarzyna; Szigeti, Kinga; Szoeke, Cassandra; Sørensen, Lauge; T, Genish; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Tanaka, Shoji; Tanaka, Rie; Tanchi, Chaturaphat; Tancredi, Daniel; Tang, Qi; Tanzi, Rudolph; Tarnow, Eugen; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Tarver, Erika; Tassy, Dominique; Tauber, Dominique; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Teipel, Stefan; Teng, Edmond; Termenon, Maite; Terriza, Felipe; Thambisetty, Madhav; Thames, April; Thatavarti, Raja Sekhar; Thiele, Frank; Thomas, Ronald; Thomas, Charlene; Thomas, Benjamin; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Wesley; Thornton-Wells, Tricia; Thorvaldsson, Valgeir; Tokuda, Takahiko; Toledo, Juan B.; Toma, Ahmed; Tomita, Naoki; Toro, Roberto; Torrealdea, Patxi; Toschi, Nicola; Tosto, Giuseppe; Toussaint, Paule; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Tractenberg, Rochelle E.; Triggs, Tyler; Trittschuh, Emily; Trotta, Gabriele; Truong Huu, Tram; Truran, Diana; Tsalikakis, Dimitrios; Tsanas, Athanasios; Tsang, Candy; Tufail, Ahsan; Tung, Joyce; Turken, And; Turner, Raymond; Tyagi, Puneet; Ueda, Yoji; Uematsu, Daisuke; Ullrich, Lauren; Umar, Nisser; Ungar, Leo; Valenzuela, Olga; van de Nes, Joseph; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lijn, Fedde; van Hecke, Wim; van Horn, John; van Leemput, Koen; van Train, Kenneth; Varkuti, Balint; Vasanawala, Minal; Veeraraghavan, Harini; Vellay, Stephane; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Verma, Manish; Vidoni, Eric; Louis, Louis; Vinyes, Georgina; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Vitek, Michael; Vogel, Simon; Voineskos, Aristotle; Vos, Stephanie; Vounou, Maria; Wade, Sara; Walsh, Alexander; Wang, Ze; Wang, Angela; Wang, Li; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Tiger; Wang, Li-San; Wang, Xu; Wang, Zheyu; Wang, Tianyao; Wang, Yongmei Michelle; Wang, Song; Wang, Lei; Wang, Lubin; Wang, Squall; Wang, Jingyan; Ward, Michael; Ward, Andrew; Watson, David; Wefel, Jeffrey; Weiner, Michael; Wenzel, Fabian; Wesnes, Keith; Shawn, Shawn; Westlye, Lars T.; Wheland, David; Whitcher, Brandon; White, Brooke; Whitlow, Christopher; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Beth, Beth; Wilson, Lorraine; Wingo, Thomas; Wirth, Miranka; Wishart, Heather; Wiste, Heather; Wittemer, Elizabeth; Wolf, Henrike; Wolke, Ira; Wolz, Robin; Wong, Koon; Woo, Ellen; Woo, Jongwook; Woods, Lynn; Worth, Andrew; Wu, Xiaoying; Wu, Yanjun; Wu, Liang; Wu, Ellen; Wyman, Bradley; Xie, Sharon; Xu, Yonghong; Xu, Yi-Zheng; Xu, Shunbin; Xu, Jun; Xu, Steven; Yamada, Tomoko; Yamashita, Fumio; Yan, Yunyi; Yang, Zijiang; Yang, Hyun Duk; Yang, Edward; Yang, Chung-Yi; Yang, Wenlu; Yang, Hyuna; Yang, Eric; Yassa, Michael; Yavorsky, Christian; Ye, Byoung Seok; Yee, Laura; Yokoyama, Jennifer; Yokoyama, Takao; Stewart, Stewart; Younhyun, Jung; Yu, C. Q.; Yu, Peng; Yuan, Ying; Yuen, Bob; Yushkevich, Paul; Zaborszky, Laszlo; Zagorodnov, Vitali; Zahodne, Laura; Zarei, Mojtaba; Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Zeitzer, Jamie; Zelinski, Elizabeth; Zeskind, Benjamin; Zhan, Xhu; Zhang, Tianhao; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Daoqiang; Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Kate; Zhang, Linda; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Peng; Zhou, Luping; Zhou, Yongxia; Zhou, Bin; Zhu, Xuyan; Zhu, Hongtu; Zhu, Linling; Zhu, Zangen; Ziegler, Gabriel; Zilka, Samantha; Zisserman, Andrew; Zito, Giancarlo; Zu, Zito; Zulfigar, Annam

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal injury in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathological process is region-specific and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based measures of localized hippocampus (HP) atrophy are known to detect region-specific changes associated with clinical AD, but it is unclear whether these measures

  5. Localized hippocampus measures are associated with Alzheimer pathology and cognition independent of total hippocampal volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmichael, O.; Xie, J.; Fletcher, E.; Singh, B.; DeCarli, C.; Olde Rikkert, M.; et al.,

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal injury in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathological process is region-specific and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based measures of localized hippocampus (HP) atrophy are known to detect region-specific changes associated with clinical AD, but it is unclear whether these measures

  6. Development of the KINS Safety Culture Maturity Model for Self and Independent Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheen, C.; Choi, Y.S.

    2016-01-01

    Safety culture of an organization is cultivated and affected not only by societal and regulatory environment of the organization, but by its philosophies, policies, events and activities experienced in the process of accomplishing its mission. The safety culture would be continuously changed by the interactions between its members along with time as an organic entity. In order to perform a systematic self- or independent assessment of safety culture, a safety culture assessment model (SCAM) properly reflecting cultural characteristics should be necessary. In addition, a SCAM should be helpful not only to establish correct directions, goals, and strategies for safety culture development, but should anticipating obstacles against safety culture development in the implementation process derived from the assessment. In practical terms, a SCAM should be useful for deriving effective guidelines and implementing of corrective action programs for the evaluated organization. Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) performed a research project for six years to develop a SCAM satisfying the above prerequisites for self- and independent assessment. The KINS SCAM was developed based on the five stage safety culture maturity model proposed by Professor Patrick Hudson and was modified into four stages to reflect existing safety culture assessment experiences at Korean nuclear power plants. In order to define the change mechanism of safety culture for development and reversion, the change model proposed by Prochaska and DiClemente was introduced into KINS SCAM and developed into the Spiral Change Model.

  7. LOCAL INDEPENDENCE FEATURE SCREENING FOR NONPARAMETRIC AND SEMIPARAMETRIC MODELS BY MARGINAL EMPIRICAL LIKELIHOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jinyuan; Tang, Cheng Yong; Wu, Yichao

    2015-01-01

    We consider an independence feature screening technique for identifying explanatory variables that locally contribute to the response variable in high-dimensional regression analysis. Without requiring a specific parametric form of the underlying data model, our approach accommodates a wide spectrum of nonparametric and semiparametric model families. To detect the local contributions of explanatory variables, our approach constructs empirical likelihood locally in conjunction with marginal nonparametric regressions. Since our approach actually requires no estimation, it is advantageous in scenarios such as the single-index models where even specification and identification of a marginal model is an issue. By automatically incorporating the level of variation of the nonparametric regression and directly assessing the strength of data evidence supporting local contribution from each explanatory variable, our approach provides a unique perspective for solving feature screening problems. Theoretical analysis shows that our approach can handle data dimensionality growing exponentially with the sample size. With extensive theoretical illustrations and numerical examples, we show that the local independence screening approach performs promisingly. PMID:27242388

  8. Rolling Resistance Measurement and Model Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse Grinderslev; Larsen, Jesper; Fraser, Elsje Sophia

    2015-01-01

    There is an increased focus worldwide on understanding and modeling rolling resistance because reducing the rolling resistance by just a few percent will lead to substantial energy savings. This paper reviews the state of the art of rolling resistance research, focusing on measuring techniques......, surface and texture modeling, contact models, tire models, and macro-modeling of rolling resistance...

  9. A model independent S/W framework for search-based software testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jungsup; Baik, Jongmoon; Lim, Sung-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    In Model-Based Testing (MBT) area, Search-Based Software Testing (SBST) has been employed to generate test cases from the model of a system under test. However, many types of models have been used in MBT. If the type of a model has changed from one to another, all functions of a search technique must be reimplemented because the types of models are different even if the same search technique has been applied. It requires too much time and effort to implement the same algorithm over and over again. We propose a model-independent software framework for SBST, which can reduce redundant works. The framework provides a reusable common software platform to reduce time and effort. The software framework not only presents design patterns to find test cases for a target model but also reduces development time by using common functions provided in the framework. We show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed framework with two case studies. The framework improves the productivity by about 50% when changing the type of a model.

  10. A tool for efficient, model-independent management optimization under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jeremy; Fienen, Michael N.; Barlow, Paul M.; Welter, Dave E.

    2018-01-01

    To fill a need for risk-based environmental management optimization, we have developed PESTPP-OPT, a model-independent tool for resource management optimization under uncertainty. PESTPP-OPT solves a sequential linear programming (SLP) problem and also implements (optional) efficient, “on-the-fly” (without user intervention) first-order, second-moment (FOSM) uncertainty techniques to estimate model-derived constraint uncertainty. Combined with a user-specified risk value, the constraint uncertainty estimates are used to form chance-constraints for the SLP solution process, so that any optimal solution includes contributions from model input and observation uncertainty. In this way, a “single answer” that includes uncertainty is yielded from the modeling analysis. PESTPP-OPT uses the familiar PEST/PEST++ model interface protocols, which makes it widely applicable to many modeling analyses. The use of PESTPP-OPT is demonstrated with a synthetic, integrated surface-water/groundwater model. The function and implications of chance constraints for this synthetic model are discussed.

  11. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume IV. Model documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M L; Allen, B J; Gale, J E; Lutz, M S; O& #x27; Hara, N E; Wood, R K

    1979-02-01

    This volume is the fourth in a series of seven documenting the PIES Integrating Model. It contains detailed descriptions of the basic assumptions behind each of the components of PIES and how they interact with one another. Chapter II of this volume presents the methodology used to integrate supply and demand. It includes a discussion of both the interface between the Demand Model and the equilibrating mechanism and the various supply models via the equilibrating algorithm used by PIES. Chapters III through IX describe each supply submodel in turn: coal, oil, and natural gas supply, utilities, refineries, advanced technologies, and transportation. Code and data documentation are covered elsewhere in this series (Volumes V and VI respectively). PIES is an evolving system. As this document was being prepared, many parts of the model were being modified. This document describes the PIES Integrating Model as of January 1, 1978.

  12. Cross-diagnostic validity in a generic instrument: an example from the Functional Independence Measure in Scandinavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimby G

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyse the cross-diagnostic validity of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM™ motor items in patients with spinal cord injury, stroke and traumatic brain injury and the comparability of summed scores between these diagnoses. Methods Data from 471 patients on FIM™ motor items at admission (stroke 157, spinal cord injury 157 and traumatic brain injury 157, age range 11–90 years and 70 % male in nine rehabilitation facilities in Scandinavia, were fitted to the Rasch model. A detailed analysis of scoring functions of the seven categories of the FIM™ motor items was made prior to testing fit to the model. Categories were re-scored where necessary. Fit to the model was assessed initially within diagnosis and then in the pooled data. Analysis of Differential Item Functioning (DIF was undertaken in the pooled data for the FIM™ motor scale. Comparability of sum scores between diagnoses was tested by Test Equating. Results The present seven category scoring system for the FIM™ motor items was found to be invalid, necessitating extensive rescoring. Despite rescoring, the item-trait interaction fit statistic was significant and two individual items showed misfit to the model, Eating and Bladder management. DIF was also found for Spinal Cord Injury, compared with the other two diagnoses. After adjustment, it was possible to make appropriate comparisons of sum scores between the three diagnoses. Conclusion The seven-category response function is a problem for the FIM™ instrument, and a reduction of responses might increase the validity of the instrument. Likewise, the removal of items that do not fit the underlying trait would improve the validity of the scale in these groups. Cross-diagnostic DIF is also a problem but for clinical use sum scores on group data in a generic instrument such as the FIM™ can be compared with appropriate adjustments. Thus, when planning interventions (group or individual, developing

  13. NEIGHBOURHOOD POVERTY, PERCEIVED DISCRIMINATION AND CENTRAL ADIPOSITY IN THE USA: INDEPENDENT ASSOCIATIONS IN A REPEATED MEASURES ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwarteng, Jamila L; Schulz, Amy J; Mentz, Graciela B; Israel, Barbara A; Shanks, Trina R; Perkins, Denise White

    2016-11-01

    This study examines the independent effects of neighbourhood context (i.e. neighbourhood poverty) and exposure to perceived discrimination in shaping risk of obesity over time. Weighted three-level hierarchical linear regression models for a continuous outcome were used to assess the independent effects of neighbourhood poverty and perceived discrimination on obesity over time in a sample of 157 non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic White and Hispanic adults in Detroit, USA, in 2002/2003 and 2007/2008. Independent associations were found between neighbourhood poverty and perceived discrimination with central adiposity over time. Residents of neighbourhoods with high concentrations of poverty were more likely to show increases in central adiposity compared with those in neighbourhoods with lower concentrations of poverty. In models adjusted for BMI, neighbourhood poverty at baseline was associated with a greater change in central adiposity among participants who lived in neighbourhoods in the second (B=3.79, p=0.025) and third (B=3.73, p=0.024) poverty quartiles, compared with those in the lowest poverty neighbourhoods. The results from models that included both neighbourhood poverty and perceived discrimination showed that both were associated with increased risk of increased central adiposity over time. Residents of neighbourhoods in the second (B=9.58, ppoverty were more likely to show greater increases in central adiposity over time, compared with those in the lowest poverty quartile, with mean discrimination at baseline independently and positively associated with increases in central adiposity over time (B=2.36, p=0.020). The results suggest that neighbourhood poverty and perceived discrimination are independently associated with a heightened risk of increase in central adiposity over time. Efforts to address persistent disparities in central adiposity in the USA should include strategies to reduce high concentrations of neighbourhood poverty as well as

  14. Muscle artifact suppression using independent-component analysis and state-space modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillán-Guzmán, Alina; Heute, Ulrich; Stephani, Ulrich; Galka, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we aim at suppressing the muscle artifacts present in electroencephalographic (EEG) signals with a technique based on a combination of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and State-Space Modeling (SSM). The novel algorithm uses ICA to provide an initial model for SSM which is further optimized by the maximum-likelihood approach. This model is fitted to artifact-free data. Then it is applied to data with muscle artifacts. The state space is augmented by extracting additional components from the data prediction errors. The muscle artifacts are well separated in the additional components and, hence, a suppression of them can be performed. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated by application to a clinical epilepsy EEG data set.

  15. A Quasi Model Independent Search for New High $p_T$ Physics at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuteson, Bruce Owen [UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.

    2000-12-01

    We present a new quasi-model-independent strategy ("Sleuth") for searching for physics beyond the standard model. We define final states to be studied, and construct a rule that identities a set of relevant variables for any particular final state. A novel algorithm searches for regions of excess in those variables and quantities the significance of any detected excess. This strategy is applied to search for new high $p_T$ physics in $\\approx$ 100 $pb^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1:8 TeV collected by the D0 experiment during 1992{1996 at the Fermilab Tevatron. We systematically analyze many exclusive final states, and demonstrate sensitivity to a variety of models predicting new phenomena at the electroweak scale. No evidence of new high $p_T$ physics is observed.

  16. Aerosol behaviour modeling and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieseke, J.A.; Reed, L.D.

    1977-01-01

    Aerosol behavior within Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) containments is of critical importance since most of the radioactive species are expected to be associated with particulate forms and the mass of radiologically significant material leaked to the ambient atmosphere is directly related to the aerosol concentration airborne within the containment. Mathematical models describing the behavior of aerosols in closed environments, besides providing a direct means of assessing the importance of specific assumptions regarding accident sequences, will also serve as the basic tool with which to predict the consequences of various postulated accident situations. Consequently, considerable efforts have been recently directed toward the development of accurate and physically realistic theoretical aerosol behavior models. These models have accounted for various mechanisms affecting agglomeration rates of airborne particulate matter as well as particle removal rates from closed systems. In all cases, spatial variations within containments have been neglected and a well-mixed control volume has been assumed. Examples of existing computer codes formulated from the mathematical aerosol behavior models are the Brookhaven National Laboratory TRAP code, the PARDISEKO-II and PARDISEKO-III codes developed at Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, and the HAA-2, HAA-3, and HAA-3B codes developed by Atomics International. Because of their attractive short computation times, the HAA-3 and HAA-3B codes have been used extensively for safety analyses and are attractive candidates with which to demonstrate order of magnitude estimates of the effects of various physical assumptions. Therefore, the HAA-3B code was used as the nucleus upon which changes have been made to account for various physical mechanisms which are expected to be present in postulated accident situations and the latest of the resulting codes has been termed the HAARM-2 code. It is the primary purpose of the HAARM

  17. Model of the co-operative trade alliance for independent retail networks in Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Záboj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the contribution is proposal of the model of co-operative trade alliance for independent trade alliances with fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG in Czech Republic. Reason of the choice of this topic is sustain of variety of retail formats in Czech market in connection with position small and medium sized trade firms in comparison with transnational trade chains. Independent trade firms face to much bigger competitors operating supermarkets and hypermarkets, namely not even in size of sales area, width and depth of the assortment but also in possibility of negotiation of more profitable trade conditions with their suppliers. Effort of these independent trade firms, which operate mostly just in local or maximally regional market, is then mutual co-operation in form of consumer co-operatives, associations, alliances and networks. These groupings then mainly through common trade negotiation and purchase get for much more advantageous delivery and payment conditions from their suppliers. Besides they can participate in mutual financing of using of promotion instruments. Partial aim of the paper is investigation of opinion and willingness of Czech trade alliances with FMCG to utilize the opportunity of mutual co-operation in common trade alliance. Next partial goal is identification of the factors affecting formation of joint co-operative grouping and its structure, eventually definition of entry conditions which should be fulfilled by individual members.The system approach will be used to realize the given objective. This approach appears as the most suitable in consideration of anticipated structure and character of supposed model. The result will be then proposal of model of mutual co-operation between individual trade alliances.

  18. Luminosity-Independent Measurement of the Proton-Proton Total Cross Section at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Antchev, G; Atanassov, I; Avati, V; Baechler, J.; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Bossini, E; Bozzo, M; Bottigli, U; Brucken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F S; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G; Covault, C; Csanad, M; Csorgo, T; Deile, M; Doubek, M; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferretti, R; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; Garcia, F; Giani, S; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hilden, T; Intonti, R A; Kavspar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrat, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, T; Lippmaa, E; Lokajivcek, M; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas-Rodriguez, F; Macri, M.; Maki, T; Mercadante, A; Minafra, N; Minutoli, S; Nemes, F; Niewiadomski, H; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Osterberg, K; Palazzi, P; Prochazka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Ruggiero, G; Saarikko, H; Santroni, A; Scribano, A; Smajek, J; Snoeys, W; Sziklai, J; Taylor, C; Turini, N; Vacek, V; Vitek, M; Welti, J; Whitmore, J; Wyszkowski, P

    2013-01-01

    TOTEM has measured the proton-proton total cross-section at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV using a luminosity independent method. In LHC fills with dedicated beam optics, the Roman Pots have been inserted very close to the beam allowing the detection of 90% of the nuclear elastic scattering events. Simultaneously the inelastic scattering rate has been measured by the T1 and T2 Telescopes. By applying the optical theorem, the total proton-proton cross-section of (101.7 $\\pm$ 2.9)mb is determined, well in agreement with the extrapolation from lower energies. This method allows also to derive the luminosity-independent elastic and inelastic cross-sections: $\\sigma_{el}$ = (27.1 $\\pm$ 1.4)mb; $\\sigma_{inel}$ = (74.7 $\\pm$ 1.7)mb.

  19. Luminosity-independent measurement of the proton-proton total cross section at √s=8 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Atanassov, I; Avati, V; Baechler, J; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Bossini, E; Bottigli, U; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F S; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G; Covault, C; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Deile, M; Doubek, M; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferretti, R; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; Garcia, F; Giani, S; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hilden, T; Intonti, R A; Kašpar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, T; Lippmaa, E; Lokajíček, M; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodríguez, F; Macrí, M; Mäki, T; Mercadante, A; Minafra, N; Minutoli, S; Nemes, F; Niewiadomski, H; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Palazzi, P; Procházka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Ruggiero, G; Saarikko, H; Santroni, A; Scribano, A; Smajek, J; Snoeys, W; Sziklai, J; Taylor, C; Turini, N; Vacek, V; Vítek, M; Welti, J; Whitmore, J; Wyszkowski, P

    2013-07-05

    The TOTEM collaboration has measured the proton-proton total cross section at √s=8 TeV using a luminosity-independent method. In LHC fills with dedicated beam optics, the Roman pots have been inserted very close to the beam allowing the detection of ~90% of the nuclear elastic scattering events. Simultaneously the inelastic scattering rate has been measured by the T1 and T2 telescopes. By applying the optical theorem, the total proton-proton cross section of (101.7±2.9) mb has been determined, well in agreement with the extrapolation from lower energies. This method also allows one to derive the luminosity-independent elastic and inelastic cross sections: σ(el)=(27.1±1.4) mb; σ(inel)=(74.7±1.7) mb.

  20. Using causal models to distinguish between neurogenesis-dependent and -independent effects on behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, Stanley E.

    2012-01-01

    There has been a substantial amount of research on the relationship between hippocampal neurogenesis and behaviour over the past 15 years, but the causal role that new neurons have on cognitive and affective behavioural tasks is still far from clear. This is partly due to the difficulty of manipulating levels of neurogenesis without inducing off-target effects, which might also influence behaviour. In addition, the analytical methods typically used do not directly test whether neurogenesis mediates the effect of an intervention on behaviour. Previous studies may have incorrectly attributed changes in behavioural performance to neurogenesis because the role of known (or unknown) neurogenesis-independent mechanisms was not formally taken into consideration during the analysis. Causal models can tease apart complex causal relationships and were used to demonstrate that the effect of exercise on pattern separation is via neurogenesis-independent mechanisms. Many studies in the neurogenesis literature would benefit from the use of statistical methods that can separate neurogenesis-dependent from neurogenesis-independent effects on behaviour. PMID:21957118

  1. Supervising Model of Independent Enterprise Group (Study of Community Development PT Badak NGL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermansyah Hermansyah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to arrange an empowerment model of enterprise group through the program of Community Development in order to be independent and ready to compete, which is begun from the empirical study of the success of Cipta Busana Cooperative.. This research uses the descriptive analysis by using a case study on one enterprise supervised by PT Badak NGL that is Koperasi Cipta Busana (Kocibu. Kocibu is chosen to be the object of research due to its success to achieve the target to be the independent supervised enterprise in the fourth year. The data analysis method used in this research is the explorative analysis. Based on the research, there are some results such as that Kocibu is one of the supervised Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises of PT Badak NGL that could develop and be independent through several supporting programs. Some of key successes of Kocibu are as follows: a high commitment, a good leader, and intensive supervising programs. Besides, a good marketing system also contributes to the key of success. There are some aspects that naturally contribute to the Kocibu improvement and emerge naturally as follows: the leader figure and the high commitment from the stakeholders. While, the aspects emerged by design are: the supervising and training programs, the evaluation, the determination of rules, and the business targets. Hopefully, after this research has been conducted, the aspects appeared naturaly would be realized so early that the success of the public empowerment program will be able to increase. 

  2. Rate-independent dissipation in phase-field modelling of displacive transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tůma, K.; Stupkiewicz, S.; Petryk, H.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, rate-independent dissipation is introduced into the phase-field framework for modelling of displacive transformations, such as martensitic phase transformation and twinning. The finite-strain phase-field model developed recently by the present authors is here extended beyond the limitations of purely viscous dissipation. The variational formulation, in which the evolution problem is formulated as a constrained minimization problem for a global rate-potential, is enhanced by including a mixed-type dissipation potential that combines viscous and rate-independent contributions. Effective computational treatment of the resulting incremental problem of non-smooth optimization is developed by employing the augmented Lagrangian method. It is demonstrated that a single Lagrange multiplier field suffices to handle the dissipation potential vertex and simultaneously to enforce physical constraints on the order parameter. In this way, the initially non-smooth problem of evolution is converted into a smooth stationarity problem. The model is implemented in a finite-element code and applied to solve two- and three-dimensional boundary value problems representative for shape memory alloys.

  3. Literature Reviews on Modeling Internal Geometry of Textile Composites and Rate-Independent Continuum Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su-Yuen, Hsu

    2011-01-01

    Textile composite materials have good potential for constructing composite structures where the effects of three-dimensional stresses are critical or geometric complexity is a manufacturing concern. There is a recent interest in advancing competence within Langley Research Center for modeling the degradation of mechanical properties of textile composites. In an initial effort, two critical areas are identified to pursue: (1) Construction of internal geometry of textile composites, and (2) Rate-independent continuum damage mechanics. This report documents reviews on the two subjects. Various reviewed approaches are categorized, their assumptions, methods, and progress are briefed, and then critiques are presented. Each review ends with recommended research.

  4. Laser shaft alignment measurement model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Chang-tao; Chen, Changzheng; Hou, Xiang-lin; Zhang, Guoyu

    2007-12-01

    Laser beam's track which is on photosensitive surface of the a receiver will be closed curve, when driving shaft and the driven shaft rotate with same angular velocity and rotation direction. The coordinate of arbitrary point which is on the curve is decided by the relative position of two shafts. Basing on the viewpoint, a mathematic model of laser alignment is set up. By using a data acquisition system and a data processing model of laser alignment meter with single laser beam and a detector, and basing on the installation parameter of computer, the state parameter between two shafts can be obtained by more complicated calculation and correction. The correcting data of the four under chassis of the adjusted apparatus moving on the level and the vertical plane can be calculated. This will instruct us to move the apparatus to align the shafts.

  5. Measuring outcomes of a pharmacist-run travel health clinic located in an independent community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Karl M; Dai, Chih-Wei; Garner, Brian; Law, Anandi V

    To describe the acceptance and refusal rates of travel-related vaccine and medication recommendations in a pharmacist-run travel health clinic, to evaluate the change in patient understanding of travel-related issues, to determine patient satisfaction with this clinic, and to determine factors influencing both patient acceptance and satisfaction. Southern California (Claremont) between July 2007 and October 2008. Hendricks Pharmacy is an independently owned community pharmacy that is part of the Good Neighbor Pharmacy Provider Network. The pharmacy offers a range of services including home delivery, compounding, and blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol screenings. Comprehensive pharmacist-run travel health clinic. Patient acceptance and refusal rates of pharmacist-made recommendations, changes in patient understanding of travel-related issues resulting from pharmacist counseling, and patient satisfaction with this travel health clinic. In a sample of 283 patients, overall patient acceptance of pharmacist-made recommendations was 84.7%. The primary reason for patient refusal of a recommendation was self-perceived low risk for infection. A subsample of patients (n = 82) completing a patient satisfaction survey found that 96% were satisfied with their overall visit. Patient satisfaction with the clinic and pharmacist services was correlated with overall patient acceptance. The high rate of patient acceptance and satisfaction with this clinic supports adoption of pharmacists as nontraditional providers of travel health services.

  6. Adaptive Kernel-density Independence Sampling based Monte Carlo Sampling (A-KISMCS) for inverse hydrological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, S.; Shafiei, M.

    2016-12-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods have been applied in many hydrologic studies to explore posterior parameter distributions within a Bayesian framework. Accurate estimation of posterior parameter distributions is key to reliably estimate marginal likelihood functions and hence to reliably estimate measures of Bayesian complexity. This paper introduces an alternative to well-known random walk based MCMC samplers. An Adaptive Kernel Density Independence Sampling based Monte Carlo Sampling (A-KISMCS) is proposed. A-KISMCS uses an independence sampler with Metropolis-Hastings (M-H) updates which ensures that candidate observations are drawn independently of the current state of a chain. This ensures efficient exploration of the target distribution. The bandwidth of the kernel density estimator is also adapted online in order to increase its accuracy and ensure fast convergence to a target distribution. The performance of A-KISMCS is tested on one several case studies, including synthetic and real world case studies of hydrological modelling and compared with Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM-zs), which is fundamentally based on random walk sampling with differential evolution. Results show that while DREAM-zs converges to slightly sharper posterior densities, A-KISMCS is slightly more efficient in tracking the mode of the posteriors.

  7. Gross genomic damage measured by DNA image cytometry independently predicts gastric cancer patient survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belien, J.A.M.; Buffart, T.E.; Gill, A.; Broeckaert, M.A.M.; Quirke, P.; Meijer, G.A.; Grabsch, H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: DNA aneuploidy reflects gross genomic changes. It can be measured by flow cytometry (FCM-DNA) or image cytometry (ICM-DNA). In gastric cancer, the prevalence of DNA aneuploidy has been reported to range from 27 to 100%, with conflicting associations with clinicopathological variables.

  8. Highly sparse representations from dictionaries are unique and independent of the sparseness measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribonval, Rémi; Nielsen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study sparse representations of signals from a general dictionary in a Banach space. For so-called localized frames in Hilbert spaces, the canonical frame coefficients are shown to provide a near sparsest expansion for several sparseness measures. However, for frames...

  9. Measurement error models, methods, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Buonaccorsi, John P

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, comprehensive strategies for treating measurement error in complex models and accounting for the use of extra data to estimate measurement error parameters have emerged. Focusing on both established and novel approaches, ""Measurement Error: Models, Methods, and Applications"" provides an overview of the main techniques and illustrates their application in various models. It describes the impacts of measurement errors on naive analyses that ignore them and presents ways to correct for them across a variety of statistical models, from simple one-sample problems to regres

  10. Sustainable fisheries in shallow lakes: an independent empirical test of the Chinese mitten crab yield model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haijun; Liang, Xiaomin; Wang, Hongzhu

    2017-07-01

    Next to excessive nutrient loading, intensive aquaculture is one of the major anthropogenic impacts threatening lake ecosystems. In China, particularly in the shallow lakes of mid-lower Changjiang (Yangtze) River, continuous overstocking of the Chinese mitten crab ( Eriocheir sinensis) could deteriorate water quality and exhaust natural resources. A series of crab yield models and a general optimum-stocking rate model have been established, which seek to benefit both crab culture and the environment. In this research, independent investigations were carried out to evaluate the crab yield models and modify the optimum-stocking model. Low percentage errors (average 47%, median 36%) between observed and calculated crab yields were obtained. Specific values were defined for adult crab body mass (135 g/ind.) and recapture rate (18% and 30% in lakes with submerged macrophyte biomass above and below 1 000 g/m2) to modify the optimum-stocking model. Analysis based on the modified optimum-stocking model indicated that the actual stocking rates in most lakes were much higher than the calculated optimum-stocking rates. This implies that, for most lakes, the current stocking rates should be greatly reduced to maintain healthy lake ecosystems.

  11. Cell-associated HIV DNA measured early during infection has prognostic value independent of serum HIV RNA measured concomitantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzenstein, Terese L; Oliveri, Roberto S; Benfield, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Using data from the Danish AIDS Cohort of HIV-infected homosexual men established in the 1980s, the prognostic value of early HIV DNA loads was evaluated. In addition to DNA measurements, concomitant serum HIV RNA levels, CD4 cell counts and CCR5 genotypes were determined. The patients were divided...

  12. Evidence in Support of the Independent Channel Model Describing the Sensorimotor Control of Human Stance Using a Humanoid Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantsje H. Pasma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Independent Channel (IC model is a commonly used linear balance control model in the frequency domain to analyze human balance control using system identification and parameter estimation. The IC model is a rudimentary and noise-free description of balance behavior in the frequency domain, where a stable model representation is not guaranteed. In this study, we conducted firstly time-domain simulations with added noise, and secondly robot experiments by implementing the IC model in a real-world robot (PostuRob II to test the validity and stability of the model in the time domain and for real world situations. Balance behavior of seven healthy participants was measured during upright stance by applying pseudorandom continuous support surface rotations. System identification and parameter estimation were used to describe the balance behavior with the IC model in the frequency domain. The IC model with the estimated parameters from human experiments was implemented in Simulink for computer simulations including noise in the time domain and robot experiments using the humanoid robot PostuRob II. Again, system identification and parameter estimation were used to describe the simulated balance behavior. Time series, Frequency Response Functions, and estimated parameters from human experiments, computer simulations, and robot experiments were compared with each other. The computer simulations showed similar balance behavior and estimated control parameters compared to the human experiments, in the time and frequency domain. Also, the IC model was able to control the humanoid robot by keeping it upright, but showed small differences compared to the human experiments in the time and frequency domain, especially at high frequencies. We conclude that the IC model, a descriptive model in the frequency domain, can imitate human balance behavior also in the time domain, both in computer simulations with added noise and real world situations with a

  13. An updated PREDICT breast cancer prognostication and treatment benefit prediction model with independent validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido Dos Reis, Francisco J; Wishart, Gordon C; Dicks, Ed M; Greenberg, David; Rashbass, Jem; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van den Broek, Alexandra J; Ellis, Ian O; Green, Andrew; Rakha, Emad; Maishman, Tom; Eccles, Diana M; Pharoah, Paul D P

    2017-05-22

    PREDICT is a breast cancer prognostic and treatment benefit model implemented online. The overall fit of the model has been good in multiple independent case series, but PREDICT has been shown to underestimate breast cancer specific mortality in women diagnosed under the age of 40. Another limitation is the use of discrete categories for tumour size and node status resulting in 'step' changes in risk estimates on moving between categories. We have refitted the PREDICT prognostic model using the original cohort of cases from East Anglia with updated survival time in order to take into account age at diagnosis and to smooth out the survival function for tumour size and node status. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to fit separate models for ER negative and ER positive disease. Continuous variables were fitted using fractional polynomials and a smoothed baseline hazard was obtained by regressing the baseline cumulative hazard for each patients against time using fractional polynomials. The fit of the prognostic models were then tested in three independent data sets that had also been used to validate the original version of PREDICT. In the model fitting data, after adjusting for other prognostic variables, there is an increase in risk of breast cancer specific mortality in younger and older patients with ER positive disease, with a substantial increase in risk for women diagnosed before the age of 35. In ER negative disease the risk increases slightly with age. The association between breast cancer specific mortality and both tumour size and number of positive nodes was non-linear with a more marked increase in risk with increasing size and increasing number of nodes in ER positive disease. The overall calibration and discrimination of the new version of PREDICT (v2) was good and comparable to that of the previous version in both model development and validation data sets. However, the calibration of v2 improved over v1 in patients diagnosed under the age

  14. Measurement of the total proANP product in mammals by processing independent analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Ingrid; Rehfeld, Jens Frederik; Gøtze, Jens Peter

    2011-01-01

    releases the assay epitope from the N-terminal region. The PIA was tested in elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure (n=450), in pigs with acute myocardial infarction (n=21), and in normal dogs and dogs with heart failure (n=77). The epitope specificity permitted reliable measurement in man, dog......, cat and pig. In human plasma, the PIA correlated well with an established proANP analysis (r=0.86, P...

  15. Independent power producer parallel operation modeling in transient network simulations for interconnected distributed generation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Fabricio A.M.; Camacho, Jose R. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, School of Electrical Engineering, Rural Electricity and Alternative Sources Lab, PO Box 593, 38400.902 Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Chaves, Marcelo L.R.; Guimaraes, Geraldo C. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, School of Electrical Engineering, Power Systems Dynamics Group, PO Box: 593, 38400.902 Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The main task in this paper is to present a performance analysis of a distribution network in the presence of an independent power producer (IP) synchronous generator with its speed governor and voltage regulator modeled using TACS -Transient Analysis of Control Systems, for distributed generation studies. Regulators were implemented through their transfer functions in the S domain. However, since ATP-EMTP (Electromagnetic Transient Program) works in the time domain, a discretization is necessary to return the TACS output to time domain. It must be highlighted that this generator is driven by a steam turbine, and the whole system with regulators and the equivalent of the power authority system at the common coupling point (CCP) are modeled in the ''ATP-EMTP -Alternative Transients Program''. (author)

  16. Strongest model-independent bound on the lifetime of Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Audren, Benjamin; Mangano, Gianpiero; Serpico, Pasquale Dario; Tram, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Dark Matter is essential for structure formation in the late Universe so it must be stable on cosmological time scales. But how stable exactly? Only assuming decays into relativistic particles, we report an otherwise model independent bound on the lifetime of Dark Matter using current cosmological data. Since these decays affect only the low-$\\ell$ multipoles of the CMB, the Dark Matter lifetime is expected to correlate with the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ as well as curvature $\\Omega_k$. We consider two models, including $r$ and $r+\\Omega_k$ respectively, versus data from Planck, WMAP, WiggleZ and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, with or without the BICEP2 data (if interpreted in terms of primordial gravitational waves). This results in a lower bound on the lifetime of CDM given by 160Gyr (without BICEP2) or 200Gyr (with BICEP2) at 95% confidence level.

  17. Creation of 3D Multi-Body Orthodontic Models by Using Independent Imaging Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Viviano Razionale

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the field of dental health care, plaster models combined with 2D radiographs are widely used in clinical practice for orthodontic diagnoses. However, complex malocclusions can be better analyzed by exploiting 3D digital dental models, which allow virtual simulations and treatment planning processes. In this paper, dental data captured by independent imaging sensors are fused to create multi-body orthodontic models composed of teeth, oral soft tissues and alveolar bone structures. The methodology is based on integrating Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT and surface structured light scanning. The optical scanner is used to reconstruct tooth crowns and soft tissues (visible surfaces through the digitalization of both patients’ mouth impressions and plaster casts. These data are also used to guide the segmentation of internal dental tissues by processing CBCT data sets. The 3D individual dental tissues obtained by the optical scanner and the CBCT sensor are fused within multi-body orthodontic models without human supervisions to identify target anatomical structures. The final multi-body models represent valuable virtual platforms to clinical diagnostic and treatment planning.

  18. Robust modeling of differential gene expression data using normal/independent distributions: a Bayesian approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ganjali

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of identifying differentially expressed genes under different conditions using gene expression microarray data, in the presence of outliers, is discussed. For this purpose, the robust modeling of gene expression data using some powerful distributions known as normal/independent distributions is considered. These distributions include the Student's t and normal distributions which have been used previously, but also include extensions such as the slash, the contaminated normal and the Laplace distributions. The purpose of this paper is to identify differentially expressed genes by considering these distributional assumptions instead of the normal distribution. A Bayesian approach using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method is adopted for parameter estimation. Two publicly available gene expression data sets are analyzed using the proposed approach. The use of the robust models for detecting differentially expressed genes is investigated. This investigation shows that the choice of model for differentiating gene expression data is very important. This is due to the small number of replicates for each gene and the existence of outlying data. Comparison of the performance of these models is made using different statistical criteria and the ROC curve. The method is illustrated using some simulation studies. We demonstrate the flexibility of these robust models in identifying differentially expressed genes.

  19. Creation of 3D multi-body orthodontic models by using independent imaging sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Sandro; Paoli, Alessandro; Razionale, Armando Viviano

    2013-02-05

    In the field of dental health care, plaster models combined with 2D radiographs are widely used in clinical practice for orthodontic diagnoses. However, complex malocclusions can be better analyzed by exploiting 3D digital dental models, which allow virtual simulations and treatment planning processes. In this paper, dental data captured by independent imaging sensors are fused to create multi-body orthodontic models composed of teeth, oral soft tissues and alveolar bone structures. The methodology is based on integrating Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and surface structured light scanning. The optical scanner is used to reconstruct tooth crowns and soft tissues (visible surfaces) through the digitalization of both patients' mouth impressions and plaster casts. These data are also used to guide the segmentation of internal dental tissues by processing CBCT data sets. The 3D individual dental tissues obtained by the optical scanner and the CBCT sensor are fused within multi-body orthodontic models without human supervisions to identify target anatomical structures. The final multi-body models represent valuable virtual platforms to clinical diagnostic and treatment planning.

  20. Composition-independent mean temperature measurements in laminar diffusion flames using spectral lineshape information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenak, D.; Narayanaswamy, V.

    2017-10-01

    Temperature is an important thermochemical property in combusting flows that holds the key to uncovering pollutant formation, flame extinction, and heat release. In a practical combustion environment, the local composition is typically unknown, which hinders the effectiveness of many traditional non-intrusive thermometry techniques. This study aims to offset this limitation by developing a laser-based thermometry technique that does not require prior knowledge of the local composition. Two methods for obtaining temperature are demonstrated in this work, both of which make use of the spectral line broadening of an absorbing species (krypton) seeded into the flow. In the first method, the local Doppler broadening is extracted from an excitation scan to yield the corresponding temperature, while the second method utilizes compositional scaling information of the collisional broadening and collisional shift to determine the temperature. Both methods are demonstrated by measuring the radial temperature profile of a steady laminar CH4/N2 diffusion flame with an air co-flow. The accuracy of the temperature measurements obtained using both methods are evaluated using corresponding temperature profiles determined from computational simulations.

  1. Measurement control program at model facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    A measurement control program for the model plant is described. The discussion includes the technical basis for such a program, the application of measurement control principles to each measurement, and the use of special experiments to estimate measurement error parameters for difficult-to-measure materials. The discussion also describes the statistical aspects of the program, and the documentation procedures used to record, maintain, and process the basic data

  2. Cluster Morphologies and Model-independent Y SZ Estimates from Bolocam Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, J.; Golwala, S. R.; Ameglio, S.; Pierpaoli, E.

    2011-02-01

    We present initial results from our ongoing program to image the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in galaxy clusters at 143 GHz using Bolocam; five clusters and one blank field are described in this manuscript. The images have a resolution of 58 arcsec and a radius of sime6-7 arcmin, which is approximately r 500-2r 500 for these clusters. We effectively high-pass filter our data in order to subtract noise sourced by atmospheric fluctuations, but we are able to obtain unbiased images of the clusters by deconvolving the effects of this filter. The beam-smoothed rms is sime10 μKCMB in these images; with this sensitivity, we are able to detect the SZ signal to beyond r 500 in binned radial profiles. We have fit our images to beta and Nagai models, fixing spherical symmetry or allowing for ellipticity in the plane of the sky, and we find that the best-fit parameter values are in general consistent with those obtained from other X-ray and SZ data. Our data show no clear preference for the Nagai model or the beta model due to the limited spatial dynamic range of our images. However, our data show a definitive preference for elliptical models over spherical models, quantified by an F ratio of sime20 for the two models. The weighted mean ellipticity of the five clusters is epsilon = 0.27 ± 0.03, consistent with results from X-ray data. Additionally, we obtain model-independent estimates of Y 500, the integrated SZ y-parameter over the cluster face to a radius of r 500, with systematics-dominated uncertainties of sime10%. Our Y 500 values, which are free from the biases associated with model-derived Y 500 values, scale with cluster mass in a way that is consistent with both self-similar predictions and expectations of a sime10% intrinsic scatter.

  3. Measurement of α-particle quenching in LAB based scintillator in independent small-scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krosigk, B. von [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Chen, M.; Liu, X.; Wright, A. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Hans, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Bronx Community College, Bronx, NY (United States); Junghans, A.R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Koegler, T. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kraus, C. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON (Canada); Kuckert, L. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Nolte, R. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); O' Keeffe, H.M. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Lancaster University, Physics Department, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Tseung, H.W.C. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, Seattle, WA (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rochester, MN (United States); Wilson, J.R. [Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Yeh, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    The α-particle light response of liquid scintillators based on linear alkylbenzene (LAB) has been measured with three different experimental approaches. In the first approach, α-particles were produced in the scintillator via {sup 12}C(n,α){sup 9}Be reactions. In the second approach, the scintillator was loaded with 2 % of {sup nat}Sm providing an α-emitter, {sup 147}Sm, as an internal source. In the third approach, a scintillator flask was deployed into the water-filled SNO+ detector and the radioactive contaminants {sup 222}Rn, {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po provided the α-particle signal. The behavior of the observed α-particle light outputs are in agreement with each case successfully described by Birks' law. The resulting Birks parameter kB ranges from (0.0066 ± 0.0016) to (0.0076 ± 0.0003) cm/MeV. In the first approach, the α-particle light response was measured simultaneously with the light response of recoil protons produced via neutron- proton elastic scattering. This enabled a first time a direct comparison of kB describing the proton and the α-particle response of LAB based scintillator. The observed kB values describing the two light response functions deviate by more than 5σ. The presented results are valuable for all current and future detectors, using LAB based scintillator as target, since they depend on an accurate knowledge of the scintillator response to different particles. (orig.)

  4. Security Analysis of Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution in Collective-Rotation Noisy Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Zhang, Yu; Wen, Shuang; Li, Lei-lei; Li, Jian

    2018-01-01

    Noise is a problem that communication channels cannot avoid. It is, thus, beneficial to analyze the security of MDI-QKD in noisy environment. An analysis model for collective-rotation noise is introduced, and the information theory methods are used to analyze the security of the protocol. The maximum amount of information that Eve can eavesdrop is 50%, and the eavesdropping can always be detected if the noise level ɛ ≤ 0.68. Therefore, MDI-QKD protocol is secure as quantum key distribution protocol. The maximum probability that the relay outputs successful results is 16% when existing eavesdropping. Moreover, the probability that the relay outputs successful results when existing eavesdropping is higher than the situation without eavesdropping. The paper validates that MDI-QKD protocol has better robustness.

  5. American = Independent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Hazel Rose

    2017-09-01

    U.S. American cultures and psyches reflect and promote independence. Devos and Banaji (2005) asked, does American equal White? This article asks, does American equal independent? The answer is that when compared to people in East Asian or South Asian contexts, people in American contexts tend to show an independent psychological signature-a sense of self as individual, separate, influencing others and the world, free from influence, and equal to, if not better than, others (Markus & Conner, 2013). Independence is a reasonable description of the selves of people in the White, middle-class American mainstream. Yet it is a less good characterization of the selves of the majority of Americans who are working-class and/or people of color. A cultural psychological approach reveals that much of North American psychology is still grounded in an independent model of the self and, as such, neglects social contexts and the psychologies of a majority of Americans. Given the prominence of independence in American ideas and institutions, the interdependent tendencies that arise from intersections of national culture with social class, race, and ethnicity go unrecognized and are often misunderstood and stigmatized. This unseen clash of independence and interdependence is a significant factor in many challenges, including those of education, employment, health, immigration, criminal justice, and political polarization.

  6. Antiallodynic Effect of Pregabalin in Rat Models of Sympathetically Maintained and Sympathetic Independent Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong Woo; Kweon, Tae Dong; Lee, Jong Seok

    2007-01-01

    Pregabalin binds to the voltage-dependent calcium channel α2δ subunit and modulates the release of neurotransmitters, resulting in analgesic effects on neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain has both sympathetically maintained pain (SMP) and sympathetic independent pain (SIP) components. We studied the antiallodynic effects of pregabalin on tactile allodynia (TA) and cold allodynia (CA) in SMP-and SIP-dominant neuropathic pain models. Allodynia was induced by ligation of the L5 & L6 spinal nerves (SMP model) or by transection of the tibial and sural nerves (SIP model) in rats. For intrathecal drug administration, a PE-10 catheter was implanted through the atlantooccipital membrane to the lumbar enlargement. Pregabalin was administered either intraperitoneally (IP) or intrathecally (IT) and dosed up incrementally until an antiallodynic effect without sedation or motor impairment was apparent. TA was assessed using von Frey filaments, and CA was assessed using acetone drops. IP-administered pregabalin dose-dependently attenuated TA in both models and CA in the SMP model, but not CA in the SIP model. IT-administered pregabalin dose-dependently attenuated both TA and CA in both models. However, the dose response curve of IT-administered pregabalin in SMP was shifted to left from that of SIP and the ED50 of IT-administered pregabalin for CA in SMP was about 900 times less than that in SIP. These findings suggest that pregabalin exerts its antiallodynic effect mainly by acting at the spinal cord, and that IT-administered pregabalin has more potent antiallodynic effects in SMP. The α2δ subunit might be less involved in the CA in SIP. PMID:17326244

  7. Standard Model measurements with the ATLAS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassani Samira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various Standard Model measurements have been performed in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 and 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. A review of a selection of the latest results of electroweak measurements, W/Z production in association with jets, jet physics and soft QCD is given. Measurements are in general found to be well described by the Standard Model predictions.

  8. Calibration and measurement of {sup 210}Pb using two independent techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, M. [Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion, CITIUS, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 4B, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: mvilla@us.es; Hurtado, S. [Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion, CITIUS, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 4B, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Manjon, G.; Garcia-Tenorio, R. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, E.T.S. Arquitectura, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    An experimental procedure has been developed for a rapid and accurate determination of the activity concentration of {sup 210}Pb in sediments by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Additionally, an alternative technique using {gamma}-spectrometry and Monte Carlo simulation has been developed. A radiochemical procedure, based on radium and barium sulphates co-precipitation have been applied to isolate the Pb-isotopes. {sup 210}Pb activity measurements were done in a low background scintillation spectrometer Quantulus 1220. A calibration of the liquid scintillation spectrometer, including its {alpha}/{beta} discrimination system, has been made, in order to minimize background and, additionally, some improvements are suggested for the calculation of the {sup 210}Pb activity concentration, taking into account that {sup 210}Pb counting efficiency cannot be accurately determined. Therefore, the use of an effective radiochemical yield, which can be empirically evaluated, is proposed. {sup 210}Pb activity concentration in riverbed sediments from an area affected by NORM wastes has been determined using both the proposed method. Results using {gamma}-spectrometry and LSC are compared to the results obtained following indirect {alpha}-spectrometry ({sup 210}Po) method.

  9. Measurement Model Specification Error in LISREL Structural Equation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Beatrice; Lomax, Richard

    This LISREL study examines the robustness of the maximum likelihood estimates under varying degrees of measurement model misspecification. A true model containing five latent variables (two endogenous and three exogenous) and two indicator variables per latent variable was used. Measurement model misspecification considered included errors of…

  10. MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2)-dependent and independent models of blister formation in pemphigus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuming; Li, Hong; Sano, Yasuyo; Gaestel, Matthias; Park, Jin Mo; Payne, Aimee S.

    2013-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune blistering disease characterized by autoantibodies to the keratinocyte adhesion protein desmoglein (Dsg) 3. Previous studies suggest that PV pathogenesis involves p38 mitogen activated protein kinase-dependent and -independent pathways. However, p38 is a difficult protein to study and therapeutically target because it has four isoforms and multiple downstream effectors. In the current study, we identify MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2) as a downstream effector of p38 signaling in PV and describe MK2-dependent and -independent mechanisms of blister formation using passive transfer of human anti-Dsg IgG4 mAbs to neonatal mice. In human keratinocytes, PV mAbs activate MK2 in a dose-dependent manner. MK2 is also activated in human pemphigus skin blisters, causing translocation of MK2 from the nucleus to the cytosol. Small molecule inhibition of MK2 and silencing of MK2 expression block PV mAb-induced Dsg3 endocytosis in human keratinocytes. Additionally, small molecule inhibition and genetic deletion of p38α and MK2 inhibit spontaneous, but not induced, suprabasal blisters by PV mAbs in mouse passive transfer models. Collectively, these data suggest that MK2 is a key downstream effector of p38 that can modulate PV autoantibody pathogenicity. MK2 inhibition may be a valuable adjunctive therapy for control of pemphigus blistering. PMID:23657501

  11. Vascular dynamics aid a coupled neurovascular network learn sparse independent features: A computational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Thomas Philips

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vascular dynamics are generally thought to be controlled by neural activity in a unidirectional fashion. However, both computational modeling and experimental evidence point to the feedback effects of vascular dynamics on neural activity. Vascular feedback in the form of glucose and oxygen controls neuronal ATP, either directly or via the agency of astrocytes, which in turn modulates neural firing. Recently, a detailed model of the neuron-astrocyte-vessel system has shown how vasomotion can modulate neural firing. Similarly, arguing from known cerebrovascular physiology, an approach known as `hemoneural hypothesis' postulates functional modulation of neural activity by vascular feedback. To instantiate this perspective, we present a computational model in which a network of `vascular units' supplies energy to a neural network. The complex dynamics of the vascular network, modeled by a network of oscillators, turns neurons ON and OFF randomly. The informational consequence of such dynamics is explored in the context of an auto-encoder network. In the proposed model, each vascular unit supplies energy to a subset of hidden neurons of an autoencoder network, which constitutes its `projective field'. Neurons that receive adequate energy in a given trial have reduced threshold, and thus are prone to fire. Dynamics of the vascular network are governed by changes in the reconstruction error of the auto-encoder network, interpreted as the neuronal demand. Vascular feedback causes random inactivation of a subset of hidden neurons in every trial. We observe that, under conditions of desynchronized vascular dynamics, the output reconstruction error is low and the feature vectors learnt are sparse and independent. Our earlier modeling study highlighted the link between desynchronized vascular dynamics and efficient energy delivery in skeletal muscle. We now show that desynchronized vascular dynamics leads to efficient training in an auto

  12. Vascular Dynamics Aid a Coupled Neurovascular Network Learn Sparse Independent Features: A Computational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Ryan T; Chhabria, Karishma; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vascular dynamics are generally thought to be controlled by neural activity in a unidirectional fashion. However, both computational modeling and experimental evidence point to the feedback effects of vascular dynamics on neural activity. Vascular feedback in the form of glucose and oxygen controls neuronal ATP, either directly or via the agency of astrocytes, which in turn modulates neural firing. Recently, a detailed model of the neuron-astrocyte-vessel system has shown how vasomotion can modulate neural firing. Similarly, arguing from known cerebrovascular physiology, an approach known as "hemoneural hypothesis" postulates functional modulation of neural activity by vascular feedback. To instantiate this perspective, we present a computational model in which a network of "vascular units" supplies energy to a neural network. The complex dynamics of the vascular network, modeled by a network of oscillators, turns neurons ON and OFF randomly. The informational consequence of such dynamics is explored in the context of an auto-encoder network. In the proposed model, each vascular unit supplies energy to a subset of hidden neurons of an autoencoder network, which constitutes its "projective field." Neurons that receive adequate energy in a given trial have reduced threshold, and thus are prone to fire. Dynamics of the vascular network are governed by changes in the reconstruction error of the auto-encoder network, interpreted as the neuronal demand. Vascular feedback causes random inactivation of a subset of hidden neurons in every trial. We observe that, under conditions of desynchronized vascular dynamics, the output reconstruction error is low and the feature vectors learnt are sparse and independent. Our earlier modeling study highlighted the link between desynchronized vascular dynamics and efficient energy delivery in skeletal muscle. We now show that desynchronized vascular dynamics leads to efficient training in an auto-encoder neural network.

  13. PTEN phosphatase-independent maintenance of glandular morphology in a predictive colorectal cancer model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagan, Ishaan C; Deevi, Ravi K; Fatehullah, Aliya; Topley, Rebecca; Eves, Joshua; Stevenson, Michael; Loughrey, Maurice; Arthur, Kenneth; Campbell, Frederick Charles

    2013-11-01

    Organotypic models may provide mechanistic insight into colorectal cancer (CRC) morphology. Three-dimensional (3D) colorectal gland formation is regulated by phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) coupling of cell division cycle 42 (cdc42) to atypical protein kinase C (aPKC). This study investigated PTEN phosphatase-dependent and phosphatase-independent morphogenic functions in 3D models and assessed translational relevance in human studies. Isogenic PTEN-expressing or PTEN-deficient 3D colorectal cultures were used. In translational studies, apical aPKC activity readout was assessed against apical membrane (AM) orientation and gland morphology in 3D models and human CRC. We found that catalytically active or inactive PTEN constructs containing an intact C2 domain enhanced cdc42 activity, whereas mutants of the C2 domain calcium binding region 3 membrane-binding loop (M-CBR3) were ineffective. The isolated PTEN C2 domain (C2) accumulated in membrane fractions, but C2 M-CBR3 remained in cytosol. Transfection of C2 but not C2 M-CBR3 rescued defective AM orientation and 3D morphogenesis of PTEN-deficient Caco-2 cultures. The signal intensity of apical phospho-aPKC correlated with that of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF-1) in the 3D model. Apical NHERF-1 intensity thus provided readout of apical aPKC activity and associated with glandular morphology in the model system and human colon. Low apical NHERF-1 intensity in CRC associated with disruption of glandular architecture, high cancer grade, and metastatic dissemination. We conclude that the membrane-binding function of the catalytically inert PTEN C2 domain influences cdc42/aPKC-dependent AM dynamics and gland formation in a highly relevant 3D CRC morphogenesis model system.

  14. PTEN Phosphatase-Independent Maintenance of Glandular Morphology in a Predictive Colorectal Cancer Model System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishaan C. Jagan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Organotypic models may provide mechanistic insight into colorectal cancer (CRC morphology. Three-dimensional (3D colorectal gland formation is regulated by phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN coupling of cell division cycle 42 (cdc42 to atypical protein kinase C (aPKC. This study investigated PTEN phosphatase-dependent and phosphatase-independent morphogenic functions in 3D models and assessed translational relevance in human studies. Isogenic PTEN-expressing or PTEN-deficient 3D colorectal cultures were used. In translational studies, apical aPKC activity readout was assessed against apical membrane (AM orientation and gland morphology in 3D models and human CRC. We found that catalytically active or inactive PTEN constructs containing an intact C2 domain enhanced cdc42 activity, whereas mutants of the C2 domain calcium binding region 3 membrane-binding loop (M-CBR3 were ineffective. The isolated PTEN C2 domain (C2 accumulated in membrane fractions, but C2 M-CBR3 remained in cytosol. Transfection of C2 but not C2 M-CBR3 rescued defective AM orientation and 3D morphogenesis of PTEN-deficient Caco-2 cultures. The signal intensity of apical phospho-aPKC correlated with that of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF-1 in the 3D model. Apical NHERF-1 intensity thus provided readout of apical aPKC activity and associated with glandular morphology in the model system and human colon. Low apical NHERF-1 intensity in CRC associated with disruption of glandular architecture, high cancer grade, and metastatic dissemination. We conclude that the membrane-binding function of the catalytically inert PTEN C2 domain influences cdc42/aPKC-dependent AM dynamics and gland formation in a highly relevant 3D CRC morphogenesis model system.

  15. Model-independent tracking of criticality signals in nuclear multifragmentation date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankland, J.D.; Chbihi, A.

    2003-01-01

    We study multifragment production in central heavy-ion collisions using model-independent universal fluctuations theory and a wide range of INDRA data for central collisions of symmetric systems of total mass A: 75 - 400 at bombarding energies from 25 to 100 MeV/nucleon. We find evidence for two different regimes at low and high incident energies, respectively, defined by the fluctuation scaling properties of the largest fragment in each event, Z(max), which plays the role of an order parameter. Data for a wide range of system masses and incident energies collapse on to an approximately universal scaling function in each regime. The form of the scaling functions is established, and their dependence on total system mass and bombarding energy is mapped out. (authors)

  16. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume V. Code documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M L; Allen, B J; Lutz, M S; Gale, J E; O& #x27; Hara, N E; Wood, R K

    1978-07-01

    This volume is a description of the Project Independence Evaluation System as a computer system. It is intended for readers wanting a basic understanding of the computer implementation of PIES rather than an understanding of the modeling methodology. It can assist those who wish to run PIES on the EIA computer facility or to use PIES on their own facilities, or to analyze the PIES computer processing. The document contains: an overview of the computer implementation; a description of the data and naming conventions used in PIES; a functional description of PIES data processing; PIES hardware and software requirements; and an operational description of the PIES processing flow. This overview defines the scope of PIES in this report and thus governs the computer system descriptions that follow. It also provides an historical view of the development of PIES.

  17. Impulse-response function of splanchnic circulation with model-independent constraints: theory and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, O L; Keiding, S; Bass, L

    2003-01-01

    Modeling physiological processes using tracer kinetic methods requires knowledge of the time course of the tracer concentration in blood supplying the organ. For liver studies, however, inaccessibility of the portal vein makes direct measurement of the hepatic dual-input function impossible in hu...

  18. Radio propagation measurement and channel modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Salous, Sana

    2013-01-01

    While there are numerous books describing modern wireless communication systems that contain overviews of radio propagation and radio channel modelling, there are none that contain detailed information on the design, implementation and calibration of radio channel measurement equipment, the planning of experiments and the in depth analysis of measured data. The book would begin with an explanation of the fundamentals of radio wave propagation and progress through a series of topics, including the measurement of radio channel characteristics, radio channel sounders, measurement strategies

  19. Reliability and Validity of the Floor Transfer Test as a Measure of Readiness for Independent Living Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardali, Gunay; Brody, Lori T; States, Rebecca A; Godwin, Ellen M

    2017-10-20

    The ability to get up from the floor after a fall is a basic skill required for functional independence. Consequently, the inability to safely get down and up from the floor or to perform a floor transfer (FT) may indicate decreased mobility and/or increased frailty. A reliable and valid test of FT ability is a critical part of the clinical decision-making process. The FT test is a simple, performance-based test that can be administered quickly and easily to determine a patient's ability to safely and successfully get down and up from the floor using any movement strategy and without time restriction. The primary purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the intrarater reliability and validity of the FT test as a practical alternative to several widely used yet time-consuming measures of physical disability, frailty, and functional mobility. A total of 61 community-dwelling older adults (65-96 years of age) participated in the study divided into 2 separate subsamples: 15 of them in the intrarater reliability part, while the other 46 in the concurrent validity one. In both subsamples, the participants were stratified on the basis of the self-reported levels of FT ability as independent, assisted, and dependent. Intrarater reliability was assessed in 2 separate occasions and scores were analyzed by intraclass correlation coefficient and κ statistics. Concurrent validity of the FT test was assessed against the self-reported FT ability questionnaire, Physical Functioning Scale, Phenotype of Physical Frailty, and the Short Physical Performance Battery. Known-groups validity was tested by determining whether the FT test distinguished between (1) community-dwelling older adults with physical disabilities versus those who without physical disabilities; and (2) community-dwelling older adults who were functionally dependent versus those who were independent. Participants were also categorized on the basis of FT test outcome as independent, assisted, or

  20. Towards a product independent ERP training model: An Insight from a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Motahar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ERP can be called as one of the most significant contributions of computer science and particularly information systems for the business environment which can support all complicated business process of an organisation including sale, purchase, warehouse and manufacturing into a single database. For such complex system like ERP, implementation involves much collaboration which raises the concern of the success of the project. Among most significant success and failure factors of ERP implementation cited in the literature are training and consultation. For many years the majority of ERP vendors promote their product specific training models as long-term and expensive allowing the organisation to gain knowledge of the ERP system and the way it handles the business process. However, recent studies showed that ERP training can be conducted in the short term and with minimum investment and yet to be effective. Findings triggered a signal and opened a new door for research to investigate vendor-independent training models that require limited investment in training and consultancy. This paper aims to provide an overview of the literature; highlighting the research methods and theories used by authors towards building ERP training models and methods.

  1. Influence maximization in social networks under an independent cascade-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiyao; Jin, Yuehui; Lin, Zhen; Cheng, Shiduan; Yang, Tan

    2016-02-01

    The rapid growth of online social networks is important for viral marketing. Influence maximization refers to the process of finding influential users who make the most of information or product adoption. An independent cascade-based model for influence maximization, called IMIC-OC, was proposed to calculate positive influence. We assumed that influential users spread positive opinions. At the beginning, users held positive or negative opinions as their initial opinions. When more users became involved in the discussions, users balanced their own opinions and those of their neighbors. The number of users who did not change positive opinions was used to determine positive influence. Corresponding influential users who had maximum positive influence were then obtained. Experiments were conducted on three real networks, namely, Facebook, HEP-PH and Epinions, to calculate maximum positive influence based on the IMIC-OC model and two other baseline methods. The proposed model resulted in larger positive influence, thus indicating better performance compared with the baseline methods.

  2. Indoor MIMO Channel Measurement and Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Andersen, Jørgen Bach

    2005-01-01

    Forming accurate models of the multiple input multiple output (MIMO) channel is essential both for simulation as well as understanding of the basic properties of the channel. This paper investigates different known models using measurements obtained with a 16x32 MIMO channel sounder for the 5.8GHz...... band. The measurements were carried out in various indoor scenarios including both temporal and spatial aspects of channel changes. The models considered include the so-called Kronecker model, a model proposed by Weichselberger et. al., and a model involving the full covariance matrix, the most...... accurate model for Gaussian channels. For each of the environments different sizes of both the transmitter and receiver antenna arrays are investigated, 2x2 up to 16x32. Generally it was found that in terms of capacity cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) all models fit well for small array sizes...

  3. Nonlinear Growth Models as Measurement Models: A Second-Order Growth Curve Model for Measuring Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeish, Daniel; Dumas, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Recent methodological work has highlighted the promise of nonlinear growth models for addressing substantive questions in the behavioral sciences. In this article, we outline a second-order nonlinear growth model in order to measure a critical notion in development and education: potential. Here, potential is conceptualized as having three components-ability, capacity, and availability-where ability is the amount of skill a student is estimated to have at a given timepoint, capacity is the maximum amount of ability a student is predicted to be able to develop asymptotically, and availability is the difference between capacity and ability at any particular timepoint. We argue that single timepoint measures are typically insufficient for discerning information about potential, and we therefore describe a general framework that incorporates a growth model into the measurement model to capture these three components. Then, we provide an illustrative example using the public-use Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten data set using a Michaelis-Menten growth function (reparameterized from its common application in biochemistry) to demonstrate our proposed model as applied to measuring potential within an educational context. The advantage of this approach compared to currently utilized methods is discussed as are future directions and limitations.

  4. A comparison of the Barthel Index and the Functional Independence Measure as outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation: patterns of disability scale usage in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Harpreet; Lipson, David; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine; Bhogal, Sanjit; Pohani, Gina; Teasell, Robert W

    2005-06-01

    In order to compare the frequency and patterns of use of the Barthel Index (BI) and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) in stroke rehabilitation trials, all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of stroke rehabilitation published between 1968 and 2002 were identified and reviewed to determine the frequency with which the BI and FIM measures were used relative to other measures of disability. The date and location of each study citing either the FIM or the BI were also recorded. Studies were assigned ratings of methodological quality based on the physiotherapy evidence database (PEDro) scoring system. Comparisons of the age, frequency and continents of origin and methodological quality of the studies were explored. Results indicate that the BI and FIM were the most common measures of disability used in RCTs examining stroke rehabilitation. However, the BI was used more often than the FIM (n=86, Pscale use in stroke rehabilitation research.

  5. Model SH intelligent instrument for thickness measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Juntao; Jia Weizhuang; Zhao Yunlong

    1995-01-01

    The authors introduce Model SH Intelligent Instrument for thickness measuring by using principle of beta back-scattering and its application range, features, principle of operation, system design, calibration and specifications

  6. Defining ATM-Independent Functions of the Mre11 Complex with a Novel Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Alessia; Nicolas, Laura; Yang-Lott, Katherine; Guryanova, Olga A; Levine, Ross L; Bassing, Craig H; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Petrini, John H J

    2016-02-01

    The Mre11 complex (Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1) occupies a central node of the DNA damage response (DDR) network and is required for ATM activation in response to DNA damage. Hypomorphic alleles of MRE11 and NBS1 confer embryonic lethality in ATM-deficient mice, indicating that the complex exerts ATM-independent functions that are essential when ATM is absent. To delineate those functions, a conditional ATM allele (ATM(flox)) was crossed to hypomorphic NBS1 mutants (Nbs1(ΔB/ΔB) mice). Nbs1(ΔB/ΔB) Atm(-/-) hematopoietic cells derived by crossing to vav(cre) were viable in vivo. Nbs1(ΔB/ΔB) Atm(-/-) (VAV) mice exhibited a pronounced defect in double-strand break repair and completely penetrant early onset lymphomagenesis. In addition to repair defects observed, fragile site instability was noted, indicating that the Mre11 complex promotes genome stability upon replication stress in vivo. The data suggest combined influences of the Mre11 complex on DNA repair, as well as the responses to DNA damage and DNA replication stress. A novel mouse model was developed, by combining a vav(cre)-inducible ATM knockout mouse with an NBS1 hypomorphic mutation, to analyze ATM-independent functions of the Mre11 complex in vivo. These data show that the DNA repair, rather than DDR signaling functions of the complex, is acutely required in the context of ATM deficiency to suppress genome instability and lymphomagenesis. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Model-independent partial wave analysis using a massively-parallel fitting framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L.; Aoude, R.; dos Reis, A. C.; Sokoloff, M.

    2017-10-01

    The functionality of GooFit, a GPU-friendly framework for doing maximum-likelihood fits, has been extended to extract model-independent {\\mathscr{S}}-wave amplitudes in three-body decays such as D + → h + h + h ‑. A full amplitude analysis is done where the magnitudes and phases of the {\\mathscr{S}}-wave amplitudes are anchored at a finite number of m 2(h + h ‑) control points, and a cubic spline is used to interpolate between these points. The amplitudes for {\\mathscr{P}}-wave and {\\mathscr{D}}-wave intermediate states are modeled as spin-dependent Breit-Wigner resonances. GooFit uses the Thrust library, with a CUDA backend for NVIDIA GPUs and an OpenMP backend for threads with conventional CPUs. Performance on a variety of platforms is compared. Executing on systems with GPUs is typically a few hundred times faster than executing the same algorithm on a single CPU.

  8. Security of Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution in the Bounded-Quantum-Storage Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pironio

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Device-independent quantum key distribution (DIQKD is a formalism that supersedes traditional quantum key distribution, as its security does not rely on any detailed modeling of the internal working of the devices. This strong form of security is only possible using devices producing correlations that violate a Bell inequality. Full security proofs of DIQKD have recently been reported, but they tolerate zero or small amounts of noise and are restricted to protocols based on specific Bell inequalities. Here, we provide a security proof of DIQKD that is both more efficient and noise resistant, and also more general, as it applies to protocols based on arbitrary Bell inequalities and can be adapted to cover supraquantum eavesdroppers limited by the no-signaling principle only. It is formulated, however, in the bounded-quantum-storage model, where an upper bound on the adversary’s quantum memory is a priori known. This condition is not a limitation at present, since the best existing quantum memories have very short coherence times.

  9. Smart Kinesthetic Measurement Model in Dance Composision

    OpenAIRE

    Triana, Dinny Devi

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to discover a model of assessment that could measure kinesthetic intelligence in arranging a dance from several related variable, both direct variable and indirect variable. The research method used was a qualitative method using path analysis to determine the direct and indirect variable; therefore, the dominant variable that supported the measurement model of kinesthetic intelligence in arranging dance could be discovered. The population used was the students of the art ...

  10. A Capacity-Restraint Transit Assignment Model When a Predetermination Method Indicates the Invalidity of Time Independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyang Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The statistical independence of time of every two adjacent bus links plays a crucial role in deciding the feasibility of using many mathematical models to analyze urban transit networks. Traditional research generally ignores the time independence that acts as the ground of their models. Assumption is usually made that time independence of every two adjacent links is sound. This is, however, actually groundless and probably causes problematic conclusions reached by corresponding models. Many transit assignment models such as multinomial probit-based models lose their effects when the time independence is not valid. In this paper, a simple method to predetermine the time independence is proposed. Based on the predetermination method, a modified capacity-restraint transit assignment method aimed at engineering practice is put forward and tested through a small contrived network and a case study in Nanjing city, China, respectively. It is found that the slope of regression equation between the mean and standard deviation of normal distribution acts as the indicator of time independence at the same time. Besides, our modified assignment method performs better than the traditional one with more reasonable results while keeping the property of simplicity well.

  11. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  12. Independent modelling in SSM's licensing review of a spent nuclear fuel repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Shulan; Dverstorp, Bjoern; Norden, Maria

    2014-01-01

    inconsistency between the documents and the actual modelling performed in SKB's dose assessment, QA problems in the consequence analyses, and insufficient justification of assumptions. We can already now conclude that independent regulatory modelling combined with traditional document review is an effective way to enhance the authority's licensing review process. SSM communicated the results from the initial review phase on the 29 October 2012 by handing in a written statement to the Land and Environment Court and SKB. SKB has also been informed of the results of SSM's independent modelling through SSM's request for complementary information. In the main review phase, to follow, we plan to continue with reproduction of selected 'What if?' and 'residual' scenarios as well as 'barrier function' scenarios that were not covered in the initial review phase. Moreover, to further investigate uncertainty in the calculated LDF values we plan to perform some alternative modelling, i.e. simpler 'reference biosphere' modelling with the objective of exploring the uncertainty of various properties of SKB's biosphere objects, including their evolution in time. Further, the details of the derivations of the probabilities of canister failure scenarios, which are beyond scope of this paper, will be handled in the in-depth review of the main review phase. (authors)

  13. Uniform California earthquake rupture forecast, version 3 (UCERF3): the time-independent model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Edward H.; Biasi, Glenn P.; Bird, Peter; Dawson, Timothy E.; Felzer, Karen R.; Jackson, David D.; Johnson, Kaj M.; Jordan, Thomas H.; Madden, Christopher; Michael, Andrew J.; Milner, Kevin R.; Page, Morgan T.; Parsons, Thomas; Powers, Peter M.; Shaw, Bruce E.; Thatcher, Wayne R.; Weldon, Ray J.; Zeng, Yuehua; ,

    2013-01-01

    In this report we present the time-independent component of the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 3 (UCERF3), which provides authoritative estimates of the magnitude, location, and time-averaged frequency of potentially damaging earthquakes in California. The primary achievements have been to relax fault segmentation assumptions and to include multifault ruptures, both limitations of the previous model (UCERF2). The rates of all earthquakes are solved for simultaneously, and from a broader range of data, using a system-level "grand inversion" that is both conceptually simple and extensible. The inverse problem is large and underdetermined, so a range of models is sampled using an efficient simulated annealing algorithm. The approach is more derivative than prescriptive (for example, magnitude-frequency distributions are no longer assumed), so new analysis tools were developed for exploring solutions. Epistemic uncertainties were also accounted for using 1,440 alternative logic tree branches, necessitating access to supercomputers. The most influential uncertainties include alternative deformation models (fault slip rates), a new smoothed seismicity algorithm, alternative values for the total rate of M≥5 events, and different scaling relationships, virtually all of which are new. As a notable first, three deformation models are based on kinematically consistent inversions of geodetic and geologic data, also providing slip-rate constraints on faults previously excluded because of lack of geologic data. The grand inversion constitutes a system-level framework for testing hypotheses and balancing the influence of different experts. For example, we demonstrate serious challenges with the Gutenberg-Richter hypothesis for individual faults. UCERF3 is still an approximation of the system, however, and the range of models is limited (for example, constrained to stay close to UCERF2). Nevertheless, UCERF3 removes the apparent UCERF2 overprediction of

  14. Models Used for Measuring Customer Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai TICHINDELEAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to define and measure the customer engagement as a forming element of the relationship marketing theory. In the first part of the paper, the authors review the marketing literature regarding the concept of customer engagement and summarize the main models for measuring it. One probability model (Pareto/NBD model and one parametric model (RFM model specific for the customer acquisition phase are theoretically detailed. The second part of the paper is an application of the RFM model; the authors demonstrate that there is no statistical significant variation within the clusters formed on two different data sets (training and test set if the cluster centroids of the training set are used as initial cluster centroids for the second test set.

  15. Promoting target models by potential measures

    OpenAIRE

    Dubiel, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Direct marketers use target models in order to minimize the spreading loss of sales efforts. The application of target models has become more widespread with the increasing range of sales efforts. Target models are relevant for offline marketers sending printed mails as well as for online marketers who have to avoid intensity. However business has retained its evaluation since the late 1960s. Marketing decision-makers still prefer managerial performance measures of the economic benefit of a t...

  16. Markowitz portfolio optimization model employing fuzzy measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Suhailywati; Jaaman, Saiful Hafizah

    2017-04-01

    Markowitz in 1952 introduced the mean-variance methodology for the portfolio selection problems. His pioneering research has shaped the portfolio risk-return model and become one of the most important research fields in modern finance. This paper extends the classical Markowitz's mean-variance portfolio selection model applying the fuzzy measure to determine the risk and return. In this paper, we apply the original mean-variance model as a benchmark, fuzzy mean-variance model with fuzzy return and the model with return are modeled by specific types of fuzzy number for comparison. The model with fuzzy approach gives better performance as compared to the mean-variance approach. The numerical examples are included to illustrate these models by employing Malaysian share market data.

  17. Multiple indicators, multiple causes measurement error models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekwe, Carmen D; Carter, Randy L; Cullings, Harry M; Carroll, Raymond J

    2014-11-10

    Multiple indicators, multiple causes (MIMIC) models are often employed by researchers studying the effects of an unobservable latent variable on a set of outcomes, when causes of the latent variable are observed. There are times, however, when the causes of the latent variable are not observed because measurements of the causal variable are contaminated by measurement error. The objectives of this paper are as follows: (i) to develop a novel model by extending the classical linear MIMIC model to allow both Berkson and classical measurement errors, defining the MIMIC measurement error (MIMIC ME) model; (ii) to develop likelihood-based estimation methods for the MIMIC ME model; and (iii) to apply the newly defined MIMIC ME model to atomic bomb survivor data to study the impact of dyslipidemia and radiation dose on the physical manifestations of dyslipidemia. As a by-product of our work, we also obtain a data-driven estimate of the variance of the classical measurement error associated with an estimate of the amount of radiation dose received by atomic bomb survivors at the time of their exposure. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Subject-independent modeling and representation data on the formation and distribution of innovative value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frolov Aleksey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Creating an innovation environment is shown in the context of interaction of economic agents in the creation and consumption of innovative value-based infrastructure approach. The problem of the complexity of collecting heterogeneous data on the formation and distribution of innovative value in the conditions of the dynamic nature of the research object and the environment is formulated. An information model providing a subject-independent representation of data on innovation value flows is proposed and allows to automate the processes of data collection and analysis with the minimization of time costs. The article was prepared in the course of carrying out research work within the framework of the project part of the state task in the field of scientific activity in accordance with the assignment 26.2758.2017 / 4.6 for 2017-2019. on the topic “System for analyzing the formation and distribution of the value of innovative products based on the infrastructure concept”.

  19. Stochastic Modeling of the Clathrin-dependent and -independent Endocytic Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hua; Dutta, Prashanta; Liu, Jin

    2017-11-01

    Endocytosis is one of the important processes that bioparticles use to enter the cells. During endocytosis the membrane-bound vesicles are formed by the invagination of plasma membrane as a result of interactions among many proteins and cytoskeletons. The clathrin-mediated endocytosis is one of the most significant form of endocytosis, where the dynamic assembly of clathrin-coated pits play a critical role. While herpes simplex virus-1 has recently shown to infect cell by a novel phagocytosis-like endocytic pathway where actin polymerization may facilitate the viral entry. In this work, we propose a stochastic model for both clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytic pathways based on Monte Carlo simulations. The important roles of clathrin coating and actin cytoskeleton as well as the impact of other biological parameters are studied. Our preliminary results indicate that there exist an intermediate particle size and ligand density that maximize the internalization efficiency. Below a critical size or surface ligand density, it is difficult for the entry of a single particle, which means clustering may needed for more efficient internalization. We also find that lower membrane bending rigidity may help promote the bioparticle entry. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01GM122081.

  20. Assessing Independent Variables Used in Econometric Modeling Forest Land Use or Land Cover Change: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Jeuck; F. Cubbage; R. Abt; R. Bardon; J. McCarter; J. Coulston; M. Renkow

    2014-01-01

    : We conducted a meta-analysis on 64 econometric models from 47 studies predicting forestland conversion to agriculture (F2A), forestland to development (F2D), forestland to non-forested (F2NF) and undeveloped (including forestland) to developed (U2D) land. Over 250 independent econometric variables were identified from 21 F2A models, 21 F2D models, 12 F2NF models, and...

  1. Obtaining better performance in the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with heralded single-photon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xing-Yu; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Wang, Qin

    2017-11-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) has been widely investigated due to its remarkable advantages on the achievable transmission distance and practical security. However, the relative low key generation rate limits its real-life implementations. In this work, we adopt the newly proposed four-intensity decoy-state scheme [Phys. Rev. A 93, 042324 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.042324] to study the performance of MDI-QKD with heralded single-photon sources (HSPS). Corresponding simulation results demonstrate that the four-intensity decoy-state scheme combining HSPS can drastically improve both the key generation rate and transmission distance in MDI-QKD, which may be very promising in future MDI-QKD systems.

  2. Fluctuations of Internal Transmittance in Security of Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution with an Untrusted Source*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yang; Bao Wan-Su; Chen Rui-Ke; Zhou Chun; Jiang Mu-Sheng; Li Hong-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) is immune to detector side channel attacks, which is a crucial security loophole problem in traditional QKD. In order to relax a key assumption that the sources are trusted in MDI-QKD, an MDI-QKD protocol with an untrusted source has been proposed. For the security of MDI-QKD with an untrusted source, imperfections in the practical experiment should also be taken into account. In this paper, we analyze the effects of fluctuations of internal transmittance on the security of a decoy-state MDI-QKD protocol with an untrusted source. Our numerical results show that both the secret key rate and the maximum secure transmission distance decrease when taken fluctuations of internal transmittance into consideration. Especially, they are more sensitive when Charlie’s mean photon number per pulse is smaller. Our results emphasize that the stability of correlative optical devices is important for practical implementations . (paper)

  3. Deriving a Barthel Index from the Northwick Park Dependency Scale and the Functional Independence Measure: are they equivalent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Williams, Heather; Rose, Hilary; Harris, Sarah; Jackson, Diana

    2010-12-01

    to examine the extent of agreement between Barthel Index scores derived from Northwick Park Dependency Scores (NPDS) and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) ratings, in an inpatient setting. previously described conversion criteria were applied in a secondary analysis of a large existing dataset, gathered in a tertiary specialist inpatient neurorehabilitation unit. patients with neurological disabilities (N = 1347), mainly following acquired brain injury. comparison of Barthel scores derived from the NPDS (rated by nursing staff) and from parallel FIM scores (rated by the therapy team). very strong intraclass correlations were observed between the total scores (0.93, PBarthel Index ratings derived from NPDS and FIM scores. However, scores may be affected by differential performance with nursing and therapy staff, and should not automatically be regarded as equivalent.

  4. A model perception on the independence of PhD students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rwandan Journal of Education ... As results, we suggest that a well-trained independent PhD student from UR should be able to think critically, to initiate, to innovate and to enhance the research capabilities. Therefore ... Keywords: PhD supervision, independent researcher, PhD student, research capability, critical thinking ...

  5. p53-independent DUX4 pathology in cell and animal models of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Bosnakovski

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is a genetically dominant myopathy caused by mutations that disrupt repression of the normally silent DUX4 gene, which encodes a transcription factor that has been shown to interfere with myogenesis when misexpressed at very low levels in myoblasts and to cause cell death when overexpressed at high levels. A previous report using adeno-associated virus to deliver high levels of DUX4 to mouse skeletal muscle demonstrated severe pathology that was suppressed on a p53-knockout background, implying that DUX4 acted through the p53 pathway. Here, we investigate the p53 dependence of DUX4 using various in vitro and in vivo models. We find that inhibiting p53 has no effect on the cytoxicity of DUX4 on C2C12 myoblasts, and that expression of DUX4 does not lead to activation of the p53 pathway. DUX4 does lead to expression of the classic p53 target gene Cdkn1a (p21 but in a p53-independent manner. Meta-analysis of 5 publicly available data sets of DUX4 transcriptional profiles in both human and mouse cells shows no evidence of p53 activation, and further reveals that Cdkn1a is a mouse-specific target of DUX4. When the inducible DUX4 mouse model is crossed onto the p53-null background, we find no suppression of the male-specific lethality or skin phenotypes that are characteristic of the DUX4 transgene, and find that primary myoblasts from this mouse are still killed by DUX4 expression. These data challenge the notion that the p53 pathway is central to the pathogenicity of DUX4.

  6. Model-independent determination of the carrier multiplication time constant in CdSe nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, Marco

    2009-11-21

    The experimental determination of the carrier multiplication (CM) time constant is complicated by the fact that this process occurs within the initial few hundreds of femtoseconds after excitation and, in transient-absorption experiments, cannot be separated from the buildup time of the 1p-state population. This work provides an accurate theoretical determination of the electron relaxation lifetime during the last stage of the p-state buildup, in CdSe nanocrystals, in the presence of a single photogenerated hole (no CM) and of a hole plus an additional electron-hole pair (following CM). From the invariance of the 1p buildup time observed experimentally for excitations above and below the CM threshold producing hot carriers with the same average per-exciton excess energy, and the calculated corresponding variations in the electron decay time in the two cases, an estimate is obtained for the carrier multiplication time constant. Unlike previous estimates reported in the literature so far, this result is model-independent, i.e., is obtained without making any assumption on the nature of the mechanism governing carrier multiplication. It is then compared with the time constant calculated, as a function of the excitation energy, assuming an impact-ionization-like process for carrier multiplication (DCM). The two results are in good agreement and show that carrier multiplication can occur on timescales of the order of tens of femtoseconds at energies close to the observed onset. These findings, which are compatible with the fastest lifetime estimated experimentally, confirm the suitability of the impact-ionization model to explain carrier multiplication in CdSe nanocrystals.

  7. Candidatus Sodalis melophagi sp. nov.: phylogenetically independent comparative model to the tsetse fly symbiont Sodalis glossinidius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Chrudimský

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Sodalis live in symbiosis with various groups of insects. The best known member of this group, a secondary symbiont of tsetse flies Sodalis glossinidius, has become one of the most important models in investigating establishment and evolution of insect-bacteria symbiosis. It represents a bacterium in the early/intermediate state of the transition towards symbiosis, which allows for exploring such interesting topics as: usage of secretory systems for entering the host cell, tempo of the genome modification, and metabolic interaction with a coexisting primary symbiont. In this study, we describe a new Sodalis species which could provide a useful comparative model to the tsetse symbiont. It lives in association with Melophagus ovinus, an insect related to tsetse flies, and resembles S. glossinidius in several important traits. Similar to S. glossinidius, it cohabits the host with another symbiotic bacterium, the bacteriome-harbored primary symbiont of the genus Arsenophonus. As a typical secondary symbiont, Candidatus Sodalis melophagi infects various host tissues, including bacteriome. We provide basic morphological and molecular characteristics of the symbiont and show that these traits also correspond to the early/intermediate state of the evolution towards symbiosis. Particularly, we demonstrate the ability of the bacterium to live in insect cell culture as well as in cell-free medium. We also provide basic characteristics of type three secretion system and using three reference sequences (16 S rDNA, groEL and spaPQR region we show that the bacterium branched within the genus Sodalis, but originated independently of the two previously described symbionts of hippoboscoids. We propose the name Candidatus Sodalis melophagi for this new bacterium.

  8. Candidatus Sodalis melophagi sp. nov.: phylogenetically independent comparative model to the tsetse fly symbiont Sodalis glossinidius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrudimský, Tomáš; Husník, Filip; Nováková, Eva; Hypša, Václav

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Sodalis live in symbiosis with various groups of insects. The best known member of this group, a secondary symbiont of tsetse flies Sodalis glossinidius, has become one of the most important models in investigating establishment and evolution of insect-bacteria symbiosis. It represents a bacterium in the early/intermediate state of the transition towards symbiosis, which allows for exploring such interesting topics as: usage of secretory systems for entering the host cell, tempo of the genome modification, and metabolic interaction with a coexisting primary symbiont. In this study, we describe a new Sodalis species which could provide a useful comparative model to the tsetse symbiont. It lives in association with Melophagus ovinus, an insect related to tsetse flies, and resembles S. glossinidius in several important traits. Similar to S. glossinidius, it cohabits the host with another symbiotic bacterium, the bacteriome-harbored primary symbiont of the genus Arsenophonus. As a typical secondary symbiont, Candidatus Sodalis melophagi infects various host tissues, including bacteriome. We provide basic morphological and molecular characteristics of the symbiont and show that these traits also correspond to the early/intermediate state of the evolution towards symbiosis. Particularly, we demonstrate the ability of the bacterium to live in insect cell culture as well as in cell-free medium. We also provide basic characteristics of type three secretion system and using three reference sequences (16 S rDNA, groEL and spaPQR region) we show that the bacterium branched within the genus Sodalis, but originated independently of the two previously described symbionts of hippoboscoids. We propose the name Candidatus Sodalis melophagi for this new bacterium.

  9. The Kennedy Krieger Independence Scales–Spina Bifida Version: A Measure of Executive Components of Self-Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Lisa A.; Tarazi, Reem A.; McCurdy, Mark D.; Schultz, Scott; Levey, Eric; Mahone, E. Mark; Zabel, T. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective Successful implementation of functional self-care skills depends upon adequate executive functioning; however, many scales assessing adaptive skills do not address the inherent executive burden of these tasks. This omission is especially relevant for individuals with spina bifida, for whom medical self-care tasks impose a significant burden requiring initiation and prospective memory. The Kennedy Krieger Independence Scales–Spina Bifida Version (KKIS–SB) is a caregiver-reported measure designed to address this gap; it assesses skills for managing both typical and spina bifida-related daily self-care demands, with a focus on the timely and independent initiation of adaptive skills. Research Method/Design Parents of 100 youth and young adults with spina bifida completed the KKIS–SB. Exploratory factor analysis and Pearson's correlations were used to assess the factor structure, reliability, and construct validity of the KKIS–SB. Results The scale demonstrates excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .891). Exploratory factor analysis yielded four factors, explaining 65.1% of the total variance. Two primary subscales were created, initiation of routines and prospective memory, which provide meaningful clinical information regarding management of a variety of typical (e.g., get up on time, complete daily hygiene routines on time) and spina bifida-specific self-care tasks (e.g., begin self-catheterization on time, perform self-examination for pressure sores). Conclusions/Implications Based upon internal consistency estimates and correlations with measures of similar constructs, initial data suggest good preliminary reliability and validity of the KKIS–SB. PMID:23438006

  10. Content validity and inter-rater reliability of the Halliwick-concept-based instrument 'Swimming with Independent Measure'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sršen, Katja Groleger; Vidmar, Gaj; Pikl, Maša; Vrečar, Irena; Burja, Cirila; Krušec, Klavdija

    2012-06-01

    The Halliwick concept is widely used in different settings to promote joyful movement in water and swimming. To assess the swimming skills and progression of an individual swimmer, a valid and reliable measure should be used. The Halliwick-concept-based Swimming with Independent Measure (SWIM) was introduced for this purpose. We aimed to determine its content validity and inter-rater reliability. Fifty-four healthy children, 3.5-11 years old, from a mainstream swimming program participated in a content validity study. They were evaluated with SWIM and the national evaluation system of swimming abilities (classifying children into seven categories). To study the inter-rater reliability of SWIM, we included 37 children and youth from a Halliwick swimming program, aged 7-22 years, who were evaluated by two Halliwick instructors independently. The average SWIM score differed between national evaluation system categories and followed the expected order (P<0.001), whereby a ceiling effect was observed in the higher categories. High inter-rater reliability was found for all 11 SWIM items. The lowest reliability was observed for item G (sagittal rotation), although the estimates were still above 0.9. As expected, the highest reliability was observed for the total score (intraclass correlation 0.996). The validity of SWIM with respect to the national evaluation system of swimming abilities is high until the point where a swimmer is well adapted to water and already able to learn some swimming techniques. The inter-rater reliability of SWIM is very high; thus, we believe that SWIM can be used in further research and practice to follow the progress of swimmers.

  11. Free-space measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol using decoy states with orbital angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Le; Zhao Sheng-Mei; Cheng Wei-Wen; Gong Long-Yan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol using orbital angular momentum (OAM) in free space links, named the OAM-MDI-QKD protocol. In the proposed protocol, the OAM states of photons, instead of polarization states, are used as the information carriers to avoid the reference frame alignment, the decoy-state is adopted to overcome the security loophole caused by the weak coherent pulse source, and the high efficient OAM-sorter is adopted as the measurement tool for Charlie to obtain the output OAM state. Here, Charlie may be an untrusted third party. The results show that the authorized users, Alice and Bob, could distill a secret key with Charlie’s successful measurements, and the key generation performance is slightly better than that of the polarization-based MDI-QKD protocol in the two-dimensional OAM cases. Simultaneously, Alice and Bob can reduce the number of flipping the bits in the secure key distillation. It is indicated that a higher key generation rate performance could be obtained by a high dimensional OAM-MDI-QKD protocol because of the unlimited degree of freedom on OAM states. Moreover, the results show that the key generation rate and the transmission distance will decrease as the growth of the strength of atmospheric turbulence (AT) and the link attenuation. In addition, the decoy states used in the proposed protocol can get a considerable good performance without the need for an ideal source. (paper)

  12. Testing substellar models with dynamical mass measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu M.C.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We have been using Keck laser guide star adaptive optics to monitor the orbits of ultracool binaries, providing dynamical masses at lower luminosities and temperatures than previously available and enabling strong tests of theoretical models. We have identified three specific problems with theory: (1 We find that model color–magnitude diagrams cannot be reliably used to infer masses as they do not accurately reproduce the colors of ultracool dwarfs of known mass. (2 Effective temperatures inferred from evolutionary model radii are typically inconsistent with temperatures derived from fitting atmospheric models to observed spectra by 100–300 K. (3 For the only known pair of field brown dwarfs with a precise mass (3% and age determination (≈25%, the measured luminosities are ~2–3× higher than predicted by model cooling rates (i.e., masses inferred from Lbol and age are 20–30% larger than measured. To make progress in understanding the observed discrepancies, more mass measurements spanning a wide range of luminosity, temperature, and age are needed, along with more accurate age determinations (e.g., via asteroseismology for primary stars with brown dwarf binary companions. Also, resolved optical and infrared spectroscopy are needed to measure lithium depletion and to characterize the atmospheres of binary components in order to better assess model deficiencies.

  13. Measures of Quality in Business Process Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Hronza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Business process modelling and analysing is undoubtedly one of the most important parts of Applied (Business Informatics. Quality of business process models (diagrams is crucial for any purpose in this area. The goal of a process analyst’s work is to create generally understandable, explicit and error free models. If a process is properly described, created models can be used as an input into deep analysis and optimization. It can be assumed that properly designed business process models (similarly as in the case of correctly written algorithms contain characteristics that can be mathematically described. Besides it will be possible to create a tool that will help process analysts to design proper models. As part of this review will be conducted systematic literature review in order to find and analyse business process model’s design and business process model’s quality measures. It was found that mentioned area had already been the subject of research investigation in the past. Thirty-three suitable scietific publications and twenty-two quality measures were found. Analysed scientific publications and existing quality measures do not reflect all important attributes of business process model’s clarity, simplicity and completeness. Therefore it would be appropriate to add new measures of quality.

  14. Efficient and reliable 3D dose quality assurance for IMRT by combining independent dose calculations with measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, R.; Wauben, D. J. L.; de Groot, M.; Godart, J.; Langendijk, J. A.; van t Veld, Aart A.; Korevaar, E. W.

    Purpose: Advanced radiotherapy treatments require appropriate quality assurance (QA) to verify 3D dose distributions. Moreover, increase in patient numbers demand efficient QA-methods. In this study, a time efficient method that combines model-based QA and measurement-based QA was developed; i.e.,

  15. A stochastic model for quantum measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budiyono, Agung

    2013-01-01

    We develop a statistical model of microscopic stochastic deviation from classical mechanics based on a stochastic process with a transition probability that is assumed to be given by an exponential distribution of infinitesimal stationary action. We apply the statistical model to stochastically modify a classical mechanical model for the measurement of physical quantities reproducing the prediction of quantum mechanics. The system+apparatus always has a definite configuration at all times, as in classical mechanics, fluctuating randomly following a continuous trajectory. On the other hand, the wavefunction and quantum mechanical Hermitian operator corresponding to the physical quantity arise formally as artificial mathematical constructs. During a single measurement, the wavefunction of the whole system+apparatus evolves according to a Schrödinger equation and the configuration of the apparatus acts as the pointer of the measurement so that there is no wavefunction collapse. We will also show that while the outcome of each single measurement event does not reveal the actual value of the physical quantity prior to measurement, its average in an ensemble of identical measurements is equal to the average of the actual value of the physical quantity prior to measurement over the distribution of the configuration of the system. (paper)

  16. MODEL-INDEPENDENT STELLAR AND PLANETARY MASSES FROM MULTI-TRANSITING EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montet, Benjamin T.; Johnson, John Asher

    2013-01-01

    Precise exoplanet characterization requires precise classification of exoplanet host stars. The masses of host stars are commonly estimated by comparing their spectra to those predicted by stellar evolution models. However, spectroscopically determined properties are difficult to measure accurately for stars that are substantially different from the Sun, such as M-dwarfs and evolved stars. Here, we propose a new method to dynamically measure the masses of transiting planets near mean-motion resonances and their host stars by combining observations of transit timing variations with radial velocity (RV) measurements. We derive expressions to analytically determine the mass of each member of the system and demonstrate the technique on the Kepler-18 system. We compare these analytic results to numerical simulations and find that the two are consistent. We identify eight systems for which our technique could be applied if follow-up RV measurements are collected. We conclude that this analysis would be optimal for systems discovered by next-generation missions similar to TESS or PLATO, which will target bright stars that are amenable to efficient RV follow-up.

  17. Modelling Systemic Iron Regulation during Dietary Iron Overload and Acute Inflammation: Role of Hepcidin-Independent Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enculescu, Mihaela; Metzendorf, Christoph; Sparla, Richard; Hahnel, Maximilian; Bode, Johannes; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Legewie, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Systemic iron levels must be maintained in physiological concentrations to prevent diseases associated with iron deficiency or iron overload. A key role in this process plays ferroportin, the only known mammalian transmembrane iron exporter, which releases iron from duodenal enterocytes, hepatocytes, or iron-recycling macrophages into the blood stream. Ferroportin expression is tightly controlled by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms in response to hypoxia, iron deficiency, heme iron and inflammatory cues by cell-autonomous and systemic mechanisms. At the systemic level, the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin is released from the liver in response to these cues, binds to ferroportin and triggers its degradation. The relative importance of individual ferroportin control mechanisms and their interplay at the systemic level is incompletely understood. Here, we built a mathematical model of systemic iron regulation. It incorporates the dynamics of organ iron pools as well as regulation by the hepcidin/ferroportin system. We calibrated and validated the model with time-resolved measurements of iron responses in mice challenged with dietary iron overload and/or inflammation. The model demonstrates that inflammation mainly reduces the amount of iron in the blood stream by reducing intracellular ferroportin transcription, and not by hepcidin-dependent ferroportin protein destabilization. In contrast, ferroportin regulation by hepcidin is the predominant mechanism of iron homeostasis in response to changing iron diets for a big range of dietary iron contents. The model further reveals that additional homeostasis mechanisms must be taken into account at very high dietary iron levels, including the saturation of intestinal uptake of nutritional iron and the uptake of circulating, non-transferrin-bound iron, into liver. Taken together, our model quantitatively describes systemic iron metabolism and generated experimentally testable predictions for additional

  18. THE BUSINESS MODEL AND FINANCIAL ASSETS MEASUREMENT

    OpenAIRE

    NICULA Ileana

    2012-01-01

    The paper work analyses some aspects regarding the implementation of IFRS 9, the relationship between the business model approach and the assets classification and measurement. It does not discuss the cash flows characteristics, another important aspect of assets classification, or the reclassifications. The business model is related to some characteristics of the banks (opaqueness, leverage ratio, compliance to capital, sound liquidity requirements and risk management) and to Special Purpose...

  19. Allele- and Tir-independent functions of intimin in diverse animal infection models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M Mallick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon binding to intestinal epithelial cells, enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC, enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, and Citrobacter rodentium trigger formation of actin pedestals beneath bound bacteria. Pedestal formation has been associated with enhanced colonization, and requires intimin, an adhesin that binds to the bacterial effector Tir, which is translocated to the host cell membrane and promotes bacterial adherence and pedestal formation. Intimin has been suggested to also promote cell adhesion by binding one or more host receptors, and allelic differences in intimin have been associated with differences in tissue and host specificity. We assessed the function of EHEC, EPEC, or C. rodentium intimin, or a set of intimin derivatives with varying Tir-binding abilities in animal models of infection. We found that EPEC and EHEC intimin were functionally indistinguishable during infection of gnotobiotic piglets by EHEC, and that EPEC, EHEC, and C. rodentium intimin were functionally indistinguishable during infection of C57BL/6 mice by C. rodentium. A derivative of EHEC intimin that bound Tir but did not promote robust pedestal formation on cultured cells was unable to promote C. rodentium colonization of conventional mice, indicating that the ability to trigger actin assembly, not simply to bind Tir, is required for intimin-mediated intestinal colonization. Interestingly, streptomycin pre-treatment of mice eliminated the requirement for Tir but not intimin during colonization, and intimin derivatives that were defective in Tir-binding still promoted colonization of these mice. These results indicate that EPEC, EHEC, and C. rodentium are functionally interchangeable during infection of gnotobiotic piglets or conventional C57BL/6 mice, and that whereas the ability to trigger Tir-mediated pedestal formation is essential for colonization of conventional mice, intimin provides a Tir-independent activity during colonization of streptomycin pre

  20. Generalised model-independent characterisation of strong gravitational lenses. I. Theoretical foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J.

    2017-05-01

    We extend our model-independent approach for characterising strong gravitational lenses to its most general form to leading order and use the orientation angles of a set of multiple images with respect to their connection line(s) in addition to the relative distances between the images, their ellipticities, and time-delays. For two symmetric images that straddle the critical curve, the orientation angle additionally allows us to determine the slope of the critical curve and a second (reduced) flexion coefficient at the critical point on the connection line between the images. It also allows us to drop the symmetry assumption that the axis of largest image extension is orthogonal to the critical curve. For three images almost forming a giant arc, the degree of assumed image symmetry is also reduced to the most general case, describing image configurations for which the source need not be placed on the symmetry axis of the two folds that unite at the cusp. For a given set of multiple images, we set limits on the applicability of our approach, show which information can be obtained in cases of merging images, and analyse the accuracy achievable due to the Taylor expansion of the lensing potential for the fold case on a galaxy cluster scale Navarro-Frenk-White-profile, a fold and cusp case on a galaxy cluster scale singular isothermal ellipse, and compare the generalised approach with our previously published one. The position of the critical points is reconstructed with less than 5'' deviation for multiple images closer to the critical points than 30% of the (effective) Einstein radius. The slope of the critical curve at a fold and its shape in the vicinity of a cusp deviate less than 20% from the true values for distances of the images to the critical points less than 15% of the (effective) Einstein radius.

  1. Magnetic measurement of creep damage: modeling and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablik, Martin J.; Jiles, David C.

    1996-11-01

    Results of inspection of creep damage by magnetic hysteresis measurements on Cr-Mo steel are presented. It is shown that structure-sensitive parameters such as coercivity, remanence and hysteresis loss are sensitive to creep damage. Previous metallurgical studies have shown that creep changes the microstructure of he material by introducing voids, dislocations, and grain boundary cavities. As cavities develop, dislocations and voids move out to grain boundaries; therefore, the total pinning sources for domain wall motion are reduced.This, together with the introduction of a demagnetizing field due to the cavities, results in the decrease of both coercivity, remanence and hence, concomitantly, hysteresis loss. Incorporating these structural effects into a magnetomechanical hysteresis model developed previously by us produces numerical variations of coercivity, remanence and hysteresis loss consistent with what is measured. The magnetic model has therefore been used to obtain appropriately modified magnetization curves for each element of creep-damaged material in a finite element (FE) calculation. The FE calculation has been used to simulate magnetic detection of non-uniform creep damage around a seam weld in a 2.25 Cr 1Mo steam pipe. In particular, in the simulation, a magnetic C-core with primary and secondary coils was placed with its pole pieces flush against the specimen in the vicinity of the weld. The secondary emf was shown to be reduced when creep damage was present inside the pipe wall at the cusp of the weld and in the vicinity of the cusp. The calculation showed that the C- core detected creep damage best if it spanned the weld seam width and if the current in the primary was such that the C- core was not magnetically saturated. Experimental measurements also exhibited the dip predicted in emf, but the measurements are not yet conclusive because the effects of magnetic property changes of weld materials, heat- affected material, and base material have

  2. Unified Balance Scale: an activity-based, bed to community, and aetiology-independent measure of balance calibrated with Rasch analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Porta, Fabio; Franceschini, Marco; Caselli, Serena; Cavallini, Paola; Susassi, Sonia; Tennant, Alan

    2011-04-01

    To build a new activity-based, "bed to community", aetiology-independent measure of balance within the neurological rehabilitation setting by merging some existing scales. Balance scales were selected using a conceptual framework and subsequently administered to a convenience sample of adult patients with balance problems due to different neurological aetiologies. Data were then processed using classical psychometric analyses and Rasch analysis in order to construct a new balance measurement tool. The Berg Balance Scale, the Tinetti Scales and the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale were selected and administered to a sample of patients, giving 302 observations. Classical psychometric analyses (item and scale analysis; confirmatory factor analysis) were undertaken on the pooled 40-item set with confirmation of unidimensionality. The subsequent Rasch analysis allowed the identification of a 27-item set satisfying the Rasch Model's requirements for fundamental measurement, with further confirmation of unidimensionality by post-hoc confirmatory factor analysis. The new scale (Unified Balance Scale) holds proven measurement properties and may be a candidate tool for "bed to community" balance measurement for patients with balance problems within the neuro-rehabilitation setting. Future studies are warranted to explore further its external validity and other clinical properties, as well as to improve its usability.

  3. Development and validation of a self-report version of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, C; Eriks-Hoogland, I; Baumberger, M; Catz, A; Itzkovich, M; Lüthi, H; Post, M W M; von Elm, E; Wyss, A; Brinkhof, M W G

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sectional validation study. To develop and validate a self-report version of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM III). Two SCI rehabilitation facilities in Switzerland. SCIM III comprises 19 questions on daily tasks with a total score between 0 and 100 and subscales for 'self-care', 'respiration & sphincter management' and 'mobility'. A self-report version (SCIM-SR) was developed by expert discussions and pretests in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) using a German translation. A convenience sample of 99 inpatients with SCI was recruited. SCIM-SR data were analyzed together with SCIM III data obtained from attending health professionals. High correlations between SCIM III and SCIM-SR were observed. Pearson's r for the total score was 0.87 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82-0.91), for the subscales self-care 0.87 (0.81-0.91); respiration & sphincter management 0.81 (0.73-0.87); and mobility 0.87 (0.82-0.91). Intraclass correlations were: total score 0.90 (95% CI 0.85-0.93); self-care 0.86 (0.79-0.90); respiration & sphincter management 0.80 (0.71-0.86); and mobility 0.83 (0.76-0.89). Bland-Altman plots showed that patients rated their functioning higher than professionals, in particular for mobility. The mean difference between SCIM-SR and SCIM III for the total score was 5.14 (point estimate 95% CI 2.95-7.34), self-care 0.89 (0.19-1.59), respiration & sphincter management 1.05 (0.18-2.28 ) and mobility 3.49 (2.44-4.54). Particularly patients readmitted because of pressure sores rated their independence higher than attending professionals. Our results support the criterion validity of SCIM-SR. The self-report version may facilitate long-term evaluations of independence in persons with SCI in their home situation.

  4. Independent component analysis for cochlear implant artifacts attenuation from electrically evoked auditory steady-state response measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez, Hanne; Gransier, Robin; Hofmann, Michael; van Wieringen, Astrid; Wouters, Jan; Moonen, Marc

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Electrically evoked auditory steady-state responses (EASSRs) are potentially useful for objective cochlear implant (CI) fitting and follow-up of the auditory maturation in infants and children with a CI. EASSRs are recorded in the electro-encephalogram (EEG) in response to electrical stimulation with continuous pulse trains, and are distorted by significant CI artifacts related to this electrical stimulation. The aim of this study is to evaluate a CI artifacts attenuation method based on independent component analysis (ICA) for three EASSR datasets. Approach. ICA has often been used to remove CI artifacts from the EEG to record transient auditory responses, such as cortical evoked auditory potentials. Independent components (ICs) corresponding to CI artifacts are then often manually identified. In this study, an ICA based CI artifacts attenuation method was developed and evaluated for EASSR measurements with varying CI artifacts and EASSR characteristics. Artifactual ICs were automatically identified based on their spectrum. Main results. For 40 Hz amplitude modulation (AM) stimulation at comfort level, in high SNR recordings, ICA succeeded in removing CI artifacts from all recording channels, without distorting the EASSR. For lower SNR recordings, with 40 Hz AM stimulation at lower levels, or 90 Hz AM stimulation, ICA either distorted the EASSR or could not remove all CI artifacts in most subjects, except for two of the seven subjects tested with low level 40 Hz AM stimulation. Noise levels were reduced after ICA was applied, and up to 29 ICs were rejected, suggesting poor ICA separation quality. Significance. We hypothesize that ICA is capable of separating CI artifacts and EASSR in case the contralateral hemisphere is EASSR dominated. For small EASSRs or large CI artifact amplitudes, ICA separation quality is insufficient to ensure complete CI artifacts attenuation without EASSR distortion.

  5. Improved Model-Independent Analysis of Semileptonic and Radiative Rare B Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, Gudrun

    2001-12-21

    We update the branching ratios for the inclusive decays B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and the exclusive decays B {yields} (K,K*){ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, with {ell} = e, {mu}, in the standard model by including the explicit {Omicron}({alpha}{sub s}) and {Lambda}{sub QCD}/m{sub b} corrections. This framework is used in conjunction with the current measurements of the branching ratios for B {yields} X{sub s{gamma}} and B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} decays and upper limits on the branching ratios for the decays B {yields} (K*, X{sub s}){ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} to work out bounds on the Wilson coefficients C{sub 7}, C{sub 8}, C{sub 9} and C{sub 10} appearing in the effective Hamiltonian formalism. The resulting bounds are found to be consistent with the predictions of the standard model and some variants of supersymmetric theories. We illustrate the constraints on supersymmetric parameters that the current data on rare B decays implies in the context of minimal flavour violating model and in more general scenarios admitting additional flavour changing mechanisms. Precise measurements of the dilepton invariant mass distributions in the decays B {yields} (X{sub s}, K*, K){ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, in particular in the lower dilepton mass region, and the forward-backward asymmetry in the decays B {yields} (X{sub s}, K*){ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, will greatly help in discriminating among the SM and various supersymmetric theories.

  6. Causal Measurement Models: Can Criticism Stimulate Clarification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    In their 2016 work, Aguirre-Urreta et al. provided a contribution to the literature on causal measurement models that enhances clarity and stimulates further thinking. Aguirre-Urreta et al. presented a form of statistical identity involving mapping onto the portion of the parameter space involving the nomological net, relationships between the…

  7. Experimental Measurement, Analysis and Modelling of Dependency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We propose a direct method of measurement of the total emissivity of opaque samples on a range of temperature around the ambient one. The method rests on the modulation of the temperature of the sample and the infra-red signal processing resulting from the surface of the sample we model the total emissivity obtained ...

  8. Model measurements for new accelerating techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, S.; Haseroth, H.; Knott, J.; Willis, W.

    1988-06-01

    We summarize the work carried out for the past two years, concerning some different ways for achieving high-field gradients, particularly in view of future linear lepton colliders. These studies and measurements on low power models concern the switched power principle and multifrequency excitation of resonant cavities. 15 refs., 12 figs

  9. Time versus frequency domain measurements: layered model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of receiver coil alignment errors δ on the response of electromagnetic measurements in a layered earth model is studied. The statistics of generalized least square inverse was employed to analyzed the errors on three different geophysical applications. The following results were obtained: (i) The FEM ellipiticity is ...

  10. Multivariate linear models and repeated measurements revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Methods for generalized analysis of variance based on multivariate normal theory have been known for many years. In a repeated measurements context, it is most often of interest to consider transformed responses, typically within-subject contrasts or averages. Efficiency considerations leads to s...... method involving differences between orthogonal projections onto subspaces generated by within-subject models....

  11. Modeling Displacement Measurement using Vibration Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGOSTON Katalin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some aspects regarding to small displacement measurement using vibration transducers. Mechanical faults, usages, slackness’s, cause different noises and vibrations with different amplitude and frequency against the normal sound and movement of the equipment. The vibration transducers, accelerometers and microphone are used for noise and/or sound and vibration detection with fault detection purpose. The output signal of the vibration transducers or accelerometers is an acceleration signal and can be converted to either velocity or displacement, depending on the preferred measurement parameter. Displacement characteristics are used to indicate when the machine condition has changed. There are many problems using accelerometers to measure position or displacement. It is important to determine displacement over time. To determinate the movement from acceleration a double integration is needed. A transfer function and Simulink model was determinate for accelerometers with capacitive sensing element. Using these models the displacement was reproduced by low frequency input.

  12. Constraining the dark energy models with H (z ) data: An approach independent of H0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, Fotios K.; Basilakos, Spyros

    2018-03-01

    We study the performance of the latest H (z ) data in constraining the cosmological parameters of different cosmological models, including that of Chevalier-Polarski-Linder w0w1 parametrization. First, we introduce a statistical procedure in which the chi-square estimator is not affected by the value of the Hubble constant. As a result, we find that the H (z ) data do not rule out the possibility of either nonflat models or dynamical dark energy cosmological models. However, we verify that the time varying equation-of-state parameter w (z ) is not constrained by the current expansion data. Combining the H (z ) and the Type Ia supernova data, we find that the H (z )/SNIa overall statistical analysis provides a substantial improvement of the cosmological constraints with respect to those of the H (z ) analysis. Moreover, the w0-w1 parameter space provided by the H (z )/SNIa joint analysis is in very good agreement with that of Planck 2015, which confirms that the present analysis with the H (z ) and supernova type Ia (SNIa) probes correctly reveals the expansion of the Universe as found by the team of Planck. Finally, we generate sets of Monte Carlo realizations in order to quantify the ability of the H (z ) data to provide strong constraints on the dark energy model parameters. The Monte Carlo approach shows significant improvement of the constraints, when increasing the sample to 100 H (z ) measurements. Such a goal can be achieved in the future, especially in the light of the next generation of surveys.

  13. Efficient and reliable 3D dose quality assurance for IMRT by combining independent dose calculations with measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, R.; Wauben, D. J. L.; Godart, J.; Langendijk, J. A.; Veld, A. A. van't; Korevaar, E. W.; Groot, M. de

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Advanced radiotherapy treatments require appropriate quality assurance (QA) to verify 3D dose distributions. Moreover, increase in patient numbers demand efficient QA-methods. In this study, a time efficient method that combines model-based QA and measurement-based QA was developed; i.e., the hybrid-QA. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the model-based QA and to evaluate time efficiency of the hybrid-QA method. Methods: Accuracy of the model-based QA was determined by comparison of COMPASS calculated dose with Monte Carlo calculations for heterogeneous media. In total, 330 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans were evaluated based on the mean gamma index (GI) with criteria of 3%/3mm and classification of PASS (GI ≤ 0.4), EVAL (0.4 0.6), and FAIL (GI ≥ 0.6). Agreement between model-based QA and measurement-based QA was determined for 48 treatment plans, and linac stability was verified for 15 months. Finally, time efficiency improvement of the hybrid-QA was quantified for four representative treatment plans. Results: COMPASS calculated dose was in agreement with Monte Carlo dose, with a maximum error of 3.2% in heterogeneous media with high density (2.4 g/cm 3 ). Hybrid-QA results for IMRT treatment plans showed an excellent PASS rate of 98% for all cases. Model-based QA was in agreement with measurement-based QA, as shown by a minimal difference in GI of 0.03 ± 0.08. Linac stability was high with an average GI of 0.28 ± 0.04. The hybrid-QA method resulted in a time efficiency improvement of 15 min per treatment plan QA compared to measurement-based QA. Conclusions: The hybrid-QA method is adequate for efficient and accurate 3D dose verification. It combines time efficiency of model-based QA with reliability of measurement-based QA and is suitable for implementation within any radiotherapy department.

  14. Measurement and Modelling of Scaling Minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villafafila Garcia, Ada

    2005-01-01

    of temperature and pressure. Reliable experimental solubility measurements under conditions similar to those found in reality will help the development of strong and consistent models. Chapter 1 is a short introduction to the problem of scale formation, the model chosen to study it, and the experiments performed......). Chapters 8 and 9 focus on the experimental part of this dissertation, analyzing different experimental procedures to determine salt solubility at high temperature and pressure, and developing a setup to perform those measurements. The motivation behind both parts of the Ph.D. project is the problem...... of scale formation found in many industrial processes, and especially in oilfield and geothermal operations. We want to contribute to the study of this problem by releasing a simple and accurate thermodynamic model capable of calculating the behaviour of scaling minerals, covering a wide range...

  15. Measurements of temperature on LHC thermal models

    CERN Document Server

    Darve, C

    2001-01-01

    Full-scale thermal models for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator cryogenic system have been studied at CERN and at Fermilab. Thermal measurements based on two different models permitted us to evaluate the performance of the LHC dipole cryostats as well as to validate the LHC Interaction Region (IR) inner triplet cooling scheme. The experimental procedures made use of temperature sensors supplied by industry and assembled on specially designed supports. The described thermal models took the advantage of advances in cryogenic thermometry which will be implemented in the future LHC accelerator to meet the strict requirements of the LHC for precision, accuracy, reliability, and ease-of-use. The sensors used in the temperature measurement of the superfluid (He II) systems are the primary focus of this paper, although some aspects of the LHC control system and signal conditioning are also reviewed. (15 refs).

  16. The Net Reclassification Index (NRI): a Misleading Measure of Prediction Improvement Even with Independent Test Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Margaret S; Fan, Jing; Feng, Ziding; Gerds, Thomas; Hilden, Jorgen

    2015-10-01

    The Net Reclassification Index (NRI) is a very popular measure for evaluating the improvement in prediction performance gained by adding a marker to a set of baseline predictors. However, the statistical properties of this novel measure have not been explored in depth. We demonstrate the alarming result that the NRI statistic calculated on a large test dataset using risk models derived from a training set is likely to be positive even when the new marker has no predictive information. A related theoretical example is provided in which an incorrect risk function that includes an uninformative marker is proven to erroneously yield a positive NRI. Some insight into this phenomenon is provided. Since large values for the NRI statistic may simply be due to use of poorly fitting risk models, we suggest caution in using the NRI as the basis for marker evaluation. Other measures of prediction performance improvement, such as measures derived from the ROC curve, the net benefit function and the Brier score, cannot be large due to poorly fitting risk functions.

  17. Structural Modeling of Measurement Error in Generalized Linear Models with Rasch Measures as Covariates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battauz, Michela; Bellio, Ruggero

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a structural analysis for generalized linear models when some explanatory variables are measured with error and the measurement error variance is a function of the true variables. The focus is on latent variables investigated on the basis of questionnaires and estimated using item response theory models. Latent variable…

  18. Gauge-Independent Scales Related to the Standard Model Vacuum Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa, Jose R.; Konstandin, Thomas; Riotto, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The measured (central) values of the Higgs and top quark masses indicate that the Standard Model (SM) effective potential develops an instability at high field values. The scale of this instability, determined as the Higgs field value at which the potential drops below the electroweak minimum, is about $10^{11}$ GeV. However, such a scale is unphysical as it is not gauge-invariant and suffers from a gauge-fixing uncertainty of up to two orders of magnitude. Subjecting our system, the SM, to several probes of the instability (adding higher order operators to the potential; letting the vacuum decay through critical bubbles; heating up the system to very high temperature; inflating it) and asking in each case physical questions, we are able to provide several gauge-invariant scales related with the Higgs potential instability.

  19. Gauge-independent scales related to the Standard Model vacuum instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, J.R.; Garny, M.; Konstandin, T.; Riotto, A.

    2016-08-01

    The measured (central) values of the Higgs and top quark masses indicate that the Standard Model (SM) effective potential develops an instability at high field values. The scale of this instability, determined as the Higgs field value at which the potential drops below the electroweak minimum, is about 10 11 GeV. However, such a scale is unphysical as it is not gauge invariant and suffers from a gauge-fixing uncertainty of up to two orders of magnitude. Subjecting our system, the SM, to several probes of the instability (adding higher order operators to the potential; letting the vacuum decay through critical bubbles; heating up the system to very high temperature; inflating it) and asking in each case physical questions, we are able to provide several gauge-invariant scales related with the Higgs potential instability.

  20. Nonclassical measurements errors in nonlinear models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Edith; Mulalic, Ismir

    that contains very detailed information about incomes. This gives a unique opportunity to learn about the magnitude and nature of the measurement error in income reported by the respondents in the Danish NTS compared to income from the administrative register (correct measure). We find that the classical...... of a households face. In this case an important policy parameter is the effect of income (reflecting the household budget) on the choice of travel mode. This paper deals with the consequences of measurement error in income (an explanatory variable) in discrete choice models. Since it is likely to give misleading...... estimates of the income effect it is of interest to investigate the magnitude of the estimation bias and if possible use estimation techniques that take the measurement error problem into account. We use data from the Danish National Travel Survey (NTS) and merge it with administrative register data...

  1. Dynamics-based model-independent local inspection method for damage detection of large structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, P. Frank; Huang, Lu

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents recent development and current capabilities of a dynamics-based Boundary Effect Evaluation Method (BEEM) for damage inspection of large structures. Damage introduces new boundaries to a structure, and influences of boundaries on steady-state high-frequency dynamic response are localized effects. The BEEM is a signal processing method that takes advantage of these localized effects to perform area-by-area extraction of damage-induced boundary effects from steady-state Operational Deflection Shapes (ODSs) to reveal damage locations. Steady-state ODSs of a structure can be measured using any full-field measurement tool, and the BEEM decomposes an ODS into central and boundary solutions using a sliding-window least-squares data-fitting technique. Numerical and experimental results show that boundary solutions are excellent damage indicators because of Gibbs' phenomenon, and the central solutions can be used to easily identify actual structural boundary conditions. Except experimental ODSs of the damaged structure under inspection the method requires no model or historical data for comparison. Experimental results of many one- and two-dimensional structures validates the capabilities of BEEM in detecting and estimating multiple small defects in large structures.

  2. Smart kinesthetic measurement model in dance composision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinny Devi Triana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to discover a model of assessment that could measure kinesthetic intelligence in arranging a dance from several related variable, both direct variable and indirect variable. The research method used was a qualitative method using path analysis to determine the direct and indirect variable; therefore, the dominant variable that supported the measurement model of kinesthetic intelligence in arranging dance could be discovered. The population used was the students of the art of dance department and were chosen by using purposive sampling technique so that the kinesthetic intelligence could be well measured. The result of this research was that the correlation between the ability in perceiving movement and the ability in conveying movement was 3.8048. The correlation between the ability in perceiving movement and kinesthetic intelligence was 0.3137. The correlation between the ability in perceiving movement and arranging a dance was -0.3751. The correlation between conveying movement and kinesthetic intelligence was 0.1333. The correlation between conveying movement and arranging a dance was -0.2399. The correlation between kinesthetic intelligence and arranging a dance was 0.8529. These result proved that kinesthetic intelligence has significant influence to the ability in arranging a dance. It could be concluded that a smart assessment model of kinesthetic intelligence in arranging a dance that was needed should measure the kinesthetic intelligence first while the ability to perceive and convey movement became the supporting element to strengthen the kinesthetic intelligence in arranging a dance.

  3. Three algorithms and SAS macros for estimating power and sample size for logistic models with one or more independent variables of interest in the presence of covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David Keith; Bursac, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Commonly when designing studies, researchers propose to measure several independent variables in a regression model, a subset of which are identified as the main variables of interest while the rest are retained in a model as covariates or confounders. Power for linear regression in this setting can be calculated using SAS PROC POWER. There exists a void in estimating power for the logistic regression models in the same setting. Currently, an approach that calculates power for only one variable of interest in the presence of other covariates for logistic regression is in common use and works well for this special case. In this paper we propose three related algorithms along with corresponding SAS macros that extend power estimation for one or more primary variables of interest in the presence of some confounders. The three proposed empirical algorithms employ likelihood ratio test to provide a user with either a power estimate for a given sample size, a quick sample size estimate for a given power, and an approximate power curve for a range of sample sizes. A user can specify odds ratios for a combination of binary, uniform and standard normal independent variables of interest, and or remaining covariates/confounders in the model, along with a correlation between variables. These user friendly algorithms and macro tools are a promising solution that can fill the void for estimation of power for logistic regression when multiple independent variables are of interest, in the presence of additional covariates in the model.

  4. Varying coefficients model with measurement error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Greene, Tom

    2008-06-01

    We propose a semiparametric partially varying coefficient model to study the relationship between serum creatinine concentration and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) among kidney donors and patients with chronic kidney disease. A regression model is used to relate serum creatinine to GFR and demographic factors in which coefficient of GFR is expressed as a function of age to allow its effect to be age dependent. GFR measurements obtained from the clearance of a radioactively labeled isotope are assumed to be a surrogate for the true GFR, with the relationship between measured and true GFR expressed using an additive error model. We use locally corrected score equations to estimate parameters and coefficient functions, and propose an expected generalized cross-validation (EGCV) method to select the kernel bandwidth. The performance of the proposed methods, which avoid distributional assumptions on the true GFR and residuals, is investigated by simulation. Accounting for measurement error using the proposed model reduced apparent inconsistencies in the relationship between serum creatinine and GFR among different clinical data sets derived from kidney donor and chronic kidney disease source populations.

  5. Correlation of Amine Swingbed On-Orbit CO2 Performance with a Hardware Independent Predictive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papale, William; Sweterlitsch, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    The Amine Swingbed Payload is an experimental system deployed on the International Space Station (ISS) that includes a two-bed, vacuum regenerated, amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) removal subsystem as the principal item under investigation. The aminebased subsystem, also described previously in various publications as CAMRAS 3, was originally designed, fabricated and tested by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International, Inc. (HSSSI) and delivered to NASA in November 2008. The CAMRAS 3 unit was subsequently designed into a flight payload experiment in 2010 and 2011, with flight test integration activities accomplished on-orbit between January 2012 and March 2013. Payload activation was accomplished in May 2013 followed by a 1000 hour experimental period. The experimental nature of the Payload and the interaction with the dynamic ISS environment present unique scientific and engineering challenges, in particular to the verification and validation of the expected Payload CO2 removal performance. A modeling and simulation approach that incorporates principles of chemical reaction engineering has been developed for the amine-based system to predict the dynamic cabin CO2 partial pressure with given inputs of sorbent bed size, process air flow, operating temperature, half-cycle time, CO2 generation rate, cabin volume and the magnitude of vacuum available. Simulation runs using the model to predict ambient CO2 concentrations show good correlation to on-orbit performance measurements and ISS dynamic concentrations for the assumed operating conditions. The dynamic predictive modelling could benefit operational planning to help ensure ISS CO2 concentrations are maintained below prescribed limits and for the Orion vehicle to simulate various operating conditions, scenarios and transients.

  6. Upper extremity function in persons with tetraplegia: relationships between strength, capacity, and the spinal cord independence measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudhe, Claudia; van Hedel, Hubertus J A

    2009-06-01

    To quantify the relationship between the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM III), arm and hand muscle strength, and hand function tests in persons with tetraplegia. A total of 29 individuals with tetraplegia (motor level between cervical 4 and thoracic 1; sensory-motor complete and incomplete) participated. The total score, category scores, and separate items of the SCIM III were compared to the upper extremity motor score (UEMS), an extended manual muscle test (MMT) for 11 upper extremity muscles, and 6 functional capacity tests of the hand. Spearman's correlation coefficients (r(s)) and regression analyses were performed. The SCIM III sum score correlated well with the sum scores of the 3 tests (r(s) > or = .76). The SCIM III self-care category correlated better with the tests ( r(s) > or = .80) compared to the other categories (r( s) SCIM III self-care item "grooming" highly correlated with muscle strength and hand capacity items (r(s) > or = .80). A combination of hand muscle tests and the key grasping task explained over 90% of the variability in the self-care category scores. The SCIM III self-care category reflects upper extremity performance as it contains especially useful and valid items that relate to upper extremity function and capacity tests.

  7. Mathematical model of radon activity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Zambianchi, Pedro, E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Denyak, Valeriy, E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Present work describes a mathematical model that quantifies the time dependent amount of {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn altogether and their activities within an ionization chamber as, for example, AlphaGUARD, which is used to measure activity concentration of Rn in soil gas. The differential equations take into account tree main processes, namely: the injection of Rn into the cavity of detector by the air pump including the effect of the traveling time Rn takes to reach the chamber; Rn release by the air exiting the chamber; and radioactive decay of Rn within the chamber. Developed code quantifies the activity of {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn isotopes separately. Following the standard methodology to measure Rn activity in soil gas, the air pump usually is turned off over a period of time in order to avoid the influx of Rn into the chamber. Since {sup 220}Rn has a short half-life time, approximately 56s, the model shows that after 7 minutes the activity concentration of this isotope is null. Consequently, the measured activity refers to {sup 222}Rn, only. Furthermore, the model also addresses the activity of {sup 220}Rn and {sup 222}Rn progeny, which being metals represent potential risk of ionization chamber contamination that could increase the background of further measurements. Some preliminary comparison of experimental data and theoretical calculations is presented. Obtained transient and steady-state solutions could be used for planning of Rn in soil gas measurements as well as for accuracy assessment of obtained results together with efficiency evaluation of chosen measurements procedure. (author)

  8. Technical Note: Assessing predictive capacity and conditional independence of landslide predisposing factors for shallow landslide susceptibility models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pereira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify the landslide predisposing factors' combination using a bivariate statistical model that best predicts landslide susceptibility. The best model is one that has simultaneously good performance in terms of suitability and predictive power and has been developed using variables that are conditionally independent. The study area is the Santa Marta de Penaguião council (70 km2 located in the Northern Portugal.

    In order to identify the best combination of landslide predisposing factors, all possible combinations using up to seven predisposing factors were performed, which resulted in 120 predictions that were assessed with a landside inventory containing 767 shallow translational slides. The best landslide susceptibility model was selected according to the model degree of fitness and on the basis of a conditional independence criterion. The best model was developed with only three landslide predisposing factors (slope angle, inverse wetness index, and land use and was compared with a model developed using all seven landslide predisposing factors.

    Results showed that it is possible to produce a reliable landslide susceptibility model using fewer landslide predisposing factors, which contributes towards higher conditional independence.

  9. Flavor release measurement from gum model system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovejero-López, I.; Haahr, Anne-Mette; van den Berg, Frans W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Flavor release from a mint-flavored chewing gum model system was measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectroscopy (APCI-MS) and sensory time-intensity (TI). A data analysis method for handling the individual curves from both methods is presented. The APCI-MS data are ratio...... composition can be measured by both instrumental and sensory techniques, providing comparable information. The peppermint oil level (0.5-2% w/w) in the gum influenced both the retronasal concentration and the perceived peppermint flavor. The sweeteners' (sorbitol or xylitol) effect is less apparent. Sensory...

  10. Model-independent constraints on modified gravity from current data and from the Euclid and SKA future surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taddei, Laura; Martinelli, Matteo; Amendola, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to constrain modified gravity with redshift space distortion observations and supernovae measurements. Compared with a standard ΛCDM analysis, we include three additional free parameters, namely the initial conditions of the matter perturbations, the overall perturbation normalization, and a scale-dependent modified gravity parameter modifying the Poisson equation, in an attempt to perform a more model-independent analysis. First, we constrain the Poisson parameter Y (also called G eff ) by using currently available f σ 8 data and the recent SN catalog JLA. We find that the inclusion of the additional free parameters makes the constraints significantly weaker than when fixing them to the standard cosmological value. Second, we forecast future constraints on Y by using the predicted growth-rate data for Euclid and SKA missions. Here again we point out the weakening of the constraints when the additional parameters are included. Finally, we adopt as modified gravity Poisson parameter the specific Horndeski form, and use scale-dependent forecasts to build an exclusion plot for the Yukawa potential akin to the ones realized in laboratory experiments, both for the Euclid and the SKA surveys.

  11. Model-independent constraints on the weak phase α (or φ2) and QCD penguin pollution in B→ππ decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhizhong; Zhang He

    2005-01-01

    We present an algebraic isospin approach towards a more straightforward and model-independent determination of the weak phase α (or φ 2 ) and QCD penguin pollution in B→ππ decays. The world averages of current experimental data allow us to impose some useful constraints on the isospin parameters of B→ππ transitions. We find that the magnitude of α (or φ 2 ) extracted from the indirect CP violation in the π + π - mode is in agreement with the standard-model expectation from other indirect measurements, but its fourfold discrete ambiguity has to be resolved in the near future

  12. Radiation budget measurement/model interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.; Ciesielski, P.; Randel, D.; Stevens, D.

    1983-01-01

    This final report includes research results from the period February, 1981 through November, 1982. Two new results combine to form the final portion of this work. They are the work by Hanna (1982) and Stevens to successfully test and demonstrate a low-order spectral climate model and the work by Ciesielski et al. (1983) to combine and test the new radiation budget results from NIMBUS-7 with earlier satellite measurements. Together, the two related activities set the stage for future research on radiation budget measurement/model interfacing. Such combination of results will lead to new applications of satellite data to climate problems. The objectives of this research under the present contract are therefore satisfied. Additional research reported herein includes the compilation and documentation of the radiation budget data set a Colorado State University and the definition of climate-related experiments suggested after lengthy analysis of the satellite radiation budget experiments.

  13. Measuring Visual Closeness of 3-D Models

    KAUST Repository

    Gollaz Morales, Jose Alejandro

    2012-09-01

    Measuring visual closeness of 3-D models is an important issue for different problems and there is still no standardized metric or algorithm to do it. The normal of a surface plays a vital role in the shading of a 3-D object. Motivated by this, we developed two applications to measure visualcloseness, introducing normal difference as a parameter in a weighted metric in Metro’s sampling approach to obtain the maximum and mean distance between 3-D models using 3-D and 6-D correspondence search structures. A visual closeness metric should provide accurate information on what the human observers would perceive as visually close objects. We performed a validation study with a group of people to evaluate the correlation of our metrics with subjective perception. The results were positive since the metrics predicted the subjective rankings more accurately than the Hausdorff distance.

  14. The Importance of Tree Height in Estimating Individual Tree Biomass While Considering Errors in Measurements and Allometric Models

    OpenAIRE

    Phalla, Thuch; Ota, Tetsuji; Mizoue, Nobuya; Kajisa, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Shigejiro; Vuthy, Ma; Heng, Sokh

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the uncertainty of individual tree biomass estimated by allometric models by both including and excluding tree height independently. Using two independent sets of measurements on the same trees, the errors in the measurement of diameter at breast height and tree height were quantified, and the uncertainty of individual tree biomass estimation caused by errors in measurement was calculated. For both allometric models, the uncertainties of the individual tree biomass estima...

  15. Modeling measurement error in tumor characterization studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjoram Paul

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Etiologic studies of cancer increasingly use molecular features such as gene expression, DNA methylation and sequence mutation to subclassify the cancer type. In large population-based studies, the tumor tissues available for study are archival specimens that provide variable amounts of amplifiable DNA for molecular analysis. As molecular features measured from small amounts of tumor DNA are inherently noisy, we propose a novel approach to improve statistical efficiency when comparing groups of samples. We illustrate the phenomenon using the MethyLight technology, applying our proposed analysis to compare MLH1 DNA methylation levels in males and females studied in the Colon Cancer Family Registry. Results We introduce two methods for computing empirical weights to model heteroscedasticity that is caused by sampling variable quantities of DNA for molecular analysis. In a simulation study, we show that using these weights in a linear regression model is more powerful for identifying differentially methylated loci than standard regression analysis. The increase in power depends on the underlying relationship between variation in outcome measure and input DNA quantity in the study samples. Conclusions Tumor characteristics measured from small amounts of tumor DNA are inherently noisy. We propose a statistical analysis that accounts for the measurement error due to sampling variation of the molecular feature and show how it can improve the power to detect differential characteristics between patient groups.

  16. Measured, modeled, and causal conceptions of fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Marshall

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes partial answers to the following questions: in what senses can fitness differences plausibly be considered causes of evolution?What relationships are there between fitness concepts used in empirical research, modeling, and abstract theoretical proposals? How does the relevance of different fitness concepts depend on research questions and methodological constraints? The paper develops a novel taxonomy of fitness concepts, beginning with type fitness (a property of a genotype or phenotype), token fitness (a property of a particular individual), and purely mathematical fitness. Type fitness includes statistical type fitness, which can be measured from population data, and parametric type fitness, which is an underlying property estimated by statistical type fitnesses. Token fitness includes measurable token fitness, which can be measured on an individual, and tendential token fitness, which is assumed to be an underlying property of the individual in its environmental circumstances. Some of the paper's conclusions can be outlined as follows: claims that fitness differences do not cause evolution are reasonable when fitness is treated as statistical type fitness, measurable token fitness, or purely mathematical fitness. Some of the ways in which statistical methods are used in population genetics suggest that what natural selection involves are differences in parametric type fitnesses. Further, it's reasonable to think that differences in parametric type fitness can cause evolution. Tendential token fitnesses, however, are not themselves sufficient for natural selection. Though parametric type fitnesses are typically not directly measurable, they can be modeled with purely mathematical fitnesses and estimated by statistical type fitnesses, which in turn are defined in terms of measurable token fitnesses. The paper clarifies the ways in which fitnesses depend on pragmatic choices made by researchers. PMID:23112804

  17. Thermal effects in shales: measurements and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinstry, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    Research is reported concerning thermal and physical measurements and theoretical modeling relevant to the storage of radioactive wastes in a shale. Reference thermal conductivity measurements are made at atmospheric pressure in a commercial apparatus; and equipment for permeability measurements has been developed, and is being extended with respect to measurement ranges. Thermal properties of shales are being determined as a function of temperature and pressures. Apparatus was developed to measure shales in two different experimental configurations. In the first, a disk 15 mm in diameter of the material is measured by a steady state technique using a reference material to measure the heat flow within the system. The sample is sandwiched between two disks of a reference material (single crystal quartz is being used initially as reference material). The heat flow is determined twice in order to determine that steady state conditions prevail; the temperature drop over the two references is measured. When these indicate an equal heat flow, the thermal conductivity of the sample can be calculated from the temperature difference of the two faces. The second technique is for determining effect of temperature in a water saturated shale on a larger scale. Cylindrical shale (or siltstone) specimens that are being studied (large for a laboratory sample) are to be heated electrically at the center, contained in a pressure vessel that will maintain a fixed water pressure around it. The temperature is monitored at many points within the shale sample. The sample dimensions are 25 cm diameter, 20 cm long. A micro computer system has been constructed to monitor 16 thermocouples to record variation of temperature distribution with time

  18. Uncertainties in model-independent extractions of amplitudes from complete experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoblit, S.; Sandorfi, A.M.; Kamano, H.; Lee, T.-S.H.

    2012-01-01

    A new generation of over-complete experiments is underway, with the goal of performing a high precision extraction of pseudoscalar meson photo-production amplitudes. Such experimentally determined amplitudes can be used both as a test to validate models and as a starting point for an analytic continuation in the complex plane to search for poles. Of crucial importance for both is the level of uncertainty in the extracted multipoles. We have probed these uncertainties by analyses of pseudo-data for KLambda photoproduction, first for the set of 8 observables that have been published for the K + Lambda channel and then for pseudo-data on a complete set of 16 observables with the uncertainties expected from analyses of ongoing CLAS experiments. In fitting multipoles, we have used a combined Monte Carlo sampling of the amplitude space, with gradient minimization, and have found a shallow X 2 valley pitted with a large number of local minima. This results in bands of solutions that are experimentally indistinguishable. All ongoing experiments will measure observables with limited statistics. We have found a dependence on the particular random choice of values of Gaussian distributed pseudo-data, due to the presence of multiple local minima. This results in actual uncertainties for reconstructed multipoles that are often considerable larger than those returned by gradient minimization routines such as Minuit which find a single local minimum. As intuitively expected, this additional level of uncertainty decreases as larger numbers of observables are included.

  19. International long-term interim storage for spent fuel. An independent storage service investor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leister, P.

    1999-01-01

    Thinking globally the obvious world-wide demands for large storage capacities for spent fuel within the next decades and the newly arising demands for long-term interim storage of spent fuel urges to respond by international interim storage facilities of high capacity. Low cost storage can be achieved only by arranging the storage facility underground in a suitable host rock formation and by selecting the geographical are by an international competition under those countries, who are willing to offer their land. The investor and operator of an international storage facility selected and realised by a competition on the free market as well as the country where the storage is built are both bound by two different kinds of contacts. The main contract is between the offering country/region and the independent operator. The independent operator has in addition a series of contracts with various utilities, which are interested to have their spent fuel stored for a longer period

  20. Adaptation and validation of the Spanish self-report version of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Rodríguez, M; Peña-Pachés, L; Grao-Castellote, C; Torralba-Collados, F; Hervás-Marín, D; Giner-Pascual, M

    2015-06-01

    This is a cross-sectional validation study. The objective of this study was to adapt and validate a self-report version of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM III) for the Spanish population. A cross-cultural adaptation of the self-report version of the SCIM III for the Spanish population was performed on the basis of international guidelines. A total of 100 patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) were recruited. A team of healthcare professionals administered the SCIM III by observation. In addition, the patients completed the Spanish self-report version (eSCIM-SR). Data from both questionnaires were analysed jointly. A high correlation was observed between SCIM III and eSCIM-SR. Lin's concordance correlation coefficient for the global score was 0.998 (95% confidence interval: 0.997, 0.998), and the subscale scores were 0.988 (0.982, 0.992) for self-care, 0.992 (0.988, 0.995) for respiration and sphincter management and 0.997 (0.995, 0.998) for Mobility. Bland-Altman plots showed a small bias of -0.32 (95% limits of agreement: -3.01, 2.37). The estimated bias was low in all three domains, with values of -0.22 (-2.12, 1.68), -0.1 (-2.02, 1.82) and -0.03 (-1.69, 1.63) for the self-care, respiration and sphincter management and mobility subscales, respectively. Our study validates the eSCIM-SR as a tool for the functional assessment of patients with SCI, principally in the outpatient setting.

  1. SCIM III (Spinal Cord Independence Measure version III): reliability of assessment by interview and comparison with assessment by observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzkovich, M; Shefler, H; Front, L; Gur-Pollack, R; Elkayam, K; Bluvshtein, V; Gelernter, I; Catz, A

    2018-01-01

    Psychometric study. The objective of this study was to examine the reliability of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM III) by interview and compare the findings with those of assessment by observation. This study was conducted at Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Israel. Thirty-five spinal cord lesion (SCL) patients who underwent rehabilitation at Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital in Israel were assessed during the last week before discharge with SCIM III by observation and by interview. Nineteen of the patients were also assessed by interview by a third rater to examine inter-rater reliability. Total agreement, kappa, Bland-Altman plots and intraclass correlation (ICC) were used for comparison between interviewers and between interviews and observations. Total agreement between the interviewers' scores and between interviews and observations was low to moderate (kappa coefficient 0.11-0.80). Bland-Altman analysis revealed good agreement, with low mean difference for almost all SCIM III subscales and total scores, between pairs of interviewers (bias -4.15, limits of agreement -22.51 to 14.19, for total score) and between interviews and observations (bias 1.62, limits of agreement -20.55 to 23.81, for total score). ICC coefficients for the SCIM III subscales and total scores were high (0.637-0.916). The findings of this study support the reliability and validity of SCIM III by interview, which appears to be useful for research of SCL patient groups. Individual scoring of SCIM III by interview, however, varied prominently between raters. Therefore, SCIM III by interview should be used with caution for clinical purposes, probably by raters whose scoring deviation, in relation to observation scores, is known.

  2. Model-Independent Analysis of the Neutron-Proton Final-State Interaction Region in the $\\pi\\pi \\to pn\\pi^+$ Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Uzikov, Yu N

    2001-01-01

    Experimental data on the \\pi\\pi\\to pn\\pi^+ reaction measured in an exclusive two-arm experiment at 800 MeV show a narrow peak arising from the strong proton-neutron final-state interaction. It was claimed, within the framework of a certain model, that this peak contained up to a 25 % spin-singlet final-state contribution. By comparing the data with those of \\pi\\pi\\to d\\pi^+ in a largely model-independent way, it is here demonstrated that at all the angles measured the whole of the peak could be explained as being due to spin-triplet final states, with the spin-singlet being at most a few percent. Good qualitative agreement with the measured proton analysing power is also found within this approach.

  3. Language-Independent and Language-Specific Aspects of Early Literacy: An Evaluation of the Common Underlying Proficiency Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, J Marc; Lonigan, Christopher J

    2017-08-01

    According to the common underlying proficiency model (Cummins, 1981), as children acquire academic knowledge and skills in their first language, they also acquire language-independent information about those skills that can be applied when learning a second language. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relevance of the common underlying proficiency model for the early literacy skills of Spanish-speaking language-minority children using confirmatory factor analysis. Eight hundred fifty-eight Spanish-speaking language-minority preschoolers (mean age = 60.83 months, 50.2% female) participated in this study. Results indicated that bifactor models that consisted of language-independent as well as language-specific early literacy factors provided the best fits to the data for children's phonological awareness and print knowledge skills. Correlated factors models that only included skills specific to Spanish and English provided the best fits to the data for children's oral language skills. Children's language-independent early literacy skills were significantly related across constructs and to language-specific aspects of early literacy. Language-specific aspects of early literacy skills were significantly related within but not across languages. These findings suggest that language-minority preschoolers have a common underlying proficiency for code-related skills but not language-related skills that may allow them to transfer knowledge across languages.

  4. Electrostatic sensor modeling for torque measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Michał; Dannert, Mirjam; Mett, Felix; Weber, Harry; Mathis, Wolfgang; Nackenhorst, Udo

    2017-09-01

    Torque load measurements play an important part in various engineering applications, as for automotive industry, in which the drive torque of a motor has to be determined. A widely used measuring method are strain gauges. A thin flexible foil, which supports a metallic pattern, is glued to the surface of the object the torque is being applied to. In case of a deformation due to the torque load, the change in the electrical resistance is measured. With the combination of constitutive equations the applied torque load is determined by the change of electrical resistance. The creep of the glue and the foil material, together with the temperature and humidity dependence, may become an obstacle for some applications Kapralov and Fesenko (1984). Thus, there have been optical and magnetical, as well as capacitive sensors introduced). This paper discusses the general idea behind an electrostatic capacitive sensor based on a simple draft of an exemplary measurement setup. For better understanding an own electrostatical, geometrical and mechanical model of this setup has been developed.

  5. Electrostatic sensor modeling for torque measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mika

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Torque load measurements play an important part in various engineering applications, as for automotive industry, in which the drive torque of a motor has to be determined. A widely used measuring method are strain gauges. A thin flexible foil, which supports a metallic pattern, is glued to the surface of the object the torque is being applied to. In case of a deformation due to the torque load, the change in the electrical resistance is measured. With the combination of constitutive equations the applied torque load is determined by the change of electrical resistance. The creep of the glue and the foil material, together with the temperature and humidity dependence, may become an obstacle for some applications Kapralov and Fesenko(1984. Thus, there have been optical and magnetical, as well as capacitive sensors introduced . This paper discusses the general idea behind an electrostatic capacitive sensor based on a simple draft of an exemplary measurement setup. For better understanding an own electrostatical, geometrical and mechanical model of this setup has been developed.

  6. Developing a collaboration with the Houston independent school district: testing the generalizability of a partnership model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduska, Jeanne; Gomez, Mary Jane; Capo, Zeph; Holmes, Venita

    2012-07-01

    Moving evidence-based practices into real-world settings is a high priority for education and public health. This paper describes the development of a partnership among the Houston Independent School District, the American Institutes of Research, and the Houston Federation of Teachers to support research on and program sustainability for the Good Behavior Game, a team-based classroom behavior management strategy that has shown positive impact in randomized field trials. The conceptual framework guiding partnership development is presented, followed by an application of the framework in Houston. Lessons learned and implications for the next stage of research and practice are then discussed.

  7. Validation and verification of agent models for trust: Independent compared to relative trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, M.; Jaffry, S.W.; Maanen, P.P. van

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the results of a validation experiment for two existing computational trust models describing human trust are reported. One model uses experiences of performance in order to estimate the trust in different trustees. The second model in addition carries the notion of relative trust.

  8. Quality of Life: Meaning, Measurement, and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    occupation of head of household, education, religion , and sex. In the Rosen and Moghadam (1988) study of the quality of life of Army wives, only 3...Navy Personnel Research and Development Center San Diego, California 92152-6800 TN-92-15 May 1992 AD-A250 813 Quality of Life : Meaning, Measurement...and Models Elyse W. Kerce 92-13297 $9ý 1 4 Approved for public release: distribuior , is unlimited. NPRDC-TN-92-15 May 1992 Quality of Life : Meaning

  9. Development of a flattening filter free multiple source model for use as an independent, Monte Carlo, dose calculation, quality assurance tool for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Austin M; Davidson, Scott E; Popple, Richard; Kry, Stephen F; Etzel, Carol; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Followill, David S

    2017-09-01

    The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) Quality Assurance Center (formerly the Radiological Physics Center) has reported varying levels of compliance from their anthropomorphic phantom auditing program. IROC-H studies have suggested that one source of disagreement between institution submitted calculated doses and measurement is the accuracy of the institution's treatment planning system dose calculations and heterogeneity corrections used. In order to audit this step of the radiation therapy treatment process, an independent dose calculation tool is needed. Monte Carlo multiple source models for Varian flattening filter free (FFF) 6 MV and FFF 10 MV therapeutic x-ray beams were commissioned based on central axis depth dose data from a 10 × 10 cm 2 field size and dose profiles for a 40 × 40 cm 2 field size. The models were validated against open-field measurements in a water tank for field sizes ranging from 3 × 3 cm 2 to 40 × 40 cm 2 . The models were then benchmarked against IROC-H's anthropomorphic head and neck phantom and lung phantom measurements. Validation results, assessed with a ±2%/2 mm gamma criterion, showed average agreement of 99.9% and 99.0% for central axis depth dose data for FFF 6 MV and FFF 10 MV models, respectively. Dose profile agreement using the same evaluation technique averaged 97.8% and 97.9% for the respective models. Phantom benchmarking comparisons were evaluated with a ±3%/2 mm gamma criterion, and agreement averaged 90.1% and 90.8% for the respective models. Multiple source models for Varian FFF 6 MV and FFF 10 MV beams have been developed, validated, and benchmarked for inclusion in an independent dose calculation quality assurance tool for use in clinical trial audits. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. Hydrogen recycle modeling and measurements in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, H.C.

    1980-01-01

    A model for hydrogen recycling developed for use in a tokamak transport code is described and compared with measurements on ISX-B and DITE. The model includes kinetic reflection of charge-exchange neutrals from the wall and deposition, thermal diffusion, and desorption processes in the wall. In a tokamak with a limiter, the inferred recycle coefficient of 0.9-1.0 is due primarily to reflection (0.8-0.9) with the remainder (0.1-0.2) being due to desorption. Laboratory experiments supply much of the data for the model and several areas are discussed where additional data are needed, such as reflection from hydrogen-loaded walls at low (approx. equal to100 eV) energy. Simulation of ISX-B shows that the recently observed density decrease with neutral beam injection may be partially due to a decrease in recycling caused by hardening of the charge-exchange flux incident on the wall from the plasma. Modeling of isotopic exchange in DITE indicates the need for an ion-induced desorption process which responds on a timescale shorter than the wall thermal diffusion time. (orig.)

  11. Evolution of the Probability Measure for the Majda Model: New Invariant Measures and Breathing PDFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camassa, Roberto; Lin, Zhi; McLaughlin, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    In 1993, Majda proposed a simple, random shear model from which scalar intermittency was rigorously predicted for the invariant probability measure of passive tracers. In this work, we present an integral formulation for the tracer measure, which leads to a new, comprehensive study on its temporal evolution based on Monte Carlo simulation and direct numerical integration. An interesting, non-monotonic "breathing" phenomenon is discovered from these results and carefully defined, with a solid example for special initial data to predict such phenomenon. The signature of this phenomenon may persist at long time, characterized by the approach of the PDF core to its infinite time, invariant value. We find that this approach may be strongly dependent on the non-dimensional Péclet number, of which the invariant measure itself is independent. Further, the "breathing" PDF is recovered as a new invariant measure in a distinguished time scale in the diffusionless limit. Rigorous asymptotic analysis is also performed to identify the Gaussian core of the invariant measures, and the critical rate at which the heavy, stretched exponential regime propagates towards the tail as a function of time is calculated.

  12. The model-independent analysis of multi-channel pion-pion scattering and the pion-pion scattering length

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Surovtsev, Yu .S.; Bydžovský, Petr; Gutsche, T.; Kaminski, R.; Lyubovitskij, V. E.; Nagy, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 219, č. 107 (2012), s. 263-266 ISSN 0920-5632. [5th Joint International Hadron Structure Conference. Tatranska Strba, 27.6.2011 - 1.7.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0984 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : scalar mesons * multichannel resonances * model-independent approach Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics

  13. Predicting the dynamics of a native Araucaria forest using a distance-independent individual tree-growth model

    OpenAIRE

    Enrique Orellana; Afonso Figueiredo Filho; Sylvio Péllico Netto; Jerome Klaas Vanclay

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent decades, native Araucaria forests in Brazil have become fragmented due to the conversion of forest to agricultural lands and commercial tree plantations. Consequently, the forest dynamics in this forest type have been poorly investigated, as most fragments are poorly structured in terms of tree size and diversity. Methods: We developed a distance-independent individual tree-growth model to simulate the forest dynamics in a native Araucaria forest located pred...

  14. Integrating Model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume III. User's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M.L.; Hutzler, M.J.

    1979-03-01

    Volume III of the six-volume series documenting the Integrating Model of PIES provides a potential PIES user with a description of how PIES operates with particular emphasis on the possible variations in assumptions and data that can be made in specifying alternative scenarios. PIES is described as it existed on January 1, 1978. The introductory chapter is followed by Section II, an overview of the structure and components of PIES. Section III discusses each of the PIES components in detail; describes the Demand Model; contains a description of the models, assumptions, and data which provide supply side inputs to the PIES Integrating Model; and concludes with a discussion of those aspects of PIES which extend the scope of the analysis beyond the national energy market. Section IV discusses two reports produced by the PIES Integrating Model: the PIES Integrating Model Report and the Coal Transportation Report. (MCW)

  15. A novel photoplethysmography technique to derive normalized arterial stiffness as a blood pressure independent measure in the finger vascular bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Gohichi; Sawada, Yukihiro; Kato, Yuichi; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi; Matsumura, Kenta; Maeda, Kimihito; Horiguchi, Masami; Ohguro, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Stiffening of the small artery may be the earliest sign of arteriosclerosis. However, there is no adequate method for directly assessing small arterial stiffness. In this study, the finger arterial elasticity index (FEI) was defined as the parameter n which denotes the curvilinearity of an exponential model of pressure (P)–volume (V a ) relationship (V a = a − b exp (−nP)). For the original estimation, the FEI was calculated from a compliance index from the finger photoplethysmogram whilst occluding the finger. A simple estimation of the FEI was devised by utilizing normalized pulse volume instead of the compliance index. Both estimations yielded close agreement with the exponential model in healthy young participants (study 1: n = 19). Since the FEI was dependent on finger mean blood pressure, normalized finger arterial stiffness index (FSI) was defined as standardized residual from their relationship: mean and standard deviation (SD) of the FSI were 50 ± 10 (study 2: n = 174). The mean coefficient of variation of the FSI for four measurements was 5.72% (study 3: n = 6). The mean and SD of the FSI in seven arteriosclerotic patients were 100.0 ± 13.5. In conclusion, the FEI and FSI by simple estimation are valid and useful for arteriosclerosis research

  16. Combined Prediction Model of Death Toll for Road Traffic Accidents Based on Independent and Dependent Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhong-xiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to build a combined model which can meet the variation rule of death toll data for road traffic accidents and can reflect the influence of multiple factors on traffic accidents and improve prediction accuracy for accidents, the Verhulst model was built based on the number of death tolls for road traffic accidents in China from 2002 to 2011; and car ownership, population, GDP, highway freight volume, highway passenger transportation volume, and highway mileage were chosen as the factors to build the death toll multivariate linear regression model. Then the two models were combined to be a combined prediction model which has weight coefficient. Shapley value method was applied to calculate the weight coefficient by assessing contributions. Finally, the combined model was used to recalculate the number of death tolls from 2002 to 2011, and the combined model was compared with the Verhulst and multivariate linear regression models. The results showed that the new model could not only characterize the death toll data characteristics but also quantify the degree of influence to the death toll by each influencing factor and had high accuracy as well as strong practicability.

  17. Reasons in Support of Data Security and Data Security Management as Two Independent Concepts: A New Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddasi, Hamid; Sajjadi, Samad; Kamkarhaghighi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Any information which is generated and saved needs to be protected against accidental or intentional losses and manipulations if it is to be used by the intended users in due time. As such, information managers have adopted numerous measures to achieve data security within data storage systems, along with the spread of information technology. The "data security models" presented thus far have unanimously highlighted the significance of data security management. For further clarification, the current study first introduces the "needs and improvement" cycle; the study will then present some independent definitions, together with a support umbrella, in an attempt to shed light on the data security management. Data security focuses on three features or attributes known as integrity, identity of sender(s) and identity of receiver(s). Management in data security follows an endless evolutionary process, to keep up with new developments in information technology and communication. In this process management develops new characteristics with greater capabilities to achieve better data security. The characteristics, continuously increasing in number, with a special focus on control, are as follows: private zone, confidentiality, availability, non-repudiation, possession, accountability, authenticity, authentication and auditability. Data security management steadily progresses, resulting in more sophisticated features. The developments are in line with new developments in information and communication technology and novel advances in intrusion detection systems (IDS). Attention to differences between data security and data security management by international organizations such as the International Standard Organization (ISO), and International Telecommunication Union (ITU) is necessary if information quality is to be enhanced.

  18. Increases in guanylin and uroguanylin in a mouse model of osmotic diarrhea are guanylate cyclase C-independent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, K A; Mann, E A; Giannella, R A; Cohen, M B

    2001-11-01

    Guanylin and uroguanylin are peptide hormones that are homologous to the diarrhea-causing Escherichia coli enterotoxins. These secretagogues are released from the intestinal epithelia into the intestinal lumen and systemic circulation and bind to the receptor guanylate cyclase C (GC-C). We hypothesized that a hypertonic diet would result in osmotic diarrhea and cause a compensatory down-regulation of guanylin/uroguanylin. Gut-to-carcass weights were used to measure fluid accumulation in the intestine. Northern and/or Western analysis was used to determine the levels of guanylin, uroguanylin, and GC-C in mice with osmotic diarrhea. Wild-type mice fed a polyethylene glycol or lactose-based diet developed weight loss, diarrhea, and an increased gut-to-carcass ratio. Unexpectedly, 2 days on either diet resulted in increased guanylin/uroguanylin RNA and prohormone throughout the intestine, elevated uroguanylin RNA, and prohormone levels in the kidney and increased levels of circulating prouroguanylin. GC-C-deficient mice given the lactose diet reacted with higher gut-to-carcass ratios. Although they did not develop diarrhea, GC-C-sufficient and -deficient mice on the lactose diet responded with elevated levels of guanylin and uroguanylin RNA and protein. A polyethylene glycol drinking water solution resulted in diarrhea, higher gut-to-carcass ratios, and induction of guanylin and uroguanylin in both GC-C heterozygous and null animals. We conclude that this model of osmotic diarrhea results in a GC-C-independent increase in intestinal fluid accumulation, in levels of these peptide ligands in the epithelia of the intestine, and in prouroguanylin in the kidney and blood.

  19. Potential Success and Barrier Factors for Implementation of the Transition to Independence (TIP Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kalinyak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this qualitative study, 28 key stakeholders who work with transition-aged youth participated in focus group discussions addressing success and barrier factors regarding implementation of a transition to independence process (TIP program for youth, ages 14–29, in three Midwestern cities. All participants had prior knowledge of TIP. The paradigm shift to client-oriented goals and services was acknowledged by respondents as the prime benefit of TIP; youth are more motivated to follow through on self-determined goals. Barrier factors for providers involved collaboration with agencies adhering to provider-oriented interventions, provision of TIP methods training, and reallocation of time and money. Barrier factors for youth involved mistrust of service providers, overcoming maturational deficits, and acquiring and maintaining relationships, reputations, and social supports.

  20. Robust Means Modeling: An Alternative for Hypothesis Testing of Independent Means under Variance Heterogeneity and Nonnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weihua; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes robust means modeling (RMM) approaches for hypothesis testing of mean differences for between-subjects designs in order to control the biasing effects of nonnormality and variance inequality. Drawing from structural equation modeling (SEM), the RMM approaches make no assumption of variance homogeneity and employ robust…

  1. Measuring the difference in mean willingness to pay when dichotomous choice contingent valuation responses are not independent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory L. Poe; Michael P. Welsh; Patricia A. Champ

    1997-01-01

    Dichotomous choice contingent valuation surveys frequently elicit multiple values in a single questionnaire. If individual responses are correlated across scenarios, the standard approach of estimating willingness to pay (WTP) functions independently for each scenario may result in biased estimates of the significance of the difference in mean WTP values. This paper...

  2. OAK FOREST CARBON AND WATER SIMULATIONS: MODEL INTERCOMPARISONS AND EVALUATIONS AGAINST INDEPENDENT DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Amthor, Jeffrey S [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, K. [NOAA ATDD; Grant, Robert F. [University of Alberta; Hartley, Anne [Florida International University, Miami; Hui, D. [University of Oklahoma; HuntJr., E. Raymond [USDA ARS; Johnson, Dale W. [University of Nevada, Reno; Kimball, John S. [University of Montana; King, Anthony Wayne [ORNL; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; Thornton, Peter [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wang, S. [Canadian Centre for Remote Sensing; Williams, M. [University of Edinburgh; Baldocchi, D. D. [University of California, Berkeley; Cushman, Robert Michael [ORNL

    2004-01-01

    Models represent our primary method for integration of small-scale, processlevel phenomena into a comprehensive description of forest-stand or ecosystem function. They also represent a key method for testing hypotheses about the response of forest ecosystems to multiple changing environmental conditions. This paper describes the evaluation of 13 stand-level models varying in their spatial, mechanistic, and temporal complexity for their ability to capture intra- and interannual components of the water and carbon cycle for an upland, oak-dominated forest of eastern Tennessee. Comparisons between model simulations and observations were conducted for hourly, daily, and annual time steps. Data for the comparisons were obtained from a wide range of methods including: eddy covariance, sapflow, chamber-based soil respiration, biometric estimates of stand-level net primary production and growth, and soil water content by time or frequency domain reflectometry. Response surfaces of carbon and water flux as a function of environmental drivers, and a variety of goodness-of-fit statistics (bias, absolute bias, and model efficiency) were used to judge model performance. A single model did not consistently perform the best at all time steps or for all variables considered. Intermodel comparisons showed good agreement for water cycle fluxes, but considerable disagreement among models for predicted carbon fluxes. The mean of all model outputs, however, was nearly always the best fit to the observations. Not surprisingly, models missing key forest components or processes, such as roots or modeled soil water content, were unable to provide accurate predictions of ecosystem responses to short-term drought phenomenon. Nevertheless, an inability to correctly capture short-term physiological processes under drought was not necessarily an indicator of poor annual water and carbon budget simulations. This is possible because droughts in the subject ecosystem were of short duration and

  3. Using the SIRDE model of social change to examine the vote of Scottish teenagers in the 2014 independence referendum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Peter R; Bennett, Mark; Abrams, Dominic

    2017-09-01

    Five hundred and seventy-three Scottish high school students were surveyed in the 2 months following the 2014 referendum on Scotland's independence. We used the Social Identity, Relative Deprivation, collective Efficacy (SIRDE) model of social change to examine the social psychological factors that should have influenced the voting choices of these teenagers. Structural equation modelling indicated that the SIRDE model fit the data and largely supported four sets of hypotheses derived from the model. Specifically, (1) those with a stronger Scottish identity, (2) those who felt frustrated and angry that Scottish people are discriminated against in British society, and (3) those who believed that Scottish people are not able to improve their relatively poor social conditions within the United Kingdom (a lack of collective efficacy) were more likely to hold separatist beliefs. Further, the relationships between identity, relative deprivation, and collective efficacy, on the one hand, and voting for Scotland's independence, on the other, were fully mediated by separatist social change beliefs. Consistent with the specificity of the model, neither political engagement nor personal relative deprivation were associated with voting choice, whereas the latter was associated with lower life satisfaction. The implications and limitations of these findings are discussed. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Incorporating Probability Models of Complex Test Structures to Perform Technology Independent FPGA Single Event Upset Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M. D.; Kim, H. S.; Friendlich, M. A.; Perez, C. E.; Seidlick, C. M.; LaBel, K. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present SEU test and analysis of the Microsemi ProASIC3 FPGA. SEU Probability models are incorporated for device evaluation. Included is a comparison to the RTAXS FPGA illustrating the effectiveness of the overall testing methodology.

  5. Toward a Subjective Measurement Model for Firm Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Artur Ledur Brito

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Firm performance is a relevant construct in strategic management research and frequently used as a dependentvariable. Despite this relevance, there is hardly a consensus about its definition, dimensionality andmeasurement, what limits advances in research and understanding of the concept. This article proposes and testsa measurement model for firm performance, based on subjective indicators. The model is grounded instakeholder theory and a review of empirical articles. Confirmatory Factor Analyses, using data from 116Brazilian senior managers, were used to test its fit and psychometric properties. The final model had six firstorderdimensions: profitability, growth, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction, social performance, andenvironmental performance. A second-order financial performance construct, influencing growth andprofitability, correlated with the first-order intercorrelated, non-financial dimensions. Results suggest dimensionscannot be used interchangeably, since they represent different aspects of firm performance, and corroborate theidea that stakeholders have different demands that need to be managed independently. Researchers andpractitioners may use the model to fully treat performance in empirical studies and to understand the impact ofstrategies on multiple performance facets.

  6. Tools for model-independent bounds in direct dark matter searches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirelli, M.; Del Nobile, E.; Panci, P.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss a framework (based on non-relativistic operators) and a self-contained set of numerical tools to derive the bounds from some current direct detection experiments on virtually any arbitrary model of Dark Matter elastically scattering on nuclei.......We discuss a framework (based on non-relativistic operators) and a self-contained set of numerical tools to derive the bounds from some current direct detection experiments on virtually any arbitrary model of Dark Matter elastically scattering on nuclei....

  7. Independent Tuning Stiffness and Toughness of Polymer Metal Composites: Modeling, Validation, and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr Esfahani, Sajedeh

    Titanium (Ti) alloys are one of the most used metals for biomedical applications, specifically in making implants. The stiffness of the dense Ti is 80-110 GPa, while the stiffness of the compact bone is 12-20 GPa. This high difference between the stiffness of the Ti alloys and compact bone results in stress shielding of the bone and stress concentration at the implant, both of which are undesirable and could result in implant failure. An alternative method to reduce the stiffness of a dense implant and avoid the stress shielding is adding porosity to the structure. This however results in considerable reduction in the toughness of the structure, which is also undesirable for the long-term success of implants. Also, implants such as knee and spine should have high fracture toughness, which is not achievable with porous structures. In this work, we study a new method for independently tuning the stiffness and toughness of the material by adding various polymers to the additively manufactured Ti structures with engineered porosity. Porous Ti samples with different levels of porosity are fabricated using selective laser melting. Various types of thermoplastic polymers including High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET), and Nylon (MXD6) are used to fill the pores to make the titanium-polymer composite parts. Compression simulations and tests are performed on both porous and composite specimens to compare the mechanical behavior of these structures. A set of finite element simulations is conducted on different structures, and the results are verified with experiments. Simulation results and experimental findings indicate that filling porous Ti with thermoplastic polymers leads to an increase in the toughness of the structure. The percentage increase of the toughness depends on several parameters such as the geometry of the porosity, the percentage of the porosity, and the type of the polymer. Also, a design algorithm is developed based on the

  8. Semi-supervised anomaly detection - towards model-independent searches of new physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuusela, Mikael; Vatanen, Tommi; Malmi, Eric; Aaltonen, Timo; Raiko, Tapani; Nagai, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Most classification algorithms used in high energy physics fall under the category of supervised machine learning. Such methods require a training set containing both signal and background events and are prone to classification errors should this training data be systematically inaccurate for example due to the assumed MC model. To complement such model-dependent searches, we propose an algorithm based on semi-supervised anomaly detection techniques, which does not require a MC training sample for the signal data. We first model the background using a multivariate Gaussian mixture model. We then search for deviations from this model by fitting to the observations a mixture of the background model and a number of additional Gaussians. This allows us to perform pattern recognition of any anomalous excess over the background. We show by a comparison to neural network classifiers that such an approach is a lot more robust against misspecification of the signal MC than supervised classification. In cases where there is an unexpected signal, a neural network might fail to correctly identify it, while anomaly detection does not suffer from such a limitation. On the other hand, when there are no systematic errors in the training data, both methods perform comparably.

  9. Utility of Monte Carlo Modelling for Holdup Measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belian, Anthony P.; Russo, P. A. (Phyllis A.); Weier, Dennis R. (Dennis Ray),

    2005-01-01

    Non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements performed to locate and quantify holdup in the Oak Ridge K25 enrichment cascade used neutron totals counting and low-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. This facility housed the gaseous diffusion process for enrichment of uranium, in the form of UF{sub 6} gas, from {approx} 20% to 93%. Inventory of {sup 235}U inventory in K-25 is all holdup. These buildings have been slated for decontaminatino and decommissioning. The NDA measurements establish the inventory quantities and will be used to assure criticality safety and meet criteria for waste analysis and transportation. The tendency to err on the side of conservatism for the sake of criticality safety in specifying total NDA uncertainty argues, in the interests of safety and costs, for obtaining the best possible value of uncertainty at the conservative confidence level for each item of process equipment. Variable deposit distribution is a complex systematic effect (i.e., determined by multiple independent variables) on the portable NDA results for very large and bulk converters that contributes greatly to total uncertainty for holdup in converters measured by gamma or neutron NDA methods. Because the magnitudes of complex systematic effects are difficult to estimate, computational tools are important for evaluating those that are large. Motivated by very large discrepancies between gamma and neutron measurements of high-mass converters with gamma results tending to dominate, the Monte Carlo code MCNP has been used to determine the systematic effects of deposit distribution on gamma and neutron results for {sup 235}U holdup mass in converters. This paper details the numerical methodology used to evaluate large systematic effects unique to each measurement type, validates the methodology by comparison with measurements, and discusses how modeling tools can supplement the calibration of instruments used for holdup measurements by providing realistic values at well

  10. Cardiopulmonary dysfunction in the Osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model Aga2 and human patients are caused by bone-independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Frank; Cohrs, Christian M; Flor, Armando; Lisse, Thomas S; Przemeck, Gerhard K H; Horsch, Marion; Schrewe, Anja; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Ivandic, Boris; Katus, Hugo A; Wurst, Wolfgang; Reisenberg, Catherine; Chaney, Hollis; Fuchs, Helmut; Hans, Wolfgang; Beckers, Johannes; Marini, Joan C; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin

    2012-08-15

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited connective tissue disorder with skeletal dysplasia of varying severity, predominantly caused by mutations in the collagen I genes (COL1A1/COL1A2). Extraskeletal findings such as cardiac and pulmonary complications are generally considered to be significant secondary features. Aga2, a murine model for human OI, was systemically analyzed in the German Mouse Clinic by means of in vivo and in vitro examinations of the cardiopulmonary system, to identify novel mechanisms accounting for perinatal lethality. Pulmonary and, especially, cardiac fibroblast of perinatal lethal Aga2/+ animals display a strong down-regulation of Col1a1 transcripts in vivo and in vitro, resulting in a loss of extracellular matrix integrity. In addition, dysregulated gene expression of Nppa, different types of collagen and Agt in heart and lung tissue support a bone-independent vicious cycle of heart dysfunction, including hypertrophy, loss of myocardial matrix integrity, pulmonary hypertension, pneumonia and hypoxia leading to death in Aga2. These murine findings are corroborated by a pediatric OI cohort study, displaying significant progressive decline in pulmonary function and restrictive pulmonary disease independent of scoliosis. Most participants show mild cardiac valvular regurgitation, independent of pulmonary and skeletal findings. Data obtained from human OI patients and the mouse model Aga2 provide novel evidence for primary effects of type I collagen mutations on the heart and lung. The findings will have potential benefits of anticipatory clinical exams and early intervention in OI patients.

  11. Does breast density measured through population-based screening independently increase breast cancer risk in Asian females?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park B

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Boyoung Park,1,2 Hye Mi Cho,2 Eun Hye Lee,3 Seunghoon Song,2 Mina Suh,2 Kui Son Choi,1,2 Bong Joo Kang,4 Kyungran Ko,5 Ann Yi,6 Hae Kyoung Jung,7 Joo Hee Cha,8 Jae Kwan Jun,1,2 1National Cancer Center Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, Goyang, Republic of Korea; 2National Cancer Control Institute, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Republic of Korea; 3Department of Radiology, Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon, Republic of Korea; 4Department of Radiology, Seoul St Mary’s Hospital, Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 5Center for Breast Cancer, National Cancer Center Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Republic of Korea; 6Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital Healthcare System Gangnam Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 7Department of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam, Republic of Korea; 8Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of breast density on breast cancer risk among women screened via a nationwide mammographic screening program. Patients and methods: We conducted a nested case–control study for a randomly selected population of 1,561 breast cancer patients and 6,002 matched controls from the National Cancer Screening Program. Breast density was measured and recorded by two independent radiologists using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS. Associations between BI-RADS density and breast cancer risk were evaluated according to screening results, time elapsed since receiving non-recall results, age, and menopausal status after adjusting for possible covariates. Results: Breast cancer risk for women with extremely dense breasts was five times higher (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] =5.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] =3

  12. MODEL DEVELOPMENT OF INFORMATION SERVICES WITH SYMBOLIC MODEL TECHNIQUES TO DEVELOP INDEPENDENCE ACADEMIC OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN IN THE DISTRICT OF KUDUS CITY LESSONS 2014/2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Lestari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study was motivated by the phenomenon of independent learning elementary school children who tend to be low. This can be observed from the tendency of primary school age children dependent on parents, friends and tutors in the homework, cheating when it replicates and mimics the work of friends. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of information services with symbolic techniques to develop independent learning model of primary school age children. The results showed that the value of t obtained figures on chances of error 0.000 9.682 less than the chance of error (p = 0.05 or in other forms 0.000 <0.05, which means significant. Furthermore, a different test showed that the average post-test bigger with 59.26 value compared with the value of the pre-test of 49.96. Thus, the alternative hypothesis that reads information service model by using symbolic models can significantly improve student learning independence supported or accepted. Keywords: Independence learning, information services, symbolic models

  13. Study on Emission Measurement of Vehicle on Road Based on Binomial Logit Model

    OpenAIRE

    Aly, Sumarni Hamid; Selintung, Mary; Ramli, Muhammad Isran; Sumi, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    This research attempts to evaluate emission measurement of on road vehicle. In this regard, the research develops failure probability model of vehicle emission test for passenger car which utilize binomial logit model. The model focuses on failure of CO and HC emission test for gasoline cars category and Opacity emission test for diesel-fuel cars category as dependent variables, while vehicle age, engine size, brand and type of the cars as independent variables. In order to imp...

  14. Stochastic inverse modelling of hydraulic conductivity fields taking into account independent stochastic structures: A 3D case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llopis-Albert, C.; Capilla, J. E.

    2010-09-01

    SummaryMajor factors affecting groundwater flow through fractured rocks include the geometry of each fracture, its properties and the fracture-network connectivity together with the porosity and conductivity of the rock matrix. When modelling fractured rocks this is translated into attaining a characterization of the hydraulic conductivity ( K) as adequately as possible, despite its high heterogeneity. This links with the main goal of this paper, which is to present an improvement of a stochastic inverse model, named as Gradual Conditioning (GC) method, to better characterise K in a fractured rock medium by considering different K stochastic structures, belonging to independent K statistical populations (SP) of fracture families and the rock matrix, each one with its own statistical properties. The new methodology is carried out by applying independent deformations to each SP during the conditioning process for constraining stochastic simulations to data. This allows that the statistical properties of each SPs tend to be preserved during the iterative optimization process. It is worthwhile mentioning that so far, no other stochastic inverse modelling technique, with the whole capabilities implemented in the GC method, is able to work with a domain covered by several different stochastic structures taking into account the independence of different populations. The GC method is based on a procedure that gradually changes an initial K field, which is conditioned only to K data, to approximate the reproduction of other types of information, i.e., piezometric head and solute concentration data. The approach is applied to the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Sweden, where, since the middle nineties, many experiments have been carried out to increase confidence in alternative radionuclide transport modelling approaches. Because the description of fracture locations and the distribution of hydrodynamic parameters within them are not accurate enough, we address the

  15. A stochastic chemostat model with an inhibitor and noise independent of population sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shulin; Zhang, Xiaolu

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a stochastic chemostat model with an inhibitor is considered, here the inhibitor is input from an external source and two organisms in chemostat compete for a nutrient. Firstly, we show that the system has a unique global positive solution. Secondly, by constructing some suitable Lyapunov functions, we investigate that the average in time of the second moment of the solutions of the stochastic model is bounded for a relatively small noise. That is, the asymptotic behaviors of the stochastic system around the equilibrium points of the deterministic system are studied. However, the sufficient large noise can make the microorganisms become extinct with probability one, although the solutions to the original deterministic model may be persistent. Finally, the obtained analytical results are illustrated by computer simulations.

  16. From “Smaller is Stronger” to “Size-Independent Strength Plateau”: Towards Measuring the Ideal Strength of Iron

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Wei-Zhong

    2015-04-17

    The trend from “smaller is stronger” to “size-independent strength plateau” is observed in the compression of spherical iron nanoparticles. When the diameter of iron nanospheres is less than a critical value, the maximum contact pressure saturates at 10.7 GPa, corresponding to a local shear stress of ≈9.4 GPa, which is comparable to the theoretical shear strength of iron.

  17. Model independent measurement of the leptonic kaon decay $K^\\pm \\to \\mu^\\pm \

    CERN Document Server

    Bizzeti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Two recent results on rare kaon decays are presented, based on $\\sim 2 \\times 10^{11} K^{\\pm}$ decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at CERN SPS in 2003 and 2004. The branching ratio of the rare leptonic decay $K^{\\pm} \\to \\mu^{\\pm} \

  18. Model-independent measurement of the W boson helicity in top quark decays at D0

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 6 (2008), 062004/1-062004/7 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527; GA MŠk LA08047 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : D0 * Tevatron * dilepton * lepton Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 7.180, year: 2008

  19. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume VI. Data documentation. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B J

    1979-02-01

    This documentation describes the PIES Integrating Model as it existed on January 1, 1978. This volume contains two chapters. In Chapter I, Overview, the following subjects are briefly described: supply data, EIA projection series and scenarios, demand data and assumptions, and supply assumptions - oil and gas availabilities. Chapter II contains supply and demand data tables and sources used by the PIES Integrating Model for the mid-range scenario target years 1985 and 1990. Tabulated information is presented for demand, price, and elasticity data; coal data; imports data; oil and gas data; refineries data; synthetics, shale, and solar/geothermal data; transportation data; and utilities data.

  20. Independencies Induced from a Graphical Markov Model After Marginalization and Conditioning: The R Package ggm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni M. Marchetti

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe some functions in the R package ggm to derive from a given Markov model, represented by a directed acyclic graph, different types of graphs induced after marginalizing over and conditioning on some of the variables. The package has a few basic functions that find the essential graph, the induced concentration and covariance graphs, and several types of chain graphs implied by the directed acyclic graph (DAG after grouping and reordering the variables. These functions can be useful to explore the impact of latent variables or of selection effects on a chosen data generating model.

  1. [Fear of falling and the relationship with the measure of functional independence and quality of life in post-Cerebral Vascular Accident (Stroke) victims].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Raquel Buarque Caminha; Laurentino, Glória Elizabeth Carneiro; Melo, Priscilla Gonçalves de; Cabral, Dinalva Lacerda; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the fear of falling of 52 chronic post-stroke individuals and to assess its relationship with measures of functional independence and quality of life (QOL). Fear of falling was assessed by the Brazilian version of Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I-BRAZIL) and functional independence by the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and QOL by the Stroke Specific Quality of Life (SSQOL) scale. Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to verify the associations between FES-I-BRAZIL and the other instruments, and the Mann-Whitney U test to compare groups with low and high fall concerns. There was a predominance of individuals with high concerns regarding falling, higher QOL, and independence. FES-I-BRAZIL was statistically associated with FIM and SSQOL. Significant relationships were also found between FES-I-Brazil with FIM transfer and locomotion sub-scales, as well as with the following SSQOL energy, family role, language, mobility, mood, self-care, and upper extremity function domains. Thus, fear of falling may contribute to reduced functional independence and QOL in post-stroke individuals and should be included in the evaluation process of these patients to ensure greater benefits during rehabilitation.

  2. Successful aging as a continuum of functional independence: lessons from physical disability models of aging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowry, K.A.; Vallejo, A.N.; Studenski, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Successful aging is a multidimensional construct that could be viewed as a continuum of achievement. Based on the disability model proposed by the WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, successful aging includes not only the presence or absence of disease, but also

  3. Quantitative coating thickness determination using a coefficient-independent hyperspectral scattering model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, LM; Papadakis, V.; Liu, P.; Adam, A.J.L.; Groves, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background
    Hyperspectral imaging is a technique that enables the mapping of spectral signatures across a surface. It is most commonly used for surface chemical mapping in fields as diverse as satellite remote sensing, biomedical imaging and heritage science. Existing models, such as the

  4. Repurposing and probabilistic integration of data: An iterative and data model independent approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, B.

    2016-01-01

    Besides the scientific paradigms of empiricism, mathematical modelling, and simulation, the method of combining and analysing data in novel ways has become a main research paradigm capable of tackling research questions that could not be answered before. To speed up research in this new paradigm,

  5. [Incorporation of an organic MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and testing of the revised model using independent data sources]. [MAGIC Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1992-09-01

    A project was initiated in March, 1992 to (1) incorporate a rigorous organic acid representation, based on empirical data and geochemical considerations, into the MAGIC model of acidification response, and (2) test the revised model using three sets of independent data. After six months of performance, the project is on schedule and the majority of the tasks outlined for Year 1 have been successfully completed. Major accomplishments to data include development of the organic acid modeling approach, using data from the Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation (ALSC), and coupling the organic acid model with MAGIC for chemical hindcast comparisons. The incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC can account for much of the discrepancy earlier observed between MAGIC hindcasts and paleolimnological reconstructions of preindustrial pH and alkalinity for 33 statistically-selected Adirondack lakes. Additional work is on-going for model calibration and testing with data from two whole-catchment artificial acidification projects. Results obtained thus far are being prepared as manuscripts for submission to the peer-reviewed scientific literature.

  6. Prediction models for the mortality risk in chronic dialysis patients: a systematic review and independent external validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramspek, Chava L; Voskamp, Pauline Wm; van Ittersum, Frans J; Krediet, Raymond T; Dekker, Friedo W; van Diepen, Merel

    2017-01-01

    In medicine, many more prediction models have been developed than are implemented or used in clinical practice. These models cannot be recommended for clinical use before external validity is established. Though various models to predict mortality in dialysis patients have been published, very few have been validated and none are used in routine clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to identify existing models for predicting mortality in dialysis patients through a review and subsequently to externally validate these models in the same large independent patient cohort, in order to assess and compare their predictive capacities. A systematic review was performed following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. To account for missing data, multiple imputation was performed. The original prediction formulae were extracted from selected studies. The probability of death per model was calculated for each individual within the Netherlands Cooperative Study on the Adequacy of Dialysis (NECOSAD). The predictive performance of the models was assessed based on their discrimination and calibration. In total, 16 articles were included in the systematic review. External validation was performed in 1,943 dialysis patients from NECOSAD for a total of seven models. The models performed moderately to well in terms of discrimination, with C -statistics ranging from 0.710 (interquartile range 0.708-0.711) to 0.752 (interquartile range 0.750-0.753) for a time frame of 1 year. According to the calibration, most models overestimated the probability of death. Overall, the performance of the models was poorer in the external validation than in the original population, affirming the importance of external validation. Floege et al's models showed the highest predictive performance. The present study is a step forward in the use of a prediction model as a useful tool for nephrologists, using evidence-based medicine that

  7. How to misinterpret photosynthesis measurements and develop incorrect ecosystem models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Iain Colin

    2017-04-01

    It is becoming widely accepted than current land ecosystem models (dynamic global vegetation models and land-surface models) rest on shaky foundations and are in need of rebuilding, taking advantage of huge data resources that were hardly conceivable when these models were first developed. It has also become almost a truism that next-generation model development should involve observationalists, experimentalists and modellers working more closely together. What is currently lacking, however, is open discussion of specific problems in the structure of current models, and how they might have arisen. Such a discussion is important if the same mistakes are not to be perpetuated in a new generation of models. I will focus on the central processes governing leaf-level gas exchange, which powers the land carbon and water cycles. I will show that a broad area of confusion exists - as much in the empirical ecophysiological literature as in modelling research - concerning the interpretation of gas-exchange measurements and (especially) their scaling up from the narrow temporal and spatial scales of laboratory measurements to the broad-scale research questions linked to global environmental change. In particular, I will provide examples (drawing on a variety of published and unpublished observations) that illustrate the benefits of taking a "plant-centred" view, showing how consideration of optimal acclimation challenges many (often untstated) assumptions about the relationship of plant and ecosystem processes to environmental variation. (1) Photosynthesis is usually measured at light saturation (implying Rubisco limitation), leading to temperature and CO2 responses that are completely different from those of gross primary production (GPP) under field conditions. (2) The actual rate of electron transport under field conditions depends strongly on the intrinsic quantum efficiency, which is temperature-independent (within a broad range) and unrelated to the maximum electron

  8. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume VI. Data documentation. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B J

    1979-02-01

    This documentation describes the PIES Integrating Model as it existed on January 1, 1978. This Volume VI of six volumes is data documentation, containing the standard table data used for the Administrator's Report at the beginning of 1978, along with the primary data sources and the office responsible. It also contains a copy of a PIES Integrating Model Report with a description of its content. Following an overview chapter, Chapter II, Supply and Demand Data Tables and Sources for the Mid-range Scenario for Target Years 1985 and 1990, data on demand, price, and elasticity; coal; imports; oil and gas; refineries; synthetics, shale, and solar/geothermal; transportation; and utilities are presented. The following data on alternate scenarios are discussed: low and high demand; low and high oil and gas supply; refinery and oil and gas data assuming a 5% annual increase in real world oil prices. Chapter IV describes the solution output obtained from an execution of PIES.

  9. Independent effects of temperature and precipitation on modeled runoff in the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, G.J.; Wolock, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    A water-balance model is used to simulate time series of water-year runoff for 4 km ?? 4 km grid cells for the conterminous United States during the 1900-2008 period. Model outputs are used to examine the separate effects of precipitation and temperature on runoff variability. Overall, water-year runoff has increased in the conterminous United States and precipitation has accounted for almost all of the variability in water-year runoff during the past century. In contrast, temperature effects on runoff have been small for most locations in the United States even during periods when temperatures for most of the United States increased significantly. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Mental health service user participation in Chinese culture: a model of independence or interdependence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jessica Pui-Shan; Tse, Samson Shu-Ki; Davidson, Larry; Cheng, Patrick

    2017-12-22

    Current models of user participation in mental health services were developed within Western culture and thus may not be applicable to Chinese communities. To present a new model of user participation, which emerged from research within a Chinese community, for understanding the processes of and factors influencing user participation in a non-Western culture. Multiple qualitative methods, including focus groups, individual in-depth interviews, and photovoice, were applied within the framework of constructivist grounded theory and collaborative research. Diverging from conceptualizations of user participation with emphasis on civil rights and the individual as a central agent, participants in the study highlighted the interpersonal dynamics between service users and different players affecting the participation intensity and outcomes. They valued a reciprocal relationship with their caregivers in making treatment decisions, cooperated with staff to observe power hierarchies and social harmony, identified the importance of peer support in enabling service engagement and delivery, and emphasized professional facilitation in advancing involvement at the policy level. User participation in Chinese culture embeds dynamic interdependence. The proposed model adds this new dimension to the existing frameworks and calls for attention to the complex local ecology and cultural consistency in realizing user participation.

  11. A quasi-model-independent search for new high pT physics at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuteson, Bruce Owen [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-12-05

    We present a new quasi-model-independent strategy (''Sleuth'') for searching for physics beyond the standard model. We define final states to be studied, and construct a rule that identifies a set of relevant variables for any particular final state. A novel algorithm searches for regions of excess in those variables and quantifies the significance of any detected excess. This strategy is applied to search for new high pT physics in approximately 100 pb-1 of proton-anti-proton collisions a √s = 1.8 TeV collected by the D0 experiment during 1992-1996 at the Fermilab Tevatron. We systematically analyze many exclusive final states, and demonstrate sensitivity to a variety of models predicting new phenomena at the electroweak scale. No evidence of new high pT physics is observed.

  12. Risk prediction models for delirium in the intensive care unit after cardiac surgery: a systematic review and independent external validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A; Mu, J L; Joynt, G M; Chiu, C H; Lai, V K W; Gin, T; Underwood, M J

    2017-03-01

    Numerous risk prediction models are available for predicting delirium after cardiac surgery, but few have been directly compared with one another or been validated in an independent data set. We conducted a systematic review to identify validated risk prediction models of delirium (using the Confusion Assessment Method-Intensive Care Unit tool) after cardiac surgery and assessed the transportability of the risk prediction models on a prospective cohort of 600 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery at a university hospital in Hong Kong from July 2013 to July 2015. The discrimination (c-statistic), calibration (GiViTI calibration belt), and clinical usefulness (decision curve analysis) of the risk prediction models were examined in a stepwise manner. Three published high-quality intensive care unit delirium risk prediction models (n=5939) were identified: Katznelson, the original PRE-DELIRIC, and the international recalibrated PRE-DELIRIC model. Delirium occurred in 83 patients (13.8%, 95% CI: 11.2-16.9%). After updating the intercept and regression coefficients in the Katznelson model, there was fair discrimination (0.62, 95% CI: 0.58-0.66) and good calibration. As the original PRE-DELIRIC model was already validated externally and recalibrated in six countries, we performed a logistic calibration on the recalibrated model and found acceptable discrimination (0.75, 95% CI: 0.72-0.79) and good calibration. Decision curve analysis demonstrated that the recalibrated PRE-DELIRIC risk model was marginally more clinically useful than the Katznelson model. Current models predict delirium risk in the intensive care unit after cardiac surgery with only fair to moderate accuracy and are insufficient for routine clinical use. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Symptom Domain Groups of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Tools Independently Predict Hospitalizations and Re-hospitalizations in Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Kavish R; Thacker, Leroy R; Wade, James B; White, Melanie B; Gavis, Edith A; Fagan, Andrew; Sterling, Richard K; Fuchs, Michael; Siddiqui, Mohammad S; Matherly, Scott; Stravitz, Richard T; Sanyal, Arun J; Puri, Puneet; Luketic, Velimir A; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2017-05-01

    Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) tools can identify health-related quality of life (HRQOL) domains that could differentially affect disease progression. Cirrhotics are highly prone to hospitalizations and re-hospitalizations, but the current clinical prognostic models may be insufficient, and thus studying the contribution of individual HRQOL domains could improve prognostication. Analyze the impact of individual HRQOL PROMIS domains in predicting time to all non-elective hospitalizations and re-hospitalizations in cirrhosis. Outpatient cirrhotics were administered PROMIS computerized tools. The first non-elective hospitalization and subsequent re-hospitalizations after enrollment were recorded. Individual PROMIS domains significantly contributing toward these outcomes were generated using principal component analysis. Factor analysis revealed three major PROMIS domain groups: daily function (fatigue, physical function, social roles/activities and sleep issues), mood (anxiety, anger, and depression), and pain (pain behavior/impact) accounted for 77% of the variability. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used for these groups to evaluate time to first hospitalization and re-hospitalization. A total of 286 patients [57 years, MELD 13, 67% men, 40% hepatic encephalopathy (HE)] were enrolled. Patients were followed at 6-month (mth) intervals for a median of 38 mths (IQR 22-47), during which 31% were hospitalized [median IQR mths 12.5 (3-27)] and 12% were re-hospitalized [10.5 mths (3-28)]. Time to first hospitalization was predicted by HE, HR 1.5 (CI 1.01-2.5, p = 0.04) and daily function PROMIS group HR 1.4 (CI 1.1-1.8, p = 0.01), independently. In contrast, the pain PROMIS group were predictive of the time to re-hospitalization HR 1.6 (CI 1.1-2.3, p = 0.03) as was HE, HR 2.1 (CI 1.1-4.3, p = 0.03). Daily function and pain HRQOL domain groups using PROMIS tools independently predict hospitalizations and re

  14. Histological changes caused by meclofenamic acid in androgen independent prostate cancer tumors: evaluation in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Delgado-Enciso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Meclofenamic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has shown therapeutic potential for different types of cancers, including androgen-independent prostate neoplasms. The antitumor effect of diverse nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been shown to be accompanied by histological and molecular changes that are responsible for this beneficial effect. The objective of the present work was to analyze the histological changes caused by meclofenamic acid in androgen-independent prostate cancer. Tumors were created in a nude mouse model using PC3 cancerous human cells. Meclofenamic acid (10 mg/kg/day; experimental group, n=5 or saline solution (control group, n=5 was administered intraperitoneally for twenty days. Histological analysis was then carried out on the tumors, describing changes in the cellular architecture, fibrosis, and quantification of cellular proliferation and tumor vasculature. Meclofenamic acid causes histological changes that indicate less tumor aggression (less hypercellularity, fewer atypical mitoses, and fewer nuclear polymorphisms, an increase in fibrosis, and reduced cellular proliferation and tumor vascularity. Further studies are needed to evaluate the molecular changes that cause the beneficial and therapeutic effects of meclofenamic acid in androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  15. eMatchSite: sequence order-independent structure alignments of ligand binding pockets in protein models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Brylinski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Detecting similarities between ligand binding sites in the absence of global homology between target proteins has been recognized as one of the critical components of modern drug discovery. Local binding site alignments can be constructed using sequence order-independent techniques, however, to achieve a high accuracy, many current algorithms for binding site comparison require high-quality experimental protein structures, preferably in the bound conformational state. This, in turn, complicates proteome scale applications, where only various quality structure models are available for the majority of gene products. To improve the state-of-the-art, we developed eMatchSite, a new method for constructing sequence order-independent alignments of ligand binding sites in protein models. Large-scale benchmarking calculations using adenine-binding pockets in crystal structures demonstrate that eMatchSite generates accurate alignments for almost three times more protein pairs than SOIPPA. More importantly, eMatchSite offers a high tolerance to structural distortions in ligand binding regions in protein models. For example, the percentage of correctly aligned pairs of adenine-binding sites in weakly homologous protein models is only 4-9% lower than those aligned using crystal structures. This represents a significant improvement over other algorithms, e.g. the performance of eMatchSite in recognizing similar binding sites is 6% and 13% higher than that of SiteEngine using high- and moderate-quality protein models, respectively. Constructing biologically correct alignments using predicted ligand binding sites in protein models opens up the possibility to investigate drug-protein interaction networks for complete proteomes with prospective systems-level applications in polypharmacology and rational drug repositioning. eMatchSite is freely available to the academic community as a web-server and a stand-alone software distribution at http://www.brylinski.org/ematchsite.

  16. Model Independence in Downscaled Climate Projections: a Case Study in the Southeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, G. M. E.; Boyles, R.

    2016-12-01

    Downscaled climate projections are used to deduce how the climate will change in future decades at local and regional scales. It is important to use multiple models to characterize part of the future uncertainty given the impact on adaptation decision making. This is traditionally employed through an equally-weighted ensemble of multiple GCMs downscaled using one technique. Newer practices include several downscaling techniques in an effort to increase the ensemble's representation of future uncertainty. However, this practice may be adding statistically dependent models to the ensemble. Previous research has shown a dependence problem in the GCM ensemble in multiple generations, but has not been shown in the downscaled ensemble. In this case study, seven downscaled climate projections on the daily time scale are considered: CLAREnCE10, SERAP, BCCA (CMIP5 and CMIP3 versions), Hostetler, CCR, and MACA-LIVNEH. These data represent 83 ensemble members, 44 GCMs, and two generations of GCMs. Baseline periods are compared against the University of Idaho's METDATA gridded observation dataset. Hierarchical agglomerative clustering is applied to the correlated errors to determine dependent clusters. Redundant GCMs across different downscaling techniques show the most dependence, while smaller dependence signals are detected within downscaling datasets and across generations of GCMs. These results indicate that using additional downscaled projections to increase the ensemble size must be done with care to avoid redundant GCMs and the process of downscaling may increase the dependence of those downscaled GCMs. Climate model generation does not appear dissimilar enough to be treated as two separate statistical populations for ensemble building at the local and regional scales.

  17. Aesthetic Surgery Training during Residency in the United States: A Comparison of the Integrated, Combined, and Independent Training Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Arash; Kim, Rebecca Y.; Wan, Derrick C.; Izadpanah, Ali; Lee, Gordon K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Three educational models for plastic surgery training exist in the United States, the integrated, combined, and independent model. The present study is a comparative analysis of aesthetic surgery training, to assess whether one model is particularly suitable to provide for high-quality training in aesthetic surgery. Methods. An 18-item online survey was developed to assess residents' perceptions regarding the quality of training in aesthetic surgery in the US. The survey had three distinct sections: demographic information, current state of aesthetic surgery training, and residents' perception regarding the quality of aesthetic surgery training. Results. A total of 86 senior plastic surgery residents completed the survey. Twenty-three, 24, and 39 residents were in integrated, combined, and independent residency programs, respectively. No statistically significant differences were seen with respect to number of aesthetic surgery procedures performed, additional training received in minimal-invasive cosmetic procedures, median level of confidence with index cosmetic surgery procedures, or perceived quality of aesthetic surgery training. Facial aesthetic procedures were felt to be the most challenging procedures. Exposure to minimally invasive aesthetic procedures was limited. Conclusion. While the educational experience in aesthetic surgery appears to be similar, weaknesses still exist with respect to training in minimally invasive/nonsurgical aesthetic procedures. PMID:25225615

  18. Linear-Time Non-Malleable Codes in the Bit-Wise Independent Tampering Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Ronald; Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Döttling, Nico

    Non-malleable codes were introduced by Dziembowski et al. (ICS 2010) as coding schemes that protect a message against tampering attacks. Roughly speaking, a code is non-malleable if decoding an adversarially tampered encoding of a message m produces the original message m or a value m' (eventuall...... non-malleable codes of Agrawal et al. (TCC 2015) and of Cher- aghchi and Guruswami (TCC 2014) and improves the previous result in the bit-wise tampering model: it builds the first non-malleable codes with linear-time complexity and optimal-rate (i.e. rate 1 - o(1))....

  19. Evaluation of the efficiency and effectiveness of independent dose calculation followed by machine log file analysis against conventional measurement based IMRT QA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baozhou; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Boddu, Sunita; Goddu, Murty; Yang, Deshan; Palaniswaamy, Geethpriya; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Wooten, Omar; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-09-06

    Experimental methods are commonly used for patient-specific IMRT delivery verification. There are a variety of IMRT QA techniques which have been proposed and clinically used with a common understanding that not one single method can detect all possible errors. The aim of this work was to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of independent dose calculation followed by machine log file analysis to conventional measurement-based methods in detecting errors in IMRT delivery. Sixteen IMRT treatment plans (5 head-and-neck, 3 rectum, 3 breast, and 5 prostate plans) created with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) were recalculated on a QA phantom. All treatment plans underwent ion chamber (IC) and 2D diode array measurements. The same set of plans was also recomputed with another commercial treatment planning system and the two sets of calculations were compared. The deviations between dosimetric measurements and independent dose calculation were evaluated. The comparisons included evaluations of DVHs and point doses calculated by the two TPS systems. Machine log files were captured during pretreatment composite point dose measurements and analyzed to verify data transfer and performance of the delivery machine. Average deviation between IC measurements and point dose calculations with the two TPSs for head-and-neck plans were 1.2 ± 1.3% and 1.4 ± 1.6%, respectively. For 2D diode array measurements, the mean gamma value with 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement was within 1.5% for 13 of 16 plans. The mean 3D dose differences calculated from two TPSs were within 3% for head-and-neck cases and within 2% for other plans. The machine log file analysis showed that the gantry angle, jaw position, collimator angle, and MUs were consistent as planned, and maximal MLC position error was less than 0.5 mm. The independent dose calculation followed by the machine log analysis takes an average 47 ± 6 minutes, while the experimental approach (using IC and

  20. Model-Independent Analysis of $B \\to \\pi K$ Decays and Bounds on the Weak Phase $\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Neubert, M

    1999-01-01

    A general parametrization of the amplitudes for the rare two-body decays B -> pi K is introduced, which makes maximal use of theoretical constraints arising from flavour symmetries of the strong interactions and the structure of the low-energy effective weak Hamiltonian. With the help of this parametrization, a model-independent analysis of the branching ratios and direct CP asymmetries in the various B -> pi K decay modes is performed, and the impact of hadronic uncertainties on bounds on the weak phase gamma = arg(Vub*) is investigated.

  1. Model independent constraints on a heavy neutral vector boson from present and future LEP and SLC data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layssac, J.; Renard, F.M.; Verzegnassi, C.

    1990-06-01

    We review the information that is already provided and will be soon provided on the parameters of a new neutral boson of the most general nature from LEP and SLC experiments. We develop a strategy that associates the general independent lepton and quark Z' couplings to precisely defined experiments. For the specific case of particular popular models (E 6 , left-right symmetry, composite Z) that we have analyzed, we predict, in case of negative searches, bounds of typical order one percent for the Z' mixing angle and one TeV for the Z' mass, at the end of the various experimental phases

  2. Concentration addition and independent action model: Which is better in predicting the toxicity for metal mixtures on zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yongfei; Feng, Jianfeng; Kang, Lili; Xu, Xin; Zhu, Lin

    2018-01-01

    The joint toxicity of chemical mixtures has emerged as a popular topic, particularly on the additive and potential synergistic actions of environmental mixtures. We investigated the 24h toxicity of Cu-Zn, Cu-Cd, and Cu-Pb and 96h toxicity of Cd-Pb binary mixtures on the survival of zebrafish larvae. Joint toxicity was predicted and compared using the concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) models with different assumptions in the toxic action mode in toxicodynamic processes through single and binary metal mixture tests. Results showed that the CA and IA models presented varying predictive abilities for different metal combinations. For the Cu-Cd and Cd-Pb mixtures, the CA model simulated the observed survival rates better than the IA model. By contrast, the IA model simulated the observed survival rates better than the CA model for the Cu-Zn and Cu-Pb mixtures. These findings revealed that the toxic action mode may depend on the combinations and concentrations of tested metal mixtures. Statistical analysis of the antagonistic or synergistic interactions indicated that synergistic interactions were observed for the Cu-Cd and Cu-Pb mixtures, non-interactions were observed for the Cd-Pb mixtures, and slight antagonistic interactions for the Cu-Zn mixtures. These results illustrated that the CA and IA models are consistent in specifying the interaction patterns of binary metal mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of Conformation Independent Computational Models for the Early Recognition of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantner, Melisa Edith; Di Ianni, Mauricio Emiliano; Ruiz, María Esperanza; Bruno-Blanch, Luis E.

    2013-01-01

    ABC efflux transporters are polyspecific members of the ABC superfamily that, acting as drug and metabolite carriers, provide a biochemical barrier against drug penetration and contribute to detoxification. Their overexpression is linked to multidrug resistance issues in a diversity of diseases. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is the most expressed ABC efflux transporter throughout the intestine and the blood-brain barrier, limiting oral absorption and brain bioavailability of its substrates. Early recognition of BCRP substrates is thus essential to optimize oral drug absorption, design of novel therapeutics for central nervous system conditions, and overcome BCRP-mediated cross-resistance issues. We present the development of an ensemble of ligand-based machine learning algorithms for the early recognition of BCRP substrates, from a database of 262 substrates and nonsubstrates compiled from the literature. Such dataset was rationally partitioned into training and test sets by application of a 2-step clustering procedure. The models were developed through application of linear discriminant analysis to random subsamples of Dragon molecular descriptors. Simple data fusion and statistical comparison of partial areas under the curve of ROC curves were applied to obtain the best 2-model combination, which presented 82% and 74.5% of overall accuracy in the training and test set, respectively. PMID:23984415

  4. Is received dose from ingested soil independent of soil PAH concentrations?-Animal model results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Rachel E; James, Kyle; Cave, Mark; Wickstrom, Mark; Siciliano, Steven D

    2016-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bioavailability from ingested soils will vary between soils; however, the nature of this variation is not well characterized. A juvenile swine model was used to link external exposure to internal benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and anthracene exposure following oral PAH ingestion of 27 different impacted site soils, soots, or spiked artificial soils. Internal exposure of BaP and anthracene, represented by area under the plasma-time curve, did not relate to soil concentration in impacted site soils, but did relate in spiked artificial soil. Point of departure modeling identified soil PAH concentrations greater than 1900 mg kg(-1) as the point where area under the curve becomes proportional to external dose. A BaP internal exposure below 1900 mg kg(-1) had an upper 95% confidence interval estimate of 33% of external exposure. Weak relationships between soil:simulated gastrointestinal fluid PAH partitioning and area under the curve values suggest that differences in internal PAH exposure between soils may not be dominated by differences in PAH partitioning. The data seem to best support exposure assessment assuming constant internal PAH exposure below soil concentrations of 1900 mg kg(-1) . However, because constant internal exposure would challenge several existing paradigms, a bioavailability estimate of 33% of the external exposure is suggested as a likely workable solution. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2261-2269. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  5. Development of Conformation Independent Computational Models for the Early Recognition of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Edith Gantner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABC efflux transporters are polyspecific members of the ABC superfamily that, acting as drug and metabolite carriers, provide a biochemical barrier against drug penetration and contribute to detoxification. Their overexpression is linked to multidrug resistance issues in a diversity of diseases. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP is the most expressed ABC efflux transporter throughout the intestine and the blood-brain barrier, limiting oral absorption and brain bioavailability of its substrates. Early recognition of BCRP substrates is thus essential to optimize oral drug absorption, design of novel therapeutics for central nervous system conditions, and overcome BCRP-mediated cross-resistance issues. We present the development of an ensemble of ligand-based machine learning algorithms for the early recognition of BCRP substrates, from a database of 262 substrates and nonsubstrates compiled from the literature. Such dataset was rationally partitioned into training and test sets by application of a 2-step clustering procedure. The models were developed through application of linear discriminant analysis to random subsamples of Dragon molecular descriptors. Simple data fusion and statistical comparison of partial areas under the curve of ROC curves were applied to obtain the best 2-model combination, which presented 82% and 74.5% of overall accuracy in the training and test set, respectively.

  6. Model-independent nonlinear control algorithm with application to a liquid bridge experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, V.; Haaning, A.; Muehlner, K.A.; Van Hook, S.J.; Swinney, H.L.

    1998-01-01

    We present a control method for high-dimensional nonlinear dynamical systems that can target remote unstable states without a priori knowledge of the underlying dynamical equations. The algorithm constructs a high-dimensional look-up table based on the system's responses to a sequence of random perturbations. The method is demonstrated by stabilizing unstable flow of a liquid bridge surface-tension-driven convection experiment that models the float zone refining process. Control of the dynamics is achieved by heating or cooling two thermoelectric Peltier devices placed in the vicinity of the liquid bridge surface. The algorithm routines along with several example programs written in the MATLAB language can be found at ftp://ftp.mathworks.com/pub/contrib/v5/control/nlcontrol. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  7. Model-based orientation-independent 3-D machine vision techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Figueiredo, R. J. P.; Kehtarnavaz, N.

    1988-01-01

    Orientation-dependent techniques for the identification of a three-dimensional object by a machine vision system are represented in parts. In the first part, the data consist of intensity images of polyhedral objects obtained by a single camera, while in the second part, the data consist of range images of curved objects obtained by a laser scanner. In both cases, the attributed graphic representation of the object surface is used to drive the respective algorithm. In this representation, a graph node represents a surface patch and a link represents the adjacency between two patches. The attributes assigned to nodes are moment invariants of the corresponding face for polyhedral objects. For range images, the Gaussian curvature is used as a segmentation criterion for providing symbolic shape attributes. Identification is achieved by an efficient graph-matching algorithm used to match the graph obtained from the data to a subgraph of one of the model graphs stored in the commputer memory.

  8. Immunological tumor destruction in a murine melanoma model by targeted LTalpha independent of secondary lymphoid tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrama, D.; Voigt, H.; Eggert, A.O.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously demonstrated that targeting lymphotoxin alpha (LTalpha) to the tumor evokes its immunological destruction in a syngeneic B16 melanoma model. Since treatment was associated with the induction of peritumoral tertiary lymphoid tissue, we speculated that the induced immune...... of specific T-cell responses even in the absence of secondary lymphoid organs. In addition, this effect is accompanied by the initiation of tertiary lymphoid tissue at the tumor site in which B and T lymphocytes are compartmentalized in defined areas and which harbor expanded numbers of tumor specific T cells...... as demonstrated by in situ TRP-2/K(b) tetramer staining. Mechanistically, targeted LTalpha therapy seems to induce changes at the tumor site which allows a coordinated interaction of immune competent cells triggering the induction of tertiary lymphoid tissue. CONCLUSION: Thus, our data demonstrate that targeted...

  9. Environmental Sound Perception: Metadescription and Modeling Based on Independent Primary Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen McAdams

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to transpose and extend to a set of environmental sounds the notion of sound descriptors usually used for musical sounds. Four separate primary studies dealing with interior car sounds, air-conditioning units, car horns, and closing car doors are considered collectively. The corpus formed by these initial stimuli is submitted to new experimental studies and analyses, both for revealing metacategories and for defining more precisely the limits of each of the resulting categories. In a second step, the new structure is modeled: common and specific dimensions within each category are derived from the initial results and new investigations of audio features are performed. Furthermore, an automatic classifier based on two audio descriptors and a multinomial logistic regression procedure is implemented and validated with the corpus.

  10. Model Independent Framework for Analysis of Scenarios with Multiple Heavy Extra Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Barducci, Daniele; Buchkremer, Mathieu; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Deandrea, Aldo; De Curtis, Stefania; Marrouche, Jad; Moretti, Stefano; Panizzi, Luca

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis strategy and a dedicated tool to determine the exclusion confidence level for any scenario involving multiple heavy extra quarks with generic decay channels, as predicted in several extensions of the Standard Model. We have created, validated and used a software package, called XQCAT (eXtra Quark Combined Analysis Tool), which is based on publicly available experimental data from direct searches for top partners and from Supersymmetry inspired searches. The code will soon be publicly available and will be upgraded to include data from new searches. By means of this code, we recast the limits from CMS on new heavy extra quarks considering a complete set of decay channels. The resulting exclusion confidence levels are presented for some simple scenarios with multiple states and general coupling assumptions. Highlighting the importance of combining multiple topology searches to obtain accurate re-interpretations of the existing searches, we discuss the reach of the SUSY analy...

  11. Independent clusters in coordinate space: an efficient alternative to shell-model expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, R.F. (Manchester Univ. (UK). Inst. of Science and Technology); Buendia, E. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Moderna); Flynn, M.F.; Guardiola, R. (Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear)

    1991-06-01

    A previous shell-model-style calculation for the ground-state energy of the {sup 4}He nucleus, based on coupled cluster techniques, was able to treat exactly the centre-of-mass motion. It is now recast in a precisely equivalent but vastly more computationally efficient form, directly in terms of coordinate-space correlation functions which are expanded in a Gaussian geminal basis and determined variationally. This reformulation further leads in a straightforward manner to a natural procedure for including higher-order correlations. Its implementation at even the simplest level produces a significant improvement in the already very good upper bounds achieved for the ground-state energy. Further extensions are also discussed. (author).

  12. Independent Directors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringe, Wolf-Georg

    2013-01-01

    about board independence in Western jurisdictions, a surprising disharmony prevails about the justification, extent and purpose of independence requirements. These considerations lead me to question the benefits of the current system. Instead, this paper proposes a new, ‘functional’ concept of board...

  13. How to easily replace the independent atom model - the example of bergenin, a potential anti-HIV agent of traditional Asian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Birger; Weber, Manuela; Kalinowski, Roman; Grabowsky, Simon; Hübschle, Christian B; Luger, Peter

    2009-12-01

    Bergenin, which has been isolated from a variety of tropical plants, has several pharmacological applications in traditional Asian medicine. Its electron-density distribution was obtained from a room-temperature low-resolution X-ray data set measured with point detection making use of multipole populations from the invariom library. Two refinement models were considered. In a first step, positional parameters and ADPs were refined with fixed library multipoles (model E1). This model was suitable to be input into a second refinement of multipoles (model E2), which converged smoothly although based on Cu Kalpha room-temperature data. Quantitative results of a topological analysis of the electron density from both models were compared with Hartree-Fock and density-functional calculations. With respect to the independent atom model (IAM) more information can be extracted from invariom modelling, including the electrostatic potential and hydrogen-bond energies, which are highly useful, especially for biologically active compounds. The reliability of the applied invariom formalism was assessed by a comparison of bond-topological properties of sucrose, for which high-resolution multipole and invariom densities were available. Since a conventional X-ray diffraction experiment using basic equipment was combined with the easy-to-use invariom formalism, the procedure described here for bergenin illustrates how it can be routinely applied in pharmacological research.

  14. Modeling-independent elucidation of inactivation pathways in recombinant and native A-type Kv channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D.; Ritter, David M.

    2012-01-01

    A-type voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels self-regulate their activity by inactivating directly from the open state (open-state inactivation [OSI]) or by inactivating before they open (closed-state inactivation [CSI]). To determine the inactivation pathways, it is often necessary to apply several pulse protocols, pore blockers, single-channel recording, and kinetic modeling. However, intrinsic hurdles may preclude the standardized application of these methods. Here, we implemented a simple method inspired by earlier studies of Na+ channels to analyze macroscopic inactivation and conclusively deduce the pathways of inactivation of recombinant and native A-type Kv channels. We investigated two distinct A-type Kv channels expressed heterologously (Kv3.4 and Kv4.2 with accessory subunits) and their native counterparts in dorsal root ganglion and cerebellar granule neurons. This approach applies two conventional pulse protocols to examine inactivation induced by (a) a simple step (single-pulse inactivation) and (b) a conditioning step (double-pulse inactivation). Consistent with OSI, the rate of Kv3.4 inactivation (i.e., the negative first derivative of double-pulse inactivation) precisely superimposes on the profile of the Kv3.4 current evoked by a single pulse because the channels must open to inactivate. In contrast, the rate of Kv4.2 inactivation is asynchronous, already changing at earlier times relative to the profile of the Kv4.2 current evoked by a single pulse. Thus, Kv4.2 inactivation occurs uncoupled from channel opening, indicating CSI. Furthermore, the inactivation time constant versus voltage relation of Kv3.4 decreases monotonically with depolarization and levels off, whereas that of Kv4.2 exhibits a J-shape profile. We also manipulated the inactivation phenotype by changing the subunit composition and show how CSI and CSI combined with OSI might affect spiking properties in a full computational model of the hippocampal CA1 neuron. This work unambiguously

  15. Development Of Entrepreneur Learning Model Based On Problem Based Learning To Increase Competency Independence And Creativity Students Of Industrial Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leola Dewiyani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently it is undeniable that the competition to get a job is very tight and of course universities have an important role in printing human resources that can compete globally not least with the Department of Industrial Engineering Faculty of Engineering Muhammadiyah University of Jakarta FT UMJ. Problems that occur is based on the analysis obtained from the track record of graduates researchers found that 60 percent of students of Industrial Engineering FT UMJ work not in accordance with the level of education owned so financially their income is still below the standard. This study aims to improve the competence of students of Industrial Engineering Department FT UMJ in entrepreneurship courses especially through the development of Problem Based Learning based learning model. Specific targets of this research were conducted with the aim to identify and analyze the need to implement learning model based on Problem Based Learning Entrepreneurship and to design and develop the model of entrepreneurship based on Problem Based Learning to improve the competence independence and creativity of Industrial Engineering students of FT UMJ in Entrepreneurship course. To achieve the above objectives this research uses research and development R amp D method. The product produced in this research is the detail of learning model of entrepreneurial model based on Problem Based Learning entrepreneurship model based on Problem Based Learning and international journals

  16. Application of independent component analysis to ac dipole based optics measurement and correction at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Shen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Correction of beta-beat is of great importance for performance improvement of high energy accelerators, like the Relativistic Hadron Ion Collider (RHIC. At RHIC, using the independent component analysis method, linear optical functions are extracted from the turn by turn beam position data of the ac dipole driven betatron oscillation. Despite the constraint of a limited number of available quadrupole correctors at RHIC, a global beta-beat correction scheme using a beta-beat response matrix method was developed and experimentally demonstrated. In both rings, a factor of 2 or better reduction of beta-beat was achieved within available beam time. At the same time, a new scheme of using horizontal closed orbit bump at sextupoles to correct beta-beat in the arcs was demonstrated in the Yellow ring of RHIC at beam energy of 255 GeV, and a peak beta-beat of approximately 7% was achieved.

  17. Model independent approach to the single photoelectron calibration of photomultiplier tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldanha, R.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, Y.; Wester, T.

    2017-08-01

    The accurate calibration of photomultiplier tubes is critical in a wide variety of applications in which it is necessary to know the absolute number of detected photons or precisely determine the resolution of the signal. Conventional calibration methods rely on fitting the photomultiplier response to a low intensity light source with analytical approximations to the single photoelectron distribution, often leading to biased estimates due to the inability to accurately model the full distribution, especially at low charge values. In this paper we present a simple statistical method to extract the relevant single photoelectron calibration parameters without making any assumptions about the underlying single photoelectron distribution. We illustrate the use of this method through the calibration of a Hamamatsu R11410 photomultiplier tube and study the accuracy and precision of the method using Monte Carlo simulations. The method is found to have significantly reduced bias compared to conventional methods and works under a wide range of light intensities, making it suitable for simultaneously calibrating large arrays of photomultiplier tubes.

  18. Regression models for predicting anthropometric measurements of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    measure anthropometric dimensions to predict difficult-to-measure dimensions required for ergonomic design of school furniture. A total of 143 students aged between 16 and 18 years from eight public secondary schools in Ogbomoso, Nigeria ...

  19. Measurement and modelling in anthropo-radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlan, Loic de

    2011-01-01

    In this HDR (Accreditation to supervise researches) report, the author gives an overview of his research activities, gives a summary of his research thesis (feasibility study of an actinide measurement system in the case of lungs), and proposes a research report on the different aspects of anthropo-radiometric measurement: context (principles, significance, sampling phantoms), development of digital phantoms (software presentation and validation), interface development and validation, application to actinide measurement in lung, taking biokinetic data into account for anthropo-radiometric measurement

  20. Multi-Day Recordings of Wearable Sensors Are Valid and Sensitive Measures of Function and Independence in Human Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogioli, Michael; Popp, Werner L; Schneider, Sophie; Albisser, Urs; Brust, Anne K; Frotzler, Angela; Gassert, Roger; Curt, Armin; Starkey, Michelle L

    2017-03-15

    Wearable sensor assessment tools have proven to be reliable in measuring function in normal and impaired movement disorders during well-defined assessment protocols. While such assessments can provide valid and sensitive measures of upper limb activity in spinal cord injury (SCI), no assessment tool has yet been introduced into unsupervised daily recordings to complement clinical assessments during rehabilitation. The objective of this study was to measure the overall amount of upper-limb activity in subjects with acute SCI using wearable sensors and relate this to lesion characteristics, independence, and function. The overall amount of upper extremity activity counts, measures of wheeling (speed and distance), and limb-use laterality were measured in 30 in-patients with an acute cervical or thoracic SCI three months after injury. The findings were related to the international standards for neurological classification of SCI, the spinal cord independence measure, and the upper extremity motor scores of the Graded and Redefined Assessment of Strength, Sensibility, and Prehension. Overall upper extremity activity counts were successfully recorded in all patients and correlated with the neurological level of injury and independence. Clinical measures of proximal muscle strength were related to overall activity count and peak velocity of wheeling. Compared with paraplegics, tetraplegics showed significantly lower activity counts and increased limb-use laterality. This is the first cross-sectional study showing the feasibility and clinical value of sensor recordings during unsupervised daily activities in rehabilitation. The strong relationship between sensor-based measures and clinical outcomes supports the application of such technology to assess and track changes in function during rehabilitation and in clinical trials.

  1. Parratt-based and model-independent X-ray reflectivity fitting procedure for nanoscale thin film characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chung-Jong; Kim, Euikwoun; Kim, Jae-Yong

    2011-05-01

    A general-purpose fitting procedure is presented for X-ray reflectivity data. The Parratt formula was used to fit the low-angle region of the reflectivity data and the resulting electron density profile (continuous base EDP or cbEDP) was then divided into a series of electron density slabs of width 1 angstroms (discrete base EDP or dbEDP), which is then easily incorporated into the Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA). An additional series of density slabs of resolution-limited width are overlapped to the dbEDP, and the density value of the each additional slab is allowed to vary to further fit the data model-independently using DWBA. Because this procedure combines the Parratt formula and the model-independent DWBA fitting, each fitting method can always be employed depending on the type of thin film. Moreover, it provides a way to overcome the difficulties when both fitting methods do not work well for certain types of thin films. Simulations show that this procedure is suitable for nanoscale thin film characterization.

  2. A Novel Triple-Pulsed 2-micrometer Lidar for Simultaneous and Independent CO2 and H2O Column Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer

    2015-01-01

    The study of global warming needs precisely and accurately measuring greenhouse gases concentrations in the atmosphere. CO2 and H2O are important greenhouse gases that significantly contribute to the carbon cycle and global radiation budget on Earth. NRC Decadal Survey recommends a mission for Active Sensing of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS). 2 micron laser is a viable IPDA transmitter to measure CO2 and H2O column density from space. The objective is to demonstrate a first airborne direct detection 2 micron IPDA lidar for CO2 and H2O measurements.

  3. Combining GPS measurements and IRI model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Pajares, M.; Juan, J.M.; Sanz, J.; Bilitza, D.

    2002-01-01

    The free electrons distributed in the ionosphere (between one hundred and thousands of km in height) produce a frequency-dependent effect on Global Positioning System (GPS) signals: a delay in the pseudo-orange and an advance in the carrier phase. These effects are proportional to the columnar electron density between the satellite and receiver, i.e. the integrated electron density along the ray path. Global ionospheric TEC (total electron content) maps can be obtained with GPS data from a network of ground IGS (international GPS service) reference stations with an accuracy of few TEC units. The comparison with the TOPEX TEC, mainly measured over the oceans far from the IGS stations, shows a mean bias and standard deviation of about 2 and 5 TECUs respectively. The discrepancies between the STEC predictions and the observed values show an RMS typically below 5 TECUs (which also includes the alignment code noise). he existence of a growing database 2-hourly global TEC maps and with resolution of 5x2.5 degrees in longitude and latitude can be used to improve the IRI prediction capability of the TEC. When the IRI predictions and the GPS estimations are compared for a three month period around the Solar Maximum, they are in good agreement for middle latitudes. An over-determination of IRI TEC has been found at the extreme latitudes, the IRI predictions being, typically two times higher than the GPS estimations. Finally, local fits of the IRI model can be done by tuning the SSN from STEC GPS observations

  4. Zinc-induced cardiomyocyte relaxation in a rat model of hyperglycemia is independent of myosin isoform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ting

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been reported previously that diabetic cardiomyopathy can be inhibited or reverted with chronic zinc supplementation. In the current study, we hypothesized that total cardiac calcium and zinc content is altered in early onset diabetes mellitus characterized in part as hyperglycemia (HG and that exposure of zinc ion (Zn2+ to isolated cardiomyocytes would enhance contraction-relaxation function in HG more so than in nonHG controls. To better control for differential cardiac myosin isoform expression as occurs in rodents after β-islet cell necrosis, hypothyroidism was induced in 16 rats resulting in 100% β-myosin heavy chain expression in the heart. β-Islet cell necrosis was induced in half of the rats by streptozocin administration. After 6 wks of HG, both HG and nonHG controls rats demonstrated similar myofilament performance measured as thin filament calcium sensitivity, native thin filament velocity in the myosin motility assay and contractile velocity and power. Extracellular Zn2+ reduced cardiomyocyte contractile function in both groups, but enhanced relaxation function significantly in the HG group compared to controls. Most notably, a reduction in diastolic sarcomere length with increasing pacing frequencies, i.e., incomplete relaxation, was more pronounced in the HG compared to controls, but was normalized with extracellular Zn2+ application. This is a novel finding implicating that the detrimental effect of HG on cardiomyocyte Ca2+ regulation can be amelioration by Zn2+. Among the many post-translational modifications examined, only phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor (RyR at S-2808 was significantly higher in HG compared to nonHG. We did not find in our hypothyroid rats any differentiating effects of HG on myofibrillar protein phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine and advanced glycated end-products, which are often implicated as complicating factors in cardiac performance due to HG. Our

  5. Central Bank independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile DEDU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the key aspects regarding central bank’s independence. Most economists consider that the factor which positively influences the efficiency of monetary policy measures is the high independence of the central bank. We determined that the National Bank of Romania (NBR has a high degree of independence. NBR has both goal and instrument independence. We also consider that the hike of NBR’s independence played an important role in the significant disinflation process, as headline inflation dropped inside the targeted band of 3% ± 1 percentage point recently.

  6. The emperor’s new measurement model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zand Scholten, A.; Maris, G.; Borsboom, D.

    2011-01-01

    In this article the author discusses professor Stephen M. Humphry's critical attitude with respect to psychometric modeling. The author criticizes Humphry's model stating that the model is theoretically interesting but cannot be tested as it is not identified. The author also states that Humphry's

  7. Experimental evaluation of a polycrystal deformation modeling scheme using neutron diffraction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Bjørn; Lorentzen, Torben

    1997-01-01

    The uniaxial behavior of aluminum polycrystals is simulated using a rate-independent incremental self-consistent elastic-plastic polycrystal deformation model, and the results are evaluated by neutron diffraction measurements. The elastic strains deduced from the model show good agreement...... with the experimental results for the 111 and 220 reflections, whereas the predicted elastic strain level for the 200 reflection is, in general, approximately 10 pct too low in the plastic regime....

  8. Energy-Independent Architectural Models for Residential Complex Plans through Solar Energy in Daegu Metropolitan City, South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Yul Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study suggests energy-independent architectural models for residential complexes through the production of solar-energy-based renewable energy. Daegu Metropolitan City, South Korea, was selected as the target area for the residential complex. An optimal location in the area was selected to maximize the production of solar-energy-based renewable energy. Then, several architectural design models were developed. Next, after analyzing the energy-use patterns of each design model, economic analyses were conducted considering the profits generated from renewable-energy use. In this way, the optimum residential building model was identified. For this site, optimal solar power generation efficiency was obtained when solar panels were installed at 25° angles. Thus, the sloped roof angles were set to 25°, and the average height of the internal space of the highest floor was set to 1.8 m. Based on this model, analyses were performed regarding energy self-sufficiency improvement and economics. It was verified that connecting solar power generation capacity from a zero-energy perspective considering the consumer’s amount of power consumption was more effective than connecting maximum solar power generation capacity according to building structure. Moreover, it was verified that selecting a subsidizable solar power generation capacity according to the residential solar power facility connection can maximize operational benefits.

  9. Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) Modeling of Laser-Induced Plasma Emission Spectra of Edible Salts for Accurate Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yonghoon; Han, Song-Hee; Nam, Sang-Ho

    2017-09-01

    We report soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) analysis of laser-induced plasma emission spectra of edible salts from 12 different geographical origins for their classification model. The spectra were recorded by using a simple laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) device. Each class was modeled by principal component analysis (PCA) of the LIBS spectra. For the classification of a separate test data set, the SIMCA model showed 97% accuracy in classification. An additional insight could be obtained by comparing the SIMCA classification result with that of partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Different from SIMCA, the PLS-DA classification accuracy seems to be sensitive to addition of new sample classes to the whole data set. This indicates that the individual modeling approach (SIMCA) can be an alternative to global modeling (PLS-DA), particularly for the classification problems with a relatively large number of sample classes.

  10. A method for estimating the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate from a vertically pointing Doppler lidar, and independent evaluation from balloon-borne in situ measurements

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, Ewan J.; Illingworth, Anthony J.; Brooks, Ian M.; Westbrook, Christopher D.; Hogan, Robin J.; Davies, Fay; Brooks, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    A method of estimating dissipation rates from a vertically pointing Doppler lidar with high temporal and spatial resolution has been evaluated by comparison with independent measurements derived from a balloon-borne sonic anemometer. This method utilizes the variance of the mean Doppler velocity from a number of sequential samples and requires an estimate of the horizontal wind speed. The noise contribution to the variance can be estimated from the observed signal-to-noise ratio and removed w...

  11. Robust Measurement via A Fused Latent and Graphical Item Response Theory Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunxiao; Li, Xiaoou; Liu, Jingchen; Ying, Zhiliang

    2018-03-12

    Item response theory (IRT) plays an important role in psychological and educational measurement. Unlike the classical testing theory, IRT models aggregate the item level information, yielding more accurate measurements. Most IRT models assume local independence, an assumption not likely to be satisfied in practice, especially when the number of items is large. Results in the literature and simulation studies in this paper reveal that misspecifying the local independence assumption may result in inaccurate measurements and differential item functioning. To provide more robust measurements, we propose an integrated approach by adding a graphical component to a multidimensional IRT model that can offset the effect of unknown local dependence. The new model contains a confirmatory latent variable component, which measures the targeted latent traits, and a graphical component, which captures the local dependence. An efficient proximal algorithm is proposed for the parameter estimation and structure learning of the local dependence. This approach can substantially improve the measurement, given no prior information on the local dependence structure. The model can be applied to measure both a unidimensional latent trait and multidimensional latent traits.

  12. Prediction models for the mortality risk in chronic dialysis patients: a systematic review and independent external validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramspek CL

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chava L Ramspek,1 Pauline WM Voskamp,1 Frans J van Ittersum,2 Raymond T Krediet,3 Friedo W Dekker,1 Merel van Diepen1 On behalf of the NECOSAD study group 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, 2Department of Nephrology, VU University Medical Center, 3Department of Nephrology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Objective: In medicine, many more prediction models have been developed than are implemented or used in clinical practice. These models cannot be recommended for clinical use before external validity is established. Though various models to predict mortality in dialysis patients have been published, very few have been validated and none are used in routine clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to identify existing models for predicting mortality in dialysis patients through a review and subsequently to externally validate these models in the same large independent patient cohort, in order to assess and compare their predictive capacities.Methods: A systematic review was performed following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA guidelines. To account for missing data, multiple imputation was performed. The original prediction formulae were extracted from selected studies. The probability of death per model was calculated for each individual within the Netherlands Cooperative Study on the Adequacy of Dialysis (NECOSAD. The predictive performance of the models was assessed based on their discrimination and calibration.Results: In total, 16 articles were included in the systematic review. External validation was performed in 1,943 dialysis patients from NECOSAD for a total of seven models. The models performed moderately to well in terms of discrimination, with C-statistics ranging from 0.710 (interquartile range 0.708–0.711 to 0.752 (interquartile range 0.750–0.753 for a time frame of 1 year. According to the calibration, most

  13. TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY OF INDEPENDENT PHONOLOGICAL MEASURES OF 2-YEAR-OLD SPEECH: A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Marie WITTLER

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Within the field of speech-language pathology, many assume commonly used informal speech sound measures are reliable. However, lack of scientific evidence to support this assumption is problematic. Speech-language pathologists often use informal speech sound analyses for establishing baseline behaviors from which therapeutic progress can be measured. Few researchers have examined the test-retest reliability of informal phonological measures when evaluating the speech productions of young children. Clinically, data regarding these measures are critical for facilitating evidence-based decision making for speech-language assessment and treatment. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to identify the evidence-base regarding temporal reliability of two such informal speech sound measures, phonetic inventory and word shape analysis, with two-year-old children. Methods: The researchers examined analyses conducted from conversational speech samples taken exactly one week apart for three children 29- to 33-months of age. The videotaped 20-minute play-based conversational samples were completed while the children interacted with their mothers. The samples were then transcribed using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA and analyzed using the two informal measures noted above. Results: Based on visual inspection of the data, the test-retest reliability of initial consonant and consonant cluster productions was unstable between the two conversational samples. However, phonetic inventories for final consonants and word shape analyses were relatively stable over time. Conclusion: Although more data is needed, the results of this study indicate that academic faculty, clinical educators, and practicing speech-language pathologists should be cautious when interpreting informal speech sound analyses based on play-based communication samples of young children.

  14. Pericardial and thoracic peri-aortic adipose tissues contribute to systemic inflammation and calcified coronary atherosclerosis independent of body fat composition, anthropometric measures and traditional cardiovascular risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Chun-Ho; Lin, Tin-Yu; Wu, Yih-Jer; Liu, Chuan-Chuan; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Yeh, Hung-I.; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chen, Su-Chiu; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Cury, Ricardo C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Coronary atherosclerosis has traditionally been proposed to be associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and anthropometric measures. However, clinical data regarding the independent value of visceral adipose tissue in addition to such traditional predictors remains obscure. Materials and methods: We subsequently studied 719 subjects (age: 48.1 ± 8.3 years, 25% females) who underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for coronary calcium score (CCS) quantification. Baseline demographic data and anthropometric measures were taken with simultaneous body fat composition estimated. Visceral adipose tissue of pericardial and thoracic peri-aortic fat was quantified by MDCT using TeraRecon Aquarius workstation (San Mateo, CA). Traditional cardiovascular risk stratification was calculated by metabolic (NCEP ATP III) and Framingham (FRS) scores and high-sensitivity CRP (Hs-CRP) was taken to represent systemic inflammation. The independent value of visceral adipose tissue to systemic inflammation and CCS was assessed by utilizing multivariable regression analysis. Results: Of all subjects enrolled in this study, the mean values for pericardial and peri-aortic adipose tissue were 74.23 ± 27.51 and 7.23 ± 3.69 ml, respectively. Higher visceral fat quartile groups were associated with graded increase of risks for cardiovascular diseases. Both adipose burdens strongly correlated with anthropometric measures including waist circumference, body weight and body mass index (all p < 0.001). In addition, both visceral amount correlates well with ATP and FRS scores, all lipid profiles and systemic inflammation marker in terms of Hs-CRP (all p < 0.001). After adjustment for baseline variables, both visceral fat were independently related to Hs-CRP levels (all p < 0.05), but only pericardial fat exerted independent role in coronary calcium deposit. Conclusion: Both visceral adipose tissues strongly correlated with systemic inflammation beyond traditional

  15. Validation of the measure automobile emissions model : a statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    The Mobile Emissions Assessment System for Urban and Regional Evaluation (MEASURE) model provides an external validation capability for hot stabilized option; the model is one of several new modal emissions models designed to predict hot stabilized e...

  16. Radiation budget measurement/model interface research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    The NIMBUS 6 data were analyzed to form an up to date climatology of the Earth radiation budget as a basis for numerical model definition studies. Global maps depicting infrared emitted flux, net flux and albedo from processed NIMBUS 6 data for July, 1977, are presented. Zonal averages of net radiation flux for April, May, and June and zonal mean emitted flux and net flux for the December to January period are also presented. The development of two models is reported. The first is a statistical dynamical model with vertical and horizontal resolution. The second model is a two level global linear balance model. The results of time integration of the model up to 120 days, to simulate the January circulation, are discussed. Average zonal wind, meridonal wind component, vertical velocity, and moisture budget are among the parameters addressed.