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Sample records for model ii trupact-ii

  1. TRUPACT-II Operating and Maintenance Instructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division

    1999-12-31

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II) Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP, the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. TRUPACT-II C of C number 9218 states, ''... each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' It further states, ''... each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the application.'' Chapter 9 of the TRUPACT-II SARP charges the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division (WID) with assuring that the TRUPACT-II is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. To meet this requirement and verify consistency of operations when loading and unloading the TRUPACT-II on the trailer, placing a payload in the packaging, unloading the payload from the packaging, or performing maintenance, the U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office (U.S. DOE/CAO) finds it necessary to implement the changes that follow. This TRUPACT-II maintenance document represents a change to previous philosophy regarding site specific procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II. This document details the instructions to be followed to consistently operate and maintain the TRUPACT-II. The intent of these instructions is to ensure that all users of the TRUPACT-II follow the same or equivalent instructions. Users may achieve this intent by any of the following methods: (1

  2. TRUPACT-II procedures and maintenance instructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-14

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for operation, inspection and maintenance of a TRUPACT-II Shipping Package and directly related components. This document shall supply the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP (NRC Certificate of Compliance No. 9218), the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. This document details the operations, maintenance, repair, replacement of components, as well as the documentation required and the procedures to be followed to maintain the integrity of the TRUPACT-II container. These procedures may be modified for site use, but as a minimum all parameters and format listed herein must be included in any site modified version. For convenience and where applicable steps may be performed out of sequence. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the minimum required procedures for use of the adjustable center of gravity lift fixture and the TRUPACT-II transport trailer in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging.

  3. TRUPACT-II 157 Examination Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry H. O& #39; Brien; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Kip E. Archibald

    2003-12-01

    This report presents the results of examination and recovery activities performed on the TRUPACT-II 157 shipping container. The container was part of a contact-handled transuranic waste shipment being transported on a truck to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico when an accident occurred. Although the transport vehicle sustained only minor damage, airborne transuranic contamination was detected in air samples extracted from inside TRUPACT-II 157 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Consequently, the shipping container was rejected, resealed, and returned to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory where the payload was disassembled, examined, and recovered for subsequent reshipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This report documents the results of those activities.

  4. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  5. DOE NCSP Review of TRUPACT-II/HalfPACT Fissile Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goluoglu, S.

    2002-03-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Nuclear Material & Spent Fuel, EM-21, tasked the CSSG to perform a scoping study to determine the feasibility of increasing the fissile mass loading limits for specified TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packages and containers. The results of the scoping study may provide insights and technical guidance for establishing fissile mass loading limits at waste generator sites and at the waste repository. The goal is to reduce costs of transporting fissile material to the WIPP from EM's various closure sites. This report documents the results of the scoping study and demonstrates that it is feasible to significantly increase the fissile mass loading limits in the TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packages and containers. Depending upon the particular payload containers used, the number of shipments to WIPP could be reduced by at least a factor of 2 and as much as a factor of 16 and the number of total payload containers required ''down-hole'' at WIPP could be reduced by at least a factor of 2 and as much as about 6. These cost savings result simply from applying a more realistic criticality analysis model rather than the very conservative, hypothetical, bounding analysis used to support the existing fissile mass loading limits. However, the applications of existing and developmental computational tools, nuclear data, and experiments from the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program have the potential to further reduce transportation and disposal container costs on the order of 7% to 17%. It is suggested that EM proceed with an effort to do the required formal analyses and pursue SARP supplements to take advantage of these savings. The success of these analyses are dependent upon the availability of the majority of the infrastructure supported by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program as defined in the Five-Year Plan for the program. Finally, it should be noted that these potential cost

  6. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.

  7. Simulation model for the WIPP transportation and delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, F. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Lippis, J. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project Office; Quinn, D. [Systems Modeling Corp., Sewickley, PA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a first of its kind repository designed to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste in bedded salt 2150 feet underground. Contact-handled (CH) TRU waste, waste with low beta or gamma emitting radionuclides that can be handled without protective clothing or additional shielding, will be transported to WIPP in Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) certified containers known as TRUPACT-IIs. The TRUPACT-II is the cornerstone of a transportation system designed for extraordinarily safe transport of TRU waste from ten DOE production and research sites to WIPP. This paper describes the complexities of the transportation system and discusses how a simulation model can be utilized as a tool to develop economical operating parameters for the system.

  8. No-migration variance petition. Volume 3, Revision 1: Appendix B, Attachments A through D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Volume III contains the following attachments: TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms (Appendix 2.10.12 of TRUPACT-II safety analysis report); and chemical compatibility analyses for waste forms across all sites.

  9. Flammability Assessment Methodology Program Phase I: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. A. Loehr; S. M. Djordjevic; K. J. Liekhus; M. J. Connolly

    1997-09-01

    The Flammability Assessment Methodology Program (FAMP) was established to investigate the flammability of gas mixtures found in transuranic (TRU) waste containers. The FAMP results provide a basis for increasing the permissible concentrations of flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in TRU waste containers. The FAMP results will be used to modify the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (TRUPACT-II SARP) upon acceptance of the methodology by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Implementation of the methodology would substantially increase the number of drums that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without repackaging or treatment. Central to the program was experimental testing and modeling to predict the gas mixture lower explosive limit (MLEL) of gases observed in TRU waste containers. The experimental data supported selection of an MLEL model that was used in constructing screening limits for flammable VOC and flammable gas concentrations. The MLEL values predicted by the model for individual drums will be utilized to assess flammability for drums that do not meet the screening criteria. Finally, the predicted MLEL values will be used to derive acceptable gas generation rates, decay heat limits, and aspiration time requirements for drums that do not pass the screening limits. The results of the program demonstrate that an increased number of waste containers can be shipped to WIPP within the flammability safety envelope established in the TRUPACT-II SARP.

  10. EXODUS II: A finite element data model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoof, L.A.; Yarberry, V.R.

    1994-09-01

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface (API).

  11. River water quality modelling: II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanahan, P.; Henze, Mogens; Koncsos, L.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. EPA QUAL2E model is currently the standard for river water quality modelling. While QUAL2E is adequate for the regulatory situation for which it was developed (the U.S. wasteload allocation process), there is a need for a more comprehensive framework for research and teaching. Moreover......, and to achieve robust model calibration. Mass balance problems arise from failure to account for mass in the sediment as well as in the water column and due to the fundamental imprecision of BOD as a state variable. (C) 1998 IAWQ Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. Supo Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Alexander Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-14

    This report describes the continuation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Supo cooling system described in the report, Supo Thermal Model Development1, by Cynthia Buechler. The goal for this report is to estimate the natural convection heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of the system using the CFD results and to compare those results to remaining past operational data. Also, the correlation for determining radiolytic gas bubble size is reevaluated using the larger simulation sample size. The background, solution vessel geometry, mesh, material properties, and boundary conditions are developed in the same manner as the previous report. Although, the material properties and boundary conditions are determined using the appropriate experiment results for each individual power level.

  13. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-12-14

    The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria with in which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

  14. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-09-09

    The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria within which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

  15. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 2, Chapter C, Appendix C1--Chapter C, Appendix C3 (beginning), Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This volume contains appendices for the following: Rocky Flats Plant and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste process information; TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms; chemical compatibility analysis for waste forms across all sites; TRU mixed waste characterization database; hazardous constituents of Rocky Flats Transuranic waste; summary of waste components in TRU waste sampling program at INEL; TRU waste sampling program; and waste analysis data.

  16. Line emission from H II blister models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical techniques to calculate the thermal and geometric properties of line emission from H II 'blister' regions are presented. It is assumed that the density distributions of the H II regions are a function of two dimensions, with rotational symmetry specifying the shape in three-dimensions. The thermal and ionization equilibrium equations of the problem are solved by spherical modeling, and a spherical sector approximation is used to simplify the three-dimensional treatment of diffuse ionizing radiation. The global properties of H II 'blister' regions near the edges of a molecular cloud are simulated by means of the geometry/density distribution, and the results are compared with observational data. It is shown that there is a monotonic increase of peak surface brightness from the i = 0 deg (pole-on) observational position to the i = 90 deg (edge-on) position. The enhancement of the line peak intensity from the edge-on to the pole-on positions is found to depend on the density, stratification, ionization, and electron temperature weighting. It is found that as i increases, the position of peak line brightness of the lower excitation species is displaced to the high-density side of the high excitation species.

  17. Spectral modeling of Type II SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The red supergiant phase represents the final stage of evolution in the life of moderate mass (8-25Msun) massive stars. Hidden from view, the core changes considerably its structure, progressing through the advanced stages of nuclear burning, and eventually becomes degenerate. Upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass, this Fe or ONeMg core collapses, leading to the formation of a proto neutron star. A type II supernova results if the shock that forms at core bounce, eventually wins over the envelope accretion and reaches the progenitor surface.The electromagnetic display of such core-collapse SNe starts with this shock breakout, and persists for months as the ejecta releases the energy deposited initially by the shock or continuously through radioactive decay. Over a timescale of weeks to months, the originally optically-thick ejecta thins out and turns nebular. SN radiation contains a wealth of information about the explosion physics (energy, explosive nucleosynthesis), the progenitor properties (structure and composition). Polarised radiation also offers signatures that can help constrain the morphology of the ejecta.In this talk, I will review the current status of type II SN spectral modelling, and emphasise that a proper solution requires a time dependent treatment of the radiative transfer problem. I will discuss the wealth of information that can be gleaned from spectra as well as light curves, from both the early times (photospheric phase) and late times (nebular phase). I will discuss the diversity of Type SNe properties and how they are related to the diversity of red supergiant stars from which they originate.SN radiation offers an alternate means of constraining the properties of red-supergiant stars. To wrap up, I will illustrate how SNe II-P can also be used as probes, for example to constrain the metallicity of their environment.

  18. Modeling interactions of Hg(II) and bauxitic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasooriya, Rohan; Tobschall, Heinz J; Bandara, Atula

    2007-11-01

    The adsorptive interactions of Hg(II) with gibbsite-rich soils (hereafter SOIL-g) were modeled by 1-pK surface complexation theory using charge distribution multi-site ion competition model (CD MUSIC) incorporating basic Stern layer model (BSM) to account for electrostatic effects. The model calibrations were performed for the experimental data of synthetic gibbsite-Hg(II) adsorption. When [NaNO(3)] > or = 0.01M, the Hg(II) adsorption density values, of gibbsite, Gamma(Hg(II)), showed a negligible variation with ionic strength. However, Gamma(Hg(II)) values show a marked variation with the [Cl(-)]. When [Cl(-)] > or = 0.01M, the Gamma(Hg(II)) values showed a significant reduction with the pH. The Hg(II) adsorption behavior in NaNO(3) was modeled assuming homogeneous solid surface. The introduction of high affinity sites, i.e., >Al(s)OH at a low concentration (typically about 0.045 sites nm(-2)) is required to model Hg(II) adsorption in NaCl. According to IR spectroscopic data, the bauxitic soil (SOIL-g) is characterized by gibbsite and bayerite. These mineral phases were not treated discretely in modeling of Hg(II) and soil interactions. The CD MUSIC/BSM model combination can be used to model Hg(II) adsorption on bauxitic soil. The role of organic matter seems to play a role on Hg(II) binding when pH>8. The Hg(II) adsorption in the presence of excess Cl(-) ions required the selection of high affinity sites in modeling.

  19. Photoionization models for giant h ii regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gra´zyna Stasi´nska

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Revisamos las fuentes de incertidumbre en los modelos de fotoionizaci on de regiones H II gigantes. Tambi en discutimos el problema de la temperatura electr onica a la luz de los ajustes de modelos en tres regiones H II gigantes.

  20. HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELS OF TYPE II-P SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Bersten

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present progress in light curve models of type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P obtained using a newly devel- oped, one-dimensional hydrodynamic code. Using simple initial models (polytropes, we reproduced the global behavior of the observed light curves and we analyzed the sensitivity of the light curves to the variation of free parameters.

  1. PARALLEL MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF TRANSPORT IN THE DARHT II BEAMLINE ON ETA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, F W; Raymond, B A; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Davis, H A; Schultze, M E

    2005-05-31

    To successfully tune the DARHT II transport beamline requires the close coupling of a model of the beam transport and the measurement of the beam observables as the beam conditions and magnet settings are varied. For the ETA II experiment using the DARHT II beamline components this was achieved using the SUICIDE (Simple User Interface Connecting to an Integrated Data Environment) data analysis environment and the FITS (Fully Integrated Transport Simulation) model. The SUICIDE environment has direct access to the experimental beam transport data at acquisition and the FITS predictions of the transport for immediate comparison. The FITS model is coupled into the control system where it can read magnet current settings for real time modeling. We find this integrated coupling is essential for model verification and the successful development of a tuning aid for the efficient convergence on a useable tune. We show the real time comparisons of simulation and experiment and explore the successes and limitations of this close coupled approach.

  2. Testing of a one dimensional model for Field II calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    to the calibrated Field II program for 1, 4, and 10 cycle excitations. Two parameter sets were applied for modeling, one real valued Pz27 parameter set, manufacturer supplied, and one complex valued parameter set found in literature, Alguer´o et al. [11]. The latter implicitly accounts for attenuation. Results show......Field II is a program for simulating ultrasound transducer fields. It is capable of calculating the emitted and pulse-echoed fields for both pulsed and continuous wave transducers. To make it fully calibrated a model of the transducer’s electro-mechanical impulse response must be included. We...... examine an adapted one dimensional transducer model originally proposed by Willatzen [9] to calibrate Field II. This model is modified to calculate the required impulse responses needed by Field II for a calibrated field pressure and external circuit current calculation. The testing has been performed...

  3. Integrating Seasonal Oscillations into Basel II Behavioural Scoring Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Klepac

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The article introduces a new methodology of temporal influence measurement (seasonal oscillations, temporal patterns for behavioural scoring development purposes. The paper shows how significant temporal variables can be recognised and then integrated into the behavioural scoring models in order to improve model performance. Behavioural scoring models are integral parts of the Basel II standard on Internal Ratings-Based Approaches (IRB. The IRB approach much more precisely reflects individual risk bank profile.A solution of the problem of how to analyze and integrate macroeconomic and microeconomic factors represented in time series into behavioural scorecard models will be shown in the paper by using the REF II model.

  4. Asymmetric Gepner Models II. Heterotic Weight Lifting

    CERN Document Server

    Gato-Rivera, B

    2010-01-01

    A systematic study of "lifted" Gepner models is presented. Lifted Gepner models are obtained from standard Gepner models by replacing one of the N=2 building blocks and the $E_8$ factor by a modular isomorphic $N=0$ model on the bosonic side of the heterotic string. The main result is that after this change three family models occur abundantly, in sharp contrast to ordinary Gepner models. In particular, more than 250 new and unrelated moduli spaces of three family models are identified. We discuss the occurrence of fractionally charged particles in these spectra.

  5. Asymmetric Gepner models II. Heterotic weight lifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gato-Rivera, B. [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Schellekens, A.N., E-mail: t58@nikhef.n [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); IMAPP, Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-05-21

    A systematic study of 'lifted' Gepner models is presented. Lifted Gepner models are obtained from standard Gepner models by replacing one of the N=2 building blocks and the E{sub 8} factor by a modular isomorphic N=0 model on the bosonic side of the heterotic string. The main result is that after this change three family models occur abundantly, in sharp contrast to ordinary Gepner models. In particular, more than 250 new and unrelated moduli spaces of three family models are identified. We discuss the occurrence of fractionally charged particles in these spectra.

  6. Standard solar model. II - g-modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, D. B.; Demarque, P.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Kim, Y.-C.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the g-mode oscillation for a set of modern solar models. Each solar model is based on a single modification or improvement to the physics of a reference solar model. Improvements were made to the nuclear reaction rates, the equation of state, the opacities, and the treatment of the atmosphere. The error in the predicted g-mode periods associated with the uncertainties in the model physics is predicted and the specific sensitivities of the g-mode periods and their period spacings to the different model structures are described. In addition, these models are compared to a sample of published observations. A remarkably good agreement is found between the 'best' solar model and the observations of Hill and Gu (1990).

  7. Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The work presented in this report is a continuation of the work described in the May 2015 report, “Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development”. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model aims to predict the temperature and bubble volume fraction in an aqueous solution of uranium. These values affect the reactivity of the fissile solution, so it is important to be able to calculate them and determine their effects on the reaction. Part A of this report describes some of the parameter comparisons performed on the CFD model using Fluent. Part B describes the coupling of the Fluent model with a Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) neutron transport model. The fuel tank geometry is the same as it was in the May 2015 report, annular with a thickness-to-height ratio of 0.16. An accelerator-driven neutron source provides the excitation for the reaction, and internal and external water cooling channels remove the heat. The model used in this work incorporates the Eulerian multiphase model with lift, wall lubrication, turbulent dispersion and turbulence interaction. The buoyancy-driven flow is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation, and the flow turbulence is determined using the k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The dispersed turbulence multiphase model is employed to capture the multiphase turbulence effects.

  8. Nyala and Bushbuck II: A Harvesting Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Temple H.; Greeff, Johanna C.

    1999-01-01

    Adds a cropping or harvesting term to the animal overpopulation model developed in Part I of this article. Investigates various harvesting strategies that might suggest a solution to the overpopulation problem without actually culling any animals. (ASK)

  9. Nyala and Bushbuck II: A Harvesting Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Temple H.; Greeff, Johanna C.

    1999-01-01

    Adds a cropping or harvesting term to the animal overpopulation model developed in Part I of this article. Investigates various harvesting strategies that might suggest a solution to the overpopulation problem without actually culling any animals. (ASK)

  10. Multilayer piezoelectric transducer models combined with Field II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Willatzen, Morten; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    with a polymer ring, and submerged into water. The transducer models are developed to account for any external electrical loading impedance in the driving circuit. The models are adapted to calculate the surface acceleration needed by the Field II software in predicting pressure pulses at any location in front...

  11. Mineral vein dynamics modelling (FRACS II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urai, J.; Virgo, S.; Arndt, M. [RWTH Aachen (Germany); and others

    2016-08-15

    The Mineral Vein Dynamics Modeling group ''FRACS'' started out as a team of 7 research groups in its first phase and continued with a team of 5 research groups at the Universities of Aachen, Tuebingen, Karlsruhe, Mainz and Glasgow during its second phase ''FRACS 11''. The aim of the group was to develop an advanced understanding of the interplay between fracturing, fluid flow and fracture healing with a special emphasis on the comparison of field data and numerical models. Field areas comprised the Oman mountains in Oman (which where already studied in detail in the first phase), a siliciclastic sequence in the Internal Ligurian Units in Italy (closed to Sestri Levante) and cores of Zechstein carbonates from a Lean Gas reservoir in Northern Germany. Numerical models of fracturing, sealing and interaction with fluid that were developed in phase I where expanded in phase 11. They were used to model small scale fracture healing by crystal growth and the resulting influence on flow, medium scale fracture healing and its influence on successive fracturing and healing, as well as large scale dynamic fluid flow through opening and closing fractures and channels as a function of fluid overpressure. The numerical models were compared with structures in the field and we were able to identify first proxies for mechanical vein-hostrock properties and fluid overpressures versus tectonic stresses. Finally we propose a new classification of stylolites based on numerical models and observations in the Zechstein cores and continued to develop a new stress inversion tool to use stylolites to estimate depth of their formation.

  12. Horns Rev II, 2-D Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU), on behalf of Energy E2 A/S part of DONG Energy A/S, Denmark. The objective of the tests was: to investigate the combined influence of the pile...

  13. Multidimensional chemical modelling, II. Irradiated outflow walls

    CERN Document Server

    Bruderer, Simon; Doty, Steven D; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Bourke, Tyler L

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the high-mass star forming region AFGL 2591 reveal a large abundance of CO+, a molecule known to be enhanced by far UV (FUV) and X-ray irradiation. In chemical models assuming a spherically symmetric envelope, the volume of gas irradiated by protostellar FUV radiation is very small due to the high extinction by dust. The abundance of CO+ is thus underpredicted by orders of magnitude. In a more realistic model, FUV photons can escape through an outflow region and irradiate gas at the border to the envelope. Thus, we introduce the first 2D axi-symmetric chemical model of the envelope of a high-mass star forming region to explain the CO+ observations as a prototypical FUV tracer. The model assumes an axi-symmetric power-law density structure with a cavity due to the outflow. The local FUV flux is calculated by a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code taking scattering on dust into account. A grid of precalculated chemical abundances, introduced in the first part of this series of papers, is used to ...

  14. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  15. Strictly isospectral Bianchi type II cosmological models

    CERN Document Server

    Rosu, H C; Obregón, O

    1996-01-01

    We show that, in the Q=0 factor ordering, the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the Bianchi type ll model with the Ansatz \\rm \\Psi=A\\, e^{\\pm \\Phi(q^{\\mu})}, due to its one-dimensional character, may be approached by the strictly isospectral Darboux-Witten technique in standard supersymmetric quantum mechanics. One-parameter families of cosmological potentials and normalizable `wavefunctions of the universe' are exhibited. The isospectral method can be used to introduce normalizable wavefunctions in quantum cosmology.

  16. The Mg II index for upper atmosphere modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thuillier

    Full Text Available The solar radio flux at 10.7 cm has been used in upper atmosphere density modelling because of its correlation with EUV radiation and its long and complete observational record. A proxy, the Mg II index, for the solar chromospheric activity has been derived by Heath and Schlesinger (1986 from Nimbus-7 data. This index allows one to describe the changes occurring in solar-activity in the UV Sun spectral irradiance. The use of this new proxy in upper atmosphere density modelling will be considered. First, this is supported by the 99.9% correlation between the solar radio flux (F10.7 and the Mg II index over a period of 19 years with, however, large differences on time scales of days to months. Secondly, correlation between EUV emissions and the Mg II index has been shown recently, suggesting that this last index may also be used to describe the EUV variations. Using the same density dataset, a model was first run with the F10.7 index as a solar forcing function and second, with the Mg II index. Comparison of their respective predictions to partial density data showed a 3–8% higher precision when the modelling uses the Mg II index rather than F10.7. An external validation, by means of orbit computation, resulted in a 20–40% smaller RMS of the tracking residuals. A density dataset spanning an entire solar cycle, together with Mg II data, is required to construct an accurate, unbiased as possible density model.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere – composition and chemistry; thermosphere – composition and chemistry – History of geophysics (atmospheric sciences

  17. Modelling of asymmetric nebulae. II. Line profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Morisset, C

    2006-01-01

    We present a tool, VELNEB_3D, which can be applied to the results of 3D photoionization codes to generate emission line profiles, position-velocity maps and 3D maps in any emission line by assuming an arbitrary velocity field. We give a few examples, based on our pseudo-3D photoionization code NEBU_3D (Morisset, Stasinska and Pena, 2005) which show the potentiality and usefulness of our tool. One example shows how complex line profiles can be obtained even with a simple expansion law if the nebula is bipolar and the slit slightly off-center. Another example shows different ways to produce line profiles that could be attributed to a turbulent velocity field while there is no turbulence in the model. A third example shows how, in certain circumstances, it is possible to discriminate between two very different geometrical structures -- here a face-on blister and its ``spherical impostor'' -- when using appropriate high resolution spectra. Finally, we show how our tool is able to generate 3D maps, similar to the ...

  18. Beyond standard model report of working group II

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, A S; Joshipura, Anjan S; Roy, Probir

    1995-01-01

    Working group II at WHEPP3 concentrated on issues related to the supersymmetric standard model as well as SUSY GUTS and neutrino properties. The projects identified by various working groups as well as progress made in them since WHEPP3 are briefly reviewed.

  19. The hydrodynamical models of the cometary compact H II region

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Feng-Yao; Li, Juan; Zhang, Jiang-Shui; Wang, Jun-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a full numerical method to study the gas dynamics of cometary ultra-compact (UC) H II regions, and associated photodissociation regions (PDRs). The bow-shock and champagne-flow models with a $40.9/21.9 M_\\odot$ star are simulated. In the bow-shock models, the massive star is assumed to move through dense ($n=8000~cm^{-3}$) molecular material with a stellar velocity of $15~km~s^{-1}$. In the champagne-flow models, an exponential distribution of density with a scale height of 0.2 pc is assumed. The profiles of the [Ne II] 12.81\\mum and $H_2~S(2)$ lines from the ionized regions and PDRs are compared for two sets of models. In champagne-flow models, emission lines from the ionized gas clearly show the effect of acceleration along the direction toward the tail due to the density gradient. The kinematics of the molecular gas inside the dense shell is mainly due to the expansion of the H II region. However, in bow-shock models the ionized gas mainly moves in the same direction as the stellar motion...

  20. SDSS-II: Determination of shape and color parameter coefficients for SALT-II fit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dojcsak, L.; Marriner, J.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In this study we look at the SALT-II model of Type IA supernova analysis, which determines the distance moduli based on the known absolute standard candle magnitude of the Type IA supernovae. We take a look at the determination of the shape and color parameter coefficients, {alpha} and {beta} respectively, in the SALT-II model with the intrinsic error that is determined from the data. Using the SNANA software package provided for the analysis of Type IA supernovae, we use a standard Monte Carlo simulation to generate data with known parameters to use as a tool for analyzing the trends in the model based on certain assumptions about the intrinsic error. In order to find the best standard candle model, we try to minimize the residuals on the Hubble diagram by calculating the correct shape and color parameter coefficients. We can estimate the magnitude of the intrinsic errors required to obtain results with {chi}{sup 2}/degree of freedom = 1. We can use the simulation to estimate the amount of color smearing as indicated by the data for our model. We find that the color smearing model works as a general estimate of the color smearing, and that we are able to use the RMS distribution in the variables as one method of estimating the correct intrinsic errors needed by the data to obtain the correct results for {alpha} and {beta}. We then apply the resultant intrinsic error matrix to the real data and show our results.

  1. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and Antimicrobial Studies of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, Mn(II, and Zn(II Complexes of ONO Schiff Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja Mendu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, Mn(II, and Zn(II complexes have been synthesized from the schiff base ligand L. The schiff base ligand [(4-oxo-4H-chromen-3-yl methylene] benzohydrazide (L has been synthesized by the reaction between chromone-3-carbaldehyde and benzoyl hydrazine. The nature of bonding and geometry of the transition metal complexes as well as schiff base ligand L have been deduced from elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1HNMR, ESR spectral studies, mass, thermal (TGA and DTA analysis, magnetic susceptibility, and molar conductance measurements. Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, and Mn(II metal ions are forming 1:2 (M:L complexes, Zn(II is forming 1:1 (M:L complex. Based on elemental, conductance and spectral studies, six-coordinated geometry was assigned for Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, Mn(II, and Zn(II complexes. The complexes are 1:2 electrolytes in DMSO except zinc complex, which is neutral in DMSO. The ligand L acts as tridentate and coordinates through nitrogen atom of azomethine group, oxygen atom of keto group of γ-pyrone ring and oxygen atom of hydrazoic group of benzoyl hydrazine. The 3D molecular modeling and energies of all the compounds are furnished. The biological activity of the ligand and its complexes have been studied on the four bacteria E. coli, Edwardella, Pseudomonas, and B. subtilis and two fungi pencillium and tricoderma by well disc and fusion method and found that the metal chelates are more active than the free schiff base ligand.

  2. Comparative study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) transportation alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    WIPP transportation studies in the Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement for WIPP are the baseline for this report. In an attempt to present the most current analysis, this study incorporates the most relevant data available. The following three transportation options are evaluated for the Disposal Phase, which is assumed to be 20 years: Truck shipments, consisting of a tractor and trailer, with three TRUPACT-IIs or one RH-72B; Regular commercial train shipments consisting of up to three railcars carrying up to 18 TRUPACT-IIs or up to six RH-72Bs; Dedicated train shipments consisting of a locomotive, an idle car, railcars carrying 18 TRUPACT-IIs or six RH-72Bs, another idle car, and a caboose or passenger car with an emergency response specialist. No other cargo is carried. This report includes: A consideration of occupational and public risks and exposures, and other environmental impacts; A consideration of emergency response capabilities; and An extimation of comparative costs.

  3. Modeling and Analysis of NGC System using Ptolemy II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Sreekumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Model based system design has been used in real time embedded systems for validating and testing during the development lifecycle. Computation models - synchronous dataflow model (SDF and Discrete Event (DE have been used and finite state machine has been integrated with SDF and Discrete Event (DE modeling domains for simulating the functionalities in the system. Here a case study of resource augmented Navigation, Guidance and Control unit of onboard computers in satellite launch vehicle has been selected as a frame work and fault tolerant algorithm has been modeled and simulated with Ptolemy II. Feasibility of the scheduling of the fault tolerant algorithm has been analyzed and dependencies existing between different components and processes in the system have been investigated. The future work consists of modeling original functionality of NGC units inside each state of FSM and can be validated for the correct performance. Non-deterministic communication and clock drifts can be accounted into the model.

  4. Theoretical models for Type I and Type II supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Recent theoretical progress in understanding the origin and nature of Type I and Type II supernovae is discussed. New Type II presupernova models characterized by a variety of iron core masses at the time of collapse are presented and the sensitivity to the reaction rate /sup 12/C(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O explained. Stars heavier than about 20 M/sub solar/ must explode by a ''delayed'' mechanism not directly related to the hydrodynamical core bounce and a subset is likely to leave black hole remnants. The isotopic nucleosynthesis expected from these massive stellar explosions is in striking agreement with the sun. Type I supernovae result when an accreting white dwarf undergoes a thermonuclear explosion. The critical role of the velocity of the deflagration front in determining the light curve, spectrum, and, especially, isotopic nucleosynthesis in these models is explored. 76 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Fitting the Two-Higgs-Doublet model of type II

    CERN Document Server

    Eberhardt, Otto

    2014-01-01

    We present the current status of the Two-Higgs-Doublet model of type II. Taking into account all available relevant information, we exclude at $95$% CL sizeable deviations of the so-called alignment limit, in which all couplings of the light CP-even Higgs boson $h$ are Standard-Model-like. While we can set a lower limit of $240$ GeV on the mass of the pseudoscalar Higgs boson at $95$% CL, the mass of the heavy CP-even Higgs boson $H$ can be even lighter than $200$ GeV. The strong constraints on the model parameters also set limits on the triple Higgs couplings: the $hhh$ coupling in the Two-Higgs-Doublet model of type II cannot be larger than in the Standard Model, while the $hhH$ coupling can maximally be $2.5$ times the size of the Standard Model $hhh$ coupling, assuming an $H$ mass below $1$ TeV. The selection of benchmark scenarios which maximize specific effects within the allowed regions for further collider studies is illustrated for the $H$ branching fraction to fermions and gauge bosons. As an exampl...

  6. Photon Number Conserving Models of H II Bubbles during Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Paranjape, Aseem; Padmanabhan, Hamsa

    2015-01-01

    Traditional excursion set based models of H II bubble growth during the epoch of reionization are known to violate photon number conservation, in the sense that the mass fraction in ionized bubbles in these models does not equal the ratio of the number of ionizing photons produced by sources and the number of hydrogen atoms in the intergalactic medium. We demonstrate that this problem arises from a fundamental conceptual shortcoming of the excursion set approach (already recognised in the literature on this formalism) which only tracks average mass fractions instead of the exact, stochastic source counts. With this insight, we build an approximately photon number conserving Monte Carlo model of bubble growth based on partitioning regions of dark matter into halos. Our model, which is formally valid for white noise initial conditions (ICs), shows dramatic improvements in photon number conservation, as well as substantial differences in the bubble size distribution, as compared to traditional models. We explore...

  7. Kinetic modelling for zinc (II) ions biosorption onto Luffa cylindrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oboh, I., E-mail: innocentoboh@uniuyo.edu.ng [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Uyo, Uyo (Nigeria); Aluyor, E.; Audu, T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Uyo, BeninCity, BeninCity (Nigeria)

    2015-03-30

    The biosorption of Zinc (II) ions onto a biomaterial - Luffa cylindrica has been studied. This biomaterial was characterized by elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and the biomaterial before and after sorption, was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer. The kinetic nonlinear models fitted were Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and Intra-particle diffusion. A comparison of non-linear regression method in selecting the kinetic model was made. Four error functions, namely coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}), hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID), average relative error (ARE), and sum of the errors squared (ERRSQ), were used to predict the parameters of the kinetic models. The strength of this study is that a biomaterial with wide distribution particularly in the tropical world and which occurs as waste material could be put into effective utilization as a biosorbent to address a crucial environmental problem.

  8. Counterparty risk analysis using Merton's structural model under Solvency II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Otero González

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The new solvency regulation in the European insurance sector, denominated Solvency II, will completely transform the system of capital requirements estimation. Recently it has introduced the latest quantitative impact study (QIS5, which provides the calculation method in the internal model for the determination of capital requirements. The aim of this paper is to analyze the adequacy of the calibration of the counterparty credit risk by the models proposed in recent quantitative impact reports (fourth and fifth. To do this we compare capital requirements obtained by the two alternatives, against which that results from applying a simulation model based on the structural approach. The results shows that the use of probabilities based on the methodology of Merton, which can be used in an internal model, compared to those based on ratings (standard model result in substantially higher capital requirements. In addition, the model proposed in QIS4 based on Vasicek distribution is not appropriate when the number of counterparties is reduced, a common situation in the European insurance sector. Moreover, the new proposal (QIS5 or Ter Berg model is more versatile and suitable than its predecessor but requires further research in order to improve the calibration hypothesis and, thus, to better approximate estimates to the risk actually assumed.

  9. Modeling the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II using non-parametric item response models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Garre, Francisca; Hidalgo, María Dolores; Guilera, Georgina; Pino, Oscar; Rojo, J Emilio; Gómez-Benito, Juana

    2015-03-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a multidimensional instrument developed for measuring disability. It comprises six domains (getting around, self-care, getting along with others, life activities and participation in society). The main purpose of this paper is the evaluation of the psychometric properties for each domain of the WHO-DAS II with parametric and non-parametric Item Response Theory (IRT) models. A secondary objective is to assess whether the WHO-DAS II items within each domain form a hierarchy of invariantly ordered severity indicators of disability. A sample of 352 patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder is used in this study. The 36 items WHO-DAS II was administered during the consultation. Partial Credit and Mokken scale models are used to study the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the WHO-DAS II scale are satisfactory for all the domains. However, we identify a few items that do not discriminate satisfactorily between different levels of disability and cannot be invariantly ordered in the scale. In conclusion the WHO-DAS II can be used to assess overall disability in patients with schizophrenia, but some domains are too general to assess functionality in these patients because they contain items that are not applicable to this pathology.

  10. Atomic Data and Spectral Models for FeII

    CERN Document Server

    Bautista, Manuel A; Ballance, Connor; Quinet, Pascal; Ferland, Gary; Mendoza, Claudio; Kallman, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    We present extensive calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact collision strengths for Fe II. The data sets involve 52 levels from the $3d\\,^7$, $3d\\,^64s$, and $3d\\,^54s^2$ configurations. Computations of $A$-values are carried out with a combination of state-of-the-art multiconfiguration approaches, namely the relativistic Hartree--Fock, Thomas--Fermi--Dirac potential, and Dirac--Fock methods; while the $R$-matrix plus intermediate coupling frame transformation, Breit--Pauli $R$-matrix and Dirac $R$-matrix packages are used to obtain collision strengths. We examine the advantages and shortcomings of each of these methods, and estimate rate uncertainties from the resulting data dispersion. We proceed to construct excitation balance spectral models, and compare the predictions from each data set with observed spectra from various astronomical objects. We are thus able to establish benchmarks in the spectral modeling of [Fe II] emission in the IR and optical regions as well as in the UV Fe...

  11. Hydrodynamical models of Type II-Plateau Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Bersten, Melina C; Hamuy, Mario

    2011-01-01

    We present bolometric light curves of Type II-plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) obtained using a newly developed, one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code with flux-limited radiation diffusion. Using our code we calculate the bolometric light curve and photospheric velocities of SN1999em obtaining a remarkably good agreement with observations despite the simplifications used in our calculation. The physical parameters used in our calculation are E=1.25 foe, M= 19 M_\\odot, R= 800 R_\\odot and M_{Ni}=0.056 M_\\odot. We find that an extensive mixing of 56Ni is needed in order to reproduce a plateau as flat as that shown by the observations. We also study the possibility to fit the observations with lower values of the initial mass consistently with upper limits that have been inferred from pre-supernova imaging of SN1999em in connection with stellar evolution models. We cannot find a set of physical parameters that reproduce well the observations for models with pre-supernova mass of \\leq 12 M_\\odot, although mode...

  12. Eagle II: A prototype for multi-resolution combat modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, D.R.; Hutchinson, J.L.

    1993-02-01

    Eagle 11 is a prototype analytic model derived from the integration of the low resolution Eagle model with the high resolution SIMNET model. This integration promises a new capability to allow for a more effective examination of proposed or existing combat systems that could not be easily evaluated using either Eagle or SIMNET alone. In essence, Eagle II becomes a multi-resolution combat model in which simulated combat units can exhibit both high and low fidelity behavior at different times during model execution. This capability allows a unit to behave in a highly manner only when required, thereby reducing the overall computational and manpower requirements for a given study. In this framework, the SIMNET portion enables a highly credible assessment of the performance of individual combat systems under consideration, encompassing both engineering performance and crew capabilities. However, when the assessment being conducted goes beyond system performance and extends to questions of force structure balance and sustainment, then SISMNET results can be used to ``calibrate`` the Eagle attrition process appropriate to the study at hand. Advancing technologies, changes in the world-wide threat, requirements for flexible response, declining defense budgets, and down-sizing of military forces motivate the development of manpower-efficient, low-cost, responsive tools for combat development studies. Eagle and SIMNET both serve as credible and useful tools. The integration of these two models promises enhanced capabilities to examine the broader, deeper, more complex battlefield of the future with higher fidelity, greater responsiveness and low overall cost.

  13. Modeling fluid dynamics on type II quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, James; Weeks, David; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    A quantum algorithm is presented for modeling the time evolution of density and flow fields governed by classical equations, such as the diffusion equation, the nonlinear Burgers equation, and the damped wave equation. The algorithm is intended to run on a type-II quantum computer, a parallel quantum computer consisting of a lattice of small type I quantum computers undergoing unitary evolution and interacting via information interchanges represented by an orthogonal matrices. Information is effectively transferred between adjacent quantum computers over classical communications channels because of controlled state demolition following local quantum mechanical qubit-qubit interactions within each quantum computer. The type-II quantum algorithm presented in this paper describes a methodology for generating quantum logic operations as a generalization of classical operations associated with finite-point group symmetries. The quantum mechanical evolution of multiple qubits within each node is described. Presented is a proof that the parallel quantum system obeys a finite-difference quantum Boltzman equation at the mesoscopic scale, leading in turn to various classical linear and nonlinear effective field theories at the macroscopic scale depending on the details of the local qubit-qubit interactions.

  14. Comparison with CLPX II airborne data using DMRT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; Liang, D.; Andreadis, K.M.; Tsang, L.; Josberger, E.G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we considered a physical-based model which use numerical solution of Maxwell Equations in three-dimensional simulations and apply into Dense Media Radiative Theory (DMRT). The model is validated in two specific dataset from the second Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX II) at Alaska and Colorado. The data were all obtain by the Ku-band (13.95GHz) observations using airborne imaging polarimetric scatterometer (POLSCAT). Snow is a densely packed media. To take into account the collective scattering and incoherent scattering, analytical Quasi-Crystalline Approximation (QCA) and Numerical Maxwell Equation Method of 3-D simulation (NMM3D) are used to calculate the extinction coefficient and phase matrix. DMRT equations were solved by iterative solution up to 2nd order for the case of small optical thickness and full multiple scattering solution by decomposing the diffuse intensities into Fourier series was used when optical thickness exceed unity. It was shown that the model predictions agree with the field experiment not only co-polarization but also cross-polarization. For Alaska region, the input snow structure data was obtain by the in situ ground observations, while for Colorado region, we combined the VIC model to get the snow profile. ??2009 IEEE.

  15. The black hole challenge in Randall-Sundrum II model

    CERN Document Server

    Pappas, Nikolaos D

    2014-01-01

    Models postulating the existence of additional spacelike dimensions of macroscopic or even infinite size, while viewing our observable universe as merely a 3-brane living in a higher-dimensional bulk were a major breakthrough when proposed some 15 years ago. The most interesting among them both in terms of elegance of the setup and of the richness of the emerging phenomenology is the Randall-Sundrum II model where one infinite extra spacelike dimension is considered with an AdS topology, characterized by the warping effect caused by the presence of a negative cosmological constant in the bulk. A major drawback of this model is that despite numerous efforts no line element has ever been found that could describe a stable, regular, realistic black hole. Finding a smoothly behaved such solution supported by the presence of some more or less conventional fields either in the bulk and/or on the brane is the core of the black hole challenge. After a comprehensive presentation of the details of the model and the ana...

  16. Type II Supernovae: Model Light Curves and Standard Candle Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude—from 0.5 to 4.0 × 1051 ergs, with a typical value of ~0.9 × 1051 ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to ~20% using only photometric data.

  17. Efficient three-dimensional global models for climate studies - Models I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russel, G.; Rind, D.; Lacis, A.; Travis, L.; Stone, P.; Lebedeff, S.; Ruedy, R.; Hansen, J.

    1983-01-01

    Climate modeling based on numerical solution of the fundamental equations for atmospheric structure and motion permits the explicit modeling of physical processes in the climate system and the natural treatment of interactions and feedbacks among parts of the system. The main difficulty concerning this approach is related to the computational requirements. The present investigation is concerned with the development of a grid-point model which is programmed so that both horizontal and vertical resolutions can easily be changed. Attention is given to a description of Model I, the performance of sensitivity experiments by varying parameters, the definition of an improved Model II, and a study of the dependence of climate simulation on resolution with Model II. It is shown that the major features of global climate can be simulated reasonably well with a horizontal resolution as coarse as 1000 km. Such a resolution allows the possibility of long-range climate studies with moderate computer resources.

  18. Photoionization models of the CALIFA H II regions. I. Hybrid models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, C.; Delgado-Inglada, G.; Sánchez, S. F.; Galbany, L.; García-Benito, R.; Husemann, B.; Marino, R. A.; Mast, D.; Roth, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    Photoionization models of H ii regions require as input a description of the ionizing spectral energy distribution (SED) and of the gas distribution, in terms of ionization parameter U and chemical abundances (e.g., O/H and N/O).A strong degeneracy exists between the hardness of the SED and U, which in turn leads to high uncertainties in the determination of the other parameters, including abundances. One way to resolve the degeneracy is to fix one of the parameters using additional information. For each of the ~20 000 sources of the CALIFA H ii regions catalog, a grid of photoionization models is computed assuming the ionizing SED to be described by the underlying stellar population obtained from spectral synthesis modeling. The ionizing SED is then defined as the sum of various stellar bursts of different ages and metallicities. This solves the degeneracy between the shape of the ionizing SED and U. The nebular metallicity (associated with O/H) is defined using the classical strong line method O3N2 (which gives our models the status of "hybrids"). The remaining free parameters are the abundance ratio N/O and the ionization parameter U, which are determined by looking for the model fitting [N ii]/Hα and [O iii]/Hβ. The models are also selected to fit [O ii]/Hβ. This process leads to a set of ~3200 models that reproduce the three observations simultaneously. We find that the regions associated with young stellar bursts (i.e., ionized by OB stars) are affected by leaking of ionizing photons,the proportion of escaping photons having a median of 80%. The set of photoionization models satisfactorily reproduces the electron temperature derived from the [O iii]λ4363/5007 line ratio. We determine new relations between the nebular parameters, like the ionization parameter U and the [O ii]/[O iii] or [S ii]/[S iii] line ratios. A new relation between N/O and O/H is obtained, mostly compatible with previous empirical determinations (and not with previous results obtained

  19. Equilibrium modeling of mono and binary sorption of Cu(II and Zn(II onto chitosan gel beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaj Józef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work are in-depth experimental studies of Cu(II and Zn(II ion removal on chitosan gel beads from both one- and two-component water solutions at the temperature of 303 K. The optimal process conditions such as: pH value, dose of sorbent and contact time were determined. Based on the optimal process conditions, equilibrium and kinetic studies were carried out. The maximum sorption capacities equaled: 191.25 mg/g and 142.88 mg/g for Cu(II and Zn(II ions respectively, when the sorbent dose was 10 g/L and the pH of a solution was 5.0 for both heavy metal ions. One-component sorption equilibrium data were successfully presented for six of the most useful three-parameter equilibrium models: Langmuir-Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Sips, Koble-Corrigan, Hill and Toth. Extended forms of Langmuir-Freundlich, Koble-Corrigan and Sips models were also well fitted to the two-component equilibrium data obtained for different ratios of concentrations of Cu(II and Zn(II ions (1:1, 1:2, 2:1. Experimental sorption data were described by two kinetic models of the pseudo-first and pseudo-second order. Furthermore, an attempt to explain the mechanisms of the divalent metal ion sorption process on chitosan gel beads was undertaken.

  20. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous type II plateau Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Pumo, M L; Spiro, S; Pastorello, A; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Manicò, G; Turatto, M

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe we infer explosion energies of $0.16$-$0.18$ foe, radii at explosion of $1.8$-$3.5 \\times 10^{13}$ cm, and ejected masses of $10$-$11.3$\\Msun. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range $\\sim 13.2$-$15.1$\\Msun\\, for SN 2003Z and $\\sim 11.4$-$12.9$\\Msun\\, for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way, enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that: a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP, b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explo...

  1. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous Type II plateau supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Spiro, S.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Manicò, G.; Turatto, M.

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe, we infer explosion energies of 0.16-0.18 foe, radii at explosion of 1.8-3.5 × 1013 cm and ejected masses of 10-11.3 M⊙. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range ˜13.2-15.1 M⊙ for SN 2003Z and ˜11.4-12.9 M⊙ for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that (a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP; (b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explosions of red (or yellow) supergiant stars of low to intermediate mass; (c) some faint objects may also be explained as electron-capture SNe from massive super-asymptotic giant branch stars; and (d) LL SNe IIP form the underluminous tail of the SNe IIP family, where the main parameter `guiding' the distribution seems to be the ratio of the total explosion energy to the ejected mass. Further hydrodynamical studies should be performed and compared to a more extended sample of LL SNe IIP before drawing any conclusion on the relevance of fall-back to this class of events.

  2. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: "each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." They further state: "each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) management and operating (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21 regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are

  3. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-09-11

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: "each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the pplication." They further state: "each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) management and operating (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21 regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are

  4. Longitudinal Stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II: A Latent Trait-State-Occasion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    In a six-wave longitudinal study with two cohorts (660 adolescents and 630 young adults), this study investigated the longitudinal stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) using the Trait-State-Occasion (TSO) model. The results revealed that the full TSO model was the best fitting representation of the depression measured by the…

  5. Analytic Models for Radiation Induced Loss in Optical Fibers II. A Physical Model,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    and identify by Mock number) PIEL GRUP UB.GR. Optical fibers Analytical models Radiation effects 19. ABSTRACT (ConinueII. anl mwr,f fneciua,, and...conditions specified in the derivation of the equations existed during the irradiations. This is because the functional form of the equations is not...tion is not necessarily incorrect. If one assumes a relatively simple form of re- covery as a function of time, such as an exponential recovery, it can

  6. QGSjet II and EPOS hadronic interaction models: comparison with the Yakutsk EAS array data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knurenko, S.P.; Sabourov, A.V. [Yu. G. Shafer Institute for Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-15

    Various hadronic interaction models were used in extensive air showers simulations. This resulted in ambiguous estimation of primary energy, cosmic ray flux intensity, mass composition, etc. Several revisions of models have been made recently; for example, third major version of QGSjet II (QGSjet II-03) model was released, new models based on actual accelerator data appeared (EPOS). Employment of newer models always leads to new comprehension of experimental results. Nevertheless, in this case there still is some ambiguity. It is a matter of how correct does the model extrapolate characteristics of primary particle interaction with nuclei of the air from high energies to ultra-high.

  7. Computational evaluation of unsaturated carbonitriles as neutral receptor model for beryllium(II) recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Ahmad Nazmi; Ahmad, Mohd Rais; Alias, Yatimah; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Woi, Pei Meng

    2014-12-01

    Design of neutral receptor molecules (ionophores) for beryllium(II) using unsaturated carbonitrile models has been carried out via density functional theory, G3, and G4 calculations. The first part of this work focuses on gas phase binding energies between beryllium(II) and 2-cyano butadiene (2-CN BD), 3-cyano propene (3-CN P), and simpler models with two separate fragments; acrylonitrile and ethylene. Interactions between beryllium(II) and cyano nitrogen and terminal olefin in the models have been examined in terms of geometrical changes, distribution of charge over the entire π-system, and rehybridization of vinyl carbon orbitals. NMR shieldings and vibrational frequencies probed charge centers and strength of interactions. The six-membered cyclic complexes have planar structures with the rehybridized carbon slightly out of plane (16° in 2-CN BD). G3 results show that in 2-CN BD complex participation of vinyl carbon further stabilizes the cyclic adduct by 16.3 kcal mol(-1), whereas, in simpler models, interaction between beryllium(II) and acetonitrile is favorable by 46.4 kcal mol(-1) compared with that of ethylene. The terminal vinyl carbon in 2-CN BD rehybridizes to sp (3) with an increase of 7 % of s character to allow interaction with beryllium(II). G4 calculations show that the Be(II) and 2-CN BD complex is more strongly bound than those with Mg(II) and Ca(II) by 98.5 and 139.2 kcal mol(-1) (-1), respectively. QST2 method shows that the cyclic and acyclic forms of Be(II)-2-CN BD complexes are separated by 12.3 kcal mol(-1) barrier height. Overlap population analysis reveals that Ca(II) can be discriminated based on its tendency to form ionic interaction with the receptor models.

  8. NSLS-II: Nonlinear Model Calibration for Synchrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson, J.

    2010-10-08

    This tech note is essentially a summary of a lecture we delivered to the Acc. Phys. Journal Club Apr, 2010. However, since the estimated accuracy of these methods has been naive and misleading in the field of particle accelerators, i.e., ignores the impact of noise, we will elaborate on this in some detail. A prerequisite for a calibration of the nonlinear Hamiltonian is that the quadratic part has been understood, i.e., that the linear optics for the real accelerator has been calibrated. For synchrotron light source operations, this problem has been solved by the interactive LOCO technique/tool (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). Before that, in the context of hadron accelerators, it has been done by signal processing of turn-by-turn BPM data. We have outlined how to make a basic calibration of the nonlinear model for synchrotrons. In particular, we have shown how this was done for LEAR, CERN (antiprotons) in the mid-80s. Specifically, our accuracy for frequency estimation was {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5} for 1024 turns (to calibrate the linear optics) and {approx} 1 x 10{sup -4} for 256 turns for tune footprint and betatron spectrum. For a comparison, the estimated tune footprint for stable beam for NSLS-II is {approx}0.1. Since the transverse damping time is {approx}20 msec, i.e., {approx}4,000 turns. There is no fundamental difference for: antiprotons, protons, and electrons in this case. Because the estimated accuracy for these methods in the field of particle accelerators has been naive, i.e., ignoring the impact of noise, we have also derived explicit formula, from first principles, for a quantitative statement. For e.g. N = 256 and 5% noise we obtain {delta}{nu} {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. A comparison with the state-of-the-arts in e.g. telecomm and electrical engineering since the 60s is quite revealing. For example, Kalman filter (1960), crucial for the: Ranger, Mariner, and Apollo (including the Lunar Module) missions during the 60s. Or Claude Shannon et al

  9. Alternative Models of Service, Centralized Machine Operations. Phase II Report. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Management Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was conducted to determine if the centralization of playback machine operations for the national free library program would be feasible, economical, and desirable. An alternative model of playback machine services was constructed and compared with existing network operations considering both cost and service. The alternative model was…

  10. Available for the Apple II: FIRM: Florida InteRactive Modeler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, C. Michael; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The Apple II microcomputer program described allows instructors with minimal programing experience to construct computer models of psychological phenomena for students to investigate. Use of these models eliminates need to maintain/house/breed animals or purchase sophisticated laboratory equipment. Several content models are also described,…

  11. Neurobiologia do parkinsonismo: II. modelos experimentais Neurobiology of parkinsonism: II. experimental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Ponzoni

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available O emprego de modelos experimentais de parkinsonismo tem contribuído não só para explicar o conhecimento das funções dos gânglios basais como também tem permitido o surgimento de várias hipóteses para explicar os processos neurodegeneratives do sistema nervoso central. Nesta revisão são apresentados e discutidos os modelos de parkinsonismo que utilizam neurotoxins como a 6-hidroxidopamina, MPTP e o manganês.The study of experimental models of parkinsonism has contributed to the knowledge of basal ganglia functions, as well as to the establishment of several hypothesis for the explanation of the cause and expression of central neurodegenerative disorders. In this review we present and discuss several models such as 6-hydroxydopamine, MPTP and manganese, all of them widely used to characterize the behavioral, cellular and molecular mechanisms of parkinsonism.

  12. Models of cuspy triaxial stellar systems. II. Regular orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Muzzio, J C; Zorzi, A F

    2012-01-01

    In the first paper of this series we used the N--body method to build a dozen cuspy (gamma ~ 1) triaxial models of stellar systems, and we showed that they were highly stable over time intervals of the order of a Hubble time, even though they had very large fractions of chaotic orbits (more than 85 per cent in some cases). The models were grouped in four sets, each one comprising models morphologically resembling E2, E3, E4 and E5 galaxies, respectively. The three models within each set, although different, had the same global properties and were statistically equivalent. In the present paper we use frequency analysis to classify the regular orbits of those models. The bulk of those orbits are short axis tubes (SATs), with a significant fraction of long axis tubes (LATs) in the E2 models that decreases in the E3 and E4 models to become negligibly small in the E5 models. Most of the LATs in the E2 and E3 models are outer LATs, but the situation reverses in the E4 and E5 models where the few LATs are mainly inn...

  13. Two-Higgs-doublet model of type II confronted with the LHC run I and run II data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Feng; Han, Xiao-Fang

    2017-06-01

    We examine the parameter space of the two-Higgs-doublet model of type II after imposing the relevant theoretical and experimental constraints from the precision electroweak data, B -meson decays, and the LHC run I and run II data. We find that the searches for Higgs bosons via the τ+τ- , W W , Z Z , γ γ , h h , h Z , H Z , and A Z channels can give strong constraints on the C P -odd Higgs A and heavy C P -even Higgs H , and the parameter space excluded by each channel is respectively carved out in detail assuming that either mA or mH are fixed to 600 or 700 GeV in the scans. The surviving samples are discussed in two different regions. (i) In the standard model-like coupling region of the 125 GeV Higgs, mA is allowed to be as low as 350 GeV, and a strong upper limit is imposed on tan β . mH is allowed to be as low as 200 GeV for the appropriate values of tan β , sin (β -α ), and mA, but is required to be larger than 300 GeV for mA=700 GeV . (ii) In the wrong-sign Yukawa coupling region of the 125 GeV Higgs, the b b ¯→A /H →τ+τ- channel can impose the upper limits on tan β and sin (β -α ), and the A →h Z channel can give the lower limits on tan β and sin (β -α ). mA and mH are allowed to be as low as 60 and 200 GeV, respectively, but 320 GeV

  14. Causality in 1+1-dimensional Yukawa model-II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asrarul Haque; Satish D Joglekar

    2013-10-01

    The limits → large, $M →$ large with ($g^{3}/M$) = const. of the 1+1-dimensional Yukawa model are discussed. The conclusion of the results on bound states of the Yukawa model in this limit (obtained in arXiv:0908.4510v3 [hep-th]) is taken into account. It is found that model reduces to an effective non-local 3 theory in this limit. Causality violation also is observed in this limit.

  15. Optimization Model for Refinery Hydrogen Networks Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique E. Tarifa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this work, a model of optimization was presented that minimizes the consumption of the hydrogen of a refinery. In this second part, the model will be augmented to take into account the length of the pipelines, the addition of purification units and the installation of new compressors, all features of industrial real networks. The model developed was implemented in the LINGO software environment. For data input and results output, an Excel spreadsheet was developed that interfaces with LINGO. The model is currently being used in YPFLuján de Cuyo refinery (Mendoza, Argentina

  16. Simple inflationary quintessential model. II. Power law potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    2016-09-01

    The present work is a sequel of our previous work [Phys. Rev. D 93, 084018 (2016)] which depicted a simple version of an inflationary quintessential model whose inflationary stage was described by a Higgs-type potential and the quintessential phase was responsible due to an exponential potential. Additionally, the model predicted a nonsingular universe in past which was geodesically past incomplete. Further, it was also found that the model is in agreement with the Planck 2013 data when running is allowed. But, this model provides a theoretical value of the running which is far smaller than the central value of the best fit in ns , r , αs≡d ns/d l n k parameter space where ns, r , αs respectively denote the spectral index, tensor-to-scalar ratio and the running of the spectral index associated with any inflationary model, and consequently to analyze the viability of the model one has to focus in the two-dimensional marginalized confidence level in the allowed domain of the plane (ns,r ) without taking into account the running. Unfortunately, such analysis shows that this model does not pass this test. However, in this sequel we propose a family of models runs by a single parameter α ∈[0 ,1 ] which proposes another "inflationary quintessential model" where the inflation and the quintessence regimes are respectively described by a power law potential and a cosmological constant. The model is also nonsingular although geodesically past incomplete as in the cited model. Moreover, the present one is found to be more simple compared to the previous model and it is in excellent agreement with the observational data. In fact, we note that, unlike the previous model, a large number of the models of this family with α ∈[0 ,1/2 ) match with both Planck 2013 and Planck 2015 data without allowing the running. Thus, the properties in the current family of models compared to its past companion justify its need for a better cosmological model with the successive

  17. Surface complexation modeling calculation of Pb(II) adsorption onto the calcined diatomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Removal of noxious heavy metal ions (e.g. Pb(II)) by surface adsorption of minerals (e.g. diatomite) is an important means in the environmental aqueous pollution control. Thus, it is very essential to understand the surface adsorptive behavior and mechanism. In this work, the Pb(II) apparent surface complexation reaction equilibrium constants on the calcined diatomite and distributions of Pb(II) surface species were investigated through modeling calculations of Pb(II) based on diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites. Batch experiments were used to study the adsorption of Pb(II) onto the calcined diatomite as a function of pH (3.0-7.0) and different ionic strengths (0.05 and 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl) under ambient atmosphere. Adsorption of Pb(II) can be well described by Freundlich isotherm models. The apparent surface complexation equilibrium constants (log K) were obtained by fitting the batch experimental data using the PEST 13.0 together with PHREEQC 3.1.2 codes and there is good agreement between measured and predicted data. Distribution of Pb(II) surface species on the diatomite calculated by PHREEQC 3.1.2 program indicates that the impurity cations (e.g. Al3+, Fe3+, etc.) in the diatomite play a leading role in the Pb(II) adsorption and dominant formation of complexes and additional electrostatic interaction are the main adsorption mechanism of Pb(II) on the diatomite under weak acidic conditions.

  18. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Support Professional. Edition II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful evaluation and support system for support professionals will help improve student outcomes. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Support Professional Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all support professionals do their best work…

  19. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules II: Lagrangian representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-09-15

    Geometric modeling of biomolecules plays an essential role in the conceptualization of biolmolecular structure, function, dynamics, and transport. Qualitatively, geometric modeling offers a basis for molecular visualization, which is crucial for the understanding of molecular structure and interactions. Quantitatively, geometric modeling bridges the gap between molecular information, such as that from X-ray, NMR, and cryo-electron microscopy, and theoretical/mathematical models, such as molecular dynamics, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and the Nernst-Planck equation. In this work, we present a family of variational multiscale geometric models for macromolecular systems. Our models are able to combine multiresolution geometric modeling with multiscale electrostatic modeling in a unified variational framework. We discuss a suite of techniques for molecular surface generation, molecular surface meshing, molecular volumetric meshing, and the estimation of Hadwiger's functionals. Emphasis is given to the multiresolution representations of biomolecules and the associated multiscale electrostatic analyses as well as multiresolution curvature characterizations. The resulting fine resolution representations of a biomolecular system enable the detailed analysis of solvent-solute interaction, and ion channel dynamics, whereas our coarse resolution representations highlight the compatibility of protein-ligand bindings and possibility of protein-protein interactions.

  20. A Primary Prevention Program: Teaching Models I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlan, Nancy T; Tschiderer, Patricia A.

    Two teaching models of a service delivery program designed to prevent speech-language problems in lower socioeconomic children were compared. Specific goals included increasing mothers' awareness of the sensory input to which infants are responsive and increasing mothers' abilities to read infant nonverbal signals. In Model 1, two speech-language…

  1. [Application of multilevel models in the evaluation of bioequivalence (II).].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiao-lan; Shen, Zhuo-zhi; Li, Xiao-song; Chen, Feng; Yang, Min

    2010-03-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to explore the applicability of multivariate multilevel models for bioequivalence evaluation. Using an example of a 4 x 4 cross-over test design in evaluating bioequivalence of homemade and imported rosiglitazone maleate tablets, this paper illustrated the multivariate-model-based method for partitioning total variances of ln(AUC) and ln(C(max)) in the framework of multilevel models. It examined the feasibility of multivariate multilevel models in directly evaluating average bioequivalence (ABE), population bioequivalence (PBE) and individual bioequivalence (IBE). Taking into account the correlation between ln(AUC) and ln(C(max)) of rosiglitazone maleate tablets, the proposed models suggested no statistical difference between the two effect measures in their ABE bioequivalence via joint tests, whilst a contradictive conclusion was derived based on univariate multilevel models. Furthermore, the PBE and IBE for both ln(AUC) and ln(C(max)) of the two types of tablets were assessed with no statistical difference based on estimates of variance components from the proposed models. Multivariate multilevel models could be used to analyze bioequivalence of multiple effect measures simultaneously and they provided a new way of statistical analysis to evaluate bioequivalence.

  2. Shunted-Josephson-junction model. II. The nonautonomous case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belykh, V. N.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, O. H.

    1977-01-01

    The shunted-Josephson-junction model with a monochromatic ac current drive is discussed employing the qualitative methods of the theory of nonlinear oscillations. As in the preceding paper dealing with the autonomous junction, the model includes a phase-dependent conductance and a shunt capacitance...

  3. Filament winding cylinders. II - Validation of the process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calius, Emilio P.; Lee, Soo-Yong; Springer, George S.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to validate the model developed by Lee and Springer for simulating the manufacturing process of filament wound composite cylinders. First, results calculated by the Lee-Springer model were compared to results of the Calius-Springer thin cylinder model. Second, temperatures and strains calculated by the Lee-Springer model were compared to data. The data used in these comparisons were generated during the course of this investigation with cylinders made of Hercules IM-6G/HBRF-55 and Fiberite T-300/976 graphite-epoxy tows. Good agreement was found between the calculated and measured stresses and strains, indicating that the model is a useful representation of the winding and curing processes.

  4. Conceptual Modeling in the Time of the Revolution: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylopoulos, John

    Conceptual Modeling was a marginal research topic at the very fringes of Computer Science in the 60s and 70s, when the discipline was dominated by topics focusing on programs, systems and hardware architectures. Over the years, however, the field has moved to centre stage and has come to claim a central role both in Computer Science research and practice in diverse areas, such as Software Engineering, Databases, Information Systems, the Semantic Web, Business Process Management, Service-Oriented Computing, Multi-Agent Systems, Knowledge Management, and more. The transformation was greatly aided by the adoption of standards in modeling languages (e.g., UML), and model-based methodologies (e.g., Model-Driven Architectures) by the Object Management Group (OMG) and other standards organizations. We briefly review the history of the field over the past 40 years, focusing on the evolution of key ideas. We then note some open challenges and report on-going research, covering topics such as the representation of variability in conceptual models, capturing model intentions, and models of laws.

  5. Synthetic Model of the Oxygen-Evolving Center: Photosystem II under the Spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Hu, Cheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Jiangyun

    2015-09-21

    The oxygen-evolving center (OEC) in photosystem II catalyzes a water splitting reaction. Great efforts have already been made to artificially synthesize the OEC, in order to elucidate the structure-function relationship and the mechanism of the reaction. Now, a new synthetic model makes the best mimic yet of the OEC. This recent study opens up the possibility to study the mechanism of photosystem II and photosynthesis in general for applications in renewable energy and synthetic biology.

  6. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-06-01

    A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

  7. Realizability algebras II : new models of ZF + DC

    CERN Document Server

    Krivine, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Using the proof-program (Curry-Howard) correspondence, we give a new method to obtain models of ZF and relative consistency results. We show the relative consistency of ZF + DC + some unusual properties for the power set of R.

  8. Supersymmetric standard model from the heterotic string (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, W. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamaguchi, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Lebedev, O.; Ratz, M. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

    2006-06-15

    We describe in detail a Z{sub 6} orbifold compactification of the heterotic E{sub 8} x E{sub 8} string which leads to the (supersymmetric) standard model gauge group and matter content. The quarks and leptons appear as three 16-plets of SO(10), two of which are localized at fixed points with local SO(10) symmetry. The model has supersymmetric vacua without exotics at low energies and is consistent with gauge coupling unification. Supersymmetry can be broken via gaugino condensation in the hidden sector. The model has large vacuum degeneracy. Certain vacua with approximate B-L symmetry have attractive phenomenological features. The top quark Yukawa coupling arises from gauge interactions and is of the order of the gauge couplings. The other Yukawa couplings are suppressed by powers of standard model singlet fields, similarly to the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. (Orig.)

  9. Horns Rev II, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Brorsen, Michael

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU), Denmark. The starting point for the present report is the previously carried out run-up tests described in Lykke Andersen & Frigaard, 2006......-shaped access platforms on piles. The Model tests include mainly regular waves and a few irregular wave tests. These tests have been conducted at Aalborg University from 9. November, 2006 to 17. November, 2006....

  10. Scale invariant cosmology II: model equations and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Maeder, Andre

    2016-01-01

    We want to establish the basic properties of a scale invariant cosmology, that also accounts for the hypothesis of scale invariance of the empty space at large scales. We write the basic analytical properties of the scale invariant cosmological models. The hypothesis of scale invariance of the empty space at large scale brings interesting simplifications in the scale invariant equations for cosmology. There is one new term, depending on the scale factor of the scale invariant cosmology, that opposes to gravity and favours an accelerated expansion. We first consider a zero-density model and find an accelerated expansion, going like t square. In models with matter present, the displacements due to the new term make a significant contribution Omega_l to the energy-density of the Universe, satisfying an equation of the form Omega_m + Omega_k + Omega_l = 1. Unlike the Friedman's models, there is a whole family of flat models (k=0) with different density parameters Omega_m smaller than 1. We examine the basic relat...

  11. Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Hans; Pruss, Jan; Webb, Glenn F.

    2006-12-01

    A new mathematical model for the dynamics of prion proliferation involving an ordinary differential equation coupled with a partial integro-differential equation is analyzed, continuing the work in [J. Pruss, L. Pujo-Menjouet, G.F. Webb, R. Zacher, Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions, Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 6 (2006) 225-235]. We show the well-posedness of this problem in its natural phase space , i.e., there is a unique global semiflow on Z+ associated to the problem. A theorem of threshold type is derived for this model which is typical for mathematical epidemics. If a certain combination of kinetic parameters is below or at the threshold, there is a unique steady state, the disease-free equilibrium, which is globally asymptotically stable in Z+; above the threshold it is unstable, and there is another unique steady state, the disease equilibrium, which inherits that property.

  12. Physics Of Eclipsing Binaries. II. The Increased Model Precision

    CERN Document Server

    Prsa, Andrej; Horvat, Martin; Pablo, Herbert; Kochoska, Angela; Bloemen, Steven; Nemravova, Jana; Giammarco, Joseph; Hambleton, Kelly M; Degroote, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    The precision of photometric and spectroscopic observations has been systematically improved in the last decade, mostly thanks to space-borne photometric missions and ground-based spectrographs dedicated to finding exoplanets. The field of eclipsing binary stars strongly benefited from this development. Eclipsing binaries serve as critical tools for determining fundamental stellar properties (masses, radii, temperatures and luminosities), yet the models are not capable of reproducing observed data well, either because of the missing physics or because of insufficient precision. This led to a predicament where radiative and dynamical effects, insofar buried in noise, started showing up routinely in the data, but were not accounted for in the models. PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs; http://phoebe-project.org) is an open source modeling code for computing theoretical light and radial velocity curves that addresses both problems by incorporating missing physics and by increasing the computational fidelity. ...

  13. Marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico - II. Model results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Mark J.; Yu, Yunke [Center for Energy Studies, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    In the second part of this two-part article on marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico, we estimate the number of committed assets in water depth less than 1000 ft that are expected to be marginal over a 60-year time horizon. We compute the expected quantity and value of the production and gross revenue streams of the gulf's committed asset inventory circa. January 2007 using a probabilistic model framework. Cumulative hydrocarbon production from the producing inventory is estimated to be 1056 MMbbl oil and 13.3 Tcf gas. Marginal production from the committed asset inventory is expected to contribute 4.1% of total oil production and 5.4% of gas production. A meta-evaluation procedure is adapted to present the results of sensitivity analysis. Model results are discussed along with a description of the model framework and limitations of the analysis. (author)

  14. Turbulent convection model in the overshooting region: II. Theoretical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S Q

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent convection models are thought to be good tools to deal with the convective overshooting in the stellar interior. However, they are too complex to be applied in calculations of stellar structure and evolution. In order to understand the physical processes of the convective overshooting and to simplify the application of turbulent convection models, a semi-analytic solution is necessary. We obtain the approximate solution and asymptotic solution of the turbulent convection model in the overshooting region, and find some important properties of the convective overshooting: I. The overshooting region can be partitioned into three parts: a thin region just outside the convective boundary with high efficiency of turbulent heat transfer, a power law dissipation region of turbulent kinetic energy in the middle, and a thermal dissipation area with rapidly decreasing turbulent kinetic energy. The decaying indices of the turbulent correlations $k$, $\\bar{u_{r}'T'}$, and $\\bar{T'T'}$ are only determined by the ...

  15. Horns Rev II, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU). The objective of the tests was: To investigate the combined influence of the pile diameter to water depth ratio and the wave height to water...... on the front side of the pile (0 to 90 degrees). These tests have been conducted at Aalborg University from 9. October, 2006 to 8. November, 2006. Unless otherwise mentioned, all values given in this report are in model scale....

  16. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Contact algorithms in resistance welding presented in the previous paper are experimentally validated in the present paper. In order to verify the mechanical contact algorithm, two types of experiments, i.e. sandwich upsetting of circular, cylindrical specimens and compression tests of discs...... with a solid ring projection towards a flat ring, are carried out at room temperature. The complete algorithm, involving not only the mechanical model but also the thermal and electrical models, is validated by projection welding experiments. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement...

  17. Autocorrelation and regularization in digital images. II - Simple image models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupp, David L. B.; Strahler, Alan H.; Woodcock, Curtis E.

    1989-01-01

    The variogram function used in geostatistical analysis is a useful statistic in the analysis of remotely sensed images. Using the results derived by Jupp et al. (1988), the basic second-order, or covariance, properties of scenes modeled by simple disks of varying size and spacing after imaging into disk-shaped pixels are analyzed to explore the relationship betwee image variograms and discrete object scene structure. The models provide insight into the nature of real images of the earth's surface and the tools for a complete analysis of the more complex case of three-dimensional illuminated discrete-object images.

  18. Lanchester-Type Models of Warfare. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    verification of combat models are as follows: 594 (1) principle of uniformitarianism does not hold, (2) systems are only partially observable, (3...the principle of uniformitarianism , which holds that physical and biological process- es, conditions, and operations do not change over time (i.e. uni

  19. SPARTAN II: An Instructional High Resolution Land Combat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico (14: C1,J4). TRAC uses these two models for doctrinal and force-structure evaluation and for training and education...8217 COMMON SHARED soldato, evento , ptgto, tgtreco, bluecount, & redcount, activeblue, activered, timetostop ’obs observer ID ’time = current simulation time

  20. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations II: radiative models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sembolini, F

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We have simulated the formation of a massive galaxy cluster (M(supcrit)(sub200) = 1.1×10(sup15)h(sup-1)M) in a CDM universe using 10 different codes (RAMSES, 2 incarnations of AREPO and 7 of GADGET), modeling hydrodynamics with full radiative...

  1. Physics Of Eclipsing Binaries. II. Toward the Increased Model Fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prša, A.; Conroy, K. E.; Horvat, M.; Pablo, H.; Kochoska, A.; Bloemen, S.; Giammarco, J.; Hambleton, K. M.; Degroote, P.

    2016-12-01

    The precision of photometric and spectroscopic observations has been systematically improved in the last decade, mostly thanks to space-borne photometric missions and ground-based spectrographs dedicated to finding exoplanets. The field of eclipsing binary stars strongly benefited from this development. Eclipsing binaries serve as critical tools for determining fundamental stellar properties (masses, radii, temperatures, and luminosities), yet the models are not capable of reproducing observed data well, either because of the missing physics or because of insufficient precision. This led to a predicament where radiative and dynamical effects, insofar buried in noise, started showing up routinely in the data, but were not accounted for in the models. PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs; http://phoebe-project.org) is an open source modeling code for computing theoretical light and radial velocity curves that addresses both problems by incorporating missing physics and by increasing the computational fidelity. In particular, we discuss triangulation as a superior surface discretization algorithm, meshing of rotating single stars, light travel time effects, advanced phase computation, volume conservation in eccentric orbits, and improved computation of local intensity across the stellar surfaces that includes the photon-weighted mode, the enhanced limb darkening treatment, the better reflection treatment, and Doppler boosting. Here we present the concepts on which PHOEBE is built and proofs of concept that demonstrate the increased model fidelity.

  2. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  3. Horns Rev II, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Brorsen, Michael

    This report is an extension of the study presented in Lykke Andersen and Brorsen, 2006 and includes results from the irregular wave tests, where Lykke Andersen & Brorsen, 2006 focused on regular waves. The 2D physical model tests were carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil...

  4. Storm Water Management Model Reference Manual Volume II – Hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    SWMM is a dynamic rainfall-runoff simulation model used for single event or long-term (continuous) simulation of runoff quantity and quality from primarily urban areas. The runoff component of SWMM operates on a collection of subcatchment areas that receive precipitation and gene...

  5. Modeling the distribution of Mg II absorbers around galaxies using Background Galaxies & Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bordoloi, R; Kacprzak, G G; Churchill, C W

    2012-01-01

    We present joint constraints on the distribution of MgII absorption around galaxies, by combining the MgII absorption seen in stacked background galaxy spectra and the distribution of host galaxies of strong MgII systems from the spectra of background quasars. We present a suite of models that predict, the dependence of MgII absorption on a galaxy's apparent inclination, impact parameter(b) and azimuthal angle. The variations in the absorption strength with azimuthal angles provide much stronger constraints on the intrinsic geometry of the MgII absorption than the dependence on the galaxy's inclination. Strong MgII absorbers (W_r(2796)>0.3) are asymmetrically distributed in azimuth around their host galaxies:72% of the absorbers studied and 100% of the close-in absorbers within b<38 kpc, are located within 50deg of the host galaxy's projected minor axis. Composite models consisting either of a simple bipolar component plus a spherical or disk component, or a single highly softened bipolar distribution, can...

  6. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of cadmium (II) biosorption by Dried Biomass Aphanothece sp. from aqueous phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awalina; Harimawan, A.; Haryani, G. S.; Setiadi, T.

    2017-05-01

    The Biosorption of cadmium (II) ions on dried biomass of Aphanothece sp.which previously grown in a photobioreactor system with atmospheric carbon dioxide fed input, was studied in a batch system with respect to initial pH, biomass concentration, contact time, and temperature. The biomass exhibited the highest cadmium (II) uptake capacity at 30ºC, initial pH of 8.0±0.2 in 60 minute and initial cadmium (II) ion concentration of 7.76 mg/L. Maximum biosorption capacities were 16.47 mg/g, 54.95 mg/g and 119.05 mg/g at range of initial cadmium (II) 0.96-3.63 mg/L, 1.99-8.10 mg/L and 6.48-54.38 mg/L, respectively. Uptake kinetics follows the pseudo-second order model while equilibrium is best described by Langmuir isotherm model. Isotherms have been used to determine thermodynamic parameter process (free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change). FTIR analysis of microalgae biomass revealed the presence of amino acids, carboxyl, hydroxyl, sulfhydryl and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for biosorption of metal ions. During repeated sorption/desorption cycles, the ratio of Cd (II) desorption to biosorption decreased from 81% (at first cycle) to only 27% (at the third cycle). Nevertheless, due to its higher biosorption capability than other adsorbent, Aphanothece sp appears to be a good biosorbent for removing metal Cd (II) ions from aqueous phase.

  7. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A; Wei, G W

    2011-12-01

    Solvation is an elementary process in nature and is of paramount importance to more sophisticated chemical, biological and biomolecular processes. The understanding of solvation is an essential prerequisite for the quantitative description and analysis of biomolecular systems. This work presents a Lagrangian formulation of our differential geometry based solvation models. The Lagrangian representation of biomolecular surfaces has a few utilities/advantages. First, it provides an essential basis for biomolecular visualization, surface electrostatic potential map and visual perception of biomolecules. Additionally, it is consistent with the conventional setting of implicit solvent theories and thus, many existing theoretical algorithms and computational software packages can be directly employed. Finally, the Lagrangian representation does not need to resort to artificially enlarged van der Waals radii as often required by the Eulerian representation in solvation analysis. The main goal of the present work is to analyze the connection, similarity and difference between the Eulerian and Lagrangian formalisms of the solvation model. Such analysis is important to the understanding of the differential geometry based solvation model. The present model extends the scaled particle theory of nonpolar solvation model with a solvent-solute interaction potential. The nonpolar solvation model is completed with a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory based polar solvation model. The differential geometry theory of surfaces is employed to provide a natural description of solvent-solute interfaces. The optimization of the total free energy functional, which encompasses the polar and nonpolar contributions, leads to coupled potential driven geometric flow and PB equations. Due to the development of singularities and nonsmooth manifolds in the Lagrangian representation, the resulting potential-driven geometric flow equation is embedded into the Eulerian representation for the purpose of

  8. Study of multiparticle production by gluon dominance model (Part II)

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolov, P F; Kuraev, E A; Kutov, A V; Nikitin, V A; Pankov, A A; Roufanov, I A; Zhidkov, N K

    2005-01-01

    The gluon dominance model presents a description of multiparticle production in proton-proton collisions and proton-antiproton annihilation. The collective behavior of secondary particles in $pp$-interactions at 70 GeV/c and higher is studied in the project {\\bf "Thermalization"}. The obtained neutral and charged multiplicity distribution parameters explain some RHIC-data. The gluon dominance model is modified by the inclusion of intermediate quark topology for the multiplicity distribution description in the pure $p\\bar p$-annihilation at few tens GeV/c and explains behavior of the second correlative moment. This article proposes a mechanism of the soft photon production as a sign of hadronization. Excess of soft photons allows one to estimate the emission region size.

  9. MODELING OF TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY PART II. MULTIPLE DRUG ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zaborovskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In oncology practice, despite significant advances in early cancer detection, surgery, radiotherapy, laser therapy, targeted therapy, etc., chemotherapy is unlikely to lose its relevance in the near future. In this context, the development of new antitumor agents is one of the most important problems of cancer research. In spite of the importance of searching for new compounds with antitumor activity, the possibilities of the “old” agents have not been fully exhausted. Targeted delivery of antitumor agents can give them a “second life”. When developing new targeted drugs and their further introduction into clinical practice, the change in their pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics plays a special role. The paper describes a pharmacokinetic model of the targeted drug delivery. The conditions under which it is meaningful to search for a delivery vehicle for the active substance were described. Primary screening of antitumor agents was undertaken to modify them for the targeted delivery based on underlying assumptions of the model.

  10. Renewable energy for passive house heating - Part II. Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badescu, V. [Candida Oancea Institute of Solar Energy, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnic University of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania); Sicre, B. [Computational Physics, Technical University of Chemnitz, Institute of Physics, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    The evaluation of renewable energy used to increase the environmental friendliness of passive houses (PH) is the topic of this paper. A time-dependent model of passive house thermal behavior is developed. The heat transfer through the high thermal inertia elements is analyzed by using a one-dimensional time-dependent conduction heat-transfer equation that is solved numerically by using a standard Netlib solver (PDECHEB). Appropriate models for the conduction through the low thermal inertia elements are used, as well as a simple approach of the solar radiation transmission through the windows. The model takes into account in a detailed fashion the internal heat sources. Also, the operation of ventilation/heating system is described and common-practice control strategies are implemented. Three renewable energy sources are considered. First, there is the passive solar heating due to the large window on the facade oriented south. Second, the active solar collector system provides thermal energy for space heating or domestic hot water preparation. Third, a ground heat exchanger (GHE) increases the fresh air temperature during the cold season. The model was applied to the Pirmasens Passive House (Rhineland Palatinate, Germany). The passive solar heating system provides most part of the heating energy during November, December, February and March while in January the ground heat exchanger is the most important renewable energy source. January and February require use of additional conventional energy sources. A clever use of the active solar heating system could avoid consuming classical fuels during November, December and March. The ground heat exchanger is a reliable renewable source of energy. It provides heat during all the day and its (rather small) heat flux is increasing when the weather becomes colder. The air temperature at heater exit is normally lower than 46 {sup o}C. This is a good reason for the use of renewable energy to replace the classical fuel or the

  11. The Friedrichs-Model with fermion-boson couplings II

    CERN Document Server

    Civitarese, O; Pronko, G P

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present a formal solution of the extended version of the Friedrichs Model. The Hamiltonian consists of discrete and continuum bosonic states, which are coupled to fermions. The simultaneous treatment of the couplings of the fermions with the discrete and continuous sectors of the bosonic degrees of freedom leads to a system of coupled equations, whose solutions are found by applying standard methods of representation of bound and resonant states.

  12. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoudi, Mehrdad [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Ping

    2013-02-07

    The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  13. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Massoudi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  14. The use of MAVIS II to integrate the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, R.; Kwon, D.M.

    1998-12-31

    The MAVIS II computer program provides for the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions. This report describes the individual components of the program and how MAVIS II is used with other available tools to integrate the design and understanding of explosive valves. The rationale and model used for each valve interaction is described. Comparisons of the calculated results with available data have demonstrated the feasibility and accuracy of using MAVIS II for analytical studies of explosive valve interactions. The model used for the explosive or pyrotechnic used as the driving force in explosive valves is the most critical to be understood and modeled. MAVIS II is an advanced version that incorporates a plastic, as well as elastic, modeling of the deformations experienced when plungers are forced into a bore. The inclusion of a plastic model has greatly expanded the use of MAVIS for all categories (opening, closure, or combined) of valves, especially for the closure valves in which the sealing operation requires the plastic deformation of either a plunger or bore over a relatively large area. In order to increase its effectiveness, the use of MAVIS II should be integrated with the results from available experimental hardware. Test hardware such as the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and Velocity Generator test provide experimental data for accurate comparison of the actual valve functions. Variable Explosive Chamber (VEC) and Constant Explosive Volume (CEV) tests are used to provide the proper explosive equation-of-state for the MAVIS calculations of the explosive driving forces. The rationale and logistics of this integration is demonstrated through an example. A recent valve design is used to demonstrate how MAVIS II can be integrated with experimental tools to provide an understanding of the interactions in this valve.

  15. Meteorological and Back Trajectory Modeling for the Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur Study II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi A. Gebhart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur (RoMANS II study with field operations during November 2008 through November 2009 was designed to evaluate the composition and sources of reactive nitrogen in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA. As part of RoMANS II, a mesoscale meteorological model was utilized to provide input for back trajectory and chemical transport models. Evaluation of the model's ability to capture important transport patterns in this region of complex terrain is discussed. Previous source-receptor studies of nitrogen in this region are also reviewed. Finally, results of several back trajectory analyses for RoMANS II are presented. The trajectory mass balance (TrMB model, a receptor-based linear regression technique, was used to estimate mean source attributions of airborne ammonia concentrations during RoMANS II. Though ammonia concentrations are usually higher when there is transport from the east, the TrMB model estimates that, on average, areas to the west contribute a larger mean fraction of the ammonia. Possible reasons for this are discussed and include the greater frequency of westerly versus easterly winds, the possibility that ammonia is transported long distances as ammonium nitrate, and the difficulty of correctly modeling the transport winds in this area.

  16. Hollow cathode modeling: II. Physical analysis and parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sary, Gaétan; Garrigues, Laurent; Boeuf, Jean-Pierre

    2017-05-01

    A numerical emissive hollow cathode model which couples plasma and thermal aspects of the NASA NSTAR cathode has been presented in a companion paper and simulation results obtained using the plasma model were compared to experimental data. We now compare simulation results with measurements using the full coupled model. Inside the cathode, the simulated plasma density profile agrees with the experimental data up to the ±50% experimental uncertainty while the simulated emitter temperature differs from measurements by at most 5 K. We then proceed to an analysis of the cathode discharge both inside the cathode where electron emission is dominant and outside in the near plume where electron transport instabilities are important. As observed previously in the literature, the total emitted electron current is much larger (34 {{A}}) than the set discharge current collected at the anode (13 {{A}}) while ionization plays a negligible role. Extracted electrons are emitted from a region much shorter than the full emitter (0.9 {{cm}} versus 2.5 {{cm}}). The influence of an applied axial magnetic field in the plume is also assessed and we observe that it leads to a 10-fold increase of the plasma density 1 cm downstream of the orifice entrance while the simulated discharge potential at the anode is increased from 10 {{V}} up to 35.5 {{V}}. Lastly, we perform a parametric study on both the operating point (discharge current, mass flow rate) and design (inner radius) of the cathode. The simulated useful operating envelope is shown to be limited at low discharge current mostly because of the probable ion sputtering of the emitter and at high discharge current because of emitter evaporation, plasma oscillations and sputtering of the keeper electrode. The behavior of the cathode is also analyzed w.r.t. its internal radius and simulation results show that the useful emitter length scales linearly with the cathode radius.

  17. Quantum chaos in the nuclear collective model. II. Peres lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stránský, Pavel; Hruska, Petr; Cejnar, Pavel

    2009-06-01

    This is a continuation of our paper [Phys. Rev. E 79, 046202 (2009)] devoted to signatures of quantum chaos in the geometric collective model of atomic nuclei. We apply the method by Peres to study ordered and disordered patterns in quantum spectra drawn as lattices in the plane of energy vs average of a chosen observable. Good qualitative agreement with standard measures of chaos is manifested. The method provides an efficient tool for studying structural changes in eigenstates across quantum spectra of general systems.

  18. Modeling direct interband tunneling. II. Lower-dimensional structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Andrew, E-mail: pandrew@ucla.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chui, Chi On [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the applicability of the two-band Hamiltonian and the widely used Kane analytical formula to interband tunneling along unconfined directions in nanostructures. Through comparisons with k·p and tight-binding calculations and quantum transport simulations, we find that the primary correction is the change in effective band gap. For both constant fields and realistic tunnel field-effect transistors, dimensionally consistent band gap scaling of the Kane formula allows analytical and numerical device simulations to approximate non-equilibrium Green's function current characteristics without arbitrary fitting. This allows efficient first-order calibration of semiclassical models for interband tunneling in nanodevices.

  19. Modern EMC analysis techniques II models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kantartzis, Nikolaos V

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this two-volume book is the systematic and comprehensive description of the most competitive time-domain computational methods for the efficient modeling and accurate solution of modern real-world EMC problems. Intended to be self-contained, it performs a detailed presentation of all well-known algorithms, elucidating on their merits or weaknesses, and accompanies the theoretical content with a variety of applications. Outlining the present volume, numerical investigations delve into printed circuit boards, monolithic microwave integrated circuits, radio frequency microelectro

  20. A Type II Diabetic Model-from Insulin Resistance to Diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionWith the development of the living standard of the people, the incidence rate of diabetes, especially type II diabetes, increase with years. Establishment of corresponding animal model has become one of the important tool investigating diabetes. Diabetic animal model is classified roughly into experimental and spontaneous diabetic animal model. The spontaneous one has a relatively high applied value. However, its extensive application has been restricted by some factors such as costliness and ...

  1. Modeling downstream fining in sand-bed rivers. II: Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S.; Parker, G.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the model presented in the companion paper, Wright and Parker (2005) is applied to a generic river reach typical of a large, sand-bed river flowing into the ocean in order to investigate the mechanisms controlling longitudinal profile development and downstream fining. Three mechanisms which drive downstream fining are studied: a delta prograding into standing water, sea-level rise, and tectonic subsidence. Various rates of sea-level rise (typical of the late Holocene) and tectonic subsidence are modeled in order to quantify their effects on the degree of profile concavity and downstream fining. Also, several other physical mechanisms which may affect fining are studied, including the relative importance of the suspended versus bed load, the effect of the loss of sediment overbank, and the influence of the delta bottom slope. Finally, sensitivity analysis is used to show that the grain-size distribution at the interface between the active layer and substrate has a significant effect on downstream fining. ?? 2005 International Association of Hydraulic Engineering and Research.

  2. MODELING THE 1958 LITUYA BAY MEGA-TSUNAMI, II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles L. Mader

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Lituya Bay, Alaska is a T-Shaped bay, 7 miles long and up to 2 miles wide. The two arms at the head of the bay, Gilbert and Crillon Inlets, are part of a trench along the Fairweather Fault. On July 8, 1958, an 7.5 Magnitude earthquake occurred along the Fairweather fault with an epicenter near Lituya Bay.A mega-tsunami wave was generated that washed out trees to a maximum altitude of 520 meters at the entrance of Gilbert Inlet. Much of the rest of the shoreline of the Bay was denuded by the tsunami from 30 to 200 meters altitude.In the previous study it was determined that if the 520 meter high run-up was 50 to 100 meters thick, the observed inundation in the rest of Lituya Bay could be numerically reproduced. It was also concluded that further studies would require full Navier-Stokes modeling similar to those required for asteroid generated tsunami waves.During the Summer of 2000, Hermann Fritz conducted experiments that reproduced the Lituya Bay 1958 event. The laboratory experiments indicated that the 1958 Lituya Bay 524 meter run-up on the spur ridge of Gilbert Inlet could be caused by a landslide impact.The Lituya Bay impact landslide generated tsunami was modeled with the full Navier- Stokes AMR Eulerian compressible hydrodynamic code called SAGE with includes the effect of gravity.

  3. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations II: radiative models

    CERN Document Server

    Sembolini, Federico; Pearce, Frazer R; Power, Chris; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T; Cui, Weiguang; Yepes, Gustavo; Beck, Alexander M; Borgani, Stefano; Cunnama, Daniel; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G; Murante, Giuseppe; Newton, Richard D A; Perret, Valentin; Saro, Alexandro; Schaye, Joop; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-01-01

    We have simulated the formation of a massive galaxy cluster (M$_{200}^{\\rm crit}$ = 1.1$\\times$10$^{15}h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$) in a $\\Lambda$CDM universe using 10 different codes (RAMSES, 2 incarnations of AREPO and 7 of GADGET), modeling hydrodynamics with full radiative subgrid physics. These codes include Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), spanning traditional and advanced SPH schemes, adaptive mesh and moving mesh codes. Our goal is to study the consistency between simulated clusters modeled with different radiative physical implementations - such as cooling, star formation and AGN feedback. We compare images of the cluster at $z=0$, global properties such as mass, and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. We find that, with respect to non-radiative simulations, dark matter is more centrally concentrated, the extent not simply depending on the presence/absence of AGN feedback. The scatter in global quantities is substantially higher than for non-radiative runs. Intriguingly, a...

  4. Neurologic abnormalities in mouse models of the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and mucolipidosis III γ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Idol

    Full Text Available UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase is an α2β2γ2 hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the mannose 6-phosphate targeting signal on lysosomal hydrolases. Mutations in the α/β subunit precursor gene cause the severe lysosomal storage disorder mucolipidosis II (ML II or the more moderate mucolipidosis III alpha/beta (ML III α/β, while mutations in the γ subunit gene cause the mildest disorder, mucolipidosis III gamma (ML III γ. Here we report neurologic consequences of mouse models of ML II and ML III γ. The ML II mice have a total loss of acid hydrolase phosphorylation, which results in depletion of acid hydrolases in mesenchymal-derived cells. The ML III γ mice retain partial phosphorylation. However, in both cases, total brain extracts have normal or near normal activity of many acid hydrolases reflecting mannose 6-phosphate-independent lysosomal targeting pathways. While behavioral deficits occur in both models, the onset of these changes occurs sooner and the severity is greater in the ML II mice. The ML II mice undergo progressive neurodegeneration with neuronal loss, astrocytosis, microgliosis and Purkinje cell depletion which was evident at 4 months whereas ML III γ mice have only mild to moderate astrocytosis and microgliosis at 12 months. Both models accumulate the ganglioside GM2, but only ML II mice accumulate fucosylated glycans. We conclude that in spite of active mannose 6-phosphate-independent targeting pathways in the brain, there are cell types that require at least partial phosphorylation function to avoid lysosomal dysfunction and the associated neurodegeneration and behavioral impairments.

  5. A Long-Term Memory Competitive Process Model of a Common Procedural Error. Part II: Working Memory Load and Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A Long-Term Memory Competitive Process Model of a Common Procedural Error, Part II: Working Memory Load and Capacity Franklin P. Tamborello, II...00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Long-Term Memory Competitive Process Model of a Common Procedural Error, Part II: Working Memory Load and...07370024.2011.601692 Tamborello, F. P., & Trafton, J. G. (2013). A long-term competitive process model of a common procedural error. In Proceedings of the 35th

  6. Polarized Molecular Orbital Model Chemistry. II. The PMO Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Fiedler, Luke; Leverentz, Hannah R; Truhlar, Donald G; Gao, Jiali

    2011-04-12

    We present a new semiempirical molecular orbital method based on neglect of diatomic differential overlap. This method differs from previous NDDO-based methods in that we include p orbitals on hydrogen atoms to provide a more realistic modeling of polarizability. As in AM1-D and PM3-D, we also include damped dispersion. The formalism is based on the original MNDO one, but in the process of parameterization we make some specific changes to some of the functional forms. The present article is a demonstration of the capability of the new approach, and it presents a successful parametrization for compounds composed only of hydrogen and oxygen atoms, including the important case of water clusters.

  7. Eigenvectors in the superintegrable model II: ground-state sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Au-Yang, Helen; Perk, Jacques H H [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, 145 Physical Sciences, Stillwater, OK 74078-3072 (United States)], E-mail: helenperk@yahoo.com, E-mail: perk@okstate.edu

    2009-09-18

    In 1993, Baxter gave 2{sup m{sub Q}} eigenvalues of the transfer matrix of the N-state superintegrable chiral Potts model with the spin-translation quantum number Q, where m{sub Q} = lfloor(NL - L - Q)/Nrfloor. In our previous paper we studied the Q = 0 ground-state sector, when the size L of the transfer matrix is chosen to be a multiple of N. It was shown that the corresponding {tau}{sub 2} matrix has a degenerate eigenspace generated by the generators of r = m{sub 0} simple sl{sub 2} algebras. These results enable us to express the transfer matrix in the subspace in terms of these generators E{sup {+-}}{sub m} and H{sub m} for m = 1, ..., r. Moreover, the corresponding 2{sup r} eigenvectors of the transfer matrix are expressed in terms of rotated eigenvectors of H{sub m}.

  8. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations - II. Radiative models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembolini, Federico; Elahi, Pascal Jahan; Pearce, Frazer R.; Power, Chris; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T.; Cui, Weiguang; Yepes, Gustavo; Beck, Alexander M.; Borgani, Stefano; Cunnama, Daniel; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G.; Murante, Giuseppe; Newton, Richard D. A.; Perret, Valentin; Puchwein, Ewald; Saro, Alexandro; Schaye, Joop; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-07-01

    We have simulated the formation of a massive galaxy cluster (M_{200}^crit = 1.1 × 1015 h-1 M⊙) in a Λ cold dark matter universe using 10 different codes (RAMSES, 2 incarnations of AREPO and 7 of GADGET), modelling hydrodynamics with full radiative subgrid physics. These codes include smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH), spanning traditional and advanced SPH schemes, adaptive mesh and moving mesh codes. Our goal is to study the consistency between simulated clusters modelled with different radiative physical implementations - such as cooling, star formation and thermal active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. We compare images of the cluster at z = 0, global properties such as mass, and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. We find that, with respect to non-radiative simulations, dark matter is more centrally concentrated, the extent not simply depending on the presence/absence of AGN feedback. The scatter in global quantities is substantially higher than for non-radiative runs. Intriguingly, adding radiative physics seems to have washed away the marked code-based differences present in the entropy profile seen for non-radiative simulations in Sembolini et al.: radiative physics + classic SPH can produce entropy cores, at least in the case of non cool-core clusters. Furthermore, the inclusion/absence of AGN feedback is not the dividing line -as in the case of describing the stellar content - for whether a code produces an unrealistic temperature inversion and a falling central entropy profile. However, AGN feedback does strongly affect the overall stellar distribution, limiting the effect of overcooling and reducing sensibly the stellar fraction.

  9. Microscopic model for the neutron dynamic structure factor of solid methane in phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin Yunchang, E-mail: yunchang.shin@yale.ed [Department of Physics, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Mike Snow, W.; Liu, C.Y.; Lavelle, C.M.; Baxter, David V. [Department of Physics, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)

    2010-08-21

    We have constructed a microscopic model for the neutron dynamic structure factor S(Q,{omega}) of solid methane in phase II. We expect this model to apply for neutron energies below 1 eV at pressures near 1 bar and temperatures below 20 K where methane possesses both free rotation and hindered rotation modes of the tetrahedral molecules in the unit cell. The model treats the motions of molecular translations, intra-molecular vibrations and the free and hindered rotations of methane molecule as independent. Total scattering cross-sections calculated from the model agree with the cross-section measurements for incident neutron energies of 0.5 meV-1 eV. The effective density of states is extracted from the model. We also present the quantitative calculation of the separate contributions of the two different rotational modes to the inelastic cross-section for different methane temperatures in phase II.

  10. Modeling transducer impulse responses for predicting calibrated pressure pulses with the ultrasound simulation program Field II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    FIELD II is a simulation software capable of predicting the field pressure in front of transducers having any complicated geometry. A calibrated prediction with this program is, however, dependent on an exact voltage-to-surface acceleration impulse response of the transducer. Such impulse response...... is not calculated by FIELD II. This work investigates the usability of combining a one-dimensional multilayer transducer modeling principle with the FIELD II software. Multilayer here refers to a transducer composed of several material layers. Measurements of pressure and current from Pz27 piezoceramic disks...... as well as pressure and intensity measurements in front of a 128 element commercial convex medical transducer are compared to the simulations. Results show that the models can predict the pressure from the piezoceramic disks with a root mean square (rms) error of 11.2% to 36.2% with a 2 dB amplitude...

  11. Support vector regression model for predicting the sorption capacity of lead (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusrat Parveen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption is supposed to be an economical process for the treatment of wastewater containing heavy metals like lead (II. In this research paper, the support vector regression (SVR has been used to predict the sorption capacity of lead (II ions with the independent input parameters being: initial lead ion concentration, pH, temperature and contact time. Tree fern, an agricultural by-product, has been employed as a low cost biosorbent. Comparison between multiple linear regression (MLR and SVR-based models has been made using statistical parameters. It has been found that the SVR model is more accurate and generalized for prediction of the sorption capacity of lead (II ions.

  12. Electronic structure of nickel(II) and zinc(II) borohydrides from spectroscopic measurements and computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrochers, Patrick J; Sutton, Christopher A; Abrams, Micah L; Ye, Shengfa; Neese, Frank; Telser, Joshua; Ozarowski, Andrew; Krzystek, J

    2012-03-05

    The previously reported Ni(II) complex, Tp*Ni(κ(3)-BH(4)) (Tp* = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate anion), which has an S = 1 spin ground state, was studied by high-frequency and -field electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) spectroscopy as a solid powder at low temperature, by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy in the solid state and in solution at room temperature, and by paramagnetic (11)B NMR. HFEPR provided its spin Hamiltonian parameters: D = 1.91(1) cm(-1), E = 0.285(8) cm(-1), g = [2.170(4), 2.161(3), 2.133(3)]. Similar, but not identical parameters were obtained for its borodeuteride analogue. The previously unreported complex, Tp*Zn(κ(2)-BH(4)), was prepared, and IR and NMR spectroscopy allowed its comparison with analogous closed shell borohydride complexes. Ligand-field theory was used to model the electronic transitions in the Ni(II) complex successfully, although it was less successful at reproducing the zero-field splitting (zfs) parameters. Advanced computational methods, both density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio wave function based approaches, were applied to these Tp*MBH(4) complexes to better understand the interaction between these metals and borohydride ion. DFT successfully reproduced bonding geometries and vibrational behavior of the complexes, although it was less successful for the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the open shell Ni(II) complex. These were instead best described using ab initio methods. The origin of the zfs in Tp*Ni(κ(3)-BH(4)) is described and shows that the relatively small magnitude of D results from several spin-orbit coupling (SOC) interactions of large magnitude, but with opposite sign. Spin-spin coupling (SSC) is also shown to be significant, a point that is not always appreciated in transition metal complexes. Overall, a picture of bonding and electronic structure in open and closed shell late transition metal borohydrides is provided, which has implications for the use of these complexes in catalysis and

  13. Theory of stellar convection - II. First stellar models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetto, S.; Chiosi, C.; Chiosi, E.; Cropper, M.; Weiss, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present here the first stellar models on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, in which convection is treated according to the new scale-free convection theory (SFC theory) by Pasetto et al. The aim is to compare the results of the new theory with those from the classical, calibrated mixing-length (ML) theory to examine differences and similarities. We integrate the equations describing the structure of the atmosphere from the stellar surface down to a few per cent of the stellar mass using both ML theory and SFC theory. The key temperature over pressure gradients, the energy fluxes, and the extension of the convective zones are compared in both theories. The analysis is first made for the Sun and then extended to other stars of different mass and evolutionary stage. The results are adequate: the SFC theory yields convective zones, temperature gradients ∇ and ∇e, and energy fluxes that are very similar to those derived from the `calibrated' MT theory for main-sequence stars. We conclude that the old scale dependent ML theory can now be replaced with a self-consistent scale-free theory able to predict correct results, as it is more physically grounded than the ML theory. Fundamentally, the SFC theory offers a deeper insight of the underlying physics than numerical simulations.

  14. Theory of stellar convection II: first stellar models

    CERN Document Server

    Pasetto, S; Chiosi, E; Cropper, M; Weiss, A

    2015-01-01

    We present here the first stellar models on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD), in which convection is treated according to the novel scale-free convection theory (SFC theory) by Pasetto et al. (2014). The aim is to compare the results of the new theory with those from the classical, calibrated mixing-length (ML) theory to examine differences and similarities. We integrate the equations describing the structure of the atmosphere from the stellar surface down to a few percent of the stellar mass using both ML theory and SFC theory. The key temperature over pressure gradients, the energy fluxes, and the extension of the convective zones are compared in both theories. The analysis is first made for the Sun and then extended to other stars of different mass and evolutionary stage. The results are adequate: the SFC theory yields convective zones, temperature gradients of the ambient and of the convective element, and energy fluxes that are very similar to those derived from the "calibrated" MT theory for main s...

  15. Dynamic spreading of nanofluids on solids part II: modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuan-Liang; Kondiparty, Kirtiprakash; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh

    2012-11-27

    Recent studies on the spreading phenomena of liquid dispersions of nanoparticles (nanofluids) have revealed that the self-layering and two-dimensional structuring of nanoparticles in the three-phase contact region exert structural disjoining pressure, which drives the spreading of nanofluids by forming a continuous wedge film between the liquid (e.g., oil) and solid surface. Motivated by the practical applications of the phenomenon and experimental results reported in Part I of this two-part series, we thoroughly investigated the spreading dynamics of nanofluids against an oil drop on a solid surface. With the Laplace equation as a starting point, the spreading process is modeled by Navier-Stokes equations through the lubrication approach, which considers the structural disjoining pressure, gravity, and van der Waals force. The temporal interface profile and advancing inner contact line velocity of nanofluidic films are analyzed through varying the effective nanoparticle concentration, the outer contact angle, the effective nanoparticle size, and capillary pressure. It is found that a fast and spontaneous advance of the inner contact line movement can be obtained by increasing the nanoparticle concentration, decreasing the nanoparticle size, and/or decreasing the interfacial tension. Once the nanofluidic film is formed, the advancing inner contact line movement reaches a constant velocity, which is independent of the outer contact angle if the interfacial tension is held constant.

  16. Modeling the Jovian subnebula: II - Composition of regular satellites ices

    CERN Document Server

    Mousis, O; Mousis, Olivier; Alibert, Yann

    2005-01-01

    We use the evolutionary turbulent model of Jupiter's subnebula described by Alibert et al. (2005a) to constrain the composition of ices incorporated in its regular icy satellites. We consider CO2, CO, CH4, N2, NH3, H2S, Ar, Kr, and Xe as the major volatile species existing in the gas-phase of the solar nebula. All these volatile species, except CO2 which crystallized as a pure condensate, are assumed to be trapped by H2O to form hydrates or clathrate hydrates in the solar nebula. Once condensed, these ices were incorporated into the growing planetesimals produced in the feeding zone of proto-Jupiter. Some of these solids then flowed from the solar nebula to the subnebula, and may have been accreted by the forming Jovian regular satellites. We show that ices embedded in solids entering at early epochs into the Jovian subdisk were all vaporized. This leads us to consider two different scenarios of regular icy satellites formation in order to estimate the composition of the ices they contain. In the first scenar...

  17. Modeling the distribution of Mg II absorbers around galaxies using background galaxies and quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordoloi, R.; Lilly, S. J. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zürich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Kacprzak, G. G. [Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Churchill, C. W., E-mail: rongmonb@phys.ethz.ch [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    We present joint constraints on the distribution of Mg II absorption around high redshift galaxies obtained by combining two orthogonal probes, the integrated Mg II absorption seen in stacked background galaxy spectra and the distribution of parent galaxies of individual strong Mg II systems as seen in the spectra of background quasars. We present a suite of models that can be used to predict, for different two- and three-dimensional distributions, how the projected Mg II absorption will depend on a galaxy's apparent inclination, the impact parameter b and the azimuthal angle between the projected vector to the line of sight and the projected minor axis. In general, we find that variations in the absorption strength with azimuthal angles provide much stronger constraints on the intrinsic geometry of the Mg II absorption than the dependence on the inclination of the galaxies. In addition to the clear azimuthal dependence in the integrated Mg II absorption that we reported earlier in Bordoloi et al., we show that strong equivalent width Mg II absorbers (W{sub r} (2796) ≥ 0.3 Å) are also asymmetrically distributed in azimuth around their host galaxies: 72% of the absorbers in Kacprzak et al., and 100% of the close-in absorbers within 35 kpc of the center of their host galaxies, are located within 50° of the host galaxy's projected semi minor axis. It is shown that either composite models consisting of a simple bipolar component plus a spherical or disk component, or a single highly softened bipolar distribution, can well represent the azimuthal dependencies observed in both the stacked spectrum and quasar absorption-line data sets within 40 kpc. Simultaneously fitting both data sets, we find that in the composite model the bipolar cone has an opening angle of ∼100° (i.e., confined to within 50° of the disk axis) and contains about two-thirds of the total Mg II absorption in the system. The single softened cone model has an exponential fall off with

  18. Active region upflows. II. Data driven magnetohydrodynamic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galsgaard, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Huang, Z.; Presmann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Observations of many active regions show a slow systematic outflow/upflow from their edges lasting from hours to days. At present no physical explanation has been proven, while several suggestions have been put forward. Aims: This paper investigates one possible method for maintaining these upflows assuming, that convective motions drive the magnetic field to initiate them through magnetic reconnection. Methods: We use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data to provide an initial potential 3D magnetic field of the active region NOAA 11123 on 2010 November 13 where the characteristic upflow velocities are observed. A simple 1D hydrostatic atmospheric model covering the region from the photosphere to the corona is derived. Local correlation tracking of the magnetic features in the HMI data is used to derive a proxy for the time dependent velocity field. The time dependent evolution of the system is solved using a resistive 3D magnetohydrodynamic code. Results: The magnetic field contains several null points located well above the photosphere, with their fan planes dividing the magnetic field into independent open and closed flux domains. The stressing of the interfaces between the different flux domains is expected to provide locations where magnetic reconnection can take place and drive systematic flows. In this case, the region between the closed and open flux is identified as the region where observations find the systematic upflows. Conclusions: In the present experiment, the driving only initiates magneto-acoustic waves without driving any systematic upflows at any of the flux interfaces. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Mathematical modeling of copper(II) ion inhibition on COD removal in an activated sludge unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamukoglu, M Yunus; Kargi, Fikret

    2007-07-19

    A mathematical model was developed to describe the Cu(II) ion inhibition on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from synthetic wastewater containing 15 mg l(-1) Cu(II) in an activated sludge unit. Experimental data obtained at different sludge ages (5-30 days) and hydraulic residence times (HRT) (5-25 h) were used to determine the kinetic, stoichiometric and inhibition constants for the COD removal rate in the presence and absence of Cu(II) ions. The inhibition pattern was identified as non-competitive, since Cu(II) ion inhibitions were observed both on maximum specific substrate removal rate (k) and on the saturation constant (Ks) with the inhibition constants of 97 and 18 mg l(-1), respectively, indicating more pronounced inhibition on Ks. The growth yield coefficient (Y) decreased and the death rate constant (b) increased in the presence of Cu(II) ions due to copper ion toxicity on microbial growth with inhibition constants of 29 and 200 mg l(-1), respectively indicating more effective inhibition on the growth yield coefficient or higher maintenance requirements. The mathematical model with the predetermined kinetic constants was able to predict the system performance reasonably well especially at high HRT operations.

  20. Competitive sorption and selective sequence of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite: Batch, modeling, EPR and XAS studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shitong; Ren, Xuemei; Zhao, Guixia; Shi, Weiqun; Montavon, Gilles; Grambow, Bernd; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-10-01

    Heavy metal ions that leach from various industrial and agricultural processes are simultaneously present in the contaminated soil and water systems. The competitive sorption of these toxic metal ions on the natural soil components and sediments significantly influences their migration, bioavailability and ecotoxicity in the geochemical environment. In this study, the competitive sorption and selectivity order of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite are investigated by combining the batch experiments, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), surface complexation modeling and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). The batch experimental data show that the coexisting Ni(II) exhibits a negligible influence on the sorption behavior of Cu(II), whereas the coexisting Cu(II) reduces the Ni(II) sorption percentage and changes the shape of the Ni(II) sorption isotherm. The sorption species of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite over the acidic and near-neutral pH range are well simulated by the surface complexation modeling. However, this model cannot identify the occurrence of surface nucleation and the co-precipitation processes at a highly alkaline pH. Based on the results of the EPR and XAS analyses, the microstructures of Cu(II) on montmorillonite are identified as the hydrated free Cu(II) ions at pH 5.0, inner-sphere surface complexes at pH 6.0 and the surface dimers/Cu(OH)2(s) precipitate at pH 8.0 in the single-solute and the binary-solute systems. For the Ni(II) sorption in the single-solute system, the formed microstructure varies from the hydrated free Ni(II) ions at the pH values of 5.0 and 6.0 to the inner-sphere surface complexes at pH 8.0. For the Ni(II) sorption in the binary-solute system, the coexisting Cu(II) induces the formation of the inner-sphere complexes at pH 6.0. In contrast, Ni(II) is adsorbed on montmorillonite via the formation of Ni phyllosilicate co-precipitate/α-Ni(OH)2(s) precipitate at pH 8.0. The selective sequence

  1. National Aviation Fuel Scenario Analysis Program (NAFSAP). Volume I. Model Description. Volume II. User Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    TESI CHART NATIONAI RUREAt (F ANDA[)Rt 1V4 A NATIONAL. AVIATION ~ FUEL SCENARIO.. ANALYSIS PROGRAM 49!! VOLUM I: MODEL DESCRIA~v 4<C VOLUME II: tr)ER...executes post processor which translates results of the graphics program to machine readable code used by the pen plotter) cr (depressing the carriage

  2. Searches for physics beyond the standard model in $f\\bar{f}$ production at LEP II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Peter John Holt

    2004-03-01

    Preliminary combinations of measurements of the 4 LEP Collaborations of the process $e^{+}e^{-} → f\\bar{f}$ at LEP II are presented. The combined results are interpreted in terms of contact interactions and the exchange of $Z’$ bosons and within models of low-scale gravity in large extra dimensions.

  3. Kinetic model of II-VI(001) semiconductor surfaces : Growth rates in atomic layer epitaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkmann, T; Ahr, M; Biehl, M

    2004-01-01

    We present a zinc-blende lattice gas model of II-VI(001) surfaces, which is investigated by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Anisotropic effective interactions between surface metal atoms allow for the description of, e.g., the sublimation of CdTe(001), including the reconstruction of Cd-te

  4. Catalytic Oxygen Evolution by a Bioinorganic Model of the Photosystem II Oxygen-Evolving Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Derrick L.; Tinoco, Arthur D.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Vrettos, John S.; Allen, Bertha Connie

    2005-01-01

    Bioinorganic models of the manganese Mn4 cluster are important not only as aids in understanding the structure and function of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), but also in developing artificial water-oxidation catalysts. The mechanism of water oxidation by photosystem II (PSII) is thought to involve the formation of a high-valent terminal Mn-oxo…

  5. A primer for biomedical scientists on how to execute model II linear regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludbrook, John

    2012-04-01

    1. There are two very different ways of executing linear regression analysis. One is Model I, when the x-values are fixed by the experimenter. The other is Model II, in which the x-values are free to vary and are subject to error. 2. I have received numerous complaints from biomedical scientists that they have great difficulty in executing Model II linear regression analysis. This may explain the results of a Google Scholar search, which showed that the authors of articles in journals of physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry rarely use Model II regression analysis. 3. I repeat my previous arguments in favour of using least products linear regression analysis for Model II regressions. I review three methods for executing ordinary least products (OLP) and weighted least products (WLP) regression analysis: (i) scientific calculator and/or computer spreadsheet; (ii) specific purpose computer programs; and (iii) general purpose computer programs. 4. Using a scientific calculator and/or computer spreadsheet, it is easy to obtain correct values for OLP slope and intercept, but the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) are inaccurate. 5. Using specific purpose computer programs, the freeware computer program smatr gives the correct OLP regression coefficients and obtains 95% CI by bootstrapping. In addition, smatr can be used to compare the slopes of OLP lines. 6. When using general purpose computer programs, I recommend the commercial programs systat and Statistica for those who regularly undertake linear regression analysis and I give step-by-step instructions in the Supplementary Information as to how to use loss functions.

  6. Target echo strength modelling at FOI, including results from the BeTSSi II workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Östberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the target echo strength (TS) modelling capacity at the Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI) is presented. The modelling methods described range from approximate ones, such as raytracing and Kirchhoff approximation codes, to high accuracy full field codes including boundary integral equation methods and finite elements methods. Illustrations of the applicability of the codes are given for a few simple cases tackled during the BeTTSi II (Benchmark Target Echo Strength Simulation) workshop held in Kiel 2014.

  7. Cosmological Parameter Uncertainties from SALT-II Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J. [Pennsylvania U.; Guy, J. [LBL, Berkeley; Kessler, R. [Chicago U., KICP; Astier, P. [Paris U., VI-VII; Marriner, J. [Fermilab; Betoule, M. [Paris U., VI-VII; Sako, M. [Pennsylvania U.; El-Hage, P. [Paris U., VI-VII; Biswas, R. [Argonne; Pain, R. [Paris U., VI-VII; Kuhlmann, S. [Argonne; Regnault, N. [Paris U., VI-VII; Frieman, J. A. [Fermilab; Schneider, D. P. [Penn State U.

    2014-08-29

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ~120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ~255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ~290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w (input) – w (recovered)) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty, the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  8. Cosmological parameter uncertainties from SALT-II type Ia supernova light curve models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Betoule, M.; El-Hage, P.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N. [LPNHE, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universié Denis Diderot Paris 7, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Kessler, R.; Frieman, J. A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Marriner, J. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Biswas, R.; Kuhlmann, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Schneider, D. P., E-mail: kessler@kicp.chicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ∼120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ∼255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ∼290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w {sub input} – w {sub recovered}) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty; the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  9. Cosmological Parameter Uncertainties from SALT-II Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Models

    CERN Document Server

    Mosher, J; Kessler, R; Astier, P; Marriner, J; Betoule, M; Sako, M; El-Hage, P; Biswas, R; Pain, R; Kuhlmann, S; Regnault, N; Frieman, J A; Schneider, D P

    2014-01-01

    We use simulated SN Ia samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and the bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: 120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, 255 SDSS SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and 290 SNLS SNe Ia (z <= 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (winput - wrecovered) ranging from -0.005 +/- 0.012 to -0.024 +/- 0.010. These biases a...

  10. LRS Bianchi Type II Massive String Cosmological Models with Magnetic Field in Lyra's Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bianchi type II massive string cosmological models with magnetic field and time dependent gauge function ( in the frame work of Lyra's geometry are investigated. The magnetic field is in -plane. To get the deterministic solution, we have assumed that the shear ( is proportional to the expansion (. This leads to , where and are metric potentials and is a constant. We find that the models start with a big bang at initial singularity and expansion decreases due to lapse of time. The anisotropy is maintained throughout but the model isotropizes when . The physical and geometrical aspects of the model in the presence and absence of magnetic field are also discussed.

  11. TARGET ANALYSIS OF SUZHOU CREEK REHABILITATION PROJECT STAGE II:BASED ON WATER QUALITY MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Zhen-liang; XU Zu-xin

    2004-01-01

    The Suzhou Creek is a seriously polluted tidal river in Shanghai. The Suzhou Creek Rehabilitation Project was launched in 1998, and the total investment will surpass 10 billion yuan RMB. It is important to assess the effectiveness of the project and ascertain its targets. In this study, by analyzing the achievements of Suzhou Creek Rehabilitation Project (Stage I) and its remaining problems, the main tasks of the Project Stage II are proposed. These works are wastewater interception, sediment dredging, bidirectional water diversion, and reconstruction of municipal pump stations. The water quality model established with USEPA's WASP is employed to analyze the quantitative targets of the Project Stage II. In the Project Stage II, the water quality of mainstream and tributaries will be improved continuously, the valus of CODCr, BOD5, DO in the mainstream will steadily attain Class IV according to the National Surface Water Quality Standard, and the ecological environment of Suzhou Creek with continuously recover.

  12. Bayesian Estimation and Prediction for Flexible Weibull Model under Type-II Censoring Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed the Bayesian estimation procedure for flexible Weibull distribution under Type-II censoring scheme assuming Jeffrey's scale invariant (noninformative and Gamma (informative priors for the model parameters. The interval estimation for the model parameters has been performed through normal approximation, bootstrap, and highest posterior density (HPD procedures. Further, we have also derived the predictive posteriors and the corresponding predictive survival functions for the future observations based on Type-II censored data from the flexible Weibull distribution. Since the predictive posteriors are not in the closed form, we proposed to use the Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC methods to approximate the posteriors of interest. The performance of the Bayes estimators has also been compared with the classical estimators of the model parameters through the Monte Carlo simulation study. A real data set representing the time between failures of secondary reactor pumps has been analysed for illustration purpose.

  13. Removal of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions by brown marine macro algae: kinetic modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, Olga; Martins, Ramiro; Matos, Cristina; Boaventura, Rui

    2008-01-01

    Specific marine macro algae species abundant at the Portuguese coast (Laminaria hiperborea, Bifurcaria bifurcata, Sargassum muticum and Fucus spiralis) were shown to be effective for removing toxic metals (Cd(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II)) from aqueous solutions. The initial metal concentrations in solution were about 75-100 mg L-1. The observed biosorption capacities for cadmium, zinc and lead ions were in the ranges of 23.9-39.5 mg g-1, 18.6-32.0 mg g-1 and 32.3-50.4 mg g-1, respectively. Kinetic ...

  14. Mn(II) and Cu(II) complexes of a bidentate Schiff's base ligand: Spectral, thermal, molecular modelling and mycological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Monika; Chandra, Sulekh; Tyagi, Prateek

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of manganese(II) and copper(II) of general composition M(L)2X2 have been synthesized [L = 2-acetyl thiophene thiosemicarbazone and X = Cl- and NO3-]. The elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, mass, IR, UV, NMR and EPR spectral studies of the compounds led to the conclusion that the ligand acts as a bidentate manner. The Schiff's base ligand forms hexacoordinated complexes having octahedral geometry for Mn(II) and tetragonal geometry for Cu(II) complexes. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In molecular modelling the geometries of Schiff's base and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31g(d,p) basis set. The mycological studies of the compounds were examined against the plant pathogenic fungi i.e. Rhizoctonia bataticola, Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium odum.

  15. Application of Bayesian hierarchical models for phase I/II clinical trials in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Shinjo; Hamada, Chikuma

    2017-03-01

    Treatment during cancer clinical trials sometimes involves the combination of multiple drugs. In addition, in recent years there has been a trend toward phase I/II trials in which a phase I and a phase II trial are combined into a single trial to accelerate drug development. Methods for the seamless combination of phases I and II parts are currently under investigation. In the phase II part, adaptive randomization on the basis of patient efficacy outcomes allocates more patients to the dose combinations considered to have higher efficacy. Patient toxicity outcomes are used for determining admissibility to each dose combination and are not used for selection of the dose combination itself. In cases where the objective is not to find the optimum dose combination solely for efficacy but regarding both toxicity and efficacy, the need exists to allocate patients to dose combinations with consideration of the balance of existing trade-offs between toxicity and efficacy. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical model and an adaptive randomization with consideration for the relationship with toxicity and efficacy. Using the toxicity and efficacy outcomes of patients, the Bayesian hierarchical model is used to estimate the toxicity probability and efficacy probability in each of the dose combinations. Here, we use Bayesian moving-reference adaptive randomization on the basis of desirability computed from the obtained estimator. Computer simulations suggest that the proposed method will likely recommend a higher percentage of target dose combinations than a previously proposed method.

  16. Reactive Transport Modeling of Microbe-mediated Fe (II) Oxidation for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surasani, V.; Li, L.

    2011-12-01

    Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) aims to improve the recovery of entrapped heavy oil in depleted reservoirs using microbe-based technology. Reservoir ecosystems often contain diverse microbial communities those can interact with subsurface fluids and minerals through a network of nutrients and energy fluxes. Microbe-mediated reactions products include gases, biosurfactants, biopolymers those can alter the properties of oil and interfacial interactions between oil, brine, and rocks. In addition, the produced biomass and mineral precipitates can change the reservoir permeability profile and increase sweeping efficiency. Under subsurface conditions, the injection of nitrate and Fe (II) as the electron acceptor and donor allows bacteria to grow. The reaction products include minerals such as Fe(OH)3 and nitrogen containing gases. These reaction products can have large impact on oil and reservoir properties and can enhance the recovery of trapped oil. This work aims to understand the Fe(II) oxidation by nitrate under conditions relevant to MEOR. Reactive transport modeling is used to simulate the fluid flow, transport, and reactions involved in this process. Here we developed a complex reactive network for microbial mediated nitrate-dependent Fe (II) oxidation that involves both thermodynamic controlled aqueous reactions and kinetic controlled Fe (II) mineral reaction. Reactive transport modeling is used to understand and quantify the coupling between flow, transport, and reaction processes. Our results identify key parameter controls those are important for the alteration of permeability profile under field conditions.

  17. An Angular Overlap Model for Cu(II) Ion in the AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jin Yu; Ponder, Jay W

    2014-01-01

    An extensible polarizable force field for transition metal ion was developed based on AMOEBA and the angular overlap model (AOM) with consistent treatment of electrostatics for all atoms. Parameters were obtained by fitting molecular mechanics (MM) energies to various ab initio gas-phase calculations. The results of parameterization were presented for copper (II) ion ligated to water and model fragments of amino acid residues involved in the copper binding sites of type 1 copper proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on aqueous copper (II) ion at various temperatures, as well as plastocyanin (1AG6) and azurin (1DYZ). Results demonstrated that the AMOEBA-AOM significantly improves the accuracy of classical MM in a number of test cases when compared to ab initio calculations. The Jahn-Teller distortion for hexa-aqua copper (II) complex was handled automatically without specifically designating axial and in-plane ligands. Analyses of MD trajectories resulted in a 6-coordination first solvation shell for aqueous copper (II) ion and a 1.8ns average residence time of water molecules. The ensemble average geometries of 1AG6 and 1DYZ copper binding sites were in general agreement with X-ray and previous computational studies.

  18. The murine angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm model: rupture risk and inflammatory progression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Y Cao

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is an enlargement of the greatest artery in the body defined as an increase in diameter of 1.5-fold. AAAs are common in the elderly population and thousands die each year from their complications. The most commonly used mouse model to study the pathogenesis of AAA is the angiotensin II (Ang II infusion method delivered via osmotic mini-pump for 28 days. Here, we studied the site-specificity and onset of aortic rupture, characterized three-dimensional (3D images and flow patterns in developing AAAs by ultrasound imaging, and examined macrophage infiltration in the Ang II model using 65 apolipoprotein E deficient mice. Aortic rupture occurred in 16 mice (25 % and was nearly as prevalent at the aortic arch (44 % as it was in the suprarenal region (56 % and was most common within the first seven days after Ang II infusion (12 of 16; 75 %. Longitudinal ultrasound screening was found to correlate nicely with histological analysis and AAA volume renderings showed a significant relationship with AAA severity index. Aortic dissection preceded altered flow patterns and macrophage infiltration was a prominent characteristic of developing AAAs. Targeting the inflammatory component of AAA disease with novel therapeutics will hopefully lead to new strategies to attenuate aneurysm growth and aortic rupture.

  19. Seizure modeling of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solution by chemically modified sugarcane bagasse fly ash: isotherms, kinetics, and column study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bhavna; Mistry, Chirag; Shah, Ajay

    2013-04-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a common environmental problem all over the world. The purpose of the research is to examine the applicability of bagasse fly ash (BFA)-an agricultural waste of sugar industry used for the synthesis of zeolitic material. The zeolitic material are used for the uptake of Pb(II) and Cd(II) heavy metal. Bagasse fly ash is used as a native material for the synthesis of zeolitic materials by conventional hydrothermal treatment without (conventional zeolitic bagasse fly ash (CZBFA)) and with electrolyte (conventional zeolitic bagasse fly ash in electrolyte media (ECZBFA)) media. Heavy metal ions Pb(II) and Cd(II) were successfully seized from aqueous media using these synthesized zeolitic materials. In this study, the zeolitic materials were well characterized by different instrumental methods such as Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, XRF, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopic microphotographs. The presence of analcime, phillipsite, and zeolite P in adsorbents confirms successful conversion of native BFA into zeolitic materials. Seizure modeling of Pb(II) and Cd(II) was achieved by batch sorption experiments, isotherms, and kinetic studies. These data were used to compare and evaluate the zeolitic materials as potential sorbents for the uptake of heavy metal ions from an aqueous media. The Langmuir isotherm correlation coefficient parameters best fit the equilibrium data which indicate the physical sorption. Pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion model matches best which indicates that the rate of sorption was controlled by film diffusion. The column studies were performed for the practical function of sorbents, and breakthrough curves were obtained, which revealed higher sorption capacity as compared to batch method. Synthesized zeolitic material (CZBFA and ECZBFA), a low-cost sorbent, was proven as potential sorbent for the uptake of Pb(II) and Cd(II) heavy metal ions.

  20. Application of Zr/Ti-Pic in the adsorption process of Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) using adsorption physico-chemical models and thermodynamics of the process; Aplicacao de Zr/Ti-PILC no processo de adsorcao de Cu(II), Co(II) e Ni(II) utilizando modelos fisico-quimicos de adsorcao e termodinamica do processo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Denis Lima; Airoldi, Claudio [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Inorganica]. E-mail: dlguerra@iqm.unicamp.br; Lemos, Vanda Porpino; Angelica, Romulo Simoes [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPa), Belem (Brazil); Viana, Rubia Ribeiro [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra. Dept. de Recursos Minerais

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study how Zr/Ti-Pic adsorbs metals. The physico-chemical proprieties of Zr/Ti-Pic have been optimized with pillarization processes and Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) adsorption from aqueous solution has been carried out, with maximum adsorption values of 8.85, 8.30 and 7.78 x-1 mmol g{sup -1}, respectively. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherm models have been applied to fit the experimental data with a linear regression process. The energetic effect caused by metal interaction was determined through calorimetric titration at the solid-liquid interface and gave a net thermal effect that enabled the calculation of the exothermic values and the equilibrium constant. (author)

  1. Correlation of h→γγ and Zγ in Type-II seesaw neutrino model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chian-Shu, E-mail: chianshu@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Geng, Chao-Qiang, E-mail: geng@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Huang, Da, E-mail: dahuang@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Lu-Hsing, E-mail: lhtsai@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2013-06-10

    We study the charged scalar contributions to the Higgs decay channels of h→γγ and h→Zγ in the Type-II seesaw neutrino model. In most of the allowed parameter space in the model, the new contribution to h→Zγ is positively correlated with that to h→γγ. If the current excess of the h→γγ rate measured by the ATLAS Collaboration persists, the h→Zγ rate should be also larger than the corresponding standard model prediction. We demonstrate that the anti-correlation between h→γγ and h→Zγ only exists in some special region.

  2. Constructing kinetic models to elucidate structural dynamics of a complete RNA polymerase II elongation cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jin; Da, Lin-Tai; Huang, Xuhui

    2015-02-01

    The RNA polymerase II elongation is central in eukaryotic transcription. Although multiple intermediates of the elongation complex have been identified, the dynamical mechanisms remain elusive or controversial. Here we build a structure-based kinetic model of a full elongation cycle of polymerase II, taking into account transition rates and conformational changes characterized from both single molecule experimental studies and computational simulations at atomistic scale. Our model suggests a force-dependent slow transition detected in the single molecule experiments corresponds to an essential conformational change of a trigger loop (TL) opening prior to the polymerase translocation. The analyses on mutant study of E1103G and on potential sequence effects of the translocation substantiate this proposal. Our model also investigates another slow transition detected in the transcription elongation cycle which is independent of mechanical force. If this force-independent slow transition happens as the TL gradually closes upon NTP binding, the analyses indicate that the binding affinity of NTP to the polymerase has to be sufficiently high. Otherwise, one infers that the slow transition happens pre-catalytically but after the TL closing. Accordingly, accurate determination of intrinsic properties of NTP binding is demanded for an improved characterization of the polymerase elongation. Overall, the study provides a working model of the polymerase II elongation under a generic Brownian ratchet mechanism, with most essential structural transition and functional kinetics elucidated.

  3. A dynamical model for FR II type radio sources with terminated jet activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligowska, Elżbieta

    2017-02-01

    Context. The extension of the KDA analytical model of FR II-type source evolution originally assuming a continuum injection process in the jet-IGM interaction towards a case of the jet's termination is presented and briefly discussed. Aims: The dynamical evolution of FR II-type sources predicted with this extended model, hereafter referred to as KDA EXT, and its application to the chosen radio sources. Methods: Following the classical approach based on the source's continuous injection and self-similarity, I propose the effective formulae describing the length and luminosity evolution of the lobes during an absence of the jet flow, and present the resulting diagrams for the characteristics mentioned. Results: Using an algorithm based on the numerical integration of a modified formula for jet power, the KDA EXT model is fitted to three radio galaxies. Their predicted spectra are then compared to the observed spectra, proving that these fits are better than the best spectral fit provided by the original KDA model of the FR II-type sources dynamical evolution.

  4. Development and molecular modeling of Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II complexes as high acting anti breast cancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Deodware

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of cobalt, nickel and copper complexes of bidentate Schiff base derived from the condensation reaction of 4-amino-5-mercapto-3-methyl-1,2,4-triazole with 2-nitrobenzaldehyde had been synthesized. The synthesized Schiff base and their metal complexes have been characterized with the support of more than a few physicochemical techniques, elemental evaluation, magnetic moment measurements, spectroscopic, thermo gravimetric techniques and X-ray powder diffraction. Spectral analysis exhibits square planer geometry for Cu(II complex while octahedral geometry for Co(II and Ni(II complexes. The Schiff base and their complexes have been screened for their anticancer activity using MCF7 cell line. In molecular docking learn exhibits that Ni(II complex is more active confirmed quantity of interaction in particular hydrogen bond interaction with ASN142 and charge interactions with ASP97 and GLU99.

  5. Structural Model of RNA Polymerase II Elongation Complex with Complete Transcription Bubble Reveals NTP Entry Routes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The RNA polymerase II (Pol II is a eukaryotic enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the messenger RNA using a DNA template. Despite numerous biochemical and biophysical studies, it remains elusive whether the "secondary channel" is the only route for NTP to reach the active site of the enzyme or if the "main channel" could be an alternative. On this regard, crystallographic structures of Pol II have been extremely useful to understand the structural basis of transcription, however, the conformation of the unpaired non-template DNA part of the full transcription bubble (TB is still unknown. Since diffusion routes of the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP substrate through the main channel might overlap with the TB region, gaining structural information of the full TB is critical for a complete understanding of Pol II transcription process. In this study, we have built a structural model of Pol II with a complete transcription bubble based on multiple sources of existing structural data and used Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations together with structural analysis to shed light on NTP entry pathways. Interestingly, we found that although both channels have enough space to allow NTP loading, the percentage of MD conformations containing enough space for NTP loading through the secondary channel is twice higher than that of the main channel. Further energetic study based on MD simulations with NTP loaded in the channels has revealed that the diffusion of the NTP through the main channel is greatly disfavored by electrostatic repulsion between the NTP and the highly negatively charged backbones of nucleotides in the non-template DNA strand. Taken together, our results suggest that the secondary channel is the major route for NTP entry during Pol II transcription.

  6. Structural Model of RNA Polymerase II Elongation Complex with Complete Transcription Bubble Reveals NTP Entry Routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Pardo-Avila, Fátima; Wang, Dong; Huang, Xuhui

    2015-07-01

    The RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a eukaryotic enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the messenger RNA using a DNA template. Despite numerous biochemical and biophysical studies, it remains elusive whether the "secondary channel" is the only route for NTP to reach the active site of the enzyme or if the "main channel" could be an alternative. On this regard, crystallographic structures of Pol II have been extremely useful to understand the structural basis of transcription, however, the conformation of the unpaired non-template DNA part of the full transcription bubble (TB) is still unknown. Since diffusion routes of the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate through the main channel might overlap with the TB region, gaining structural information of the full TB is critical for a complete understanding of Pol II transcription process. In this study, we have built a structural model of Pol II with a complete transcription bubble based on multiple sources of existing structural data and used Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations together with structural analysis to shed light on NTP entry pathways. Interestingly, we found that although both channels have enough space to allow NTP loading, the percentage of MD conformations containing enough space for NTP loading through the secondary channel is twice higher than that of the main channel. Further energetic study based on MD simulations with NTP loaded in the channels has revealed that the diffusion of the NTP through the main channel is greatly disfavored by electrostatic repulsion between the NTP and the highly negatively charged backbones of nucleotides in the non-template DNA strand. Taken together, our results suggest that the secondary channel is the major route for NTP entry during Pol II transcription.

  7. Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume II. Operation manual. [SIMWEST code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Burroughs, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume II, the SIMWEST operation manual, describes the usage of the SIMWEST program, the design of the library components, and a number of simple example simulations intended to familiarize the user with the program's operation. Volume II also contains a listing of each SIMWEST library subroutine.

  8. [Factor models of the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Validation with coronary patients and a critique of Ward's model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pino Pérez, Antonio; Ibáñez Fernández, Ignacio; Bosa Ojeda, Francisco; Dorta González, Ruth; Gaos Miezoso, María Teresa

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to validate in a sample of 205 coronary patients a factor model for the BDI-II, especially a model that would allow for modeling of depressive symptoms after explicitly removing bias related to somatic symptoms of depression that would overlap those of heart disease. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses for ordinal data were conducted. A one-factor model, six correlated two-factor models and, derivatives thereof, seven models with a single General Depression factor and two uncorrelated factors, were analyzed. Exploratory analysis extracted two factors, Somatic-affective and Cognitive. Confirmatory factor analyses showed the worst fit for the one-factor model. Two-factor models were surpassed in goodness of fit by the models of general-factor and group factors. Among these, the General, Somatic-affective and Cognitive (G-Sa-C) model of Beck with students is noteworthy. The reduced General, Somatic and Cognitive (G-S-C) model of Ward showed the worst goodness of fit. Our model surpasses the cutoff criteria of all fit indexes. We conclude that the inclusion of a general-factor and group factors in all the models surpasses the results of G-S-C model and, therefore, questions it. The G-Sa-C model is strengthened.

  9. Self-tuning Solution of Cosmological Constant in RS-II Model and Goldstone Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J E

    2001-01-01

    I give a review on the self-tuning solution of the cosmological constant in a 5D RS-II model using a three index antisymmetric tensor field $A_{MNP}$. The three index antisymmetric tensor field can be the fundamental one appearing in 11D supergravity. Also, the dual of its field strength $H_{MNPQ}$, being a massless scalar, may be interpreted as a Goldstone boson of some spontaneously broken global symmetry.

  10. Radiative emission of solar features in the Ca II K line: comparison of measurements and models

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolli, I; Uitenbroek, H; Giorgi, F; Rast, M P; Solanki, S K

    2010-01-01

    We study the radiative emission of various types of solar features, such as quiet Sun, enhanced network, plage, and bright plage regions, identified on filtergrams taken in the Ca II K line. We analysed fulldisk images obtained with the PSPT, by using three interference filters that sample the Ca II K line with different bandpasses. We studied the dependence of the radiative emission of disk features on the filter bandpass. We also performed a NLTE spectral synthesis of the Ca II K line integrated over the bandpass of PSPT filters. The synthesis was carried out by utilizing both the PRD and CRD with the most recent set of semi­empirical atmosphere models in the literature and some earlier atmosphere models. We measured the CLV of intensity values for various solar features identified on PSPT images and compared the results obtained with those derived from the synthesis. We find that CRD calculations derived using the most recent quiet Sun model, on average, reproduce the measured values of the quiet Sun regi...

  11. Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

    2010-07-01

    Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

  12. Compartmental models: theory and practice using the SAAM II software system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobelli, C; Foster, D M

    1998-01-01

    Understanding in vivo the functioning of metabolic systems at the whole-body or regional level requires one to make some assumptions on how the system works and to describe them mathematically, that is, to postulate a model of the system. Models of systems can have different characteristics depending on the properties of the system and the database available for their study; they can be deterministic or stochastic, dynamic or static, with lumped or distributed parameters. Metabolic systems are dynamic systems and we focus here on the most widely used class of dynamic (differential equation) models: compartmental models. This is a class of models for which the governing law is conservation of mass. It is a very attractive class to users because it formalizes physical intuition in a simple and reasonable way. Compartmental models are lumped parameter models, in that the events in the system are described by a finite number of changing variables, and are thus described by ordinary differential equations. While stochastic compartment models can also be defined, we discuss here the deterministic versions--those that can work with exact relationships between model variables. These are the models most widely used in discussions of endocrinology and metabolism. In this chapter, we will discuss the theory of compartmental models, and then discuss how the SAAM II software system, a system designed specifically to aid in the development and testing of multicompartmental models, can be used.

  13. Tools for system validation. Dynamic modelling of the direct condenser at Sandvik II in Vaexjoe; Hjaelpmedel foer systemvalidering. Dynamisk modellering av direktkondensorn paa Sandvik II i Vaexjoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaberg, Martin [Dynasim AB, Lund (Sweden); Tuszynski, Jan [Sycon Energikonsult AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    The project reported here aimed to test the suitability of existing computer tools for modelling of energy processes. The suggested use for the models are at the early tests and validations of new, refurbished or modernised thermal plants. The technique presented in this report should be applicable for clarification of the scope of delivery and testing for both the process and tile control system. The validation process can thus be simplified, allowing risk reduction and predictability of the commissioning. The main delays and economical misfortune often occurs during commissioning. This report should prove the feasibility of the purchase routines where purchaser, vendor and quality inspection will use a common model of the process to validate system requirements and specifications. Later on it is used to validate structure and predefine testing. Thanks to agreement on the common model, early tests can be conducted on complex systems, minimizing the investment risks. The modelling reported here concerns the direct condenser at Sandvik 11, power and heating plant owned by Vaexjoe Energi AB in Sweden. We have chosen the direct condenser because it is an existing, well-documented and well-defined subsystem of high complexity in both structure and operation. Heavy transients made commissioning and test runs of similar condensers throughout Sweden costly and troublesome. The work resulted in an open, general, and physically correct model. The model can easily be re-dimensioned through physical parameters of common use. The control system modelled corresponds to the actual control system at the Sandvik II plant. Any improvement or deep validation of the controllers was not included in this work. The suitability is shown through four simulation cases. Three cases are based on a registered plant operation during a turbine trip. The first test case uses present plant data, the second an old steam valve actuator and the third uses the old actuator and an error in level

  14. Modeling of optical spectra of the light-harvesting CP29 antenna complex of photosystem II--part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ximao; Kell, Adam; Pieper, Jörg; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2013-06-01

    Until recently, it was believed that the CP29 protein from higher plant photosystem II (PSII) contains 8 chlorophylls (Chl's) per complex (Ahn et al. Science 2008, 320, 794-797; Bassi et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 1999, 96, 10056-10061) in contrast to the 13 Chl's revealed by the recent X-ray structure (Pan et al. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 2011, 18, 309-315). This disagreement presents a constraint on the interpretation of the underlying electronic structure of this complex. To shed more light on the interpretation of various experimental optical spectra discussed in the accompanying paper (part I, DOI 10.1021/jp4004328 ), we report here calculated low-temperature (5 K) absorption, fluorescence, hole-burned (HB), and 300 K circular dichroism (CD) spectra for CP29 complexes with a different number of pigments. We focus on excitonic structure and the nature of the low-energy state using modeling based on the X-ray structure of CP29 and Redfield theory. We show that the lowest energy state is mostly contributed to by a612, a611, and a615 Chl's. We suggest that in the previously studied CP29 complexes from spinach (Pieper et al. Photochem. Photobiol.2000, 71, 574-589) two Chl's could have been lost during the preparation/purification procedure, but it is unlikely that the spinach CP29 protein contains only eight Chl's, as suggested by the sequence homology-based study (Bassi et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.1999, 96, 10056-10061). The likely Chl's missing in wild-type (WT) CP29 complexes studied previously (Pieper et al. Photochem. Photobiol. 2000, 71, 574-589) include a615 and b607. This is why the nonresonant HB spectra shown in that reference were ~1 nm blue-shifted with the low-energy state mostly localized on about one Chl a (i.e., a612) molecule. Pigment composition of CP29 is discussed in the context of light-harvesting and excitation energy transfer.

  15. Saturation magnetization of Ni(II) in metalloproteins and model compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendova, M.; Day, E.P.; Kiick, K.; Johnson, M.; Ma, L.; Scott, B.; Hausinger, R.; Todd, M.; Peterson, J. (Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States) Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States) Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States) Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The Ni(II) sites of urease (from Klebsiella aerogenes and jack bean), coenzyme F[sub 430] (from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum), and several model compounds having octahedral symmetry have been studied using the saturation megnetization technique. Data were collected at four fixed fields over the temperature range from 2 - 200K. Theoretical curves calculated from the spin Hamiltonian were used to fit the experimentally obtained magnetization curves. The following parameters were determined: the spine state (S), the amount of the sample in this spin state ([S]), the gyromagnetic ratio (g), and the zero field splitting parameters (D, E/D). The amount of S=1 paramagnetism of the Ni(II) sites was found to depend on the pH of the buffer and on the concentration of the protein in D[sub 2]O (for coenzyme F[sub 430]). The relationship of the strength of the ligand field to the zero field splitting parameter was studied for the model compounds. There was no evidence for exchange coupling between the two Ni(II) ions at the active sites of either plant or bacterial urease.

  16. DFT calculations of EPR parameters for copper(II)-exchanged zeolites using cluster models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, William M; Larsen, Sarah C

    2010-01-14

    The coordination environment of Cu(II) in hydrated copper-exchanged zeolites was explored through the use of density functional theory (DFT) calculations of EPR parameters. Extensive experimental EPR data are available in the literature for hydrated copper-exchanged zeolites. The copper complex in hydrated copper-exchanged zeolites was previously proposed to be [Cu(H(2)O)(5)OH](+) based on empirical trends in tetragonal model complex EPR data. In this study, calculated EPR parameters for the previously proposed copper complex, [Cu(H(2)O)(5)OH](+), were compared to model complexes in which Cu(II) was coordinated to small silicate or aluminosilicate clusters as a first approximation of the impact of the zeolitic environment on the copper complex. Interpretation of the results suggests that Cu(II) is coordinated or closely associated with framework oxygen atoms within the zeolite structure. Additionally, it is proposed that the EPR parameters are dependent on the Si/Al ratio of the parent zeolite.

  17. 4-nitrocatechol as a probe of a Mn(II)-dependent extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenase (MndD): comparison with relevant Fe(II) and Mn(II) model complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Mark F; Costas, Miquel; Ito, Masami; Jo, Du-Hwan; Tipton, A Alex; Whiting, Adam K; Que, Lawrence

    2003-02-01

    Mn(II)-dependent 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate 2,3-dioxygenase (MndD) is an extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenase from Arthrobacter globiformis that has 82% sequence identity to and cleaves the same substrate (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid) as Fe(II)-dependent 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPCD) from Brevibacterium fuscum. We have observed that MndD binds the chromophoric 4-nitrocatechol (4-NCH(2)) substrate as a dianion and cleaves it extremely slowly, in contrast to the Fe(II)-dependent enzymes which bind 4-NCH(2) mostly as a monoanion and cleave 4-NCH(2) 4-5 orders of magnitude faster. These results suggest that the monoanionic binding state of 4-NC is essential for extradiol cleavage. In order to address the differences in 4-NCH(2) binding to these enzymes, we synthesized and characterized the first mononuclear monoanionic and dianionic Mn(II)-(4-NC) model complexes as well as their Fe(II)-(4-NC) analogs. The structures of [(6-Me(2)-bpmcn)Fe(II)(4-NCH)](+), [(6-Me(3)-TPA)Mn(II)(DBCH)](+), and [(6-Me(2)-bpmcn)Mn(II)(4-NCH)](+) reveal that the monoanionic catecholate is bound in an asymmetric fashion (Delta r(metal-O(catecholate))=0.25-0.35 A), as found in the crystal structures of the E(.)S complexes of extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases. Acid-base titrations of [(L)M(II)(4-NCH)](+) complexes in aprotic solvents show that the p K(a) of the second catecholate proton of 4-NCH bound to the metal center is half a p K(a) unit higher for the Mn(II) complexes than for the Fe(II) complexes. These results are in line with the Lewis acidities of the two divalent metal ions but are the opposite of the trend observed for 4-NCH(2) binding to the Mn(II)- and Fe(II)-catechol dioxygenases. These results suggest that the MndD active site decreases the second p K(a) of the bound 4-NCH(2) relative to the HPCD active site.

  18. Molecular Mechanics (MM) Force Fields for Modelling of Copper(II) Amino Acid Complexes in Different Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabolović, Jasmina

    2009-03-01

    New MM force field developed for modelling the properties of copper(II) complexes with aliphatic amino acid in vacuo, in crystal, and in aqueous solution was applied to study conformational properties of bis(N,N-diethylglycinato)copper(II). Two hypotheses are examined and confirmed as true: (i) the conformations which do not allow apical coordination to the copper(II) are the most stable in vacuo and in aqueous solution; (ii) MM calculations quantitatively support the supposition that the experimentally observed conformer is better suited for crystal packing than the in vacuo and in solution most stable conformers.

  19. Discriminating neutrino mass models using Type-II see-saw formula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Nimal Singh; Mahadev Patagiri; Mrinal Kumar Das

    2006-02-01

    An attempt has been made to discriminate theoretically the three possible patterns of neutrino mass models,viz., degenerate, inverted hierarchical and normal hierachical models, within the framework of Type-II see-saw formula. From detailed numerical analysis we are able to arrive at a conclusion that the inverted hierarchical model with the same CP phase (referred to as Type [IIA]), appears to be most favourable to survive in nature (and hence most stable), with the normal hierarchical model (Type [III]) and inverted hierarchical model with opposite CP phase (Type [IIB]), follow next. The degenerate models (Types [IA,IB,IC]) are found to be most unstable. The neutrino mass matrices which are obtained using the usual canonical see-saw formula (Type I), and which also give almost good predictions of neutrino masses and mixings consistent with the latest neutrino oscillation data, are re-examined in the presence of the left-handed Higgs triplet within the framework of non-canonical see-saw formula (Type II). We then estimate a parameter (the so-called discriminator) which may represent the minimum degree of suppression of the extra term arising from the presence of left-handed Higgs triplet, so as to restore the good predictions on neutrino masses and mixings already acquired in Type-I see-saw model. The neutrino mass model is said to be favourable and hence stable when its canonical see-saw term dominates over the non-canonical (perturbative) term, and this condition is used here as a criterion for discriminating neutrino mass models.

  20. Reduction of GAG storage in MPS II mouse model following implantation of encapsulated recombinant myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friso, Adelaide; Tomanin, Rosella; Alba, Sabrina; Gasparotto, Nicoletta; Puicher, Elisabetta Piller; Fusco, Mariella; Hortelano, Gonzalo; Muenzer, Joseph; Marin, Oriano; Zacchello, Franco; Scarpa, Maurizio

    2005-11-01

    Hunter syndrome, mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II), is a X-linked inherited disorder caused by the deficiency of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), involved in the lysosomal catabolism of the glycosaminoglycans (GAG) dermatan and heparan sulfate. Such a deficiency leads to the intracellular accumulation of undegraded GAG and eventually to a progressive severe clinical pattern. Many attempts have been made in the last two to three decades to identify possible therapeutic strategies for the disorder, including gene therapy and somatic cell therapy. In this study we evaluated the intraperitoneal implantation of allogeneic myoblasts over-expressing IDS, enclosed in alginate microcapsules, in the MPS II mouse model. Animals were monitored for 8 weeks post-implantation, during which plasma and tissue IDS levels, as well as tissue and urinary GAG contents, were measured. Induced enzyme activity occurred both in the plasma and in the different tissues analyzed. A significant decrease in urinary undegraded GAG between the fourth and the sixth week of treatment was observed. Moreover, a biochemical reduction of GAG deposits was measured 8 weeks after treatment in the liver and kidney, on average 30 and 38%, respectively, while in the spleen GAG levels were almost normalized. Finally, the therapeutic effect was confirmed by histolochemical examination of the same tissues. Such effects were obtained following implantation of about 1.5 x 10(6) recombinant cells/animal. Taken together, these results represent a clear evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of this strategy in the MPS II mouse model, and encourage further evaluation of this approach for potential treatment of human beings. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: II. Control of the H II Region Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R S; Kewley, L J; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; van Breugel, W; Groves, B A; Leitherer, C

    2006-03-01

    We examine from a theoretical viewpoint how the physical parameters of H II regions are controlled both in normal galaxies and in starburst environments. These parameters are the H II region luminosity function, the time-dependent size, the covering fraction of molecular clouds, the pressure in the ionized gas and the ionization parameter. The factors which control them are the initial mass function of the exciting stars, the cluster mass function, the metallicity and the mean pressure in the surrounding interstellar medium. We investigate the sensitivity of the H{alpha} luminosity to the IMF, and find that this can translate to about 30% variation in derived star formation rates. The molecular cloud dissipation timescale is estimated from a case study of M17 to be {approx} 1 Myr. Based upon H II luminosity function fitting for nearby galaxies, we propose that the cluster mass function has a log-normal form peaking at {approx} 185M{sub {circle_dot}}. This suggests that the cluster mass function is the continuation of the stellar IMF to higher mass. The pressure in the H II regions is controlled by the mechanical luminosity flux from the central cluster. Since this is closely related to the ionizing photon flux, we show that the ionization parameter is not a free variable, and that the diffuse ionized medium may be composed of many large, faint and old H II regions. Finally, we derive theoretical probability distributions for the ionization parameter as a function of metallicity and compare these to those derived for SDSS galaxies.

  2. Zn(II)-curcumin protects against hemorheological alterations, oxidative stress and liver injury in a rat model of acute alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuan; Mei, Xue-Ting; Zheng, Yan-Ping; Xu, Dong-Hui

    2014-03-01

    Curcumin can chelate metal ions, forming metallocomplexes. We compared the effects of Zn(II)-curcumin with curcumin against hemorheological alterations, oxidative stress and liver injury in a rat model of acute alcoholism. Oral administration of Zn(II)-curcumin dose-dependently prevented the ethanol-induced elevation of serum malondialdehyde (MDA) content and reductions in glutathione level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Zn(II)-curcumin also inhibited ethanol-induced liver injury. Additionally, Zn(II)-curcumin dose-dependently inhibited hemorheological abnormalities, including the ethanol-induced elevation of whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, blood viscosity at corrected hematocrit (45%), erythrocyte aggregation index, erythrocyte rigidity index and hematocrit. Compared to curcumin at the same dose, Zn(II)-curcumin more effectively elevated SOD activity, ameliorated liver injury and improved hemorheological variables. These results suggest that Zn(II)-curcumin protected the rats from ethanol-induced liver injury and hemorheological abnormalities via the synergistic effect of curcumin and zinc.

  3. Dipole model analysis of the new HERA I+II data

    CERN Document Server

    Luszczak, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    We use the dipole model to analyze the inclusive DIS cross section data, obtained from the HERA I+II measurements \\cite{Abramowicz:2015mha}. We show that these combined data are very well described within the dipole model framework, which is complemented with a valence quark structure functions. Our motivation is to investigate the gluon density with the BGK dipole model \\cite{BGK} as an alternative to the PDF approach. BGK dipole model uses for evolution the DGLAP mechanism in the $kt$ factorization scheme (in contrast to the collinear factorization for PDFs). We confirm our results from the previous paper \\cite{Luszczak:2013rxa} with old HERA data \\cite{HERA2010}. In addition we also performed a first, preliminary investigation of saturation. The analysis was done in the xFitter framework \\cite{xFitter,xFitter2,xFitter3,xFitter4,xFitter5}.}

  4. A GLOBAL MODEL OF THE LIGHT CURVES AND EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF TYPE II-PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejcha, Ondřej [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Prieto, Jose L., E-mail: pejcha@astro.princeton.edu [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441 Santiago (Chile)

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ∼230 velocity and ∼6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard R{sub V}∼3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  5. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user`s perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ``comfort parameters`` and ``perspective reality`` of the user`s model of the world. In developing visual displays for the EBR-II fuel handling system, the focus would be to incorporate the comfort parameters that overlap from each of the representation systems: visual, auditory and kinesthetic then incorporate the comfort parameters of the most prominent group of the population, and last, blend in the other two representational system comfort parameters. The focus of this informal study was to use the techniques of meta-modeling and synesthesia to develop a virtual environment that closely resembled the operator`s perspective of the fuel handling system of Argonne`s Experimental Breeder Reactor - II. An informal study was conducted using NLP as the behavioral model in a v reality (VR) setting.

  6. Fe K alpha and hydrodynamic loop model diagnostics for a large flare on II Peg

    CERN Document Server

    Ercolano, Barbara; Reale, Fabio; Testa, Paola; Miller, Jon M

    2008-01-01

    The observation by the Swift X-ray Telescope of the Fe K alpha_1, alpha_2 doublet during a large flare on the RS CVn binary system II Peg represents one of only two firm detections to date of photospheric Fe K alpha from a star other than our Sun. We present models of the Fe K alpha equivalent widths reported in the literature for the II Peg observations and show that they are most probably due to fluorescence following inner shell photoionisation of quasi-neutral Fe by the flare X-rays. Our models constrain the maximum height of flare the to 0.15 R_* assuming solar abundances for the photospheric material, and 0.1 R_* and 0.06 R_* assuming depleted photospheric abundances ([M/H]=-0.2 and [M/H]=-0.4, respectively). Accounting for an extended loop geometry has the effect of increasing the estimated flare heights by a factor of ~3. These predictions are consistent with those derived using results of flaring loop models, which are also used to estimate the flaring loop properties and energetics. From loop models...

  7. First-Year Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Results: Constraints on Non-Standard Cosmological Models

    CERN Document Server

    Sollerman, J; Davis, T M; Blomqvis, M; Bassett, B; Becker, A C; Cinabro, D; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Frieman, J; Garnavich, P; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Miquel, R; Nichol, R C; Richmond, M W; Sako, M; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Vanderplas, J T; Wheeler, J C

    2009-01-01

    We use the new SNe Ia discovered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey together with additional supernova datasets as well as observations of the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations to constrain cosmological models. This complements the analysis presented by Kessler et al. in that we discuss and rank a number of the most popular non-standard cosmology scenarios. When this combined data-set is analyzed using the MLCS2k2 light-curve fitter, we find that more exotic models for cosmic acceleration provide a better fit to the data than the Lambda-CDM model. For example, the flat DGP model is ranked higher by our information criteria tests than the standard model. When the dataset is instead analyzed using the SALT-II light-curve fitter, the standard cosmological constant model fares best. Our investigation also includes inhomogeneous Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models. While our LTB models can be made to fit the supernova data as well as any other model, the extra parameters they require are not...

  8. Testing lowered isothermal models with direct N-body simulations of globular clusters - II. Multimass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuten, M.; Zocchi, A.; Gieles, M.; Hénault-Brunet, V.

    2017-09-01

    Lowered isothermal models, such as the multimass Michie-King models, have been successful in describing observational data of globular clusters. In this study, we assess whether such models are able to describe the phase space properties of evolutionary N-body models. We compare the multimass models as implemented in limepy (Gieles & Zocchi) to N-body models of star clusters with different retention fractions for the black holes and neutron stars evolving in a tidal field. We find that multimass models successfully reproduce the density and velocity dispersion profiles of the different mass components in all evolutionary phases and for different remnants retention. We further use these results to study the evolution of global model parameters. We find that over the lifetime of clusters, radial anisotropy gradually evolves from the low- to the high-mass components and we identify features in the properties of observable stars that are indicative of the presence of stellar-mass black holes. We find that the model velocity scale depends on mass as m-δ, with δ ≃ 0.5 for almost all models, but the dependence of central velocity dispersion on m can be shallower, depending on the dark remnant content, and agrees well with that of the N-body models. The reported model parameters, and correlations amongst them, can be used as theoretical priors when fitting these types of mass models to observational data.

  9. FASIMA II - modelling and simulation of any drive unit concepts; FASIMA II - Modellierung und Simulation beliebiger Antriebsstrangkonzepte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoerl, T.; Flaig, A.; Lechner, G.

    1995-12-31

    In FASIMA II, the Institute for Machine Elements at the University of Stuttgart has a tool available which makes possible the examination of complex drive unit configurations. The examination of a vehicle of the compact class is introduced as an example of an application. The mass-production variant of the vehicle with a 5 speed manual gearbox was compared with two hybrid variants and a variant with a continuous variable transmission instead of the standard gearbox. It was found that hybrid drives do not necessarily lead to fuel savings. (orig.) [Deutsch] Mit FASIMA II steht am Institut fuer Maschinenelemente der Universitaet Stuttgart ein Werkzeug zur Verfuegung, das die Untersuchung auch komplexer Antriebsstrahkonfigurationen ermoeglicht. Als Anwendungsbeispiel wird eine Untersuchung eines Fahrzeugs der Kompaktklasse vorgestellt. Die Serienvariante des Fahrzeugs mit 5-Gang-Handschaltgetriebe wurde mit zwei hybriden Varianten und einer Variante mit einem CVT anstelle des Seriengetriebes verglichen. Hierbei zeigte sich, dass Hybridantriebe nicht zwangslaeufig zu Kraftstoffeinsparungen fuehren. (orig.)

  10. Study on Lumped Kinetic Model for FDFCC II. Validation and Prediction of Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Feiyue; Weng Huixin; Luo Shixian

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of formulating the 9-lump kinetic model for gasoline catalytic upgrading and the 12-lump kinetic model for heavy oil FCC, this paper is aimed at development of a combined kinetic model for a typical FDFCC process after analyzing the coupled relationship and combination of these two models. The model is also verified by using commercial data, the results of which showed that the model can better predict the product yields and their quality, with the relative errors between the main products of the unit and commercial data being less than five percent. Furthermore, the combined model is used to predict and optimize the operating conditions for gasoline riser and heavy oil riser in FDFCC. So this paper can offer some guidance for the processing of FDFCC and is instructive to model research and development of such multi-reactor process and combined process.

  11. Removal of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions by brown marine macro algae: Kinetic modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Olga M.M. [LRSE - Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); REQUIMTE, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto, Rua Dr. Bernardino de Almeida 431 4200-072 Porto (Portugal); Martins, Ramiro J.E. [Departamento de Engenharia Quimica e Biologica, Escola Superior de Tecnologia, Instituto Politecnico de Braganca, Campus de Santa Apolonia, 5301-857 Braganca (Portugal); LRSE - Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Delerue-Matos, Cristina M. [REQUIMTE, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto, Rua Dr. Bernardino de Almeida 431 4200-072 Porto (Portugal); Boaventura, Rui A.R. [Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); LRSE - Laboratory of Separation and Reaction Engineering, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: bventura@fe.up.pt

    2008-05-01

    Specific marine macro algae species abundant at the Portuguese coast (Laminaria hyperborea, Bifurcaria bifurcata, Sargassum muticum and Fucus spiralis) were shown to be effective for removing toxic metals (Cd(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II)) from aqueous solutions. The initial metal concentrations in solution were about 75-100 mg L{sup -1}. The observed biosorption capacities for cadmium, zinc and lead ions were in the ranges of 23.9-39.5, 18.6-32.0 and 32.3-50.4 mg g{sup -1}, respectively. Kinetic studies revealed that the metal uptake rate was rather fast, with 75% of the total amount occurring in the first 10 min for all algal species. Experimental data were well fitted by a pseudo-second order rate equation. The contribution of internal diffusion mechanism was significant only to the initial biosorption stage. Results indicate that all the studied macro algae species can provide an efficient and cost-effective technology for eliminating heavy metals from industrial effluents.

  12. Removal of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions by brown marine macro algae: kinetic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Olga M M; Martins, Ramiro J E; Delerue-Matos, Cristina M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-05-01

    Specific marine macro algae species abundant at the Portuguese coast (Laminaria hyperborea, Bifurcaria bifurcata, Sargassum muticum and Fucus spiralis) were shown to be effective for removing toxic metals (Cd(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II)) from aqueous solutions. The initial metal concentrations in solution were about 75-100 mg L(-1). The observed biosorption capacities for cadmium, zinc and lead ions were in the ranges of 23.9-39.5, 18.6-32.0 and 32.3-50.4 mg g(-1), respectively. Kinetic studies revealed that the metal uptake rate was rather fast, with 75% of the total amount occurring in the first 10 min for all algal species. Experimental data were well fitted by a pseudo-second order rate equation. The contribution of internal diffusion mechanism was significant only to the initial biosorption stage. Results indicate that all the studied macro algae species can provide an efficient and cost-effective technology for eliminating heavy metals from industrial effluents.

  13. Risk Factors Accompanied with Nephropathy in Patients with Type II Diabetes; Test of the Biopsychosocial Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Rahimian Boogar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The study of biopsychosocial factors influencing nephropathy as a most serious complication of type II diabetes is important. This study aimed to investigate risk factors accompanied with nephropathy in patients with type II diabetes based on the biopsychosocial model. Materials & Methods: In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 295 patients with type II diabetes were selected by convenience sampling in Tehran Shariati hospital outpatient clinics. The data were collected by demographical information questionnaire along with disease characteristics and depression anxiety stress scales (dass, quality of life scale (who- qol- bref, diabetes self-management scale (dsms, and diabetes knowledge scale (dks, then analyzed by chi-square, independent t-test and logistic regression with pasw software. Results: Hypertension (OR=3.841 & P0.05.Conclusion: It is important to pay attention to hypertension, glycated hemoglobin, body mass index, diabetes self-management, depression, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge for therapeutic intervention programming and diabetes complications control protocols for diabetic patients.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(2:44-53

  14. Type II supernova energetics and comparison of light curves to shock-cooling models

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, Adam; De Cia, Annalisa; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O; Kulkarni, S R; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Yaron, Ofer; Vreeswijk, Paul; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Perley, Daniel A; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S Bradley; Rebbapragada, Umaa D; Woźniak, P R; Filippenko, Alexei V; Clubb, K I; Nugent, Peter E; Pan, Y -C; Badenes, C; Howell, D Andrew; Valenti, Stefano; Sand, David; Sollerman, J; Johansson, Joel; Leonard, Douglas C; Horst, J Chuck; Armen, Stephen F; Fedrow, Joseph M; Quimby, Robert M; Mazzali, Paulo; Pian, Elena; Sternberg, Assaf; Matheson, Thomas; Sullivan, M; Maguire, K; Lazarevic, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of $57$ $R$-band Type II SN light curves that are well monitored during their rise, having $>5$ detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within $1-3$ days. We show that the energy per unit mass ($E/M$) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the model of Rabinak & Waxman (2011), while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on $R$-band data alone. We find that Type II SN explosion energies span a range of $E/M=(0.2-20)\\times 10^{51} \\; \\rm{erg/(10 M}_\\odot$), and have a mean energy per unit mass of $\\left\\langle E/M \\right\\rangle = 0.85\\times 10^{51} \\; \\rm{erg/(10 M}_\\odot$), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small sp...

  15. High Performance Computing Application: Solar Dynamo Model Project II, Corona and Heliosphere Component Initialization, Integration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-24

    allocate solar heating into any location of the corona . Its total contribution depended on the integration of the unsigned magnetic flux at 1 Rs...AFRL-RD-PS- TR-2015-0028 AFRL-RD-PS- TR-2015-0028 HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING APPLICATION: SOLAR DYNAMO MODEL PROJECT II; CORONA AND HELIOSPHERE...Dynamo Model Project II, Corona and Heliosphere Component Initialization, Integration and Validation 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  16. Design, simulation, and experimental verification of a computer model and enhanced position estimator for the NPS AUV II

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, David C.

    1991-01-01

    A full six-degree-of-freedom computer model of the Naval Postgraduate School Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (NPS AUV II) is developed. Hydrodynamic Coefficients are determined by geometric similarity with an existing swimmer delivery vehicle and analysis of initial open loop AUV II trials. Comparisons between simulated and experimental results demonstrate the validity of the model and the techniques used. A reduced order observer of lateral velocity was produced to provide an input for an enha...

  17. A hybrid phenomenological model for ferroelectroelastic ceramics. Part II: Morphotropic PZT ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, S.; Neumeister, P.; Balke, H.

    2016-10-01

    In this part II of a two part series, the rate-independent hybrid phenomenological constitutive model introduced in part I is modified to account for the material behavior of morphotropic lead zirconate titanate ceramics (PZT ceramics). The modifications are based on a discussion of the available literature results regarding the micro-structure of these materials. In particular, a monoclinic phase and a highly simplified representation of the hierarchical structure of micro-domains and nano-domains observed experimentally are incorporated into the model. It is shown that experimental data for the commercially available morphotropic PZT material PIC151 (PI Ceramic GmbH, Lederhose, Germany) can be reproduced and predicted based on the modified hybrid model.

  18. $h\\rightarrow Z\\gamma$ in Type-II seesaw neutrino model

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chian-Shu; Huang, Da; Tsai, Lu-Hsing

    2013-01-01

    We study the Higgs decay channel of $h\\rightarrow Z\\gamma$ in the type-II seesaw neutrino model. In most of the allowed parameter space in the model, the new contribution to $h\\rightarrow Z\\gamma$ is correlated with that to $h\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$. If the current $2\\sigma$ excess of the $h\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ rate measured by the LHC persists, the $h\\rightarrow Z\\gamma$ rate should be also larger than the corresponding standard model prediction. We demonstrate that the anti-correlation between $h\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ and $h\\rightarrow Z\\gamma$ only exists in some special region.

  19. Time-dependent toroidal compactification proposals and the Bianchi type II model: Classical and quantum solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, J.; Toledo Sesma, L.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we construct an effective four-dimensional model by compactifying a ten-dimensional theory of gravity coupled with a real scalar dilaton field on a time-dependent torus without the contributions of fluxes as first approximation. This approach is applied to anisotropic cosmological Bianchi type II model for which we study the classical coupling of the anisotropic scale factors with the two real scalar moduli produced by the compactification process. Also, we present some solutions to the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) equation in the context of Standard Quantum Cosmology and we claim that these quantum solution are generic in the moduli scalar field for all Bianchi Class A models. Also we give the relation to these solutions for asymptotic behavior to large argument in the corresponding quantum solution in the gravitational variables and compare with Bohm's solutions, finding that this corresponds to the lowest-order WKB approximation.

  20. Investigations about Starting Cracks in DC-Casting of 6063-Type Billets Part II: Modelling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, E. K.; Schneider, W.

    Influence on starting crack tendency of varying a number of casting parameters has been studied by experiments, Part I (1), and by model calculations, Part II. Both studies point to starting block shape as a most important single factor in controlling starting cracks. By using the thermal model ALSIM-2 in analysing initial experimental results, the variable heat transfer towards the starting block was determined. This made possible a satisfactory model analysis of the starting phase and likewise the formulation of a useful cracking concept. Thus by using calculated and measured liquid pool depth curve in the starting phase of casting as a basis, an effective starting block shape was found. This new shape practically eliminates the starting crack problems in extrusion billets of the AA6063 type alloys.

  1. Time-dependent toroidal compactification proposals and the Bianchi type II model: classical and quantum solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Socorro, J

    2015-01-01

    In this work we construct an effective four-dimensional model by compactifying a ten-dimensional theory of gravity coupled with a real scalar dilaton field on a time-dependent torus without the contributions of fluxes as first approximation. This approach is applied to anisotropic cosmological Bianchi type II model for which we study the classical coupling of the anisotropic scale factors with the two real scalar moduli produced by the compactification process. Also, we present some solutions to the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) equation in the context of Standard Quantum Cosmology and we claim that these quantum solution are generic in the moduli scalar field for all Bianchi Class A models. Also we gives the relation to these solutions for asymptotic behavior to large argument in the corresponding quantum solution in the gravitational variables and is compared with the Bohm's solutions, finding that this corresponds to lowest-order WKB approximation.

  2. Hierarchical competition models with the Allee effect II: the case of immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assas, Laila; Dennis, Brian; Elaydi, Saber; Kwessi, Eddy; Livadiotis, George

    2015-01-01

    This is part II of an earlier paper that dealt with hierarchical models with the Allee effect but with no immigration. In this paper, we greatly simplify the proofs in part I and provide a proof of the global dynamics of the non-hyperbolic cases that were previously conjectured. Then, we show how immigration to one of the species or to both would, drastically, change the dynamics of the system. It is shown that if the level of immigration to one or to both species is above a specified level, then there will be no extinction region where both species go to extinction.

  3. Transducer models in the ultrasound simulation program FIELD II and their accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Bæk, David

    2010-01-01

    The FIELD II simulation program can be used for simulating any kind of linear ultrasound fields. The program is capable of describing multi-element transducers used with any kind of excitation, apodization, and focusing. The program has been widely used in both academia and by commercial ultrasound...... companies for investigation novel transducer geometries and advanced linear imaging schemes. The program models transducer geometries using a division of the transducer elements into either rectangles, triangles, or bounding lines. The precision of the simulation and the simulation time is intimately linked...

  4. Principles of crop modelling and simulation: II. the implications of the objective in model development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dourado-Neto D.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of presenting to scientists the implications of the objective in model development and a basic vision of modeling, with its potential applications and limitations in agriculture, an integration of crop modeling professionals with agricultural professionals is suggested. Models mean modernization of the information, of the measurement process and of an efficient way to learn more about complex systems. They are one of the best mechanisms of transforming information in useful knowledge and of transferring this knowledge to others. One of the problems that impede a larger progress in modeling is the lack of communication between modelers and a frequent appearance of modelers without a global vision of reality.

  5. Aerosols at the Poles: An AeroCom Phase II Multi-Model Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, M.; Samset, B. H.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic and natural sources reach the Polar Regions through long-range transport. By scattering and absorbing solar radiation, aerosols perturb the energy balance in the region and may have played a significant role in recent Arctic warming. Aerosols in Polar regions are however, poorly constrained in present day global climate models. Here we compare aerosol burdens from simulations with 16 global aerosol models from the Aerocom phase II model inter-comparison project with available observations at both Poles. We show that the annual mean multi-model median Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is not a bad representation of the measured AOD in Arctic, even though the model spread is large. The models tend to underestimate the spring maximum and overestimate the summer/autumn minimum. We also document the geographical distribution and seasonal cycle of aerosol burdens and shortwave anthropogenic direct radiative forcing (DRF) of the total aerosol and the individual aerosol species; black carbon (BC), sulfate, and primary organic aerosols from fossil/bio fuel and biomass burning, dust and sea-salt. A subset of models has also reported nitrate and secondary organic aerosols. The models produce an annual mean median AOD 0.07 in the Arctic and 0.01 the Antarctic. The Arctic modeled annual mean DRF is slightly negative -0.12 Wm-2, dominated by a positive black carbon DRF during spring and a negative sulfate DRF during summer. We perform sensitivity experiments with one of the Aerocom models (GISS modelE) to investigate how regional emissions of BC and sulfate and the lifetime of BC influence the Arctic and Antarctic aerosol burdens.

  6. Comprehensive and Macrospin-Based Magnetic Tunnel Junction Spin Torque Oscillator Model- Part II: Verilog-A Model Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tingsu; Eklund, Anders; Iacocca, Ezio; Rodriguez, Saul; Malm, B. Gunnar; Akerman, Johan; Rusu, Ana

    2015-03-01

    The rapid development of the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) spin torque oscillator (STO) technology demands an analytical model to enable building MTJ STO-based circuits and systems so as to evaluate and utilize MTJ STOs in various applications. In Part I of this paper, an analytical model based on the macrospin approximation, has been introduced and verified by comparing it with the measurements of three different MTJ STOs. In Part II, the full Verilog-A implementation of the proposed model is presented. To achieve a reliable model, an approach to reproduce the phase noise generated by the MTJ STO has been proposed and successfully employed. The implemented model yields a time domain signal, which retains the characteristics of operating frequency, linewidth, oscillation amplitude and DC operating point, with respect to the magnetic field and applied DC current. The Verilog-A implementation is verified against the analytical model, providing equivalent device characteristics for the full range of biasing conditions. Furthermore, a system that includes an MTJ STO and CMOS RF circuits is simulated to validate the proposed model for system- and circuit-level designs. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed model opens the possibility to explore STO technology in a wide range of applications.

  7. Education as Experimentation: A Planned Variation Model. Volume IIIA: Findings: Cohort II; Interim Findings: Cohort III. Volume IIIB: Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Linda B.; And Others

    This segment of the national evaluation study of the Follow Through Planned Variation Model reviews the background of the study, describes 13 of the Follow Through models involved, and presents an analysis of the effects of these models on students. The analysis is based on data from 4 years of Follow Through participation by Cohort II children…

  8. A multimedia fate and chemical transport modeling system for pesticides: II. Model evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Rong; Yang Fuquan; Sloan, James J [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Trevor Scholtz, M, E-mail: sloanj@connect.uwaterloo.ca [ORTECH Environmental, 2395 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, ON, L5K 1B3 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Pesticides have adverse health effects and can be transported over long distances to contaminate sensitive ecosystems. To address problems caused by environmental pesticides we developed a multimedia multi-pollutant modeling system, and here we present an evaluation of the model by comparing modeled results against measurements. The modeled toxaphene air concentrations for two sites, in Louisiana (LA) and Michigan (MI), are in good agreement with measurements (average concentrations agree to within a factor of 2). Because the residue inventory showed no soil residues at these two sites, resulting in no emissions, the concentrations must be caused by transport; the good agreement between the modeled and measured concentrations suggests that the model simulates atmospheric transport accurately. Compared to the LA and MI sites, the measured air concentrations at two other sites having toxaphene soil residues leading to emissions, in Indiana and Arkansas, showed more pronounced seasonal variability (higher in warmer months); this pattern was also captured by the model. The model-predicted toxaphene concentration fraction on particles (0.5-5%) agrees well with measurement-based estimates (3% or 6%). There is also good agreement between modeled and measured dry (1:1) and wet (within a factor of less than 2) depositions in Lake Ontario. Additionally this study identified erroneous soil residue data around a site in Texas in a published US toxaphene residue inventory, which led to very low modeled air concentrations at this site. Except for the erroneous soil residue data around this site, the good agreement between the modeled and observed results implies that both the US and Mexican toxaphene soil residue inventories are reasonably good. This agreement also suggests that the modeling system is capable of simulating the important physical and chemical processes in the multimedia compartments.

  9. Gravimetry and GPS observations at Belgrano II station to test ocean tidal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scheinert

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of a joint Argentine-German project gravimetric time series observations are being carried out at the Argentine Antarctic station Belgrano II. Two gravity meters were installed in the first half of February 2007. The set-up of the gravimeters as well as first results of the ongoing observations are discussed. Additionally, kinematic positions derived from a GPS-station at the Vahsel Bay glacier near Belgrano II can be used to get a first insight into the floating behavior of this glacier. The goal of these observations is to discriminate the effect of ocean tides and to test ocean tidal models. Since ocean tides are an important phenomenon that has to be considered in a variety of geoscientific investigations in polar regions, appropriate corrections have to be applied in the different analyses, e.g. to infer temporal mass variations from satellite data, to investigate ice-shelf dynamics and deformations, or to come up with precise station positions and velocities within a terrestrial reference system. However, the ocean tide models show larger uncertainties in the Antarctic seas and (moreover at areas covered by ice shelves and, therefore, need to be improved. This joint Argentine-German project is a contribution to the International Polar Year 2007/2008 and its project POLENET. After completion of the recordings at Belgrano II by the end of 2007 it is planned to move the equipment to San Mart ín in order to get a second gravimetric time series during the year 2008.

  10. Type II Supernova Energetics and Comparison of Light Curves to Shock-cooling Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Yaron, Ofer; Vreeswijk, Paul; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Perley, Daniel A.; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S. Bradley; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, K. I.; Nugent, Peter E.; Pan, Y.-C.; Badenes, C.; Howell, D. Andrew; Valenti, Stefano; Sand, David; Sollerman, J.; Johansson, Joel; Leonard, Douglas C.; Horst, J. Chuck; Armen, Stephen F.; Fedrow, Joseph M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Mazzali, Paulo; Pian, Elena; Sternberg, Assaf; Matheson, Thomas; Sullivan, M.; Maguire, K.; Lazarevic, Sanja

    2016-03-01

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, with \\gt 5 detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 1-3 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak & Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of E/M = (0.2-20) × 1051 erg/(10 {M}⊙ ), and have a mean energy per unit mass of =0.85× {10}51 erg/(10 {M}⊙ ), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate ({{Δ }}{m}15), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. This limits the possible power sources for such events.

  11. Critical Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification Models. Part II: Kinetic and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Żogała

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: This paper presents state of art in the field of coal gasification modeling using kinetic and computational fluid dynamics approach. The paper also presents own comparative analysis (concerned with mathematical formulation, input data and parameters, basic assumptions, obtained results etc. of the most important models of underground coal gasification.

  12. Nitrogen Risk Assessment Model for Scotland: II. Hydrological transport and model testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Dunn

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount and concentration of N in catchment runoff is strongly controlled by a number of hydrological influences, such as leaching rates and the rate of transport of N from the land to surface water bodies. This paper describes how the principal hydrological controls at a catchment scale have been represented within the Nitrogen Risk Assessment Model for Scotland (NIRAMS; it demonstrates their influence through application of the model to eight Scottish catchments, contrasting in terms of their land use, climate and topography. Calculation of N leaching rates, described in the preceding paper (Dunn et al., 2004, is based on soil water content determined by application of a weekly water balance model. This model uses national scale datasets and has been developed and applied to the whole of Scotland using five years of historical meteorological data. A catchment scale transport model, constructed from a 50m digital elevation model, routes flows of N through the sub-surface and groundwater to the stream system. The results of the simulations carried out for eight different catchments demonstrate that the NIRAMS model is capable of predicting time-series of weekly stream flows and N concentrations, to an acceptable degree of accuracy. The model provides an appropriate framework for risk assessment applications requiring predictions in ungauged catchments and at a national scale. Analysis of the model behaviour shows that streamwater N concentrations are controlled both by the rate of supply of N from leaching as well as the rate of transport of N from the land to the water. Keywords: nitrogen, diffuse pollution, hydrology, model, transport, catchment

  13. Application of blocking diagnosis methods to general circulation models. Part II: model simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriopedro, D.; Trigo, R.M. [Universidade de Lisboa, CGUL-IDL, Faculdade de Ciencias, Lisbon (Portugal); Garcia-Herrera, R.; Gonzalez-Rouco, J.F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica de la Tierra II, Facultad de C.C. Fisicas, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    A previously defined automatic method is applied to reanalysis and present-day (1950-1989) forced simulations of the ECHO-G model in order to assess its performance in reproducing atmospheric blocking in the Northern Hemisphere. Unlike previous methodologies, critical parameters and thresholds to estimate blocking occurrence in the model are not calibrated with an observed reference, but objectively derived from the simulated climatology. The choice of model dependent parameters allows for an objective definition of blocking and corrects for some intrinsic model bias, the difference between model and observed thresholds providing a measure of systematic errors in the model. The model captures reasonably the main blocking features (location, amplitude, annual cycle and persistence) found in observations, but reveals a relative southward shift of Eurasian blocks and an overall underestimation of blocking activity, especially over the Euro-Atlantic sector. Blocking underestimation mostly arises from the model inability to generate long persistent blocks with the observed frequency. This error is mainly attributed to a bias in the basic state. The bias pattern consists of excessive zonal winds over the Euro-Atlantic sector and a southward shift at the exit zone of the jet stream extending into in the Eurasian continent, that are more prominent in cold and warm seasons and account for much of Euro-Atlantic and Eurasian blocking errors, respectively. It is shown that other widely used blocking indices or empirical observational thresholds may not give a proper account of the lack of realism in the model as compared with the proposed method. This suggests that in addition to blocking changes that could be ascribed to natural variability processes or climate change signals in the simulated climate, attention should be paid to significant departures in the diagnosis of phenomena that can also arise from an inappropriate adaptation of detection methods to the climate of the

  14. FISPACT-II: An Advanced Simulation System for Activation, Transmutation and Material Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublet, J.-Ch.; Eastwood, J. W.; Morgan, J. G.; Gilbert, M. R.; Fleming, M.; Arter, W.

    2017-01-01

    Fispact-II is a code system and library database for modelling activation-transmutation processes, depletion-burn-up, time dependent inventory and radiation damage source terms caused by nuclear reactions and decays. The Fispact-II code, written in object-style Fortran, follows the evolution of material irradiated by neutrons, alphas, gammas, protons, or deuterons, and provides a wide range of derived radiological output quantities to satisfy most needs for nuclear applications. It can be used with any ENDF-compliant group library data for nuclear reactions, particle-induced and spontaneous fission yields, and radioactive decay (including but not limited to TENDL-2015, ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-4.0u, CENDL-3.1 processed into fine-group-structure files, GEFY-5.2 and UKDD-16), as well as resolved and unresolved resonance range probability tables for self-shielding corrections and updated radiological hazard indices. The code has many novel features including: extension of the energy range up to 1 GeV; additional neutron physics including self-shielding effects, temperature dependence, thin and thick target yields; pathway analysis; and sensitivity and uncertainty quantification and propagation using full covariance data. The latest ENDF libraries such as TENDL encompass thousands of target isotopes. Nuclear data libraries for Fispact-II are prepared from these using processing codes PREPRO, NJOY and CALENDF. These data include resonance parameters, cross sections with covariances, probability tables in the resonance ranges, PKA spectra, kerma, dpa, gas and radionuclide production and energy-dependent fission yields, supplemented with all 27 decay types. All such data for the five most important incident particles are provided in evaluated data tables. The Fispact-II simulation software is described in detail in this paper, together with the nuclear data libraries. The Fispact-II system also includes several utility programs for code-use optimisation

  15. Blooms' separation of the final exam of Engineering Mathematics II: Item reliability using Rasch measurement model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuaad, Norain Farhana Ahmad; Nopiah, Zulkifli Mohd; Tawil, Norgainy Mohd; Othman, Haliza; Asshaari, Izamarlina; Osman, Mohd Hanif; Ismail, Nur Arzilah

    2014-06-01

    In engineering studies and researches, Mathematics is one of the main elements which express physical, chemical and engineering laws. Therefore, it is essential for engineering students to have a strong knowledge in the fundamental of mathematics in order to apply the knowledge to real life issues. However, based on the previous results of Mathematics Pre-Test, it shows that the engineering students lack the fundamental knowledge in certain topics in mathematics. Due to this, apart from making improvements in the methods of teaching and learning, studies on the construction of questions (items) should also be emphasized. The purpose of this study is to assist lecturers in the process of item development and to monitor the separation of items based on Blooms' Taxonomy and to measure the reliability of the items itself usingRasch Measurement Model as a tool. By using Rasch Measurement Model, the final exam questions of Engineering Mathematics II (Linear Algebra) for semester 2 sessions 2012/2013 were analysed and the results will provide the details onthe extent to which the content of the item providesuseful information about students' ability. This study reveals that the items used in Engineering Mathematics II (Linear Algebra) final exam are well constructed but the separation of the items raises concern as it is argued that it needs further attention, as there is abig gap between items at several levels of Blooms' cognitive skill.

  16. The circumstellar structure of the Be shell star φ Persei. II. Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, W.; Štefl, S.

    2001-03-01

    We model Fe Ii 5317 emission lines and phase resolved He I 6678 and 5876 emission lines of the bright B2e&sdO shell binary phi Per to find the size and shape of the excitation region inside the circumprimary disk. We find the Fe Ii 5317 emission to originate within 9 stellar radii in an axisymmetric disk around the primary. Orbital phase variations of He I 6678 are fit in terms of a disk sector with disk radius of 10 stellar radii and opening angle of =~ 120degr facing the secondary. This region can be alternatively described by an intersection of a sphere around the secondary and the circumprimary disk with a penetration depth of about 7 R_*. Similar fit values are found for He I 5876. The enigmatic orbital phase precedence of shell occurrence in the He I emission features is discussed. We favor a model in which the inner He I shell is deformed because of differential rotation in combination with a finite recombination time. Based on observations collected at the Ondřejov Observatory (of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic), the German-Spanish Astronomical Center (DSAZ) -- Calar Alto (operated by the Max-Plank-Institut für Astronomie Heidelberg jointly with the Spanish National Commission for Astronomy) and Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP; CNRS, France).

  17. Radial electric field computations with DKES and neoclassical models in TJ-II stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinell, Julio; Gutierrez-Tapia, Cesar; Lopez-Bruna, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Radial electric fields arise due to the non-ambipolar transport in stellarator plasmas and play an important role in determining some improved confinement regimes. In order to calculate this electric field it is necessary to take all particle fluxes that are not ambipolar. The most important contribution to these fluxes comes from neoclassical transport. Here we use particle fluxes obtained from kinetic equation computations using the code DKES to evaluate the radial electric field profiles for certain discharges of the heliac TJ-II. Experimental profiles for the density and temperatures are used together with the diffusion coefficients obtained with DKES. A similar computation of the electric field is performed with three analytical neoclassical models that use an approximation for the magnetic geometry. The ambipolar electric field from the models is compared with the one given by DKES and we find that they are all qualitatively similar. They are also compared with experimental measurements of the electric field obtained with HIBP. It is shown that, although the electric field is reasonably well reproduced by the neoclassical computations, especially in high temperature regimes, the particle fluxes are not. Thus, neoclassical theory provides good Er estimates in TJ-II. Support from CONACyT 152905 and DGAPA IN109115 projects is acknowledged.

  18. Survey of non-linear hydrodynamic models of type-II Cepheids

    CERN Document Server

    Smolec, R

    2015-01-01

    We present a grid on non-linear convective type-II Cepheid models. The dense model grids are computed for 0.6M_Sun and a range of metallicities ([Fe/H]=-2.0,-1.5,-1.0), and for 0.8M_Sun ([Fe/H]=-1.5). Two sets of convective parameters are considered. The models cover the full temperature extent of the classical instability strip, but are limited in luminosity; for the most luminous models violent pulsation leads to the decoupling of the outermost model shell. Hence, our survey reaches only the shortest period RV Tau domain. In the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram we detect two domains in which period doubled pulsation is possible. The first extends through the BL Her domain and low luminosity W Vir domain (pulsation periods ~2-6.5 d). The second domain extends at higher luminosities (W Vir domain; periods >9.5d). Some models within these domains display period-4 pulsation. We also detect very narrow domains (~10 K wide) in which modulation of pulsation is possible. Another interesting phenomenon we detect is double...

  19. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume VI. Data documentation. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B J

    1979-02-01

    This documentation describes the PIES Integrating Model as it existed on January 1, 1978. This Volume VI of six volumes is data documentation, containing the standard table data used for the Administrator's Report at the beginning of 1978, along with the primary data sources and the office responsible. It also contains a copy of a PIES Integrating Model Report with a description of its content. Following an overview chapter, Chapter II, Supply and Demand Data Tables and Sources for the Mid-range Scenario for Target Years 1985 and 1990, data on demand, price, and elasticity; coal; imports; oil and gas; refineries; synthetics, shale, and solar/geothermal; transportation; and utilities are presented. The following data on alternate scenarios are discussed: low and high demand; low and high oil and gas supply; refinery and oil and gas data assuming a 5% annual increase in real world oil prices. Chapter IV describes the solution output obtained from an execution of PIES.

  20. LRS Bianchi type-II string cosmological models in a modified theory of gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakavalli, T.; Ananda Rao, G.; Reddy, D. R. K.

    2017-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of spatially homogeneous anisotropic LRS Bianchi type-II cosmological models with string source in a modified theory of gravitation formulated by Harko et al. (Phys. Rev. D 84:024020, 2011) which is universally known as f( R, T) gravity. Here R is the Ricci scalar and T is the trace of the energy momentum tensor. By solving the field equation we have presented massive string and Takabyasi or p-string models in this theory. However it is interesting to note that geometric string in this space-time does not exist in this theory. Physical and geometrical properties of the strings obtained are also discussed.

  1. Parameter sensitivity study of a Field II multilayer transducer model on a convex transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    .ResultsPredictions using the ZR give a pressure pulse error (PPE) and an intensity error (IE) of 32 % and 23 %, respectively, relative to the measured. Altering the piezoelectric permittivity +12 % from ZR decreases the PPE to 30 % and the IE to 2 % relative to the measured. Changing the stiffness constant of the lens -4......A multilayer transducer model for predicting a transducer impulse response has in earlier works been developed and combined with the Field II software. This development was tested on current, voltage, and intensity measurements on piezoceramics discs (Bæk et al. IUS 2008) and a convex 128 element...... ultrasound imaging transducer (Bæk et al. ICU 2009). The model benefits from its 1D simplicity and hasshown to give an amplitude error around 1.7‐2 dB. However, any prediction of amplitude, phase, and attenuation of pulses relies on the accuracy of manufacturer supplied material characteristics, which may...

  2. Re-modeling Chara action potential: II. The action potential form under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Beilby

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In part I we established Thiel-Beilby model of the Chara action potential (AP. In part II the AP is investigated in detail at the time of saline stress. Even very short exposure of salt-sensitive Chara cells to artificial pond water with 50 mM NaCl (Saline APW modified the AP threshold and drastically altered the AP form. Detailed modeling of 14 saline APs from 3 cells established that both the Ca2+ pump and the Ca2+ channels on internal stores seem to be affected, with the changes sometimes cancelling and sometimes re-enforcing each other, leading to APs with long durations and very complex forms. The exposure to salinity offers further insights into AP mechanism and suggests future experiments. The prolonged APs lead to greater loss of chloride and potassium ions, compounding the effects of saline stress.

  3. TRACER-II: a complete computational model for mixing and propagation of vapor explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K.H. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Maritime Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Park, I.G.; Park, G.C.

    1998-01-01

    A vapor explosion is a physical process in which very rapid energy transfer occurs between a hot liquid and a volatile, colder liquid when the two liquids come into a sudden contact. For the analyses of potential impacts from such explosive events, a computer program, TRACER-II, has been developed, which contains a complete description of mixing and propagation phases of vapor explosions. The model consists of fuel, fragmented fuel (debris), coolant liquid, and coolant vapor in two-dimensional Eulerian coordinates. The set of governing equations are solved numerically using finite difference method. The results of this numerical simulation of vapor explosions are discussed in comparison with the recent experimental data of FARO and KROTOS tests. When compared to some selected FARO and KROTOS data, the fuel-coolant mixing and explosion propagation behavior agree reasonably with the data, although the results are yet sensitive primarily to the melt breakup and fragmentation modeling. (author)

  4. Excessive activity of cathepsin K is associated with cartilage defects in a zebrafish model of mucolipidosis II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron C. Petrey

    2012-03-01

    The severe pediatric disorder mucolipidosis II (ML-II; also known as I-cell disease is caused by defects in mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P biosynthesis. Patients with ML-II exhibit multiple developmental defects, including skeletal, craniofacial and joint abnormalities. To date, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these clinical manifestations are poorly understood. Taking advantage of a zebrafish model of ML-II, we previously showed that the cartilage morphogenesis defects in this model are associated with altered chondrocyte differentiation and excessive deposition of type II collagen, indicating that aspects of development that rely on proper extracellular matrix homeostasis are sensitive to decreases in Man-6-P biosynthesis. To further investigate the molecular bases for the cartilage phenotypes, we analyzed the transcript abundance of several genes in chondrocyte-enriched cell populations isolated from wild-type and ML-II zebrafish embryos. Increased levels of cathepsin and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP transcripts were noted in ML-II cell populations. This increase in transcript abundance corresponded with elevated and sustained activity of several cathepsins (K, L and S and MMP-13 during early development. Unlike MMP-13, for which higher levels of protein were detected, the sustained activity of cathepsin K at later stages seemed to result from its abnormal processing and activation. Inhibition of cathepsin K activity by pharmacological or genetic means not only reduced the activity of this enzyme but led to a broad reduction in additional protease activity, significant correction of the cartilage morphogenesis phenotype and reduced type II collagen staining in ML-II embryos. Our findings suggest a central role for excessive cathepsin K activity in the developmental aspects of ML-II cartilage pathogenesis and highlight the utility of the zebrafish system to address the biochemical underpinnings of metabolic disease.

  5. HIERARCHICAL METHODOLOGY FOR MODELING HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS PART II: DETAILED MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B; Donald L. Anton, D

    2008-12-22

    There is significant interest in hydrogen storage systems that employ a media which either adsorbs, absorbs or reacts with hydrogen in a nearly reversible manner. In any media based storage system the rate of hydrogen uptake and the system capacity is governed by a number of complex, coupled physical processes. To design and evaluate such storage systems, a comprehensive methodology was developed, consisting of a hierarchical sequence of models that range from scoping calculations to numerical models that couple reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer for both the hydrogen charging and discharging phases. The scoping models were presented in Part I [1] of this two part series of papers. This paper describes a detailed numerical model that integrates the phenomena occurring when hydrogen is charged and discharged. A specific application of the methodology is made to a system using NaAlH{sub 4} as the storage media.

  6. Modeling of surface myoelectric signals--Part II: Model-based signal interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merletti, R; Roy, S H; Kupa, E; Roatta, S; Granata, A

    1999-07-01

    Experimental electromyogram (EMG) data from the human biceps brachii were simulated using the model described in [10] of this work. A multichannel linear electrode array, spanning the length of the biceps, was used to detect monopolar and bipolar signals, from which double differential signals were computed, during either voluntary or electrically elicited isometric contractions. For relatively low-level voluntary contractions (10%-30% of maximum force) individual firings of three to four-different motor units were identified and their waveforms were closely approximated by the model. Motor unit parameters such as depth, size, fiber orientation and length, location of innervation and tendonous zones, propagation velocity, and source width were estimated using the model. Two applications of the model are described. The first analyzes the effects of electrode rotation with respect to the muscle fiber direction and shows the possibility of conduction velocity (CV) over- and under-estimation. The second focuses on the myoelectric manifestations of fatigue during a sustained electrically elicited contraction and the interrelationship between muscle fiber CV, spectral and amplitude variables, and the length of the depolarization zone. It is concluded that a) surface EMG detection using an electrode array, when combined with a model of signal propagation, provides a useful method for understanding the physiological and anatomical determinants of EMG waveform characteristics and b) the model provides a way for the interpretation of fatigue plots.

  7. Overview of the Mathematical and Empirical Receptor Models Workshop (Quail Roost II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robert K.; Pace, Thompson G.

    On 14-17 March 1982, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored the Mathematical and Empirical Receptor Models Workshop (Quail Roost II) at the Quail Roost Conference Center, Rougemont, NC. Thirty-five scientists were invited to participate. The objective of the workshop was to document and compare results of source apportionment analyses of simulated and real aerosol data sets. The simulated data set was developed by scientists from the National Bureau of Standards. It consisted of elemental mass data generated using a dispersion model that simulated transport of aerosols from a variety of sources to a receptor site. The real data set contained the mass, elemental, and ionic species concentrations of samples obtained in 18 consecutive 12-h sampling periods in Houston, TX. Some participants performed additional analyses of the Houston filters by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, or light microscopy. Ten groups analyzed these data sets using a variety of modeling procedures. The results of the modeling exercises were evaluated and structured in a manner that permitted model intercomparisons. The major conclusions and recommendations derived from the intercomparisons were: (1) using aerosol elemental composition data, receptor models can resolve major emission sources, but additional analyses (including light microscopy and X-ray diffraction) significantly increase the number of sources that can be resolved; (2) simulated data sets that contain up to 6 dissimilar emission sources need to be generated, so that different receptor models can be adequately compared; (3) source apportionment methods need to be modified to incorporate a means of apportioning such aerosol species as sulfate and nitrate formed from SO 2 and NO, respectively, because current models tend to resolve particles into chemical species rather than to deduce their sources and (4) a source signature library may be required to be compiled for each airshed in order to

  8. A kinetic model for type I and II IP3R accounting for mode changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekmann, Ivo; Wagner, Larry E; Yule, David; Crampin, Edmund J; Sneyd, James

    2012-08-22

    Based upon an extensive single-channel data set, a Markov model for types I and II inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP(3)R) is developed. The model aims to represent accurately the kinetics of both receptor types of IP(3)R depending on the concentrations of inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)), adenosine trisphosphate (ATP), and intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)). In particular, the model takes into account that for some combinations of ligands the IP(3)R switches between extended periods of inactivity alternating with intervals of bursting activity (mode changes). In a first step, the inactive and active modes are modeled separately. It is found that, within modes, both receptor types are ligand-independent. In a second step, the submodels are connected by transition rates. Ligand-dependent regulation of the channel activity is achieved by modulating these transitions between active and inactive modes. As a result, a compact representation of the IP(3)R is obtained that accurately captures stochastic single-channel dynamics including mode changes in a model with six states and 10 rate constants, only two of which are ligand-dependent.

  9. Models of class II methanol masers based on improved molecular data

    CERN Document Server

    Cragg, D M; Godfrey, P D

    2005-01-01

    The class II masers of methanol are associated with the early stages of formation of high-mass stars. Modelling of these dense, dusty environments has demonstrated that pumping by infrared radiation can account for the observed masers. Collisions with other molecules in the ambient gas also play a significant role, but have not been well modelled in the past. Here we examine the effects on the maser models of newly available collision rate coefficients for methanol. The new collision data does not alter which transitions become masers in the models, but does influence their brightness and the conditions under which they switch on and off. At gas temperatures above 100 K the effects are broadly consistent with a reduction in the overall collision cross-section. This means, for example, that a slightly higher gas density than identified previously can account for most of the observed masers in W3(OH). We have also examined the effects of including more excited state energy levels in the models, and find that th...

  10. Multidimensional realistic modelling of Cepheid-like variables-II: Analysis of a Cepheid model

    CERN Document Server

    Mundprecht, Eva; Kupka, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Non-local, time-dependent convection models have been used in the literature to explain the location of double-mode pulsations in Cepheids in the HR diagram as well as the existence and location of the red edge of the Cepheid instability strip. These properties are highly sensitive to model parameters. We use 2D radiation hydrodynamical simulations with realistic microphysics and grey radiative-transfer to model the upper 42 % of a short period Cepheid. The simulations show that the strength of the convection zone varies significantly over the pulsation period and exhibits a phase shift of the convective flux relative to the variations in radius. We evaluate the convective flux and the work performed by volume expansion as predicted by the most commonly used convection models. It turns out that over one pulsation cycle the model parameter $\\alpha_{\\rm c}$, which is proportional to the convective flux, has to be varied by up to a factor of beyond 2 to match the convective flux obtained from the simulations. To...

  11. Quantum groups as generalized gauge symmetries in WZNW models. Part II. The quantized model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiivanov, L.; Furlan, P.

    2017-07-01

    This is the second part of a paper dealing with the "internal" (gauge) symmetry of the Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW) model on a compact Lie group G. It contains a systematic exposition, for G = SU( n), of the canonical quantization based on the study of the classical model (performed in the first part) following the quantum group symmetric approach first advocated by L.D. Faddeev and collaborators. The internal symmetry of the quantized model is carried by the chiral WZNW zero modes satisfying quadratic exchange relations and an n-linear determinant condition. For generic values of the deformation parameter the Fock representation of the zero modes' algebra gives rise to a model space of U q ( sl( n)). The relevant root of unity case is studied in detail for n = 2 when a "restricted" (finite dimensional) quotient quantum group is shown to appear in a natural way. The module structure of the zero modes' Fock space provides a specific duality with the solutions of the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equation for the four point functions of primary fields suggesting the existence of an extended state space of logarithmic CFT type. Combining left and right zero modes (i.e., returning to the 2 D model), the rational CFT structure shows up in a setting reminiscent to covariant quantization of gauge theories in which the restricted quantum group plays the role of a generalized gauge symmetry.

  12. Modelling Solar Oscillation Power Spectra: II. Parametric Model of Spectral Lines Observed in Doppler Velocity Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Vorontsov, Sergei V

    2013-01-01

    We describe a global parametric model for the observed power spectra of solar oscillations of intermediate and low degree. A physically motivated parameterization is used as a substitute for a direct description of mode excitation and damping as these mechanisms remain poorly understood. The model is targeted at the accurate fitting of power spectra coming from Doppler velocity measurements and uses an adaptive response function that accounts for both the vertical and horizontal components of the velocity field on the solar surface and for possible instrumental and observational distortions. The model is continuous in frequency, can easily be adapted to intensity measurements and extends naturally to the analysis of high-frequency pseudo modes (interference peaks at frequencies above the atmospheric acoustic cutoff).

  13. Propeller aircraft interior noise model. II - Scale-model and flight-test comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    A program for predicting the sound levels inside propeller driven aircraft arising from sidewall transmission of airborne exterior noise is validated through comparisons of predictions with both scale-model test results and measurements obtained in flight tests on a turboprop aircraft. The program produced unbiased predictions for the case of the scale-model tests, with a standard deviation of errors of about 4 dB. For the case of the flight tests, the predictions revealed a bias of 2.62-4.28 dB (depending upon whether or not the data for the fourth harmonic were included) and the standard deviation of the errors ranged between 2.43 and 4.12 dB. The analytical model is shown to be capable of taking changes in the flight environment into account.

  14. Photocatalytic Reduction of Ni (II Ions Using Low Amounts of Titania Nanoparticles: RSM Modelling, Kinetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Saien

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heavy metals in aquatic systems usually interfere with many beneficial uses of water. Divalent nickel is a commonly occurring toxic metal in natural ecosystems due to the effluent of refineries, electroplating, and casting industries. In aquatic environments, nickel appears as Ni (II and Ni0. Despite the high reported toxicity for Ni (II, Ni0 is only slightly toxic. Various methods have been proposed for the treatment of aqueous solutions containing Ni (II. Photocatalytic reduction is an important process; titanium dioxide has been mostly used as a very efficient photocatalyst. Methods: In this study, the removal of divalent nickel ions in aqueous solutions was studied in the presence of remarkably low dosages of nano-titania photocatalyst. Direct imposed irradiation was utilized for treatment of solutions. Accordingly, the influence of four operational parameters, including temperature within the conventional range of 20 to 40 °C, was investigated. Design of experiments, modeling and process optimization were accomplished using central composite design of response surface methodology. Results: Reduced quadratic expression was developed for the reduction efficiency (RE, and the analysis of variance showed its capability in reproducing the data. The effectiveness of each parameter was determined. At the best found conditions of [TiO2] = 42 mg/L, pH = 9.2, T = 34 °C and after 90 minutes of treatment, about 85% removal was achieved for initial 5 mg/L nickel solutions. Pseudo first order reactions proceeded. Conclusion: Based on CCD method, the influence of individual operating parameters and their interactions were obtained. A quadratic equation predicted the variations quite well.

  15. Multiscale modeling, simulations, and experiments of coating growth on nanofibers. Part II. Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldum, A.; Clemons, C. B.; Dill, L. H.; Kreider, K. L.; Young, G. W.; Zheng, X.; Evans, E. A.; Zhang, G.; Hariharan, S. I.

    2005-08-01

    This work is Part II of an integrated experimental/modeling investigation of a procedure to coat nanofibers and core-clad nanostructures with thin-film materials using plasma-enhanced physical vapor deposition. In the experimental effort, electrospun polymer nanofibers are coated with aluminum materials under different operating conditions to observe changes in the coating morphology. This procedure begins with the sputtering of the coating material from a target. Part I [J. Appl. Phys. 98, 044303 (2005)] focused on the sputtering aspect and transport of the sputtered material through the reactor. That reactor level model determines the concentration field of the coating material. This field serves as input into the present species transport and deposition model for the region surrounding an individual nanofiber. The interrelationships among processing factors for the transport and deposition are investigated here from a detailed modeling approach that includes the salient physical and chemical phenomena. Solution strategies that couple continuum and atomistic models are used. At the continuum scale, transport dynamics near the nanofiber are described. At the atomic level, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the deposition and sputtering mechanisms at the coating surface. Ion kinetic energies and fluxes are passed from the continuum sheath model to the MD simulations. These simulations calculate sputtering and sticking probabilities that in turn are used to calculate parameters for the continuum transport model. The continuum transport model leads to the definition of an evolution equation for the coating-free surface. This equation is solved using boundary perturbation and level set methods to determine the coating morphology as a function of operating conditions.

  16. MODELING THE NUCLEAR INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TYPE II ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lira, Paulina; Videla, Liza [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Wu, Yanling [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Alonso-Herrero, Almudena [Instituto de Fisica de Catabria, CSIC-UC, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Alexander, David M.; Ward, Martin [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-20

    We present results from model fitting to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a homogeneous sample of Seyfert II galaxies drawn from the 12 {mu}m Galaxy Sample. Imaging and nuclear flux measurements are presented in an accompanying paper. Here we add Spitzer/IRS observations to further constrain the SEDs after careful subtraction of a starburst component. We use the library of CLUMPY torus models from Nenkova et al. and also test the two-phase models recently produced by Stalevski et al. We find that photometric and spectroscopic observations in the mid-IR ({lambda} {approx}> 5 {mu}m) are crucial to properly constrain the best-fit torus models. About half of our sources show clear near-IR excess of their SEDs above the best-fit models. This problem can be less severe when using the Stalevski et al. models. The nature of this emission is not clear since best-fitted blackbody temperatures are very high ({approx}1700-2500 K) and the Type II classification of our sources would correspond to a small probability to peer directly into the hottest regions of the torus. Crucially, the derived torus parameters are quite robust when using CLUMPY models, independently of whether or not the sources require an additional blackbody component. Our findings suggest that tori are characterized by N{sub 0}{approx}>5, {sigma} {approx}> 40, {tau} {approx}< 25, Angle i {approx}> 40 Degree-Sign , Y {approx}< 50, and A {sup los} {sub v} {approx} 100-300, where N{sub 0} is the number of clouds in the equatorial plane of the torus, {sigma} is the characteristic opening angle of the cloud distribution, {tau} is the opacity of a single cloud, Angle i is the line-of-sight orientation of the torus, Y is the ratio of the inner to the outer radii, and A {sup los} {sub v} is the total opacity along the line of sight. From these, we can determine typical torus sizes and masses of 0.1-5.0 pc and 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M {sub Sun }, respectively. We find tentative evidence that those nuclei with

  17. Models of the SL9 Impacts II. Radiative-hydrodynamic Modeling of the Plume Splashback

    CERN Document Server

    Deming, D; Deming, Drake; Harrington, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    We model the plume "splashback" phase of the SL9 collisions with Jupiter using the ZEUS-3D hydrodynamic code. We modified the Zeus code to include gray radiative transport, and we present validation tests. We couple the infalling mass and momentum fluxes of SL9 plume material (from paper I) to a jovian atmospheric model. A strong and complex shock structure results. The modeled shock temperatures agree well with observations, and the structure and evolution of the modeled shocks account for the appearance of high excitation molecular line emission after the peak of the continuum light curve. The splashback region cools by radial expansion as well as by radiation. The morphology of our synthetic continuum light curves agree with observations over a broad wavelength range (0.9 to 12 microns). A feature of our ballistic plume is a shell of mass at the highest velocities, which we term the "vanguard". Portions of the vanguard ejected on shallow trajectories produce a lateral shock front, whose initial expansion a...

  18. Modeling of pheromone communication system of forest Lepidopterous insects. II. Model of female searching by male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kovalev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose an agent­based simulation model search. This model allows us to evaluate the effectiveness of different males­females pheromone search strategies for Lepidoptera. In the model, we consider the simplest case of the search, when the pheromone has only one chemical component. It is assumed that the insects are able to detect the pheromone molecules and the sensory cells generate action potentials in contact with the pheromone for some time. Thereafter pheromone molecule is inactivated. This behavior can be regarded as a memory of individual. Proportion of individuals who have reached the source is selected as an integral indicator of the search efficiency. To evaluate the effectiveness, numeric experiments were performed in different conditions: random walk, search algorithm without memory, and algorithm with memory and return mechanism. The resulting effectiveness of source localization by insects for flight in turbulent flows is ~ 70 %, which corresponds to experiments with live specimens in literature. In this case, proposed pheromone search algorithm is quite simple, which makes it biologically correct. Conducted modeling calculations can be the starting point for planning of field observations and pest monitoring systems using pheromone traps.

  19. Type-II super-Bäcklund transformation and integrable defects for the N=1 super sinh-Gordon model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, A.R.; Gomes, J.F.; Spano, N.I.; Zimerman, A.H. [Instituto de Física Teórica - IFT/UNESP,Rua Doutor Bento Teobaldo Ferraz, 271, Bloco II, 01140-070, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-06-18

    A new super-Bäcklund transformation for the N=1 supersymmetric sinh-Gordon equation is constructed. Based on this construction we propose a type-II integrable defect for the supersymmetric sinh-Gordon model consistent with this new transformation through the Lagrangian formalism. Explicit expressions for the modified conserved energy, momentum and supercharges are also computed. In addition, we show for the model that the type-II defect can also been regarded as a pair of fused defects of a previously introduced type. The explicit derivation of the associated defect matrices is also presented as a necessary condition for the integrability of the model.

  20. Type-II super-Backlund transformation and integrable defects for the N=1 super sinh-Gordon model

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, A R; Spano, N I; Zimerman, A H

    2015-01-01

    A new super-Backlund transformation for the N=1 supersymmetric sinh-Gordon equation is constructed. Based on this construction we propose a type-II integrable defect for the supersymmetric sinh-Gordon model consistent with this new transformation through the Lagrangian formalism. Explicit expressions for the modified conserved energy, momentum and supercharges are also computed. In addition, we show for the model that the type-II defect can also been regarded as a pair of fused defects of a previously introduced type. The explicit derivation of the associated defect matrices is also presented as a necessary condition for the integrability of the model.

  1. Type-II super-Bäcklund transformation and integrable defects for the N = 1 super sinh-Gordon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, A. R.; Gomes, J. F.; Spano, N. I.; Zimerman, A. H.

    2015-06-01

    A new super-Bäcklund transformation for the N = 1 supersymmetric sinhGordon equation is constructed. Based on this construction we propose a type-II integrable defect for the supersymmetric sinh-Gordon model consistent with this new transformation through the Lagrangian formalism. Explicit expressions for the modified conserved energy, momentum and supercharges are also computed. In addition, we show for the model that the type-II defect can also been regarded as a pair of fused defects of a previously introduced type. The explicit derivation of the associated defect matrices is also presented as a necessary condition for the integrability of the model.

  2. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  3. A single H II region model of the strong interstellar scattering towards Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicheneder, Egid; Dexter, Jason

    2017-05-01

    Until recently, the strong interstellar scattering observed towards the Galactic centre (GC) black hole, Sgr A*, was thought to come from dense gas within the GC region. The pulse broadening towards the transient magnetar SGR J1745-2900 near Sgr A* has shown that the source of the scattering is instead located much closer to Earth, possibly in a nearby spiral arm. We show that a single H II region along the line of sight, 1.5-4.8 kpc away from Earth with density ne of a few ≃ 100 cm^{-3} and radius R ≃ 1.8-3.2 pc can explain the observed angular broadening of Sgr A*. Clouds closer to the GC overproduce the observed disperson measure, providing an independent location constraint that agrees with that from the magnetar pulse broadening. Our model predicts that sources within ≲10 pc should show the same scattering origin as the magnetar and Sgr A*, while the nearest known pulsars with separations >20 pc should not. The radio spectrum of Sgr A* should show a cut-off from free-free absorption at 0.2 ≲ ν ≲ 1 GHz. For a magnetic field strength B ≃ 15-70 μG, the H II region could produce the rotation measure of the magnetar, the largest of any known pulsar, without requiring the gas near Sgr A* to be strongly magnetized.

  4. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David P. Colton

    2007-02-28

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

  5. The role of myosin II in glioma invasion: A mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wanho; Lim, Sookkyung; Kim, Yangjin

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas are malignant tumors that are commonly observed in primary brain cancer. Glioma cells migrate through a dense network of normal cells in microenvironment and spread long distances within brain. In this paper we present a two-dimensional multiscale model in which a glioma cell is surrounded by normal cells and its migration is controlled by cell-mechanical components in the microenvironment via the regulation of myosin II in response to chemoattractants. Our simulation results show that the myosin II plays a key role in the deformation of the cell nucleus as the glioma cell passes through the narrow intercellular space smaller than its nuclear diameter. We also demonstrate that the coordination of biochemical and mechanical components within the cell enables a glioma cell to take the mode of amoeboid migration. This study sheds lights on the understanding of glioma infiltration through the narrow intercellular spaces and may provide a potential approach for the development of anti-invasion strategies via the injection of chemoattractants for localization. PMID:28166231

  6. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  7. Using a tensor model for analyzing some aspects of mode-II loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seitl S.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available When analyzing the scatter and discrepancies arising among the fracture toughness resulting for differentmaterials and given mixity ratio KIIC/KIC three factors seems to be influential in contributing to the still unsatisfactory state of affairs in this field: a the lack of established requirements as regards geometry and minimal in- and out-of-plane dimensions of specimens regulating the test for determining mode-II fracture toughnessKIIC or, in the more general case, its equivalent in mixed mode cases, b the role played by the micro-cracking present in the process zone, acknowledged as a microstructural phenomenon already pointed out by Kalthoff and co-workers, needs to be experimentally investigated, and is not considered in the mainly analytical and numerical focussing pursued here, and c the insufficient attention paid to the particularity of the stress fields around the crack front before and after the daughter crack is formed. In this work, the last question is addressed with the intention of contributing to the clarification of some points with regard to crack instability under mode-II and mixed-mode loading, in particular, why it is difficult to formulate a sufficiently simple failure model for mechanical components or real structures for which the type of load or the geometry results in stress states from which the potential of mixed mode failure arises.

  8. Association of Adipokine Resistin With Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance in Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokhanguei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Resistin is a recently discovered signal molecule that has been linked to obesity, type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM and metabolic syndrome. Objectives This study aimed to assess whether serum resistin is associated with insulin resistance and glucose concentration in males with T2DM. Patients and Methods Thirty two adult non-trained males with type II diabetes, 34-48 years old and 88-110 kg of body weight, participated in this study by accessible sampling. Fasting blood samples were collected from all participants in order to measure serum resistin, insulin and glucose concentration. Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR was calculated using fasting insulin and glucose. Relations between variables were determined by Pearson correlations. Results We found that serum resistin had a positive significant correlation with insulin resistance (P = 0.000, r = 0.64. No significant correlation was found between serum resistin and fasting glucose concentration in the studied patients (P = 0.21, r = 0.23. Conclusions Based on these data, we can argue that circulating glucose concentration is not directly affected by serum resistin in T2DM. It seems that resistin affects glucose indirectly, through insulin resistance.

  9. Survey of non-linear hydrodynamic models of type-II Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolec, R.

    2016-03-01

    We present a grid of non-linear convective type-II Cepheid models. The dense model grids are computed for 0.6 M⊙ and a range of metallicities ([Fe/H] = -2.0, -1.5, -1.0), and for 0.8 M⊙ ([Fe/H] = -1.5). Two sets of convective parameters are considered. The models cover the full temperature extent of the classical instability strip, but are limited in luminosity; for the most luminous models, violent pulsation leads to the decoupling of the outermost model shell. Hence, our survey reaches only the shortest period RV Tau domain. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, we detect two domains in which period-doubled pulsation is possible. The first extends through the BL Her domain and low-luminosity W Vir domain (pulsation periods ˜2-6.5 d). The second domain extends at higher luminosities (W Vir domain; periods >9.5 d). Some models within these domains display period-4 pulsation. We also detect very narrow domains (˜10 K wide) in which modulation of pulsation is possible. Another interesting phenomenon we detect is double-mode pulsation in the fundamental mode and in the fourth radial overtone. Fourth overtone is a surface mode, trapped in the outer model layers. Single-mode pulsation in the fourth overtone is also possible on the hot side of the classical instability strip. The origin of the above phenomena is discussed. In particular, the role of resonances in driving different pulsation dynamics as well as in shaping the morphology of the radius variation curves is analysed.

  10. Modeling reverberation mapping data II: dynamical modeling of the Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2008 dataset

    CERN Document Server

    Pancoast, Anna; Treu, Tommaso; Park, Daeseong; Barth, Aaron J; Bentz, Misty C; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2013-01-01

    We present dynamical modeling of the broad line region (BLR) for a sample of five Seyfert 1 galaxies using reverberation mapping data taken by the Lick AGN Monitoring Project (LAMP) in 2008. The sample includes Arp 151, Mrk 1310, NGC 5548, NGC 6814, and SBS 1116+583A. By modeling the continuum light curve and H$\\beta$ line profiles directly we are able to constrain the geometry and kinematics of the BLR. Modeling the kinematics also allows us to make a measurement of the black hole mass that does not depend upon the virial coefficient or normalizing factor needed in traditional reverberation mapping analysis. We find that the geometry of the BLR is generally a thick disk viewed close to face-on, but a more spherical geometry is not ruled out for two of the five AGNs. While the H$\\beta$ is found to come preferentially from the far side of the BLR, the mean size of the BLR is consistent with the lags measured with cross-correlation analysis. The BLR kinematics are generally found to be consistent with either in...

  11. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results: AEROSOL PROFILES IN AEROCOM II GCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffi, Brigitte [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Schulz, Michael [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Bréon, François-Marie [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Dentener, Frank [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Steensen, Birthe Marie [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Griesfeller, Jan [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Winker, David [NASA Langley Research Center, MS/475, Hampton Virginia USA; Balkanski, Yves [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Bauer, Susanne E. [Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University, New York New York USA; NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York New York USA; Bellouin, Nicolas [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading UK; Berntsen, Terje [Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo Norway; Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Bian, Huisheng [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore Country Maryland USA; Chin, Mian [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Diehl, Thomas [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Easter, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Ghan, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Hauglustaine, Didier A. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Iversen, Trond [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo Norway; Kirkevåg, Alf [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Liu, Xiaohong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at University of Wyoming, Laramie Wyoming USA; Lohmann, Ulrike [ETH-Zentrum, Zürich Switzerland; Myhre, Gunnar [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Rasch, Phil [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Seland, Øyvind [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Skeie, Ragnhild B. [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Steenrod, Stephen D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Stier, Philip [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford UK; Tackett, Jason [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton Virginia USA; Takemura, Toshihiko [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka Japan; Tsigaridis, Kostas [Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University, New York New York USA; NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York New York USA; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Now at National Institute for Agronomic Research, Thiverval-Grignon France; Yoon, Jinho [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju Korea; Zhang, Kai [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg Germany

    2016-06-27

    The ability of eleven models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model inter-comparison initiative (AeroCom II) is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded dataset of aerosol extinction profiles built on purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 sub-continental regions show that five models improved whereas three degraded in reproducing the Zα 0-6 km mean extinction height diagnostic, which is computed over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models’ performance remains highly variable, it has generally improved in terms of inter-regional diversity and seasonality. The biases in Zα 0-6 km have notably decreased in the U.S. and European industrial and downwind maritime regions, whereas the timing of the Zα 0-6 km peak season has improved for all but two models. However, most of the models now show a Zα 0-6 km underestimation over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα 0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the (changes in the) the performance of the individual models and for the inter-model diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties that can contribute to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  12. Deriving remote sensing reflectance from turbid Case II waters using green-shortwave infrared bands based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Yin, Shoujing; Xiao, Rulin; Xu, Qianxiang; Lin, Changsong

    2014-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to validate the applicability of a shortwave infrared atmospheric correction model (SWIR-based model) in deriving remote sensing reflectance in turbid Case II waters, and to improve that model using a proposed green-shortwave infrared model (GSWIR-based model). In a GSWIR-based model, the aerosol type is determined by a SWIR-based model and the reflectance due to aerosol scattering is calculated using spectral slope technology. In this study, field measurements collected from three independent cruises from two different Case II waters were used to compare models. The results indicate that both SWIR- and GSWIR-based models can be used to derive the remote sensing reflectance at visible wavelengths in turbid Case II waters, but GSWIR-based models are superior to SWIR-based models. Using the GSWIR-based model decreases uncertainty in remote sensing reflectance retrievals in turbid Case II waters by 2.6-12.1%. In addition, GSWIR-based model’s sensitivity to user-supplied parameters was determined using the numerical method, which indicated that the GSWIR-based model is more sensitive to the uncertainty of spectral slope technology than to that of aerosol type retrieval methodology. Due to much lower noise tolerance of GSWIR-based model in the blue and near-infrared regions, the GSWIR-based model performs poorly in determining remote sensing reflectance at these wavelengths, which is consistent with the GSWIR-based model’s accuracy evaluation results.

  13. Toward a network model of MHC class II-restricted antigen processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence C Eisenlohr

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The standard model of Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII-restricted antigen processing depicts a straightforward, linear pathway: Internalized antigens are converted into peptides that load in a chaperone dependent manner onto nascent MHCII in the late endosome, the complexes subsequently trafficking to the cell surface for recognition by CD4+ T cells (TCD4+. Several variations on this theme, both moderate and radical, have come to light but these alternatives have remained peripheral, the conventional pathway generally presumed to be the primary driver of TCD4+ responses. Here we continue to press for the conceptual repositioning of these alternatives toward the center while proposing that MHCII processing be thought of less in terms of discrete pathways and more in terms of a network whose major and minor conduits are variable depending upon many factors, including the epitope, the nature of the antigen, the source of the antigen, and the identity of the antigen-presenting cell.

  14. Dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun; Zu, Li; Jiang, Daqing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response. For the stochastic systems, we firstly establish sufficient conditions for the existence of the globally positive solutions. Then we investigate the asymptotic moment estimations of the positive solutions and study the ultimately bounded in the mean of them. Thirdly, by constructing some suitable Lyapunov functions, we verify that there are unique stationary distributions and they are ergodic. The obtained results show that the systems still retain some stability in the sense of weak stability provided that the intensity of the white noise is relatively small. Finally, some numerical simulations are introduced to illustrate our main results.

  15. Chromospheric diagnosis with Ca II lines: forward modeling in forward scattering (I)

    CERN Document Server

    Carlin, E S

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the first synthetic tomography of the quiet solar chromosphere formed by spatial maps of scattering polarization. It has been calculated for the CaII 8498, 8542 and 3934 A lines by solving the NLTE (non-local thermodynamical equilibrium) RT (radiative transfer) problem of the second kind in a 3D atmosphere model obtained from realistic MHD (magneto-hydrodynamical) simulations. Maps of circular polarization were calculated neglecting atomic polarization. Our investigation focuses on the linear polarization signals induced by kinematics, radiation field anisotropy and Hanle effect in forward-scattering geometry. Thus, instead of considering slit profiles at the limb as normally done in the study of the second solar spectrum, we synthetize and analyze spatial maps of polarization at disk center. It allows us to understand the spatial signatures of dynamics and magnetic field in the linear polarization for discriminating them observationally. Our results suggest new ideas for chromospheric diagno...

  16. Modeling neural mechanisms for genesis of respiratory rhythm and pattern. II. Network models of the central respiratory pattern generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybak, I A; Paton, J F; Schwaber, J S

    1997-04-01

    The present paper describes several models of the central respiratory pattern generator (CRPG) developed employing experimental data and current hypotheses for respiratory rhythmogenesis. Each CRPG model includes a network of respiratory neuron types (e.g., early inspiratory; ramp inspiratory; late inspiratory; decrementing expiratory; postinspiratory; stage II expiratory; stage II constant firing expiratory; preinspiratory) and simplified models of lung and pulmonary stretch receptors (PSR), which provide feedback to the respiratory network. The used models of single respiratory neurons were developed in the Hodgkin-Huxley style as described in the previous paper. The mechanism for termination of inspiration (the inspiratory off-switch) in all models operates via late-I neuron, which is considered to be the inspiratory off-switching neuron. Several two- and three-phase CRPG models have been developed using different accepted hypotheses of the mechanism for termination of expiration. The key elements in the two-phase models are the early-I and dec-E neurons. The expiratory off-switch mechanism in these models is based on the mutual inhibitory connections between early-I and dec-E and adaptive properties of the dec-E neuron. The difference between the two-phase models concerns the mechanism for ramp firing patterns of E2 neurons resulting either from the intrinsic neuronal properties of the E2 neuron or from disinhibition from the adapting dec-E neuron. The key element of the three-phase models is the pre-I neuron, which acts as the expiratory off-switching neuron. The three-phase models differ by the mechanisms used for termination of expiration and for the ramp firing patterns of E2 neurons. Additional CRPG models were developed employing a dual switching neuron that generates two bursts per respiratory cycle to terminate both inspiration and expiration. Although distinctly different each model generates a stable respiratory rhythm and shows physiologically

  17. Modelling and observation of transionospheric propagation results from ISIS II in preparation for ePOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Gillies

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP is scheduled to be launched as part of the Cascade Demonstrator Small-Sat and Ionospheric Polar Explorer (CASSIOPE satellite in early 2008. A Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI on ePOP will receive HF transmissions from various ground-based transmitters. In preparation for the ePOP mission, data from a similar transionospheric experiment performed by the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS II satellite has been studied. Prominent features in the received 9.303-MHz signal were periodic Faraday fading of signal intensity at rates up to 13 Hz and a time of arrival delay between the O- and X-modes of up to 0.8 ms. Both features occurred when the satellite was above or south of the Ottawa transmitter. Ionospheric models for ray tracing were constructed using both International Reference Ionosphere (IRI profiles and local peak electron density values from ISIS ionograms. Values for fade rate and differential mode delay were computed and compared to the values observed in the ISIS II data. The computed values showed very good agreement to the observed values of both received signal parameters when the topside sounding foF2 values were used to scale IRI profiles, but not when strictly modelled IRI profiles were used. It was determined that the primary modifier of the received signal parameters was the foF2 density and not the shape of the profile. This dependence was due to refraction, at the 9.303-MHz signal frequency, causing the rays to travel larger distances near the peak density where essentially all the mode splitting occurred. This study should assist in interpretation of ePOP RRI data when they are available.

  18. Modelling reverberation mapping data - II. Dynamical modelling of the Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2008 data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancoast, Anna; Brewer, Brendon J.; Treu, Tommaso; Park, Daeseong; Barth, Aaron J.; Bentz, Misty C.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2014-12-01

    We present dynamical modelling of the broad-line region (BLR) for a sample of five Seyfert 1 galaxies using reverberation mapping data taken by the Lick AGN Monitoring Project in 2008. By modelling the AGN continuum light curve and Hβ line profiles directly, we are able to constrain the geometry and kinematics of the BLR and make a measurement of the black hole mass that does not depend upon the virial factor, f, needed in traditional reverberation mapping analysis. We find that the geometry of the BLR is generally a thick disc viewed close to face-on. While the Hβ emission is found to come preferentially from the far side of the BLR, the mean size of the BLR is consistent with the lags measured with cross-correlation analysis. The BLR kinematics are found to be consistent with either inflowing motions or elliptical orbits, often with some combination of the two. We measure black hole masses of log _{10}(M_ BH/M_{odot })=6.62^{+0.10}_{-0.13} for Arp 151, 7.42^{+0.26}_{-0.27} for Mrk 1310, 7.59^{+0.24}_{-0.21} for NGC 5548, 6.37^{+0.21}_{-0.16} for NGC 6814, and 6.99^{+0.32}_{-0.25} for SBS 1116+583A. The f factors measured individually for each AGN are found to correlate with inclination angle, although not with M BH, L5100, or FWHM/σ of the emission line profile.

  19. FutureTox II: in vitro data and in silico models for predictive toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Thomas B; Keller, Douglas A; Sander, Miriam; Carney, Edward W; Doerrer, Nancy G; Eaton, David L; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne Compton; Hastings, Kenneth L; Mendrick, Donna L; Tice, Raymond R; Watkins, Paul B; Whelan, Maurice

    2015-02-01

    FutureTox II, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology workshop, was held in January, 2014. The meeting goals were to review and discuss the state of the science in toxicology in the context of implementing the NRC 21st century vision of predicting in vivo responses from in vitro and in silico data, and to define the goals for the future. Presentations and discussions were held on priority concerns such as predicting and modeling of metabolism, cell growth and differentiation, effects on sensitive subpopulations, and integrating data into risk assessment. Emerging trends in technologies such as stem cell-derived human cells, 3D organotypic culture models, mathematical modeling of cellular processes and morphogenesis, adverse outcome pathway development, and high-content imaging of in vivo systems were discussed. Although advances in moving towards an in vitro/in silico based risk assessment paradigm were apparent, knowledge gaps in these areas and limitations of technologies were identified. Specific recommendations were made for future directions and research needs in the areas of hepatotoxicity, cancer prediction, developmental toxicity, and regulatory toxicology.

  20. Polarized light scanning cryomacroscopy, part II: Thermal modeling and analysis of experimental observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Justin S G; Solanki, Prem K; Eisenberg, David P; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    This study aims at developing thermal analysis tools and explaining experimental observations made by means of polarized-light cryomacroscopy (Part I). Thermal modeling is based on finite elements analysis (FEA), where two model parameters are extracted from thermal measurements: (i) the overall heat transfer coefficient between the cuvette and the cooling chamber, and (ii) the effective thermal conductivity within the cryoprotective agent (CPA) at the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range. The effective thermal conductivity takes into account enhanced heat transfer due to convection currents within the CPA, creating the so-called Bénard cells. Comparison of experimental results with simulation data indicates that the uncertainty in simulations due to the propagation of uncertainty in measured physical properties exceeds the uncertainty in experimental measurements, which validates the modeling approach. It is shown in this study that while a cavity may form in the upper-center portion of the vitrified CPA, it has very little effect on estimating the temperature distribution within the domain. This cavity is driven by thermal contraction of the CPA, with the upper-center of the domain transitioning to glass last. Finally, it is demonstrated in this study that additional stresses may develop within the glass transition temperature range due to nonlinear behavior of the thermal expansion coefficient. This effect is reported here for the first time in the context of cryobiology, using the capabilities of polarized-light cryomacroscopy.

  1. Pathological features of glycogen storage disease type II highlighted in the knockout mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijvoet, A G; Van Hirtum, H; Vermey, M; Van Leenen, D; Van Der Ploeg, A T; Mooi, W J; Reuser, A J

    1999-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII; Pompe's disease) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by lysosomal alpha-glucosidase deficiency. Skeletal muscle weakness is the most conspicuous clinical symptom of patients suffering from GSDII and skeletal muscle also is prominently involved in the knockout mouse model of this disease. Thus far, however, little detailed information has been published on the pathological changes in other mouse tissues. This paper aims to provide these data and gives a record of the clinical course of the mouse model over a 2-year period. Four-month-old affected mice perform worse in a running wheel than their unaffected littermates, but do not yet display other clear signs of disease. The lysosomal glycogen storage, already evident at birth, becomes more severe in time, leading to muscle wasting by 9-10 months of age and then limb girdle weakness and kyphosis. The disease does not markedly shorten the animal's life span despite the serious tissue pathology, which is not limited to heart and skeletal muscle, but is also seen in the smooth muscle of blood vessels and of the respiratory, digestive, and urogenital tracts. In addition, the mice have lysosomal glycogen storage in the liver, kidney, spleen, and salivary gland; in Schwann cells of the peripheral nerves, and in a subset of neurons in the central nervous system. By pathological criteria, the knockout mouse model parallels the human infantile form of GSDII and is attractive for studying the possible reversal of tissue pathology and symptomatology under different therapeutic regimes.

  2. A Model of Biocomplexity in River Networks - Part II: Tenets and Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delong, M. D.; Thorp, J. H.; Thoms, M. C.

    2005-05-01

    We are proposing a model of lotic biocomplexity encompassing spatiotemporal scales from headwaters to large rivers and from main channels to floodplains. Part I of our presentation in the symposium discusses the general theory and predicted changes along longitudinal gradients in the river network. In Part II, we use the foundation of this theory to make predictions for the ecological behavior of the river ecosystem. These predictions are designed to stimulate research tests of these hypotheses and to obtain data allowing the continuing refinement of the overall model. Fourteen principles or model tenets are included which describe the functioning of epigean portions of lotic ecosystems on ecological time scales; they are focused more on the riverscape than the entire riverine landscape. These 14 tenets predict how patterns of individual species distributions, community regulation, lotic ecosystem processes, and floodplain interactions will vary over spatiotemporal scales, especially as they relate to the functional process zones formed by hydrogeomorphic patches. We make no claim to originality for all these tenets. Some of these ideas are well supported in the scientific literature, others may be acceptable to the scientific community but currently lack empirical support, and some may be very speculative and possibly controversial.

  3. Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System, Phase II: Dodecahedral Micro-Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Rick E.

    2012-03-01

    In the first year of this contractual effort a hypo-elastic constitutive model was developed and shown to have great potential in modeling the elastic response of parenchyma. This model resides at the macroscopic level of the continuum. In this, the second year of our support, an isotropic dodecahedron is employed as an alveolar model. This is a microscopic model for parenchyma. A hopeful outcome is that the linkage between these two scales of modeling will be a source of insight and inspiration that will aid us in the final year's activity: creating a viscoelastic model for parenchyma.

  4. A valence bond model for aqueous Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions in the AMOEBA polarizable force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jin Yu; Ponder, Jay W

    2013-04-05

    A general molecular mechanics (MM) model for treating aqueous Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions was developed based on valence bond (VB) theory and incorporated into the atomic multipole optimized energetics for biomolecular applications (AMOEBA) polarizable force field. Parameters were obtained by fitting MM energies to that computed by ab initio methods for gas-phase tetra- and hexa-aqua metal complexes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the proposed AMOEBA-VB model were performed for each transition metal ion in aqueous solution, and solvent coordination was evaluated. Results show that the AMOEBA-VB model generates the correct square-planar geometry for gas-phase tetra-aqua Cu(2+) complex and improves the accuracy of MM model energetics for a number of ligation geometries when compared to quantum mechanical (QM) computations. On the other hand, both AMOEBA and AMOEBA-VB generate results for Zn(2+)-water complexes in good agreement with QM calculations. Analyses of the MD trajectories revealed a six-coordination first solvation shell for both Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions in aqueous solution, with ligation geometries falling in the range reported by previous studies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A dynamic in vitro lipolysis model. II: Evaluation of the model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangenberg, N H; Müllertz, A; Kristensen, H G; Hovgaard, L

    2001-10-01

    A lipolysis model was characterised and evaluated by investigating the composition of the aqueous phase and the concentration of probucol and danazol in the aqueous phase. Effects of bile salt levels at 5, 10, 20, and 30 mM were investigated. Samples were taken at 0%, 50%, 75% and 95% hydrolysis of the triglycerides, and the aqueous phases were isolated by ultra-centrifugation, whereby the concentrations of bile salts, fatty acids, mono-, di-, triglycerides, and drug substances were measured. At high Ca(2+)-concentrations, bile salts were believed to precipitate with Ca(2+). The concentration of lipolytic products (fatty acids + monoglycerides) was dependent on the bile salt concentration. The ratio between lipolytic product and bile salts was 1.55+/-0.09 (S.D.). This ratio is equivalent to mixed bile salt micelles and vesicles in equilibrium. The aqueous solubility of probucol and danazol was increased in the presence of bile salts. The concentration of danazol in the aqueous phase was dependent on the solubilisation capacity of the aqueous phase. In the case of probucol, the concentration in the aqueous phase was dependent on the partition of probucol between the aqueous phase and the remaining triglyceride phase. This difference between danazol and probucol was attributed to the effect of different lipophilicity.

  6. A stochastic model for the synthesis and degradation of natural organic matter. Part III: Modeling Cu(II) complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabaniss, Stephen E. [Department of Chemistry, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)], E-mail: cabaniss@unm.edu; Maurice, Patricia A. [Department of Geology and Civil Engineering, University of Notre Dame (United States); Madey, Greg [Department of Computer Science, University of Notre Dame (United States)

    2007-08-15

    An agent-based biogeochemical model has been developed which begins with biochemical precursor molecules and simulates the transformation and degradation of natural organic matter (NOM). This manuscript presents an empirical quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) which uses the numbers of ligand groups, charge density and heteroatom density of a molecule to estimate Cu-binding affinity (K{sub Cu}{sup '}) at pH 7.0 and ionic strength 0.10 for the molecules in this model. Calibration of this QSAR on a set of 41 model compounds gives a root mean square error of 0.88 log units and r{sup 2} 0.93. Two simulated NOM assemblages, one beginning with small molecules (tannins, terpenoids, flavonoids) and one with biopolymers (protein, lignin), give markedly different distributions of logK{sub Cu}{sup '}. However, calculations based on these logK{sub Cu}{sup '} distributions agree qualitatively with published experimental Cu(II) titration data from river and lake NOM samples.

  7. Kinetic analysis of palladium(II) adsorption process on condensed-tannin gel based on redox reaction models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Ho; Ogata, Takeshi; Nakano, Yoshio

    2007-07-01

    We have developed a novel recovery system of palladium (Pd) from wastes such as spent catalysts or scraps, using tannin gel particles synthesized from condensed-tannin molecules. The Pd(II) ionic species are reduced to metallic Pd(0) on the network of the tannin gel: a two-electron transfer from the tannin gel to Pd(II). The kinetic study of the electron transfer was performed with a multiple reaction model containing an intermediate step (formation of a ligand-substituted Pd(II)-tannin inner sphere complex), resulting in a better fit with the experimental results than with the single reaction model (outer sphere redox reaction), which means that the inner sphere redox mechanism is an appropriate reaction model for the Pd(II) adsorption process. Because the intermediate is included in the adsorption amount, the adsorption process can be divided into two steps: fast adsorption by the ligand substitution at the initial stage and slow adsorption by the subsequent redox reaction after the ligand substitution reaches an equilibrium state, with different adsorption rates between the Pd(II) ionic species (PdCl(+)>PdCl(2)>PdCl(3)(-),PdCl(4)(2-)).

  8. Dimensional and hierarchical models of depression using the Beck Depression Inventory-II in an Arab college student sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohaeri Jude U

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An understanding of depressive symptomatology from the perspective of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA could facilitate valid and interpretable comparisons across cultures. The objectives of the study were: (i using the responses of a sample of Arab college students to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II in CFA, to compare the "goodness of fit" indices of the original dimensional three-and two-factor first-order models, and their modifications, with the corresponding hierarchical models (i.e., higher - order and bifactor models; (ii to assess the psychometric characteristics of the BDI-II, including convergent/discriminant validity with the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25. Method Participants (N = 624 were Kuwaiti national college students, who completed the questionnaires in class. CFA was done by AMOS, version 16. Eleven models were compared using eight "fit" indices. Results In CFA, all the models met most "fit" criteria. While the higher-order model did not provide improved fit over the dimensional first - order factor models, the bifactor model (BFM had the best fit indices (CMNI/DF = 1.73; GFI = 0.96; RMSEA = 0.034. All regression weights of the dimensional models were significantly different from zero (P Conclusion The broadly adequate fit of the various models indicates that they have some merit and implies that the relationship between the domains of depression probably contains hierarchical and dimensional elements. The bifactor model is emerging as the best way to account for the clinical heterogeneity of depression. The psychometric characteristics of the BDI-II lend support to our CFA results.

  9. The treatment of mixing in core helium burning models - II. Constraints from cluster star counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Thomas; Campbell, Simon W.; Lattanzio, John C.; van Duijneveldt, Adam

    2016-03-01

    The treatment of convective boundaries during core helium burning is a fundamental problem in stellar evolution calculations. In the first paper of this series, we showed that new asteroseismic observations of these stars imply they have either very large convective cores or semiconvection/partially mixed zones that trap g modes. We probe this mixing by inferring the relative lifetimes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and horizontal branch (HB) from R2, the observed ratio of these stars in recent HST photometry of 48 Galactic globular clusters. Our new determinations of R2 are more self-consistent than those of previous studies and our overall calculation of R2 = 0.117 ± 0.005 is the most statistically robust now available. We also establish that the luminosity difference between the HB and the AGB clump is Δ log {L}_HB^AGB = 0.455 ± 0.012. Our results accord with earlier findings that standard models predict a lower R2 than is observed. We demonstrate that the dominant sources of uncertainty in models are the prescription for mixing and the stochastic effects that can result from its numerical treatment. The luminosity probability density functions that we derive from observations feature a sharp peak near the AGB clump. This constitutes a strong new argument against core breathing pulses, which broaden the predicted width of the peak. We conclude that the two mixing schemes that can match the asteroseismology are capable of matching globular cluster observations, but only if (i) core breathing pulses are avoided in models with a semiconvection/partially mixed zone, or (ii) that models with large convective cores have a particular depth of mixing beneath the Schwarzschild boundary during subsequent early-AGB `gravonuclear' convection.

  10. RF Cell Modeling and Experiments for Wakefield Minimization in DARHT-II

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, S D; Nelson, Scott D.; Vella, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Electron beams of linear induction accelerators experience deflective forces caused by RF fields building up as a result of accelerating cavities of finite size. These forces can significantly effect the beam when a long linac composed of identical cells is assembled. Recent techniques in computational modeling, simulation, and experiments for 20 MeV DARHT-II (Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test) accelerator cells were found to reduce the wakefield impedance of the cells from 800 ohms/meter to 350 ohms/meter and experimental results confirm the results of the modeling efforts. Increased performance of the cell was obtained through a parametric study of the accelerator structure, materials, material tuning, and geometry. As a result of this effort, it was found that thickness-tuned ferrite produced a 50% deduction in the wakefield impedance in the low frequency band and was easily tunable based on the material thickness. It was also found that shaped metal sections allow for high-Q resonances to be de-tun...

  11. Atlantic-Arctic exchange in a series of ocean model simulations (CORE-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Christina; Behrens, Erik; Biastoch, Arne

    2014-05-01

    In this study we aim to improve the understanding of exchange processes between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean. The Nordic Sea builds an important connector between these regions, by receiving and modifying warm and saline Atlantic waters, and by providing dense overflow as a backbone of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Using a hierarchy of global ocean/sea-ice models, the specific role of the Nordic Seas, both providing a feedback with the AMOC, but also as a modulator of the Atlantic water flowing into the Arctic Ocean, is examined. The models have been performed under the CORE-II protocol, in which atmospheric forcing of the past 60 years was applied in a subsequent series of 5 iterations. During the course of this 300-year long integration, the AMOC shows substantial changes, which are correlated with water mass characteristics in the Denmark Strait overflow characteristics. Quantitative analyses using Lagrangian trajectories explore the impact of these trends on the Arctic Ocean through the Barents Sea and the Fram Strait.

  12. Simulation and modeling of the Gamble II self-pinched ion beam transport experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, D.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Hinshelwood, D.D. [and others

    1999-07-01

    Progress in numerical simulations and modeling of the self-pinched ion beam transport experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is reviewed. In the experiment, a 1.2-MeV, 100-kA proton beam enters a 1-m long, transport region filled with a low pressure gas (30--250 mTorr helium, or 1 Torr air). The time-dependent velocity distribution function of the injected ion beam is determined from an orbit code that uses a pinch-reflex ion diode model and the measured voltage and current from this diode on the Gamble II generator at NRL. This distribution function is used as the beam input condition for numerical simulations carried out using the hybrid particle-in-cell code IPROP. Results of the simulations will be described, and detailed comparisons will be made with various measurements, including line-integrated electron-density, proton-fluence, and beam radial-profile measurements. As observed in the experiment, the simulations show evidence of self-pinching for helium pressures between 35 and 80 mTorr. Simulations and measurements in 1 Torr air show ballistic transport. The relevance of these results to ion-driven inertial confinement fusion will be discussed.

  13. A review on ROCK-II inhibitors: From molecular modelling to synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Surmil; Savjani, Jignasa

    2016-05-15

    Rho kinase enzyme expressed in different disease conditions and involved in mediating vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling in the pathogenesis. There are two isoforms of Rho kinases, namely ROCK I and ROCK II, responsible for different physiological function due to difference in distribution, but almost similar in structure. The Rho kinase 2 belongs to AGC family and is widely distributed in brain, heart and muscles. It is responsible for contraction of vascular smooth muscles by calcium sensitization. Its defective and unwanted expression can lead to many medical conditions like multiple sclerosis, myocardial ischemia, inflammatory responses, etc. Many Rho kinase 1 and 2 inhibitors have been designed for Rho/Rho kinase pathway by use of molecular modeling studies. Most of the designed compounds have been modeled based on ROCK 1 enzyme. This article is focused on Rho kinase 2 inhibitors as there are many ways to improvise by use of Computer aided drug designing as very less quantum of research work carried out. Herein, the article highlights different stages of designing like docking, SAR and synthesis of ROCK inhibitors and recent advances. It also highlights future prospective to improve the activity.

  14. A Pressure-dependent Model for the Regulation of Lipoprotein Lipase by Apolipoprotein C-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Nathan L; Larsson, Mikael; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Small, Donald M

    2015-07-17

    Apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) is the co-factor for lipoprotein lipase (LPL) at the surface of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. LPL hydrolyzes triacylglycerol, which increases local surface pressure as surface area decreases and amphipathic products transiently accumulate at the lipoprotein surface. To understand how apoC-II adapts to these pressure changes, we characterized the behavior of apoC-II at multiple lipid/water interfaces. ApoC-II adsorption to a triacylglycerol/water interface resulted in large increases in surface pressure. ApoC-II was exchangeable at this interface and desorbed on interfacial compressions. These compressions increase surface pressure and mimic the action of LPL. Analysis of gradual compressions showed that apoC-II undergoes a two-step desorption, which indicates that lipid-bound apoC-II can exhibit at least two conformations. We characterized apoC-II at phospholipid/triacylglycerol/water interfaces, which more closely mimic lipoprotein surfaces. ApoC-II had a large exclusion pressure, similar to that of apoC-I and apoC-III. However, apoC-II desorbed at retention pressures higher than those seen with the other apoCs. This suggests that it is unlikely that apoC-I and apoC-III inhibit LPL via displacement of apoC-II from the lipoprotein surface. Upon rapid compressions and re-expansions, re-adsorption of apoC-II increased pressure by lower amounts than its initial adsorption. This indicates that apoC-II removed phospholipid from the interface upon desorption. These results suggest that apoC-II regulates the activity of LPL in a pressure-dependent manner. ApoC-II is provided as a component of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins and is the co-factor for LPL as pressure increases. Above its retention pressure, apoC-II desorbs and removes phospholipid. This triggers release of LPL from lipoproteins.

  15. A Pressure-dependent Model for the Regulation of Lipoprotein Lipase by Apolipoprotein C-II*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Nathan L.; Larsson, Mikael; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Small, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) is the co-factor for lipoprotein lipase (LPL) at the surface of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. LPL hydrolyzes triacylglycerol, which increases local surface pressure as surface area decreases and amphipathic products transiently accumulate at the lipoprotein surface. To understand how apoC-II adapts to these pressure changes, we characterized the behavior of apoC-II at multiple lipid/water interfaces. ApoC-II adsorption to a triacylglycerol/water interface resulted in large increases in surface pressure. ApoC-II was exchangeable at this interface and desorbed on interfacial compressions. These compressions increase surface pressure and mimic the action of LPL. Analysis of gradual compressions showed that apoC-II undergoes a two-step desorption, which indicates that lipid-bound apoC-II can exhibit at least two conformations. We characterized apoC-II at phospholipid/triacylglycerol/water interfaces, which more closely mimic lipoprotein surfaces. ApoC-II had a large exclusion pressure, similar to that of apoC-I and apoC-III. However, apoC-II desorbed at retention pressures higher than those seen with the other apoCs. This suggests that it is unlikely that apoC-I and apoC-III inhibit LPL via displacement of apoC-II from the lipoprotein surface. Upon rapid compressions and re-expansions, re-adsorption of apoC-II increased pressure by lower amounts than its initial adsorption. This indicates that apoC-II removed phospholipid from the interface upon desorption. These results suggest that apoC-II regulates the activity of LPL in a pressure-dependent manner. ApoC-II is provided as a component of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins and is the co-factor for LPL as pressure increases. Above its retention pressure, apoC-II desorbs and removes phospholipid. This triggers release of LPL from lipoproteins. PMID:26026161

  16. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of cadmium(II) biosorption by nonliving algal biomass Oedogonium sp. from aqueous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, V K; Rastogi, A

    2008-05-01

    The biosorption of cadmium(II) ions on Oedogonium sp. is studied in a batch system with respect to initial pH, algal dose, contact time and the temperature. The algal biomass exhibited the highest cadmium(II) uptake capacity at 25 degrees C, at the initial pH value of 5.0 in 55 min and at the initial cadmium(II) ion concentration of 200 mg L(-1). Biosorption capacity decreased from 88.9 to 80.4 mg g(-1) with an increase in temperature from 25 to 45 degrees C at this initial cadmium(II) concentration. Uptake kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order model and equilibrium is well described by Langmuir isotherm. Isotherms have been used to determine thermodynamic parameters of the process, viz., free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change. FTIR analysis of algal biomass revealed the presence of amino, carboxyl, hydroxyl and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for biosorption of metal ions. Acid pretreatments did not substantially increase metal sorption capacity but alkali like NaOH pretreatment slightly enhanced the metal removal ability of the biomass. During repeated sorption/desorption cycles at the end of fifth cycle, Cd(II) sorption decreased by 18%, with 15-20% loss of biomass. Nevertheless, Oedogonium sp. appears to be a good sorbent for removing metal Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  17. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of cadmium(II) biosorption by nonliving algal biomass Oedogonium sp. from aqueous phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V.K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)], E-mail: vinodfcy@iitr.ernet.in; Rastogi, A. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2008-05-01

    The biosorption of cadmium(II) ions on Oedogonium sp. is studied in a batch system with respect to initial pH, algal dose, contact time and the temperature. The algal biomass exhibited the highest cadmium(II) uptake capacity at 25 deg. C, at the initial pH value of 5.0 in 55 min and at the initial cadmium(II) ion concentration of 200 mg L{sup -1}. Biosorption capacity decreased from 88.9 to 80.4 mg g{sup -1} with an increase in temperature from 25 to 45 deg. C at this initial cadmium(II) concentration. Uptake kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order model and equilibrium is well described by Langmuir isotherm. Isotherms have been used to determine thermodynamic parameters of the process, viz., free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change. FTIR analysis of algal biomass revealed the presence of amino, carboxyl, hydroxyl and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for biosorption of metal ions. Acid pretreatments did not substantially increase metal sorption capacity but alkali like NaOH pretreatment slightly enhanced the metal removal ability of the biomass. During repeated sorption/desorption cycles at the end of fifth cycle, Cd(II) sorption decreased by 18%, with 15-20% loss of biomass. Nevertheless, Oedogonium sp. appears to be a good sorbent for removing metal Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  18. Kinetic and isotherm modeling of Cd (II) adsorption by L-cysteine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, Mahmoud; Zazouli, Mohammad Ali; Yousefi, Zabihollah; Akbari-adergani, Behrouz

    2015-11-01

    In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized by L-cysteine to show the kinetic and isotherm modeling of Cd (II) ions onto L-cysteine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The adsorption behavior of Cd (II) ion was studied by varying parameters including dose of L-MWCNTs, contact time, and cadmium concentration. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were also investigated based on Cd (II) adsorption tests. The results showed that an increase in contact time and adsorbent dosage resulted in increase of the adsorption rate. The optimum condition of the Cd (II) removal process was found at pH=7.0, 15 mg/L L-MWCNTs dosage, 6 mg/L cadmium concentration, and contact time of 60 min. The removal percent was equal to 89.56 at optimum condition. Langmuir and Freundlich models were employed to analyze the experimental data. The data showed well fitting with the Langmuir model (R2=0.994) with q max of 43.47 mg/g. Analyzing the kinetic data by the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations revealed that the adsorption of cadmium using L-MWSNTs following the pseudo-second-order kinetic model with correlation coefficients (R2) equals to 0.998, 0.992, and 0.998 for 3, 6, and 9 mg/L Cd (II) concentrations, respectively. The experimental data fitted very well with the pseudo-second-order. Overall, treatment of polluted solution to Cd (II) by adsorption process using L-MWCNT can be considered as an effective technology.

  19. Experiment, modeling and optimization of liquid phase adsorption of Cu(II) using dried and carbonized biomass of Lyngbya majuscula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Deepika; Dutta, Susmita

    2017-05-01

    The present work aims at evaluation of the potential of cyanobacterial biomass to remove Cu(II) from simulated wastewater. Both dried and carbonized forms of Lyngbya majuscula, a cyanobacterial strain, have been used for such purpose. The influences of different experimental parameters viz., initial Cu(II) concentration, solution pH and adsorbent dose have been examined on sorption of Cu(II). Kinetic and equilibrium studies on Cu(II) removal from simulated wastewater have been done using both dried and carbonized biomass individually. Pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir isotherm have been found to fit most satisfactorily to the kinetic and equilibrium data, respectively. Maximum 87.99 and 99.15 % of Cu(II) removal have been achieved with initial Cu(II) concentration of 10 and 25 mg/L for dried and carbonized algae, respectively, at an adsorbent dose of 10 g/L for 20 min of contact time and optimum pH 6. To optimize the removal process, Response Surface Methodology has been employed using both the dried and carbonized biomass. Removal with initial Cu(II) concentration of 20 mg/L, with 0.25 g adsorbent dose in 50 mL solution at pH 6 has been found to be optimum with both the adsorbents. This is the first ever attempt to make a comparative study on Cu(II) removal using both dried algal biomass and its activated carbon. Furthermore, regeneration of matrix was attempted and more than 70% and 80% of the adsorbent has been regenerated successfully in the case of dried and carbonized biomass respectively upto the 3rd cycle of regeneration study.

  20. Efficient catalytic phosphate diester cleavage by the synergetic action of two Cu(II) centers in a dinuclear cis-diaqua Cu(II) calix[4]arene enzyme model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenveld, Peter; Engbersen, Johan F.J.; Kooijman, Huub; Spek, Anthony L.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    1998-01-01

    A calix[4]arene derivative 2-[Cu(II)]2 functionalized with two cis-diaqua Cu(II) centers at the distal positions of the upper rim was synthesized and investigated as a model for dinuclear metalloenzymes that catalyze chemical transformations of phosphate esters. The flexible dinuclear calix[4]arene

  1. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) complexes of N, N' – ... temperature and coordinated water were determined ... indicating fairly stable complex compounds (Table 1). The complex compounds are insoluble [Table 2] in water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in ...

  2. Model based design and analysis of phase II HIV-1 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekić, Dinko; Röshammar, Daniel; Simonsson, Ulrika S H

    2013-08-01

    This work explores the advantages of a model based drug development (MBDD) approach for the design and analysis of antiretroviral phase II trials. Two different study settings were investigated: (1) a 5-arm placebo-controlled parallel group dose-finding/proof of concept (POC) study and (2) a comparison of investigational drug and competitor. Studies were simulated using a HIV-1 dynamics model in NONMEM. The Monte-Carlo Mapped Power method determined the sample size required for detecting a dose-response relationship and a significant difference in effect compared to the competitor using a MBDD approach. Stochastic simulation and re-estimation were used for evaluation of model parameter precision and bias given different sample sizes. Results were compared to those from an unpaired, two-sided t test and ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). In all scenarios, the MBDD approach resulted in smaller study sizes and more precisely estimated treatment effect than conventional statistical analysis. Using a MBDD approach, a sample size of 15 patients could be used to show POC and estimate ED50 with a good precision (relative standard error, 25.7 %). A sample size of 10 patients per arm was needed using the MBDD approach for detecting a difference in treatment effect of ≥20 % at 80 % power, a 3.4-fold reduction in sample size compared to a t test. The MBDD approach can be used to achieve more precise dose-response characterization facilitating decision making and dose selection. If necessitated, the sample size needed to reach a desired power can potentially be reduced compared to traditional statistical analyses. This may allow for comparison against competitors already in early clinical studies.

  3. A Test of Three Basic Assumptions of Situational Leadership® II Model and Their Implications for HRD Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigarmi, Drea; Roberts, Taylor Peyton

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to test the following three assertions underlying the Situational Leadership® II (SLII) Model: all four leadership styles are received by followers; all four leadership styles are needed by followers; and if there is a fit between the leadership style a follower receives and needs, that follower will demonstrate favorable…

  4. Salt II: Illusion and Reality. World Order Models Project. Working Paper Number Nine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Robert C.

    The document discusses miscalculations by public officials, arms control experts, journalists, and the general public regarding the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks; assesses the Salt II treaty; and suggests criteria for appraising Salt II. The objective is to stimulate research, education, dialogue, and political action which will contribute to a…

  5. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2007-12-13

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: "each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." They further state: "each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) management and operating (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21 regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are

  6. Testing Type II Radiative Seesaw Model: from Dark Matter Detection to LHC Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Shu-Yuan; Liao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the testability of the type II radiative seesaw in which neutrino mass and dark matter (DM) are related at one-loop level. Under the constraints from DM relic density, direct and indirect detection, and invisible Higgs decays, we find three possible regions of DM mass $M_{s_1}$ that can survive the present and even the future experiments: (1) the Higgs resonance region with $M_{s_1}\\sim M_h/2$, (2) the Higgs region with $M_{s_1}\\sim M_h$, and (3) the coannihilation region with $M_{s_2}\\sim M_{s_1}$. Here $s_{1,2}$ are two scalar singlets with the lighter $s_1$ being the DM candidate. Based on DM properties and direct collider constraints, we choose three benchmark points to illustrate the testability of this model at LHC. We perform a detailed simulation of the four-lepton and tri-lepton signatures at 13 (14) TeV LHC. While both signatures are found to be promising at all benchmark points, the tri-lepton one is even better: it is possible to reach the $5\\sigma$ significance with an integrated lumin...

  7. Radiation-MHD models of elephant trunks and globules in H II regions

    CERN Document Server

    Mackey, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    We study the formation and evolution of pillars of dense gas, known as elephant trunks, at the boundaries of H II regions, formed by shadowing of ionising radiation by dense clumps. The effects of magnetic fields on this process are investigated using 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulations. For a simulation in which an initially uniform magnetic field of strength |B|=50 uG is oriented perpendicular to the radiation propagation direction, the field is swept into alignment with the pillar during its dynamical evolution, in agreement with observations of the "Pillars of Creation" in M16, and of some cometary globules. This effect is significantly enhanced when the simulation is re-run with a weaker field of 18 uG. A stronger field with |B|=160 uG is sufficient to prevent this evolution completely, also significantly affecting the photoionisation process. Using a larger simulation domain it is seen that the pillar formation models studied in Mackey & Lim (2010) ultimately evolve to cometary structures ...

  8. Chromospheric Diagnosis with Ca II Lines: Forward Modeling in Forward Scattering. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, E. S.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a synthetic tomography of the quiet solar chromosphere formed by spatial maps of scattering polarization. It has been calculated for the Ca II 8498, 8542, and 3934 Å lines by solving the non-LTE radiative transfer problem of the second kind in a three-dimensional atmosphere model obtained from realistic magneto-hydrodynamical simulations. Our investigation focuses on the linear polarization signals induced by kinematics, radiation field anisotropy, and the Hanle effect in forward-scattering geometry. Thus, instead of considering slit profiles at the limb as normally done in the study of the second solar spectrum, we synthesize and analyze spatial maps of polarization at the disk center. This allows us to understand the spatial signatures of dynamics and magnetic field in the linear polarization in order to discriminate them observationally. Our results suggest some ideas for chromospheric diagnosis that will be developed throughout a series of papers. In particular, Hanle polarity inversion lines and dynamic Hanle diagrams are two concepts introduced in the present work. We find that chromospheric dynamics and magnetic field topology create spatial polarization fingerprints that trace the dynamic situation of the plasma and the magnetic field. This allows us to reconstruct the magnetic field intensity in the middle chromosphere using Stokes V along grooves of null linear polarization. We finally address the problems of diagnosing Hanle saturation and kinematic amplification of scattering signals using Hanle diagrams.

  9. Testing the type II radiative seesaw model: From dark matter detection to LHC signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shu-Yuan; Han, Zhi-Long; Liao, Yi

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the testability of the type II radiative seesaw in which neutrino mass and dark matter (DM) are related at one-loop level. Under the constraints from DM relic density, direct and indirect detection, and invisible Higgs decays, we find three possible regions of DM mass Ms1that can survive the present and even the future experiments: (1) the Higgs resonance region with Ms 1˜Mh/2 , (2) the Higgs region with Ms1˜Mh, and (3) the coannihilation region with Ms 2˜Ms 1. Here s1 ,2 are two scalar singlets with the lighter s1 being the DM candidate. Based on DM properties and direct collider constraints, we choose three benchmark points to illustrate the testability of this model at the LHC. We perform a detailed simulation of the four-lepton and trilepton signatures at 13(14) TeV LHC. While both signatures are found to be promising at all benchmark points, the trilepton one is even better: it is possible to reach the 5 σ significance with an integrated luminosity of 100 fb-1.

  10. Outcomes of different Class II treatments : Comparisons using the American Board of Orthodontics Model Grading System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinci Cansunar, Hatice; Uysal, Tancan

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of three different Class II treatment modalities followed by fixed orthodontic therapy, using the American Board of Orthodontics Model Grading System (ABO-MGS). As a retrospective study, files of patients treated at postgraduate orthodontic  clinics in different cities in Turkey was randomly selected. From 1684 posttreatment records, 669 patients were divided into three groups: 269 patients treated with extraction of two upper premolars, 198 patients treated with cervical headgear, and 202 patients treated with functional appliances. All the cases were evaluated by one researcher using ABO-MGS. The χ (2), Z test, and multivariate analysis of variance were used for statistical evaluation (p < 0.05). No significant differences were found among the groups in buccolingual inclination, overjet, occlusal relationship, and root angulation. However, there were significant differences in alignment, marginal ridge height, occlusal contact, interproximal contact measurements, and overall MGS average scores. The mean treatment time between the extraction and functional appliance groups was significantly different (p = 0.017). According to total ABO-MGS scores, headgear treatment had better results than functional appliances. The headgear group had better tooth alignment than the extraction group. Headgear treatment resulted in better occlusal contacts than the functional appliances and had lower average scores for interproximal contact measurements. Functional appliances had the worst average scores for marginal ridge height. Finally, the functional appliance group had the longest treatment times.

  11. Desulfurization of Model Oil via Adsorption by Copper(II) Modified Bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Dezhi; Huang, Huan; Shi, Li [East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2013-03-15

    In order to further reduce the sulfur content in liquid hydrocarbon fuels, a desulfurization process by adsorption for removing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and propylmercaptan (PM) was investigated. Bentonite adsorbents modified by CuCl{sub 2} for the desulfurization of model oil was investigated. The results indicated that the modified bentonite adsorbents were effective for adsorption of DMS and PM. The bentonite adsorbents were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analysis (TGA). The acidity was measured by FT-IR spectroscopy. Several factors that influence the desulfurization capability, including loading and calcination temperature, were studied. The maximum sulfur adsorption capacity was obtained at a Cu(II) loading of 15 wt %, and the optimum calcination temperature was 150 .deg. C. Spectral shifts of the v(C-S) and v(Cu-S) vibrations of the complex compound obtained by the reaction of CuCl{sub 2} and DMS were measured with the Raman spectrum. On the basis of complex adsorption reaction and hybrid orbital theory, the adsorption on modified bentonite occurred via multilayer intermolecular forces and S-M (σ) bonds.

  12. Biosorption of Cu (II onto chemically modified waste mycelium of Aspergillus awamori: Equilibrium, kinetics and modeling studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZDRAVKA VELKOVA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biosorption potential of chemically modified waste mycelium of industrial xylanase-producing strain Aspergillus awamori for Cu (II removal from aqueous solutions was evaluated. The influence of pH, contact time and initial Cu (II concentration on the removal efficiency was evaluated. Maximum biosorption capacity was reached by sodium hydroxide treated waste fungal mycelium at pH 5.0. The Langmuir adsorption equation matched very well the adsorption equilibrium data in the studied conditions. The process kinetic followed the pseudo-firs order model.

  13. Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Matthew [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb -1 of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high š. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

  14. Synergistic interaction of levetiracetam with gabapentin in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model – a type II isobolographic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wlaz Aleksandra; Kondrat-Wrobel Maria W.; Zaluska Katarzyna; Kochman Ewelina; Rekas Anna R.; Luszczki Jarogniew J.

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at characterizing the anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam in combination with gabapentin, in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model. Herein, psychomotor seizures were evoked in male albino Swiss mice by a current (32 mA, 6 Hz, 3 s stimulus duration) delivered via ocular electrodes. Type II isobolographic analysis was used to characterize the anticonvulsant interactions between the drugs in combination, for fixed-ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10. The type II isobolog...

  15. Modeling Pb (II) adsorption from aqueous solution by ostrich bone ash using adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mohammad J; Abedi-Koupai, Jahangir; Eslamian, Sayed S; Mousavi, Sayed F; Hasheminejad, Hasti

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of Adaptive Neural-Based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model in estimating the efficiency of Pb (II) ions removal from aqueous solution by ostrich bone ash, a batch experiment was conducted. Five operational parameters including adsorbent dosage (C(s)), initial concentration of Pb (II) ions (C(o)), initial pH, temperature (T) and contact time (t) were taken as the input data and the adsorption efficiency (AE) of bone ash as the output. Based on the 31 different structures, 5 ANFIS models were tested against the measured adsorption efficiency to assess the accuracy of each model. The results showed that ANFIS5, which used all input parameters, was the most accurate (RMSE = 2.65 and R(2) = 0.95) and ANFIS1, which used only the contact time input, was the worst (RMSE = 14.56 and R(2) = 0.46). In ranking the models, ANFIS4, ANFIS3 and ANFIS2 ranked second, third and fourth, respectively. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the estimated AE is more sensitive to the contact time, followed by pH, initial concentration of Pb (II) ions, adsorbent dosage, and temperature. The results showed that all ANFIS models overestimated the AE. In general, this study confirmed the capabilities of ANFIS model as an effective tool for estimation of AE.

  16. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Rose, Brent S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T. [Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  17. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of Cd(II) biosorption by algae Gelidium and agar extraction algal waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2006-01-01

    In this study an industrial algal waste from agar extraction has been used as an inexpensive and effective biosorbent for cadmium (II) removal from aqueous solutions. This biosorbent was compared with the algae Gelidium itself, which is the raw material for agar extraction. Equilibrium data follow both Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson models. The parameters of Langmuir equilibrium model are q(max)=18.0 mgg(-1), b=0.19 mgl(-1) and q(max)=9.7 mgg(-1), b=0.16 mgl(-1), respectively for Gelidium and the algal waste. Kinetic experiments were conducted at initial Cd(II) concentrations in the range 6-91 mgl(-1). Data were fitted to pseudo-first- and second-order Lagergren models. For an initial Cd(II) concentration of 91 mgl(-1) the parameters of the pseudo-first-order Lagergren model are k(1,ads)=0.17 and 0.87 min(-1); q(eq)=16.3 and 8.7 mgg(-1), respectively, for Gelidium and algal waste. Kinetic constants vary with the initial metal concentration. The adsorptive behaviour of biosorbent particles was modelled using a batch reactor mass transfer kinetic model. The model successfully predicts Cd(II) concentration profiles and provides significant insights on the biosorbents performance. The homogeneous diffusivity, D(h), is in the range 0.5-2.2 x10(-8) and 2.1-10.4 x10(-8)cm(2)s(-1), respectively, for Gelidium and algal waste.

  18. Model membrane interaction and DNA-binding of antimicrobial peptide Lasioglossin II derived from bee venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Lee, Meryl; Sivaraman, J; Chatterjee, Chiradip

    2013-01-01

    Lasioglossins, a new family of antimicrobial peptide, have been shown to have strong antimicrobial activity with low haemo-lytic and mast cell degranulation activity, and exhibit cytotoxic activity against various cancer cells in vitro. In order to understand the active conformation of these pentadecapeptides in membranes, we have studied the interaction of Lasioglossin II (LL-II), one of the members of Lasioglossins family with membrane mimetic micelle Dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) by fluorescence, Circular Dichroism (CD) and two dimensional (2D) (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Fluorescence experiments provide evidence of interaction of the N-terminal tryptophan residue of LL-II with the hydrophobic core of DPC micelle. CD results show an extended chain conformation of LL-II in water which is converted to a partial helical conformation in the presence of DPC micelle. Moreover we have determined the first three-dimensional NMR structure of LL-II bound to DPC micelle with rmsd of 0.36Å. The solution structure of LL-II shows hydrophobic and hydrophilic core formation in peptide pointing towards different direction in the presence of DPC. This amphipathic structure may allow this peptide to penetrate deeply into the interfacial region of negatively charged membranes and leading to local membrane destabilization. Further we have elucidated the DNA binding ability of LL-II by agarose gel retardation and fluorescence quenching experiments.

  19. New LUX and PandaX-II results illuminating the simplest Higgs-portal dark matter models

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Tandean, Jusak

    2016-12-01

    Direct searches for dark matter (DM) by the LUX and PandaX-II Collaborations employing xenon-based detectors have recently come up with the most stringent limits to date on the spin-independent elastic scattering of DM off nucleons. For Higgs-portal scalar DM models, the new results have precluded any possibility of accommodating low-mass DM as suggested by the DAMA and CDMS II Si experiments utilizing other target materials, even after invoking isospin-violating DM interactions with nucleons. In the simplest model, SM+D, which is the standard model plus a real singlet scalar named darkon acting as the DM candidate, the LUX and PandaX-II limits rule out DM masses roughly from 4 to 450 GeV, except a small range around the resonance point at half of the Higgs mass where the interaction cross-section is near the neutrino-background floor. In the THDM II+D, which is the type-II two-Higgs-doublet model combined with a darkon, the region excluded in the SM+D by the direct searches can be recovered due to suppression of the DM effective interactions with nucleons at some values of the ratios of Higgs couplings to the up and down quarks, making the interactions significantly isospin-violating. However, in either model, if the 125-GeV Higgs boson is the portal between the dark and SM sectors, DM masses less than 50 GeV or so are already ruled out by the LHC constraint on the Higgs invisible decay. In the THDM II+D, if the heavier CP -even Higgs boson is the portal, theoretical restrictions from perturbativity, vacuum stability, and unitarity requirements turn out to be important instead and exclude much of the region below 100 GeV. For larger DM masses, the THDM II+D has plentiful parameter space that corresponds to interaction cross-sections under the neutrino-background floor and therefore is likely to be beyond the reach of future direct searches without directional sensitivity.

  20. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  1. Coordination mode of pentadentate ligand derivative of 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol with nickel(II) and copper(II) metal ions: synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, molecular modeling and fungicidal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Gautam, Seema; Kumar, Amit; Madan, Molly

    2015-02-01

    Complexes of nickel(II), and copper(II) were synthesized with pantadentate ligand i.e. 3,3'-thiodipropionicacid-bis(5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol) (L). The ligand was synthesized by the condensation of thiodipropionic acid and 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol in 1:2 ratio, respectively. Synthesized ligand was characterized by elemental analysis, mass, (1)H NMR, IR, and molecular modeling. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moment, IR, electronic spectra, ESR, and molecular modeling. The newly synthesized complexes possessed general composition [M(L)X2] where M = Ni(II), Cu(II), L = pantadentate ligand and X = Cl(-), CH3COO(-). The IR spectral data indicated that the ligand behaved as a pantadentate ligand and coordinated to the metal ion through N2S3 donor atoms. The molar conductance value of Ni(II), and Cu(II) complexes in DMSO corresponded to their electrolytic behavior. On the basis of spectral study, octahedral and tetragonal geometry was assigned for Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes, respectively. In vitro fungicidal study of ligand and its complexes was investigated against fungi Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candidia krusei, and Candida tropicalis by means of well diffusion method.

  2. The formation of IRIS diagnostics V. A quintessential model atom of C II and general formation properties of the C II lines at 133.5 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Rathore, Bhavna

    2015-01-01

    The 133.5 nm lines are important observables for the NASA/SMEX mission Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). To make 3D non-LTE radiative transfer computationally feasible it is crucial to have a model atom with as few levels as possible while retaining the main physical processes. We here develop such a model atom and we study the general formation properties of the C II lines. We find that a nine-level model atom of C I-C III with the transitions treated assuming complete frequency redistribution (CRD) suffices to describe the 133.5 nm lines. 3D scattering effects are important for the intensity in the core of the line. The lines are formed in the optically thick regime. The core intensity is formed in layers where the temperature is about 10kK at the base of the transition region. The lines are 1.2-4 times wider than the atomic absorption profile due to the formation in the optically thick regime. The smaller opacity broadening happens for single peak intensity profiles where the chromospheric temp...

  3. Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 1: Introduction to Ptolemy II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    which receives support from the National Science Foundation (NSF awards #0720882 ( CSR -EHS: PRET), #0647591 ( CSR -SGER), and #0720841 ( CSR -CPS)), the U...Foundation (NSF awards #0720882 ( CSR -EHS: PRET), #0647591 ( CSR -SGER), and #0720841 ( CSR -CPS)), the U. S. Army Research Office (ARO #W911NF-07-2...Ptolemy II configuration [26]. The ability to create such separately branded and packaged subsets of Ptolemy II is a major feature. The semantics of hybrid

  4. Kinetics, mechanistic and thermodynamics of Zn(II) ion sorption: a modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Vishal; Balomajumder, Chandrajit; Agarwal, Vijay Kumar [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)

    2012-07-15

    Biosorption potential of Cedrus deodara sawdust (CDS) in terms of sorption of Zn(II) ion across liquid phase has been evaluated in the present investigation. The surface of the CDS biomass before the sorption of Zn(II) ions seemed to be more porous, non-crystalline and heterogeneous. The maximum uptake capacity of CDS was 97.39 mg g{sup -1}. Sorption of Zn(II) ion on the surface of CDS sawdust was maximum at pH 5, temperature 45 C, initial concentration of Zn(II) ion 100 mg L{sup -1}, biomass dose 1 g L{sup -1}, contact time 150 min, and agitation rate 160 rpm. Pseudo second-order kinetics with the highest linear regression coefficient (R{sup 2} = 0.99), and lowest values of error functions, i.e., chi ({chi}{sup 2}) and sum of square errors (SSE) against pseudo first-order rate kinetics showed that the sorption of Zn(II) ion on the surface of CDS was mediated by chemosorptive forces of attraction rather than physical adsorption. Mechanistically, relatively higher proportion of sorption of Zn(II) ion in early phase of contact time was profoundly explained by Bangham's equation and film diffusivity (D{sup f}). Intraparticle or pore diffusion (D{sub p}) of Zn(II) ion inside the pores of CDS was rate limiting step at the later stage of contact time. Furthermore, the thermodynamic study on sorption of metal ion delineated the fact that the Zn(II) sorption on the surface of CDS was spontaneous, endothermic together with increased entropy at solid liquid interface. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Atucha II NPP full scope simulator modelling with the thermal hydraulic code TRAC{sub R}T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Pablo Rey; Ruiz, Jose Antonio; Rivero, Norberto, E-mail: prey@tecnatom.e, E-mail: jaruiz@tecnatom.e, E-mail: nrivero@tecnatom.e [Tecnatom S.A., Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    In February 2010 NA-SA (Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A.) awarded Tecnatom the Atucha II full scope simulator project. NA-SA is a public company owner of the Argentinean nuclear power plants. Atucha II is due to enter in operation shortly. Atucha II NPP is a PHWR type plant cooled by the water of the Parana River and has the same design as the Atucha I unit, doubling its power capacity. Atucha II will produce 745 MWe utilizing heavy water as coolant and moderator, and natural uranium as fuel. A plant singular feature is the permanent core refueling. TRAC{sub R}T is the first real time thermal hydraulic six-equations code used in the training simulation industry for NSSS modeling. It is the result from adapting to real time the best estimate code TRACG. TRAC{sub R}T is based on first principle conservation equations for mass, energy and momentum for liquid and steam phases, with two phase flows under non homogeneous and non equilibrium conditions. At present, it has been successfully implemented in twelve full scope replica simulators in different training centers throughout the world. To ease the modeling task, TRAC{sub R}T includes a graphical pre-processing tool designed to optimize this process and alleviate the burden of entering alpha numerical data in an input file. (author)

  6. Mixed ligand Cu(II)N2O2 complexes: biomimetic synthesis, activities in vitro and biological models, theoretical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Yin, Bing; Kang, Yifan; Liu, Ping; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yaoyu; Li, Jianli

    2014-12-15

    Three new mixed ligand Cu(II)N2O2 complexes, namely, [Cu(II)(2-A-6-MBT)2(m-NB)2] (1), [Cu(II)(2-ABT)2(m-NB)2] (2), and [Cu(II)(2-ABT)2(o-NB)2] (3), (2-A-6-MBT = 2-amino-6-methoxybenzothiazole, m-NB = m-nitrobenzoate, 2-ABT = 2-aminobenzothiazole, and o-NB = o-nitrobenzoate), have been prepared by the biomimetic synthesis strategy, and their structures were determined by X-ray crystallography studies and spectral methods. These complexes exhibited the effective superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and catecholase activity. On the basis of the experimental data and computational studies, the structure-activity relationship for these complexes was investigated. The results reveal that electron-accepting abilities of these complexes and coordination geometries have significant effects on the SOD activity and catecholase activity. Then, we found that 1 and 2 exerted potent intracellular antioxidant capacity in the model of H2O2-induced oxidative stress based on HeLa cervical cancer cells, which were screened out by the cytotoxicity assays of different kinds of cells. Furthermore, 1-3 showed the favorable biocompatibility in two different biological models: Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human vascular endothelial cells. These biological experimental data are indicative of the promising application potential of these complexes in biology and pharmacology.

  7. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  8. Effect of angiotensin II receptor blocker on experimental periodontitis in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Naoto; Moriyama, Keiji; Ganburged, Ganjargal

    2013-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by aneurysm and dilatation of the aortic root, tall stature, and ectopia lentis. These manifestations reflect excessive signaling of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Moreover, cases are frequently associated with severe periodontitis, which is a chronic inflammation of the gingiva, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Recently, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) were discovered to be an effective drug class that can prevent aortic aneurysm and dilation in Marfan syndrome by inhibiting TGF-β signaling. To investigate the effect of ARB on the progression of periodontitis, the application of a potent ARB, telmisartan, was examined in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome (MgΔ). Six-week-old male heterozygous MgΔ and wild-type mice were challenged with Porphyromonas gingivalis, which causes chronic periodontitis, with and without telmisartan application. After infection, alveolar bone resorption was measured by micro-computed tomography (μCT), and inflammatory cytokine levels were examined. Infection of Porphyromonas gingivalis induced alveolar bone resorption in both MgΔ and wild-type mice. The amount of resorption was significantly larger in the former than the latter. Immunoarray and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses demonstrated that interleukin-17 (IL-17) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels were significantly higher in infected MgΔ mice than infected wild-type mice. Telmisartan treatment significantly suppressed the alveolar bone resorption of infected MgΔ mice. Telmisartan also significantly decreased levels of TGF-β, IL-17, and TNF-α in infected MgΔ mice to levels seen in infected wild-type mice. This study suggests that ARB can prevent the severe periodontitis frequently seen in Marfan syndrome.

  9. Numerical models of protoneutron stars and type-II supernovae - recent developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janka, H.T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Garching (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    The results of recent multi-dimensional simulations of type-II supernovae are reviewed. They show that convective instabilities in the collapsed stellar core might play an important role already during the first second after the formation of the supernovae shock. Convectively unstable situations occur below and near the neutrinosphere as well as in the neutrino-heated region between the nascent neutron star and the supernova shock after the latter has stalled at a radiums of typically 100-200 km. While convective overturn in the layer of neutrino energy deposition clearly helps the explosion to develop and potentially provides an explanation of strong mantle and envelope mixing, asphericities, and non-uniform {sup 56}Ni distribution observed in supernova SN 1987A, its presence and importance depends on the strength of the neutrino heating and thus on the size of the neutrino fluxes from the neutrino star. Convection in the hot-bubble region can only be developed if the growth timescale of the instabilities and the heating timescale are both shorter than the accretion timescale of the matter advected through the stagnant shock. For too small neutrino luminosities this requirement is not fulfilled and convective activity cannot develop, leading to very weak explosions or even fizzling models, just as in the one-dimensional situations. Convectively enhanced neutrino luminosities from the protoneutron star can therefore provide an essential condition for the explosion of the star. Very recent two-dimensional, self-consistent, general relativistic simulations of the cooling of a newly-formed neutron star demonstrate and confirm the possibility that Ledoux convection, driven by negative lepton number and entropy gradients, may encompass the whole protoneutron star within less than one second and can lead to an increase of the neutrino fluxes by up to a factor of two. (author) 9 figs., refs.

  10. Modelling the chemistry of star-forming filaments - II. Testing filament characteristics with synthetic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifried, D.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Suri, S.; Walch, S.

    2017-06-01

    We present synthetic continuum and 13CO and C18O line emission observations of dense and cold filaments. The filaments are dynamically evolved using 3D-magnetohydrodynamic simulations that include one of the largest on-the-fly chemical networks used to date, which models the detailed evolution of H2 and CO. We investigate the reliability of observable properties, in particular filament mass and width, under different simulation conditions like magnetic field orientation and cosmic ray ionization rate. We find that filament widths of ˜0.1 pc can be probed with both line and continuum emission observations with a high accuracy (deviations ≤20 per cent). However, the width of more narrow filaments can be significantly overestimated by up to a factor of a few. Masses obtained via the dust emission are accurate within a few per cent whereas the masses inferred from molecular line emission observations deviate from the actual mass by up to a factor of 10 and show large differences for different J transitions. The inaccurate estimate of filament masses and widths of narrow filaments using molecular line observations can be attributed to (i) the non-isothermal state of the filaments, (ii) optical depth effects and (iii) the subthermally excited state of CO, while inclination effects and opacity correction only influence the obtained masses and widths by less than 50 per cent. Both, mass and width estimates, can be improved by using two isotopes to correct for the optical depth. Since gas and dust temperatures generally differ (by up to 25 K), the filaments appear more gravitationally unstable if the (too low) dust temperature is used for the stability analysis.

  11. Comparing the Predictions of two Mixed Neutralino Dark Matter Models with the Recent CDMS II Candidate Events

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, D P

    2010-01-01

    We consider two optimally mixed neutralino dark matter models, based on nonuniversal gaugino masses, which were recently proposed by us to achieve WMAP compatible relic density over a large part of the MSSM parameter space. We compare the resulting predictions for the spin-independent DM scattering cross-section with the recent CDMS II data, assuming the possibility of the two reported candidate events being signal events. For one model the predicted cross-section agrees with the putative signal over a small part of the parameter space, while for the other the agreement holds over the entire WMAP compatible parameter space of the model.

  12. Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik Soni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glucova Active Tablet is a proprietary Ayurvedic formulation with ingredients reported for anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hyperlipidemic activity and antioxidant properties. Objective: Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats. Materials and Methods: Experimental Type I diabetes was induced in 24 albino rats with intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg. Type II diabetes was induced in 18 albino rats by intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg along with high fat diet. The rats were divided in 5 groups for Type I model and 4 groups for Type II model. Normal control group was kept common for both experimental models. Glucova Active Tablet (108 mg/kg treatment was provided for 28 days twice daily orally. Fasting blood glucose level, serum lipid profile and liver anti-oxidant parameters like superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione was carried out in both experimental models. Pancreas histopathology was also done. Statistical analysis were done by ′analysis of variance′ test followed by post hoc Tukey′s test, with significant level of P < 0.05.Results and Discussion: Glucova Active Tablet showed significant effect on fasting blood glucose level. It also showed significant alteration in lipid profile and antioxidant parameters. Histopathology study revealed restoration of beta cells in pancreas in Glucova Active Tablet treated group. Conclusion: Finding of this study concludes that Glucova Active Tablet has shown promising anti-diabetic activity in Type I and Type II diabetic rats. It was also found showing good anti-hyperlipidemic activity and anti-oxidant property.

  13. Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Hardik; Patel, Sejal; Patel, Ghanshyam; Paranjape, Archana

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glucova Active Tablet is a proprietary Ayurvedic formulation with ingredients reported for anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hyperlipidemic activity and antioxidant properties. Objective: Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats. Materials and Methods: Experimental Type I diabetes was induced in 24 albino rats with intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Type II diabetes was induced in 18 albino rats by intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg) along with high fat diet. The rats were divided in 5 groups for Type I model and 4 groups for Type II model. Normal control group was kept common for both experimental models. Glucova Active Tablet (108 mg/kg) treatment was provided for 28 days twice daily orally. Fasting blood glucose level, serum lipid profile and liver anti-oxidant parameters like superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione was carried out in both experimental models. Pancreas histopathology was also done. Statistical analysis were done by ‘analysis of variance’ test followed by post hoc Tukey's test, with significant level of P < 0.05. Results and Discussion: Glucova Active Tablet showed significant effect on fasting blood glucose level. It also showed significant alteration in lipid profile and antioxidant parameters. Histopathology study revealed restoration of beta cells in pancreas in Glucova Active Tablet treated group. Conclusion: Finding of this study concludes that Glucova Active Tablet has shown promising anti-diabetic activity in Type I and Type II diabetic rats. It was also found showing good anti-hyperlipidemic activity and anti-oxidant property. PMID:24948860

  14. An exploratory study of proficient undergraduate Chemistry II students' application of Lewis's model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sumudu R.

    This exploratory study was based on the assumption that proficiency in chemistry must not be determined exclusively on students' declarative and procedural knowledge, but it should be also described as the ability to use variety of reasoning strategies that enrich and diversify procedural methods. The study furthermore assumed that the ability to describe the structure of a molecule using Lewis's model and use it to predict its geometry as well as some of its properties is indicative of proficiency in the essential concepts of covalent bonding and molecule structure. The study therefore inquired into the reasoning methods and procedural techniques of proficient undergraduate Chemistry II students when solving problems, which require them to use Lewis's model. The research design included an original survey, designed by the researcher for this study, and two types of interviews, with students and course instructors. The purpose of the survey was two-fold. First and foremost, the survey provided a base for the student interview selection, and second it served as the foundation for the inquiry into the strategies the student use when solving survey problems. Twenty two students were interviewed over the course of the study. The interview with six instructors allowed to identify expected prior knowledge and skills, which the students should have acquired upon completion of the Chemistry I course. The data, including videos, audios, and photographs of the artifacts produced by students during the interviews, were organized and analyzed manually and using QSR NVivo 10. The research found and described the differences between proficient and non-proficient students' reasoning and procedural strategies when using Lewis's model to describe the structure of a molecule. One of the findings clearly showed that the proficient students used a variety of cues to reason, whereas other students used one memorized cue, or an algorithm, which often led to incorrect representations in

  15. Structure of an Iron(II) Dioxygen Complex; A Model for Oxygen Carrying Hemeproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collman, James P.; Gagne, Robert R.; Reed, Christopher A.; Robinson, Ward T.; Rodley, Gordon A.

    1974-01-01

    The preliminary structural characterization of a reversible ferrous dioxygen complex is reported. Mono(N-methyl imidazole) (dioxygen) meso-tetra (α,α,α,α-o-pivalamidephenyl) porphinatorino(II), [Fe(O2)-(N-Me imid) (α,α,α,α-TpivPP)], 1, isolated from toluene solution, crystallizes in the monoclinic system with four molecules in a unit cell of dimensions a = 18.690 (3), b = 19.514 (3), c = 18.638 (3) Å, and β = 91.00 (1)°. R = 0.15 for 841 reflections having F2 > 3σ (F2). The complex 1 has four pivalamido groups on one side of the porphyrin forming a hydrophobic pocket of 5.4-Å depth which encloses coordinated dioxygen. The dioxygen is coordinated “end-on,” with a bent Fe-O-O bond. The Fe-O-O plane bisects an N-Fe-N right angle of the equatorial iron porphyrin plane and is four way statistically disordered. In addition there is a crystallographic 2-fold axis through iron, coordinated oxygen, and nitrogen of the axially bound N-methyl imidazole. Thus there are two types of coordinated dioxygen with the Fe-O-O plane either parallel or perpendicular to the trans axial imidazole plane. Corresponding values for the Fe-O-O bond angles are 135-(4)° and 137(4)° and for the O-O bond lengths are 1.23 (0.08) and 1.26 (0.08) Å, with a dihedral angle of 90° between alternative orientations of the Fe-O-O plane. The Fe-O distance is 1.75 (0.02) Å and Fe-N (imidazole) is 2.07 (0.02) Å, suggesting multiple bond character in the Fe-O moiety. The similarity of the Mössbauer spectrum of the model complex, 1, with oxyhemoglobin indicates that 1 may be a good model for oxygen binding in the oxygen transport hemeproteins. PMID:4524640

  16. [Selection of a statistical model for the evaluation of the reliability of the results of toxicological analyses. II. Selection of our statistical model for the evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antczak, K; Wilczyńska, U

    1980-01-01

    Part II presents a statistical model devised by the authors for evaluating toxicological analyses results. The model includes: 1. Establishment of a reference value, basing on our own measurements taken by two independent analytical methods. 2. Selection of laboratories -- basing on the deviation of the obtained values from reference ones. 3. On consideration of variance analysis, t-student's test and differences test, subsequent quality controls and particular laboratories have been evaluated.

  17. Assessing Inter-Model Continuity Between the Section II and Section III Conceptualizations of Borderline Personality Disorder in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Chloe M; Simms, Leonard J

    2017-03-02

    DSM-5 includes 2 competing models of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in Sections II and III. Empirical comparisons between these models are required to understand and improve intermodel continuity. We compared Section III BPD traits to Section II BPD criteria assessed via semistructured interviews in 455 current/recent psychiatric patients using correlation and regression analyses, and also evaluated the incremental predictive power of other Section III traits. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that self-harm would incrementally predict BPD Criterion 5 over the Section III traits. Results supported Section III BPD traits as an adequate representation of traditional BPD symptomatology, although modifications that would increase intermodel continuity were identified. Finally, we found support for the incremental validity of suspiciousness, anhedonia, perceptual dysregulation, and self-harm, suggesting possible gaps in the Section III PD trait definitions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. MEDSLIK-II, a Lagrangian marine oil spill model for short-term forecasting – Part 1: Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. De Dominicis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The processes of transport, diffusion and transformation of surface oil in seawater can be simulated using a Lagrangian model formalism coupled with Eulerian circulation models. This paper describes the formalism and the conceptual assumptions of a Lagrangian marine oil slick numerical model and re-writes the constitutive equations in a modern mathematical framework. The Lagrangian numerical representation of the oil slick requires three different state variables: the slick, the particle and the structural state variables. Transformation processes (evaporation, spreading, dispersion and coastal adhesion act on the slick state variables, while particles variables are used to model the transport and diffusion processes. The slick and particle variables are recombined together to compute the oil concentration in water, a structural state variable. The mathematical and numerical formulation of oil transport, diffusion and transformation processes described in this paper, together with the many simplifying hypothesis and parameterizations, form the basis of a new, open source Lagrangian surface oil spill model, so-called MEDSLIK-II. Part 2 of this paper describes the applications of MEDSLIK-II to oil spill simulations that allow the validation of the model results and the study of the sensitivity of the simulated oil slick to different model numerical parameterizations.

  19. Local fractional variational iteration algorithm II for non-homogeneous model associated with the non-differentiable heat flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we begin with the non-homogeneous model for the non-differentiable heat flow, which is described using the local fractional vector calculus, from the first law of thermodynamics in fractal media point view. We employ the local fractional variational iteration algorithm II to solve the fractal heat equations. The obtained results show the non-differentiable behaviors of temperature fields of fractal heat flow defined on Cantor sets.

  20. A delayed stage-structured Holling II predator-prey model with mutual interference and impulsive perturbations on predator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao Jianjun [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Guizhou College of Finance and Economics, Guiyang 550004 (China)], E-mail: jiaojianjun05@126.com; Chen Lansun [Department of Applied Mathematics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)], E-mail: lschen@amss.ac.cn; Cai Shaohong [Guizhou College of Finance and Economics, Guiyang 550004 (China)], E-mail: caish@mail.gzife.edu.cn

    2009-05-30

    In this work, we investigate a delayed stage-structured Holling II predator-prey model with mutual interference and impulsive perturbations on predator. Sufficient conditions of the global attractivity of prey-extinction periodic solution and the permanence of the system are obtained. We also prove that all solutions of the system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Our results provide reliable tactical basis for the practical pest management.

  1. New LUX and PandaX-II Results Illuminating the Simplest Higgs-Portal Dark Matter Models

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Direct searches for dark matter (DM) by the LUX and PandaX-II Collaborations employing xenon-based detectors have recently come up with the most stringent limits to date on the elastic scattering of DM off nucleons. For Higgs-portal scalar DM models, the new results have precluded any possibility of accommodating low-mass DM as suggested by the DAMA and CDMS II Si experiments utilizing other target materials, even after invoking isospin-violating DM interactions with nucleons. In the simplest model, SM+D, which is the standard model plus a real scalar singlet named darkon acting as the DM candidate, the LUX and PandaX-II limits rule out DM masses from 5 GeV to about 330 GeV, except a small range around the resonant point at half of the Higgs mass where the interaction cross-section is near the neutrino-background floor. In the THDMII+D, which extends the SM+D by the addition of another Higgs doublet, the region excluded in the SM+D by the direct searches can be recovered due to suppression of the DM effective...

  2. Femtomolar Zn(II) affinity in a peptide-based ligand designed to model thiolate-rich metalloprotein active sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petros, Amy K; Reddi, Amit R; Kennedy, Michelle L; Hyslop, Alison G; Gibney, Brian R

    2006-12-11

    Metal-ligand interactions are critical components of metalloprotein assembly, folding, stability, electrochemistry, and catalytic function. Research over the past 3 decades on the interaction of metals with peptide and protein ligands has progressed from the characterization of amino acid-metal and polypeptide-metal complexes to the design of folded protein scaffolds containing multiple metal cofactors. De novo metalloprotein design has emerged as a valuable tool both for the modular synthesis of these complex metalloproteins and for revealing the fundamental tenets of metalloprotein structure-function relationships. Our research has focused on using the coordination chemistry of de novo designed metalloproteins to probe the interactions of metal cofactors with protein ligands relevant to biological phenomena. Herein, we present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of Fe(II), Co(II), Zn(II), and[4Fe-4S]2(+/+) binding to IGA, a 16 amino acid peptide ligand containing four cysteine residues, H2N-KLCEGG-CIGCGAC-GGW-CONH2. These studies were conducted to delineate the inherent metal-ion preferences of this unfolded tetrathiolate peptide ligand as well as to evaluate the role of the solution pH on metal-peptide complex speciation. The [4Fe-4S]2(+/+)-IGA complex is both an excellent peptide-based synthetic analogue for natural ferredoxins and is flexible enough to accommodate mononuclear metal-ion binding. Incorporation of a single ferrous ion provides the FeII-IGA complex, a spectroscopic model of a reduced rubredoxin active site that possesses limited stability in aqueous buffers. As expected based on the Irving-Williams series and hard-soft acid-base theory, the Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes of IGA are significantly more stable than the Fe(II) complex. Direct proton competition experiments, coupled with determinations of the conditional dissociation constants over a range of pH values, fully define the thermodynamic stabilities and speciation of each MII-IGA complex. The

  3. Complete coding sequence, sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase (TbOST II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baticados, Waren N; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Nagasawa, Hideyuki; Baticados, Abigail M

    2011-01-01

    The partial nucleotide sequence of putative Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense oligosaccharyl transferase gene was previously reported. Here, we describe the determination of its full-length nucleotide sequence by Inverse PCR (IPCR), subsequent biological sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling. The full-length DNA sequence has an Open Reading Frame (ORF) of 2406 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 801 amino acid residues. Protein and DNA sequence analyses revealed that homologues within the genome of other kinetoplastid and various origins exist. Protein topology analysis predicted that Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase clone II (TbOST II) is a transmembrane protein with transmembrane helices in probably an N(cytosol)-C(cytosol) orientation. Data from the GenBank database assembly and sequence analyses in general clearly state that TbOST II is the STT3 subunit of OST in T.b. rhodesiense that necessitates further characterisation and functional studies with RNAi. TbOST II sequence had been deposited in the GenBank (accession number GU245937).

  4. A new method for screening potential sII and sH hydrogen clathrate hydrate promoters with model potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankcombe, Terry J; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2011-08-01

    A new predictive computational method for classifying clathrate hydrate promoter molecules is presented, based on the interaction energies between potential promoters and the water networks of sII and sH clathrates. The motivation for this work is identifying promoters for storing hydrogen compactly in clathrate hydrates. As a first step towards achieving this goal, we have developed a general method aimed at distinguishing between molecules that form sII clathrate hydrates and molecules that can-together with a weakly interacting help gas-form sH clathrate hydrates. The new computational method calculates differences in estimated formation energies of the sII and the sH clathrate hydrate. Model interaction potentials have been used, including the electrostatic interactions with newly calculated partial charges for all the considered potential promoter molecules. The methodology can discriminate between the clathrate structure types (sII or sH) formed by each potential promoter with good selectivity, i.e., better than achieved with a simple van der Waals diameter criterion.

  5. Complex of manganese (II) with curcumin: Spectroscopic characterization, DFT study, model-based analysis and antiradical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgannezhad, Lena; Dehghan, Gholamreza; Ebrahimipour, S. Yousef; Naseri, Abdolhossein; Nazhad Dolatabadi, Jafar Ezzati

    2016-04-01

    The complex formation between curcumin (Cur) and Manganese (II) chloride tetrahydrate (MnCl2.4H2O) was studied by UV-Vis and IR spectroscopy. Spectroscopic data suggest that Cur can chelate Manganese cations. A simple multi-wavelength model-based method was used to define stability constant for complexation reaction regardless of the spectra overlapping of components. Also, pure spectra and concentration profiles of all components were extracted using this method. Density functional theory (DFT) was also used to view insight into complexation mechanism. Antioxidant activity of Cur and Cur-Mn(II) complex was evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging method. Bond dissociation energy (BDE), the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) of Cur and the complex also were calculated at PW91/TZ2P level of theory using ADF 2009.01 package. The experimental results show that Cur has a higher DPPH radical scavenging activity than Cur-Mn(II). This observation is theoretically justified by means of lower BDE and higher HOMO and LUMO energy values of Cur ligand as compared with those of Cur-Mn(II) complex.

  6. Methods and Model Development for Coupled RELAP5/PARCS Analysis of the Atucha-II Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Ward

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the steady state and transient behavior of CNA-II, several tasks were required. Methods and models were developed in several areas. HELIOS lattice models were developed and benchmarked against WIMS/MCNP5 results generated by NA-SA. Cross-sections for the coupled RELAP5/PARCS calculation were extracted from HELIOS within the GenPMAXS framework. The validation of both HELIOS and PARCS was performed primarily by comparisons to WIMS/PUMA and MCNP for idealized models. Special methods were developed to model the control rods and boron injection systems of CNA-II. The insertion of the rods is oblique, and a special routine was added to PARCS to treat this effect. CFD results combined with specialized mapping routines were used to model the boron injection system. In all cases there was good agreement in the results which provided confidence in the neutronics methods and modeling. A coupled code benchmark between U of M and U of Pisa is ongoing and results are still preliminary. Under a LOCA transient, the best estimate behavior of the core appears to be acceptable.

  7. Magnetoelastic plane waves in rotating media in thermoelasticity of type II (G-N model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Roychoudhuri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A study is made of the propagation of time-harmonic plane waves in an infinite, conducting, thermoelastic solid permeated by a uniform primary external magnetic field when the entire medium is rotating with a uniform angular velocity. The thermoelasticity theory of type II (G-N model (1993 is used to study the propagation of waves. A more general dispersion equation is derived to determine the effects of rotation, thermal parameters, characteristic of the medium, and the external magnetic field. If the primary magnetic field has a transverse component, it is observed that the longitudinal and transverse motions are linked together. For low frequency (χ≪1, χ being the ratio of the wave frequency to some standard frequency ω∗, the rotation and the thermal field have no effect on the phase velocity to the first order of χ and then this corresponds to only one slow wave influenced by the electromagnetic field only. But to the second order of χ, the phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, and the specific energy loss are affected by rotation and depend on the thermal parameters cT, cT being the nondimensional thermal wave speed of G-N theory, and the thermoelastic coupling εT, the electromagnetic parameters εH, and the transverse magnetic field RH. Also for large frequency, rotation and thermal field have no effect on the phase velocity, which is independent of primary magnetic field to the first order of (1/χ (χ≫1, and the specific energy loss is a constant, independent of any field parameter. However, to the second order of (1/χ, rotation does exert influence on both the phase velocity and the attenuation factor, and the specific energy loss is affected by rotation and depends on the thermal parameters cT and εT, electromagnetic parameter εH, and the transverse magnetic field RH, whereas the specific energy loss is independent of any field parameters to the first order of (1/χ.

  8. Results of the project 'combustion modelling' (BKM II); Ergebnisse des Projekts 'Brennkammermodellierung' (BKM II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noll, B.; Rachner, M.; Frank, P.; Schmitz, G.; Geigle, K.P.; Meier, W.; Schuetz, H.; Aigner, M. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Verbrennungstechnik; Kessler, R. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Goettingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Aerodynamik und Stroemungstechnik; Lehmann, B. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Koeln (Germany). Inst. fuer Antriebstechnik; Forkert, T. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Koeln (Germany). Simulation und Softwaretechnik

    2002-07-01

    In the year 1996 the spheres of competence of several DLR-Institutes working in the areas of fluid dynamics, reaction kinetics, combustion, numerical methods and laser measuring techniques have been brought together while contributing to the internal DLR project 'combustion chamber modelling (BKM)', in order to proceed with the computational simulation of combustion processes in combustion chambers of gas turbines. The main issue was the development of a research code for numerical simulation of fluid flow in real combustion chambers. Here the development of computational models of physical and chemical processes was emphasized, among other processes the formation of soot was treated. Moreover, a worldwide outstanding database of measured data for the purpose of code validation has been created within the framework of the BKM project using the laboratory facilities of the DLR, which are in Germany unique for the experimental investigation of the various processes in combustion chambers of gas turbines. The project BKM is part of the specific DLR-programme 'energy'. With the successful completion of the first phase of the project in 1998, a second project phase of three years (BKM II) has been launched at the beginning of 1999. Here the work of the first phase continued and new topics were tackled. The second phase of the project was partly founded by the DLR-programme 'aeronautics'. (orig.) [German] Im Jahr 1996 wurden die Faehigkeiten mehrerer DLR-Institute auf den Gebieten Stroemungsmechanik, Reaktionskinetik, Verbrennung sowie Numerische Verfahren und Laser-Messverfahren in dem DLR-internen Projekt 'Brennkammermodellierung' (BKM) zusammengefuehrt, um die rechnerische Simulation der Verbrennungsvorgaenge in Gasturbinen-Brennkammern voranzutreiben. Dabei war die Entwicklung eines Forschungscodes zur numerischen Simulation von realen Brennkammerstroemungen das vorrangige Ziel der Arbeiten. Ein besonderes Schwergewicht lag

  9. Phylogenetic relationships and protein modelling revealed two distinct subfamilies of group II HKT genes between crop and model grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyarathna, H A Chandima K; Francki, Michael G

    2016-07-01

    Molecular evolution of large protein families in closely related species can provide useful insights on structural functional relationships. Phylogenetic analysis of the grass-specific group II HKT genes identified two distinct subfamilies, I and II. Subfamily II was represented in all species, whereas subfamily I was identified only in the small grain cereals and possibly originated from an ancestral gene duplication post divergence from the coarse grain cereal lineage. The core protein structures were highly analogous despite there being no more than 58% amino acid identity between members of the two subfamilies. Distinctly variable regions in known functional domains, however, indicated functional divergence of the two subfamilies. The subsets of codons residing external to known functional domains predicted signatures of positive Darwinian selection potentially identifying new domains of functional divergence and providing new insights on the structural function and relationships between protein members of the two subfamilies.

  10. Product-Improvement Test (Phase II), Jetcal Tester, Model H119A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-03-05

    1520-220-20. • ~~i~~aic. M Ii a• masb ., .f~~M * paa* •~ ~~~~~~~~~~D AT E tYP ED NAM E, lOADS. 0* TITk J 1 .l.NATU.e L. D. Griffin , Supv., Quality

  11. Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 2: Ptolemy II Software Architecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    the State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC , Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota. PTOLEMY II...FA9550-06-0312), the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL), the State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC , Lockheed

  12. Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 3: Ptolemy II Domains)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-15

    State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC , Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota. PTOLEMY II...MURI #FA9550-06-0312), the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL), the State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agi- lent, Bosch, HSBC

  13. Expression of metallothionein-I, -II, and -III in Alzheimer disease and animal models of neuroinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidalgo, Juan; Penkowa, Milena; Espejo, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly clear that the metallothionein (MT) family of proteins is important in neurobiology. MT-I and MT-II are normally dramatically up-regulated by neuroinflammation. Results for MT-III are less clear. MTs could also be relevant in human neuropathology. In Alz...

  14. The Variable Stiffness Actuator vsaUT-II: Mechanical Design, Modeling, and Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, Stefan; Rusticelli, Giacomo; Zucchelli, Andrea; Stramigioli, Stefano; Carloni, Raffaella

    In this paper, the rotational variable stiffness actuator vsaUT-II is presented. This actuation system is characterized by the property that the apparent stiffness at the actuator output can be varied independently from its position. This behavior is realized by implementing a variable transmission

  15. Extended-soft-core baryon-baryon model. II. Hyperon-nucleon interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, T.A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The YN results are presented from the extended soft-core (ESC) interactions. They consist of local and nonlocal potentials because of (i) one-boson exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of pseudoscalar, vector, scalar, and axial mesons; (ii) diffractive exchanges; (iii) two-pseudoscalar

  16. FORUM - FutureTox II: In vitro Data and In Silico Models for Predictive Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    FutureTox II, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology workshop, was held in January, 2014. The meeting goals were to review and discuss the state of the science in toxicology in the context of implementing the NRC 21st century vision of predicting in vivo resp...

  17. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks. II. Line diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, I.; Tilling, I.; Woitke, P.; Thi, W.-F.; Hogerheijde, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: In this paper, we explore the diagnostic power of the far-IR fine-structure lines of [Oi] 63.2 μm, 145.5 μm, [Cii] 157.7 μm, as well as the radio and sub-mm lines of CO J=1-0, 2-1 and 3-2 in application to disks around Herbig Ae stars. We aim at understanding where the lines originate from, how the line formation process is affected by density, temperature and chemical abundance in the disk, and to what extent non-LTE effects are important. The ultimate aim is to provide a robust way to determine the gas mass of protoplanetary disks from line observations. Methods: We use the recently developed disk code ProDiMo to calculate the physico-chemical structure of protoplanetary disks and apply the Monte-Carlo line radiative transfer code Ratran to predict observable line profiles and fluxes. We consider a series of Herbig Ae type disk models ranging from 10-6 M_⊙ to 2.2 × 10-2 M_⊙ (between 0.5 and 700 AU) to discuss the dependency of the line fluxes and ratios on disk mass for otherwise fixed disk parameters. This paper prepares for a more thorough multi-parameter analysis related to the Herschel open time key program Gasps. Results: We find the [Cii] 157.7 μm line to originate in LTE from the surface layers of the disk, where The total emission is dominated by surface area and hence depends strongly on disk outer radius. The [Oi] lines can be very bright (>10-16 W/m2) and form in slightly deeper and closer regions under non-LTE conditions. For low-mass models, the [Oi] lines come preferentially from the central regions of the disk, and the peak separation widens. The high-excitation [Oi] 145.5 μm line, which has a larger critical density, decreases more rapidly with disk mass than the 63.2 μm line. Therefore, the [Oi] 63.2 μm/145.5 μm ratio is a promising disk mass indicator, especially as it is independent of disk outer radius for R_out>200 AU. CO is abundant only in deeper layers AV ⪆ 0.05. For too low disk masses (M_disk⪉10-4~M_⊙) the dust

  18. Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

    2005-04-01

    This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

  19. Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John McCord

    2004-12-01

    This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

  20. Implementation of “PLST” Assessment Model to Detect Development of Language Skill in Early Childhood (Phase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelva Rolina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This research will be done for 3 years (3 phases. The first year had been done on 2013 ago. 2014 is the second year of research (phase II. Research phase of this study (second year, namely development phase: the prototype of model is developed to be a model. The activities carried out in phase II include: expert validation test, readability test, revision, kindergarten teacher training, limited trial, and the trial was extended to find models that fit between the theoretical concepts with empirical data in the field. And finally (second year, from all kindergarten which be the sample study, it was found that all kindergarten were using the general assessment without special assessment for development of children’s language, so it is necessary to create assessment “PLST” to detect the development of language skill for early childhood (kindergarten student. It has to continue in second to third year. The final research, which is at the end of the third year (phase III is expected to match model assessment “PLST” as well as the guidance in learning in kindergarten, which can be used by teachers to detect and monitor the development of language skills, identifying the amount of vocabulary and sentences are mastered children, and the stages of language development next. To achieve these objectives, the researcher adopted a model of research, development, and diffusion by Hopkins & Clark (Havelock, 1976

  1. Modelling on the Equilibrium, Kinetics and Thermodynamics for Zinc (II Ions Removal from Solution by “Aloji” Kaolinite Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Akpomie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the use of Aloji kaolinite clay as an adsorbent for Zinc (II ions from solution. The aim of this research was the use of the kaolinite mineral as a low cost adsorbent for the removal of zinc (II ions from aqueous stream. The adsorption was performed by the use of batch method and the dependence of pH, initial metal ion concentration, contact time and temperature on adsorption were investigated. Maximum adsorption of zinc ions was achieved at an optimum pH of 4.0. Equilibrium sorption was achieved within 60 minutes of the experiment. Equilibrium sorption data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm. The Freundlich isotherm gave a better fit to the data than the Langmuir isotherm based on the comparison of their linear regression R2 values. Kinetic studies revealed the applicability of the Pseudo-second order kinetic model than the Pseudo-first order model based on their R2 values. Thermodynamic parameters such as changes in Gibbs free energy, ΔG0, enthalpy, ΔH0 and entropy, ΔS0 were evaluated and showed the adsorption process to be spontaneous, feasible and exothermic in nature. These results showed the potential of Aloji kaolinite clay as a suitable low-cost adsorbent for Zinc (II ions from aqueous stream

  2. Modeling the ternary complex TCR-Vbeta/CollagenII(261-273/HLA-DR4 associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina De Rosa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is known that genetic predisposition to rheumatoid arthritis (RA is associated with the MHC class II allele HLA-DR4 and that residues 261-273 of type II collagen (huCollp261 represent an immunodominant T cell epitope restricted by the DR4 molecule. Despite recent advances in characterization of MHC and T cell receptor (TCR contacts to this epitope, the atomic details of TCR/huCollp261/HLA-DR4 ternary complex are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have used computational modeling to get insight into this interaction. A three-dimensional model of the TCR Vbeta domain from a DR4(+ patient affected by RA has been derived by homology modeling techniques. Subsequently, the structure of the TCR Vbeta domain in complex with huCollp261/HLA-DR4 was obtained from a docking approach in conjunction with a filtering procedure based on biochemical information. The best complex from the docking experiments was then refined by 20 ns of molecular dynamics simulation in explicit water. The predicted model is consistent with available experimental data. Our results indicate that residues 97-101 of CDR3beta are critical for recognition of huCollp261/HLA-DR4 by TCR. We also show that TCR contacts on p/MHC surface affect the conformation of the shared epitope expressed by DR alleles associated with RA susceptibility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work presents a three-dimensional model for the ternary complex TCR-Vbeta/collagenII(261-273/HLA-DR4 associated with rheumatoid arthritis that can provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of self reactivity.

  3. Distribution of sac pressure in an experimental aneurysm model after endovascular repair: the effect of endoleak types I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenos, Eleftherios S; Stevens, Scott L; Freeman, Michael B; Pacanowski, John P; Cassada, David C; Goldman, Mitchell H

    2003-06-01

    To study in an experimental aneurysm model the differential distribution of strain/pressure (S/P) on the aneurysm wall before and after endograft exclusion and in the presence of individual type I and type II endoleaks. Two tapered elliptical Gore-Tex patches were sutured to an anterior and posterior longitudinal arteriotomy of an 8-mm Gore-Tex tube graft, thus creating a fusiform aneurysm. Two S/P transducers were placed at the proximal sac adjacent to the proximal neck, 2 at the site of the widest sac diameter, and 2 at the sac adjacent to the distal neck. The aneurysm, which was connected to a pulsatile pump system, was excluded using a 10-mm endograft. Type I and type II endoleaks were created and tested individually. S/P measurements were obtained at systemic systolic pressures (BP) of 80, 110, and 150 mmHg. Thrombosis of the sac contents was induced by injection of thrombin and calcium in the sac. Angiography was used to verify presence or absence of flow in the sac. Aneurysm exclusion resulted in significant S/P reductions at all 3 BP levels versus prior to exclusion (p0.05 for all 3 BP levels). In the presence of a proximal type I endoleak, S/P distribution was not uniform, and S/P at the proximal neck was close to S/P prior to exclusion (p>0.05 no graft versus type I endoleak for all 3 BP levels). This was also true in the presence of thrombus. With a type II endoleak, S/P was more evenly distributed and was not significantly elevated compared to the pressure without an endoleak (p>0.05, graft versus type II endoleak for all 3 BP levels). Thrombus had no effect on intrasac S/P with a type II endoleak. Intrasac S/P was significantly higher in the presence of a type I endoleak compared to a type II endoleak when BP=150 mmHg (p=0.008). Endovascular exclusion of an aneurysm results in uniform S/P reduction in the aneurysm sac. Type I endoleak, but not type II endoleak, results in significantly higher S/P in an area of the sac adjacent to the proximal neck

  4. Modeling the quantum interference signatures of the Ba II D2 4554 A line in the second solar spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Smitha, H N; Stenflo, J O; Sampoorna, M

    2013-01-01

    Quantum interference effects play a vital role in shaping the linear polarization profiles of solar spectral lines. The Ba II D2 line at 4554 A is a prominent example, where the F-state interference effects due to the odd isotopes produce polarization profiles, which are very different from those of the even isotopes that have no F-state interference. It is therefore necessary to account for the contributions from the different isotopes to understand the observed linear polarization profiles of this line. Here we do radiative transfer modeling with partial frequency redistribution (PRD) of such observations while accounting for the interference effects and isotope composition. The Ba II D2 polarization profile is found to be strongly governed by the PRD mechanism. We show how a full PRD treatment succeeds in reproducing the observations, while complete frequency redistribution (CRD) alone fails to produce polarization profiles that have any resemblance with the observed ones. However, we also find that the li...

  5. Ultraviolet C II and Si III Transit Spectroscopy and Modeling of the Evaporating Atmosphere of GJ436b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke Loyd, R. O.; Koskinen, T. T.; France, Kevin; Schneider, Christian; Redfield, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen gas evaporating from the atmosphere of the hot-Neptune GJ436b absorbs over 50% of the stellar Lyα emission during transit. Given the planet’s atmospheric composition and energy-limited escape rate, this hydrogen outflow is expected to entrain heavier atoms such as C and O. We searched for C and Si in the escaping atmosphere of GJ436b using far-ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope COS G130M observations made during the planet’s extended H i transit. These observations show no transit absorption in the C ii 1334,1335 Å and Si iii 1206 Å lines integrated over [‑100, 100] km s‑1, imposing 95% (2σ) upper limits of 14% (C ii) and 60% (Si iii) depth on the transit of an opaque disk and 22% (C ii) and 49% (Si iii) depth on an extended highly asymmetric transit similar to that of H i Lyα. C+ is likely present in the outflow according to a simulation we carried out using a spherically symmetric photochemical-hydrodynamical model. This simulation predicts an ∼2% transit over the integrated bandpass, consistent with the data. At line center, we predict the C ii transit depth to be as high as 19%. Our model predicts a neutral hydrogen escape rate of 1.6× {10}9 g s‑1 (3.1× {10}9 g s‑1 for all species) for an upper atmosphere composed of hydrogen and helium.

  6. Transformation impacts of dissolved and solid phase Fe(II) on trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in an iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) mixed column system: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yeunook; Kim, Dooil; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Singhal, Naresh; Park, Jae-Woo

    2012-12-01

    In this research, we conducted trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in a column filled with iron and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) and developed a mathematical model to investigate the critical reactions between active species in iron/IRB/contaminant systems. The formation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) in this system with IRB and zero-valent iron (ZVI, Fe(0)) coated with a ferric iron (Fe(III)) crust significantly affected TCE reduction and IRB respiration in various ways. This study presents a new framework for transformation property and reducing ability of both dissolved (Fe(II)(dissolved)) and solid form ferrous iron (Fe(II)(solid)). Results showed that TCE reduction was strongly depressed by Fe(II)(solid) rather than by other inhibitors (e.g., Fe(III) and lactate), suggesting that Fe(II)(solid) might reduce IRB activation due to attachment to IRB cells. Newly exposed Fe(0) from the released Fe(II)(dissolved) was a strong contributor to TCE reduction compared to Fe(II)(solid). In addition, our research confirmed that less Fe(II)(solid) production strongly supported long-term TCE reduction because it may create an easier TCE approach to Fe(0) or increase IRB growth. Our findings will aid the understanding of the contributions of iron media (e.g., Fe(II)(solid), Fe(II)(dissolved), Fe(III), and Fe(0)) to IRB for decontamination in natural groundwater systems.

  7. A multicriteria model for ranking of improvement approaches in construction companies based on the PROMETHÉE II method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Maciel de Melo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the construction production process may be improved using several different methods such as Lean Construction, ISO 9001, ISO 14001 or ISO 18001. Construction companies need a preliminary study and systematic implementation of changes to become more competitive and efficient. This paper presents a multicriteria decision model for the selection and ranking of such alternatives for improvement approaches regarding the aspects of quality, sustainability and safety, based on the PROMETHEE II method. The adoption of this model provides more confidence and visibility for decision makers. One of the differentiators of this model is the use of a fragmented set of improvement alternatives. These alternatives were combined with some restrictions to create a global set of alternatives. An application to three scenarios, considering realistic data, was developed. The results of the application show that the model should be incorporated into the strategic planning process of organizations.

  8. Modeling the water circulation in the North Atlantic in the scope of the CORE-II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, K. V.; Grankina, T. B.; Ibraev, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical experiment on the reproduction of the variability in the state of North Atlantic water in 1948-2007 with a spatial resolution of 0.25° has been performed using the global ocean model developed at Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences (INM RAS), and the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology (IO RAS) (the INM-IO model). The data on the state of the atmosphere, radiation fluxes, and bulk formulas of the CORE-II protocol are used as boundary conditions. Five successive 60-year calculation cycles have been performed in order to obtain the quasi-equilibrium state of a model ocean. For the last 20 years, the main elements of large-scale ocean circulation have been analyzed and compared with the WOA09 atlas data and the results of other models.

  9. Kontribusi Model Pembelajaran Berbasis Proyek terhadap Faktor AIK dalam Pembelajaran Matematika Siswa Kelas II/3 SMPN 2 Makassar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrullah Nasrullah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk menggunakan model pembelajaran berbasis proyek untuk meningkatkan antusiasme, intensitas aktivitas, dan kecakapan siswa dalam pembelajaran matematika. Untuk mencapai tujuan tersebut, penelitian tindakan kelas dipilih sebagai jenis penelitian yang berlangsung selama dua siklus. Setiap siklus memuat tahapan diantaranya: perencanaan, pelaksanaan tindakan, observasi, dan refleksi. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan di SMPN 2 Makassar, dengan subjek siswa kelas II/3 sebanyak 45 orang. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kontribusi model pembelajaran berbasis proyek, bukan hanya meningkatkan antusiasme, intensitas, dan kecakapan siswa dalam mengikuti kegiatan pembelajaran matematika, tetapi juga membantu siswa dalam meningkatkan pemahaman terhadap materi pelajaran yang diberikan. Secara statistik, persentase antusiasme berubah dari 58,7% (sedang menjadi 80,7% (tinggi; persentase intensitas berubah dari 46,9% (kurang menjadi 77,3% (tinggi; persentase kecakapan berubah dari 18,7% (sangat kurang menjadi 64% (sedang. Kemudian rerata untuk hasil belajar siklus I ke siklus II meningkat dari 8,26 menjadi 8,27. Terdapat kenaikan 0,01. Kata kunci: Model Pembelajaran Berbasis Proyek, antusiasme, intensitas, dan kecakapan  AbstractThis study aims to apply project-based learning model to enhance enthusiasm, activity intensity, and students competencies on learning mathematics. Making this aim, classroom action research is chosen for two cycles. Each of cycle consist of planning, action, observation, and reflection. It was held at SMPN 2 Makassar with subject of 45 graders in class II/3. The result shows that contribution of the model, not only to trigger entushiasm, intensity, and competency in which students are engaging with activities of learning mathematics, but to facilitate students improving comprehension about subject matter. Statistically, the percentage of enthusiasm, intensity, and competencies are changing from 58

  10. Prediction of the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC using a regularized thermodynamic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittelmann Hans D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of peptide fragments of extracellular peptides to class II MHC is a crucial event in the adaptive immune response. Each MHC allotype generally binds a distinct subset of peptides and the enormous number of possible peptide epitopes prevents their complete experimental characterization. Computational methods can utilize the limited experimental data to predict the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC. Results We have developed the Regularized Thermodynamic Average, or RTA, method for predicting the affinities of peptides binding to class II MHC. RTA accounts for all possible peptide binding conformations using a thermodynamic average and includes a parameter constraint for regularization to improve accuracy on novel data. RTA was shown to achieve higher accuracy, as measured by AUC, than SMM-align on the same data for all 17 MHC allotypes examined. RTA also gave the highest accuracy on all but three allotypes when compared with results from 9 different prediction methods applied to the same data. In addition, the method correctly predicted the peptide binding register of 17 out of 18 peptide-MHC complexes. Finally, we found that suboptimal peptide binding registers, which are often ignored in other prediction methods, made significant contributions of at least 50% of the total binding energy for approximately 20% of the peptides. Conclusions The RTA method accurately predicts peptide binding affinities to class II MHC and accounts for multiple peptide binding registers while reducing overfitting through regularization. The method has potential applications in vaccine design and in understanding autoimmune disorders. A web server implementing the RTA prediction method is available at http://bordnerlab.org/RTA/.

  11. Toward a Kinetic Model of Silicon Carbide Condensation in Type II Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneault, Ethan A. N.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most interesting types of dust grain extracted from terrestrial meteorites is the silicon carbide X-grain (SiC-X). These grains bear distinct isotopic signatures which classify them as supernova condensates, but their formation within the ejecta has not been well-studied. Using a kinetic chemistry network, we investigate possible pathways that lead to the formation of silicon carbide grains in the cooling outflows of type II supernovae.

  12. Modeling Lost-Particle Accelerator Backgrounds in PEP-II Using LPTURTLE

    CERN Document Server

    Fieguth, Theodore; Kozanecki, Witold

    2005-01-01

    Background studies during the design, construction, commissioning, operation and improvement of BaBar and PEP-II have been greatly influenced by results from a program referred to as LPTURTLE (Lost Particle TURTLE a modified version of Decay TURTLE) which was originally conceived for the purpose of studying gas background for SLC. This venerable program is still in use today. We describe its use, capabilities and improvements and refer to current results now being applied to BaBar.

  13. TJ-II data retrieving by means of a client/server model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, J.; Sánchez, E.; Crémy, C.; Portas, A.; Dulya, C. M.; Nilsson, J.

    1999-01-01

    The database of the TJ-II flexible heliac is centralized in a Unix server. This computer also commands the on-line processes related to data acquisition during TJ-II discharges: programming of measurement systems, connectivity with control systems, data visualization, and computations. The server has to provide access to the data so that signal analysis can be performed by local users or even from remote hosts. Data retrieving is accomplished by means of a client/server architecture in which two data servers are permanently running in the background of the Unix computer. One of them serves data requests from local clients and the other one sends data to remote clients. The communication protocol in both cases has been developed by using TCP/IP and Berkeley sockets. The client part consists of a set of routines (FORTRAN and C callable), which, in a transparent way, provide connectivity with the servers. This structure allows access to TJ-II data exactly in the same way from any computer, hiding not only specific aspects of the database, but hardware architecture of the server computer as well. In addition, the remote access makes it possible to distribute computations and to reduce the load on the Unix server from analysis and visualization tasks. At present, this software is running in four different environments: the Unix server itself, various types of Unix workstations, a CRAY J90 and a CRAY T3E. Finally, due to the fact that visualization is essential for TJ-II data analysis, a powerful and a very flexible visualization tool has been developed. It is a point and click application based on X Window/Motif. Data access is carried out through the client/server processes mentioned above and the software runs in the client computer.

  14. A structure-based model of energy transfer reveals the principles of light harvesting in photosystem II supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Doran I G; Amarnath, Kapil; Fleming, Graham R

    2013-06-19

    Photosystem II (PSII) initiates photosynthesis in plants through the absorption of light and subsequent conversion of excitation energy to chemical energy via charge separation. The pigment binding proteins associated with PSII assemble in the grana membrane into PSII supercomplexes and surrounding light harvesting complex II trimers. To understand the high efficiency of light harvesting in PSII requires quantitative insight into energy transfer and charge separation in PSII supercomplexes. We have constructed the first structure-based model of energy transfer in PSII supercomplexes. This model shows that the kinetics of light harvesting cannot be simplified to a single rate limiting step. Instead, substantial contributions arise from both excitation diffusion through the antenna pigments and transfer from the antenna to the reaction center (RC), where charge separation occurs. Because of the lack of a rate-limiting step, fitting kinetic models to fluorescence lifetime data cannot be used to derive mechanistic insight on light harvesting in PSII. This model will clarify the interpretation of chlorophyll fluorescence data from PSII supercomplexes, grana membranes, and leaves.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SSP in NIR. II. Synthesis models (Meneses-Goytia+, 2015)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meneses-Goytia, S.; Peletier, R. F.; Trager, S. C.; Vazdekis, A.

    2015-01-01

    The present Single Stellar Populations (SSP) models are derived from my Ph.D.'s thesis and this paper. The following nomenclature is used throughout the paper and the website (http://smg.astro-research.net/ssp-models/the-models/) to describe the models, e.g. MarS models use the M08 isochrones (Mar)

  16. Primordial 4He abundance: a determination based on the largest sample of H II regions with a methodology tested on model H II regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Stasińska, G.; Guseva, N. G.

    2013-10-01

    We verified the validity of the empirical method to derive the 4He abundance used in our previous papers by applying it to CLOUDY (v13.01) models. Using newly published He i emissivities for which we present convenient fits as well as the output CLOUDY case B hydrogen and He i line intensities, we found that the empirical method is able to reproduce the input CLOUDY 4He abundance with an accuracy of better than 1%. The CLOUDY output data also allowed us to derive the non-recombination contribution to the intensities of the strongest Balmer hydrogen Hα, Hβ, Hγ, and Hδ emission lines and the ionisation correction factors for He. With these improvements we used our updated empirical method to derive the 4He abundances and to test corrections for several systematic effects in a sample of 1610 spectra of low-metallicity extragalactic H ii regions, the largest sample used so far. From this sample we extracted a subsample of 111 H ii regions with Hβ equivalent width EW(Hβ) ≥ 150 Å, with excitation parameter x = O2+/O ≥ 0.8, and with helium mass fraction Y derived with an accuracy better than 3%. With this subsample we derived the primordial 4He mass fraction Yp = 0.254 ± 0.003 from linear regression Y - O/H. The derived value of Yp is higher at the 68% confidence level (CL) than that predicted by the standard big bang nucleosynthesis (SBBN) model, possibly implying the existence of different types of neutrino species in addition to the three known types of active neutrinos. Using the most recently derived primordial abundances D/H = (2.60 ± 0.12) × 10-5 and Yp = 0.254 ± 0.003 and the χ2 technique, we found that the best agreement between abundances of these light elements is achieved in a cosmological model with baryon mass density Ωbh2 = 0.0234 ± 0.0019 (68% CL) and an effective number of the neutrino species Neff = 3.51 ± 0.35 (68% CL). Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, programs 073.B-0283(A), 081.C-0113(A

  17. National Centers for Environmental Prediction-Department of Energy (NCEP-DOE) Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP)-II Reanalysis (Reanalysis-2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NCEP-DOE Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-II) reanalysis is a follow-on project to the "50-year" (1948-present) NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis Project....

  18. A murine experimental anthracycline extravasation model: pathology and study of the involvement of topoisomerase II alpha and iron in the mechanism of tissue damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thougaard, Annemette V; Langer, Seppo W; Hainau, Bo;

    2010-01-01

    The bisdioxopiperazine topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor dexrazoxane has successfully been introduced into the clinic as an antidote to accidental anthracycline extravasation based on our preclinical mouse studies. The histology of this mouse extravasation model was investigated and found...

  19. Cardiac electrophysiological experiments in numero, Part II: Models of electrophysiological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M; Camm, A J

    1991-11-01

    This article is the second part of a three article series reviewing computer simulation models of the heart, in particular of cardiac electrophysiology. The previous section of the review discussed the methodological principles of the construction and application of computer models. This article overviews the development of mathematical and computer modeling studies applied to cardiology. The models are classified according to the physiological processes that were simulated; this article distinguishes models oriented to cardiac mechanics, hemodynamics, and electrophysiology. The electrophysiology models are discussed in more detail and the review classifies them into four main categories: models of cellular processes, models of tissue behavior, models of the ventricular electric field, and models of macroconduction disturbances. In each category, the historical development of the models and their key achievements are described.

  20. Space constrained homology modelling: the paradigm of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of dengue (type II) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kontopoulos, Dimitrios Georgios; Kossida, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure is more conserved than sequence in nature. In this direction we developed a novel methodology that significantly improves conventional homology modelling when sequence identity is low, by taking into consideration 3D structural features of the template, such as size and shape. Herein, our new homology modelling approach was applied to the homology modelling of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of dengue (type II) virus. The RdRp of dengue was chosen due to the low sequence similarity shared between the dengue virus polymerase and the available templates, while purposely avoiding to use the actual X-ray structure that is available for the dengue RdRp. The novel approach takes advantage of 3D space corresponding to protein shape and size by creating a 3D scaffold of the template structure. The dengue polymerase model built by the novel approach exhibited all features of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and was almost identical to the X-ray structure of the dengue RdRp, as opposed to the model built by conventional homology modelling. Therefore, we propose that the space-aided homology modelling approach can be of a more general use to homology modelling of enzymes sharing low sequence similarity with the template structures.

  1. Higgs and Dark Matter Physics in the Type-II Two-Higgs-Doublet Model inspired by E_6 GUT

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, P; Yu, Chaehyun

    2015-01-01

    We study Higgs and dark matter physics in the type-II two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM) with an extra U(1)_H gauge symmetry, inspired by the E_6 grand unified theory (GUT). From the viewpoint of the bottom-up approach, the additional U(1)_H gauge symmetry plays a crucial role in avoiding the tree-level flavor changing neutral currents mediated by neutral Higgs bosons in general 2HDMs. In the model with U(1)_H gauge symmetry, which has Type-II Yukawa couplings, we have to introduce additional chiral fermions that are charged under the U(1)_H gauge symmetry as well as under the Standard-Model (SM) gauge symmetry in order to cancel chiral gauge anomalies. For the U(1)_H charge assignment and the extra matters, we adopt the ones inspired by the E_6 GUT: the extra quark-like and lepton-like fermions with the non-trivial U(1)_H charges. We discuss their contributions to the physical observables, such as the measurements of Higgs physics and electro-weak interactions, and investigate the consistency with the experiment...

  2. Synergistic interaction of levetiracetam with gabapentin in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model – a type II isobolographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wlaz Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at characterizing the anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam in combination with gabapentin, in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model. Herein, psychomotor seizures were evoked in male albino Swiss mice by a current (32 mA, 6 Hz, 3 s stimulus duration delivered via ocular electrodes. Type II isobolographic analysis was used to characterize the anticonvulsant interactions between the drugs in combination, for fixed-ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10. The type II isobolographic analysis revealed that the combinations of levetiracetam with gabapentin for the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10 were supra-additive (synergistic; P<0.05 in terms of seizure suppression, while the combinations for the fixed-ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 were additive in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model. We conclude that, as the combinations of levetiracetam with gabapentin for the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10 exerted supra-additive (synergistic interaction in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model, this may be considered as particularly favorable combinations in further clinical practice.

  3. Modeled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparision. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modeled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  4. Modelled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long-range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present-day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparison. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modelled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  5. Modeled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Samset

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric black carbon (BC absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF. However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparision. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modeled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  6. Modelling Energy Loss Mechanisms and a Determination of the Electron Energy Scale for the CDF Run II W Mass Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddick, Thomas [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    The calibration of the calorimeter energy scale is vital to measuring the mass of the W boson at CDF Run II. For the second measurement of the W boson mass at CDF Run II, two independent simulations were developed. This thesis presents a detailed description of the modification and validation of Bremsstrahlung and pair production modelling in one of these simulations, UCL Fast Simulation, comparing to both geant4 and real data where appropriate. The total systematic uncertainty on the measurement of the W boson mass in the W → eve channel from residual inaccuracies in Bremsstrahlung modelling is estimated as 6.2 ±3.2 MeV/c2 and the total systematic uncertainty from residual inaccuracies in pair production modelling is estimated as 2.8± 2.7 MeV=c2. Two independent methods are used to calibrate the calorimeter energy scale in UCL Fast Simulation; the results of these two methods are compared to produce a measurement of the Z boson mass as a cross-check on the accuracy of the simulation.

  7. Matérn's hard core models of types I and II with arbitrary compact grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiderlen, Markus; Hörig, Mario

    Matérn's classical hard core models can be interpreted as models obtained from a stationary marked Poisson process by dependent thinning. The marks are balls of fixed radius, and a point is retained when its associated ball does not hit any other balls (type I) or when its random birth time is st...... of this model with the process of intact grains of the dead leaves model and the Stienen model leads to analogous results for the latter....

  8. Synthesis, magnetostructural correlation, and catalytic promiscuity of unsymmetric dinuclear copper(II) complexes: models for catechol oxidases and hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osório, Renata E H M B; Peralta, Rosely A; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; de Almeida, Vicente R; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Fischer, Franciele L; Terenzi, Hernán; Mangrich, Antonio S; Mantovani, Karen Mary; Ferreira, Dalva E C; Rocha, Willian R; Haase, Wolfgang; Tomkowicz, Zbigniew; dos Anjos, Ademir; Neves, Ademir

    2012-02-06

    Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization, through elemental analysis, electronic spectroscopy, electrochemistry, potentiometric titration, electron paramagnetic resonance, and magnetochemistry, of two dinuclear copper(II) complexes, using the unsymmetrical ligands N',N',N-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-(2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylbenzyl)-1,3-propanediamin-2-ol (L1) and N',N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N,N-(2-hydroxybenzyl)(2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylbenzyl)-1,3-propanediamin-2-ol (L2). The structures of the complexes [Cu(2)(L1)(μ-OAc)](ClO(4))(2)·(CH(3))(2)CHOH (1) and [Cu(2)(L2)(μ-OAc)](ClO(4))·H(2)O·(CH(3))(2)CHOH (2) were determined by X-ray crystallography. The complex [Cu(2)(L3)(μ-OAc)](2+) [3; L3 = N-(2-hydroxybenzyl)-N',N',N-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,3-propanediamin-2-ol] was included in this study for comparison purposes only (Neves et al. Inorg. Chim. Acta2005, 358, 1807-1822). Magnetic data show that the Cu(II) centers in 1 and 2 are antiferromagnetically coupled and that the difference in the exchange coupling J found for these complexes (J = -4.3 cm(-1) for 1 and J = -40.0 cm(-1) for 2) is a function of the Cu-O-Cu bridging angle. In addition, 1 and 2 were tested as catalysts in the oxidation of the model substrate 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol and can be considered as functional models for catechol oxidase. Because these complexes possess labile sites in their structures and in solution they have a potential nucleophile constituted by a terminal Cu(II)-bound hydroxo group, their activity toward hydrolysis of the model substrate 2,4-bis(dinitrophenyl)phosphate and DNA was also investigated. Double electrophilic activation of the phosphodiester by monodentate coordination to the Cu(II) center that contains the phenol group with tert-butyl substituents and hydrogen bonding of the protonated phenol with the phosphate O atom are proposed to increase the hydrolase activity (K(ass.) and k(cat.)) of 1 and 2 in comparison with that found for complex 3. In fact

  9. Kinetics modeling of a pulsed Cu{endash}Ne discharge: potential for new ultraviolet laser transitions in Cu II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carman, R.J. [Center for Lasers and Applications, Macquarie University, Sydney, (Australia) NSW 2109

    1996-06-01

    A rate-equation analysis has been used to investigate the feasibility of exciting new UV laser transitions in Cu II (3{ital d}{sup 9}4{ital p}{minus}3{ital d}{sup 9}4{ital s}) by use of a pulsed Cu{emdash}Ne discharge. The model predicts average output powers in excess of 100 mW at 10 kHz from the combined output at 201.5 and 211.2 nm. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  10. Comparative modeling of the three-dimensional structure of type II antifreeze protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Sönnichsen, F D; Sykes, B D; Davies, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    Type II antifreeze proteins (AFP), which inhibit the growth of seed ice crystals in the blood of certain fishes (sea raven, herring, and smelt), are the largest known fish AFPs and the only class for which detailed structural information is not yet available. However, a sequence homology has been recognized between these proteins and the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectins. The structure of this domain from rat mannose-binding protein (MBP-A) has been solved by X-ray crystallogr...

  11. Parametric and non-parametric modeling of short-term synaptic plasticity. Part II: Experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dong; Wang, Zhuo; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z; Berger, Theodore W

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a synergistic parametric and non-parametric modeling study of short-term plasticity (STP) in the Schaffer collateral to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron (SC) synapse. Parametric models in the form of sets of differential and algebraic equations have been proposed on the basis of the current understanding of biological mechanisms active within the system. Non-parametric Poisson-Volterra models are obtained herein from broadband experimental input-output data. The non-parametric model is shown to provide better prediction of the experimental output than a parametric model with a single set of facilitation/depression (FD) process. The parametric model is then validated in terms of its input-output transformational properties using the non-parametric model since the latter constitutes a canonical and more complete representation of the synaptic nonlinear dynamics. Furthermore, discrepancies between the experimentally-derived non-parametric model and the equivalent non-parametric model of the parametric model suggest the presence of multiple FD processes in the SC synapses. Inclusion of an additional set of FD process in the parametric model makes it replicate better the characteristics of the experimentally-derived non-parametric model. This improved parametric model in turn provides the requisite biological interpretability that the non-parametric model lacks.

  12. Synthesis and structure of copper(II) complexes: Potential cyanide sensor and oxidase model'

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PALASH MONDAL; SANKAR PRASAD PARUA; POULAMI PATTANAYAK; UTTAM DAS; SURAJIT CHATTOPADHYAY

    2016-05-01

    The new complexes of compositions $[(L_{a})_{2}Cu]$ and $[(L_{b})_{2}Cu]$ were prepared by treating with2-hydroxy-5-methyl-3-(2-aryldiazenyl)phenylimino) methyl) benzaldehyde $(HL_{a})$ and ethyl-2-cyano-3-(2-hydroxy-5-methyl-3-(-(2-aryldiazenyl) phenylimino) methyl) phenyl) acrylate $(HL_{b})$ ligands [where aryl isphenyl for $HL_{a}^{1}$ and $HL_{b}^{1}$ ; p-methyl phenyl for $HL_{a}^{2}$ and $HL_{b}^{2}$ ; and p-chloro phenyl for $HL_{a}^{3}$ and $HL_{b}^{3}$ ] with $Cu(OAc)_{2}.H_{2}O$, respectively. Both the bis copper(II) complexes consist of tridentate (N,N,O) anionic ligands, $L^{-}_a$ or $L^{-}_b$ . X-ray structures of the representative complexes $[(L^{1}_{a})_{2}Cu]$ and $[(L^{2}_{b})_{2}Cu]$ were determined toconfirm the molecular species unequivocally. The molecular structure of copper complexes exhibited tetragonallydistorted (Jahn-Teller) geometry consistent with the $d^{9}$ configuration of Cu(II) metal ion. Oxidation ofbenzyl alcohols using the newly synthesized complexes as catalyst has been studied. Photoluminescence propertiesof $[(L^{2}_{a})_{2}Cu]$ and $[(L^{2}_{b})_{2}Cu]$ were exploited for selective cyanide recognition. The $[(L_{b})_{2}Cu], complexesdisplayed antibacterial activity toward gram positive and gram negative bacteria

  13. AUTH Regional Climate Model Contributions to EURO-CORDEX. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katragkou, E.; Gkotovou, I.; Kartsios, S.; Pavlidis, V.; Tsigaridis, K.; Trail, M.; Nazarenko, L.; Karacostas, Theodore S.

    2017-01-01

    Regional climate downscaling techniques are being increasingly used to provide higher-resolution climate information than is available directly from contemporary global climate models. The Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) initiative was build to foster communication and knowledge exchange between regional climate modelers. The Department of Meteorology and Climatology of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki has been contributing to the CORDEX initiative since 2010, with regional climate model simulations over the European domain (EURO-CORDEX). Results of this work are presented here, including two hindcasts and a historical simulation with the Weather Research Forecasting model (WRF), driven by ERA-interim reanalysis and the NASA Earth System Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE2, respectively. Model simulations are evaluated with the EOBS climatology and the model performance is assessed.

  14. High order fluid model for streamer discharges. II. Numerical solution and investigation of planar fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Markosyan, A H; Ebert, U

    2013-01-01

    The high order fluid model developed in the preceding paper is employed here to study the propagation of negative planar streamer fronts in pure nitrogen. The model consists of the balance equations for electron density, average electron velocity, average electron energy and average electron energy flux. These balance equations have been obtained as velocity moments of Boltzmann's equation and are here coupled to the Poisson equation for the space charge electric field. Here the results of simulations with the high order model, with a PIC/MC (Particle in cell/Monte Carlo) model and with the first order fluid model based on the hydrodynamic drift-diffusion approximation are presented and compared. The comparison with the MC model clearly validates our high order fluid model, thus supporting its correct theoretical derivation and numerical implementation. The results of the first order fluid model with local field approximation, as usually used for streamer discharges, show considerable deviations. Furthermore,...

  15. AUTH Regional Climate Model Contributions to EURO-CORDEX. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katragkou, E.; Gkotovou, I.; Kartsios, S.; Pavlidis, V.; Tsigaridis, K.; Trail, M.; Nazarenko, L.; Karacostas, Theodore S.

    2017-01-01

    Regional climate downscaling techniques are being increasingly used to provide higher-resolution climate information than is available directly from contemporary global climate models. The Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) initiative was build to foster communication and knowledge exchange between regional climate modelers. The Department of Meteorology and Climatology of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki has been contributing to the CORDEX initiative since 2010, with regional climate model simulations over the European domain (EURO-CORDEX). Results of this work are presented here, including two hindcasts and a historical simulation with the Weather Research Forecasting model (WRF), driven by ERA-interim reanalysis and the NASA Earth System Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE2, respectively. Model simulations are evaluated with the EOBS climatology and the model performance is assessed.

  16. Kinetic modeling and thermodynamic study to remove Pb(II), Cd(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) from aqueous solution using dead and living Azolla filiculoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhshaee, Roohan [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Rasht Branch, P.O. Box 41335-3516, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khosravi, Morteza [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, North Tehran Branch, P.O. Box 191367-4711, Tehran 191367-4711 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: drm_khosravi@yahoo.com; Ganji, Masoud Taghi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, North Tehran Branch, P.O. Box 191367-4711, Tehran 191367-4711 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-06-30

    Dead Azolla filiculoides can remove Pb{sup 2+},Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} corresponding to second-order kinetic model. The maximum adsorption capacity (Q {sub max}) to remove these metal ions by the alkali and CaCl{sub 2}/MgCl{sub 2}/NaCl (2:1:1, molar ratio) activated Azolla from 283 to 313 K was 1.431-1.272, 1.173-0.990, 1.365-1.198 and 1.291-0.981 mmol/g dry biomass, respectively. Q {sub max} to remove these heavy metals by the non-activated Azolla at the mentioned temperature range was obtained 1.131-0.977, 1.092-0.921, 1.212-0.931 and 1.103-0.923 mmol/g dry biomass, respectively. In order to remove these metal ions by the activated Azolla, the enthalpy change ({delta}H) was -4.403, -4.495, -4.557 and -4.365 kcal/mol and the entropy change ({delta}S) was 2.290, 1.268, 1.745 and 1.006 cal/mol K, respectively. While, to remove these metal ions by the non-activated Azolla, {delta}H was -3.685, -3.766, -3.967 and -3.731 kcal/mol and {delta}S was 2.440, 1.265, 1.036 and 0.933 cal/mol K, respectively. On the other hand, the living Azolla removed these heavy metals corresponding to first-order kinetic model. It was also shown that pH, temperature and photoperiod were effective both on the rate of Azolla growth and the rate of heavy metals uptake during 10 days. It was appeared the use of Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} increased both Azolla growth rate and the rate of heavy metals uptake while the using KNO{sub 3} although increased Azolla growth rate but decreased the rate of heavy metals uptake.

  17. Two-Higgs-doublet type-II and -III models and t → ch at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arhrib, A. [Universite Abdelmalek Essaadi, Departement de Mathematiques, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, B. 416, Tangier (Morocco); National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Physics Division, Hsinchu (China); Benbrik, R. [Cadi Ayyad University, LPHEA, Semlalia, Marrakech (Morocco); Faculte Polydisciplinaire de Safi, MSISM Team, Sidi Bouzid, B.P 4162, Safi (Morocco); Chen, Chuan-Hung [National Cheng-Kung University, Department of Physics, Tainan (China); Gomez-Bock, Melina [Universidad de las Americas Puebla, DAFM, Cholula, PUE (Mexico); Semlali, Souad [Cadi Ayyad University, LPHEA, Semlalia, Marrakech (Morocco)

    2016-06-15

    We study the constraints of the generic two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM) type-III and the impacts of the new Yukawa couplings. For comparisons, we revisit the analysis in the 2HDM type-II. To understand the influence of all involving free parameters and to realize their correlations, we employ a χ-square fitting approach by including theoretical and experimental constraints, such as the S, T, and U oblique parameters, the production of standard model Higgs and its decay to γγ, WW*/ZZ*, τ{sup +}τ{sup -}, etc. The errors of the analysis are taken at 68, 95.5, and 99.7% confidence levels. Due to the new Yukawa couplings being associated with cos(β - α) and sin(β - α), we find that the allowed regions for sin α and tan β in the type-III model can be broader when the dictated parameter χ{sub F} is positive; however, for negative χ{sub F}, the limits are stricter than those in the type-II model. By using the constrained parameters, we find that the deviation from the SM in h → Zγ can be of O(10 %). Additionally, we also study the top-quark flavor-changing processes induced at the tree level in the type-III model and find that when all current experimental data are considered, we get Br(t → c(h, H)) < 10{sup -3} for m{sub h} = 125.36 and m{sub h} = 150 GeV, and Br(t → cA) slightly exceeds 10{sup -3} for m{sub A} = 130 GeV. (orig.)

  18. Response surface modeling of Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution by Pistacia vera L.: Box-Behnken experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Demirel, Sevgi; Vanderbei, Robert J

    2009-11-15

    A three factor, three-level Box-Behnken experimental design combining with response surface modeling (RSM) and quadratic programming (QP) was employed for maximizing Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution by Antep pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) shells based on 17 different experimental data obtained in a lab-scale batch study. Three independent variables (initial pH of solution (pH(0)) ranging from 2.0 to 5.5, initial concentration of Pb(II) ions (C(0)) ranging from 5 to 50 ppm, and contact time (t(C)) ranging from 5 to 120 min) were consecutively coded as x(1), x(2) and x(3) at three levels (-1, 0 and 1), and a second-order polynomial regression equation was then derived to predict responses. The significance of independent variables and their interactions were tested by means of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with 95% confidence limits (alpha=0.05). The standardized effects of the independent variables and their interactions on the dependent variable were also investigated by preparing a Pareto chart. The optimum values of the selected variables were obtained by solving the quadratic regression model, as well as by analysing the response surface contour plots. The optimum coded values of three test variables were computed as x(1)=0.125, x(2)=0.707, and x(3)=0.107 by using a LOQO/AMPL optimization algorithm. The experimental conditions at this global point were determined to be pH(0)=3.97, C(0)=43.4 ppm, and t(C)=68.7 min, and the corresponding Pb(II) removal efficiency was found to be about 100%.

  19. Effect of the Intervention based on Partnership Care Model on Self-Concept Promotion in Patients with Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sajjadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: As a chronic worldwide spreading disease, diabetes negatively affects the persons’ self-concept. Since self-concept plays an important role in daily life, it should be under consideration especially in the patients with chronic diseases. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of the partnership-care model intervention on self-concept enhancement in persons with type II diabetes. Materials & Methods: In the controlled randomized clinical trial, 60 patients with type II diabetes referred to Imam Zaman Hospital were studied in Mashhad in 2015. The subjects, selected via available sampling method, were divided into two groups including control and experimental groups. Data was collected using a three-section questionnaire including demographic information, the disease information, and Beck self-concept test sections. The self-concept of the subjects having been determined, seven 90-minute partnership-care intervention sessions were conducted in experimental group. Then, the self-concept was measured in both groups. Data was analyzed by SPSS 20 software using paired T, independent T, and Chi-square tests. Findings: Before and after the intervention, the mean self-concept scores were not significantly different in control group (p=0.066. However, the difference was significant in experimental group (p<0.001. In addition, the mean scores of control and experimental groups were not significantly different before the intervention (p=0.537. Nevertheless, the mean self-concept scores of the groups were significantly different after the intervention (p<0.001. Conclusion: The intervention based on the partner-ship care model enhances the self-concept in patients with type II diabetes.

  20. An Interactive Activation Model of the Effect of Context in Perception. Part II. Report No. 8003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumelhart, David E.; McClelland, James L.

    This report is the second in a two-part series introducing an interactive activation model of context effects in perception. In the first part, a model for the perception of letters in words and other contexts was described and applied to a number of experiments. This second part applies the same model to a number of new experiments designed to…

  1. METHANOGENESIS AND SULFATE REDUCTION IN CHEMOSTATS: II. MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND VERIFICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive dynamic model is presented that simulates methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). This model incorporates the complex chemistry of anaerobic systems. A salient feature of the model is its ability to predict the effluent ...

  2. An Interactive Activation Model of the Effect of Context in Perception. Part II. Report No. 8003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumelhart, David E.; McClelland, James L.

    This report is the second in a two-part series introducing an interactive activation model of context effects in perception. In the first part, a model for the perception of letters in words and other contexts was described and applied to a number of experiments. This second part applies the same model to a number of new experiments designed to…

  3. Elastic and Piezoelectric Properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube Composites. Part II; Finite Element Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. Alicia; Hardie, Robert; Yamakov, Vesselin; Park, Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-part series where the first part presents a molecular dynamics model of a single Boron Nitride Nanotube (BNNT) and this paper scales up to multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix. This paper presents finite element (FE) models to investigate the effective elastic and piezoelectric properties of (BNNT) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites studied in this paper are thin films of polymer matrix with aligned co-planar BNNTs. The FE modelling approach provides a computationally efficient way to gain an understanding of the material properties. We examine several FE models to identify the most suitable models and investigate the effective properties with respect to the BNNT volume fraction and the number of nanotube walls. The FE models are constructed to represent aligned and randomly distributed BNNTs in a matrix of resin using 2D and 3D hollow and 3D filled cylinders. The homogenisation approach is employed to determine the overall elastic and piezoelectric constants for a range of volume fractions. These models are compared with an analytical model based on Mori-Tanaka formulation suitable for finite length cylindrical inclusions. The model applies to primarily single-wall BNNTs but is also extended to multi-wall BNNTs, for which preliminary results will be presented. Results from the Part 1 of this series can help to establish a constitutive relationship for input into the finite element model to enable the modeling of multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix.

  4. The ARIC predictive model reliably predicted risk of type II diabetes in Asian populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Calvin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of high-risk individuals is crucial for effective implementation of type 2 diabetes mellitus prevention programs. Several studies have shown that multivariable predictive functions perform as well as the 2-hour post-challenge glucose in identifying these high-risk individuals. The performance of these functions in Asian populations, where the rise in prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is expected to be the greatest in the next several decades, is relatively unknown. Methods Using data from three Asian populations in Singapore, we compared the performance of three multivariate predictive models in terms of their discriminatory power and calibration quality: the San Antonio Health Study model, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities model and the Framingham model. Results The San Antonio Health Study and Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities models had better discriminative powers than using only fasting plasma glucose or the 2-hour post-challenge glucose. However, the Framingham model did not perform significantly better than fasting glucose or the 2-hour post-challenge glucose. All published models suffered from poor calibration. After recalibration, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities model achieved good calibration, the San Antonio Health Study model showed a significant lack of fit in females and the Framingham model showed a significant lack of fit in both females and males. Conclusions We conclude that adoption of the ARIC model for Asian populations is feasible and highly recommended when local prospective data is unavailable.

  5. Lagrangian theory of structure formation in relativistic cosmology II: average properties of a generic evolution model

    CERN Document Server

    Buchert, Thomas; Wiegand, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Kinematical and dynamical properties of a generic inhomogeneous cosmological model, spatially averaged with respect to free-falling (generalized fundamental) observers, are investigated for the matter model `irrotational dust'. Paraphrasing a previous Newtonian investigation, we present a relativistic generalization of a backreaction model based on volume-averaging the `Relativistic Zel'dovich Approximation'. In this model we investigate the effect of `kinematical backreaction' on the evolution of cosmological parameters as they are defined in an averaged inhomogenous cosmology, and we show that the backreaction model interpolates between orthogonal symmetry properties by covering subcases of the plane-symmetric solution, the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi solution and the Szekeres solution. We so obtain a powerful model that lays the foundations for quantitatively addressing curvature inhomogeneities as they would be interpreted as `Dark Energy' or `Dark Matter' in a quasi-Newtonian cosmology. The present model, havi...

  6. VCD Robustness of the Amide-I and Amide-II Vibrational Modes of Small Peptide Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góbi, Sándor; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Tarczay, György

    2015-09-01

    The rotational strengths and the robustness values of amide-I and amide-II vibrational modes of For(AA)n NHMe (where AA is Val, Asn, Asp, or Cys, n = 1-5 for Val and Asn; n = 1 for Asp and Cys) model peptides with α-helix and β-sheet backbone conformations were computed by density functional methods. The robustness results verify empirical rules drawn from experiments and from computed rotational strengths linking amide-I and amide-II patterns in the vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of peptides with their backbone structures. For peptides with at least three residues (n ≥ 3) these characteristic patterns from coupled amide vibrational modes have robust signatures. For shorter peptide models many vibrational modes are nonrobust, and the robust modes can be dependent on the residues or on their side chain conformations in addition to backbone conformations. These robust VCD bands, however, provide information for the detailed structural analysis of these smaller systems.

  7. Modeling of solvent extraction equilibrium of Cu(II from sulphuric Acid solution with MOC-55TD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of Cu(II from acidic sulphate aqueous solutions using the commercial MOC-55TD extractant is studied. A predictive model, which consists in a set of non-linear mass action and mass balance equations is proposed. The model was solved using a tailor-made equation-solving program. The extraction of copper can be described by the formation of CuR2 species (log Kext= 0.717 ± 0.03 in the organic phase. The copper equilibrium isotherm was also obtained at 20°C.

    Se estudia la extracción de Cu(II de disoluciones acuosas acidas, en medio sulfato, mediante la oxima comercial MOC-55TD. Se propone un modelo para predecir la extracción del metal; este modelo consiste en una serie de ecuaciones no lineales de acción de masas y balance de masas. El modelo se resolvió empleando un programa de ordenador específicamente definido para este tipo de equilibrios. La extracción de cobre se describe por la formación de la especie CuR2 (log Kext= 0,717 ± 0,03 en la fase orgánica. Se ha obtenido la isoterma de extracción de cobre a 20 °C.

  8. Kinetics modelling of Cu(II) biosorption on to coconut shell and Moringa oleifera seeds from tropical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheampong, Mike A; Pereira, Joana P C; Meulepas, Roel J W; Lens, Piet N L

    2012-01-01

    Adsorption kinetic studies are of great significance in evaluating the performance of a given adsorbent and gaining insight into the underlying mechanism. This work investigated the sorption kinetics of Cu(II) on to coconut shell and Moringa oleifera seeds using batch techniques. To understand the mechanisms of the biosorption process and the potential rate-controlling steps, kinetic models were used to fit the experimental data. The results indicate that kinetic data were best described by the pseudo-second-order model with correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.9974 and 0.9958 for the coconut shell and Moringa oleifera seeds, respectively. The initial sorption rates obtained for coconut shell and Moringa oleifera seeds were 9.6395 x 10(-3) and 8.3292 x 10(-2) mg g(-1) min(-1), respectively. The values of the mass transfer coefficients obtained for coconut shell (1.2106 x 10(-3) cm s(-1)) and Moringa oleifera seeds (8.965 x 10(-4) cm s(-1)) indicate that the transport of Cu(II) from the bulk liquid to the solid phase was quite fast for both materials investigated. The results indicate that intraparticle diffusion controls the rate of sorption in this study; however, film diffusion cannot be neglected, especially at the initial stage of sorption.

  9. Unbound position II in MXCXXC metallochaperone model peptides impacts metal binding mode and reactivity: Distinct similarities to whole proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshan, Michal S; Dekel, Noa; Goch, Wojciech; Shalev, Deborah E; Danieli, Tsafi; Lebendiker, Mario; Bal, Wojciech; Tshuva, Edit Y

    2016-06-01

    The effect of position II in the binding sequence of copper metallochaperones, which varies between Thr and His, was investigated through structural analysis and affinity and oxidation kinetic studies of model peptides. A first Cys-Cu(I)-Cys model obtained for the His peptide at acidic and neutral pH, correlated with higher affinity and more rapid oxidation of its complex; in contrast, the Thr peptide with the Cys-Cu(I)-Met coordination under neutral conditions demonstrated weaker and pH dependent binding. Studies with human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) and three of its mutants where S residues were replaced with Ala suggested that (a) the binding affinity is influenced more by the binding sequence than by the protein fold (b) pH may play a role in binding reactivity, and (c) mutating the Met impacted the affinity and oxidation rate more drastically than did mutating one of the Cys, supporting its important role in protein function. Position II thus plays a dominant role in metal binding and transport.

  10. Dynamical Models for the Formation of Elephant Trunks in H II Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Mackey, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The formation of pillars of dense gas at the boundaries of H II Regions is investigated with hydrodynamical numerical simulations including ionising radiation from a point source. We show that shadowing of ionising radiation by an inhomogeneous density field is capable of forming so-called elephant trunks (pillars of dense gas as in e.g. M16) without the assistance of self-gravity, or of ionisation front and cooling instabilities. A large simulation of a density field containing randomly generated clumps of gas is shown to naturally generate elephant trunks with certain clump configurations. These configurations are simulated in isolation and analysed in detail to show the formation mechanism and determine possible observational signatures. Pillars formed by the shadowing mechanism are shown to have rather different velocity profiles depending on the initial gas configuration, but asymmetries mean that the profiles also vary significantly with perspective, limiting their ability to discriminate between format...

  11. Use of ELVIS II platform for random process modelling and analysis of its probability density function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikova, Yu. S.; Nugmanov, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of probability density function estimation for a random process is one of the most common in practice. There are several methods to solve this problem. Presented laboratory work uses methods of the mathematical statistics to detect patterns in the realization of random process. On the basis of ergodic theory, we construct algorithm for estimating univariate probability density distribution function for a random process. Correlational analysis of realizations is applied to estimate the necessary size of the sample and the time of observation. Hypothesis testing for two probability distributions (normal and Cauchy) is used on the experimental data, using χ2 criterion. To facilitate understanding and clarity of the problem solved, we use ELVIS II platform and LabVIEW software package that allows us to make the necessary calculations, display results of the experiment and, most importantly, to control the experiment. At the same time students are introduced to a LabVIEW software package and its capabilities.

  12. Bianchi Type-II inflationary models with constant deceleration parameter in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C P Singh; S Kumar

    2007-05-01

    Einstein's field equations are considered for a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi Type-II space–time in the presence of a massless scalar field with a scalar potential. Exact solutions of scale factors and other physical parameters are obtained by using a special law of variation for Hubble's parameter that yields a constant value of deceleration parameter. To get inflationary solutions, a flat region is considered in which the scalar potential is constant. Power-law and exponential cases are studied and in both solutions there is an anisotropic expansion of the cosmic fluid, but the fluid has vanishing vorticity. A detailed study of geometrical and kinematical properties of solutions has been carried out.

  13. Genetic effects of ATP1A2 in familial hemiplegic migraine type II and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritz, Stephanie M; Radcliffe, Richard A

    2013-04-05

    Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase alpha 2 (Atp1a2) is an integral plasma membrane protein belonging to the P-type ATPase family that is responsible for maintaining the sodium (Na(+)) and potassium (K(+)) gradients across cellular membranes with hydrolysis of ATP. Atp1a2 contains two subunits, alpha and beta, with each having various isoforms and differential tissue distribution. In humans, mutations in ATP1A2 are associated with a rare form of hereditary migraines with aura known as familial hemiplegic migraine type II. Genetic studies in mice have revealed other neurological effects of Atp1a2 in mice including anxiety, fear, and learning and motor function disorders. This paper reviews the recent findings in the literature concerning Atp1a2.

  14. Lidar measurements during a haze episode in Penang, Malaysia and validation of the ECMWF MACC-II model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Wei Ying; Lolli, Simone; Hee, Wan Shen; Lim, Hwee San; Jafri, M. Z. Mat; Benedetti, Angela; Jones, Luke

    2015-04-01

    Haze is a phenomenon which occurs when there is a great amount of tiny particulates suspended in the atmosphere. During the period of March 2014, a long period of haze event occurred in Penang, Malaysia. The haze condition was measured and monitored using a ground-based Lidar system. By using the measurements obtained, we evaluated the performance of the ECMWF MACC-II model. Lidar measurements showed that there was a thick aerosol layer confined in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) with extinction coefficients exceeding values of 0.3 km-1. The model however has underestimated the atmospheric conditions in Penang. Backward trajectories analysis was performed to identify aerosols sources and transport. It is speculated that the aerosols came from the North-East direction which was influenced by the North-East monsoon wind and some originated from the central eastern coast of Sumatra along the Straits of Malacca.

  15. (I) A Declarative Framework for ERP Systems(II) Reactors: A Data-Driven Programming Model for Distributed Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefansen, Christian Oskar Erik

    on the idea of soft constraints the paper explains the design, semantics, and use of a language for allocating work in business processes. The language lets process designers express both hard constraints and soft constraints. (II) The Reactors programming model: • Reactors: A Data-Oriented Synchronous......, namely the general ledger and accounts receivable. The result is an event-based approach to designing ERP systems and an abstract-level sketch of the architecture. • Compositional Specification of Commercial Contracts. The paper describes the design, multiple semantics, and use of a domain......-specific language (DSL) for modeling commercial contracts. • SMAWL: A SMAll Workflow Language Based on CCS. The paper shows how workflow patterns can be encoded in CCS and proceeds to design a macro language, SMAWL, for workflows based on those patterns. The semantics of SMAWL is defined via translation to CCS...

  16. Dynamical behavior of a rumor transmission model with Holling-type II functional response in emergency event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Liang'an; Jiang, Jiehui; Gong, Sixing; He, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Rumor transmission has become an important issue in emergency event. In this paper, a rumor transmission model with Holling-type II functional response was proposed, which provides excellent explanations of the scientific knowledge effect with rumor spreading. By a global analysis of the model and studying the stability of the rumor-free equilibrium and the rumor-endemic equilibrium, we found that the number of infective individuals equal to zero or positive integer as time went on. A numerical simulation is carried out to illustrate the feasibility of our main results. The results will provide the theoretical support to rumor control in emergency event and also provide decision makers references for the public opinions management.

  17. Higher order explicit solutions for nonlinear dynamic model of column buckling using variational approach and variational iteration algorithm-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Saman; Nikkar, Ali [University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    This paper deals with the determination of approximate solutions for a model of column buckling using two efficient and powerful methods called He's variational approach and variational iteration algorithm-II. These methods are used to find analytical approximate solution of nonlinear dynamic equation of a model for the column buckling. First and second order approximate solutions of the equation of the system are achieved. To validate the solutions, the analytical results have been compared with those resulted from Runge-Kutta 4th order method. A good agreement of the approximate frequencies and periodic solutions with the numerical results and the exact solution shows that the present methods can be easily extended to other nonlinear oscillation problems in engineering. The accuracy and convenience of the proposed methods are also revealed in comparisons with the other solution techniques.

  18. Steady flow in a model of the human carotid bifurcation. Part II--laser-Doppler anemometer measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadvaj, B K; Mabon, R F; Giddens, D P

    1982-01-01

    The evidence for hypothesizing a relationship between hemodynamics and atherogenesis as well as the motivation for selecting the carotid bifurcation for extensive fluid dynamic studies has been discussed in Part I of this two-paper sequence. Part II deals with velocity measurements within the bifurcation model described by Fig. 1 and Table 1 of the previous paper. A plexiglass model conforming to the dimensions of the average carotid bifurcation was machined and employed for velocity measurements with a laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA). The objective of this phase of the study was to obtain quantitative information on the velocity field and to estimate levels and directions of wall shear stress in the region of the bifurcation.

  19. Bianisotropic-critical-state model to study flux cutting in type-II superconductors at parallel geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Salazar, C.

    2016-04-01

    A critical-state model is postulated that incorporates, for the first time, the structural anisotropy and flux-line cutting effect in a type-II superconductor. The model is constructed starting from the theoretical scheme of Romero-Salazar and Pérez-Rodríguez to study the anisotropy induced by flux cutting. Here, numerical calculations of the magnetic induction and static magnetization are presented for samples under an alternating magnetic field, orthogonal to a static dc-bias one. The interplay of the two anisotropies is analysed by comparing the numerical results with available experimental data for an yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) plate, and a vanadium-titanium (VTi) strip, subjected to a slowly oscillating field {H}y({H}z) in the presence of a static field {H}z({H}y).

  20. A Model for Providing Guidance Services in Elementary Schools: A Generalist-Preventive Approach. Implemented Model. Maxi II Practicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Sydney B.

    The purpose of this practicum was to develop, implement, and evaluate a model for elementary school guidance at Northwoods Elementary School, if the need for such a model could be demonstrated. The need was demonstrated, the model was developed and tested. Subsequent investigation demonstrated that guidance services were increased as a result of…

  1. Modeling powder encapsulation in dosator-based machines: II. Experimental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawam, Ammar; Schultz, Leon

    2011-12-15

    A theoretical model was previously derived to predict powder encapsulation in dosator-based machines. The theoretical basis of the model was discussed earlier. In this part; the model was evaluated experimentally using two powder formulations with substantially different flow behavior. Encapsulation experiments were performed using a Zanasi encapsulation machine under two sets of experimental conditions. Model predicted outcomes such as encapsulation fill weight and plug height were compared to those experimentally obtained. Results showed a high correlation between predicted and actual outcomes demonstrating the model's success in predicting the encapsulation of both formulations. The model is a potentially useful in silico analysis tool that can be used for capsule dosage form development in accordance to quality by design (QbD) principles.

  2. A matrix model for the topological string II: The spectral curve and mirror geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eynard, Bertrand; Marchal, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    In a previous paper, we presented a matrix model reproducing the topological string partition function on an arbitrary given toric Calabi-Yau manifold. Here, we study the spectral curve of our matrix model and thus derive, upon imposing certain minimality assumptions on the spectral curve, the large volume limit of the BKMP "remodeling the B-model" conjecture, the claim that Gromov-Witten invariants of any toric Calabi-Yau 3-fold coincide with the spectral invariants of its mirror curve.

  3. A wave-mechanical model of incoherent neutron scattering II. Role of the momentum transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Frauenfelder, Hans; Young, Robert D.; Fenimore, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    We recently introduced a wave-mechanical model for quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) in proteins. We call the model ELM for "Energy Landscape Model". We postulate that the spectrum of the scattered neutrons consists of lines of natural width shifted from the center by fluctuations. ELM is based on two facts: Neutrons are wave packets; proteins have low-lying substates that form the free-energy landscape (FEL). Experiments suggest that the wave packets are a few hundred micrometers long....

  4. Modeling of the HiPco process for carbon nanotube production. II. Reactor-scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Dateo, Christopher E.; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process, developed at Rice University, has been reported to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes from gas-phase reactions of iron carbonyl in carbon monoxide at high pressures (10-100 atm). Computational modeling is used here to develop an understanding of the HiPco process. A detailed kinetic model of the HiPco process that includes of the precursor, decomposition metal cluster formation and growth, and carbon nanotube growth was developed in the previous article (Part I). Decomposition of precursor molecules is necessary to initiate metal cluster formation. The metal clusters serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube growth. The diameter of metal clusters and number of atoms in these clusters are some of the essential information for predicting carbon nanotube formation and growth, which is then modeled by the Boudouard reaction with metal catalysts. Based on the detailed model simulations, a reduced kinetic model was also developed in Part I for use in reactor-scale flowfield calculations. Here this reduced kinetic model is integrated with a two-dimensional axisymmetric reactor flow model to predict reactor performance. Carbon nanotube growth is examined with respect to several process variables (peripheral jet temperature, reactor pressure, and Fe(CO)5 concentration) with the use of the axisymmetric model, and the computed results are compared with existing experimental data. The model yields most of the qualitative trends observed in the experiments and helps to understanding the fundamental processes in HiPco carbon nanotube production.

  5. Understanding Shock Dynamics in the Inner Heliosphere with Modeling and Type II Radio Data: the 2010-04-03 Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong Na; Odstrcil, Dusan; Mays, L.; Cyr, O. C. St.; Gopalswamy, N.; Cremades, H.

    2012-01-01

    The 2010 April 03 solar event was studied using observations from STEREO SECCHI, SOHO LASCO, and Wind kilometric Type II data (kmTII) combined with WSA-Cone-ENLIL model simulations performed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC). In particular, we identified the origin of the coronal mass ejection (CME) using STEREO EUVI and SOHO EIT images. A flux-rope model was fit to the SECCHI A and B, and LASCO images to determine the CMEs direction, size, and actual speed. J-maps from STEREO COR2HI-1HI-2 and simulations fromCCMC were used to study the formation and evolution of the shock in the inner heliosphere. In addition, we also studied the time-distance profile of the shock propagation from kmTII radio burst observations. The J-maps together with in-situ datafrom the Wind spacecraft provided an opportunity to validate the simulation results andthe kmTII prediction. Here we report on a comparison of two methods of predictinginterplanetary shock arrival time: the ENLIL model and the kmTII method; andinvestigate whether or not using the ENLIL model density improves the kmTIIprediction. We found that the ENLIL model predicted the kinematics of shock evolutionwell. The shock arrival times (SAT) and linear-fit shock velocities in the ENLILmodel agreed well with those measurements in the J-maps along both the CME leading edge and the Sun-Earth line. The ENLIL model also reproduced most of the largescale structures of the shock propagation and gave the SAT prediction at Earth with an error of 17 hours. The kmTII method predicted the SAT at Earth with an error of 15 hours when using n0 4.16 cm3, the ENLIL model plasma density near Earth; but itimproved to 2 hours when using n0 6.64 cm3, the model density near the CMEleading edge at 1 AU.

  6. Comparison of high-latitude thermospheric meridional winds II: combined FPI, radar and model climatologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, E.M.; Aruliah, A.; Mueller-Wodarg, I.C.F.; Aylward, A. [Atmospheric Physics Lab., Univ. Coll. London, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    The climatological behaviour of the thermospheric meridional wind above Kiruna, Sweden (67.4 N, 20.4 E) has been investigated for seasonal and solar cycle dependence using six different techniques, comprising both model and experimental sources. Model output from both the empirical Horizontal Wind Model (HWM) (Hedin et al., 1988) and the numerical coupled thermosphere and ionosphere model (CTIM) are compared to the measured behaviour at kiruna, as a single site example. The empirical International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model is used as input to an implementation of servo theory, to provide another climatology combining empirical input with a theoretical framework. The experimental techniques have been introduced in a companion paper in this issue and provide climatologies from direct measurements, using fabry-perot interferometers (FPI), together with 2 separate techniques applied to the European incoherent scatter radar (EISCAT) database to derive neutral winds. One of these techniques uses the same implementation of servo theory as has been used with the IRI model. Detailed comparisons for each season and solar activity category allow for conclusions to be drawn as to the major influences on the climatological behaviour of the wind at this latitude. Comparison of the incoherent scatter radar (ISR) derived neutral winds with FPI, empirical model and numerical model winds is important to our understanding and judgement of the validity of the techniques used to derive thermospheric wind databases. The comparisons also test model performance and indicate possible reasons for differences found between the models. In turn, the conclusions point to possible improvements in their formulation. In particular it is found that the empirical models are over-reliant on mid-latitude data in their formulation, and fail to provide accurate estimates of the winds at high-latitudes. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of high-latitude thermospheric meridionalwinds II: combined FPI, radar and model Climatologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Griffin

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The climatological behaviour of the thermospheric meridional wind above Kiruna, Sweden (67.4°N, 20.4°E has been investigated for seasonal and solar cycle dependence using six different techniques, comprising both model and experimental sources. Model output from both the empirical Horizontal Wind Model (HWM (Hedin et al., 1988 and the numerical Coupled Thermosphere and Ionosphere Model (CTIM are compared to the measured behaviour at Kiruna, as a single site example. The empirical International Reference Ionosphere (IRI model is used as input to an implementation of servo theory, to provide another climatology combining empirical input with a theoretical framework. The experimental techniques have been introduced in a companion paper in this issue and provide climatologies from direct measurements, using Fabry-Perot Interferometers (FPI, together with 2 separate techniques applied to the European Incoherent Scatter radar (EISCAT database to derive neutral winds. One of these techniques uses the same implementation of servo theory as has been used with the IRI model. Detailed comparisons for each season and solar activity category allow for conclusions to be drawn as to the major influences on the climatological behaviour of the wind at this latitude. Comparison of the incoherent scatter radar (ISR derived neutral winds with FPI, empirical model and numerical model winds is important to our understanding and judgement of the validity of the techniques used to derive thermospheric wind databases. The comparisons also test model performance and indicate possible reasons for differences found between the models. In turn, the conclusions point to possible improvements in their formulation. In particular it is found that the empirical models are over-reliant on mid-latitude data in their formulation, and fail to provide accurate estimates of the winds at high-latitudes.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (thermospheric dynamics

  8. Reaction of Pb(II) and Zn(II) with Ethyl Linoleate To Form Structured Hybrid Inorganic–Organic Complexes: A Model for Degradation in Historic Paint Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Margaret G.; Palmer, Michael R.; Suchomel, Matthew R.; Berrie, Barbara H. (NGA); (Bordeaux)

    2016-09-23

    To investigate soap formation in drying oils in historic paints, the reaction between metal acetates (K+, Zn2+, Pb2+) and ethyl linoleate (EL) was studied using optical microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and electron microscopy. Pb(II) and Zn(II) react rapidly with EL to form highly structured, spherulitic, luminescent crystallites that aggregate. Evidence from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis and high-resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction indicates that these are organic–inorganic hybrid complexes or coordination polymers. FTIR absorbance peaks at ca. 1540 cm–1 for Pb(II) and ca. 1580 cm–1 for Zn(II) are consistent with the formation of carboxylate complexes. The complexes formed offer insight into the degradation processes observed in oil paint films, suggesting that soap formation is rapid when metal ions are solubilized and can occur with unsaturated fatty acids that are present in fresh oils. These complexes may account for the atypical luminescence observed in lead-containing cured oil paint films.

  9. Organizational Effectiveness: Development and Validation of Integrated Models. Report II. Empirical Studies of Organizational Effectiveness Using Multivariate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    adaptivity Multidimensionality 20. A trACT (Cirtite s ,yers nif e a and ideriify by block ,,mber) This report is in three parts, each summarizing an...I~ , . 0N. 1N .7 (6 16- 1 C6 -w N 7 ( CA a, .7 ( O 0 (N ft * U, i , ’C - 0 a’ I - CI~0 ’. IN i I N - U , I o ti- a 0’ I N C~ t39 2 - IN IN...i c t W -, C. C6 0 - -7 -r - 0 3 Z -6- - - . . .. . . . . 40 I I i I A I II I I I t .0N . t 3i N 3 C 3 N = N N i 01 C N N =N OO w -s ~0 § - -V ~ 4- 0

  10. Ionized Gas in Damped Lyman Alpha Protogalaxies II. Comparison Between Models and the Kinematic Data

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, A M; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    2000-01-01

    We test semi-analytic models for galaxy formation with accurate kinematic data of damped Lyman alpha protogalaxies (DLAs) presented in the companion paper I. The models envisage centrifugally supported exponential disks at the centers of dark matter halos which are filled with ionized gas undergoing radial infall to the disks. The halo masses are drawn from cross-section weighted mass distributions predicted by CDM cosmogonies, or by the null hypothesis (TF model) that the dark matter mass distribution has not evolved since z ~ 3. In our models, C IV absorption lines detected in DLAs arise in infalling ionized clouds while the low-ion absorption lines arise from neutral gas in the disks. Using Monte Carlo methods we find: (a) The CDM models are incompatible with the low-ion statistics at more than 99% confidence whereas some TF models cannot be excluded at more than 88% confidence. (b) Both CDM and TF models agree with the observed distribution of C IV velocity widths. (c) The CDM models generate differences ...

  11. Approximation of N(k)(infinity)-functions II : Convergence of Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksma, Aad; Luger, Annemarie; Shondin, Yuri; Behrndt, J; Forster, KH; Trunk, C

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of Part I, [9] in the list of references, where models for N(k)(infinity)-functions have been studied in detail. In the present paper we investigate the convergence of the corresponding models as a singular N(k)(infinity)-functionis approximated by regular N(k)(infinity)

  12. Aeolian processes across transverse dunes. II: Modelling the sediment transport and profile development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, P.M.; Arens, S.M.; van Boxel, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a model which simulates dune development resulting from aeolian saltation transport. The model was developed for application to coastal foredunes, but is also applicable to sandy deserts with transverse dunes. Sediment transport is calculated using published deterministic and em

  13. PARAFAC2 - Part II. Modeling chromatographic data with retention time shifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bro, Rasmus; Andersson, Claus A.; Kiers, Henk A.L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper offers an approach for handling retention time shifts in resolving chromatographic data using the PARAFAC2 model. In Part I of this series an algorithm for PARAFAC2 was developed and extended to N-way arrays. It was discussed that the PARAFAC2 model has a number of attractive features. It

  14. Low-temperature charging of lithium-ion cells Part II: Model reduction and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmlinger, Jürgen; Tippmann, Simon; Buchholz, Michael; Dietmayer, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Lithium-ion cells, especially when used in electric vehicles at varying operation conditions, require a sophisticated battery management to ensure an optimal operation regarding operation limits, performance, and maximum lifetime. In some cases, the best trade-off between these conflictive goals can only be reached by considering internal, non-measurable cell characteristics. This article presents a data-driven model-reduction method for a strict electrochemical model. The model describes the charging process of a lithium-ion cell and possibly occurring degradation effects in a large temperature range and is presented in Part I of this contribution. The model-reduction process is explained in detail, and the gained model is compared to the original electrochemical model showing a very high approximation quality. This reduced model offers a very low computation complexity and is therefore suitable for the implementation in a battery management system (BMS). Based on this model, an advanced charging strategy is presented and evaluated for possible reductions in charging times especially at low temperatures.

  15. Probing cosmology with weak lensing selected clusters II: Dark energy and f(R) gravity models

    CERN Document Server

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing and future wide-field galaxy surveys can be used to locate a number of clusters of galaxies with cosmic shear measurement alone. We study constraints on cosmological models using statistics of weak lensing selected galaxy clusters. We extend our previous theoretical framework to model the statistical properties of clusters in variants of cosmological models as well as in the standard LCDM model. Weak lensing selection of clusters does not rely on the conventional assumption such as the relation between luminosity and mass and/or hydrostatic equilibrium, but a number of observational effects compromise robust identification. We use a large set of realistic mock weak-lensing catalogs as well as analytic models to perform a Fisher analysis and make forecast for constraining two competing cosmological models, wCDM model and f(R) model proposed by Hu & Sawicki, with our lensing statistics. We show that weak lensing selected clusters are excellent probe of cosmology when combined with cosmic shear power...

  16. Evolutionary stellar population synthesis with MILES - II. Scaled-solar and \\alpha-enhanced models

    CERN Document Server

    Vazdekis, A; Cassisi, S; Ricciardelli, E; Falcón-Barroso, J; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; La Barbera, F; Beasley, M A; Pietrinferni, A

    2015-01-01

    We present models that predict spectra of old- and intermediate-aged stellar populations at 2.51\\AA\\ (FWHM) with varying [\\alpha/Fe] abundance. The models are based on the MILES library and on corrections from theoretical stellar spectra. The models employ recent [Mg/Fe] determinations for the MILES stars and BaSTI scaled-solar and \\alpha-enhanced isochrones. We compute models for a suite of IMF shapes and slopes, covering a wide age/metallicity range. Using BaSTI, we also compute "base models" matching The Galactic abundance pattern. We confirm that the \\alpha-enhanced models show a flux excess with respect to the scaled-solar models blue-ward $\\sim$4500\\AA, which increases with age and metallicity. We also confirm that both [MgFe] and [MgFe]' indices are [\\alpha/Fe]-insensitive. We show that the sensitivity of the higher order Balmer lines to [\\alpha/Fe] resides in their pseudo-continua, with narrower index definitions yielding lower sensitivity. We confirm that the \\alpha-enhanced models yield bluer (redde...

  17. Aeolian processes across transverse dunes. II: Modelling the sediment transport and profile development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, P.M.; Arens, S.M.; van Boxel, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a model which simulates dune development resulting from aeolian saltation transport. The model was developed for application to coastal foredunes, but is also applicable to sandy deserts with transverse dunes. Sediment transport is calculated using published deterministic and

  18. Comparison of two potato simulation models under climate change. II Application of climate change scenarios.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, J.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of climate change (for the year 2050 compared to ambient climate) and change in climatic variability on potato growth and production at 6 sites in Europe were calculated. These calculations were done with both a simple growth model, POTATOS, and a comprehensive model, NPOTATO. Comparison

  19. Comparison of two soya bean simulation models under climate change : II Application of climate change scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, J.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of climate change (for 2050 compared to ambient climate) and change in climatic variability on soya bean growth and production at 3 sites in the EU have been calculated. These calculations have been done with both a simple growth model, SOYBEANW, and a comprehensive model, CROPGRO.

  20. Improved angular momentum evolution model for solar-like stars II. Exploring the mass dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Gallet, Florian

    2015-01-01

    We developed angular momentum evolution models for 0.5 and 0.8 $M_{\\odot}$ stars. The parametric models include a new wind braking law based on recent numerical simulations of magnetised stellar winds, specific dynamo and mass-loss rate prescriptions, as well as core/envelope decoupling. We compare model predictions to the distributions of rotational periods measured for low mass stars belonging to star forming regions and young open clusters. Furthermore, we explore the mass dependence of model parameters by comparing these new models to the solar-mass models we developed earlier. Rotational evolution models are computed for slow, median, and fast rotators at each stellar mass. The models reproduce reasonably well the rotational behaviour of low-mass stars between 1~Myr and 8-10~Gyr, including pre-main sequence to zero-age main sequence spin up, prompt zero-age main sequence spin down, and early-main sequence convergence of the surface rotation rates. Fast rotators are found to have systematically shorter di...

  1. TheME: an environment for building formal KADS II models of expertise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balder, John; Akkermans, J.M.; Akkermans, Hans

    1992-01-01

    COMMONKADS is a well-known methodology for the development of knowledge-based systems. In this methodology one constructs so-called models of expertise as a basis for the development. A new feature with respect to older versions of the KADS methodology is a formal version of these models, whereby

  2. Aeolian processes across transverse dunes. II: Modelling the sediment transport and profile development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, P.M.; Arens, S.M.; van Boxel, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a model which simulates dune development resulting from aeolian saltation transport. The model was developed for application to coastal foredunes, but is also applicable to sandy deserts with transverse dunes. Sediment transport is calculated using published deterministic and em

  3. Cybernetically sound organizational structures II: Relating de Sitter's design theory to Beer's viable system model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterbergh, J.M.I.M.; Vriens, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    - Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to show how the viable system model (VSM) and de Sitter's design theory can complement each other in the context of the diagnosis and design of viable organizations. - Design/methodology/approach – Key concepts from Beer's model and de Sitter's design theory

  4. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume 1. Model evolution and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    The Energy Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.), under Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship, has been engaged in the development of a comprehensive mechanistic model of Fluidized Bed Combustors (FBC). The primary aims of this modeling effort are the generation and to the extent possible, validation of an analytical framework for the design and scale-up of fluidized bed combustors. In parallel with this modeling effort, M.I.T. also embarked upon the development of an FBC-Data Base Management System (FBC-DBMS) aimed at facilitating the coordination, interpretation and utilization of the experimental data that are or will become available from diverse sources, as well as in the identification of areas of large uncertainty or having a paucity of experimental results. The synergistic operation of the FBC-Model and FBC-Data Base promises to offer a powerful tool for the design and optimization of FBC's and represents the ultimate goal of the M.I.T. effort. The modeling effort was initially focused upon evaluation and application of state-of-the-art models. The initial system model was divided into five basic components: fluid dynamics, combustion, sulfur capture, heat transfer and emissions. Due to the technical complexity of modeling FBC operation and the initial primitive nature of models for these components, it was deemed necessary to be able to incorporate evolutionary improvements in understanding and correlating FBC phenomena: the M.I.T. system model is, therefore, modular in nature, i.e., each sub-model can be replaced by an updated or equivalent sub-model without necessitating reprogramming of the entire system model.

  5. Single stellar populations in the near-infrared II. Synthesis models

    CERN Document Server

    Meneses-Goytia, S; Trager, S C; Vazdekis, A

    2015-01-01

    We present unresolved single stellar population synthesis models in the near-infrared (NIR) range. The extension to the NIR is important for the study of early-type galaxies, since these galaxies are predominantly old and therefore emit most of their light in this wavelength range. The models are based on a library of empirical stellar spectra, the NASA infrared telescope facility (IRTF) spectral library. Integrating these spectra along theoretical isochrones, while assuming an initial mass function (IMF), we have produced model spectra of single age-metallicity stellar populations at a resolution R~2000. These models can be used to fit observed spectral of globular clusters and galaxies, to derive their age distribution, chemical abundances and IMF. The models have been tested by comparing them to observed colours of elliptical galaxies and clusters in the Magellanic Clouds. Predicted absorption line indices have been compared to published indices of other elliptical galaxies. The comparisons show that our m...

  6. Mathematical modeling of materially nonlinear problems in structural analyses, Part II: Application in contemporary software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonić Zoran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents application of nonlinear material models in the software package Ansys. The development of the model theory is presented in the paper of the mathematical modeling of material nonlinear problems in structural analysis (part I - theoretical foundations, and here is described incremental-iterative procedure for solving problems of nonlinear material used by this package and an example of modeling of spread footing by using Bilinear-kinematics and Drucker-Prager mode was given. A comparative analysis of the results obtained by these modeling and experimental research of the author was made. Occurrence of the load level that corresponds to plastic deformation was noted, development of deformations with increasing load, as well as the distribution of dilatation in the footing was observed. Comparison of calculated and measured values of reinforcement dilatation shows their very good agreement.

  7. A Soluble Model for Scattering and Decay in Quaternionic Quantum Mechanics II Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Horwitz, L P

    1994-01-01

    In a previous paper, it was shown that a soluble model can be constructed for the description of a decaying system in analogy to the Lee-Friedrichs model of complex quantum theory. It is shown here that this model also provides a soluble scattering theory, and therefore constitutes a model for a decay scattering system. Generalized second resolvent equations are obtained for quaternionic scattering theory. It is shown explicitly for this model, in accordance with a general theorem of Adler, that the scattering matrix is complex subalgebra valued. It is also shown that the method of Adler, using an effective optical potential in the complex sector to describe the effect of the quaternionic interactions, is equivalent to the general method of Green's functions described here.

  8. Health effects models for off-site radiological consequence analysis on nuclear reactor accidents (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Toshimitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takahashi, Tomoyuki [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Yonehara, Hidenori [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [eds.

    2000-12-01

    This report is a revision of JAERI-M 91-005, 'Health Effects Models for Off-Site Radiological Consequence Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Accidents'. This revision provides a review of two revisions of NUREG/CR-4214 reports by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission which is the basis of the JAERI health effects models and other several recent reports that may impact the health effects models by international organizations. The major changes to the first version of the JAERI health effects models and the recommended parameters in this report are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. This report also provides suggestions about future revisions of computational aspects on health effects models. (author)

  9. Testing spectral models for stellar populations with star clusters: II. Results

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, Rosa M Gonzalez

    2009-01-01

    High spectral resolution evolutionary synthesis models have become a routinely used ingredient in extragalactic work, and as such deserve thorough testing. Star clusters are ideal laboratories for such tests. This paper applies the spectral fitting methodology outlined in Paper I to a sample of clusters, mainly from the Magellanic Clouds and spanning a wide range in age and metallicity, fitting their integrated light spectra with a suite of modern evolutionary synthesis models for single stellar population. The combinations of model plus spectral library employed in this investigation are Galaxev/STELIB, Vazdekis/MILES, SED@/GRANADA, and Galaxev/MILES+GRANADA, which provide a representative sample of models currently available for spectral fitting work. A series of empirical tests are performed with these models, comparing the quality of the spectral fits and the values of age, metallicity and extinction obtained with each of them. A comparison is also made between the properties derived from these spectral f...

  10. The 1995 revision of the joint US/UK geomagnetic field models. II: Main field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J.M.; Coleman, R.J.; Macmillan, S.; Barraclough, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the 1995 main-field revision of the World Magnetic Model (WMM-95). It is based on Project MAGNET high-level (??? 15,000 ft.) vector aeromagnetic survey data collected between 1988 and 1994 and on scalar total intensity data collected by the Polar Orbiting Geomagnetic Survey (POGS) satellite during the period 1991 through 1993. The spherical harmonic model produced from these data describes that portion of the Earth's magnetic field generated internal to the Earth's surface at the 1995.0 Epoch. When combined with the spherical harmonic model of the Earth's secular variation described in paper I, the Earth's main magnetic field is fully characterized between the years 1995 and 2000. Regional magnetic field models for the conterminous United States, Alaska and, Hawaii were generated as by-products of the global modeling process.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SSP in NIR. II. Synthesis models (Meneses-Goytia+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses-Goytia, S.; Peletier, R. F.; Trager, S. C.; Vazdekis, A.

    2015-08-01

    The present Single Stellar Populations (SSP) models are derived from my Ph.D.'s thesis and this paper. The following nomenclature is used throughout the paper and the website (http://smg.astro-research.net/ssp-models/the-models/) to describe the models, e.g. MarS models use the M08 isochrones (Mar) and the Salpeter (S) IMF. General information about the models is given in table1. For further information, please refer to the paper. Each set of models and their corresponding predictions are available in the website and VIZIER. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) can be downloaded in a zip-file from those pages in ascii format . The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) can be downloaded in a zip-file from t hose pages in ascii format . The nomenclature of each SED is as follows: isochroneIMFsedXXXXHZX.XXXXXXXXXTgXX.XXXXXXXe+XX - where XXXX tells whether those models contain C-stars or no (COMBO or NOCS respectively) H is the spectral band in which normalization occurred Z_X.XXXXXXXXX is the metallicity in terms of Z Tg_XX.XXXXXXXe+XX is the age in years. Each set of models contains MarS - 96 SEDs GirS - 96 SEDs BaSS - 116 SEDs We have also included in the websites the Integrated colours and line-strength indices from all our models (MarS, GirS and BaSS). The SEDs were convolved to a velocity dispersion of 350km/s before calculating indices. (5 data files).

  12. Glucosidase II from rat liver microsomes. Kinetic model for binding and hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, J M; Santa-Cecilia, A; Calvo, P

    1991-01-01

    Glucosidase II is an enzyme involved in glycoprotein biosynthesis, releasing both alpha-1,3-linked glucose residues from the protein-linked oligosaccharide Glc2Man9GlcNAc2-R in the processing of N-glycans. We studied the kinetic properties of the enzyme, purified to homogeneity and, for the first time, we have been able to demonstrate the occurrence of two active sites in this enzyme and to establish the mechanisms of binding and hydrolysis of the physiological substrate at its active site(s). The analyses of data fitting to single and double hyperbolic equations and the Eadie-Hofstee profile, together with the inhibition kinetics, demonstrate that the enzyme has two different active sites. The Km and Vmax. values for the high-affinity site (site 1) were 0.78 mM and 437 munits/mg respectively, whereas the values for the low-affinity site (site 2) were 481 mM and 13797 munits/mg respectively, for the p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-glucopyranoside substrate. The Vmax./Km ratios, which indicate the efficacy of an active site for a substrate, were 560 and 28.7 ml/min per g for active sites 1 and 2, respectively. The inhibition type, with respect to site 1, for glucose, maltose, D-glucone-delta-lactone, CaCl2 and MgCl2 was pure-competitive, partial-competitive, parabolic, non-competitive and non-competitive respectively. Ki values for glucose, maltose, CaCl2 and MgCl2 were 6.75, 2.05, 10.60 and 14.20 mM respectively. Thus glucose would bind to active site 1, maltose to site 2 (and near to site 1) and D-glucone-delta-lactone to either site 1 or 2. The following hydrolysis mechanism for the physiological substrate (Glc2Man9GlcNAc2-protein) of glucosidase II may be concluded from all the foregoing kinetic evidence: the external glucose would be the first released residue, at active site 2, thereafter producing Glc1Man9GlcNAc2-protein; the remaining glucose would be released at active site 1, delivering the Man9GlcNAc2-protein product, which would leave the enzyme. PMID:1898361

  13. Groundwater flow modelling under ice sheet conditions in Greenland (phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaquet, Olivier; Namar, Rabah; Siegel, Pascal [In2Earth Modelling Ltd, Lausanne (Switzerland); Jansson, Peter [Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    Within the framework of the GAP project, this second phase of geosphere modelling has enabled the development of an improved regional model that has led to a better representation of groundwater flow conditions likely to occur under ice sheet conditions. New data in relation to talik geometry and elevation, as well as to deformation zones were integrated in the geosphere model. In addition, more realistic hydraulic properties were considered for geosphere modelling; they were taken from the Laxemar site in Sweden. The geological medium with conductive deformation zones was modelled as a 3D continuum with stochastically hydraulic properties. Surface and basal glacial meltwater rates provided by a dynamic ice sheet model were assimilated into the groundwater flow model using mixed boundary conditions. The groundwater flow system is considered to be governed by infiltration of glacial meltwater in heterogeneous faulted crystalline rocks in the presence of permafrost and taliks. The characterisation of the permafrost-depth distribution was achieved using a coupled description of flow and heat transfer under steady state conditions. Using glaciological concepts and satellite data, an improved stochastic model was developed for the description at regional scale for the subglacial permafrost distribution in correlation with ice velocity and bed elevation data. Finally, the production of glacial meltwater by the ice sheet was traced for the determination of its depth and lateral extent. The major improvements are related to the type and handling of the subglacial boundary conditions. The use of meltwater rates provided by an ice sheet model applied as input to a mixed boundary condition enables to produce a more plausible flow field in the Eastern part of the domain, in comparison to previous modelling results (Jaquet et al. 2010). In addition, the integration of all potential taliks within the modelled domain provides a better characterisation of the likely groundwater

  14. Modeling the Effects of Ecosystem Fragmentation and Restoration: Management Models for Mobile Animals. Volume 1. Appendices I-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    mesquite in mesquite (no edge effect ) How to Run the Model Open an existing or new ArcView GIS project. Open a View, and if not already present, add...values, which in the same example would be 0.7 and 25, respectively. To model no edge effect (the null model) for any one edge type, enter a value of...units for dmax are the same as the map units of the habitat spatial data. For edge types in which no edge effect will be modeled, enter a “basal

  15. Using DFT methodology for more reliable predictive models: Design of inhibitors of Golgi α-Mannosidase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobovská, Adela; Tvaroška, Igor; Kóňa, Juraj

    2016-05-01

    Human Golgi α-mannosidase II (GMII), a zinc ion co-factor dependent glycoside hydrolase (E.C.3.2.1.114), is a pharmaceutical target for the design of inhibitors with anti-cancer activity. The discovery of an effective inhibitor is complicated by the fact that all known potent inhibitors of GMII are involved in unwanted co-inhibition with lysosomal α-mannosidase (LMan, E.C.3.2.1.24), a relative to GMII. Routine empirical QSAR models for both GMII and LMan did not work with a required accuracy. Therefore, we have developed a fast computational protocol to build predictive models combining interaction energy descriptors from an empirical docking scoring function (Glide-Schrödinger), Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) method, and quantum mechanical density functional theory (QM-DFT) calculations. The QSAR models were built and validated with a library of structurally diverse GMII and LMan inhibitors and non-active compounds. A critical role of QM-DFT descriptors for the more accurate prediction abilities of the models is demonstrated. The predictive ability of the models was significantly improved when going from the empirical docking scoring function to mixed empirical-QM-DFT QSAR models (Q(2)=0.78-0.86 when cross-validation procedures were carried out; and R(2)=0.81-0.83 for a testing set). The average error for the predicted ΔGbind decreased to 0.8-1.1kcalmol(-1). Also, 76-80% of non-active compounds were successfully filtered out from GMII and LMan inhibitors. The QSAR models with the fragmented QM-DFT descriptors may find a useful application in structure-based drug design where pure empirical and force field methods reached their limits and where quantum mechanics effects are critical for ligand-receptor interactions. The optimized models will apply in lead optimization processes for GMII drug developments.

  16. Hot-gas cleanup system model development. Volume II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushimaru, K.; Bennett, A.; Bekowies, P.J.

    1982-11-01

    Under Contract to the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Flow Industries, Inc., has developed computer models to simulate the physical performance of five hot-gas cleanup devices for pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), combined-cycle power plants. Separate cost models have also been developed to estimate the cost of each device. The work leading to the development of these models is described in Volume I of this report. This volume contains the user's manuals for both the physical and cost models. The manuals for the physical models are given first followed by those for the cost models. Each manual is a complete and separate document. The model names and devices and their respective subroutine names are: (1) Moving Granular Bed Filter by Combustion Power Company, USRCGB, QFCOST; (2) Ceramic Bag Filter by Acurex, USRACB, QDCOST; (3) Electrostatic Granular Bed Filter by General Electric, USRGGB, QACOST; (4) Electrostatic Precipitator by Research Cottrell, USRCEP, QECOST; and (5) Electrocyclone by General Electric, USRGCY, QBCOST.

  17. From steady-state to synchronized yeast glycolytic oscillations II: model validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Preez, Franco B; van Niekerk, David D; Snoep, Jacky L

    2012-08-01

    In an accompanying paper [du Preez et al., (2012) FEBS J279, 2810-2822], we adapt an existing kinetic model for steady-state yeast glycolysis to simulate limit-cycle oscillations. Here we validate the model by testing its capacity to simulate a wide range of experiments on dynamics of yeast glycolysis. In addition to its description of the oscillations of glycolytic intermediates in intact cells and the rapid synchronization observed when mixing out-of-phase oscillatory cell populations (see accompanying paper), the model was able to predict the Hopf bifurcation diagram with glucose as the bifurcation parameter (and one of the bifurcation points with cyanide as the bifurcation parameter), the glucose- and acetaldehyde-driven forced oscillations, glucose and acetaldehyde quenching, and cell-free extract oscillations (including complex oscillations and mixed-mode oscillations). Thus, the model was compliant, at least qualitatively, with the majority of available experimental data for glycolytic oscillations in yeast. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a model for yeast glycolysis has been tested against such a wide variety of independent data sets. The mathematical models described here have been submitted to the JWS Online Cellular Systems Modelling Database and can be accessed at http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za/database/dupreez/index.html. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  18. Extraction of resinoids from St. John's wort (Hypericumperforatum L: II. Modeling of extraction kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljković Vlada B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of resinoids from St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L was studied in a series of two papers. While the first part dealt with the effects of the operating conditions on the yield of resinoids (total extract and process optimization, the mathematical models of extraction kinetics were analyzed in the second one. The extraction was carried out using an aqueous solution of ethanol (70 and 95 % v/v at the hydromodulus (plant material to solvent ratio, w/v of 1:5 or 1:10. The plant material was disintegrated and divided into three fractions (particle mean size 0.23, 0.57 and 1.05 mm. The temperature was 25, 50 or about 80°C (boiling temperature. Three models were applied for modeling the extraction kinetics: a model based on the film theory, a model based on unsteady state diffusion through solid material and the empirical Ponomarev equation. Because of its physical basis, the relative simplicity and good fitting of the experimental data, the model based on the film theory could be proposed for mathematical modeling of solid-liquid etraction processes.

  19. Prediction and assimilation of surf-zone processes using a Bayesian network: Part II: Inverse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holland, K. Todd

    2011-01-01

    A Bayesian network model has been developed to simulate a relatively simple problem of wave propagation in the surf zone (detailed in Part I). Here, we demonstrate that this Bayesian model can provide both inverse modeling and data-assimilation solutions for predicting offshore wave heights and depth estimates given limited wave-height and depth information from an onshore location. The inverse method is extended to allow data assimilation using observational inputs that are not compatible with deterministic solutions of the problem. These inputs include sand bar positions (instead of bathymetry) and estimates of the intensity of wave breaking (instead of wave-height observations). Our results indicate that wave breaking information is essential to reduce prediction errors. In many practical situations, this information could be provided from a shore-based observer or from remote-sensing systems. We show that various combinations of the assimilated inputs significantly reduce the uncertainty in the estimates of water depths and wave heights in the model domain. Application of the Bayesian network model to new field data demonstrated significant predictive skill (R2 = 0.7) for the inverse estimate of a month-long time series of offshore wave heights. The Bayesian inverse results include uncertainty estimates that were shown to be most accurate when given uncertainty in the inputs (e.g., depth and tuning parameters). Furthermore, the inverse modeling was extended to directly estimate tuning parameters associated with the underlying wave-process model. The inverse estimates of the model parameters not only showed an offshore wave height dependence consistent with results of previous studies but the uncertainty estimates of the tuning parameters also explain previously reported variations in the model parameters.

  20. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: II. Phase asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spardy, Lucy E; Markin, Sergey N; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Rybak, Ilya A; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper (Spardy et al 2011 J. Neural Eng. 8 065003), we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems, and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself.

  1. Six missense mutations associated with type I and type II protein C deficiency and implications obtained from molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y Z; Sakata, T; Matsusue, T; Umeyama, H; Kato, H; Miyata, T

    1994-10-01

    The molecular basis of protein C deficiency was studied in three type I and three type II heterozygotes. Three probands showed thrombotic complications. All the exons and intron/exon junctions of the protein C gene were studied using a strategy combining by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, and DNA sequencing of the PCR-amplified fragments. Six missense mutations were identified, including three novel ones. One was located in exon II, in which the initiating translation codon (ATG) encoding for Met at position -42 was replaced by ACG encoding for Thr. The other five were located in exon IX, and included TAC(Tyr399)-->CAC(His), CCG(Pro327)-->CTG(Leu), GAC(Asp359)-->AAC(Asn) in two cases, and GGG(Gly350)-->AGG(Arg). Four of the six missense mutations occurred in CG dinucleotide. Sequence analysis of the other exons excluded additional mutations. By restriction enzyme analysis, co-segregation of the mutation with protein C deficiency was observed in four families. The other two mutations at amino acid positions -42 and 350 were also considered to be associated with protein C deficiency due to the absence of these mutations in 50 normal individuals. A structural model of the protease domain of mutant activated protein C was constructed by the chimeric modelling method, and the resultant model suggested conformational changes due to each missense mutation identified in protein C deficiency. The present data also provide some evidence regarding the genetic heterogeneity of protein C deficiency.

  2. Efficient catalytic phosphate ester cleavage by binuclear zinc(II) pyrazolate complexes as functional models of metallophosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, Larysa V; Maciag, Anna; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V; Haukka, Matti; Pavlenko, Vadim A; Iskenderov, Turganbay S; Kozłowski, Henryk; Meyer, Franc; Fritsky, Igor O

    2009-07-20

    A series of dizinc(II) complexes based on the pyrazolate ligands 3-[(1E)-N-hydroxyethanimidoyl]-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (H(3)L(1)), (1E,1'E)-1,1'-(4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3,5-diyl)diethanone dihydrazone (HL(2)), (E,E)-(4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3,5-diyl)bis(methylmethanone) dioxime (H(3)L(3)), (E,E)-(4-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-3,5-diyl)bis(phenylmethanone) dioxime (H(3)L(4)), and 1H-pyrazole-3,5-dicarboxylic acid (H(3)L(5)) have been synthesized and investigated as functional models of phosphoesterases, focusing on correlations between the hydrolytic activity and molecular parameters of the bimetallic core. Speciation of the various dizinc complexes in solution has been determined potentiometrically, and the structures in the solid state have been established by X-ray crystallography. The hydrolysis of two phosphoesters, an RNA model 2-hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP) and the pesticide paraoxon-ethyl (POE), promoted by the dinuclear phosphoesterase model complexes has been investigated in DMSO/buffered water (1:1) at 50 degrees C as a function of complex concentration, substrate concentration, and pH. Drastic differences in the hydrolytic activities of [Zn(2)(HL(1))(2)](0), [Zn(2)(L(2))(2)](2+), [Zn(2)(H(2)L(3))(2)](2+), and [Zn(2)(HL(5))(2)](2-) are observed and can be attributed to molecular peculiarities. Pyrazolate-bridged dinuclear zinc(II) complexes seem to provide a sufficient number of coordination sites for both activating the substrate and generating the nucleophile, where the phosphate esters are preferentially bound in a bidentate bridging fashion (in the case of HPNP) and in a monodentate fashion (in the case of POE).

  3. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.; Tennant, Allyn F.

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon temperature data, and a refined model of the molecular transport.

  4. A STRUCTURAL EQUATION MODEL-II FOR WORK-LIFE BALANCE OF IT PROFESSIONALS IN CHENNAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashida A. Banu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study developed and tested a model of work life balance of IT professionals employing structural equation modeling (SEM to analyze the relationship between work place support (WPS and work interference with personal life (WIPL, personal life interference with work (PLIW, satisfaction with work-life balance (SWLB and improved effectiveness at work (IEW. The model fit the data well and hypotheses are generally supported. WPS and SWLB are negatively related to WIPL and PLIW. However, there is a positive relationship between SWLB and IEW.

  5. Numerical solution of multiband k.p model for tunnelling in type-II heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Botha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new and very general method was developed for calculating the charge and spin-resolved electron tunnelling in type-II heterojunctions. Starting from a multiband k.p description of the bulk energy-band structure, a multiband k.p Riccati equation was derived. The reflection and transmission coefficients were obtained for each channel by integrating the Riccati equation over the entire heterostructure. Numerical instability was reduced through this method, in which the multichannel log-derivative of the envelope function matrix, rather than the envelope function itself, was propagated. As an example, a six-band k.p Hamiltonian was used to calculate the current-voltage characteristics of a 10-nm wide InAs/ GaSb/InAs single quantum well device which exhibited negative differential resistance at room temperature. The calculated current as a function of applied (bias voltage was found to be in semiquantitative agreement with the experiment, a result which indicated that inelastic transport mechanisms do not contribute significantly to the valley currents measured in this particular device.

  6. Model documentation natural gas transmission and distribution model (NGTDM) of the national energy modeling system. Volume II: Model developer`s report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-03

    To partially fulfill the requirements for {open_quotes}Model Acceptance{close_quotes} as stipulated in EIA Standard 91-01-01 (effective February 3, 1991), the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has conducted tests of the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) for the specific purpose of validating the forecasting model. This volume of the model documentation presents the results of {open_quotes}one-at-a-time{close_quotes} sensitivity tests conducted in support of this validation effort. The test results are presented in the following forms: (1) Tables of important model outputs for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented with respect to change in each input from the reference case; (2) Tables of percent changes from base case results for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (3) Tables of conditional sensitivities (percent change in output/percent change in input) for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (4) Finally, graphs presenting the percent change from base case results for each year of the forecast period are presented for selected key outputs. To conduct the sensitivity tests, two main assumptions are made in order to test the performance characteristics of the model itself and facilitate the understanding of the effects of the changes in the key input variables to the model on the selected key output variables: (1) responses to the amount demanded do not occur since there are no feedbacks of inputs from other NEMS models in the stand-alone NGTDM run. (2) All the export and import quantities from and to Canada and Mexico, and liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports and exports are held fixed (i.e., there are no changes in imports and exports between the reference case and the sensitivity cases) throughout the forecast period.

  7. Behavior of human serum albumin on strong cation exchange resins: II. model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitl, Agnes; Butté, Alessandro; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-08-20

    Experiments with human serum albumin on a strong cation exchange resin exhibit a peculiar elution pattern: the protein elutes with two peaks in a modifier gradient. This behavior is modeled with a general rate model, where the two elution peaks are modeled with two binding conformations, one of which is at equilibrium conditions, while for the other, the adsorption process is rate limited. Isocratic experiments under nonadsorbing conditions were used to characterize the mass transfer process. The isotherm of both adsorption conformations as well as the kinetic of adsorption and desorption for the second conformation are functions of the modifier concentration. They are evaluated with linear modifier gradient experiments and step experiments with various adsorption times. All experimental features are well reproduced by the proposed modified general rate model.

  8. Model of deep non-volcanic tremor part II: episodic tremor and slip

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenzon, Naum I

    2014-01-01

    Bursts of tremor accompany a moving slip pulse in Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events. The sources of this non-volcanic tremor (NVT) are largely unknown. We have developed a model describing the mechanism of NTV generation. According to this model, NTV is a reflection of resonant-type oscillations excited in a fault at certain depth ranges. From a mathematical viewpoint, tremor (phonons) and slip pulses (solitons) are two different solutions of the sine-Gordon equation describing frictional processes inside a fault. In an ETS event, a moving slip pulse generates tremor due to interaction with structural heterogeneities in a fault and to failures of small asperities. Observed tremor parameters, such as central frequency and frequency attenuation curve, are associated with fault parameters and conditions, such as elastic modulus, effective normal stress, penetration hardness and friction. Model prediction of NTV frequency content is consistent with observations. In the framework of this model it is possible t...

  9. Fixed site neutralization model programmer's manual. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engi, D.; Chapman, L.D.; Judnick, W.; Blum, R.; Broegler, L.; Lenz, J.; Weinthraub, A.; Ballard, D.

    1979-12-01

    This report relates to protection of nuclear materials at nuclear facilities. This volume presents the source listings for the Fixed Site Neutralization Model and its supporting modules, the Plex Preprocessor and the Data Preprocessor. (DLC)

  10. The Shape of Dark Matter Haloes II. The Galactus HI Modelling & Fitting Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, S P C; Allen, R J; Freeman, K C

    2016-01-01

    We present a new HI modelling tool called \\textsc{Galactus}. The program has been designed to perform automated fits of disc-galaxy models to observations. It includes a treatment for the self-absorption of the gas. The software has been released into the public domain. We describe the design philosophy and inner workings of the program. After this, we model the face-on galaxy NGC2403, using both self-absorption and optically thin models, showing that self-absorption occurs even in face-on galaxies. It is shown that the maximum surface brightness plateaus seen in Paper I of this series are indeed signs of self-absorption. The apparent HI mass of an edge-on galaxy can be drastically lower compared to that same galaxy seen face-on. The Tully-Fisher relation is found to be relatively free from self-absorption issues.

  11. Charge-state-dependent energy loss of slow ions. II. Statistical atom model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Möller, Wolfhard

    2016-05-01

    A model for charge-dependent energy loss of slow ions is developed based on the Thomas-Fermi statistical model of atoms. Using a modified electrostatic potential which takes the ionic charge into account, nuclear and electronic energy transfers are calculated, the latter by an extension of the Firsov model. To evaluate the importance of multiple collisions even in nanometer-thick target materials we use the charge-state-dependent potentials in a Monte Carlo simulation in the binary collision approximation and compare the results to experiment. The Monte Carlo results reproduce the incident charge-state dependence of measured data well [see R. A. Wilhelm et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 052708 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.052708], even though the experimentally observed charge exchange dependence is not included in the model.

  12. The clustering of baryonic matter. II: halo model and hydrodynamic simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fedeli, C; Velliscig, M; Van Daalen, M; Schaye, J; Hoekstra, H

    2014-01-01

    We recently developed a generalization of the halo model in order to describe the spatial clustering properties of each mass component in the Universe, including hot gas and stars. In this work we discuss the complementarity of the model with respect to a set of cosmological simulations including hydrodynamics of different kinds. We find that the mass fractions and density profiles measured in the simulations do not always succeed in reproducing the simulated matter power spectra, the reason being that the latter encode information from a much larger range in masses than that accessible to individually resolved structures. In other words, this halo model allows one to extract information on the growth of structures from the spatial clustering of matter, that is complementary with the information coming from the study of individual objects. We also find a number of directions for improvement of the present implementation of the model, depending on the specific application one has in mind. The most relevant one...

  13. A Mathematical Model of Sea Breezes Along the Alaskan Beaufort Sea Coast: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozo, Thomas L.

    1982-07-01

    A nonlinear, time-dependent, two-dimensional sea breeze model allowing imposition of prevailing large-scale wind conditions has been developed. The model is an extension of Estoque's model with modifications in the treatment of the continuity equation, eddy diffusivity (unstable conditions), surface heating function and the numerical scheme.The model is applied to a cross section of the Beaufort Sea Coast using typically measured arctic conditions as input. These include u-w plane velocity vectors, isotachs of the u, v and w wind velocity components, temperature contours, surface wind vectors at varying distances from the coastline, and wind speed and direction profiles for various simulated synoptic wind directions.The mathematical results reproduced measurements of atmospheric boundary layer turning of the wind with height (pilot balloon data), temporal surface wind vector turning and inversion height variations, while also giving evidence that sea breeze circulation could be strengthened by weak offshore (southwesterly and westerly winds) opposing synoptic winds.

  14. Application of nonlocal models to nano beams. Part II: Thickness length scale effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Applicability of nonlocal models to nano-beams is discussed in terms of the Eringen's nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli (EB) beam model. In literature, most work has taken the axial coordinate derivative in the Laplacian operator presented in nonlocal elasticity. This causes that the non-locality always makes the beam soften as compared to the local counterpart. In this paper, the thickness scale effect is solely considered to investigate if the nonlocal model can simulate stiffening effect. Taking the thickness derivative in the Laplacian operator leads to the presence of a surface stress state. The governing equation derived is compared to that of the EB model with the surface stress. The results obtained reveal that the nonlocality tends to decrease the bending moment stiffness whereas to increase the bending rigidity in the governing equation. This tendency also depends on the surface conditions.

  15. Oxidatively Robust Monophenolate-Copper(II) Complexes as Potential Models of Galactose Oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.; Watanabe, M.; Pratt, R.C.; Stack, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    Cupric complexes of a novel phenanthroline-phenolate ligand have strongly distorted coordination geometries and electrochemical properties conducive to modeling the spectroscopy and reactivity of the enzyme galactose oxidase.

  16. Forward Modelling of Standing Kink Modes in Coronal Loops II. Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic waves are believed to play a significant role in coronal heating, and could be used for remote diagnostics of solar plasma. Both the heating and diagnostic applications rely on a correct inversion (or backward modelling) of the observables into the thermal and magnetic structures of the plasma. However, owing to the limited availability of observables, this is an ill-posed issue. Forward Modelling is to establish a plausible mapping of plasma structuring into observables. In this study, we set up forward models of standing kink modes in coronal loops and simulate optically thin emissions in the extreme ultraviolet bandpasses, and then adjust plasma parameters and viewing angles to match three events of transverse loop oscillations observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. We demonstrate that forward models could be effectively used to identify the oscillation overtone and polarization, to reproduce the general profile of oscillation amplitude and phase, and t...

  17. Predictive modeling of infrared radiative heating in tomato dry-peeling process: Part II. Model validation and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A predictive mathematical model was developed to simulate heat transfer in a tomato undergoing double sided infrared (IR) heating in a dry-peeling process. The aims of this study were to validate the developed model using experimental data and to investigate different engineering parameters that mos...

  18. Wettability of Sanded and Aged Fast-growing Poplar Wood Surfaces: II. Dynamic Wetting Models

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiyong Qin; Qian Zhang; Qiang Gao; Shifeng Zhang; Jianzhang Li

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic wettability of adhesive on sanded and aged wood surfaces was measured using the sessile drop method. Four different models were used to evaluate and compare the wetting process. It was shown that the wettability of freshly sanded wood and aged wood both decreased compared to the control wood. There was no evidence of change in wettability with increasing grit number. Aging reduced the wettability of the wood surface. The coefficients of determination (R2) for all four models were ...

  19. A model of modulated diffusion. II. Numerical results on statistical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzani, A.; Siboni, S.; Turchetti, G. [dell`Universita Bologna (Italy)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    We investigate numerically the statistical properties of a model of modulated diffusion for which we have already computed analytically the diffusion coefficient D. Our model is constructed by adding a deterministic or random noise to the frequency of an integrable isochronous system. We consider in particular the central limit theorem and the invariance principle and we show that they follow whenever D is positive and for any magnitude of the noise; we also investigate the asymptotic distribution in a case when D=0.

  20. Testing the recent charge-on-spring type polarizable water models. II. Vapor-liquid equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Péter T.; Baranyai, András

    2012-11-01

    We studied the vapor-liquid coexistence region of seven molecular models of water. All models use the charge-on-spring (COS) method to express polarization. The studied models were the COS/G2, COS/G3 [H. Yu and W. F. van Gunsteren, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 9549 (2004), 10.1063/1.1805516], the SWM4-DP [G. Lamoureux, A. D. MacKerell, Jr., and B. Roux, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 5185 (2003), 10.1063/1.1598191], the SWM4-NDP [G. Lamoureux, E. Harder, I. V. Vorobyov, B. Roux, and A. D. MacKerell, Jr., Chem. Phys. Lett. 418, 245 (2006), 10.1016/j.cplett.2005.10.135], and three versions of our model, the BKd1, BKd2, and BKd3. The BKd1 is the original Gaussian model [P. T. Kiss, M. Darvas, A. Baranyai, and P. Jedlovszky, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114706 (2012), 10.1063/1.3692602] with constant polarization and with a simple exponential repulsion. The BKd2 applies field-dependent polarizability [A. Baranyai and P. T. Kiss, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 234110 (2011), 10.1063/1.3670962], while the BKd3 model has variable size to approximate the temperature-density (T-ρ) curve of water [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 194102 (2012), 10.1063/1.4767063]. We calculated the second virial coefficient, the heat of vaporization, equilibrium vapor pressure, the vapor-liquid coexistence curve, and the surface tension in terms of the temperature. We determined and compared the critical temperatures, densities, and pressures of the models. We concluded that the high temperature slope of the (T-ρ) curve accurately predicts the critical temperature. We found that Gaussian charge distributions have clear advantages over the point charges describing the critical region. It is impossible to describe the vapor-liquid coexistence properties consistently with nonpolarizable models, even if their critical temperature is correct.

  1. Antarctic firn compaction rates from repeat-track airborne radar data: II. Firn model evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The thickness and density of the Antarctic firn layer vary considerably in time and space, thereby contributing to ice-sheet volume and mass changes. Distinguishing between these mass and volume changes is important for ice-sheet mass-balance studies. Evolution of firn layer depth and density is often modeled, because direct measurements are scarce. Here we directly compare modeled firn compaction rates with observed rates obtained from repeat-track airborne radar data over a 2 year interval ...

  2. Testing the recent charge-on-spring type polarizable water models. II. Vapor-liquid equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Péter T; Baranyai, András

    2012-11-21

    We studied the vapor-liquid coexistence region of seven molecular models of water. All models use the charge-on-spring (COS) method to express polarization. The studied models were the COS∕G2, COS∕G3 [H. Yu and W. F. van Gunsteren, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 9549 (2004)], the SWM4-DP [G. Lamoureux, A. D. MacKerell, Jr., and B. Roux, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 5185 (2003)], the SWM4-NDP [G. Lamoureux, E. Harder, I. V. Vorobyov, B. Roux, and A. D. MacKerell, Jr., Chem. Phys. Lett. 418, 245 (2006)], and three versions of our model, the BKd1, BKd2, and BKd3. The BKd1 is the original Gaussian model [P. T. Kiss, M. Darvas, A. Baranyai, and P. Jedlovszky, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114706 (2012)] with constant polarization and with a simple exponential repulsion. The BKd2 applies field-dependent polarizability [A. Baranyai and P. T. Kiss, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 234110 (2011)], while the BKd3 model has variable size to approximate the temperature-density (T-ρ) curve of water [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 194102 (2012)]. We calculated the second virial coefficient, the heat of vaporization, equilibrium vapor pressure, the vapor-liquid coexistence curve, and the surface tension in terms of the temperature. We determined and compared the critical temperatures, densities, and pressures of the models. We concluded that the high temperature slope of the (T-ρ) curve accurately predicts the critical temperature. We found that Gaussian charge distributions have clear advantages over the point charges describing the critical region. It is impossible to describe the vapor-liquid coexistence properties consistently with nonpolarizable models, even if their critical temperature is correct.

  3. Systems approach to excitation-energy and electron transfer reaction networks in photosystem II complex: model studies for chlorophyll a fluorescence induction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Shigenori; Ebina, Kuniyoshi

    2015-09-07

    Photosystem II (PS II) is a protein complex which evolves oxygen and drives charge separation for photosynthesis employing electron and excitation-energy transfer processes over a wide timescale range from picoseconds to milliseconds. While the fluorescence emitted by the antenna pigments of this complex is known as an important indicator of the activity of photosynthesis, its interpretation was difficult because of the complexity of PS II. In this study, an extensive kinetic model which describes the complex and multi-timescale characteristics of PS II is analyzed through the use of the hierarchical coarse-graining method proposed in the authors׳ earlier work. In this coarse-grained analysis, the reaction center (RC) is described by two states, open and closed RCs, both of which consist of oxidized and neutral special pairs being in quasi-equilibrium states. Besides, the PS II model at millisecond scale with three-state RC, which was studied previously, could be derived by suitably adjusting the kinetic parameters of electron transfer between tyrosine and RC. Our novel coarse-grained model of PS II can appropriately explain the light-intensity dependent change of the characteristic patterns of fluorescence induction kinetics from O-J-I-P, which shows two inflection points, J and I, between initial point O and peak point P, to O-J-D-I-P, which shows a dip D between J and I inflection points.

  4. Time-symmetric initial data of large brane-localized black hole in RS-II model

    CERN Document Server

    Tanahashi, Norihiro

    2008-01-01

    In the aim of shedding a new light on the classical black hole evaporation conjecture stating that a static brane-localized black hole (BH) larger than the bulk curvature scale does not exist in Randall-Sundrum II (RS-II) model, we investigate time-symmetric initial data with a brane-localized apparent horizon (AH) and analyzed its properties. We find that a three-parameter family of such initial data can be constructed by simply placing a brane on a constant time surface of Schwarzschild anti-de Sitter space. By this method, we unambiguously confirm that initial data with an arbitrarily large AH area do exist. We compare the ADM mass and the horizon area of our initial data with that of the black string (BS) solution, and find that any initial data constructed by this method do not have a smaller mass than the BS solution when the horizon area is larger than the size determined by the bulk curvature scale. We further investigate what kind of configuration realizes the minimum mass for the same AH area. The c...

  5. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part II: Mechanical modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    We present two modeling approaches for predicting the macroscopic elastic properties of carbon nanotubes/polymer composites with thick interphase regions at the nanotube/matrix frontier. The first model is based on local continuum mechanics; the second one is based on hybrid local/non-local continuum mechanics. The key computational issues, including the peculiar homogenization technique and treatment of periodical boundary conditions in the non-local continuum model, are clarified. Both models are implemented through a three-dimensional geometric representation of the carbon nanotubes network, which has been detailed in Part I. Numerical results are shown and compared for both models in order to test convergence and sensitivity toward input parameters. It is found that both approaches provide similar results in terms of homogenized quantities but locally can lead to very different microscopic fields. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigation of a mineral melting cupola furnace. Part II. Mathematical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leth-Miller, R.; Jensen, A.D.; Glarborg, P.; Jensen, L.M.; Hansen, P.B.; Jorgensen, S.B. [Rockwool International AS, Hedehusene (Denmark)

    2003-12-24

    A mathematical model of a mineral melting cupola furnace for stone wool production has been developed for improving cupola operation. The 1-D, first-engineering-principles model includes mass and heat balances for the gas phase, five solid phases, and four liquid phases. The gas and solid/liquid phases flow countercurrently. Seven chemical reactions account for the conversions of coke, iron oxide, limestone, and gaseous species. The heterogeneous reactions of coke conversion are limited by both kinetics and mass transport. Heat transfer between phases is modeled including both convection and radiation. The model predicts gas concentrations; mass flow rates; and temperature profiles of the solid, melt, and gas in the cupola, as well as heat loss to the water-cooled walls. Inputs to the model include the coke, rock, and blast air properties, the blast air amount, and the coke percentage in the charge. The unknown model parameters are estimated on the basis of input/output measurements. A comparison of the predicted and measured concentration and temperature profiles inside the cupola shows good agreement.

  7. Computational models of music perception and cognition II: Domain-specific music processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwins, Hendrik; Grachten, Maarten; Herrera, Perfecto; Hazan, Amaury; Marxer, Ricard; Serra, Xavier

    2008-09-01

    In Part I [Purwins H, Herrera P, Grachten M, Hazan A, Marxer R, Serra X. Computational models of music perception and cognition I: The perceptual and cognitive processing chain. Physics of Life Reviews 2008, in press, doi:10.1016/j.plrev.2008.03.004], we addressed the study of cognitive processes that underlie auditory perception of music, and their neural correlates. The aim of the present paper is to summarize empirical findings from music cognition research that are relevant to three prominent music theoretic domains: rhythm, melody, and tonality. Attention is paid to how cognitive processes like category formation, stimulus grouping, and expectation can account for the music theoretic key concepts in these domains, such as beat, meter, voice, consonance. We give an overview of computational models that have been proposed in the literature for a variety of music processing tasks related to rhythm, melody, and tonality. Although the present state-of-the-art in computational modeling of music cognition definitely provides valuable resources for testing specific hypotheses and theories, we observe the need for models that integrate the various aspects of music perception and cognition into a single framework. Such models should be able to account for aspects that until now have only rarely been addressed in computational models of music cognition, like the active nature of perception and the development of cognitive capacities from infancy to adulthood.

  8. Explicit Finite Element Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabric for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems, Phase II. Part 3; Material Model Development and Simulation of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, J.; Erlich, D.; Shockey, D.

    2009-01-01

    A team consisting of Arizona State University, Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center, and SRI International collaborated to develop computational models and verification testing for designing and evaluating turbine engine fan blade fabric containment structures. This research was conducted under the Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence and was sponsored by the Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program. The research was directed toward improving the modeling of a turbine engine fabric containment structure for an engine blade-out containment demonstration test required for certification of aircraft engines. The research conducted in Phase II began a new level of capability to design and develop fan blade containment systems for turbine engines. Significant progress was made in three areas: (1) further development of the ballistic fabric model to increase confidence and robustness in the material models for the Kevlar(TradeName) and Zylon(TradeName) material models developed in Phase I, (2) the capability was improved for finite element modeling of multiple layers of fabric using multiple layers of shell elements, and (3) large-scale simulations were performed. This report concentrates on the material model development and simulations of the impact tests.

  9. Modelling air pollution for epidemiologic research--part II: predicting temporal variation through land use regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölter, A; Lindley, S; de Vocht, F; Simpson, A; Agius, R

    2010-12-01

    Over recent years land use regression (LUR) has become a frequently used method in air pollution exposure studies, as it can model intra-urban variation in pollutant concentrations at a fine spatial scale. However, very few studies have used the LUR methodology to also model the temporal variation in air pollution exposure. The aim of this study is to estimate annual mean NO(2) and PM(10) concentrations from 1996 to 2008 for Greater Manchester using land use regression models. The results from these models will be used in the Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study (MAAS) birth cohort to determine health effects of air pollution exposure. The Greater Manchester LUR model for 2005 was recalibrated using interpolated and adjusted NO(2) and PM(10) concentrations as dependent variables for 1996-2008. In addition, temporally resolved variables were available for traffic intensity and PM(10) emissions. To validate the resulting LUR models, they were applied to the locations of automatic monitoring stations and the estimated concentrations were compared against measured concentrations. The 2005 LUR models were successfully recalibrated, providing individual models for each year from 1996 to 2008. When applied to the monitoring stations the mean prediction error (MPE) for NO(2) concentrations for all stations and years was -0.8μg/m³ and the root mean squared error (RMSE) was 6.7μg/m³. For PM(10) concentrations the MPE was 0.8μg/m³ and the RMSE was 3.4μg/m³. These results indicate that it is possible to model temporal variation in air pollution through LUR with relatively small prediction errors. It is likely that most previous LUR studies did not include temporal variation, because they were based on short term monitoring campaigns and did not have historic pollution data. The advantage of this study is that it uses data from an air dispersion model, which provided concentrations for 2005 and 2010, and therefore allowed extrapolation over a longer time period

  10. A Comparison of a Machine Learning Model with EuroSCORE II in Predicting Mortality after Elective Cardiac Surgery: A Decision Curve Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allyn, Jérôme; Allou, Nicolas; Augustin, Pascal; Philip, Ivan; Martinet, Olivier; Belghiti, Myriem; Provenchere, Sophie; Montravers, Philippe; Ferdynus, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    The benefits of cardiac surgery are sometimes difficult to predict and the decision to operate on a given individual is complex. Machine Learning and Decision Curve Analysis (DCA) are recent methods developed to create and evaluate prediction models. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using a prospective collected database from December 2005 to December 2012, from a cardiac surgical center at University Hospital. The different models of prediction of mortality in-hospital after elective cardiac surgery, including EuroSCORE II, a logistic regression model and a machine learning model, were compared by ROC and DCA. Of the 6,520 patients having elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, 6.3% died. Mean age was 63.4 years old (standard deviation 14.4), and mean EuroSCORE II was 3.7 (4.8) %. The area under ROC curve (IC95%) for the machine learning model (0.795 (0.755-0.834)) was significantly higher than EuroSCORE II or the logistic regression model (respectively, 0.737 (0.691-0.783) and 0.742 (0.698-0.785), p machine learning model, in this monocentric study, has a greater benefit whatever the probability threshold. According to ROC and DCA, machine learning model is more accurate in predicting mortality after elective cardiac surgery than EuroSCORE II. These results confirm the use of machine learning methods in the field of medical prediction.

  11. Statistical Tools for Fitting Models of the Population Consequences of Acoustic Disturbance to Data from Marine Mammal Populations (PCAD Tools II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Consequences of Acoustic Disturbance to Data from Marine Mammal Populations (PCAD Tools II) Len Thomas, John Harwood, Catriona Harris, & Robert...build a coherent statistical framework for modeling the effects of disturbance, particularly acoustic disturbance, on different species of marine mammals ...are formulated 2 APPROACH Our technical approach has involved building and fitting statistical models to marine mammal data in order to quantify

  12. The modelling of an SF6 arc in a supersonic nozzle: II. Current zero behaviour of the nozzle arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Liu, J.; Yan, J. D.; Fang, M. T. C.

    2016-08-01

    The present work (part II) forms the second part of an investigation into the behaviour of SF6 nozzle arc. It is concerned with the aerodynamic and electrical behaviour of a transient nozzle arc under a current ramp specified by a rate of current decay (di/dt) before current zero and a voltage ramp (dV/dt) after current zero. The five flow models used in part I [1] for cold gas flow and DC nozzle arcs have been applied to study the transient arc at three stagnation pressures (P 0) and two values of di/dt for the current ramp, representing a wide range of arcing conditions. An analysis of the physical mechanisms encompassed in each flow model is given with an emphasis on the adequacy of a particular model in describing the rapidly varying arc around current zero. The critical rate of rise of recovery voltage (RRRV) is found computationally and compared with test results of Benenson et al [2]. For transient nozzle arcs, the RRRV is proportional to the square of P 0, rather than to the square root of P 0 for DC nozzle arcs. The physical mechanisms responsible for the strong dependence of RRRV on P 0 have been investigated. The relative merits of the flow models employed are discussed.

  13. Bianchi Type-II String Cosmological Models in Normal Gauge for Lyra's Manifold with Constant Deceleration Parameter

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Shilpi; Pradhan, Anirudh

    2010-01-01

    The present study deals with a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi-II cosmological models representing massive strings in normal gauge for Lyra's manifold by applying the variation law for generalized Hubble's parameter that yields a constant value of deceleration parameter. The variation law for Hubble's parameter generates two types of solutions for the average scale factor, one is of power-law type and other is of the exponential form. Using these two forms, Einstein's modified field equations are solved separately that correspond to expanding singular and non-singular models of the universe respectively. The energy-momentum tensor for such string as formulated by Letelier (1983) is used to construct massive string cosmological models for which we assume that the expansion ($\\theta$) in the model is proportional to the component $\\sigma^{1}_{~1}$ of the shear tensor $\\sigma^{j}_{i}$. This condition leads to $A = (BC)^{m}$, where A, B and C are the metric coefficients and m is proportionality cons...

  14. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

  15. Inverse modeling and uncertainty analysis of potential groundwater recharge to the confined semi-fossil Ohangwena II Aquifer, Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Markus; Houben, Georg; Lohe, Christoph; Quinger, Martin; Himmelsbach, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    The identification of potential recharge areas and estimation of recharge rates to the confined semi-fossil Ohangwena II Aquifer (KOH-2) is crucial for its future sustainable use. The KOH-2 is located within the endorheic transboundary Cuvelai-Etosha-Basin (CEB), shared by Angola and Namibia. The main objective was the development of a strategy to tackle the problem of data scarcity, which is a well-known problem in semi-arid regions. In a first step, conceptual geological cross sections were created to illustrate the possible geological setting of the system. Furthermore, groundwater travel times were estimated by simple hydraulic calculations. A two-dimensional numerical groundwater model was set up to analyze flow patterns and potential recharge zones. The model was optimized against local observations of hydraulic heads and groundwater age. The sensitivity of the model against different boundary conditions and internal structures was tested. Parameter uncertainty and recharge rates were estimated. Results indicate that groundwater recharge to the KOH-2 mainly occurs from the Angolan Highlands in the northeastern part of the CEB. The sensitivity of the groundwater model to different internal structures is relatively small in comparison to changing boundary conditions in the form of influent or effluent streams. Uncertainty analysis underlined previous results, indicating groundwater recharge originating from the Angolan Highlands. The estimated recharge rates are less than 1% of mean yearly precipitation, which are reasonable for semi-arid regions.

  16. Viscoelastic-damage interface model formulation with friction to simulate the delamination growth in mode II shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Mohammad Saeed; Hosseini-Toudeshky, Hossein

    2017-02-01

    In this paper a formulation of a viscoelastic-damage interface model with friction in mode-II is presented. The cohesive constitutive law contains elastic and damage regimes. It has been assumed that the shear stress in the elastic regime follows the viscoelastic properties of the matrix material. The three element Voigt model has been used for the formulation of relaxation modulus of the material. Damage evolution proceeds according to the bilinear cohesive constitutive law combined with friction stress consideration. Combination of damage and friction is based on the presumption that the damaged area, related to an integration point, can be dismembered into the un-cracked area with the cohesive damage and cracked area with friction. Samples of a one element model have been presented to see the effect of parameters on the cohesive constitutive law. A comparison between the predicted results with available results of end-notched flexure specimens in the literature is also presented to verify the model. Transverse crack tension specimens are also simulated for different applied displacement velocities.

  17. A study of M Mira variables based on IRAS LRS observations. II. Model fits and derived parameters for 109 Miras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onaka, T.; Jong, T. de; Willems, F.J. (Amsterdam Univ. (NL))

    1989-12-01

    We have fitted dust shell models to the IRAS LRS spectra of 109 M Mira variables. The main assumptions in the model calculations are: (i) the dust shell is spherical and optically thin, (ii) the dust grains consist of aluminum oxide and amorphous magnesium silicate, (iii) the mass loss rate is constant, (iv) the stellar photosphere is characterized by R = 3 x 10{sup 13} cm and T = 2500 K. Best fit models are calculated for each star. A model is completely determined by five parameters: the dust temperatures at the inner boundaries of the aluminum oxide and silicate dust shells, the column densities of each dust grain component, and the distance to the star. It turns out that the 1 - 200 {mu}m infrared energy distributions calculated for the best fit parameters also provide quite satisfactory fits to the observed near- and far-infrared broad-band data for most sources. The material presented here forms the basis for a study of dust condensation in the circumstellar shells around Mira variables.

  18. Circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution for scalar transmissibility functions. Part II: Probabilistic model and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wang-Ji; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2016-12-01

    In Part I of this study, some new theorems, corollaries and lemmas on circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution have been mathematically proved. This part II paper is dedicated to providing a rigorous treatment of statistical properties of raw scalar transmissibility functions at an arbitrary frequency line. On the basis of statistics of raw FFT coefficients and circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution, explicit closed-form probabilistic models are established for both multivariate and univariate scalar transmissibility functions. Also, remarks on the independence of transmissibility functions at different frequency lines and the shape of the probability density function (PDF) of univariate case are presented. The statistical structures of probabilistic models are concise, compact and easy-implemented with a low computational effort. They hold for general stationary vector processes, either Gaussian stochastic processes or non-Gaussian stochastic processes. The accuracy of proposed models is verified using numerical example as well as field test data of a high-rise building and a long-span cable-stayed bridge. This study yields new insights into the qualitative analysis of the uncertainty of scalar transmissibility functions, which paves the way for developing new statistical methodologies for modal analysis, model updating or damage detection using responses only without input information.

  19. Exchange interactions in [2 × 2] Cu(II) grids: on the reliability of the fitting spin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzado, Carmen J; Evangelisti, Stefano

    2014-02-21

    This paper reports a theoretical analysis of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of a ferromagnetic Cu(II) [2 × 2] grid. The calculations confirm a quintet (S = 2) ground state and an energy-level distribution of the magnetic states in accordance with Heisenberg behaviour. The whole set of first- and second-neighbour magnetic coupling constants has been evaluated, all in agreement with the structure and arrangement of the Cu 3dx(2) - y(2) magnetic orbitals. The results indicate that the dominant interaction in the system is the ferromagnetic coupling between the nearest Cu sites. The calculated J values suggest a C(2v) spin-spin interaction pattern, instead of the D(4h) model employed in the magnetic data fit. However, both spin models provide similar plots of the thermal dependence of the susceptibility and magnetic moment data. This study highlights the fact that the spin models resulting from the fittings can be just effective models, capable of correctly reproducing the macroscopic properties, although not always in accordance with the microscopic interactions governing these properties.

  20. SYSTEM-COGNITIVE MODEL OF FORECASTING THE DEVELOPMENT OF DIVERSIFIED AGRO-INDUSTRIAL CORPORATIONS. PART II. SYNTHESIS AND MODEL VERIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutsenko Y. V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, in accordance with the methodology of the Automated system-cognitive analysis (ASCanalysis, we examine the implementation of the 3rd ASC-analysis: synthesis and verification of forecasting models of development of diversified agro-industrial corporations. In this step, we have synthesis and verification of 3 statistical and 7 system-cognitive models: ABS – matrix of the absolute frequencies, PRC1 and PRC2 – matrix of the conditional and unconditional distributions, INF1 and INF2 private criterion: the amount of knowledge based on A. Kharkevich, INF3 – private criterion: the Chi-square test: difference between the actual and the theoretically expected absolute frequencies INF4 and INF5 – private criterion: ROI - Return On Investment, INF6 and INF7 – private criterion: the difference between conditional and unconditional probability (coefficient of relationship. The reliability of the created models was assessed in accordance with the proposed metric is similar to the known F-test, but does not involve the performance of normal distribution, linearity of the object modeling, the independence and additivity acting factors. The accuracy of the obtained models was high enough to resolve the subsequent problems of identification, forecasting and decision making, as well as studies of the modeled object by studying its model, scheduled for consideration in future articles

  1. Spectroscopic investigation of new water soluble Mn(II)(2) and Mg(II)(2) complexes for the substrate binding models of xylose/glucose isomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Ayan; Bera, Manindranath

    2014-01-30

    In methanol, the reaction of stoichiometric amounts of Mn(OAc)(2)·4H(2)O and the ligand H(3)hpnbpda [H(3)hpnbpda=N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-2-hydroxy-1,3-propanediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid] in the presence of NaOH, afforded a new water soluble dinuclear manganese(II) complex, [Mn2(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)] (1). Similarly, the reaction of Mg(OAc)(2)·4H(2)O and the ligand H3hpnbpda in the presence of NaOH, in methanol, yielded a new water soluble dinuclear magnesium(II) complex, [Mg2(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)(H2O)2] (2). DFT calculations have been performed for the structural optimization of complexes 1 and 2. The DFT optimized structure of complex 1 shows that two manganese(II) centers are in a distorted square pyramidal geometry, whereas the DFT optimized structure of complex 2 reveals that two magnesium(II) centers adopt a six-coordinate distorted octahedral geometry. To understand the mode of substrate binding and the mechanistic details of the active site metals in xylose/glucose isomerases (XGI), we have investigated the binding interactions of biologically important monosaccharides d-glucose and d-xylose with complexes 1 and 2, in aqueous alkaline solution by a combined approach of FTIR, UV-vis, fluorescence, and (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescence spectra show the binding-induced gradual decrease in emission of complexes 1 and 2 accompanied by a significant blue shift upon increasing the concentration of sugar substrates. The binding modes of d-glucose and d-xylose with complex 2 are indicated by their characteristic coordination induced shift (CIS) values in (13)C NMR spectra for C1 and C2 carbon atoms.

  2. Universal tight binding model for chemical reactions in solution and at surfaces. II. Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovoi, A Y; Sheppard, T J; Pashov, D L; Kohanoff, J J; Paxton, A T

    2014-07-28

    A revised water model intended for use in condensed phase simulations in the framework of the self consistent polarizable ion tight binding theory is constructed. The model is applied to water monomer, dimer, hexamers, ice, and liquid, where it demonstrates good agreement with theoretical results obtained by more accurate methods, such as DFT and CCSD(T), and with experiment. In particular, the temperature dependence of the self diffusion coefficient in liquid water predicted by the model, closely reproduces experimental curves in the temperature interval between 230 K and 350 K. In addition, and in contrast to standard DFT, the model properly orders the relative densities of liquid water and ice. A notable, but inevitable, shortcoming of the model is underestimation of the static dielectric constant by a factor of two. We demonstrate that the description of inter and intramolecular forces embodied in the tight binding approximation in quantum mechanics leads to a number of valuable insights which can be missing from ab initio quantum chemistry and classical force fields. These include a discussion of the origin of the enhanced molecular electric dipole moment in the condensed phases, and a detailed explanation for the increase of coordination number in liquid water as a function of temperature and compared with ice--leading to insights into the anomalous expansion on freezing. The theory holds out the prospect of an understanding of the currently unexplained density maximum of water near the freezing point.

  3. [Pain sensitivity changes in schizophrenic patients and animal models--Part II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuboly, Gábor; Horváth, Gyöngyi

    2009-05-30

    Diminished pain sensitivity in schizophrenic patients has been reported for more than 50 years, however little is known about the substrate and the basic mechanisms underlying altered pain sensitivity in this disease, therefore, relevant animal models are of decisive importance in the study of psychiatric diseases. The authors report a review consisting of two parts focusing on pain sensitivity changes in patients and in different animal models which proved the eligibility as schizophrenia models and pain sensitivities have also been determined. The second part of this article analyzed the results regarding knock out mice as schizophrenia models. These data proved that several genes have significant role in the pathomechanism of schizophrenia; therefore deficiency in one gene does not produce animals showing all signs of this disease. As regards the pain sensitivity changes, only a few data are available with controversial results. Data originated from complex chronic animal models indicate that they might be more adequate methods for studying the mechanisms of schizophrenia including the pain-sensitivity changes.

  4. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  5. The clustering of baryonic matter. II: halo model and hydrodynamic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedeli, C. [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Semboloni, E.; Velliscig, M.; Daalen, M. Van; Schaye, J.; Hoekstra, H., E-mail: cosimo.fedeli@oabo.inaf.it, E-mail: sembolon@strw.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: velliscig@strw.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: daalen@strw.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: schaye@strw.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: hoekstra@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, PO Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-08-01

    We recently developed a generalization of the halo model in order to describe the spatial clustering properties of each mass component in the Universe, including hot gas and stars. In this work we discuss the complementarity of the model with respect to a set of cosmological simulations including hydrodynamics of different kinds. We find that the mass fractions and density profiles measured in the simulations do not always succeed in reproducing the simulated matter power spectra, the reason being that the latter encode information from a much larger range in masses than that accessible to individually resolved structures. In other words, this halo model allows one to extract information on the growth of structures from the spatial clustering of matter, that is complementary with the information coming from the study of individual objects. We also find a number of directions for improvement of the present implementation of the model, depending on the specific application one has in mind. The most relevant one is the necessity for a scale dependence of the bias of the diffuse gas component, which will be interesting to test with future detections of the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium. This investigation confirms the possibility to gain information on the physics of galaxy and cluster formation by studying the clustering of mass, and our next work will consist of applying the halo model to use future high-precision cosmic shear surveys to this end.

  6. A Turbulent Origin for Flocculent Spiral Structure in Galaxies: II. Observations and Models of M33

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, B G; Elmegreen, D M; Cuillandre, J C; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Leitner, Samuel N.; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles

    2003-01-01

    Fourier transform power spectra of azimuthal scans of the optical structure of M33 are evaluated for B, V, and R passbands and fit to fractal models of continuum emission with superposed star formation. Power spectra are also determined for Halpha. The best models have intrinsic power spectra with 1D slopes of around -0.7pm0.7, significantly shallower than the Kolmogorov spectrum (slope =-1.7) but steeper than pure noise (slope=0). A fit to the power spectrum of the flocculent galaxy NGC 5055 gives a steeper slope of around -1.5pm0.2, which could be from turbulence. Both cases model the optical light as a superposition of continuous and point-like stellar sources that follow an underlying fractal pattern. Foreground bright stars are clipped in the images, but they are so prominent in M33 that even their residual affects the power spectrum, making it shallower than what is intrinsic to the galaxy. A model consisting of random foreground stars added to the best model of NGC 5055 fits the observed power spectrum...

  7. The shape of dark matter haloes - II. The GALACTUS H I modelling & fitting tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, S. P. C.; van der Kruit, P. C.; Allen, R. J.; Freeman, K. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new H I modelling tool called GALACTUS. The program has been designed to perform automated fits of disc-galaxy models to observations. It includes a treatment for the self-absorption of gas. The software has been released into the public domain. We describe the design philosophy and inner workings of the program. After this, we model the face-on galaxy NGC 2403 using both self-absorption and optically thin models, showing that self-absorption occurs even in face-on galaxies. These results are then used to model an edge-on galaxy. It is shown that the maximum surface brightness plateaus seen in Paper I of this series are indeed signs of self-absorption. The apparent H I mass of an edge-on galaxy can be drastically lower compared with that same galaxy seen face-on. The Tully-Fisher relation is found to be relatively free from self-absorption issues.

  8. Combining partially ranked data in plant breeding and biology: II. Analysis with Rasch model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Simko

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Many years of breeding experiments, germplasm screening, and molecular biologic experimentation have generated volumes of sequence, genotype, and phenotype information that have been stored in public data repositories. These resources afford genetic and genomic researchers the opportunity to handle and analyze raw data from multiple laboratories and study groups whose research interests revolve around a common or closely related trait. However, although such data sets are widely available for secondary analysis, their heterogeneous nature often precludes their direct combination and joint exploration. Integration of phenotype information across multiple studies and databases is challenging due to variations in the measurement instruments, endpoint classifications, and biological material employed by each investigator. In the present work, we demonstrate how Rasch measurement model can surmount these problems. The model allows incorporating data sets with partially overlapping variables, large numbers of missing data points and dissimilar ratings of phenotypic endpoints. The model also enables quantifying the extent of heterogeneity between data sets. Biologists can use the model in a data-mining process to obtain combined ratings from various databases and other sources. Subsequently, these ratings can be used for selecting desirable material or (in combination with genotypic information for mapping genes involved in the particular trait. The model is not limited to genetics and breeding and can be applied in many other areas of biology and agriculture.

  9. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II:Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢涛; William Perrie; 赵尚卓; 方贺; 于文金; 何宜军

    2016-01-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface.

  10. Acetone photophysics at 282 nm excitation at elevated pressure and temperature. II: Fluorescence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason; Raju, Mandhapati; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2017-07-01

    This is the second in a series of two papers that presents an updated fluorescence model and compares with the new experimental data reported in the first paper, as well as the available literature data, to extend the range of acetone photophysics to elevated pressure and temperature conditions. This work elucidates the complete acetone photophysical model in terms of each and every competing radiative and non-radiative rate. The acetone fluorescence model is then thoroughly examined and optimized based on disparity with recently conducted elevated pressure and temperature photophysical calibration experiments. The current work offers insight into the competition between non-radiative and vibrational energy decay rates at elevated temperature and pressure and proposes a global optimization of model parameters from the photophysical model developed by Thurber (Acetone Laser-Induced Fluorescence for Temperature and Multiparameter Imaging in Gaseous Flows. PhD thesis, Stanford University Mechanical Engineering Department, 1999). The collisional constants of proportionality, which govern vibrational relaxation, are shown to be temperature dependent at elevated pressures. A new oxygen quenching rate is proposed which takes into account collisions with oxygen as well as the oxygen-assisted intersystem crossing component. Additionally, global trends in ketone photophysics are presented and discussed.

  11. Stellar model atmospheres with magnetic line blanketing. II. Introduction of polarized radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, S A

    2006-01-01

    The technique of model atmosphere calculation for magnetic Ap and Bp stars with polarized radiative transfer and magnetic line blanketing is presented. A grid of model atmospheres of A and B stars are computed. These calculations are based on direct treatment of the opacities due to the bound-bound transitions that ensures an accurate and detailed description of the line absorption and anomalous Zeeman splitting. The set of model atmospheres was calculated for the field strengths between 1 and 40 kG. The high-resolution energy distribution, photometric colors and the hydrogen Balmer line profiles are computed for magnetic stars with different metallicities and are compared to those of non-magnetic reference models and to the previous paper of this series. The results of modelling confirmed the main outcomes of the previous study: energy redistribution from UV to the visual region and flux depression at 5200A. However, we found that effects of enhanced line blanketing when transfer for polarized radiation take...

  12. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste -- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Stone; Michael Benson; Christopher Orme; Thomas Luther; Eric Peterson

    2005-09-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB, characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds. Carbon may, in the presence of suitable precious metal catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with and bind hydrogen. In the presence of oxygen, the precious metal may also eliminate hydrogen by catalyzing the formation of water. This reaction is called catalytic recombination. DEB has the needed binding rate and capacity for hydrogen that potentially could be generated in the TRUPACT II. Phases 1 and 2 of this project showed that uncoated DEB performed satisfactorily in lab scale tests. Based upon these results, Phase 3, the final project phase, included larger scale testing. Test vessels were scaled to replicate the ratio between void space in the inner containment vessel of a TRUPACT-II container and a payload of seven 55-gallon drums. The tests were run with an atmosphere of air for 63.9 days at ambient temperature (15-27°C) and a scaled hydrogen generation rate of 2.60E-07 moles per second (0.35 cc/min). A second type of getter known as VEI, a proprietary polymer hydrogen getter characterized by carbon-carbon double bonds, was also tested in Phase 3. Hydrogen was successfully “gettered” by both getter systems. Hydrogen concentrations remained below 5 vol% (in

  13. Ionospheric Modelling using GPS to Calibrate the MWA. II: Regional ionospheric modelling using GPS and GLONASS to estimate ionospheric gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Arora, B S; Ord, S M; Tingay, S J; Bell, M; Callingham, J R; Dwarakanath, K S; For, B -Q; Hancock, P; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kapinska, A D; Lenc, E; McKinley, B; Offringa, A R; Procopio, P; Staveley-Smith, L; Wayth, R B; Wu, C; Zheng, Q

    2016-01-01

    We estimate spatial gradients in the ionosphere using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and GLONASS (Russian global navigation system) observations, utilising data from multiple GPS stations in the vicinity of Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO). In previous work the ionosphere was characterised using a single-station to model the ionosphere as a single layer of fixed height and this was compared with ionospheric data derived from radio astronomy observations obtained from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). Having made improvements to our data quality (via cycle slip detection and repair) and incorporating data from the GLONASS system, we now present a multi-station approach. These two developments significantly improve our modelling of the ionosphere. We also explore the effects of a variable-height model. We conclude that modelling the small-scale features in the ionosphere that have been observed with the MWA will require a much denser network of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) statio...

  14. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Steve; Swartz, Doug; Tice, Neil; Plucinsky, Paul; Grant, Catherine; Marshall, Herman; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60degC) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition may have changed, perhaps partially related to changes in the operating temperature of the ACIS housing. This evolution of the accumulation of the molecular contamination has motivated further analysis of contamination migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory, particularly within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon monitored temperature data, and an accordingly refined model of the molecular transport.

  15. Antiperiodic dynamical 6-vertex model by separation of variables II: Functional equations and form factors

    CERN Document Server

    Levy-Bencheton, D; Terras, V

    2015-01-01

    We pursue our study of the antiperiodic dynamical 6-vertex model using Sklyanin's separation of variables approach, allowing in the model new possible global shifts of the dynamical parameter. We show in particular that the spectrum and eigenstates of the antiperiodic transfer matrix are completely characterized by a system of discrete equations. We prove the existence of different reformulations of this characterization in terms of functional equations of Baxter's type. We notably consider the homogeneous functional $T$-$Q$ equation which is the continuous analog of the aforementioned discrete system and show, in the case of a model with an even number of sites, that the complete spectrum and eigenstates of the antiperiodic transfer matrix can equivalently be described in terms of a particular class of its $Q$-solutions, hence leading to a complete system of Bethe equations. Finally, we compute the form factors of local operators for which we obtain determinant representations in finite volume.

  16. Kompaneets Model Fitting of the Orion-Eridanus Superbubble II: Thinking Outside of Barnard's Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Pon, Andy; Alves, Joao; Bally, John; Basu, Shantanu; Tielens, Alexander G G M

    2016-01-01

    The Orion star-forming region is the nearest active high-mass star-forming region and has created a large superbubble, the Orion-Eridanus superbubble. Recent work by Ochsendorf et al. (2015) has extended the accepted boundary of the superbubble. We fit Kompaneets models of superbubbles expanding in exponential atmospheres to the new, larger shape of the Orion-Eridanus superbubble. We find that this larger morphology of the superbubble is consistent with the evolution of the superbubble being primarily controlled by expansion into the exponential Galactic disk ISM if the superbubble is oriented with the Eridanus side farther from the Sun than the Orion side. Unlike previous Kompaneets model fits that required abnormally small scale heights for the Galactic disk (<40 pc), we find morphologically consistent models with scale heights of 80 pc, similar to that expected for the Galactic disk.

  17. An inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model of pulsar emission II. frequency behavior of pulse profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Qiao, G J; Zhang, B; Han, J L

    2001-01-01

    The shapes of pulse profiles, especially their variations with respect to observing frequencies, are very important to understand emission mechanisms of pulsars, while no previous attempt has been made in interpreting the complicated phenomenology. In this paper, we present theoretical simulations for the integrated pulse profiles and their frequency evolution within the framework of the inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model proposed by Qiao (1988) and Qiao & Lin (1998). Using the phase positions of the pulse components predicted by the ``beam-frequency figure'' of the ICS model, we present Gaussian fits to the multi-frequency pulse profiles for some pulsars. It is shown that the model can reproduce various types of the frequency evolution behaviors of pulse profiles observed.

  18. Computer generated track and field scoring tables: II. Theoretical foundation and development of a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, J G

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is made into the subject of scoring tables for track and field with emphasis on the application of computers to calculate and output the tables. The resulting scoring tables represent an attempt to describe the effective quality of performance for track and field events. This paper is published in three parts. The first portion reviewed the historical development of scoring tables. This part concerns the theoretical foundation and development of a mathematical model. A set of underlying principles and construction guidelines are established as a basis for all scoring tables. In order to satisfy the goals, a model which includes an exponential term is developed. The concept of a zero offset is introduced as a boundary value for the low-level performances. The final part concerns an evaluation of the model and an analysis of the point scores for different events.

  19. A coupled $2\\times2$D Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model. II. Reference dynamo solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Lemerle, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we complete the presentation of a new hybrid $2\\times2$D flux transport dynamo (FTD) model of the solar cycle based on the Babcock-Leighton mechanism of poloidal magnetic field regeneration via the surface decay of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). This hybrid model is constructed by allowing the surface flux transport (SFT) simulation described in Lemerle et al. 2015 to provide the poloidal source term to an axisymmetric FTD simulation defined in a meridional plane, which in turn generates the BMRs required by the SFT. A key aspect of this coupling is the definition of an emergence function describing the probability of BMR emergence as a function of the spatial distribution of the internal axisymmetric magnetic field. We use a genetic algorithm to calibrate this function, together with other model parameters, against observed cycle 21 emergence data. We present a reference dynamo solution reproducing many solar cycle characteristics, including good hemispheric coupling, phase relationship betwe...

  20. Microwave dielectric spectrum of vegetation. I - Experimental observations. II - Dual-dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Rayes, Mohamed A.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1987-01-01

    The microwave dielectric behavior of vegetation materials is examined as a function of water content, microwave frequency, and temperature. Dielectric spectra for various types of vegetation, such as leaves, stalks, and trunks at various moisture conditions, were measured using a coaxial probe technique. The basic features and operation of the coaxial probe system are described. Examples of dielectric measurements for the vegetation materials are presented, and the relation between temperature and the dielectric constant is studied. The development of a dual-dispersion model that accounts for the dielectric properties of water in both free and bound conditions is described. The applicability of the model is evaluated by comparing it with the dielectric data; good correlation is observed between the model and the data over a wide range of moisture conditions and over the 0.2-20 GHz range.